Science.gov

Sample records for mev proton inelastic

  1. Inelastic scattering of 61 MeV protons by pb-207

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owais, M.

    1976-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the excitation of the first four neutron-hole states and the doublet at 2.61 MeV by 61.2 MeV protons were measured. The data are analyzed in terms of both a purely collective model description and a microscopic model supplemented by macroscopic core polarization. A realistic two-body interaction is used and knock-on amplitudes are included. Core polarization is found to be important but represents a relatively smaller contribution than in most nuclei previously studied. A parallel analysis of similar data at lower proton bombarding energies reveals a surprisingly strong energy dependence of the reaction mechanisms.

  2. /sup 74,76,78,80,82/Se by inelastic scattering of 64. 8 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.

    1986-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of 64.8 MeV protons has been studied on the stable even XU YSSe isotopes. The inelastically scattered protons were momentum analyzed in a magnetic spectrograph with a resulting energy resolution of approximately 20 keV. Levels up to the excitation energy of about 5 MeV were investigated. Many new levels were observed for the isotopes studied. The angular distributions obtained were compared with the predictions of distorted-wave Born approximation and coupled-channels calculations and a number of new spin assignments were proposed. Several 4 states with comparable strengths were found at about E/sub x/ = 2.0--5.0 MeV, showing large fragmentation of octupole and hexadecapole transition strengths, in contrast to the case of Zn isotopes. The distributions of the transition strengths for the 2 , 3 , and 4 states were compared with the theoretical calculations based on the random-phase-approximation model for spherical nuclei.

  3. Inelastic scattering of 65 MeV protons from /sup 12/C, /sup 24/Mg, /sup 28/Si, and /sup 32/S

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Okada, K.; Kondo, M.; Hosono, K.; Saito, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Hatanaka, K.; Noro, T.; Nagamachi, S.; Shimizu, H.; Ogino, K.; Kadota, Y.; Matsuki, S.; Wakai, M.

    1985-05-01

    Measurements of angular distributions of the cross sections and analyzing powers for the elastic and inelastic scatterings of 65 MeV polarized protons from /sup 12/C, /sup 24/Mg, /sup 28/Si, and /sup 32/S are reported. Coupled channels analyses of the scattering data are presented assuming the 0/sub 1//sup +/, 2/sub 1//sup +/, and 4/sub 1//sup +/ states to be members of the ground band, the 0/sub 2//sup +/ state to begin the

  4. Inelastic Scattering Of Electrons By Protons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cone, A. A.; Chen, K. W.; Dunning, J. R. Jr.; Hartwig, G.; Ramsey, N. F.; Walker, J. K.; Wilson, R.

    1966-12-01

    The inelastic scattering of electrons by protons has been measured at incident electron energies up to 5 BeV/c and momentum transfers q{sup 2}=4(BeV/c){sup 2}. Excitation of known nucleon resonances at M=1238, 1512, 1688 and possibly 1920 MeV have been observed. The calculations for the resonance at M=1238 MeV have been compared with calculations by Adler based on the dispersion theory of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu. The agreement is good. Qualitative models are discussed for the other resonances.

  5. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  6. Measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Gartner, J.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Roinishvili, V.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.

    2013-05-01

    A measurement is presented of the inelastic proton-proton cross section at a centre-of-mass energy of √{ s} = 7 TeV. Using the CMS detector at the LHC, the inelastic cross section is measured through two independent methods based on information from (i) forward calorimetry (for pseudorapidity 3 < | η | < 5), in collisions where at least one proton loses more than 5 ×10-6 of its longitudinal momentum, and (ii) the central tracker (| η | < 2.4), in collisions containing an interaction vertex with more than one, two, or three tracks with transverse momenta pT > 200 MeV / c. The measurements cover a large fraction of the inelastic cross section for particle production over about nine units of pseudorapidity and down to small transverse momenta. The results are compared with those of other experiments, and with models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions.

  7. Inelastic proton-solid collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echenique, P. M.; Flores, F.

    1987-05-01

    A first-principles calculation of charge states of moving protons in Al is presented. The many-body self-energy approach combined with ordinary atomic physics has been used. We find that at high velocities, V>2V0 or 3V0 (Bohr velocity), the processes are atomiclike, while at intermediate velocities, 0.7V0proton charges.

  8. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 50-MeV pions from 28Si and 30Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienands, U.; Hessey, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Rozon, F. M.; Roser, H. W.; Altman, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Gill, D. R.; Smith, G. R.; Wiedner, C. A.; Manley, D. M.; Berman, B. L.; Crawford, H. J.; Grion, N.

    1987-02-01

    Angular distributions of the differential cross section for elastic and inelastic scattering of 50-MeV π+ and π- on 28Si and 30Si have been measured to a relative accuracy of 5-10 We fitted the cross section of elastic π+ and π- scattering from 28Si simultaneously with an optical model using a second-order potential of the Michigan State University form. Our best-fit parameters differ from those given previously. The ratio of the neutron and proton transition-matrix elements for the first Jπ=2+ state in 28Si is found from the inelastic cross section to be 1.13+/-0.09. For 30Si, the ratio is found to be 0.93+/-0.09, which differs significantly from the value derived from lifetime measurements on mirror nuclei.

  9. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Caciolli, A.; Calzolai, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, 19F(p,p')19F, from the first five excited levels of 19F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm2) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm2). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF2) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  10. Evaluation of proton inelastic reaction models in Geant4 for prompt gamma production during proton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jeyasugiththan, Jeyasingam; Peterson, Stephen W

    2015-10-07

    During proton beam radiotherapy, discrete secondary prompt gamma rays are induced by inelastic nuclear reactions between protons and nuclei in the human body. In recent years, the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit has played an important role in the development of a device for real time dose range verification purposes using prompt gamma radiation. Unfortunately the default physics models in Geant4 do not reliably replicate the measured prompt gamma emission. Determining a suitable physics model for low energy proton inelastic interactions will boost the accuracy of prompt gamma simulations. Among the built-in physics models, we found that the precompound model with a modified initial exciton state of 2 (1 particle, 1 hole) produced more accurate discrete gamma lines from the most important elements found within the body such as 16O, 12C and 14N when comparing them with the available gamma production cross section data. Using the modified physics model, we investigated the prompt gamma spectra produced in a water phantom by a 200 MeV pencil beam of protons. The spectra were attained using a LaBr3 detector with a time-of-flight (TOF) window and BGO active shield to reduce the secondary neutron and gamma background. The simulations show that a 2 ns TOF window could reduce 99% of the secondary neutron flux hitting the detector. The results show that using both timing and active shielding can remove up to 85% of the background radiation which includes a 33% reduction by BGO subtraction.

  11. Evaluation of proton inelastic reaction models in Geant4 for prompt gamma production during proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyasugiththan, Jeyasingam; Peterson, Stephen W.

    2015-10-01

    During proton beam radiotherapy, discrete secondary prompt gamma rays are induced by inelastic nuclear reactions between protons and nuclei in the human body. In recent years, the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit has played an important role in the development of a device for real time dose range verification purposes using prompt gamma radiation. Unfortunately the default physics models in Geant4 do not reliably replicate the measured prompt gamma emission. Determining a suitable physics model for low energy proton inelastic interactions will boost the accuracy of prompt gamma simulations. Among the built-in physics models, we found that the precompound model with a modified initial exciton state of 2 (1 particle, 1 hole) produced more accurate discrete gamma lines from the most important elements found within the body such as 16O, 12C and 14N when comparing them with the available gamma production cross section data. Using the modified physics model, we investigated the prompt gamma spectra produced in a water phantom by a 200 MeV pencil beam of protons. The spectra were attained using a LaBr3 detector with a time-of-flight (TOF) window and BGO active shield to reduce the secondary neutron and gamma background. The simulations show that a 2 ns TOF window could reduce 99% of the secondary neutron flux hitting the detector. The results show that using both timing and active shielding can remove up to 85% of the background radiation which includes a 33% reduction by BGO subtraction.

  12. a Survey of Giant Resonance Excitations with 200 Mev Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, James Royce

    The giant resonance region in ('60)Ni, ('90)Zr, ('120)Sn, and ('208)Pb has been studied using inelastic scattering of 200 MeV protons. Angular distributions were obtained for the giant quadrupole resonance, giant octupole resonance, and for the combined giant dipole and giant monopole resonance between 4 and 20 degrees. The 2(H/2PI)(omega) component of the giant hexadecapole resonance has been directly observed for the first time in ('208)Pb. In the other nuclei, upper limits on the amount of hexadecapole strength contained within the giant quadrupole resonance have been obtained. Peaks are observed in ('60)Ni and ('90)Zr that are consistent with recently reported M1 states. Discrepancies between sum rules extracted from this data and from previous work are discussed. Possible explanations include DWBA breakdown or difficulties in estimating the magnitude of the continuum. Systematics obtained for the giant resonances are compared to earlier work.

  13. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  14. RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

    2007-11-27

    The use of HTS materials in high radiation environmentsrequires that the superconducting properties remain constant up to aradiation high dose. BSCCO-2223 samples from two manufacturers wereirradiated with 50 MeV protons at fluences of up to 5 x 1017 protons/cm2.The samples lost approximately 75 percent of their pre-irradiation Ic.This compares with Nb3Sn, which loses about 50 percent at the samedisplacements per atom.

  15. RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, Arno; Heibronn, L.H; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

    2007-11-01

    The use of HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that the superconducting properties remain constant up to a radiation high dose. BSCCO-2223 samples from two manufacturers were irradiated with 50 MeV protons at fluences of up to 5 x 10{sup 17} protons/cm{sup 2}. The samples lost approximately 75% of their pre-irradiation I{sub c}. This compares with Nb{sub 3}Sn, which loses about 50% at the same displacements per atom.

  16. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  17. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  18. Stochastic cooling of 200 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambertson, G.; Bisognano, J.; Flood, W.; Laslett, L. J.; Leemann, C.; Leskovar, B.; Lo, C. C.; Main, R.; Smith, L.; Staples, J.

    1980-07-01

    Vertical and longitudinal cooling was achieved at the FNAL 200 MeV cooling ring. Initial longitudinal cooling times of 20 seconds for 1.5 x 1 million circulating protons are in approximate 20 seconds for 1.5 x 1 million circulating protons are in approximate agreement with calculations based on measured system parameters. The cooling systems have an electronic bandwidth of approxmately 300 MHz, traveling wave pickups and kickers, and a notch filter using flexible cable. The traveling wave structures provide a good signal-to-noise ratio and reduce output power requirements.

  19. Pion elastic and inelastic 2+1 scattering on 58,60,62,64Ni at Tπ=180 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laymon, C. M.; Amos, W.; Burlein, M. G.; Fortune, H. T.; Ekenberg, T.; Kotwal, A.; O'donnell, J. M.; Silk, J. D.; Zumbro, J. D.; Morris, C. L.; Seestrom, S. J.; Dhuga, K. S.; Garnett, R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. W.; Moore, C. F.; Morris, S. L.; Watson, D. L.

    1996-03-01

    Angular distributions for π+ and π- elastic and inelastic scattering from the Z=28 closed-proton-shell nuclei 58,60,62,64Ni have been measured at an incident pion kinetic energy of 180 MeV. Values for the neutron and proton matrix elements for the transition to the Jπ=2+1 state have been extracted using the distorted wave impulse approximation in which the π+ and π- data were fitted simultaneously and the neutron and proton vibrational transition strengths were treated as free parameters. While all transitions are predominantly collective, extracted values of Mn/Mp indicate increasing collectivity as a function of neutron number and are consistent with the collective limit of N/Z for 64Ni.

  20. Dirac Calculations for Proton Inelastic Scattering at Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nohy, N. A.; El-Hammamy, M. N.; Aly, N. E.; Abdel-Moneim, A. M.; Hamza, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Relativistic proton inelastic scattering from different targets (16O, 24Mg, 28Si, 40Ca, 54Fe, 58Ni, 90Zr, 154Sm, 176Yb, and 208Pb) at intermediate energies is analyzed in the framework of phenomenological optical potentials based on the Dirac formalism. Parameters of the Dirac phenomenological potential with Woods Saxon (WS) shape are obtained. The first order vibrational collective model with one phonon is used to calculate the transition optical potentials to the first low-lying excited state (2+) of the investigated target nuclei. Also, the variation of deformation length ( δ) with energy and mass number is studied. It is noticed that the deformation length increases slightly with energy at intermediate range.

  1. MeV proton flux predictions near Saturn's D ring.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, P; Roussos, E; Kotova, A; Cooper, J F; Mitchell, D G; Krupp, N; Paranicas, C

    2015-10-01

    Radiation belts of MeV protons have been observed just outward of Saturn's main rings. During the final stages of the mission, the Cassini spacecraft will pass through the gap between the main rings and the planet. Based on how the known radiation belts of Saturn are formed, it is expected that MeV protons will be present in this gap and also bounce through the tenuous D ring right outside the gap. At least one model has suggested that the intensity of MeV protons near the planet could be much larger than in the known belts. We model this inner radiation belt using a technique developed earlier to understand Saturn's known radiation belts. We find that the inner belt is very different from the outer belts in the sense that its intensity is limited by the densities of the D ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere, not by radial diffusion and satellite absorption. The atmospheric density is relatively well constrained by EUV occultations. Based on that we predict an intensity in the gap region that is well below that of the known belts. It is more difficult to do the same for the region magnetically connected to the D ring since its density is poorly constrained. We find that the intensity in this region can be comparable to the known belts. Such intensities pose no hazard to the mission since Cassini would only experience these fluxes on timescales of minutes but might affect scientific measurements by decreasing the signal-to-contamination ratio of instruments.

  2. MeV proton flux predictions near Saturn's D ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Roussos, E.; Kotova, A.; Cooper, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.

    2015-10-01

    Radiation belts of MeV protons have been observed just outward of Saturn's main rings. During the final stages of the mission, the Cassini spacecraft will pass through the gap between the main rings and the planet. Based on how the known radiation belts of Saturn are formed, it is expected that MeV protons will be present in this gap and also bounce through the tenuous D ring right outside the gap. At least one model has suggested that the intensity of MeV protons near the planet could be much larger than in the known belts. We model this inner radiation belt using a technique developed earlier to understand Saturn's known radiation belts. We find that the inner belt is very different from the outer belts in the sense that its intensity is limited by the densities of the D ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere, not by radial diffusion and satellite absorption. The atmospheric density is relatively well constrained by EUV occultations. Based on that we predict an intensity in the gap region that is well below that of the known belts. It is more difficult to do the same for the region magnetically connected to the D ring since its density is poorly constrained. We find that the intensity in this region can be comparable to the known belts. Such intensities pose no hazard to the mission since Cassini would only experience these fluxes on timescales of minutes but might affect scientific measurements by decreasing the signal-to-contamination ratio of instruments.

  3. Shielding measurements for a 230 MeV proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Energetic secondary neutrons produced as protons interact with accelerator components and patients dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton radiotherapy facilities. Due to the scarcity of data describing neutron production, attenuation, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent values, these parameters were measured for 230 MeV proton bombardment of stopping length Al, Fe, and Pb targets at emission angles of 0{degree}, 22{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree} in a thick concrete shield. Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters with volumes ranging from 1 cm{sup 3} to 1000 cm{sup 3} were used to obtain microdosimetric spectra from which absorbed dose and radiation quality are deduced. Does equivalent values and attenuation lengths determined at depth in the shield were found to vary sharply with angle, but were found to be independent of target material. Neutron dose and radiation length values are compared with Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations performed using the Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code (LAHET). Calculations used 230 MeV protons incident upon an Fe target in a shielding geometry similar to that used in the experiment. LAHET calculations overestimated measured attenuation values at 0{degree}, 22{degree}, and 45{degree}, yet correctly predicted the attenuation length at 90{degree}. Comparison of the mean radiation quality estimated with the Monte Carlo calculations with measurements suggest that neutron quality factors should be increased by a factor of 1.4. These results are useful for the shielding design of new facilities as well as for testing neutron production and transport calculations.

  4. ETFE polymer bombarded with 1 MeV proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, M. A.; de Almeida, A.; Muntele, I.; Muntele, C.; Delalez, N.; Ila, D.

    2005-12-01

    The ethylenetetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) is a polymer formed by alternating ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene segments. It has high impact resistance and useful mechanical properties. ETFE can be used as components of pumps, valves, tie wraps, and electrical components. It can also be applied in the field of medical physics as intra venous catheters and as radiation dosimeter. When a material is exposed to the ionizing radiation, it suffers damage that depends on the type, energy and intensity of the radiation. In order to determine the radiation damage mechanism, ETFE films were bombarded with 1 MeV protons to the fluence between 1 × 1011 and 1 × 1016 protons/cm2 and the chemical species emitted during the bombardment were measured with residual gas analysis (RGA) and show that HF gas is the entity preferentially emitted. Optical absorption photospectrometry (OAP) and attenuated total reflectometry fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) shows quantitative chemical evidence of the damage. Our results show that damage is detectable at low proton fluence, but damage that can compromise the application in dosimetry occurs only for fluence greater than 1014 protons/cm2.

  5. Angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Skoy, V. R.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Bogolyubov, E. P.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    The work is devoted to measuring the angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei. A portable ING-27 neutron generator (designed and fabricated at VNIIA, Moscow) with a built-in 64-pixel silicon α-detector was used as a source of tagged neutrons. The γ-rays of characteristic nuclear radiation from 12C were detected with a spectrometric system that consisted of 22 γ-detectors based on NaI(Tl) crystals arranged around the carbon target. The measured angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays is analyzed and compared with the results of other published experimental works.

  6. Measurement of Neutron Proton Going to Proton Proton Negative Pion at 443 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, Mark Gregory

    Experiment E372 at TRIUMF measured the analyzing powers (A_{rm NO}, A_ {rm SO}, A_{rm LO}) and relative differential cross section for the reaction np to pppi ^- at 443 MeV. We directed a polarized neutron beam on to a liquid hydrogen target and measured the scattered events in a large solid angle detector capable of measuring the velocities and directions of all of the protons produced in the reaction as well as many of the pions. Kinematic analysis of the events allowed us to remove almost all background and resulted in a clean set of np to pppi^- events. These events were binned against appropriate kinematic variables to produce yields which correspond to relative differential cross sections, and asymmetries which correspond to A _{rm NO}, A_{rm SO}, and A_{rm LO }. These results are the first of their kind for this energy. Comparisons to a theoretical model of Kloet and Lomon and a preliminary study using partial waves are presented.

  7. {sup {bold 6}}Li(vector)+{sup {bold 12}}C inelastic scattering at 30 and 50 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, P.L.; Kemper, K.W.; Green, P.V.; Mohajeri, K.; Myers, E.G.; Schmidt, B.G.; Hnizdo, V.

    1996-09-01

    A complete set of analyzing powers (AP`s), {ital iT}{sub 11}, {ital T}{sub 20}, {ital T}{sub 21}, and {ital T}{sub 22}, for 50 MeV {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li(vector),{sup 6}Li) elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}, 4.44 MeV), {sup 12}C(0{sup +}, 7.65 MeV), and {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}, 9.64 MeV) states over the center-of-mass (c.m.) angular range 10{degree}{endash}115{degree} is reported. In addition, cross sections for the excited states 3{sup +}(2.18 MeV), 2{sup +}(4.31 MeV), and 1{sup +}(5.65 MeV) of {sup 6}Li were measured by using the inverse-kinematics reaction {sup 6}Li({sup 12}C,{sup 12}C) at 100 MeV. A combined analysis of the new 50 MeV data and previous 30 MeV data has been carried out using the coupled-channels (CC) code FRESCO. The CC calculations use an optical potential with double-folded (DF) real central, Woods-Saxon imaginary central, and Thomas real spin-orbit (SO) potentials. Calculations include reorientation terms and coupling to the first three excited states of {sup 6}Li and the first two nonzerospin states of {sup 12}C. The {sup 6}Li coupling strengths were fixed by the measured {sup 6}Li excited-state cross sections. The elastic-scattering cross sections and A.P.`s are described well. The need for an explicit SO potential is apparent in the elastic and inelastic-scattering AP`s {ital iT}{sub 11}, more so at 30 MeV than at 50 MeV. The rank-2 AP`s up to 50{degree} c.m. arise mainly from ground-state reorientation effects. The DF potential normalization constant {ital N} approaches unity for the 50 MeV data. At both energies, the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}) cross sections are underestimated at large angles, and the description of the {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}) cross sections is poor in detail. The {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}) AP`s and the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}) {ital iT}{sub 11} are not reproduced at either energy. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Deep proton writing with 12 MeV protons for rapid prototyping of microstructures in polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Gökçe, Berkcan; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Vervaeke, Michael; Meyer, Pascal; Guttmann, Markus; Dubruel, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Deep proton writing (DPW) is a fabrication technology developed for the rapid prototyping of polymer microstructures. We use polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates, which act as a positive resist, for irradiation with a collimated 12-MeV energy proton beam. Using 12 MeV enables the irradiation of increasingly thick PMMA substrates with less conicity of the sidewalls compared to the lower energies used in previous work. A microhole of 47.7 μm diameter over a depth of 1 mm is achieved, leading to a maximum aspect ratio of 21∶1. The sidewalls of the irradiated structures show a slightly conical shape and their root-mean-square surface roughness is lower than 50 nm averaged over 72 measured areas of 56 μm×44 μm. This means that DPW components have optical surface quality sidewalls for wavelengths larger than 400 nm. Based on the trade-off among the sidewall roughness, conicity, and the development time, we determine that the optimal proton fluence for 12-MeV DPW in PMMA is 7.75×106 μm-2. Finally, we discuss some high aspect ratio microstructures with optical surface quality that were created with DPW to be used for a myriad of applications, such as micromirrors, microlenses, optofluidic devices, and high-precision alignment structures for single-mode optical fiber connectors.

  9. Neutron production from 200-500 MeV proton interaction with spacecraft materials.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Richard H; Kinnison, James D; Roth, David R

    2005-01-01

    We report on detailed energy spectra of neutron production > 14 MeV from collisions of 200-500 MeV protons with combinations of aluminium, graphite and polyethylene. Comparisons of normalised neutron spectra are made with respect to incident proton energy, angle of neutron production and material. In general, carbon (graphite) or polyethylene (by itself or in combination with aluminium) reduce secondary neutron production > 14 MeV relative to the production from interactions in aluminium.

  10. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S A; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, N; Bianchi, L; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Böttger, S; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bose, S; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Boyer, B; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caballero Orduna, D; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carlin Filho, N; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; 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Ferreiro, E G; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoras, A; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, S; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, P G; Innocenti, G M; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Ivanytskyi, O; Jachołkowski, A; Jacobs, P M; Jang, H J; Janik, R; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jha, D M; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jirden, L; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kakoyan, V; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khan, M M; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, S; Kim, B; Kim, T; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, J H; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kliemant, M; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Koch, K; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Korneev, A; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Krawutschke, T; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; 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    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass MX <200 GeV/c(2)) [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively at centre-of-mass energies [Formula: see text]; for double diffraction (for a pseudorapidity gap Δη>3) σDD/σINEL=0.11±0.03,0.12±0.05, and [Formula: see text], respectively at [Formula: see text]. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: [Formula: see text] mb at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared to previous measurements at proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders at lower energies, to measurements by other experiments at the LHC, and to theoretical models.

  11. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25meV resolution at the Cu K -edge

    DOE PAGES

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; ...

    2015-06-27

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the CuK-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25meV (FWHM) at 8981eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  12. Spin decomposition of the responses of Ca-44 and Ca-48 to 300 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    F. T. Baker; L. Bimbot; R. W. Fergerson; C. Glashausser; A. Green; O. Hausser; K. Hicks; K. Jones; C. A. Miller; M. Vetterli; R. Abegg; D. Beatty; B. Bonin; B. Castel; X. Y. Chen; V. Cupps; C. Djalali; R. Henderson; K. P. Jackson; R. Jeppesen; K. Nakayama; S. K. Nanda; R. Sawafta; S. Yen

    1991-07-01

    Angular distributions of the double-differential cross section d2σ/dΩ dE(σ) and the spin-flip probability Snn have been measured for inclusive proton inelastic scattering from 44Ca at 290 MeV and from 48Ca at 318 MeV. Excitation energies up to about 50 MeV for 44Ca and 40 MeV for 48Ca have been investigated over the laboratory angular ranges of 3° to 12° for 44Ca and 3° to 9° for 48Ca. Multipole decompositions of angular distributions of both the spin-flip cross section σSnn and the estimated cross section for ΔS=0 transitions have been performed. Distributions of strengths were deduced for ΔL=1, ΔS=0 (the giant dipole), ΔL=2, ΔS=0 (the giant quadrupole), ΔL=0, ΔS=1 (the magnetic dipole), ΔL=1, ΔS=1 (the spin dipole), and ΔL=2, ΔS=1 (the spin quadrupole). The ΔS=0 summed strengths for 44Ca are lower than for 40Ca and 48Ca. The spin-dipole summed strengths are found to be approximately independent of A. For 48Ca, essentially all M1 strength observed was in the 10.23 MeV 1+ state; for 44Ca, M1 strength was observed to be fragmented over a range of 7 to 18 Mev.

  13. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H- beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  14. Separation of Pygmy Dipole and M1 Resonances in Zr90 by a High-Resolution Inelastic Proton Scattering Near 0°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, C.; Utsunomiya, H.; Tamii, A.; Akimune, H.; Nakada, H.; Shima, T.; Yamagata, T.; Kawabata, T.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Nagashima, M.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Sakuda, M.; Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kondo, T.; Bilgier, B.; Kozer, H. C.; Lui, Y.-W.; Hatanaka, K.

    2012-06-01

    A high-resolution measurement of inelastic proton scattering off Zr90 near 0° was performed at 295 MeV with a focus on a pronounced strength previously reported in the low-energy tail of giant dipole resonance. A forest of fine structure was observed in the excitation energy region 7-12 MeV. A multipole decomposition analysis of the angular distribution for the forest was carried out using the ECIS95 distorted-wave Born approximation code with the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation model of E1 and M1 transition densities and inclusion of E1 Coulomb excitation. The analysis separated pygmy dipole and M1 resonances in the forest at EPDR=9.15±0.18MeV with ΓPDR=2.91±0.64MeV and at EM1=9.53±0.06MeV with ΓM1=2.70±0.17MeV in the Lorentzian function, respectively. The B(E1)↑ value for pygmy dipole resonance over 7-11 MeV is 0.75±0.08e2fm2, which corresponds to 2.1±0.2% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule.

  15. Inelastic Proton Scattering on 21Na in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Roby

    2009-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, S. Reeve, Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, A.G. Tuff, O. Roberts, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods, T. Davinson, G. J. Lotay, University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; H. Al Falou, G.C. Ball, M. Djongolov, A. Garnsworthy, G. Hackman, J.N. Orce, C.J. Pearson, S. Triambak, S.J. Williams, TRIUMF; C. Andreiou, D.S. Cross, N. Galinski, R. Kshetri, Simon Fraser University; C. Sumithrarachchi, M.A. Schumaker, University of Guelph; M.P. Jones, S.V. Rigby, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; T.E. Drake, University of Toronto; We describe an experiment and associated technique [1] to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. At the TRIUMF ISAC-II radioactive beam accelerator facility in Canada, particles inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics are detected with Bambino, a δE-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with the charged particles to cleanly select inelastic scattering events. We measured resonances above the alpha threshold in ^22Mg of relevance to the rate of break-out from the hot-CNO cycle via the reaction ^ 18Ne(α,p)^21Na. [1] PJ Woods et al. Rex-ISOLDE proposal 424 Cern (2003).

  16. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Boyer, B.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Das, I.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, R.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, S.; Kim, B.; Kim, T.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, K. S.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, M. V. D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, F.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass M X <200 GeV/ c 2) σ_{SD}/σ_{INEL} = 0.21 ± 0.03, 0.20^{+0.07}_{-0.08}, and 0.20^{+0.04}_{-0.07}, respectively at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 0.9, 2.76{, and }7 {TeV}; for double diffraction (for a pseudorapidity gap Δ η>3) σ DD/ σ INEL=0.11±0.03,0.12±0.05, and 0.12^{+0.05}_{-0.04}, respectively at √{s} = 0.9, 2.76{, and }7 {TeV}. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: σ_{INEL} = 62.8^{+2.4}_{-4.0} (model) ±1.2 (lumi) mb at √{s} = 2.76 {TeV} and 73.2^{+2.0}_{-4.6} (model) ±2.6 (lumi) {mb} at √{s} = 7 {TeV}. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared to previous measurements at proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders at lower energies, to measurements by other experiments at the LHC, and to theoretical models.

  17. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of >100 MeV Protons in Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-05-01

    Recently several studies have presented correlative evidence for a significant-to-dominant role for a flare-resident process in the acceleration of high-energy protons in large solar particle events. In one of these investigations, a high correlation between >100 MeV proton fluence and 35 GHz radio fluence is obtained by omitting large proton events associated with relatively weak flares; these outlying events are attributed to proton acceleration by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We argue that the strong CMEs and associated shocks observed for proton events on the main sequence of the scatter plot are equally likely to accelerate high-energy protons. In addition, we examine ratios of 0.5 MeV electron to >100 MeV proton intensities in large SEP events, associated with both well-connected and poorly-connected solar eruptions, to show that scaled-up versions of the small flares associated with classical impulsive SEP events are not significant accelerators of >100 MeV protons.

  18. Interplay of the elastic and inelastic channels in the 16O+27Al scattering at Elab = 280 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Nicolosi, D.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Lubian, J.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; de Faria, P. N.; Foti, A.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent data indicated a nuclear rainbow-like pattern in the elastic scattering of 16O + 27Al at E_{lab}=100 MeV that arises from couplings of the ground to the low-lying states of the 27Al nucleus. Similar effect was identified in the elastic angular distribution of 16O + 12C at E_{lab}=281 and 330 MeV. These experiments show a crucial role of microscopic details of nuclear structure in the elastic scattering of heavy ions at energies well above the Coulomb barrier. In this work we investigate the 16O + 27Al system at E_{lab}=280 MeV for which a coupled channel calculation predicts a pronounced nuclear rainbow-like structure. Obtained experimental data show evidences of an important coupling of the elastic channel to the inelastic. Coupled channel calculations reproduce the experimental angular distributions when a re-normalization factor on the real part of the optical potential is introduced. A proper theoretical approach still requires a high degree of accuracy for the nuclear structure models and new tools to deal with collective excitations.

  19. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, [ital y][sub [ital cut

  20. Toward a QCD analysis of jet rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates defined by the JADE clustering algorithm are compared to perturbative Quantum chromodynamics (PQCD) and different Monte Carlo model predictions. The applicability of the jet-parton duality hypothesis is studied. We obtain hadronic jet rates which are approximately a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the parton level. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  1. 25 MeV Solar Proton Events in Cycle 24 and Previous Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize observations of nearly 1000 solar energetic particle events that include 25 MeV protons made by Goddard instruments on various spacecraft (IMPs IV, V, 7, 8, ISEE-3) and by other instruments on SOHO, since 1967, encompassing solar cycles 20 to 24. We also include recent observations of such events from the STEREO spacecraft. These extended observations place studies focusing on Cycles 23 and 24 in a broader context. For example, the time distribution of 25 MeV proton events varies from cycle to cycle such that each cycle is unique. In the current cycle, ~25 MeV proton events were absent during the preceding solar minimum, whereas earlier minima showed occasional, often reasonably intense events, and there have been, so far, fewer exceptionally intense events compared to Cycles 22 and 23, though Cycle 21 also apparently lacked such events.

  2. Neutron production by a 13C thick target irradiated by 20 90 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhersonneau, G.; Malkiewicz, T.; Vakhtin, D.; Plokhoi, V.; Alyakrinskiy, O.; Barbui, M.; Brandenburg, S.; Dendooven, P.; Cinausero, M.; Kandiev, Ya.; Kettunen, H.; Khlebnikov, S.; Lyapin, V.; Penttilä, H.; Prete, G.; Rizzi, V.; Samarin, S.; Tecchio, L. B.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tyurin, G.

    2008-10-01

    Neutron production using an enriched 13C carbon converter has been measured during the design study of the italian RIB facility SPES. Energy and angular distributions of neutrons emitted by bombarding a 13C target of stopping length with protons in the range of 20 to 90 MeV have been measured by time-of-flight and activation and compared with the prediction of a Monte Carlo code developed at Snezhinsk. At the proton energy of 100 MeV, firstly envisaged for SPES, the gain with respect to a natural C target is less than a factor of two, while yields still compare well with those for 40 MeV deuterons on natural carbon adopted by SPIRAL-II. At energies near 30 MeV the 13C thick target is definitely more prolific than the target of natural carbon, but both yields with protons are clearly lower than the one with deuterons. At the energy of 20 MeV envisaged for a first stage of SPES it might be more efficient to irradiate the uranium target with protons rather than using the two-stage method with converter.

  3. Medical Application of the SARAF-Proton/Deuteron 40 MeV Superconducting Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, Shlomi

    2007-11-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) is based on a superconducting linear accelerator currently being built at the Soreq research center (Israel). The SARAF is planned to generate a 2 mA 4 MeV proton beam during its first year of operation and up to 40 MeV proton or deuteron beam in 2012. The high intensity beam, together with the linac ability to adjust the ion energy provides opportunities for medical research, such as Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and the production of medical radioisotopes, for instance 103Pd for prostate brachytherapy.

  4. Radiation shielding for 250 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, M.

    1987-04-01

    This paper is targetted at personnel who have the responsibility of designing the radiation shielding against neutron fluences created when protons interact with matter. Shielding of walls and roofs are discussed, as well as neutron dose leakage through labyrinths. Experimental data on neutron flux attenuation are considered, as well as some calculations using the intranuclear cascade calculations and parameterizations.

  5. 1000 MeV Proton beam therapy facility at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute Synchrocyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, N. K.; Gavrikov, Yu A.; Ivanov, E. M.; Karlin, D. L.; Khanzadeev, A. V.; Yalynych, N. N.; Riabov, G. A.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Vinogradov, V. M.

    2006-05-01

    Since 1975 proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron with fixed energy of 1000 MeV is used for the stereotaxic proton therapy of different head brain diseases. 1300 patients have been treated during this time. The advantage of high energy beam (1000 MeV) is low scattering of protons in the irradiated tissue. This factor allows to form the dose field with high edge gradients (20%/mm) that is especially important for the irradiation of the intra-cranium targets placed in immediate proximity to the life critical parts of the brain. Fixation of the 6 0mm diameter proton beam at the isodose centre with accuracy of ±1.0 mm, two-dimensional rotation technique of the irradiation provide a very high ratio of the dose in the irradiation zone to the dose at the object's surface equal to 200:1. The absorbed doses are: 120-150 Gy for normal hypophysis, 100-120 Gy for pituitary adenomas and 40-70 Gy for arterio-venous malformation at the rate of absorbed dose up to 50 Gy/min. In the paper the dynamics and the efficiency of 1000 MeV proton therapy treatment of the brain deceases are given. At present time the feasibility study is in progress with the goal to create a proton therapy on Bragg peak by means of the moderation of 1000 MeV proton beam in the absorber down to 200 MeV, energy required for radiotherapy of deep seated tumors.

  6. Investigation of the elastic and inelastic scattering of α-particles from 13C in the energy range 26.6-65MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtebayev, N.; Sakhiyev, S. K.; Janseitov, D. M.; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Alimov, D.; Danilov, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured the differential cross-sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of α-particles on 13C target at the isochronous cyclotron U-150 M INP Republic of Kazakhstan. The beam energies of α-particles were 29MeV and 50MeV. As a result of research we obtained new experimental data for the α + 13C elastic scattering and inelastic one leading to the 3.68 (3/2-), 6.86 (5/2+) and 7.5 (5/2-)MeV excited states of 13C nucleus. The experimental results on elastic scattering were analyzed within the framework of the optical model using Woods-Saxon potential and the double folding one. The theoretical calculations for the concerned excited states were performed using the coupled channel (CC) method. The optimal deformation parameters for the excited states of 13C nucleus were extracted.

  7. Neutron yield from a thick 13C target irradiated by 90 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyakrinskiy, O.; Andrighetto, A.; Barbui, M.; Brandenburg, S.; Cinausero, M.; Dalena, B.; Dendooven, P.; Fioretto, E.; Lhersonneau, G.; Lyapin, W.; Prete, G.; Simonetti, G.; Stroe, L.; Tecchio, L. B.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2005-08-01

    In the context of the design of an intense source of low and intermediate energy neutrons, the angular and energy distributions of neutrons produced in the interaction of 90 MeV protons in a 13C target, in which the protons are stopped, have been measured by time-of-flight and activation techniques. As compared to 12C the yield is less than a factor two higher, while it is somewhat less than for a 9Be target.

  8. Neutron scattering cross sections for /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U inferred from proton scattering and charge exchange measurements. [7 MeV, 26 and 27 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.; Grimes, S.M.; Pohl, B.A.; Poppe, C.H.; Wong, C.

    1980-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,n) reactions to the isobaric analog states (IAS) of /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U targets were measured at 26 and 27 MeV. The analysis of the data was done in conjunction with the proton elastic and inelastic (2/sup +/, 4/sup +/, 6/sup +/) differential cross sections measured at 26 MeV. Because collective effects are important in this mass region, deformed coupled-channels calculations were carried out for the simultaneous analysis of the proton and neutron outgoing channels. The sensitivity of the calculations was studied with respect to the optical model parameters used in the calculations, the shape of the nuclear charge distribution, the type of coupling scheme assumed among the levels, the magnitude of the deformation parameters, and the magnitude of the isovector potentials, V/sub 1/ and W/sub 1/. A Lane model-consistent analysis of the data was used to infer optical potential parameters for 6- to 7-MeV neutrons. The neutron elastic differential cross sections obtained from these calculations are compared with measurements available in the literature, and with results obtained using neutron parameters from global sets reported at these energies. 7 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Low cost/low intensity 50 MeV proton irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Martin, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Protons have been proposed as one of the most useful particles for radiation therapy, but have found limited use due to the cost and scarcity of medium energy proton accelerators. However, the highly successful program on the Harvard Cyclotron has increased interest in expanding the number of treatment facilities. In order to demonstrate that high intensity proton accelerators are not required and to gain experience with treating patients using protons, a low cost and low intensity source of 50 MeV protons was developed at Argonne. Although the beam penetration is limited to 22 mm, the beam is capable of treating a major fraction of the ocular melanoma tumors treated at the Harvard Cyclotron. This beam operates parasitically with the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron at Argonne using a source of 50 MeV H/sup 0/ atoms which are produced by stripping in the gas of the 50 MeV H/sup -/ linear accelerator. A stripping fraction of about 3 to 5 x 10/sup -5/ is observed and yields a 0.4 namp beam of protons. Results on the properties and operation of this parasitic beam are presented. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  10. {eta}-meson production in proton-proton collisions at excess energies of 40 and 72 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Petren, H.; Calen, H.; Fransson, K.; Faeldt, G.; Hoeistad, B.; Jacewicz, M.; Johansson, T.; Keleta, S.; Koch, I.; Kullander, S.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Schoenning, K.; Wolke, M.; Zlomanczuk, J.; Bargholtz, Chr.; Geren, L.; Lindberg, K.; Tegner, P.-E.; Thoerngren Engblom, P.

    2010-11-15

    The production of {eta} mesons in proton-proton collisions has been studied using the WASA detector at the CELSIUS storage ring at excess energies of Q=40 MeV and Q=72 MeV. The {eta} was detected through its 2{gamma} decay in a near-4{pi} electromagnetic calorimeter, whereas the protons were measured by a combination of straw chambers and plastic scintillator planes in the forward hemisphere. About 6.9x10{sup 4} and 9.3x10{sup 4} events were found at Q=40 MeV and Q=72 MeV, respectively, with background contributions of less than 5%. A simple parametrization of the production cross section in terms of low partial waves was used to evaluate the acceptance corrections. Strong evidence was found for the influence of higher partial waves. The Dalitz plots show the presence of p waves in both the pp and the {eta}{l_brace}pp{r_brace} systems and the angular distributions of the {eta} in the center-of-mass frame suggest the influence of d-wave {eta} mesons.

  11. η-meson production in proton-proton collisions at excess energies of 40 and 72 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrén, H.; Bargholtz, Chr.; Bashkanov, M.; Bogoslavsky, D.; Calén, H.; Clement, H.; Demirörs, L.; Ekström, C.; Fransson, K.; Fäldt, G.; Gerén, L.; Höistad, B.; Ivanov, G.; Jacewicz, M.; Jiganov, E.; Johansson, T.; Keleta, S.; Khakimova, O.; Koch, I.; Kren, F.; Kullander, S.; Kupść, A.; Lindberg, K.; Marciniewski, P.; Morosov, B.; Pauly, C.; Petukhov, Y.; Povtorejko, A.; Schönning, K.; Scobel, W.; Skorodko, T.; Stepaniak, J.; Tegnér, P.-E.; Thörngren Engblom, P.; Tikhomirov, V.; Wilkin, C.; Wolke, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zartova, I.; Złomańczuk, J.

    2010-11-01

    The production of η mesons in proton-proton collisions has been studied using the WASA detector at the CELSIUS storage ring at excess energies of Q=40 MeV and Q=72 MeV. The η was detected through its 2γ decay in a near-4π electromagnetic calorimeter, whereas the protons were measured by a combination of straw chambers and plastic scintillator planes in the forward hemisphere. About 6.9×104 and 9.3×104 events were found at Q=40 MeV and Q=72 MeV, respectively, with background contributions of less than 5%. A simple parametrization of the production cross section in terms of low partial waves was used to evaluate the acceptance corrections. Strong evidence was found for the influence of higher partial waves. The Dalitz plots show the presence of p waves in both the pp and the η{pp} systems and the angular distributions of the η in the center-of-mass frame suggest the influence of d-wave η mesons.

  12. Analysis of latent tracks for MeV protons in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Takahashi, S.; Zayats, A.; Malka, V.; Fritzler, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2007-02-01

    For protons of energy up to a few MeV, the temporal evolution of etched latent tracks in CR-39 nuclear track detector has been numerically modeled by assuming that the electronic energy loss of the protons governs the latent track formation. The technique is applied in order to obtain the energy spectrum of high intensity laser driven proton beams, with high accuracy. The precise measurement of the track length and areal track density have been achieved by scanning short etched, highly populated CR-39 employing atomic force microscope.

  13. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  14. A new proton fluence model for E greater than 10 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers describe a new engineering model for the fluence of protons with energies greater than 10 MeV. The data set used is a combination of observations made primarily from the Earth's surface between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of Earth between 1963 and 1985. With this data set we find that the distinction between ordinary proton events and anomalously large proton events made in earlier work disappears. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. In contrast to earlier models, results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event.

  15. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    DOE PAGES

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; ...

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather thanmore » the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.« less

  16. Calculations of neutron shielding data for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Jian, S H

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron sources and their attenuation in concrete were investigated in detail for protons with energies ranging from 10 to 100 MeV striking on target materials of C, N, Al, Fe, Cu and W. A two-step approach was adopted: thick-target double-differential neutron yields were first calculated from the (p, xn) cross sections recommended in the ICRU Report 63; further, transport simulations of those neutrons in concrete were performed by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The purpose of this study is to provide reasonably accurate parameters for shielding design for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators. Source terms and the corresponding attenuation lengths in concrete for several target materials are given as a function of proton energies and neutron emission angles.

  17. Filamentation control and collimation of laser accelerated MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, B.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Mandal, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Weng, S. M.; Murakami, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that the proton beam filamentation in dense plasma can be controlled in multi-layered (Al-CH-Al) sandwich targets. We observe up to three-fold reduction in the MeV proton beam divergence (~12°) from these targets as a result of decrease in filamentary structures in the proton beam profile. Strong self-generated resistive magnetic fields in targets with a high-Z transport layer are mainly responsible for this observed effect. Enhancement in the proton flux and energy is also observed from these targets. Supported by a matching 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and theoretical considerations, we suggest that these targets can be very effectively implemented to collimate proton beams useful for ion oncology applications or advanced fast igniter approach of inertial confinement fusion (ICF).

  18. Proton-induced polonium production in massive lead bismuth target irradiated by 660 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Aleksander; Petrochenkov, Sergey; Pohorecki, Wladyslaw

    2006-06-01

    The paper presents study of polonium production in bismuth foils placed in lead target. Proton-induced production of residual nuclei 206Po, 207Po, 208Po, 209Po, 210Po in 209Bi foils placed in lead target irradiated by 660 MeV protons was calculated. A comparison with calculated spatial distribution of polonium production using an MCNPX code and experimental results has been performed. The results of calculation will be useful for design of target of Subcritical Assembly in Dubna (SAD).

  19. Gadolinium-148 production cross section measurements for 600-and 800-MEV protons.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Mashnik, S. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, {sup 148}Gd production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 {mu}m thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 {mu}m thin Al activation foils. Gadolinium spallation yields were determined from these foils using alpha spectroscopy and compared with the LANL codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. When heavy metal targets, such as tungsten, are bombarded with protons greater than a few hundred MeV many different nuclides are produced. These nuclides are both stable and radioactive and are created by spallation, proton activation, or secondary reactions with neutrons and other nuclear particles made in the target. These products are distributed somewhat heterogeneously throughout a thick target because of the energy dependence of the cross sections and energy loss of the proton beam within the target. From this standpoint, it is difficult to measure nuclide production cross sections for a given energy proton in a thick target. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility and 1L target at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. DOE requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on radionuclide inventories in the target as a means of determining the 'nuclear facility' category level. Presently, WNR's Target 4 is a non-nuclear facility while the Lujan 1L target is classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten and other heavy elements. Allowable isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of {sup 148}Gd is generally low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total inhalation dose burden in an accident

  20. Absolute polarimeter for the proton-beam energy of 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A. N.; Atoian, G.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Nurushev, S. B.; Pylaev, F. S.; Raparia, D.; Runtso, M. F.; Stephenson, E.

    2013-12-15

    A polarimeter is upgraded and tested in a 200-MeV polarized-proton beam at the accelerator-collider facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The polarimeter is based on the elastic polarizedproton scattering on a carbon target at an angle of 16.2°, in which case the analyzing power is close to unity and was measured to a very high degree of precision. It is shown that, in the energy range of 190–205 MeV, the absolute polarization can be measured to a precision better than ±0.5%.

  1. Calculation of A x for the Proton-Deuteron Breakup Reaction at 135 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Mehmandoost-Khajeh-Dad, A. A.; Shafaei, M. A.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Biegun, A.; Gašparic, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Moeini, H.; Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Sworst, R.

    2013-08-01

    Observables in proton-deuteron scattering are sensitive probes of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and three-nucleon force effects (3NF). Several facilities in the world, including Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), allow a detailed study a few-nucleon interaction below the pion-production threshold exploiting polarized proton and deuteron beams. In this contribution we explored 3NF effects in the break-up scattering process by performing a measurement of differential cross section and the analyzing power, especially the x component of the analyzing power, using a 135 MeV polarized-proton beam impinging on a liquid-deuteron target. The proton-deuteron breakup reaction leads to a final state with three free particles and a rich phase space that allows us to study observables for continuous set of kinematical configurations of the outgoing nucleons. The results are interpreted with the help of state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations.

  2. Preliminary shielding assessment for the 100 MeV proton linac (KOMAC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Cho, Y S; Chang, J

    2005-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project is building the Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex facilities from 2002 to 2012, which consists of a high-current 100 MeV proton linear accelerator and various beam-lines. This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the shielding required for the 20 mA proton linac and the beam-dump. For an accurate information on secondary neutron production from the guiding magnet and primary heat sink of the beam dump, proton-induced 63Cu and 65Cu cross section data were evaluated and applied to shielding calculations. The required thickness of the concrete was assessed by a simple line-of-sight model for the lateral shielding of the beam-line and the full shielding of the beam dump. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed using the MCNPX code to obtain the source term and attenuation coefficients for the three-dimensional lateral shielding model of the beam-line.

  3. Elastic scattering of polarized protons on deuterium at 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, G.S.

    1984-07-01

    A specific set of spin transfer coefficients has been measured for proton-deuteron elastic scattering at 800 MeV using an unpolarized liquid deuterium target. The experiment was done using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) with a polarized proton beam. The scattered proton spin direction was determined using the Focal Plane Polarimeter (FPP) of the HRS, which employs a carbon analyzer. Some of the spin dependent parameters measured in this experiment are of considerable interest because they provide selective information about the nucleon-nucleon (NN) amplitude. Since the deuteron is the simplest bound nucleus, pd elastic scattering is particularly well suited for testing multiple scattering theories. These measurements will also be used to eventually determine the full pd collision matrix, which contains all possible information about the scattering process. In addition, the experimental setup is described for a polarized proton-polarized deuterium target spin transfer experiment also done at the HRS at 800 MeV incident proton energy. 71 references.

  4. Target depth dependence of damage rate in metals by 150 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Mori, Y.; Sato, K.; Uesugi, T.; Xu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    A series of irradiation experiments with 150 MeV protons was performed. The relationship between target depth (or shield thickness) and displacement damage during proton irradiation was obtained by in situ electrical resistance measurements at 20 K. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements were also performed at room temperature after irradiation, as a function of the target thickness. The displacement damage was found to be high close to the beam incident surface area, and decreased with increasing target depth. The experimental results were compared with damage production calculated with an advanced Monte Carlo particle transport code system (PHITS).

  5. Microscopic description of 295 MeV polarized protons incident on Sn isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, W.; Sharma, Manjari; Gambhir, Y. K.; Kailas, S.

    2010-03-15

    We present a Brueckner theory analysis of proton-scattering data from Sn isotopes at 295 MeV. A soft-core Urbana v{sub 14} internucleon potential has been used to calculate reaction matrices that are folded with point-nucleon (both proton and neutron) densities obtained in the relativistic mean field (RMF) framework to calculate the optical potential. We get reasonably satisfactory agreement with the differential cross-section and analyzing-power data using only three scaling parameters for all isotopes. It is observed that the calculated neutron skin increases smoothly as the neutron number increases, in conformity with earlier findings.

  6. Equation of State Measurements of Dense Plasmas Heated by Laser Accelerated MeV Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Bernstein, Aaron; Cho, Byoung-Ick; Grigsby, Will; Dalton, Allen; Shepherd, Ronnie; Ping, Yuan; Chen, Hui; Widmann, Klaus; Ozterhoz, Jens; Ditmire, Todd

    2008-04-01

    Using a fast proton beam generated with an ultra intense laser we have generated and measured the equation of state of solid density plasma at temperatures near 20 eV, a regime in which there have been few previous experimental measurements. The laser accelerated a directional, short pulse of MeV protons, which isochorically heated a solid slab of aluminum. Using two simultaneous, temporally resolved measurements we observed the thermal emission and expansion of the heated foil with picosecond time resolution. With these data we were able to confirm, to within 10%, the SESAME equation-of-state table in this dense plasma region.

  7. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 7Li at 81 MeV versus that of 14N ions by 7Li at 80 and 110 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchik, A. T.; Rudchik, A. A.; Muravynets, L. M.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.; Piasecki, E.; Trzcińska, A.; Koshchy, E. I.; Pirnak, Val. M.; Ponkratenko, O. A.; Strojek, I.; Stolarz, A.; Herashchenko, O. V.; Stepanenko, Yu. M.; Plujko, V. A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.

    2017-02-01

    Angular distributions of the elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 7Li nuclei were measured at the energy Elab (15N) = 81 MeV (Ec.m. = 25.77 MeV). The data were analyzed within the coupled-reaction-channels method. The elastic and inelastic scattering, spin reorientations of 7Li as well as the more important one- and two-step transfer reactions were included in the channels-coupling scheme. The parameters of 7Li +15N optical potential of Woods-Saxon form as well as deformation parameters of these nuclei were deduced. The analysis showed that the forward angle elastic scattering is dominated by pure potential scattering whereas the middle and large angle scattering gets a contribution from the ground state reorientation of 7Li. Contributions from particle transfers were negligible for the present scattering system. The 7Li +15N elastic scattering was compared with that of 7Li +14N at the energies Elab (14N) = 80 MeV and 110 MeV. Different contributions to the elastic scatterings from other nuclear processes are shown to be responsible for the isotopic difference observed in the large angle scattering.

  8. Isotopic production cross sections in proton-nucleus collisions at 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Machner, H.; Aschman, D.G.; Steyn, D.; Baruth-Ram, K.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Cowley, A.A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Nangu, B.M.; Spoelstra, B.; Pilcher, J.V.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-04-15

    Intermediate-mass fragments from the interaction of {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 197}Au with 200-MeV protons were measured in an angular range from 20 deg. to 120 deg. in the laboratory system. The fragments, ranging from isotopes of helium up to isotopes of carbon, were isotopically resolved. Double-differential cross sections, energy-differential cross sections, and total cross sections were extracted.

  9. RF phase stability in the 100-MeV proton linac operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Kyung-Tae

    2015-02-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac of the Korea multi-purpose accelerator complex (KOMAC) has been operated to provide a proton beam to users. The 100-MeV linac consists of a 3-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator (RFQ), four 20-MeV drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks, two medium-energy beam-transmitter (MEBT) tanks, and seven 100-MeV DTL tanks. The requirements of the field stability are within ±1% in RF amplitude and ±1 degree in RF phase. The RF phase stability is influenced by a RF reference line, RF transmission lines, and a RF control system. The RF reference signal is chosen to be a 300-MHz local oscillator (LO) signal, and a rigid copper coaxial line with temperature control was installed for an RF reference distribution. A phase stability of ±0.1 degrees was measured under a temperature change of ±0.1 °C. A digital feedback control system with a field-programmable gate-array (FPGA) module was adopted for a high RF stability. The RF phase was maintained within ±0.1 degrees with a dummy cavity and was within ±0.3 degrees at RFQ operation. In the case of the 20-MeV DTL tanks, one klystron drives 4 tanks, and the input phases of 4 tanks were designed to be in phase. The input phases of 4 tanks were fixed within ±1 degree by adjusting a phase shifter in each waveguide.

  10. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun E-mail: koreasds@naver.com

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  11. Occurrence of brain tumors in rhesus monkeys exposed to 55-MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, D. H.; Yochmowitz, M. G.; Hardy, K. A.; Salmon, Y. L.

    Twenty-year observation of monkeys exposed to single doses of high energy protons simulating solar particles revealed that the most prevalent fatal cancers were brain tumors in the group of animals exposed to 55-MeV protons. Of 72 animals (50 males and 22 females) receiving 0.25 to 8.0 Gy total body surface dose, nine developed fatal tumors classified as grade IV astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme. The latent period for tumor development ranged from 14 months to 20 years, with a median of 5 years. Doses associated with the tumors were 4.0 to 8.0 Gy. Eight males and one female were affected. Depth-dose determinations suggest that the high incidence of cerebral neoplasia is associated with the Bragg Peak energy distribution of the 55-MeV protons. Comparison of the tumor incidence with that in humans with brain exposures incidental to radiotherapy indicates a high biological effectiveness compared with gamma radiation. Studies are in progress to attempt to replicate the results in rodents and establish a dose-response curve for proton-induced brain tumors.

  12. Single event upsets calculated from new ENDF/B-VI proton and neutron data up to 150 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Normand, E.

    1999-06-01

    Single-event upsets (SEU) in microelectronics are calculated from newly-developed silicon nuclear reaction recoil data that extend up to 150 MeV, for incident protons and neutrons. Calculated SEU cross sections are compared with measured data.

  13. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  14. Radiation effects induced in pin photodiodes by 40- and 85-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becher, J.; Kernell, R. L.; Reft, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    PIN photodiodes were bombarded with 40- and 85-MeV protons to a fluence of 1.5 x 10 to the 11th power p/sq cm, and the resulting change in spectral response in the near infrared was determined. The photocurrent, dark current and pulse amplitude were measured as a function of proton fluence. Changes in these three measured properties are discussed in terms of changes in the diode's spectral response, minority carrier diffusion length and depletion width. A simple model of induced radiation effects is presented which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The model assumes that incident protons produce charged defects within the depletion region simulating donor type impurities.

  15. Response of Cellulose detectors to different doses of 62 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, S. P.; Mishra, R.; Dwivedi, K. K.; Ghosh, S.; Fink, D.; Khathing, D. T.

    2003-08-01

    Optical and thermal responses of two cellulose detectors, Cellulose triacetate (Triafol-TN) and Cellulose acetate butyrate (Triafol-BN), to four different doses of 62 MeV protons were studied using spectroscopic, thermal and track-etching techniques. The spectroscopic analysis revealed that though the optical band-gap in the polymers was affected by proton irradiation, the polymers showed high resistance against any major structural modification by radiation. The thermal stability of the polymers was found to be affected by proton irradiation. The activation energy of etching was found to be almost constant for both the polymers even after irradiation. It is hoped that the findings in this work would be of significant relevance to material science and applications of polymers.

  16. New Capabilties of 800 MeV Proton Radiography at LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G. E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Rigg, P. A.; Rightley, P. M.; Mariam, F. G.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Tupa, D.

    2007-12-01

    Three new capabilities have recently been commissioned at the proton radiography [1] facility at Los Alamos. A powder gun driver system has been installed and commissioned and a series of demonstration measurements have been completed. This powder gun is now regularly used to drive dynamic experiments. A new CMOS hybrid camera technology has been developed and fielded resulting in dramatic improvements in quantum efficiency as well as providing eight additional radiographic images per dynamic event. A proton x3 magnifier was designed, built and commissioned to provide improved radiographic resolution for 800 MeV proton radiography experiments. Details of these new capabilities will be presented along with data from recent experiments which utilized these new capabilities.

  17. Bend-fatigue properties of 590 MeV proton irradiated JPCA and 316F SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Usami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Nishino, Y.; Kawai, M.; Dai, Y.

    2004-08-01

    A beam window of a spallation target will be subjected to proton/neutron irradiation, pressure wave and thermal stresses accompanied by high-energy proton beam injection. To obtain irradiation data, the SINQ target irradiation program (STIP) was initiated in 1996 at PSI. JAERI takes part in STIP and conducted the post-irradiation examination of JPCA, 316F. Irradiation conditions of JAERI specimens were as follows: proton energy was 590 MeV. Irradiation temperature ranged from 135 to 360 °C and irradiation dose from 6.3 to 12.5 dpa. The fatigue life of irradiated specimens is almost the same as that of unirradiated specimens. On the other hand, fracture surfaces varied with irradiation conditions. Specimens irradiated at low temperature fractured in a ductile manner. However, intergranular fractured surfaces were observed for 316F irradiated up to 12.5 dpa at 360 °C.

  18. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries for Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on Proton and Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Suman; Kuhn, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions encode information on the transverse motion of quarks and gluons inside the nucleon, and may help us understand their orbital angular momentum. The TMDs can be accessed from the target and double spin asymmetries of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) reactions, where the asymmetries, AUL and ALL are convolutions of the fragmentation functions and the TMDs. The EG1-DVCS experiment with CLAS at Jefferson Lab measured semi-inclusive pion production on longitudinally polarized proton and deuteron targets with polarized electrons of 6 GeV. We will show preliminary results on target single spin asymmetries and target-beam double spin asymmetries for these reactions.

  19. Multiplicity and transverse momentum fluctuations in inelastic proton-proton interactions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Andronov, E.; Antićić, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blümer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Cirković, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Deveaux, M.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Garibov, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Herve, A.; Hierholzer, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kisiel, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kowalik, K.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuich, M.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lewicki, M.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Manić, D.; Marcinek, A.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Morozov, S.; Mrówczyński, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Naskręt, M.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Pavin, M.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sarnecki, R.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seryakov, A.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Tefelska, A.; Tefelski, D.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and transverse momentum fluctuations of charged particles were performed in inelastic p+p interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80, and 158 { GeV }/c beam momentum. Results for the scaled variance of the multiplicity distribution and for three strongly intensive measures of multiplicity and transverse momentum fluctuations Δ [PT,N], Σ [PT,N] and Φ_{p_T} are presented. For the first time the results on fluctuations are fully corrected for experimental biases. The results on multiplicity and transverse momentum fluctuations significantly deviate from expectations for the independent particle production. They also depend on charges of selected hadrons. The string-resonance Monte Carlo models Epos and Ur qmd do not describe the data. The scaled variance of multiplicity fluctuations is significantly higher in inelastic p+p interactions than in central Pb+Pb collisions measured by NA49 at the same energy per nucleon. This is in qualitative disagreement with the predictions of the Wounded Nucleon Model. Within the statistical framework the enhanced multiplicity fluctuations in inelastic p+p interactions can be interpreted as due to event-by-event fluctuations of the fireball energy and/or volume.

  20. Cross sections and partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at En = 21.6 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Ramström, E; Trostell, B

    1990-09-01

    The Studsvik high-resolution, low-background time-of-flight facility has been used to measure differential neutron scattering cross sections for nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at a neutron energy of 21.6 MeV. Angular distributions in the range 10 degrees-160 degrees have been measured for both elastic and inelastic scattering from some low-lying levels in the three nuclei. Angle-integrated cross sections have been determined by fitting Legendre polynomial expansions to the differential data. Partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic scattering have been deduced from these fits. Analyses in terms of the spherical optical model and the distorted-wave Born approximation have provided information on potential parameters and deformations, which have been used to calculate cross sections and partial kerma factors. Comparisons have been made with other recent data sets and model predictions, as well as with the evaluated neutron data file ENDF/B-V.

  1. a Technique to Calibrate Neutron-Proton Elastic Scattering Spin Observables Near 183 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Theodore William

    Free neutron-proton scattering is one of the most fundamental reactions we can study in the field of nuclear physics, yet the n-p scattering data base is quite sparse. The data that does exist is often plagued by systematic uncertainties associated with the determination of beam and/or target polarizations. In contrast, there is an abundance of high quality, high statistics p-p elastic scattering data. We report on a technique which we have developed which exploits the high quality of the p-p data to calibrate n-p elastic scattering spin observables by simultaneous measurement of vec n-vec p and p-vec p elastic scattering by bombarding a polarized proton target with a mixed beam of polarized neutrons and protons. This technique has allowed us to calibrate the n-p elastic spin observables at 183 MeV: the beam and target analyzing powers A _{n}(theta_{p}),A _{p}(theta p), and the spin correlation coefficient, C_{NN}( theta_{p}). The mixed secondary beam was produced by bombarding a liquid deuterium target with a 200 MeV beam of polarized protons. The experiment was preformed in the Polarized Neutron Facility at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility utilizing a left-right symmetric detection system, sensitive to both scattered protons and neutrons, and spanned the laboratory angular range of 24^circ to 62^circ. We identified free scattering events through a number of kinematic correlations. We compare our results to various phase shift calculations and potential models and examine the sensitivity of magnitude of various phase shifts results to the inclusion of our data into the n-p data base.

  2. Cross sections from proton irradiation of thorium at 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Weidner, John W.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Fassbender, Michael E.; Jackman, Kevin; Couture, Aaron; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 65 nuclides produced from 800-MeV proton irradiation of thorium foils. These data are useful as benchmarks for computational predictions in the ongoing process of theoretical code development and also in the design of spallation-based radioisotope production currently being considered for multiple radiotherapeutic pharmaceutical agents. Measured data are compared with the predictions of three mcnp6 event generators and used to evaluate the potential for 800-MeV productions of radioisotopes of interest for medical radiotherapy. In only a few instances code predictions are discrepant from measured values by more than a factor of 2, demonstrating satisfactory predictive power across a large mass range. Similarly, agreement between measurements presented here and those previously reported is good, lending credibility to predictions of target yields and radioimpurities for high-energy accelerator-produced radionuclides.

  3. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  4. Elastic and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of {sup 58}Ni and {sup 90}Zr using 240-MeV {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Krishichayan; Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Tokimoto, Y.; Button, J.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2010-01-15

    Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {sup 6}Li particles from {sup 58}Ni and {sup 90}Zr were measured with the multipole-dipole-multipole spectrometer from 4 deg. <={theta}{sub c.m.}<=43 deg. The elastic scattering data were fitted with the double-folding model using the density-dependent M3Y NN effective interaction and with a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential. B(E2) and B(E3) values obtained for low-lying 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states with the double-folding calculations agreed with the adopted values.

  5. Cross Sections and Analyzing Powers of Nitrogen -15(PROTON, NEUTRON)OXYGEN-15 at 200 Mev and 494 Mev.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciskowski, Douglas Edward

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been measured for the ^{15} N(p,n)^{15}O(g.s.) reaction at bombarding energies of 200 MeV and 494 MeV. The 494 MeV data were obtained at the LAMPF Neutron Time-Of -Flight Facility on an 82 m flight path with a resolution of about 2.7 MeV. The 200 MeV data were obtained at IUCF on a 76 m flight path with a resolution of about 1.1 MeV. At both energies, the measured analyzing power is small, the magnitude is less than.2 for momentum transfers of less than 1 fm^{-1}. In contrast, both Relativistic and standard DWIA calculations predict a maximum of A = -.7 near q = 0.7 fm ^{-1}.

  6. An 800-MeV proton radiography facility for dynamic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, N. S. P.; Ables, E.; Adams, Ken; Alrick, K. R.; Amann, J. F.; Balzar, Stephen; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Crow, M. L.; Cushing, S. B.; Eddleman, J. C.; Fife, T. T.; Flores, Paul; Fujino, D.; Gallegos, R. A.; Gray, N. T.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hogan, G. E.; Holmes, V. H.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Knudsson, J. N.; London, R. K.; Lopez, R. R.; McDonald, T. E.; McClelland, J. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Morley, K. B.; Morris, C. L.; Naivar, F. J.; Parker, E. L.; Park, H. S.; Pazuchanics, P. D.; Pillai, C.; Riedel, C. M.; Sarracino, J. S.; Shelley, F. E., Jr.; Stacy, H. L.; Takala, B. E.; Thompson, Richard; Tucker, H. E.; Yates, G. J.; Ziock, H.-J.; Zumbro, J. D.

    1999-11-01

    The capability has successfully been developed at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) to utilize a spatially and temporally prepared 800 MeV proton beam to produce proton radiographs. A series of proton bursts are transmitted through a dynamic object and transported, via a unique magnetic lens system, to an image plane. The magnetic lens system permits correcting for the effects of multiple coulomb scattering which would otherwise completely blur the spatially transmitted information at the image plane. The proton radiographs are recorded either on a time integrating film plate or with a recently developed multi-frame electronic imaging camera system. The latter technique permits obtaining a time dependent series of proton radiographs with time intervals (modulo 358 ns) up to many microseconds and variable time intervals between images. One electronically shuttered, intensified, CCD camera is required per image. These cameras can detect single protons interacting with a scintillating fiber optic array in the image plane but also have a dynamic range which permits recording radiographs with better than 5% statistics for observation of detailed density variations in the object. A number of tests have been carried out to characterize the quality of the proton radiography system for absolute mass determination, resolution, and dynamic range. Initial dynamic experiments characterized the temporal and spatial behavior of shock propagation in a high explosive sample with up to six images per experiment. Based on experience with the prototype system, a number of upgrades are being implemented including the anticipated capability for enhanced mass discrimination through differential multiple coulomb scattering radiographs and more images with improved imaging techniques.

  7. Nuclear excitation functions from 40 to 200 MeV proton irradiation of terbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Parker, Lauren A.; Jackman, Kevin R.; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 26 radionuclides, measured with 40-200 MeV proton irradiations of terbium foils. These data provide the basis for the production of medically relevant radionuclides (e.g., 152Tb, 155Tb, 155Eu, and 156Eu) and 153Gd, a potential source used in ongoing efforts to characterize stellar nucleosynthesis routes. Computational predictions from the ALICE2011, CEM03.03, Bertini, and INCL + ABLA codes are compared with newly measured data to contribute to the ongoing process of code development, and yields are calculated for selected radionuclides using measured data.

  8. Phenomenological optical potential analysis of proton-carbon elastic scattering at 200 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Differential cross sections for 200 MeV protons elastically scattered from C-12 were analyzed utilizing a local, complex, spin-dependent optical potential with a harmonic well radial dependence. Analyses were performed using the WKB and eikonal approximations. For the latter, first-order corrections to he phase shifts were incorporated to account for the spin-orbit contribution. Large disagreement between theory and experiment was observed when the usual Thomas form for the spin-orbit potential was utilized. Substantial improvement was obtained by allowing the parameters in the central and spin-orbit potential terms to vary independently.

  9. Neutron-proton spin-correlation parameter A sub z z at 68 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hammans, M.; Brogli-Gysin, C.; Burzynski, S.; Campbell, J.; Haffter, P.; Henneck, R.; Lorenzon, W.; Pickar, M.A.; Sick, I. ); Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; van den Brandt, B. )

    1991-05-06

    We report a first measurement of the spin-correlation parameter {ital A}{sub {ital z}{ital z}} in neutron-proton scattering at 67.5 MeV. The results, obtained in the angular range 105{degree}{le}{theta}{sub c.m.}{le}170{degree} with typical accuracies of 0.008, are highly sensitive to the {sup 3}{ital S}{sub 1}-{sup 3}{ital D}{sub 1} mixing parameter {epsilon}{sub 1}. A phase-shift analysis based on the current world data yields a value of {epsilon}{sub 1} significantly higher than predicted by modern potential models.

  10. Parity nonconservation in proton-water scattering at 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, D.E.; Bowman, J.D.; Carlini, R.; Mischke, R.E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R.W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A.B.; Talaga, R.

    1982-01-01

    A search has been made for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an unpolarized water target. The result is for the longitudinal asymmetry, A/sub L/ = +(6.6 +- 3.2) x 10/sup -7/. Control runs with Pb, using a thickness which gave equivalent beam broadening from Coulomb multiple scattering, but a factor of ten less nuclear interactions than the water target, gave A/sub L/ = -(0.5 +- 6.0) x 10/sup -7/.

  11. Charged pions from the isotopes sup 58,64 Ni by 201 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, A.; Aiello, S.; Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Pappalardo, G.S. ); Bimbot, L. ); Reide, F. ); Willis, N.; Oeschler, H.

    1989-08-01

    Charged pion production induced by 201 MeV protons on {sup 58}Ni and {sup 64}Ni has been studied. The double differential cross sections have been measured over a wide angular range. Different behavior of the angular distribution is observed for low and high energy pions. The yield of positive pions shows a pronounced forward peaked component. The deduced total production yields are about the same for ({ital p},{pi}{sup +}) on both isotopes whereas that for {sup 64}Ni({ital p},{pi}{sup {minus}}) is twice as large as for {sup 58}Ni({ital p},{pi}{sup {minus}}).

  12. Parity Nonconservation in Proton-water Scattering at 800 MeV

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nagle, D. E.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; Mischke, R. E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A. B.; Talaga, R.

    1982-01-01

    A search has been made for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an unpolarized water target. The result is for the longitudinal asymmetry, A{sub L} = +(6.6 +- 3.2) x 10{sup -7}. Control runs with Pb, using a thickness which gave equivalent beam broadening from Coulomb multiple scattering, but a factor of ten less nuclear interactions than the water target, gave A{sub L} = -(0.5 +- 6.0) x 10{sup -7}.

  13. Gamma Strength Functions and Level Densities from 300 MeV Proton Scatttering at 0°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Neumann-Cosel, Peter; Bassauer, Sergej; Martin, Dirk

    The gamma strength function (GSF) as well as total level densities (LDs) in 208Pb and 96Mo were extracted from high-resolution forward angle inelastic proton scattering data taken at RCNP, Osaka, Japan, and compared to experimental results obtained with the Oslo method in order to test the validity of the Brink-Axel (BA) hypothesis in the energy region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The case of 208Pb is inconclusive because of strong fluctuations of the GSF due to the small level density in a doubly closed-shell nucleus. In 96Mo the data are consistent with the BA hypothesis. The good agreement of LDs provides an independent confirmation of the approach underlying the decomposition of GSF and LDs in Oslo-type experiments.

  14. Spallation yield of neutrons produced in thick lead target bombarded with 250 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Ma, F.; Zhanga, X. Y.; Ju, Y. Q.; Zhang, H. B.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, J. G.; Zhou, B.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, X. W.; Luo, P.; Yang, L.; Zhang, Y. B.; Li, J. Y.; Xu, J. K.; Liang, T. J.; Wang, S. L.; Yang, Y. W.; Gu, L.

    2015-01-01

    The neutron yield from thick target of Pb irradiated with 250 MeV protons has been studied experimentally. The neutron production was measured with the water-bath gold method. The thermal neutron distributions in the water were determined according to the measured activities of Au foils. Corresponding results calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were compared with the experimental data. It was found out that the Au foils with cadmium cover significantly changed the spacial distribution of the thermal neutron field. The corrected neutron yield was deduced to be 2.23 ± 0.19 n/proton by considering the influence of the Cd cover on the thermal neutron flux.

  15. Proton-Deuteron Break-Up Measurements with Bina at 135 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Biegun, A.; Gašparić, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Moeini, H.; Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Sworst, R.

    High-precision measurements of the proton-deuteron elastic and break-up reaction have been performed in the past at KVI and elsewhere with the aim to study three-nucleon force (3NF) effects. In the present work, we explored 3NF effects in the break-up scattering process by performing a measurement of vector analyzing powers and differential cross sections using a 135 MeV polarized-proton beam impinging on a liquid-deuterium target. For this study, we used a new experimental setup, Big Instrument for Nuclear-polarization Analysis, BINA, which covers almost the entire kinematical phase space of the break-up reaction. The results are interpreted with the help of state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations.

  16. Investigation of the Isospin Response of the (4) Helium Continuum Using the HELIUM-4(PROTON, Proton'x) Reaction at T(p) = 100 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raue, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    The principle of charge symmetry (CS) implies invariance of the strong interaction under 180 ^circ rotations in isospin space. The study of charge symmetric, proton and neutron decays from the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of ^4He (25<= E_{x}<= 35 MeV) is one way to probe the validity of CS. If CS is valid, then one would expect nearly equal charge -symmetric decay rates with small deviations due to the Coulomb interaction. An evaluation of photoabsorption measurements concluded that R_gamma= sigma(gamma,p)/sigma(gamma,n) was large indicating sizable isospin mixing in the ^4He GDR and suggested the possibility of a large CS violating component in the strong interaction. However, data used in that evaluation are in disagreement and recent experiments continue to give inconsistent values for R _gamma. Other experiments intended to provided complementary information are generally consistent with minimal isospin mixing in the ^4He GDR but questions have arisen regarding their ability to address the problem. This experiment addresses the issue of CS by measuring charge symmetric ^3H and ^3He decays of the ^4He continuum excited by proton inelastic scattering. The experiment was designed to reduce most of the systematic errors associated with Rgamma by detecting the ^4He^ star charge symmetric decay particles with the same apparatus. Angular correlation functions (ACF) have been measured concurrent with (p,p^ ') cross sections for proton scattering angles of theta_sp{p}{lab } = 24, 30 and 35^circ in order to identify the multipolarities excited by the reaction. A unique target/detector apparatus was developed to detect low-energy ions from ^4 He^star decay over a broad angle range. Analysis of the ^4He(p,p ^' t) ACF provides evidence that predominately Delta L = 1 transitions have been excited in the GDR region. This analysis cannot uniquely identify the J^pi of ^4He^star resonances. A fit to the ^4He( p,p^' t) integrated cross section using resonance lineshapes from a

  17. Experimental study of ion-beam self-pinched transport for MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, J.M.; Young, F.C.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Weber, B.V.

    1999-07-01

    A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV proton beam from a pinch-reflex ion diode on the Gamble II accelerator is used to test the concept of self-pinched ion transport. Self-pinched transport (SPT) uses the self-generated magnetic field from the ion beam to radially confine the ion beam. A proton beam is injected through a 3-cm radius aperture covered with a 2-{micro}m thick polycarbonate foil into a 10-cm radius transport region. The transport region is filled with helium at pressures of 30--250 mTorr, vacuum (10{sup {minus}4} Torr), or 1-Torr air. The beam is diagnosed with witness plates, multiple-pinhole-camera imaging onto radiochromic film, time- and space-resolved proton-scattering, and with prompt-{gamma} and nuclear-activation from LiF targets. Witness-plates and the multiple-pinhole-camera are used to determine the size, location, and uniformity of the beam at different distances from the injection aperture. A beam global divergence of 200 mrad is measured at 15 cm. At 50 cm, the beam fills the transport region. At 110 cm and 100- to 200-mTorr helium, there is evidence of beam filamentation. The measured increase in protons is consistent with the physical picture for SPT, and comparisons with IPROP simulations are in qualitative agreement with the measurements.

  18. Stochastic spatial energy deposition profiles for MeV protons and keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalagama, C.; Bettiol, A. A.; Watt, F.

    2009-12-01

    With the rapid advances being made in novel high-energy ion-beam techniques such as proton beam writing, single-ion-event effects, ion-beam-radiation therapy, ion-induced fluorescence imaging, proton/ion microscopy, and ion-induced electron imaging, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the spatial energy-deposition profiles of energetic ions as they penetrate matter. In this work we present the results of comprehensive yet straightforward event-by-event Monte Carlo calculations that simulate ion/electron propagation and secondary electron ( δ ray) generation to yield spatial energy-deposition data. These calculations combine SRIM/TRIM features, EEDL97 data and volume-plasmon-localization models with a modified version of one of the newer δ ray generation models, namely, the Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht. The development of the computer code DEEP (deposition of energy due to electrons and protons) offers a unique means of studying the energy-deposition/redistribution problem while still retaining the important stochastic nature inherent in these processes which cannot be achieved with analytical modeling. As an example of an application of DEEP we present results that compare the energy-deposition profiles of primary MeV protons and primary keV electrons in polymethymethacrylate. Such data are important when comparing proximity effects in the direct write lithography processes of proton-beam writing and electron-beam writing. Our calculations demonstrate that protons are able to maintain highly compact spatial energy-deposition profiles compared with electrons.

  19. Neutron production for 250 MeV protons bombarding on thick grain-made tungsten target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueying; Zhang, Yanbin; Ma, Fei; Ju, Yongqin; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Hongbin; Li, Yanyan; Wan, Bo; Wang, Jianguo; Ge, Honglin

    2015-08-01

    Neutron yield for 250 MeV protons incident on a tungsten target has been measured using the water bath method. The target was made of many randomly placed tungsten grains. Through analyzing the activity of Au foils, the neutron flux distribution in water was obtained. The neutrons slowing down process shows that the neutrons from tungsten have an average energy lower than neutrons from the lead target. The neutron yield was experimentally determined to be 2.02 ± 0.15 neutron/proton. Detailed simulation was also performed with the Geant4 toolkit. Comparison has been made with the experimentally derived neutron yield. It was found that, around 250 MeV, experimental results were described satisfactorily with a combination of high-energy spallation, low-energy neutron reaction and scattering. It was shown that the grain-packed target does not affect much the main neutronic properties, which are of crucial importance for the design of the spallation target.

  20. Inelastic cross sections, overlap functions and {C}_{q} moments from ISR to LHC energies in proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggio, P. C.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the energy dependence of the parton-parton inelastic cross sections, parton-parton inelastic overlap functions and the C q moments in proton interactions from \\sqrt{s}=10 to 14000 GeV. The approach we used is based on a phenomenological procedure where elastic and inelastic proton observables are described in a connected way by exploring the unitarity of the S-matrix. Applying a quantum-chromodynamics-inspired eikonal model, that contains contributions of the quark-quark, quark-gluon and gluon-gluon interactions, theoretical predictions on inelastic cross sections and C q moments are compared with measurements and show a successful description of the experimental data. The Koba-Nielson-Olesen hypothesis violation is discussed as a consequence of the semihard contribution to the multiparticle production in the interactions, in accordance with several experimental and theoretical previous results. A prediction of the ratio {σ }{{el}}/{σ }{{tot}} as a function of the collision energy is presented and also compared with the experimental information.

  1. A Monte Carlo Model for LET Spectra of 200 MeV Protons Used for Microelectronic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Culpepper, William X.

    2003-01-01

    The direct ionization Linear Energy Transfer (LET) for 200 MeV protons in silicon is much smaller than that for higher charged particles since LET increases as the square of the ion charge. However, occasionally the proton interacts with the silicon nuclei and produces a shower of fragments and a recoiling nucleus. When this happens, the LET produced is much greater than the direct ionization LET. Testing the single event effect susceptibility of components using energetic (200 MeV) protons is often the only viable option for system level testing commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) avionics that have not been designed for space environments. However, the question of how a system tested with protons will perform in a heavy ion environment arises. Here the concern is not only with prediction of on-orbit upset rate, but also about possibility of on-orbit failures that were not observed during proton testing.

  2. Two-particle correlations in azimuthal angle and pseudorapidity in inelastic p + p interactions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    DOE PAGES

    Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Andronov, E.; ...

    2017-01-30

    Results on two-particle ΔηΔΦ correlations in inelastic p + p interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80, and 158 GeV/c are presented. The measurements were performed using the large acceptance NA61/SHINE hadron spectrometer at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The data show structures which can be attributed mainly to effects of resonance decays, momentum conservation, and quantum statistics. Furthermore, the results are compared with the Epos and UrQMD models.

  3. Two-particle correlations in azimuthal angle and pseudorapidity in inelastic p + p interactions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Andronov, E.; Antićić, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Ćirković, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Damyanova, A.; Davis, N.; Dembinski, H.; Deveaux, M.; Diakonos, F.; Luise, S. Di; Dominik, W.; Dumarchez, J.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Garibov, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hervé, A. E.; Hierholzer, M.; Hylen, J.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Johnson, S. R.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kiełbowicz, M.; Kisiel, J.; Knezević, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalik, K.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuich, M.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lewicki, M.; Lundberg, B.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Manić, D.; Marchionni, A.; Marcinek, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Merzlaya, A.; Messerly, B.; Mills, G. B.; Morozov, S.; Mrówczyński, S.; Nagai, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Naskręt, M.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Ozvenchuk, V.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paolone, V.; Pavin, M.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rameika, R.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Wąs, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rumberger, B. T.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sarnecki, R.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seryakov, A.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tefelska, A.; Tefelski, D.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Walewski, M.; Wickremasinghe, A.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zwaska, R.

    2017-02-01

    Results on two-particle Δ η Δ φ correlations in inelastic p + p interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80, and 158 GeV/c are presented. The measurements were performed using the large acceptance NA61/SHINE hadron spectrometer at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The data show structures which can be attributed mainly to effects of resonance decays, momentum conservation, and quantum statistics. The results are compared with the Epos and UrQMD models.

  4. Independent isotopic yields in 25 MeV and 50 MeV proton-induced fission of natU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, H.; Gorelov, D.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Parkkonen, J.; Peräjärvi, K.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Simutkin, V.; Sonoda, T.; Weber, C.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-04-01

    Independent isotopic yields for elements from Zn to La in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were determined with the JYFLTRAP facility. In addition, isotopic yields for Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pd and Xe in the 50 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were measured. The deduced isotopic yield distributions are compared with a Rubchenya model, the GEF model with universal parameters and the semi-empirical Wahl model. Of these, the Rubchenya model gives the best overall agreement with the obtained data. Combining the isotopic yield data with mass yield data to obtain the absolute independent yields was attempted. The result depends on the mass yield distribution.

  5. Visualization experiment of 30 MeV proton beam irradiated water target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwan Hong, Bong; Gun Yang, Tea; Su Jung, In; Soo Park, Yeun; Hee Cho, Hyung

    2011-11-01

    The nucleate boiling phenomena in a water target irradiated by 30 MeV proton beam were visualized experimentally. The beam size was 10 mm in diameter and beam current of 10, 15 and 20 μA were used, respectively. A target cavity of 4.5 cc in volume was filled with distilled water without atmosphere. A CMOS camera is used to record the phenomena through a side window. The temperature and pressure were measured during experiments. The depth of the Bragg peak was indicated by the blue light emission of the proton beam in the water target. In the case of 10 μA beam intensity, there was no visible phase change but fluxes by convection was observed at the Bragg peak and near the foil surface region. At 15 μA beam intensity, steam bubbles were generated by homogenous nuclear boiling at the Bragg peak and corrupted by cavitation at the upper region. The steam bubble generation point can be indicated by the blue light emission, which can show us the position of the Bragg peak. At 20 μΑ beam intensity, the steam bubbles were generated at Bragg peak and near the foil surface. The homogenous nucleate boiling at the Bragg peak was dominant and the heterogeneous nucleate boiling near the foil surface took place, occasionally. The cavitation of the steam bubble was also observed in the upper region within the target. The penetration depth of the proton beam was change along with the steam bubble formation. The blue light emission of the proton beam in water shows that the penetration depth of the proton beam becomes deeper when vapor bubbles are generated.

  6. Formation of hydrogen atom in 2s state in proton-sodium inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, A. Elkilany

    2015-03-01

    The inelastic collision of protons with sodium atoms are treated for the first time within the framework of the coupled-static and frozen core approximations. The method is used for calculating partial and total cross-sections with the assumption that only two channels (elastic and hydrogen formation in 2s state) are open. In each case, the calculations are carried out for seven values of the total angular momentum ℓ(0 ≤ ℓ ≤ 6). The target is described using the Clementi Roetti wave functions within the framework of the one valence electron model. We use Lipmann-Swinger equation to solve the derived equations of the problem, then apply an iterative numerical method to obtain the code of computer to calculate iterative partial cross-sections. This can be done through calculating the reactance matrix at different values of considered energies to obtain the transition matrix that gives partial and total cross sections. The present results for total hydrogen (2s state) formation cross sections are in agreement with results of other available ones in wide range of incident energy.

  7. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Measurement of the Inelastic Proton-Proton Cross Section at sqrt[s]=13  TeV with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC.

    PubMed

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    2016-10-28

    This Letter presents a measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section using 60  μb^{-1} of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy sqrt[s] of 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Inelastic interactions are selected using rings of plastic scintillators in the forward region (2.07<|η|<3.86) of the detector. A cross section of 68.1±1.4  mb is measured in the fiducial region ξ=M_{X}^{2}/s>10^{-6}, where M_{X} is the larger invariant mass of the two hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. In this ξ range the scintillators are highly efficient. For diffractive events this corresponds to cases where at least one proton dissociates to a system with M_{X}>13  GeV. The measured cross section is compared with a range of theoretical predictions. When extrapolated to the full phase space, a cross section of 78.1±2.9  mb is measured, consistent with the inelastic cross section increasing with center-of-mass energy.

  9. Measurement of the Inelastic Proton-Proton Cross Section at √{s }=13 TeV with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Monden, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muškinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero Y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales de Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section using 60 μb -1 of p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy √{s } of 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Inelastic interactions are selected using rings of plastic scintillators in the forward region (2.07 <|η |<3.86 ) of the detector. A cross section of 68.1 ±1.4 mb is measured in the fiducial region ξ =MX2/s >10-6, where MX is the larger invariant mass of the two hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. In this ξ range the scintillators are highly efficient. For diffractive events this corresponds to cases where at least one proton dissociates to a system with MX>13 GeV . The measured cross section is compared with a range of theoretical predictions. When extrapolated to the full phase space, a cross section of 78.1 ±2.9 mb is measured, consistent with the inelastic cross section increasing with center-of-mass energy.

  10. Radiation effects on silicon bipolar transistors caused by 3-10 MeV protons and 20-60 MeV bromine ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingji; Geng, Hongbin; Lan, Mujie; Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu

    2010-03-01

    The current gain degradation in silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) was examined under irradiation with 3-10 MeV protons and 20-60 MeV bromine (Br) ions with various dose levels. To characterize the radiation damage of the NPN BJTs, the ionizing dose D i and displacement dose D d as a function of chip depth in the NPN BJTs were calculated for both the protons and Br ions with different energies. Based on the irradiation testing and calculated results, it is shown that the current gain degradation of NPN BJTs is sensitive to the ratio of D d/( D d+ D i) in the sensitive region given by protons and Br ions. The irradiation particles (protons and Br ions), which give larger D d/( D d+ D i) at a given total dose, would generate more severe damage to the NPN BJTs. The reciprocal of the gain variation as a function of the displacement dose was compared, showing that the Messenger-Spratt equation becomes relevant to describe the experimental data, when the ratio of the D d/( D d+ D i) are larger and the displacement dose are higher than a certain value.

  11. Near realtime forecasting of MeV protons on the basis of sub relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrenz, Johannes; Heber, Bernd; Kuehl, Patrick; Sarlanis, Christos; Malandraki, Olga; Posner, Arik

    2016-04-01

    A major impact on human and robotic space exploration activities is the sudden and prompt occurrence of solar energetic ion events. In order to provide up to an hour warning before these particles arrive at Earth, relativistic electron and below 50 MeV proton data from the Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN) on SOHO were used to implement the 'Relativistic Electron Alert System for Exploration (REleASE)'. It has been demonstrated that the analysis of relativistic electron time profiles provides a low miss and false alarm rate. High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis (HESPERIA) is a project funded within the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (PROTEC-1-2014 Call: Space Weather). Within this project the REleASE forecasting scheme was rewritten in the open access programming language PYTHON and will be made public. As a next step, we have analyzed the possibility to also use, along with relativistic electrons (v > 0.9 c) provided by SOHO, near-relativistic (v <0.8 c) electron measurements from other instruments like the Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). This would prove to be particularly useful during periods that SOHO does not provide continuous near real-time data. We show that the ACE/EPAM observations can be adapted to the REleASE forecasting scheme to provide reliable SEP forecasts. A comparison of measured and forecast proton intensities by SOHO/EPHIN and ACE/EPAM will be presented. In addition we investigated the false alarm rate and detection probability of solar ion events. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  12. Mutation effect of MeV protons on bioflocculant bacteria Bacillus cereus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. N.; Ren, N.; Xue, J. M.; Yang, J.; Rong, B. L.

    2007-09-01

    A 3.2 MeV proton beam was used to irradiate bioflocculant bacteria (Bacillus cereus) to achieve mutation. The ion fluence ranged from 1011 to 1014/cm2. Most of the bacteria were killed when the ion fluence reached 1012 ions/cm2. The survival ratio drops in an exponential way on further increasing the ion fluence. The flocculating activity of 7 samples out of 51 showed a positive change, and a perfect mutant C7-23 with a stable high capacity of bioflocculant production was found. RAPD measurements showed that a new lane appears in this sample. The flocculating activity of the C7-23 bacteria increased by factors of 22%, 54% and 217% under pH values of 4, 7 or 10, respectively.

  13. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  14. Study of the radioactivity induced in air by a 15-MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Braccini, S; Ereditato, A; Nesteruk, K P; Scampoli, P; Zihlmann, K

    2015-02-01

    Radioactivity induced by a 15-MeV proton beam extracted into air was studied at the beam transport line of the 18-MeV cyclotron at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). The produced radioactivity was calculated and measured by means of proportional counters located at the main exhaust of the laboratory. These devices were designed for precise assessment of air contamination for radiation protection purposes. The main produced isotopes were (11)C, (13)N and (14)O. Both measurements and calculations correspond to two different irradiation conditions. In the former, protons were allowed to travel for their full range in air. In the latter, they were stopped at the distance of 1.5 m by a beam dump. Radioactivity was measured continuously in the exhausted air starting from 2 min after the end of irradiation. For this reason, the short-lived (14)O isotope gave a negligible contribution to the measured activity. Good agreement was found between the measurements and the calculations within the estimated uncertainties. Currents in the range of 120-370 nA were extracted in air for 10-30 s producing activities of 9-22 MBq of (11)C and (13)N. The total activities for (11)C and (13)N per beam current and irradiation time for the former and the latter irradiation conditions were measured to be (3.60 ± 0.48) × 10(-3) MBq (nA s)(-1) and (2.89 ± 0.37) × 10(-3) MBq (nA s)(-1), respectively.

  15. Interlock system for machine protection of the KOMAC 100-MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Gi

    2015-02-01

    The 100-MeV proton linear accelerator of the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) has been developed. The beam service started this year after performing the beam commissioning. If the very sensitive and essential equipment is to be protected during machine operation, a machine interlock system is required, and the interlock system has been implemented. The purpose of the interlock system is to shut off the beam when the radio-frequency (RF) and ion source are unstable or a beam loss occurs. The interlock signal of the KOMAC linac includes a variety of sources, such as the beam loss, RF and high-voltage converter modulator faults, and fast closing valves of the vacuum window at the beam lines and so on. This system consists of a hardware-based interlock system using analog circuits and a software-based interlock system using an industrial programmable logic controller (PLC). The hardware-based interlock system has been fabricated, and the requirement has been satisfied with the results being within 10 µs. The software logic interlock system using the PLC has been connected to the framework of with the experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS) to integrate a variety of interlock signals and to control the machine components when an interlock occurs. This paper will describe the design and the construction of the machine interlock system for the KOMAC 100-MeV linac.

  16. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  17. Proton-proton correlations at small relative momentum in neon-nucleus collisions at E/A=400 and 800 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupieux, P.; Alard, J. P.; Augerat, J.; Babinet, R.; Bastid, N.; Brochard, F.; Charmensat, P.; De Marco, N.; Fanet, H.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Girard, J.; Gorodetzky, P.; Gosset, J.; Laspalles, C.; Lemaire, M. C.; L'Hote, D.; Lucas, B.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M. J.; Poitou, J.; Qassoud, D.; Racca, C.; Schimmerling, W.

    1988-01-01

    Proton-proton small angle correlations have been measured in neon-nucleus collisions, using the 4 pi detector Diogene, at 400 and 800 MeV per nucleon incident energies. Values of the size of the emitting region are obtained by comparison with the Koonin formula, taking into account the biases of the apparatus. The dependence of the density on target mass and incident energy is also analysed.

  18. Proton-proton correlations at small relative momentum in neon-nucleus collisions at E/A=400 and 800 MeV.

    PubMed

    Dupieux, P; Alard, J P; Augerat, J; Babinet, R; Bastid, N; Brochard, F; Charmensat, P; De Marco, N; Fanet, H; Fodor, Z; Fraysse, L; Girard, J; Gorodetzky, P; Gosset, J; Laspalles, C; Lemaire, M C; L'Hôte, D; Lucas, B; Marroncle, J; Montarou, G; Parizet, M J; Poitou, J; Qassoud, D; Racca, C; Schimmerling, W

    1988-01-07

    Proton-proton small angle correlations have been measured in neon-nucleus collisions, using the 4 pi detector Diogene, at 400 and 800 MeV per nucleon incident energies. Values of the size of the emitting region are obtained by comparison with the Koonin formula, taking into account the biases of the apparatus. The dependence of the density on target mass and incident energy is also analysed.

  19. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25meV resolution at the Cu K -edge

    SciTech Connect

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank-Uwe; Wille, Hans-Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-06-27

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the CuK-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25meV (FWHM) at 8981eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  20. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {sup 6}Li ions from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 48}Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krishichayan,; Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Button, J.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2010-04-15

    Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {sup 6}Li particles from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 48}Ca were measured with the multipole-dipole-multipole spectrometer from 4 deg. <=theta{sub c.m.}<=40 deg. Optical potential parameters were obtained by fitting the elastic-scattering data with the double-folding model using the density-dependent M3Y NN effective interaction and B(E2) and B(E3) values obtained for low-lying 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states agreed with the adopted values. The results are compared with those obtained using potentials derived from the systematics of potentials previously obtained for {sup 24}Mg, {sup 28}Si, {sup 58}Ni, and {sup 90}Zr. Cross sections for excitation of giant resonances were also calculated with the potentials obtained.

  1. Dynamic Pressure of Liquid Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl. D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    2000-02-01

    Described here are efforts to diagnose transient pressures generated by a short-pulse (about 0.5 microseconds) high intensity proton ({approximately} 2 * 10 14 per pulse) beam. Proton energy is 800-MeV. The tests were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR). Such capability is required for understanding target interaction for the Spallation Neutron Source project as described previously at this conference.1-4 The main approach to effect the pressure measurements utilized the deflection of a diaphragm in intimate contact with the mercury. There are a wide variety of diaphragm-deflection methods used in scientific and industrial applications. Many deflection-sensing approaches are typically used, including, for instance, capacitive and optical fiber techniques. It was found, however, that conventional pressure measurement using commercial pressure gages with electrical leads was not possible due to the intense nuclear radiation enviro nment. Earlier work with a fiber optic strain gauge demonstrated the viability of using fiber optics for this environment.

  2. Production of radionuclides in artificial meteorites irradiated isotropically with 600 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, R.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.; Herpers, U.

    1986-01-01

    The understanding of the production of cosmogenic nuclides in small meteorites (R is less than 40 cm) still is not satisfactory. The existing models for the calculation of depth dependent production rates do not distinguish between the different types of nucleons reacting in a meteorite. They rather use general depth dependent particle fluxes to which cross sections have to be adjusted to fit the measured radionuclide concentrations. Some of these models can not even be extended to zero meteorite sizes without logical contradictions. Therefore, a series of three thick target irradiations was started at the 600 MeV proton beam of the CERN isochronuous cyclotron in order to study the interactions of small stony meteorites with galactic protons. The homogeneous 4 pi irradiation technique used provides a realistic meteorite model which allows a direct comparison of the measured depth profiles with those in real meteorites. Moreover, by the simultaneous measurement of thin target production cross sections one can differentiate between the contributions of primary and secondary nucleons over the entire volume of the artificial meteorite.

  3. Shielding variation effects for 250 MeV protons on tissue targets.

    PubMed

    Brandl, A; Hranitzky, C; Rollet, S

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides results of computer simulation studies with the goal to analyse issues regarding radiation protection for personnel, patients and third persons involved in hadron therapy treatment. The treatment room and the patient are modelled by simple cylindrical geometries at incident proton energies of 250 MeV. Monte Carlo simulations of the energy and angular dependence of proton, neutron and photon radiation fields and resulting ambient dose equivalent distributions outside the shielding walls are performed. In order to investigate systematic uncertainties due to the shielding materials and inherent to the computer models, various concrete compositions, densities and water contents are modelled, and the influence of simulation parameters on the results obtained is determined. Generally, good agreement is found between results provided by MCNPX and FLUKA computer codes. Variations in neutron ambient dose attenuation from -50 to +/-30% are found due to varying concrete composition. Changes in the water content of the concrete in the order of 8% may cause variations up to 20%.

  4. Measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross-section at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    2011-09-06

    The dependence of the rate of proton-proton interactions on the centre-of-mass collision energy, √s, is of fundamental importance for both hadron collider physics and particle astrophysics. The dependence cannot yet be calculated from first principles; therefore, experimental measurements are needed. Here we present the first measurement of the inelastic proton-proton interaction cross-section at a centre-of-mass energy, √s, of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected by requiring hits on scintillation counters mounted in the forward region of the detector. An inelastic cross-section of 60.3 ± 2.1 mb is measured for ξ > 5×10⁻⁶, where ξ is calculated from the invariant mass, M(X), of hadrons selected using the largest rapidity gap in the event. For diffractive events, this corresponds to requiring at least one of the dissociation masses to be larger than 15.7 GeV.

  5. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, F. D.; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J. C.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sloan, T.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2012-10-01

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt{s}=318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6 % for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5< Q 2<200 GeV2 in photon virtuality, 0.00035 < {x_{{P}}}< 0.09 in proton fractional momentum loss, 0.09<| t|<0.55 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 0.0018< β<0.816 in β=x/{x_{{P}}}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable.

  6. Study on strontium isotope abundance-ratio measurements by using a 13-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Rb-Sr dating method is used in dating Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. This method measures the 87Rb and the 87Sr concentrations by using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) [J. Hefne et al., Inter. J. Phys. Sci. 3(1), 28 (2008)]. In addition, it calculates the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio to increase the reliability of Rb-Sr dating. In this study, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was measured by using a 13-MeV proton accelerator. Proton kinetic energies are in the range of tens of megaelectronvolts, and protons have large absorption cross-sections for ( p, n) reactions with most substances. After absorbing a proton with such a high kinetic energy, an element is converted into a nuclide with its atomic number increased by one via nuclear transmutation. These nuclides usually have short half-lives and return to the original state through radioactive decay. When a strontium sample is irradiated with protons, nuclear transmutation occurs; thus, the strontium isotope present in the sample changes to a yttrium isotope, which is an activated radioisotope. Based on this, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was calculated by analyzing the gamma-rays emitted by each yttrium isotope. The KIRAMS-13 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Center of Chosun University, where 13-MeV protons can be extracted, was utilized in our experiment. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio was computed for samples irradiated with these protons, and the result was similar to the isotope ratio for the Standard Reference Material, i.e., 98.2 ± 3.4%. As part of the analysis, proton activation analyses were performed using 13-MeV protons, and the experimental results of this research suggest a possible approach for measuring the strontium-isotope abundance ratio of samples.

  7. Injection of electrons and protons with energies of tens of MeV into L less than 3 on 24 March 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, J. B.; Kolasinski, W. A.; Fillius, R. W.; Mullen, E. G.

    1992-01-01

    On 24 March 1991 instrumentation aboard CRRES observed the almost instantaneous injection of electrons and protons with energies above 15 MeV into the L-region in the range 2-3. The energy spectrum of the injected electrons, a power law (E exp -6) peaked at 15 MeV and continued to at least 50 MeV.

  8. γ strength function and level density of 208Pb from forward-angle proton scattering at 295 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassauer, S.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Tamii, A.

    2016-11-01

    Background: γ strength functions (GSFs) and level densities (LDs) are essential ingredients of statistical nuclear reaction theory with many applications in astrophysics, reactor design, and waste transmutation. Purpose: The aim of the present work is a test of systematic parametrizations of the GSF recommended by the RIPL-3 database for the case of 208Pb. The upward GSF and LD in 208Pb are compared to γ decay data from an Oslo-type experiment to examine the validity of the Brink-Axel (BA) hypothesis. Methods: The E 1 and M1 parts of the total GSF are determined from high-resolution forward angle inelastic proton scattering data taken at 295 MeV at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka, Japan. The total LD in 208Pb is derived from the 1- LD extracted with a fluctuation analysis in the energy region of the isovector giant dipole resonance. Results: The E 1 GSF is compared to parametrizations recommended by the RIPL-3 database showing systematic deficiencies of all models in the energy region around neutron threshold. The new data for the poorly known spin-flip M 1 resonance call for a substantial revision of the model suggested in RIPL-3. The total GSF derived from the present data is larger in the PDR energy region than the Oslo data but the strong fluctuations due to the low LD resulting from the double shell closure of 208Pb prevent a conclusion on a possible violation of the BA hypothesis. Using the parameters suggested by RIPL-3 for a description of the LD in 208Pb with the back-shifted Fermi gas model, remarkable agreement between the two experiments spanning a wide excitation energy range is obtained. Conclusions: Systematic parametrizations of the E 1 and M 1 GSF parts need to be reconsidered at low excitation energies. The good agreement of the LD provides an independent confirmation of the approach underlying the decomposition of GSF and LD in Oslo-type experiments.

  9. COPPER-64 Production Studies with Natural Zinc Targets at Deuteron Energy up to 19 Mev and Proton Energy from 141 Down to 31 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonardi, Mauro L.; Birattari, Claudio; Groppi, Flavia; Song Mainard, Hae; Zhuikov, Boris L.; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M.; Lapshina, Elena V.; Mebel, Michail V.; Menapace, Enzo

    2004-07-01

    High specific activity no-carrier-added 64Cu is a β-/β+ emitting radionuclide of increasing interest for PET imaging, as well as systemic and targeted radioimmunotherapy of tumors. Its peculiarity of intense Auger emitter is still under investigation. The cross-sections for production of 64Cu from Zn target of natural isotopic composition were measured in the deuteron energy range from threshold up to 19 MeV and proton energy range from 141 down to 31 MeV. The stacked-foil technique was used at both K=38 cyclotron of JRC-Ispra of CEC, Italy and 160 MeV intersection point of INR proton-LINAC in Troitsk, Russia. Several Ga, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, V, Fe and Mn radionuclides were detected in Zn targets at the EOB. Optimized irradiation conditions are reported as a function of deuteron energy and energy loss into the Zn target, as well as target irradiation time and cooling time after radiochemistry. The activity of n.c.a. 64Cu was measured through its only γ emission of 1346 keV (i.e. 0.473 % intensity) both by instrumental and radiochemical methods, due to the non-specificity of annihilation radiation at 511 keV. To this last purpose, it was necessary to carry out a selective radiochemical separation of GaIII radionuclides by liquid/liquid extraction from the bulk of irradiated Zn targets and other spallation products, which remained in the 7 M HCl aqueous phase. Anion exchange chromatography tests had been carried out to separate the 64Cu from all others radionuclides in n.c.a. form. Theoretical calculations of cross-sections were performed with codes EMPIRE II and PENELOPE for deuteron reactions and CEF model and HMS-ALICE hybrid model for proton reactions. The theoretical results are presented and compared with the experimental values.

  10. Short term prediction of E greater than or equal to 10 MeV proton fluxes from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Both the anisotropic and isotropic diffusion theories can be used to extrapolate proton fluxes for E greater than or equal to 10 meV for over 50% of the particle events. The isotropic diffusion theory uses a diffusion coefficient: D = Mr sup beta. It was found that M and beta tended to be functions of flare position on the solar disk. A measurement of the interplanetary flux in near earth space gives a good indication of the polar cap fluxes. It was found that the 30 MHz absorption over the poles during a PCA is proportional to the square root of the integral proton flux E greater than or equal to 11 meV in interplanetary space, J = KA squared, with K = 8 plus or minus 2 and J in protons/sq cm-sec-ster.

  11. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  12. Measurement of the displacement cross-section of copper irradiated with 125 MeV protons at 12 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Makoto; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Uesugi, Tomonori; Ishi, Yoshihiro; Xu, Qiu; Yashima, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Mori, Yoshiharu; Ogitsu, Toru

    2015-03-01

    To validate Monte Carlo codes for the prediction of radiation damage in metals irradiated by >100 MeV protons, the defect-induced electrical resistivity changes related to the displacement cross-section of copper were measured with 125 MeV proton irradiation at 12 K. The cryogenic irradiation system was developed with a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to cool the sample via an oxygen-free high-conductivity copper plate by conduction cooling. The sample was a copper wire with a 250-μm diameter and 99.999% purity sandwiched between two aluminum nitride ceramic sheets. The electrical resistivity changes of the copper wire were measured using the four-probe technique. After 125 MeV proton irradiation with 1.45 × 1018 protons/m2 at 12 K, the total resistivity increase was 4.94 × 10-13 Ω m (resistance increase: 1.53 μΩ), while the resistivity of copper before irradiation was 9.44 × 10-12 Ω m (resistance: 29.41 μΩ). The resistivity increase did not change during annealing after irradiation below 15 K. The experimental displacement cross-section for 125 MeV irradiation shows similar results to the experimental data for 1.1 and 1.94 GeV. Comparison with the calculated results indicated that the defect production efficiency in Monte Carlo codes gives a good quantitative description of the displacement cross-section in the energy region >100 MeV.

  13. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  14. The corrosion of materials in water irradiated by 800 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, R. S.; Pile, D. L.; Butt, D. P.

    2000-02-01

    A method for measuring the real-time corrosion rates for Alloy 718, stainless steels (SS) 304L and 316L nuclear grade (NG), aluminum alloys 5052 (Al5052) and 6061 (Al6061), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W) in two separate water systems that were irradiated by 800 MeV protons is presented. The first water system was fabricated entirely of 304 SS, thoroughly cleaned before operation, and employed hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to mitigate the formation of some of the radiolysis products. The samples were adequately shielded from the irradiation cavity such that only the effects of water chemistry were investigated. Over the course of that irradiation period the corrosion rates for 304L SS, 316L-NG SS, Alloy 718, and Ta were less than 0.12 μm/yr. For Al6061 and Al5052, the corrosion rates were of the order of 0.50-2.0 μm/yr. The corrosion rate of W was relatively high between 5.0 and 30 μm/yr. The second water system, fabricated from copper piping and steel components, was not cleaned prior to operation, and employed no HWC. In comparison to the other system, the corrosion rates in the copper/steel system were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher. These results are discussed in terms of water radiolysis and water impurity levels.

  15. Commissioning of a compact laser-based proton beam line for high intensity bunches around 10Â MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Kroll, F.; Blažević, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Roth, M.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the first results of experiments with a new laser-based proton beam line at the GSI accelerator facility in Darmstadt. It delivers high current bunches at proton energies around 9.6 MeV, containing more than 109 particles in less than 10 ns and with tunable energy spread down to 2.7% (ΔE/E0 at FWHM). A target normal sheath acceleration stage serves as a proton source and a pulsed solenoid provides for beam collimation and energy selection. Finally a synchronous radio frequency (rf) field is applied via a rf cavity for energy compression at a synchronous phase of -90 deg. The proton bunch is characterized at the end of the very compact beam line, only 3 m behind the laser matter interaction point, which defines the particle source.

  16. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  17. Injection and diffusive transport of suprathermal through energetic solar flare protons (35 keV to 20 MeV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeck, J.; Mason, G. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the injection and interplanetary propagation of low-energy protons caused by the solar particle event of July 20, 1981, in which flare protons in the range from 35 keV to 20 MeV were observed by instruments on ISEE 3. The observed time-intensity and time-anisotropy profiles were fitted over the entire energy range using a model based on the spherically symmetric Fokker-Plank equation, including convection, diffusion, and adiabatic deceleration. The results are used to discuss the behavior of the radial interplanetary diffusion coefficient and the scattering mean free path for protons. Also, evidence is found for diffusive coronal shock acceleration of protons during the event.

  18. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-15

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  19. Folding model analysis of 240 MeV {sup 6}Li elastic scattering on {sup 116}Sn and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of {sup 116}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; Tokimoto, Y.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2007-11-15

    Elastic scattering of 240 MeV {sup 6}Li ions from {sup 116}Sn was measured from 4 deg.{<=}{theta}{sub c.m.}{<=}32 deg. The data were fitted with a Woods-Saxon phenomenological potential and with double folding models using the M3Y NN effective interaction with and without density dependence. DWBA calculations with the fitted parameters were used to calculate cross sections for inelastic scattering to low-lying 2{sup +}and 3{sup -} states. B(E2) and B(E3) values were extracted and compared with electromagnetic values and those obtained from {alpha} inelastic scattering.

  20. Development of a gaseous proton-recoil detector for fission cross section measurements below 1 MeV neutron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2016-03-01

    The elastic H(n,p) reaction is sometimes used to measure neutron flux, in order to produce high precision measurements. The use of this technique is not straightforward to use below incident neutron energy of 1 MeV, due to a high background in the detected proton spectrum. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to investigate such background and determine its origin and components. Based on these investigations, a gaseous proton-recoil detector has been designed, with a reduced low energy background.

  1. 225Ac and 223Ra production via 800 MeV proton irradiation of natural thorium targets.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Ballard, B; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Fassbender, M E; Goff, G S; Gritzo, R; Hemez, F M; Runde, W; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for the formation of (225,227)Ac, (223,225)Ra, and (227)Th via the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at a nominal proton energy of 800 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data for the production of (223,225)Ra, (227)Ac and (227)Th by this method were found in the literature. A comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows agreement within a factor of two. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra is a viable production method.

  2. Routine production of copper-64 using 11.7MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, C. M.; Smith, S. V.; Asad, A. H.; Chan, S.; Price, R. I.

    2012-12-19

    Reliable production of copper-64 ({sup 64}Cu) was achieved by irradiating enriched nickel-64 ({sup 64}Ni, >94.8%) in an IBA 18/9 cyclotron. Nickel-64 (19.1 {+-} 3.0 mg) was electroplated onto an Au disc (125{mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15mm). Targets were irradiated with 11.7 MeV protons for 2 hours at 40{mu}A. Copper isotopes ({sup 60,61,62,64}Cu) were separated from target nickel and cobalt isotopes ({sup 55,57,61}Co) using a single ion exchange column, eluted with varying concentration of low HCl alcohol solutions. The {sup 64}Ni target material was recovered and reused. The {sup 64}Cu production rate was 1.46{+-}0.3MBq/{mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni(n = 10) (with a maximum of 2.6GBq of {sup 64}Cu isolated after 2hr irradiation at 40uA. Radionuclidic purity of the {sup 64}Cu was 98.7 {+-} 1.6 % at end of separation. Cu content was < 6mg/L (n = 21). The specific activity of {sup 64}Cu was determined by ICP-MS and by titration with Diamsar to be 28.9{+-}13.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.70{+-}0.35Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n = 10) and 13.1{+-}12.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.35{+-}0.32Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n 9), respectively; which are in agreement, however, further work is required.

  3. Response functions of Fuji imaging plates to monoenergetic protons in the energy range 0.6-3.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, T.; Denis-Petit, D.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Aleonard, M. M.

    2013-01-15

    We have measured the responses of Fuji MS, SR, and TR imaging plates (IPs) to protons with energies ranging from 0.6 to 3.2 MeV. Monoenergetic protons were produced with the 3.5 MV AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires de Faisceaux d'Ions en Region Aquitaine) accelerator at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). The IPs were irradiated with protons backscattered off a tantalum target. We present the photo-stimulated luminescence response of the IPs together with the fading measurements for these IPs. A method is applied to allow correction of fading effects for variable proton irradiation duration. Using the IP fading corrections, a model of the IP response function to protons was developed. The model enables extrapolation of the IP response to protons up to proton energies of 10 MeV. Our work is finally compared to previous works conducted on Fuji TR IP response to protons.

  4. Inelastic scattering of polarized protons and a possible hexadecapole-shape transition between the light /sup 74,76,78/Se and the heavy /sup 80,82/Se isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuki, S.; Higo, T.; Ohsawa, T.; Shiba, T.; Yanabu, Y.; Ogino, K.; Kadota, Y.; Haga, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Kume, K.; Matoba, M.

    1983-11-07

    The ground-state band up to the 4/sup +/ state in the even /sup 74approximately82/Se isotopes was studied by inelastic scattering of polarized protons at 65 MeV. Both the cross-section sigma(theta) and the analyzing-power A(theta) measurements leading to the 4/sup +/ state in the light /sup 74,76,78/Se isotopes show quite different shapes from those in the heavy /sup 80,82/Se isotopes. Coupled-channels analyses show that both the sigma(theta) and A(theta) distributions are well reproduced with a positive deformation parameter ..beta../sub 4/ in /sup 74,76,78/Se, but with a negative ..beta../sub 4/ in /sup 80,82/Se, indicating a hexadecapole-shape transition between /sup 78/Se and /sup 80/Se.

  5. Energy loss straggling of (0.5 < Ep < 2.0) MeV protons in formvar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaroum, S.; Damache, S.; Moussa, D.; Ouichaoui, S.; Amari, L.

    2015-07-01

    Energy loss distributions for (0.5 < Ep < 2.0) MeV protons traversing polyvinyl formal have been measured in transmission. Then, they have been analyzed in order to determine energy loss straggling variance data. For avoiding non-stochastic broadenings and single collision events, only energy loss fractions within the range 2 % ⩽ ΔE/E ⩽ 20 % have been considered. The inferred energy loss straggling data are compared to values derived by several theories of the collisional energy straggling and by Yang et al. empirical formula with assuming the validity of the Bragg-Kleeman additivity rule for compounds in all the performed calculations. The obtained results are discussed with distinguishing two projectile velocity regimes delimited by the proton energy Ep ∼ 1.2 MeV. Over the high proton velocity regime, our data are in very consistent with the classical Bohr theory and the Yang et al. empirical formula predicting constant collisional energy loss straggling. It clearly appears that over the low proton velocity regime, our energy loss straggling data are in best overall quantitative agreement with values predicted by the Sigmund-Schinner binary collision stopping theory (the BCAS) involving both the shell and Barkas-Anderson corrections. Besides, the slight low energy-dependent behavior of experimental data shows to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston theory and the Yang et al. empirical formula.

  6. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of defects introduced in antimony doped Ge by 2 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamhere, C.; Das, A. G. M.; Auret, F. D.; Chawanda, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Venter, A.

    2011-08-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS have been used to investigate the defects created in Sb doped Ge after irradiation with 2 MeV protons having a fluence of 1×10 13 protons/cm 2. The results show that proton irradiation resulted in primary hole traps at E V +0.15 and E V +0.30 eV and electron traps at E C -0.38, E C -0.32, E C -0.31, E C -0.22, E C -0.20, E C -0.17, E C -0.15 and E C -0.04 eV. Defects observed in this study are compared with those introduced in similar samples after MeV electron irradiation reported earlier. E C -0.31, E C -0.17 and E C -0.04, and E V +0.15 eV were not observed previously in similar samples after high energy irradiation. Results from this study suggest that although similar defects are introduced by electron and proton irradiation, traps introduced by the latter are dose dependent.

  7. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Chen, Ching-Fong; Hogan, Gary E.; Hunter, James F.; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morley, Deborah J.; Saunders, Alexander

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomography on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.

  8. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, Sky K. L.; Morris, Christopher L.; Merrill, Frank Edward; Mariam, Fesseha Gebre; Saunders, Alexander

    2016-01-14

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the protonimaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Furthermore, comparison with a series of static calibrationimages demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  9. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy 800 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Sjue, Sky K. L.; Morris, Christopher L.; Merrill, Frank Edward; ...

    2016-01-14

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the protonimaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane.more » Furthermore, comparison with a series of static calibrationimages demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.« less

  10. Measurement of the free neutron-proton analyzing power and spin transfer parameters in the charge exchange region at 790 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ransome, R.D.

    1981-07-01

    The free neutron-proton analyzing power and the spin transfer parameters (K/sub NN/, K/sub SS/, K/sub SL/, and K/sub LL/) were measured at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility at 790 MeV between 165/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ center of mass. A 40% polarized neutron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target was used. The recoil protons were momentum analyzed with a magnetic spectrometer to isolate elastic scatters. A large solid angle carbon polarimeter was used to measure the proton polarization. The measurements are the first at this energy and are in basic agreement with pre-existing phase shift solutions. The proton-carbon analyzing power was measured between 500 and 750 MeV. An empirical fit to the proton-carbon analyzing power between 100 and 750 MeV was done.

  11. Residual Nuclide Production by Proton-Induced Reactions on Uranium for Energies between 20 and 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uosif, M. A. M.; Michel, R.; Herpers, U.; Kubik, P.-W.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.

    2005-05-01

    Within the HINDAS project, proton-irradiation experiments were performed at the injector cyclotron of the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen/Switzerland in order to investigate the production of residual nuclides from natural uranium. The stacked-foil technique was used to cover proton energies between 20 MeV and 70 MeV. Copper targets were used for monitoring the proton beam using the reaction 65Cu (p,n)65Zn. Residual radionuclides were measured by off-line γ-spectrometry. Excitation functions were obtained for the production of 91Y, 95Zr, 95mNb, 99Mo, 103Ru, 112Pd, 115Cd, 124Sb, 126Sb, 127Sb, 132Te, 131I, 134Cs, 136Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141Ce, 144Ce, 147Nd, and 238Np. The experimental data are compared to the sparse results of earlier measurements and with theoretical excitation functions calculated by the newly developed TALYS code. Good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained for product masses up to 115. For higher-mass fission products and for 238Np, there are still systematic deviations between theory and experiment. These deviations are discussed as deficits of the fission model in the heavy part of the fission product distribution.

  12. Residual Nuclide Production by Proton-Induced Reactions on Uranium for Energies between 20 and 70 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Uosif, M.A.M.; Michel, R.; Herpers, U.; Kubik, P.-W.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.

    2005-05-24

    Within the HINDAS project, proton-irradiation experiments were performed at the injector cyclotron of the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen/Switzerland in order to investigate the production of residual nuclides from natural uranium. The stacked-foil technique was used to cover proton energies between 20 MeV and 70 MeV. Copper targets were used for monitoring the proton beam using the reaction 65Cu (p,n)65Zn. Residual radionuclides were measured by off-line {gamma}-spectrometry. Excitation functions were obtained for the production of 91Y, 95Zr, 95mNb, 99Mo, 103Ru, 112Pd, 115Cd, 124Sb, 126Sb, 127Sb, 132Te, 131I, 134Cs, 136Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141Ce, 144Ce, 147Nd, and 238Np. The experimental data are compared to the sparse results of earlier measurements and with theoretical excitation functions calculated by the newly developed TALYS code. Good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained for product masses up to 115. For higher-mass fission products and for 238Np, there are still systematic deviations between theory and experiment. These deviations are discussed as deficits of the fission model in the heavy part of the fission product distribution.

  13. Proton-induced cross sections relevant to production of 225Ac and 223Ra in natural thorium targets below 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Hemez, F; Ballard, B; Bach, H; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Dry, D; Fassbender, M E; Gulley, M S; Jackman, K R; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for (223,)(225)Ra, (225)Ac and (227)Th production by the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at proton energies below 200 MeV. Our measurements are in good agreement with previously published data and offer a complete excitation function for (223,)(225)Ra in the energy range above 90 MeV. Comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows reasonable-to-good agreement. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra below 200 MeV is a viable production method.

  14. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Parajon, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Abad, E.

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 106 protons/cm2 s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  15. The microstructure of the 1.4914 MANET martensitic steel before and after irradiation with 590 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavillet, D.; Marmy, P.; Victoria, M.

    1992-09-01

    Optical and transmission electron microscope observations, together with SEM (scanning electron microscope) and ASTEM (analytical scanning transmission electron microscope) microanalysis have been performed in samples of the DIN 1.4914 martensitic steel (MANET cast), both before and after irradiation with 590 MeV protons to doses up to 1 dpa at temperatures between 363 and 703 K. The chemical composition of the different carbide geometries have been obtained. No substantial modification of the carbide and precipitate structure is observed after either deformation under fatigue or after irradiation to 1 dpa at 703 K. No bubbles have been observed in a specimen irradiated to 0.7 dpa, containing 87 appm He.

  16. Nuclear excitation functions of proton-induced reactions (Ep = 35-90 MeV) from Fe, Cu, and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Stephen A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.; Nickles, Robert J.; Engle, Jonathan W.

    2016-11-01

    Fe, Cu, and Al stacked foils were irradiated by 90 MeV protons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Isotope Production Facility to measure nuclear cross sections for the production of medically relevant isotopes, such as 52gMn, 54Mn, 48Cr, 55Co, 58mCo and 57Ni. The decay of radioactive isotopes produced during irradiation was monitored using high-purity germanium gamma spectroscopy over the months following irradiation. Proton fluence was determined using the natAl(p,x)22Na, natCu(p,x)62Zn natCu(p,x)65Zn, and natCu(p,x)56Co monitor reactions. Calculated cross sections were compared against literature values and theoretical TALYS predictions. Notably this work includes the first reported independent cross section measurements of natCu(p,x)58mCo and natCu(p,x)58gCo.

  17. Observations of low-energy /0.3- to 1.8-MeV/ differential spectrums of trapped protons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, D.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of differential energy spectrums of trapped protons obtained from several passes during the period January to November 1969 using the polar orbiting, low-altitude Injun 5 satellite equipped with a special solid-state detector proton-electron telescope are presented. Results reveal the existence of a quasi-persistent peak in the differential energy spectrum in the McIlwain shell parameter (L) range 2 to 2.6 and in the energy range of approximately 0.32 to 0.72 MeV. The fact that the shape of the spectrum is stable for several days or can change with time scales as small as 4 hours suggests an impulsive acceleration mechanism deep in the radiation belts. Other features of the spectrum show that if the spectrum is represented by an exponential form in energy, the dependence of the spectral parameter is in general agreement with diffusion theory over the L range of approximately 2 to 4.

  18. Theoretical study of isotopic production cross-sections in proton-nucleus reactions at 200MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Mohammad S.

    2016-03-01

    As NASA's future plans are likely to include extended human missions in deep space, protections from space radiation take on increased importance. When galactic cosmic rays, mainly protons, interacts with the material of spacecraft, secondary fragments are produced, which contribute substantially to the dose and dose equivalent received by the crew inside. A detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism, as well as a knowledge of cross sections are needed. We analyze energy spectra, angular distributions, and isotopic cross-sections of intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) from the interaction of 27Al, 59Co, and 197Au with 200 MeV protons. Calculations within the modified statistical model with final state interaction were performed using SAPTON code. General agreement is obtained with the experiment which suggests that most of the IMFs are emitted after equilibrium is reached (i.e. in the evaporation stage).

  19. Prompt radiation, shielding and induced radioactivity in a high-power 160 MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magistris, Matteo; Silari, Marco

    2006-06-01

    CERN is designing a 160 MeV proton linear accelerator, both for a future intensity upgrade of the LHC and as a possible first stage of a 2.2 GeV superconducting proton linac. A first estimate of the required shielding was obtained by means of a simple analytical model. The source terms and the attenuation lengths used in the present study were calculated with the Monte Carlo cascade code FLUKA. Detailed FLUKA simulations were performed to investigate the contribution of neutron skyshine and backscattering to the expected dose rate in the areas around the linac tunnel. An estimate of the induced radioactivity in the magnets, vacuum chamber, the cooling system and the concrete shield was performed. A preliminary thermal study of the beam dump is also discussed.

  20. Positron annihilation on defects in silicon irradiated with 15 MeV protons.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, N Y; Elsayed, M; Krause-Rehberg, R; Emtsev, V V; Oganesyan, G A; Kozlovski, V V

    2013-01-23

    Microstructure and thermal stability of the radiation defects in n-FZ-Si ([P] ≈ 7 × 10(15) cm(-3)) single crystals have been investigated. The radiation defects have been induced by irradiation with 15 MeV protons and studied by means of both the positron lifetime spectroscopy and low-temperature measurements of the Hall effect. At each step of the isochronal annealing over the temperature range ∼60-700 °C the positron lifetime has been measured for the temperature interval ∼30-300 K, and for samples-satellites the temperature dependences of the charge carriers and mobility have been determined over the range ∼4.2-300 K. It is argued that as-grown impurity centers influence the average positron lifetime by forming shallow (E(b) ≈ 0.013 eV) positron states. The radiation-induced defects were also found to trap positrons into weakly bound (E(b) ≤ 0.01 eV) states. These positron states are observed at cryogenic temperatures during the isochronal annealing up to T(anneal.) = 340 °C. The stages of annealing in the temperature intervals ∼60-180 °C and ∼180-260 °C reflect the disappearance of E-centers and divacancies, respectively. Besides these defects the positrons were found to be localized at deep donor centers hidden in the process of annealing up to the temperature T(anneal.) ≈ 300 °C. The annealing of the deep donors occurs over the temperature range ∼300-650 °C. At these centers positrons are estimated to be bound with energies E(b) ≈ 0.096 and 0.021 eV within the temperature intervals ∼200-270 K and ∼166-66 K, respectively. The positron trapping coefficient from these defects increases from ∼1.1 × 10(16) to ∼6.5 × 10(17) s(-1) over the temperature range ∼266-66 K, thus substantiating a cascade phonon-assisted positron trapping mechanism whose efficiency is described by ≈T(-3) law. It is argued that the value of activation energy of the isochronal annealing E(a) ≈ 0.74-0.59 eV is due to dissociation of the

  1. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y[sub cut], in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W [approx equal] 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x [approx equal] 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of [alpha][sub s], are studied.

  2. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y{sub cut}, in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W {approx_equal} 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x {approx_equal} 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of {alpha}{sub s}, are studied.

  3. Pionic charge exchange on the proton from 40 to 250 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschopf, J.; Bauer, M.; Clement, H.; Cröni, M.; Denz, H.; Friedman, E.; Gibson, E. F.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G. J.

    2006-08-01

    The total cross sections for pionic charge exchange on hydrogen were measured using a transmission technique on thin CH2 and C targets. Data were taken for π- lab energies from 39 to 247 MeV with total errors of typically 2% over the Δ-resonance and up to 10% at the lowest energies. Deviations from the predictions of the SAID phase shift analysis in the 60-80 MeV region are interpreted as evidence for isospin-symmetry breaking in the s-wave amplitudes. The charge dependence of the Δ-resonance properties appears to be smaller than previously reported.

  4. Design of a 10 MeV normal conducting CW proton linac based on equidistant multi-gap CH cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Continuous wave (CW) high current proton linacs have wide applications as the front end of high power proton machines. The low energy part of such a linac is the most difficult and there is currently no widely accepted solution. Based on the analysis of the focusing properties of the CW low energy proton linac, a 10 MeV low energy normal conducting proton linac based on equidistant seven-gap Cross-bar H-type (CH) cavities is proposed. The linac is composed of ten 7-gap CH cavities and the transverse focusing is maintained by quadrupole doublets located between the cavities. The total length of the linac is less than 6 meters and the average acceleration gradient is about 1.2 MeV/m. The electromagnetic properties of the cavities are investigated by Microwave Studio. At the nominal acceleration gradient the maximum surface electric field in the cavities is less than 1.3 times the Kilpatrick limit, and the Ohmic loss of each cavity is less than 35 kW. Multi-particle beam dynamics simulations are performed with Tracewin code, and the results show that the beam dynamics of the linac are quite stable, the linac has the capability to accelerate up to 30 mA beam with acceptable dynamics behavior. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003)

  5. Variations in the Processing of DNA Double-Strand Breaks Along 60-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beams

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I.; Currell, Frederick J.; Kacperek, Andrzej; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the variations in induction and repair of DNA damage along the proton path, after a previous report on the increasing biological effectiveness along clinically modulated 60-MeV proton beams. Methods and Materials Human skin fibroblast (AG01522) cells were irradiated along a monoenergetic and a modulated spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) proton beam used for treating ocular melanoma at the Douglas Cyclotron, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The DNA damage response was studied using the 53BP1 foci formation assay. The linear energy transfer (LET) dependence was studied by irradiating the cells at depths corresponding to entrance, proximal, middle, and distal positions of SOBP and the entrance and peak position for the pristine beam. Results A significant amount of persistent foci was observed at the distal end of the SOBP, suggesting complex residual DNA double-strand break damage induction corresponding to the highest LET values achievable by modulated proton beams. Unlike the directly irradiated, medium-sharing bystander cells did not show any significant increase in residual foci. Conclusions The DNA damage response along the proton beam path was similar to the response of X rays, confirming the low-LET quality of the proton exposure. However, at the distal end of SOBP our data indicate an increased complexity of DNA lesions and slower repair kinetics. A lack of significant induction of 53BP1 foci in the bystander cells suggests a minor role of cell signaling for DNA damage under these conditions. PMID:26452569

  6. The radiation dosimetry of a quartz viewer irradiated with a 4.5 MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyasathian, Kalong

    The present dissertation describes a procedure to measure the radiation dose received by an accelerator operator who uses a quartz viewer to locate an ion beam. This procedure consists of the following steps: (i) A solid-state gamma radiation detector was calibrated to determine its efficiency and its energy scale. (ii) The calibrated detector was used to measure the gamma energy spectrum obtained when bombarding the viewer with the ion beam. This measurement was normalized, that is, beam current and measurement duration were determined. (iii) Individual gamma energy lines were extracted from the gamma spectrum and the respective energies and emission rates were obtained. Energies were checked with known transitions in silicon and oxygen, to ensure correct identification. (iv) The Compton gamma energy spectrum generated by the primary gamma rays was determined using a Compton code. (v) Finally the charged-ion bremsstrahlung spectrum was obtained using the formalism of Alder et. al. In this dissertation several prospective contributors to the radiation dose have been checked and were found to be insignificant. They were: the radiation dose due to x-rays generated by Compton electrons and the radiation dose generated by electrons produced by collisions with the incident ions. With a proton energy of 4.5 MeV the eye dose equivalent was determined at 0 and 90 degrees to the proton beam. At 0 degree with a proton fluence rate of 8.9 x 1011 protons/s the dose was 8.7 x 10-3 rem/hr. At 90 degrees with a proton fluence rate of 1.1 x 1012 protons/s the dose was 8.1 x 10-3 rem/hr.

  7. Design, performance, and calculated error of a Faraday cup for absolute beam current measurements of 600-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    A mobile self-contained Faraday cup system for beam current measurments of nominal 600 MeV protons was designed, constructed, and used at the NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The cup is of reentrant design with a length of 106.7 cm and an outside diameter of 20.32 cm. The inner diameter is 15.24 cm and the base thickness is 30.48 cm. The primary absorber is commercially available lead hermetically sealed in a 0.32-cm-thick copper jacket. Several possible systematic errors in using the cup are evaluated. The largest source of error arises from high-energy electrons which are ejected from the entrance window and enter the cup. A total systematic error of -0.83 percent is calculated to be the decrease from the true current value. From data obtained in calibrating helium-filled ion chambers with the Faraday cup, the mean energy required to produce one ion pair in helium is found to be 30.76 + or - 0.95 eV for nominal 600 MeV protons. This value agrees well, within experimental error, with reported values of 29.9 eV and 30.2 eV.

  8. Validity of the relativistic impulse approximation for elastic proton-nucleus scattering at energies lower than 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Hillhouse, G. C.; Meng, J.

    2008-07-15

    We present the first study to examine the validity of the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) for describing elastic proton-nucleus scattering at incident laboratory kinetic energies lower than 200 MeV. For simplicity we choose a {sup 208}Pb target, which is a spin-saturated spherical nucleus for which reliable nuclear structure models exist. Microscopic scalar and vector optical potentials are generated by folding invariant scalar and vector scattering nucleon-nucleon (NN) amplitudes, based on our recently developed relativistic meson-exchange model, with Lorentz scalar and vector densities resulting from the accurately calibrated PK1 relativistic mean field model of nuclear structure. It is seen that phenomenological Pauli blocking (PB) effects and density-dependent corrections to {sigma}N and {omega}N meson-nucleon coupling constants modify the RIA microscopic scalar and vector optical potentials so as to provide a consistent and quantitative description of all elastic scattering observables, namely, total reaction cross sections, differential cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation functions. In particular, the effect of PB becomes more significant at energies lower than 200 MeV, whereas phenomenological density-dependent corrections to the NN interaction also play an increasingly important role at energies lower than 100 MeV.

  9. Deuteron-proton breakup reaction at Ed=7.4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, H.; Nachabe, A. M.; Slobodrian, R. J.

    1986-04-01

    The reaction d+p-->p+p+n is investigated at Elabd=7.4 MeV. Calculations of the cross section are compared with recent kinematically complete measurements. The Coulomb potential is taken fully into account in the calculations based on the strong approximation of Mo/ller wave operator approach.

  10. A Faraday Cup with high frequency response for a 200 MeV LINAC proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.; Bittner, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this device, composed essentially of coaxial line elements, is monitoring, on a per micropulse basis, the beam intensity of a 200 MeV LINAC at the BNL Radiation Effects Facility. The center conductor of the coaxial line acts as a beam stop. The output pulses are suitable for fast timing. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Further results in the search for the direct two-proton decay of ^94Ag^m (J^π= 21^+, 6.7 MeV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerny, J.; Lee, D. W.; Perajarvi, K.; Moltz, D. M.; Barquest, B. R.; Grossman, L. E.; Jeong, W.; Jewett, C. C.

    2008-10-01

    Both direct one-proton decay and direct two-proton decay of ^94Ag^m from this 0.4 s isomeric state have been reported in experiments utilizing the GSI on-line mass separator [1]. In the latter decay, coincident events between silicon E detectors with a threshold energy of 0.4 MeV and a summed decay energy of 1.9±0.1 MeV were observed with a yield of 350±210 pb in coincidence with γ-decays in the ^92Rh daughter. We utilized our helium-jet system at the LBNL 88-inch cyclotron to repeat this experiment, again employing the ^58Ni(^40Ca,p3n) reaction at 197 MeV. Reaction products were transported via a capillary to a detection area and collected on a slowly rotating wheel in front of an assembly of 24 δEgas-δEgas-ESi detector telescopes with a threshold of 0.4 MeV for identifying protons. Five of these telescopes observe the 0.79 MeV single proton decay from ^94Ag^m at the reported yield of 1.3 nb. In the 240/276 identified proton detector combinations with low background, no proton-proton coincidences have been observed. Data from the remaining 36 detector combinations require a separate analysis, which is in progress. Monte Carlo analyses of our anticipated proton-proton coincidences for both sets of detector combinations will be presented. ^ 1Mukha et al., Nature 439, 298 (2006).

  12. Activation calculations for trapped protons below 200 MeV: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    Tables are given displaying of the results of the activation calculations of metal samples and other material aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility-1 (LDEF-1) and Spacelab-2 with the computer program, PTRAP4. The computer printouts give the reaction, the reactant product, the proton reaction cross sections as a function of the energy of the incident protons, and the activation as a function of distance into the sample from the exposed surface.

  13. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; ...

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomographymore » on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.« less

  15. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed.

  16. Validation of nuclear models in Geant4 using the dose distribution of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam.

    PubMed

    Hall, David C; Makarova, Anastasia; Paganetti, Harald; Gottschalk, Bernard

    2016-01-07

    A proton pencil beam is associated with a surrounding low-dose envelope, originating from nuclear interactions. It is important for treatment planning systems to accurately model this envelope when performing dose calculations for pencil beam scanning treatments, and Monte Carlo (MC) codes are commonly used for this purpose. This work aims to validate the nuclear models employed by the Geant4 MC code, by comparing the simulated absolute dose distribution to a recent experiment of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam stopping in water. Striking agreement is observed over five orders of magnitude, with both the shape and normalisation well modelled. The normalisations of two depth dose curves are lower than experiment, though this could be explained by an experimental positioning error. The Geant4 neutron production model is also verified in the distal region. The entrance dose is poorly modelled, suggesting an unaccounted upstream source of low-energy protons. Recommendations are given for a follow-up experiment which could resolve these issues.

  17. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding.

    PubMed

    George, K; Willingham, V; Wu, H; Gridley, D; Nelson, G; Cucinotta, F A

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples.

  18. Shielding data for 100 250 MeV proton accelerators: Double differential neutron distributions and attenuation in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Magistris, M.; Mereghetti, A.; Silari, M.; Zajacova, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Double differential distributions of neutrons produced by 100, 150, 200 and 250 MeV protons stopped in a thick iron target were simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code at four emission angles: forward, 45°, transverse and 135° backwards. The attenuation in ordinary concrete of the dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons, protons, photons and electrons was calculated. Some of the resulting attenuation curves are best fitted by a double-exponential function rather than a single-exponential. The effect of various approximations introduced in the simulations is thoroughly discussed. The contribution to the total ambient dose equivalent from photons and protons is usually limited to a few percent, except in the backward direction where photons contribute more than 10% and up to 35% to the total dose for a shield thickness of 1-2 m. Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of energy and emission angle, along with fit to the Monte Carlo data. An extensive comparison is made of values obtained in the present work with published experimental and computational data.

  19. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of 145 MeV proton-irradiated AlBeMet 162

    SciTech Connect

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; McDonald, Kirk T.; Ghose, Sanjit; Zhong, Zhong; Simos, Nikolaos

    2016-08-03

    AlBeMet 162 (Materion Co., formerly Brush Wellman) has been irradiated with 145 MeV protons up to 1.2x1020 cm-2 fluence, with irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-220oC. Macroscopic postirradiation evaluation on the evolution of mechanical and thermal properties was integrated with a comprehensive X-ray- diffraction study using high-energy monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray beams, which offered a microscopic view of the irradiation damage effects on AlBeMet. The study confirmed the stability of the metal-matrix composite, its resistance to proton damage, and the continuing separation of the two distinct phases, fcc aluminum and hcp beryllium, following irradiation. Furthermore, based on the absence of inter-planar distance change during proton irradiation, it was confirmed that the stacking faults and clusters on the Al (111) planes are stable, and thus can migrate from the cascade region and be absorbed at various sinks. XRD analysis of the unirradiated AlBeMet 162 showed clear change in the texture of the fcc phase with orientation especially in the Al (111) reflection which exhibits a “non-perfect” six-fold symmetry, implying lack of isotropy in the composite.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of 145 MeV proton-irradiated AlBeMet 162

    DOE PAGES

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; McDonald, Kirk T.; Ghose, Sanjit; ...

    2016-08-03

    AlBeMet 162 (Materion Co., formerly Brush Wellman) has been irradiated with 145 MeV protons up to 1.2x1020 cm-2 fluence, with irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-220oC. Macroscopic postirradiation evaluation on the evolution of mechanical and thermal properties was integrated with a comprehensive X-ray- diffraction study using high-energy monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray beams, which offered a microscopic view of the irradiation damage effects on AlBeMet. The study confirmed the stability of the metal-matrix composite, its resistance to proton damage, and the continuing separation of the two distinct phases, fcc aluminum and hcp beryllium, following irradiation. Furthermore, based on the absencemore » of inter-planar distance change during proton irradiation, it was confirmed that the stacking faults and clusters on the Al (111) planes are stable, and thus can migrate from the cascade region and be absorbed at various sinks. XRD analysis of the unirradiated AlBeMet 162 showed clear change in the texture of the fcc phase with orientation especially in the Al (111) reflection which exhibits a “non-perfect” six-fold symmetry, implying lack of isotropy in the composite.« less

  1. Proton beam studies with a 1.25 MeV, cw radio frequency quadrupole linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, G.O.; Hardek, T.W.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A high-current, cw linear accelerator has been proposed as a spallation neutron source driver for tritium production. Key features of this accelerator are high current (100 mA), low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 268 MHz, cw radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC section and klystrode based rf system were obtained from the Chalk River Laboratories and were previously installed at LANL to support systems development and advanced studies in support of cw, proton accelerators. A variation of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) proton injector, modified to operate at 50 keV, was mated to the RFQ and was operated to support advance developments for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. High current, proton beam studies were completed which focused on the details of injector-RFQ integration, development of beam diagnostics, development of operations procedures, and personnel and equipment safety systems integration. This development led to acceleration of up to 100 mA proton beam.

  2. Utilization of an intense beam of 800 MeV protons to prepare radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Since the early 1970's, a program has been underway at this institution to employ the excess proton beam emerging from the major experimental areas of the LAMPF accelerator to make a wide variety of radioactive nuclides. This paper presents a review of the targets irradiated, cross section data, and nuclide yield measurements. 32 refs., 1 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Mechanisms of mutagenesis in human cells exposed to 55 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauny, S.; Wiese, C.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Protons represent the major type of charged particle radiation in spaceflight environments. The purpose of this study was to assess mutations arising in human lymphoid cells exposed to protons. Mutations were quantitated at the thymidine kinase (TK1) locus in cell lines derived from the same donor: TK6 cells (wt TP53) and WTK1 cells (mutant TP53). WTK1 cells were much more susceptible to mutagenesis following proton exposure than TK6 cells. Intragenic deletions were observed among early-arising TK1 mutants in TK6 cells, but not in WTK1 cells where all of the mutants arose by LOH. Deletion was the predominant mode of LOH in TK6 cells, while allelic recombination was the major mode of LOH in WTK1 cells. Deletions were of variable lengths, from <1 cM to 64 cM, while mutations that arose by allelic recombination often extended to the telomere. In summary, proton exposures elicited many types of mutations at an autosomal locus in human cells. Most involved large scale loss of genetic information, either through deletion or by recombination.

  4. Advanced polymer targets for TNSA regime producing 6 MeV protons at 1016 W/cm2 laser intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.

    2017-02-01

    High intensity laser pulses, at an intensity of the order of 1016 W/cm2, are employed to irradiate in vacuum polyethylene terephthalate thin foils in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime. The plasma obtained in the forward emission is investigated using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors connected in a time-of-flight configuration, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. The results indicate that the foil thickness of 1 micron is optimal to accelerate protons of up to 6.5 MeV. The high ion acceleration can be due to different effects such as the high absorption in the advanced semicrystalline polymer containing spherulite centers, the high resonant absorption in gold nanoparticles embedded in the polymer, the optimal thickness of the used polymer to enhance the electron density in the forward plasma, and the self-focusing effect induced by preplasma created in front of the irradiated target.

  5. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  6. Absolute doubly differential cross sections for ionization of adenine by 1.0-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-09-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections of adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 1.0-MeV protons have been measured using a vapor-phase adenine target. Ejected electrons were analyzed by a 45 deg. parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer in an electron energy range from 1 to 1000 eV at electron emission angles from 15 deg. to 165 deg. The effective target thickness of adenine was determined by a Rutherford forward scattering method and a vapor deposition method. Present data are in good agreement with recent calculations. Comparisons were made with other data on various hydrocarbon molecules. It was found that the ionization cross sections of these molecules can be scaled fairly well in terms of the total number of valence electrons.

  7. Experimental cross-sections for proton induced nuclear reactions on mercury up to 65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Szücs, Z.; Brezovcsik, K.

    2016-07-01

    Cross-sections for formation of activation products induced by protons on natural mercury targets were measured. Results for 196m,196g,197g(cum), 198m,198g,199g(cum), 200g(cum), 201,202Tl, 194g(cum), 195g(cum), 196g(cum), 198m,199g(cum) Au and 195m,197m,203Hg are presented up to 65 MeV incident particle energy, many of these for the first time. The experimental data are compared with literature values and with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 code (results taken from TENDL-2015 on-line library), thick target yields were derived and possible applications in biomedical sciences are discussed.

  8. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN LOW ACTIVATION MARTENSITIC STEELS F82H AND OPTIMAX AFTER 800 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Y. DAI; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    Low-activation martensitic steels, F82H (mod.) and Optimax-A, have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons up to 5.9 dpa. The tensile properties and microstructure have been studied. The results show that radiation hardening increases continuously with irradiation dose. F82H has lesser irradiation hardening as compared to Optimax-A in the present work and DIN1.4926 from a previous study. The irradiation embrittlement effects are evident in the materials since the uniform elongation is reduced sharply to less than 2%. However, all the irradiated samples ruptured in a ductile-fracture mode. Defect clusters have been observed. The size and the density of defect clusters increase with the irradiation dose. Precipitates are amorphous after irradiation.

  9. The tensile and fatigue properties of DIN 1.4914 martensitic stainless steel after 590 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmy, P.; Victoria, M.

    1992-09-01

    Tensile and low cycle fatigue subsize specimens of DIN 1.4914 martensitic steel (MANET) have been irradiated with 590 MeV protons to doses up to 1 dpa and at temperatures between 363 and 703 K. The helium produced by spallation reactions was measured as 130 appm/dpa. A strong radiation hardening is found, which decreases as the irradiation temperature increases. The tensile elongation is reduced after irradiation, but the fracture mode is always ductile and transgranular. The radition hardening produced at low irradiation temperatures is recovered after annealing at higher temperatures. Continous softening is observed during low cycle fatigue testing. The rate of softening of the irradiated material is stonger than that of the unirradiated material and tends to reach the saturation level of the latter. The irradiation badly affects the fatigue life, particularly in the temperature domain of dynamic strain ageing between 553 and 653 K.

  10. Numerical simulation and optimization of the variable energy 60-1000 MeV proton beams at PNPI synchrocyclotron for testing the radiation resistance of electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, S. A.; Ivanov, E. M.; Ivanov, N. A.; Lebedeva, J. S.; Riabov, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    A universal center for testing electronic components (ECs) for the needs of aviation and space is created in the SC-1000 Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute" (PNPI NRC KI). One of the main instruments of these tests is variable energy protons beams. This paper presents Monte Carlo simulation results for a proton beam with energy of 1000 MeV passing through copper and tungsten degraders, and defines the length of these degraders to obtain energies of 60, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000 MeV. Detailed studies of further transmission of the proton beams along the beam line using the copper degrader are accomplished. Basic theoretical parameters for each proton beam, such as the intensity, the energy heterogeneity, beam size, and uniformity of its spatial distribution are obtained.

  11. Polarized-target asymmetry in pion-proton bremsstrahlung at 298 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, A.; Amsler, C.; Bistirlich, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Crowe, K.M.; Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; Haddock, R.P.; Konter, J.A.; Ljungfelt, S.; Loude, J.F.; Mango, S.; Meyer, C.A.; Perroud, J.P.; Riedlberger, J.; Renker, D.; Schaad, M.; Sober, D.I.; Truoel, P.; Weymuth, P. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley California 94720 Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen, Paul Scherrer Institut, Department of Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 10024 )

    1990-05-28

    First data are presented for the polarized-target asymmetry in the reaction {pi}{sup +}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup +}{ital p}{gamma} at an incident pion energy of 298 MeV. The geometry was chosen to maximize the sensitivity to the radiation of the magnetic dipole moment {mu}{sub {Delta}} of the {Delta}{sup ++}(1232 MeV). A fit of the asymmetry in the cross section {ital d}{sup 5}{sigma}/{ital d}{Omega}{sub {pi}} {ital d}{Omega}{sub {gamma}} {ital dk} as a function of the photon energy {ital k} to predictions from a recent isobar-model calculation with {mu}{sub {Delta}} as the only free parameter yields {mu}{sub {Delta}}=1.64({plus minus}0.19exp{Delta},{plus minus}0.14 theor){mu}{sub {ital p}}. Though this value agrees with bag-model corrections to the SU(6) prediction {mu}{sub {Delta}}=2{mu}{sub {ital p}}, further clarifications on the model dependence of the result are needed, in particular since the isobar model fails to describe both the cross section and the asymmetry at the highest photon energies.

  12. Calculating Variations in Biological Effectiveness for a 62 MeV Proton Beam

    PubMed Central

    Carante, Mario Pietro; Ballarini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of radiation-induced cell death and chromosome aberrations [called BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations (BIANCA)] was further developed and applied to therapeutic protons. The model assumes a pivotal role of DNA cluster damage, which can lead to clonogenic cell death following three main steps: (i) a DNA “cluster lesion” (CL) produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d gives rise to chromosome aberrations; (iii) certain aberration types (dicentrics, rings, and large deletions) lead to clonogenic inactivation. The yield of CLs and the probability, f, that a chromosome fragment remains un-rejoined even if other fragment(s) are present within d, were adjustable parameters. The model, implemented as a MC code providing simulated dose–responses directly comparable with experimental data, was applied to pristine and modulated Bragg peaks of the proton beam used to treat eye melanoma at INFN-LNS in Catania, Italy. Experimental survival curves for AG01522 cells exposed to the Catania beam were reproduced, supporting the model assumptions. Furthermore, cell death and chromosome aberrations at different depths along a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose profile were predicted. Both endpoints showed an increase along the plateau, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the distal dose fall-off, due to low-energy protons. Cell death and chromosome aberrations were also predicted for V79 cells, in the same irradiation scenario as that used for AG01522 cells. In line with other studies, this work indicated that assuming a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along a proton SOBP may be sub-optimal. Furthermore, it provided qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the dependence of the beam effectiveness on the considered endpoint and dose. More generally, this work represents an example of therapeutic beam characterization avoiding the use of

  13. Measurement of the inelastic cross section in proton-lead collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.

    2016-08-01

    The inelastic hadronic cross section in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L = 12.6 ± 0.4 nb-1, has been collected with an unbiased trigger for inclusive particle production. The cross section is obtained from the measured number of proton-lead collisions with hadronic activity produced in the pseudorapidity ranges 3 < η < 5 and/or - 5 < η < - 3, corrected for photon-induced contributions, experimental acceptance, and other instrumental effects. The inelastic cross section is measured to be σinel (pPb) = 2061 ± 3 (stat) ± 34 (syst) ± 72 (lumi) mb. Various Monte Carlo generators, commonly used in heavy ion and cosmic ray physics, are found to reproduce the data within uncertainties. The value of σinel (pPb) is compatible with that expected from the proton-proton cross section at 5.02 TeV scaled up within a simple Glauber approach to account for multiple scatterings in the lead nucleus, indicating that further net nuclear corrections are small.

  14. X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic studies of MeV proton irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, S.; Joseph, B.; Sekhar, B. R.; Dev, B. N.

    2008-07-01

    Poly-crystalline graphite samples were irradiated using 2.25 MeV H + ions with a fluence of 2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2. Magnetic ordering in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples have been reported earlier under the similar irradiation conditions [Esquinazi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 227201]. In that study, the authors attribute the observed irradiation induced magnetic ordering to the formation of a mixed sp 2-sp 3 hybridized carbon atoms. In the present study, we report the X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic studies on pristine and irradiated samples. Irradiated samples are found to show an increased number of sp 3 hybridized carbon atoms. However, the Raman spectrum, specially the second order data, do indicate that the nature of the graphene lattice structure has been preserved in the irradiated samples. The mechanisms for the irradiation induced enhancement in sp 3 hybridization are discussed.

  15. Response functions of Fuji imaging plates to monoenergetic protons in the energy range 0.6-3.2 MeV.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aleonard, M M

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the responses of Fuji MS, SR, and TR imaging plates (IPs) to protons with energies ranging from 0.6 to 3.2 MeV. Monoenergetic protons were produced with the 3.5 MV AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires de Faisceaux d'Ions en Région Aquitaine) accelerator at the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). The IPs were irradiated with protons backscattered off a tantalum target. We present the photo-stimulated luminescence response of the IPs together with the fading measurements for these IPs. A method is applied to allow correction of fading effects for variable proton irradiation duration. Using the IP fading corrections, a model of the IP response function to protons was developed. The model enables extrapolation of the IP response to protons up to proton energies of 10 MeV. Our work is finally compared to previous works conducted on Fuji TR IP response to protons.

  16. Simultaneous quiet time observations of energetic radiation belt protons and helium ions - The equatorial alpha/p ratio near 1 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, T. A.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of energetic helium ions and protons in the earth's radiation belts has been conducted with Explorer 45 in the immediate vicinity of the equatorial plane. Protons were measured from less than 1 keV to 1.6 MeV and also above 3.3 MeV in a channel responsive up to 22 MeV; helium ions were monitored in three passbands: 910 keV to 3.15 MeV, 590 to 910 keV, and 2.0 to 3.99 MeV. Alpha/proton flux ratios were found to vary significantly with energy and location in the radiation belts. At equal energy per nucleon a range of variability for alpha/p from 0.0001 to well above 0.001 was found, and at equal energy per ion the corresponding variability was from 0.001 to above 10. The latter findings emphasize the relative importance of the very energetic helium ions in the overall radiation belt ion populations.

  17. Measurement of a 200 MeV proton beam using a polyurethane dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Malcolm; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey

    2006-12-01

    PRESAGETM (Heuris Pharma LLC, Skillman, NJ) is a three-dimensional polyurethane dosimeter containing a leuco dye that generates a color change when irradiated. The dosimeter is solid and does not require a container to maintain its shape. The dosimeter is transparent before irradiation and the maximum absorbance of the leuco dye occurs at 633 nm which is compatible with the OCT-OPUSTM laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of PRESAGETM to proton beam radiotherapy.

  18. Noise performance of 0.35-(mu)m SOI CMOS devices and micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binkley, D. M.; Hopper, C. E.; Cressler, J. D.; Mojarradi, M. M.; Blalock, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents measured noise for 0.35(mu)m, silicon-on-insulator devices and a micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation. Flicker noise voltage, important for gyros having low frequency output, increases less than 32% after irradiation.

  19. RBE and genetic susceptibility of mouse and rat spermatogonial stem cells to protons, heavy charged particles and 1.5 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kaltenboeck, B.

    The main purpose of the present study is to provide data on RBE and genetic susceptibility in the mouse and the rat when exposed to protons, HZE particles and neutrons. Genetic damage from exposure to 50 MeV and 9 GeV protons, 4 GeV/nucleon helium ions, 4 GeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1.5 MeV neutrons was studied in adult (CBA × C57Bl/6J) F1 mice. Damage from 9 GeV protons and 4 GeV helium ions was studied in adult Wistar rats. The incidence of reciprocal translocations (RT) induced in the spermatogonial stem cells of each species was recorded. RBE values were derived by comparing linear regression coefficients from dose-responses within the same dose-range for each of the radiation types tested and 60Co γ-rays or by means of a direct nonparametric method. RT yields measured after mouse and rat spermatogonial irradiation with protons, heavy charged particles and neutrons fit the linear model of the dose-response relationship. Relative to 60Co γ-rays, RBE values are as follows for mouse spermatogonia: 0.9 for 50 MeV protons; 1.3 for 9 GeV protons; 0.7 for 4 GeV helium ions; and 1.3 for 4 GeV carbon ions. For rat spermatogonia, values were: 1.7 for 9 GeV protons and 1.3 for helium ions. Compared to mice irradiated using the same experimental design, rats were more susceptible to high-LET radiations, with susceptibility assessed by genetic damage to their spermatogonial stem cells. The RBE of 1.5 MeV neutron is about 6.6.

  20. DoPET: an in-treatment monitoring system for proton therapy at 62 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, V.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Collini, F.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Milluzzo, G.; Morrocchi, M.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Sportelli, G.; Zaccaro, E.

    2016-12-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy is highly effective in treating cancer thanks to its conformal dose deposition. This superior capability in dose deposition has led to a massive growth of the treated patients around the world, raising the need of treatment monitoring systems. An in-treatment PET system, DoPET, was constructed and tested at CATANA beam-line, LNS-INFN in Catania, where 62 MeV protons are used to treat ocular melanoma. The PET technique profits from the beta+ emitters generated by the proton beam in the irradiated body, mainly 15-O and 11-C. The current DoPET prototype consists of two planar 15 cm × 15 cm LYSO-based detector heads. With respect to the previous versions, the system was enlarged and the DAQ up-graded during the years so now also anthropomorphic phantoms, can be fitted within the field of view of the system. To demonstrate the capability of DoPET to detect changes in the delivered treatment plan with respect to the planned one, various treatment plans were used delivering a standard 15 Gy fraction to an anthropomorphic phantom. Data were acquired during and after the treatment delivery up to 10 minutes. When the in-treatment phase was long enough (more than 1 minute), the corresponding activated volume was visible just after the treatment delivery, even if in presence of a noisy background. The after-treatment data, acquired for about 9 minutes, were segmented finding that few minutes are enough to be able to detect changes. These experiments will be presented together with the studies performed with PMMA phantoms where the DoPET response was characterized in terms of different dose rates and in presence of range shifters: the system response is linear up to 16.9 Gy/min and has the ability to see a 1 millimeter range shifter.

  1. Elastic scattering of polarized protons on helium three at 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, A.

    1985-07-01

    A set of spin dependent parameters and cross sections has been measured for polarized p-/sup 3/He elastic scattering over the range of q .7 to 4.2 fm/sup -1/. The experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) with a polarized proton beam at .8 GeV. The focal plane polarimeter of the HRS was used to determine the spin direction of the scattered proton. Since /sup 3/He is one of the simplest nuclei, polarized p-/sup 3/He scattering provides a very sensitive test of multiple scattering theories. The theoretical analysis was done by using two different wave functions for /sup 3/He as input to the multiple scattering theory. The theoretical calculations and experimental data together will give us useful information about nucleon-nucleon amplitudes and also help us to obtain a better understanding of the scattering process. 68 refs., 55 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Hugoniot Measurements at Low Pressures in Tin Using 800 MeV proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Cynthia; Hogan, Gary E; King, Nicholas S. P.; Kwiathowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; McNeil, Wendy Vogan; Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher; Rightley, Paul; Saunders, Alexander

    2009-08-05

    A 2cm long 8 mm diameter cylindrical tin target has been shocked to a pressure in the region of the {beta} {yields} {gamma} phase change using a small, low density PETN charge mounted on the opposite side of a stainless steel diaphragm. The density jump and shock velocity were measured radiographically as the shock wave moved through the sample and the pressure dropped, using the proton radiography facility at LANL. This provided a quasi-continuous record of the equations of state along the Hugoniot for the P1 wave from a shock velocity of 3.25 km/sec down to near the sound speed. Edge release effects were removed from the data using tomographic techniques. The data show evidence for a phase transition that extends over a broad pressure range. The data and analysis will be presented.

  3. Energy loss of MeV protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.

    1996-05-01

    A parameter-free model is presented to study the energy loss of fast protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces. The contributions to the energy loss from excitation of valence-band electrons and ionization of localized target-atom electronic states are calculated separately. The former is calculated from the induced surface wake potential using linear response theory and the specular-reflection model, while the latter is calculated in the first Born approximation. The results obtained are in good agreement with available experimental data. However, the experimental qualitative trend of the energy loss as a function of the angle of incidence is obtained when the valence-band electron model is replaced by localized target atom electron states, though with a worse quantitative agreement. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Neutron scattering measurements in {sup 197}Au from 850 keV to 2.0 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, M.; Chen, J.; Egan, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross-sections for low lying levels in {sup 197}Au have been measured for incident neutron energies of 1.0 MeV, 1.5 MeV and 2.0 MeV. In addition, the total neutron cross sections in {sup 197}Au was measured from 850 keV to 1.5 MeV. For both experiments the UML 5.5 MV Van-de-Graaff accelerator with a Mobley post acceleration compression system, produced subnanosecond proton pulses which generated neutrons via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) {sup 7}Be reaction.

  5. Orientation features of {sup 24}Mg(2+) aligned nuclei in (p, p) and (d, d) reactions at E{sub x} ≈ 7.5 MeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Galanina, L. I. Zelenskaya, N. S.; Lebedev, V. M.; Orlova, N. V.; Spassky, A. V.

    2015-09-15

    Experimental angular dependences of cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering and the result obtained by reconstructing the populations of magnetic sublevels, multipole-moment orientation tensors, and polarization tensors are presented for {sup 24}Mg (2{sup +}, 1.369 MeV) aligned nuclei produced in inelastic proton scattering at E{sub p} = 7.4 MeV. The experimental results in question are compared with the results of calculations based on the coupled-channel method and on the compound-nucleus model, the 3/2{sup +} resonance in the {sup 25}Al compound nucleus being taken into account. The orientation features of {sup 24}Mg (2{sup +}, 1.369 MeV) nuclei produced in inelastic proton and deuteron scattering on {sup 24}Mg at E{sub x} ≈ 7.5 MeV per nucleon are found to be generally similar despite a substantial difference in the respective differential cross sections.

  6. The Elemental Analysis of Biological and Environmental Materials Using a 2MEV Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshed, Waheed

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A programme has been developed to simulate the proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) spectra and its uses have been described. The PIXE technique has been applied to the analysis of new biological reference materials which consist of IAEA human diet samples and NIST leaf samples. Homogeneity of these and two existing reference materials, IAEA soil -7 and Bowen's kale, has also been determined at the mug scale. A subsample representative of a material is ascertained by determination of sampling factors for the elements detected in the material. Proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) analysis in conjunction with PIXE has been employed to investigate F and other elemental concentrations found in human teeth samples. The mean F concentration in enamel and dentine parts of teeth followed an age dependent model. Concentrations of Ca and P were found to be higher in the enamel than in the dentine. Analysis of blood and its components in the study of elemental models in sickle cell disease in Nigerians has been carried out. Comparisons revealed that Cl, Ca and Cu were at higher levels whereas K, Fe, Zn and Rb were at lower levels in the whole blood of the sicklers compared to controls. Similar results were obtained for the erythrocytes except that Br was found at higher concentration in erythrocytes of the sicklers. Higher concentrations of Cl, K, Fe and Cu were also observed in plasma of the sicklers compared to controls. PIXE and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used in the characterization of the Harmattan dust particulates collected at Kano and Ife. Most of the elements were found to be at higher concentrations as compared to those found in Recife (Brazil) and Toronto (Canada). The value of total suspended particulate was above the relevant national air quality standards. PIXE in conjunction with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis was employed in the

  7. High-Energy-Resolution Inelastic Electron and Proton Scattering and the Multiphonon Nature of Mixed-Symmetry 2{sup +} States in {sup 94}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Burda, O.; Kuhar, M.; Lenhardt, A.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Botha, N.; Fearick, R. W.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fransen, C.; Fujita, H.; Holt, J. D.; Pietralla, N.; Scholten, O.

    2007-08-31

    High-energy-resolution inelastic electron scattering (at the S-DALINAC) and proton scattering (at iThemba LABS) experiments permit a thorough test of the nature of proposed one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states of the nucleus {sup 94}Mo. The combined analysis reveals the one-phonon content of the mixed-symmetry state and its isovector character suggested by microscopic nuclear model calculations. The purity of two-phonon 2{sup +} states is extracted.

  8. Measurement of Dynamic Strain on a Mercury Target Vessel During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.

    2001-01-11

    A mercury target vessel, designed to simulate some aspects of the eventual target design for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be built in Oak Ridge by the Department of Energy, was used in a test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to study the strain induced from thermal shock of bombarding protons. In the SNS, intense thermal shock loads are expected to cause an enormous rate of temperature rise ({approximately}10{sup 7} K/s), with resulting pressure waves in the mercury that may lead to large stresses on the thin walls of the mercury target. To guide the mercury target design and to benchmark the computer design codes, transient strain was measured using fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensors. Twenty strain sensors were attached in various axial and transverse orientations to a cylindrical stainless steel target vessel containing mercury. The vessel was 10 cm in diameter, about 15 cm long, and with a 5-cm radius hemispherical shell welded to the forward end. The test was done at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) beam facility on 30-31 January 1999. The sensors were attached with gauge lengths of about two centimeters, and were located in pairs in most areas, for redundancy and facilitation of data analysis. The 800-MeV proton deposition of 0.5--2.3 x 10{sup 13} over a full-width at half maximum beam size of {approximately}25 mm, produced axial strains peaking at a few microstrains, with transverse (hoop) strains more than an order of magnitude higher. We describe the experiments, including the sensors and measurement configuration, and discuss the strain data analysis.

  9. [BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF FISSION SPECTRUM NEUTRONS AND PROTONS WITH ENERGIES OF 60-126 MEV DURING ACUTE AND PROLONGED IRRADIATION].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons of the fission spectrum are characterized by relatively high values of linear energy transfer (LET). Data about their effects on biological objects are used to evaluate the risk of delayed effects of accelerated ions within the same LET range that serve as an experimental model of the nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Additionally, risks of delayed consequences to cosmonaut's health and average lifetime from certain GCR fluxes and secondary neutrons can be also prognosticated. The article deals with comparative analysis of the literature on reduction of average lifespan (ALS) of animals exposed to neutron reactor spectrum, 60-126 MeV protons, and X- and γ-rays in a broad range of radiation intensity and duration. It was shown that a minimal lifespan reduction by 5% occurs due to a brief exposure to neutrons with the absorbed dose of 5 cGy, whereas same lifespan reduction due to hard X- and γ-radiation occurs after absorption of a minimal dose of 100 cGy. Therefore, according to the estimated minimal ALS reduction in mice, neutron effectiveness is 20-fold higher. Biological effectiveness of protons as regards ALS reduction is virtually equal to that of standard types of radiation. Exposure to X- and γ-radiation with decreasing daily doses, and increasing number of fractions and duration gives rise to an apparent trend toward a less dramatic ALS reduction in mice; on the contrary, exposure to neutrons of varying duration had no effect on threshold doses for the specified ALS reductions. Factors of relative biological effectiveness of neutrons reached 40.

  10. Measurement of double differential charged-particle emission cross sections for reactions induced by 26 MeV protons and FKK model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Aoto, A.; Kashimoto, H.

    1994-06-01

    Double differential charged-particle emission cross sections of proton-induced reactions have been measured for {sup nat}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Si, {sup 98}Mo, {sup 106}Pd, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 181}Ta at energies around 26 MeV. Several (p,p{prime}) and (p,n) data for {sup 98}Mo and {sup 106}Pd in the incident energy range from 12 to 26 MeV are analysed in terms of the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model, in order to study preequilibrium nucleon emission from nucleon-induced reactions.

  11. Radiochemical study of the combined (p,π0) and (p,γ) reactions on bismuth with protons from 62 to 480 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. E.; Singh, P. P.; Friesel, D. L.; Yavin, A.; Doron, A.; D'Auria, J. M.; Sheffer, G.; Dillig, M.

    1981-08-01

    The excitation function for the combined 209Bi(p,γ)210Po and 209Bi(p,π0)210Po reactions was measured for proton energies from 62 to 480 MeV. The measurements were made using standard radiochemical and residual α-counting techniques. Below pion-production threshold the radiative proton-capture cross section was observed to decrease with increasing proton energy. Above threshold the combined cross section increases to about 10 μb at 170 MeV. From a smooth extrapolation of the (p,γ) cross section to energies above pion-production threshold, an estimate of a cross section for the (p,π0) process is obtained. A theoretical fit of the summed total cross section into all particle bound states was made using a density of states factor, a two nucleon t matrix, and by taking into account the initial state (proton) and final state (pion) distortions using optical potentials. [NUCLEAR REACTIONS 209Bi(p,γ)210Po+209Bi(p,π0)210Po, 209Bi(p,2n)208Po, 209Bi(p,4n)206Po, Ep=62-480 MeV, measured polonium-production cross section, thin targets, radiochemical method, α counting, theoretical fit to the (p,π0) data using two-nucleon model.

  12. Neutron spectra produced by 30, 35 and 40 MeV proton beams at KIRAMS MC-50 cyclotron with a thick beryllium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Won; Bak, Sang-In; Ham, Cheolmin; In, Eun Jin; Kim, Do Yoon; Min, Kyung Joo; Zhou, Yujie; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrons over a wide range of energies are produced by bombarding a 1.05 cm thick beryllium target with protons of different energies delivered by the MC-50 Cyclotron of the Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). The neutron flux Φ(En) versus neutron energy En, produced by protons of 30, 35, and 40 MeV energies, was obtained by using the GEANT4 code with a data-based hadronic model. For the experimental validation of the simulated neutron spectra, a number of pure aluminum and iron oxide samples were irradiated with the neutrons produced by 30, 35, and 40 MeV protons at 20 μA beam current. The gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn produced, respectively, through 27Al(n,α)24Na and 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reactions were measured by a HPGe detector. The neutron flux Φ(En) at each neutron energy from the simulation was multiplied with the evaluated cross-sections σ(En) of the respective nuclear reaction, and the summation ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) was calculated over the neutron spectrum for each proton energy of 30, 35, and 40 MeV. The measured gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn were found in good agreement with the activities estimated by using the summed values of ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) along with other parameters in a neutron activation method.

  13. A comparison of 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma irradiation induced degradation in the electrical characteristics of N-channel MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Arshiya; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Pradeep, T. M.; Pushpa, N.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    N-channel depletion MOSFETs were irradiated with 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad(Si) to 100 Mrad(Si). The electrical characteristics of MOSFET such as threshold voltage (Vth), density of interface trapped charges (ΔNit), density of oxide trapped charges (ΔNot), transconductance (gm), mobility (μ), leakage current (IL) and drain saturation current (ID Sat) were studied as a function of dose. A considerable increase in ΔNit and ΔNot and decrease in Vth,gm, μ, and ID Sat was observed after irradiation. The results of 4 MeV Proton irradiation were compared with that of Co-60 gamma radiation and it is found that the degradation is more for the devices irradiated with 4 MeV Protons when compared with the Co-60 gamma radiation. This indicates that Protons induce more trapped charges in the field oxide region when compared to the gamma radiation.

  14. Study of neutron spectra in a water bath from a Pb target irradiated by 250 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Ju, Yong-Qin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Chen, Liang; Ge, Hong-Lin; Wan, Bo; Luo, Peng; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Li, Jian-Yang; Xu, Jun-Kui; Wang, Song-Lin; Yang, Yong-Wei; Yang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Spallation neutrons were produced by the irradiation of Pb with 250 MeV protons. The Pb target was surrounded by water which was used to slow down the emitted neutrons. The moderated neutrons in the water bath were measured by using the resonance detectors of Au, Mn and In with a cadmium (Cd) cover. According to the measured activities of the foils, the neutron flux at different resonance energies were deduced and the epithermal neutron spectra were proposed. Corresponding results calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were compared with the experimental data to check the validity of the code. The comparison showed that the simulation could give a good prediction for the neutron spectra above 50 eV, while the finite thickness of the foils greatly effected the experimental data in low energy. It was also found that the resonance detectors themselves had great impact on the simulated energy spectra. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation and Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (11305229, 11105186, 91226107, 91026009, XDA03030300)

  15. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  16. Measurement of SEU cross sections in the CDF SVX3 ASIC using 63 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Bishai, M.; Gay, C.; Hill, C.; Nahn, S.; Pellett, D. E.; Pope, G.; Shepard, P. F.; Slaughter, A. J.; Webster, W. C., III

    2000-06-01

    The single event upset (SEU) cross section has been measured for 63 MeV protons incident on static memory cells in the CDF SVX3 pipelined silicon strip readout ASIC. The device was fabricated in the Honeywell 0.8 μm RICMOS IV bulk process, and contains a number of cells with minimum gate length transistors to control the mode of operation of the chip. Cross sections per cell of (4.4±1.8)×10 -16 cm2, (2.1±0.7)×10 -15 cm2, and (3.9±0.9)×10 -15 cm2 were measured for angles of incidence of 0°, 45°, and 80°, respectively, for cells with 0.8 μm gate length. The SVX3 SEU rate in Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron was estimated to be sufficiently low that it would not affect the performance of the CDF Silicon Tracker.

  17. Annealing characteristics of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells irradiated with 1.00 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdulaziz, Salman S.; Woodyard, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous Si:H and amorphous Si sub x, Ge sub (1-x):H solar cells were irradiated with 1.00 MeV proton fluences in the range of 1.00E14 to 1.25E15 cm (exp -2). Annealing of the short circuit current density was studied at 0, 22, 50, 100, and 150 C. Annealing times ranged from an hour to several days. The measurements confirmed that annealing occurs at 0 C and the initial characteristics of the cells are restored by annealing at 200 C. The rate of annealing does not appear to follow a simple nth order reaction rate model. Calculations of the short-circuit current density using quantum efficiency measurements and the standard AM1.5 global spectrum compare favorably with measured values. It is proposed that the degradation in J sub sc with irradiation is due to carrier recombination through the fraction of D (o) states bounded by the quasi-Fermi energies. The time dependence of the rate of annealing of J sub sc does appear to be consistent with the interpretation that there is a thermally activated dispersive transport mechanism which leads to the passivation of the irradiation induced defects.

  18. Radiation performance of GaAs concentrator cells for 0.4 to 12 MeV electrons and 0.1 to 37 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Henry B.; Anspaugh, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide concentrator cells have been irradiated with both electrons and protons with a wide variety of energies. The cells are made using OM-VPE growth process with a junction depth of a half micron. All data are taken with bare cells without coverglasses or shielding. Performance data are given at the designed concentration level of 100X AMO. Results are presented in a number of ways, including performance of electrical parameters (Pmax, Isc, and Voc) as a function of fluence for different electron and proton energies. Critical fluences (defined at a degradation of 25 percent in Pmax) are calculated for each energy level and presented for both electron and proton irradiations.

  19. Secondary neutron spectrum from 250-MeV passively scattered proton therapy: Measurement with an extended-range Bonner sphere system

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Burgett, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are an unavoidable consequence of proton therapy. While the neutron dose is low compared to the primary proton dose, its presence and contribution to the patient dose is nonetheless important. The most detailed information on neutrons includes an evaluation of the neutron spectrum. However, the vast majority of the literature that has reported secondary neutron spectra in proton therapy is based on computational methods rather than measurements. This is largely due to the inherent limitations in the majority of neutron detectors, which are either not suitable for spectral measurements or have limited response at energies greater than 20 MeV. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to measure a secondary neutron spectrum from a proton therapy beam using a spectrometer that is sensitive to neutron energies over the entire neutron energy spectrum. Methods: The authors measured the secondary neutron spectrum from a 250-MeV passively scattered proton beam in air at a distance of 100 cm laterally from isocenter using an extended-range Bonner sphere (ERBS) measurement system. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated using measured fluence and fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Results: The neutron fluence spectrum had a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate energy continuum between the thermal and evaporation peaks. The H*(10) was dominated by the neutrons in the evaporation peak because of both their high abundance and the large quality conversion coefficients in that energy interval. The H*(10) 100 cm laterally from isocenter was 1.6 mSv per proton Gy (to isocenter). Approximately 35% of the dose equivalent was from neutrons with energies ≥20 MeV. Conclusions: The authors measured a neutron spectrum for external neutrons generated by a 250-MeV proton beam using an ERBS measurement system that was sensitive to neutrons over the entire

  20. Investigation of the Stability and 1.0 MeV Proton Radiation Resistance of Commercially Produced Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Alloy Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below 1E14 sq cm fluences above 1E14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed In dark I-V measurements. The current mechanism were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  1. Measurement of natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re excitation function of natural tungsten by using a 100-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jungran; Lee, Jieun; Lee, Samyol

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the proton-induced excitation function for the natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re nuclear reaction has been measured in the energy region below 100 MeV by using the 100-MeV proton linear accelerator at the Korea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. The stacked foil activation technique was adopted in the present study. The gamma-rays generated from the proton-irradiated samples were measured by using a gamma-ray spectroscopy system with a HPGe detector. The 27Al(p,3p+n)24Na reaction was used as a monitor reaction for proton flux monitoring. The nuclear reactions of natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re were observed in the present study. The proton-induced excitation functions of natural tungsten were derived from the delayed gamma-ray yield of the produced nucleus. The present results were compared with the previous experimental excitation function data of Yu. E. Titarenko et al. [1].

  2. Characterization of Hundreds of MeV 7Li(p,n) Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Source at RCNP Using a Proton Recoil Telescope and TOF Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Iwase, Hiroshi; Yashima, Hiroshi; Satoh, Daiki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Masuda, Akihiko; Nakane, Yoshihiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Shima, Tatsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Nakamura, Takashi

    The peak neutron fluence of a quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n) neutron source at RCNP of Osaka University have been measured for four incident proton energies between 100 and 300 MeV, using a proton recoil telescope (PRT) with event selection by a time-of-flight technique. We deduced the cross section of the peak neutron production reaction, 7Li(p,n0,1)7Be, at 0° and compared with that previously obtained with a time-of-flight (TOF) method employing an organic liquid scintillator. The results obtained with different methods are in agreement within their uncertainties and generally consistent with the other experimental data in several hundreds of MeV region.

  3. Radiation Tolerance Characterization of Dual Band InAs/GaSb Type-II Strain-Layer Superlattice pBp Detectors Using 63 MeV Protons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    films J. Appl. Phys. 112, 073718 (2012) Additional information on Appl. Phys. Lett. Journal Homepage: http://apl.aip.org/ Journal Information...considered for space applications due to their relative advantage in manu- facturability, compared with conventional mercury -cadmium- telluride (MCT) IR...preliminary 1–2 MeV proton irradiation studies of Sb -based T2SLS photodiodes where the detectors were unbiased and at 300 K during irradiation, which

  4. Search for narrow structure in proton-antiproton annihilation cross sections from 1900 to 1960 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, D.I.; Pealsee, D.C.; Miller, R.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Oh, B.Y.; Smith, G.A.; Whitmore, J.; Brando, T.; Daftari, I.; deGuzman, A.

    1985-01-01

    The anti pp annihilation cross section has been measured with good resolution (approx.2 MeV rms) in the mass range 1900-1960 MeV. No narrow structures are seen, the 90% confidence level upper limit being 8-12 mb-MeV for the integrated area of a resonance in this mass range. However, we do not rule out a very narrow bump-dip structure seen in an earlier experiment in the 1935-1941 MeV mass interval. The data also do not support the existence of a broad structure previously reported at 1937 MeV.

  5. Measurements of proton induced γ-ray emission cross-sections on Mg from 1.0 to 3.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, N.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Differential cross-section of proton induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 24Mg(p,p‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV), 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg (Eγ = 390, 585, 975 keV) and 26Mg(p,γ)27Al (Eγ = 1014 keV) were measured for proton energies from 1 to 3 MeV using a 60 μg/cm2 Mg target evaporated on a 40 μg/cm2 Ag thin film. The γ-rays were collected by a 50% relative efficiency HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction, while the backscattered protons were collected by an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165°. Simultaneous collection of γ-ray and RBS spectra is a great advantage of this approach which makes differential cross-section measurements independent on the collected beam charge. Measured cross-section values were compared with the previously reported data in the literature. Absolute γ-ray differential cross-sections were obtained with an overall systematic uncertainty of about ±6% and statistical uncertainty of less than ±5% for proton energies higher than 2.24 MeV.

  6. Investigation of the stability and 1.0 MeV proton radiation resistance of commercially produced hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters or fluences below 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2); fluences above 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2) require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  7. Shielding data for 100 250 MeV proton accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in thick iron and concrete/iron shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Magistris, M.; Mereghetti, A.; Silari, M.; Zajacova, Z.

    2008-08-01

    Double differential distributions of neutrons produced by 100, 150, 200 and 250 MeV protons stopped in a thick iron target were calculated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code at four emission angles: forward, 45°, transverse and 135° backwards. The attenuation in thick iron shields of the dose equivalent due to neutrons, protons, photons and electrons was also calculated. The contribution to the total ambient dose equivalent from photons and protons is limited to a few percent at maximum. Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of energy and emission angle, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. A brief discussion of simulations performed with composite iron/concrete shields is also given, showing the need for further investigations.

  8. Di-proton decay of the 6.15 MeV 1- state in 18Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. A.; Barker, F. C.; Millener, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    The widths for one- and two-proton decay of the 1-2 state in 18Ne are calculated. Shell-model wave functions are used to obtain the spectroscopic factors. The R-matrix theory of Barker which incorporates the final-state interaction between the two protons is used for the di-proton decay model. The calculated widths for both one- and two-proton decay are in qualitative agreement with experiment. We find that the decay width for sequential two-proton decay through the ghost of the 1/2+ bound state in 17F is comparable to the width of the direct di-proton decay.

  9. Response of human lymphocytes to proton radiation of 60 MeV compared to 250 kV X-rays by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, Justyna; Rawojć, Kamila; Panek, Agnieszka; Swakoń, Jan; Prasanna, Pataje G; Rydygier, Marzena

    2015-04-01

    Particle radiotherapy such as protons provides a new promising treatment modality to cancer. However, studies on its efficacy and risks are relatively sparse. Using the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay, we characterized response of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, obtained from health donors irradiated in vitro in the dose range: 0-4. 0 Gy, to therapeutic proton radiation of 60 MeV from AIC-144 isochronous cyclotron, by studying nuclear division index and DNA damage and compared them with X-rays. Peripheral blood lymphocytes show decreased ability to proliferate with increasing radiation doses for both radiation types, however, in contrast to X-rays, irradiation with protons resulted in a higher proliferation index at lower doses of 0.75 and 1.0 Gy. Protons are more effective in producing MN at doses above 1.75 Gy compared to X-rays. Dose-response curves for micronucleus incidence can be best described by a cubic model for protons, while for X-rays the response was linear. The differences in the energy spectrum and intracellular distribution of energy between radiation types are also apparent at the intracellular distribution of cytogenetic damage as seen by the distribution of various numbers of micronuclei in binucleated cells. Our studies, although preliminary, further contribute to the understanding of the mechanistic differences in the response of HPBL in terms of cellular proliferation and cytogenetic damage induced by protons and X-rays as well as intra-cellular distribution of energy and thus radiobiological effectiveness.

  10. The effects of 800 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion of tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel, and gold

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Kanner, G.; Daemen, L.

    1997-12-01

    Real time electrochemical data were acquired for tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel 304L, and gold targets during proton irradiation at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The goal of this research was to establish a better understanding of the corrosion properties of materials as a function of proton irradiation and gain insight into the mechanism of the observed phenomena. The following electrochemical observations were made during proton irradiation of W, Ta, SS304, and Au: (1) the open circuit potential of all materials increased with increasing proton fluence; (2) the corrosion rate (at the OCP) of W and SS304 increased with increasing proton fluence; (3) the passive dissolution rate for SS304 and Ta decreased with increasing proton fluence; (4) the anodic dissolution rate for W increased with increasing proton fluence; (5) the pitting potential for SS304 increased with proton fluence, which is an indication that the material is less susceptible to pitting attack during irradiation.

  11. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  12. (π+/-,π+/-p) reaction at 245 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasetzky, E.; Ashery, D.; Altman, A.; Yavin, A. I.; Schlepütz, F. W.; Powers, R. J.; Bertl, W.; Felawka, L.; Walter, H. K.; Winter, R. G.; Pluym, J. V. D.

    1982-05-01

    The inclusive (π+/-,π+/-p) reactions on C, Fe, and Bi were studied at 245 MeV in a broad kinematic range by means of coincidence measurement of the outgoing particles. The π-p angular correlations and proton-energy spectra show features consistent with those expected from quasifree scattering. It is observed that about 80% of the inclusive inelastic scattering cross section at backward pion angles may be attributed to nucleon knockout mechanisms. The results allow identification of the direct quasifree process, unperturbed by higher order effects, which accounts for 30%, 20%, and 15% of the C, Fe, and Bi inclusive (π+,π+) differential cross sections, respectively. The ratio of positive to negative pion cross sections for quasifree scattering, integrated over the proton energy and angle, are in agreement with the ratio for free π-p scattering. Such is not the case for various proton angles. The deviation of the positive to negative ratio at the peak of the proton angular correlation from the free scattering ratio is most pronounced for more forward pion angles. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (π+/-,π+/-p) coin. measurements on C, Fe, Bi, E=245 MeV; deduced σknockout decomposition of σinelastic.

  13. A high-statistics measurement of transverse spin effects in dihadron production from muon-proton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-09-01

    A measurement of the azimuthal asymmetry in dihadron production in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on transversely polarised proton (NH3) targets is presented. They provide independent access to the transversity distribution functions through the measurement of the Collins asymmetry in single hadron production. The data were taken in the year 2010 with the COMPASS spectrometer using a 160 GeV/c muon beam of the CERN SPS, increasing by a factor of about four the overall statistics with respect to the previously published data taken in the year 2007. The measured sizeable asymmetry is in good agreement with the published data. An approximate equality of the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry is observed, suggesting a common physical mechanism in the underlying fragmentation.

  14. Investigation of the structure of deep hole states in {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb by means of inelastic proton scattering at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob`ev, A.A.; Dotsenko, Yu.V.; Lobodenko, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    A missing-mass correlation spectrometer with overall energy resolution FWHM = 3.5 MeV is used to study the reactions (p, 2p) and (p, np) on {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei at energy T{sub 0} = 1.0 GeV under experimental conditions permitting complete kinematic reconstruction. Proton- and neutron-separation-energy spectra are obtained in a wide binding-energy range. Empirical regularities observed in the evolution of the principal parameters of deep hole states of protons and neutrons in going from light to heavy nuclei are discussed. Experimental data are analyzed by the Hartree-Fock method with Skyrme forces, as well as with modified Moszkowski {delta} interaction. 26 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Estimate of the radiation source term for 18F production via thick H218O targets bombarded with 18 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzate, Juan Ángel

    2015-12-01

    The positron-emitting radionuclide most important from the point of view of radiation protection is 18F. This isotope is usually produced by bombarding 18O-enriched water with protons. Currently there are few experimental data on the radiation source term generated during these reactions. In addition, presently there is no theoretical estimates of this source term, for use in radiation protection, validated by experimental data. Up till now this term is calculated by using nuclear interactions' simulation codes, such as ALICE91. An estimate of the energy spectra for neutrons and photons, induced by 18 MeV protons on H218O target, have been calculated by using MCNPX code with cross sections from release 0 of ENDF/B VII library for all materials except 18O, for which TENDL-2012 library was used. This estimate was validated against a recent experiment carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The calculated spectra have generally well reproduced experiments. The results show that the calculated radiation source term may be used to estimate the neutron activation of the accelerator components and the cyclotron building, to calculate the cyclotron shielding, and to carry out radiation protection evaluations in general, for the case of cyclotrons producing 18F by means of the 18O(p,n)18F nuclear reactions, for proton energies up to 18 MeV.

  16. Large Scale Accelerator Production of 225Ac: Effective Cross sections for 78-192 MeV Protons Incident on 232Th Targets

    DOE PAGES

    Griswold, Justin R; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Engle, Jonathan W.; ...

    2016-09-28

    Actinium-225 and 213Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of 225Ac. The high energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal target has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of 225Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of Th metal at beam energies between 78 and 200 MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridgemore » National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes as well as for some of the fission products are presented. The cross sections for production of 225Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7 mb in the incident proton energy range of 78 to 192 MeV. Based on these data, production of Curie quantities of 225Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0 g cm-2232Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.« less

  17. Large scale accelerator production of (225)Ac: Effective cross sections for 78-192MeV protons incident on (232)Th targets.

    PubMed

    Griswold, J R; Medvedev, D G; Engle, J W; Copping, R; Fitzsimmons, J M; Radchenko, V; Cooley, J C; Fassbender, M E; Denton, D L; Murphy, K E; Owens, A C; Birnbaum, E R; John, K D; Nortier, F M; Stracener, D W; Heilbronn, L H; Mausner, L F; Mirzadeh, S

    2016-12-01

    Actinium-225 and (213)Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of (225)Ac. The high-energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal targets has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of (225)Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of thorium metal at beam energies between 78 and 192MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes, as well as for some of the fission products, are presented. The cross sections for production of (225)Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7mb in the incident proton energy range of 78-192MeV. Based on these data, production of curie quantities of (225)Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0gcm(-2 232)Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.

  18. Calibration of GafChromic EBT3 for absorbed dose measurements in 5 MeV proton beam and {sup 60}Co γ-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Vadrucci, M. Ronsivalle, C.; Marracino, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Picardi, L.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Esposito, G.; De Angelis, C.; Cherubini, R.; Pimpinella, M.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To study EBT3 GafChromic film in low-energy protons, and for comparison purposes, in a reference {sup 60}Co beam in order to use it as a calibrated dosimetry system in the proton irradiation facility under construction within the framework of the Oncological Therapy with Protons (TOP)-Intensity Modulated Proton Linear Accelerator for RadioTherapy (IMPLART) Project at ENEA-Frascati, Italy. Methods: EBT3 film samples were irradiated at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, with a 5 MeV proton beam generated by a 7 MV Van de Graaff CN accelerator. The nominal dose rates used were 2.1 Gy/min and 40 Gy/min. The delivered dose was determined by measuring the particle fluence and the energy spectrum in air with silicon surface barrier detector monitors. A preliminary study of the EBT3 film beam quality dependence in low-energy protons was conducted by passively degrading the beam energy. EBT3 films were also irradiated at ENEA-National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology with gamma radiation produced by a {sup 60}Co source characterized by an absorbed dose to water rate of 0.26 Gy/min as measured by a calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber. EBT3 film calibration curves were determined by means of a set of 40 film pieces irradiated to various doses ranging from 0.5 Gy to 30 Gy absorbed dose to water. An EPSON Expression 11000XL color scanner in transmission mode was used for film analysis. Scanner response stability, intrafilm uniformity, and interfilm reproducibility were verified. Optical absorption spectra measurements were performed on unirradiated and irradiated EBT3 films to choose the most sensitive color channel to the dose range used. Results: EBT3 GafChromic films show an under response up to about 33% for low-energy protons with respect to {sup 60}Co gamma radiation, which is consistent with the linear energy transfer dependence already observed with higher energy protons, and a negligible dose

  19. Holmium-161 produced using 11.6 MeV protons: A practical source of narrow-band X-rays.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Bryan J; Mendenhall, Marcus H

    2010-10-01

    We present a novel technique to produce narrow-band X-rays by preparing (161)Ho from the bombardment of dysprosium foil by 11.6 MeV protons. The activated foil produces predominantly 45-55 keV X-rays, which are suitable for activating iodinated radio-sensitizing agents (e.g. IUdR) for oncological therapy. We demonstrate that clinically useful quantities of the nuclide are easily produced with a medical cyclotron which is far from the current state of the art.

  20. Comparison of the (p,xn) cross sections from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for (p,xn) reactions (x ranges from 0 to 8) from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons at the Brookhaven AGS Linac injector. Chemical yields were determined by using /sup 239/Np and /sup 233/Pa as tracers. Yield patterns obtained in this work can be compared to the experimental results and theoretical calculations from earlier work, and they are consistent within the framework of intranuclear cascade followed by neutron evaporation and fission competition.

  1. RBE for late somatic effects in mice irradiated with 60 MeV protons relative to X-rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, E. B., Jr.; Clapp, N. K.; Bender, R. S.; Jernigan, M. C.; Upton, A. C.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the relative biological effectiveness of energetic protons for the induction of somatic effects in a mammal (mice) following whole body irradiation. The proton energy used approximates the mean energy for proton spectra accompanying solar events. The effects on longevity and the incidence of major neoplastic diseases are summarized. The results obtained suggest that medium energy proton irradiation is no more effective, and on the whole, probably less effective, than conventional X radiation for the induction of late radiation effects in the mouse.

  2. Investigation of the radiation resistance of triple-junction a-Si:H alloy solar cells irradiated with 1.00 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of 1.00 MeV proton irradiation on hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells is reported for the first time. The cells were designed for radiation resistance studies and included 0.35 cm(sup 2) active areas on 1.0 by 2.0 cm(sup 2) glass superstrates. Three cells were irradiated through the bottom contact at each of six fluences between 5.10E12 and 1.46E15 cm(sup -2). The effect of the irradiations was determined with light current-voltage measurements. Proton irradiation degraded the cell power densities from 8.0 to 98 percent for the fluences investigated. Annealing irradiated cells at 200 C for two hours restored the power densities to better than 90 percent. The cells exhibited radiation resistances which are superior to cells reported in the literature for fluences less than 1E14 cm(sup -2).

  3. The streaming of 1.3 - 2.3 MeV cosmic-ray protons during periods between prompt solar particle events. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    The anisotropy of 1.3 to 2.3 MeV protons in interplanetary space was measured using the Caltech electron/isotope spectrometer aboard IMP-7 for 317 6 hour periods from 72/273 to 74/2. Periods dominated by prompt solar particle events are not included. The convective and diffusive anisotropies were determined from the observed anisotropy using concurrent solar wind speed measurements and observed energy spectra. The diffusive flow of particles was found to be typically toward the sun, indicating a positive radial gradient in the particle density. This anisotropy was inconsistent with previously proposed sources of low energy proton increases seen at 1 AU which involve continual solar acceleration. The typical properties of this new component of low-energy cosmic rays were determined for this period which is near solar minimum.

  4. Secondary particle yields from 400 MeV/u carbon ion and 250 MeV proton beams incident on thick targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Pelliccioni, M.

    2011-07-01

    The double differential particle yield produced by hadron beams striking thick targets of copper, tungsten and ICRU tissue, have been determined by means of the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA (version FLUKA 2008.3b.1). 400 MeV/u carbon ion and 250 MeV proton pencil beams have been considered. Secondary neutrons, photons, and protons have been scored. In order to validate the obtained data, a few simulations have been also repeated with MCNPX 2.6.0. The calculated results are presented and compared with the experimental data reported in literature. They should be very useful to solve a number of problems related to technological aspects of hadrontherapy.

  5. Absolute Differential Cross-Sections for Elastic PION(+/-)/PROTON Scattering at 30 Less than or Equal to T(pion) Less than or Equal to 140 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, Jeffrey Thomas

    Differential cross sections for elastic pi^{+/-}p scattering have been measured at TRIUMF for 10 incident pion energies in three separate experiments at 66.8 <= T_{pi} <= 138.8 MeV, Tpi = 66.8 MeV (pi^+p only), and 30 <= T_{pi} <= 66.8 MeV, using three independent techniques. Typical statistical accuracies are 1-3% and normalization uncertainties are 1.2-3.0%. Extensive experimental checks were employed to minimize systematic errors. Incident pion beam rates were varied by a factor of 5, target thickness was varied by a factor of 10, different target compositions were used (CH_2 and CH_{1.1 }), and derangements of the detector geometry tested the reproducibility of the cross sections under widely varying conditions. Three separate Monte Carlo routines were used. All measurements used solid targets. Thin scintillators and time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were used to count and identify particles incident on the targets and to detect the scattered pions. Recoil protons were detected in coincidence with the scattered pions in two of the three experiments. At the upper range of incident pion energies (66.8 to 138 MeV), a two-arm coincidence technique was used in which proton detection was similar to pion detection (TOF). At the three lowest incident pion energies, an active target technique was used in which the recoil particles were detected by means of the light generated within the CH_ {1.1} scintillator-target. These are the only elastic pip coincidence measurements by any experimental group below 140 MeV incident pion energy. At 66.8 MeV, a third technique was used in which no recoil particles were detected. At incident pion energies of 100 MeV and above, all pi^{+/-}p results from these three measurements are in good agreement with previous measurements, as are the pi ^-p results at all energies. However, while the pi^{+/-}p results of these three experiments are consistent within experimental error at the overlapping energy of 66.8 MeV, they are 10-25% lower than

  6. Exclusive studies of 130-270 MeV {sup 3}He- and 200-MeV proton-induced reactions on {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup 197}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Ginger, D. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Hsi, W.-C.; Hudan, S.; Cornell, E.; Souza, R. T. de; Viola, V. E.; Korteling, R. G.

    2008-09-15

    Exclusive light-charged-particle and IMF spectra have been measured with the ISiS detector array for bombardments of {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup 197}Au nuclei with 130-270-MeV {sup 3}He and 200-MeV protons. The results are consistent with previous interpretations based on inclusive data that describe the global yield of complex fragments in terms of a time-dependent process. The emission mechanism for energetic nonequilibrium fragments observed at forward angles with momenta up to twice the beam momentum is also investigated. This poorly understood mechanism, for which the angular distributions indicate formation on a time scale comparable to the nuclear transit time, are accompanied primarily by thermal-like emissions. The data are most consistent with a schematic picture in which nonequilibrium fragments are formed in a localized region of the target nucleus at an early stage in the energy-dissipation process, where the combined effects of high energy density and Fermi motion produce the observed suprathermal spectra.

  7. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  8. Excitation of 0/sup -/ states by /sup 16/O(pp')/sup 16/O inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Ikegami, H.; Kondo, M.; Matsuoka, N.; Saito, T.; Matsuki, S.; Ogino, K.; Kato, S.

    1984-08-01

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 0/sup -/ states in /sup 16/O have been measured in inelastic scattering of 65 MeV polarized protons. This is the first observation of both isovector and isoscalar 0/sup +/..-->..0/sup -/ transitions in proton scattering on a particular isotope. Microscopic distorted-wave Born approximations and distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations do not describe very well either experimental cross sections or analyzing powers. It is suggested that more complicated reaction mechanisms and wave functions may be needed to describe these transitions.

  9. Effect of irradiation with MeV protons and electrons on the conductivity compensation and photoluminescence of moderately doped p-4H-SiC (CVD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A. Bogdanova, E. V.; Seredova, N. V.

    2015-09-15

    The compensation of moderately doped p-4H-SiC samples grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method under irradiation with 0.9-MeV electrons and 15-MeV protons is studied. The experimentally measured carrier removal rates are 1.2–1.6 cm{sup –1} for electrons and 240–260 cm{sup –1} for protons. The dependence of the concentration of uncompensated acceptors and donors, measured in the study, demonstrates a linear decrease with increasing irradiation dose to the point of complete compensation. This run of the dependence shows that compensation of the samples is due to the transition of carriers to deep centers formed by primary radiation-induced defects. It is demonstrated that, in contrast to n-SiC (CVD), primary defects in the carbon sublattice of moderately doped p-SiC (CVD) only cannot account for the compensation process. In p-SiC, either primary defects in the silicon sublattice, or defects in both sublattices are responsible for conductivity compensation. Also, photoluminescence spectra are examined in relation to the irradiation dose.

  10. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the 15 March 2013 coronal mass ejection event—Interpretation of the 30-80 MeV proton flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Vourlidas, Angelos; Plunkett, Simon; Dryer, Murray; Wu, S. T.; Mewaldt, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The coronal mass ejection (CME) event on 15 March 2013 is one of the few solar events in Cycle 24 that produced a large solar energetic particle (SEP) event and severe geomagnetic activity. Observations of SEP from the ACE spacecraft show a complex time-intensity SEP profile that is not easily understood with current empirical SEP models. In this study, we employ a global three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation to help interpret the observations. The simulation is based on the H3DMHD code and incorporates extrapolations of photospheric magnetic field as the inner boundary condition at a solar radial distance (r) of 2.5 solar radii. A Gaussian-shaped velocity pulse is imposed at the inner boundary as a proxy for the complex physical conditions that initiated the CME. It is found that the time-intensity profile of the high-energy (>10 MeV) SEPs can be explained by the evolution of the CME-driven shock and its interaction with the heliospheric current sheet and the nonuniform solar wind. We also demonstrate in more detail that the simulated fast-mode shock Mach number at the magnetically connected shock location is well correlated (rcc ≥ 0.7) with the concurrent 30-80 MeV proton flux. A better correlation occurs when the 30-80 MeV proton flux is scaled by r-1.4(rcc = 0.87). When scaled by r-2.8, the correlation for 10-30 MeV proton flux improves significantly from rcc = 0.12 to rcc = 0.73, with 1 h delay. The present study suggests that (1) sector boundary can act as an obstacle to the propagation of SEPs; (2) the background solar wind is an important factor in the variation of IP shock strength and thus plays an important role in manipulation of SEP flux; (3) at least 50% of the variance in SEP flux can be explained by the fast-mode shock Mach number. This study demonstrates that global MHD simulation, despite the limitation implied by its physics-based ideal fluid continuum assumption, can be a viable tool for SEP data analysis.

  11. Reinvestigation of the direct two-proton decay of the long-lived isomer 94Ag(m) [0.4 s, 6.7 MeV, (21+)].

    PubMed

    Cerny, J; Moltz, D M; Lee, D W; Peräjärvi, K; Barquest, B R; Grossman, L E; Jeong, W; Jewett, C C

    2009-10-09

    An attempt to confirm the reported direct one-proton and two-proton decays of the (21+) isomer at 6.7(5) MeV in 94Ag has been made. The 0.39(4) s half-life of the isomer permitted use of a helium-jet system to transport reaction products from the 40Ca + (nat)Ni reaction at 197 MeV to a low-background area; 24 gas DeltaE-(Si)E detector telescopes were used to identify emitted protons down to 0.4 MeV. No evidence was obtained for two-proton radioactivity with a summed energy of 1.9(1) MeV and a branching ratio of 0.5(3)%. Two groups of one-proton radioactivity from this isomer had also been reported; our data confirm the lower energy group at 0.79(3) MeV with its branching ratio of 1.9(5)%.

  12. Relative Biological Effectiveness Variation Along Monoenergetic and Modulated Bragg Peaks of a 62-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beam: A Preclinical Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I.; Perozziello, Francesca M.; Manti, Lorenzo; Currell, Frederick J.; Hanton, Fiona; McMahon, Stephen J.; Kavanagh, Joy N.; Cirrone, Giuseppe Antonio Pablo; Romano, Francesco; Prise, Kevin M.; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The biological optimization of proton therapy can be achieved only through a detailed evaluation of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) variations along the full range of the Bragg curve. The clinically used RBE value of 1.1 represents a broad average, which disregards the steep rise of linear energy transfer (LET) at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). With particular attention to the key endpoint of cell survival, our work presents a comparative investigation of cell killing RBE variations along monoenergetic (pristine) and modulated (SOBP) beams using human normal and radioresistant cells with the aim to investigate the RBE dependence on LET and intrinsic radiosensitvity. Methods and Materials: Human fibroblasts (AG01522) and glioma (U87) cells were irradiated at 6 depth positions along pristine and modulated 62-MeV proton beams at the INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy). Cell killing RBE variations were measured using standard clonogenic assays and were further validated using Monte Carlo simulations and the local effect model (LEM). Results: We observed significant cell killing RBE variations along the proton beam path, particularly in the distal region showing strong dose dependence. Experimental RBE values were in excellent agreement with the LEM predicted values, indicating dose-averaged LET as a suitable predictor of proton biological effectiveness. Data were also used to validate a parameterized RBE model. Conclusions: The predicted biological dose delivered to a tumor region, based on the variable RBE inferred from the data, varies significantly with respect to the clinically used constant RBE of 1.1. The significant RBE increase at the distal end suggests also a potential to enhance optimization of treatment modalities such as LET painting of hypoxic tumors. The study highlights the limitation of adoption of a constant RBE for proton therapy and suggests approaches for fast implementation of RBE models in treatment planning.

  13. Solar Energetic Protons at >500 MeV in the Sun's Atmosphere and in Interplanetary Space: The 2012 May 17 Ground Level Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylka, A. J.; Dietrich, W. F.; Murphy, R. J.; Ng, C. K.; Share, G. H.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    For energetic particles produced at or near the Sun, it is generally recognized that at least two distinct acceleration mechanisms are operating: (1) acceleration at coronal sites of magnetic reconnection, generally associated with flares and (2) acceleration at shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It is also generally recognized that both mechanisms can accelerate protons to multi-GeV energies, although the precise ways in which this comes about is still an area of active research. Moreover, when a very large solar energetic particle (SEP) event is observed in interplanetary space, both a large flare and the launch of a fast CME are observed nearly simultaneously (unless the flare occurs behind a limb). Numerous studies have tried to sort out how these two energetic phenomena might contribute to the particles observed in interplanetary space. Are the flare-accelerated particles confined to closed field lines? Or do some of them 'leak' to open field lines, thereby allowing them to contribute to the interplanetary SEPs? If so, how large is the flare contribution relative to particles accelerated by the CME-driven shock? To date, there is no consensus on any of these issues, particularly at the highest energies, where the release of particles from the neighborhood of the Sun generally persists for only a short period of time. Although Cycle 24 has thus far been disappointing in its rate of SEP events, the one Ground Level Event (GLE) observed so far, on 2012 May 17, provides the opportunity to address these issues in a more thorough manner than ever before. Fermi has reported sustained emission of >100 MeV gamma-rays that result from proton-induced pion-production in the solar atmosphere. At 1 AU, we have observations of the GLE from the world-wide neutron network, from which the event-integrated proton spectrum and the time-dependent anisotropy have been extracted. This event was also observed at both STEREO spacecraft, giving us the ability to model

  14. Correlated analysis of 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals using photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Wang, Yuhan; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Fu, Xu; Guo, Na; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV protons in CdZnTe crystals has been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques. A notable quenching of PL intensity is observed in the regions irradiated with a fluence of 6 × 1013 p/cm2, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. Moreover, the intensity of emission peak Dcomplex centered at 1.48 eV dominates in the PL spectrum obtained from irradiated regions, ascribed to the increase of interstitial dislocation loops and A centers. The intensity of TSC spectra in irradiated regions decreases compared to the virgin regions, resulting from the charge collection inefficiency caused by proton-induced recombination centers. By comparing the intensity of identified traps obtained from numerical fitting using simultaneous multiple peak analysis (SIMPA) method, it suggests that proton irradiation under such dose can introduce high density of dislocation and A-centers in CdZnTe crystals, consistent with PL results.

  15. Critical current density of Nb3Sn wires after irradiation with 65MeV and 24GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, T.; Scheuerlein, C.; Richter, D.; Bottura, L.; Ballarino, A.; Flükiger, R.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial Nb3Sn wires with Ti and Ta additives (RRP process) and with Ta additives (PIT process) with a diameter of 1 mm have been irradiated at room temperature with protons of 65 MeV and of 24 GeV at various fluences up to 1×1021 p/m2. A steady increase of Jc vs. fluence was observed for all the wires up to the highest fluence. The observed increase of Jc at 4.2K in all wires was quite similar in spite of the very different proton energies. With increasing fluence. the radiation induced pinning force was found to increase. the enhancement Jc/Jco after 5.04×1020 p/m2 reaching 1.4 for Ta and 1.8 for Ti alloyed wires at 10T. The present results were quantitatively analysed by assuming a radiation induced point pinning mechanism in addition to grain boundary pinning. The results are compared with those of an ongoing neutron irradiation study undertaken on the same Nb3Sn wires in collaboration with the Atominstitut Vienna. Proton irradiation was found to produce considerably higher damage than neutron irradiation.

  16. Optical spectroscopy and imaging of colour centres in lithium fluoride crystals and thin films irradiated by 3 MeV proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Carpanese, M.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2014-05-01

    Lithium fluoride is a well-known dosimeter material and it is currently under investigation also for high-resolution radiation imaging detectors based on colour centre photoluminescence. In order to extend their applications, proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by a linear accelerator, were used to irradiate LiF crystals and thin films in the fluence range of 1010-1015 protons/cm2. The irradiation induces the formation of colour centres, mainly the primary F centre and the aggregate F2 and F3+ defects, which are stable at room temperature. By optical pumping in the blue spectral region, the F2 and F3+ centres emit broad photoluminescence bands in the visible spectral range. By conventional fluorescence microscopy, the integrated photoluminescence intensity was carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films as a function of the irradiation fluence: a linear optical response was obtained in a large range of fluence, which is dependent on the used LiF samples. Colour centres concentrations were estimated in LiF crystals by optical absorption spectroscopy. It was possible to record the transversal proton beam intensity profile by acquiring the photoluminescence image of the irradiated spots on LiF films.

  17. Investigation of activation cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natMo up to 40 MeV: New data and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 90Mo(cum), 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(cum), 92mNb, 95mNb, 95gNb, 96Nb and 88Zr(cum), 89Zr(cum) were measured up to 40 MeV proton energy by a using stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to study the production possibility of the medically important 99mTc and its 99Mo parent nucleus, to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of proton beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analysed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes.

  18. Analyzing powers and proton spin transfer coefficients in the elastic scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an L-type polarized deuteron target at small momentum transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    Analyzing powers and spin transfer coefficients which describe the elastic scattering of polarized protons from a polarized deuteron target have been measured. The energy of the proton beam was 800 MeV and data were taken at laboratory scattering angles of 7, 11, 14, and 16.5 degrees. One analyzing power was also measured at 180 degrees. Three linearly independent orientations of the beam polarization were used and the target was polarized parallel and antiparallel to the direction of the beam momentum. The data were taken with the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (experiment 685). The results are compared with multiple scattering predictions based on Dirac representations of the nucleon-nucleon scattering matrices. 27 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Neutron transition strengths of 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in the neutron-rich oxygen isotopes determined from inelastic proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Dang Chien; Khoa, Dao T.

    2009-03-15

    A coupled-channel analysis of the {sup 18,20,22}O(p,p{sup '}) data has been performed to determine the neutron transition strengths of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in oxygen targets, using the microscopic optical potential and inelastic form factor calculated in the folding model. A complex density- and isospin-dependent version of the CDM3Y6 interaction was constructed, based on the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculation of nuclear matter, for the folding model input. Given an accurate isovector density dependence of the CDM3Y6 interaction, the isoscalar ({delta}{sub 0}) and isovector ({delta}{sub 1}) deformation lengths of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in {sup 18,20,22}O have been extracted from the folding model analysis of the (p,p{sup '}) data. A specific N dependence of {delta}{sub 0} and {delta}{sub 1} has been established which can be linked to the neutron shell closure occurring at N approaching 16. The strongest isovector deformation was found for the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state in {sup 20}O, with {delta}{sub 1} about 2.5 times larger than {delta}{sub 0}, which indicates a strong core polarization by the valence neutrons in {sup 20}O. The ratios of the neutron/proton transition matrix elements (M{sub n}/M{sub p}) determined for the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in {sup 18,20}O have been compared with those deduced from the mirror symmetry, using the measured B(E2) values of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in the proton-rich {sup 18}Ne and {sup 20}Mg nuclei, to discuss the isospin impurity in the 2{sub 1}{sup +} excitation of the A=18, T=1 and A=20, T=2 isobars.

  20. Sub-micrometer 20MeV protons or 45MeV lithium spot irradiation enhances yields of dicentric chromosomes due to clustering of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Schmid, T E; Friedland, W; Greubel, C; Girst, S; Reindl, J; Siebenwirth, C; Ilicic, K; Schmid, E; Multhoff, G; Schmitt, E; Kundrát, P; Dollinger, G

    2015-11-01

    In conventional experiments on biological effects of radiation types of diverse quality, micrometer-scale double-strand break (DSB) clustering is inherently interlinked with clustering of energy deposition events on nanometer scale relevant for DSB induction. Due to this limitation, the role of the micrometer and nanometer scales in diverse biological endpoints cannot be fully separated. To address this issue, hybrid human-hamster AL cells have been irradiated with 45MeV (60keV/μm) lithium ions or 20MeV (2.6keV/μm) protons quasi-homogeneously distributed or focused to 0.5×1μm(2) spots on regular matrix patterns (point distances up to 10.6×10.6μm), with pre-defined particle numbers per spot to provide the same mean dose of 1.7Gy. The yields of dicentrics and their distribution among cells have been scored. In parallel, track-structure based simulations of DSB induction and chromosome aberration formation with PARTRAC have been performed. The results show that the sub-micrometer beam focusing does not enhance DSB yields, but significantly affects the DSB distribution within the nucleus and increases the chance to form DSB pairs in close proximity, which may lead to increased yields of chromosome aberrations. Indeed, the experiments show that focusing 20 lithium ions or 451 protons per spot on a 10.6μm grid induces two or three times more dicentrics, respectively, than a quasi-homogenous irradiation. The simulations reproduce the data in part, but in part suggest more complex behavior such as saturation or overkill not seen in the experiments. The direct experimental demonstration that sub-micrometer clustering of DSB plays a critical role in the induction of dicentrics improves the knowledge on the mechanisms by which these lethal lesions arise, and indicates how the assumptions of the biophysical model could be improved. It also provides a better understanding of the increased biological effectiveness of high-LET radiation.

  1. Acceleration of protons to above 6 MeV using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pomerantz, I.; Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Gordon, D.; Sprangel, P.; Zigler, A.

    2012-07-09

    A scheme is presented for using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets for the generation of fast protons. This novel method may relax the requirements for very high laser intensities, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based ion acceleration system.

  2. SU-E-T-554: Monte Carlo Calculation of Source Terms and Attenuation Lengths for Neutrons Produced by 50–200 MeV Protons On Brass

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Mendez, J; Faddegon, B; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used TOPAS (TOPAS wraps and extends Geant4 for medical physicists) to compare Geant4 physics models with published data for neutron shielding calculations. Subsequently, we calculated the source terms and attenuation lengths (shielding data) of the total ambient dose equivalent (TADE) in concrete for neutrons produced by protons in brass. Methods: Stage1: The Bertini and Binary nuclear models available in Geant4 were compared with published attenuation at depth of the TADE in concrete and iron. Stage2: Shielding data of the TADE in concrete was calculated for 50– 200 MeV proton beams on brass. Stage3: Shielding data from Stage2 was extrapolated for 235 MeV proton beams. This data was used in a point-line-source analytical model to calculate the ambient dose per unit therapeutic dose at two locations inside one treatment room at the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center. Finally, we compared these results with experimental data and full TOPAS simulations. Results: At larger angles (∼130o) the TADE in concrete calculated with the Bertini model was about 9 times larger than that calculated with the Binary model. The attenuation length in concrete calculated with the Binary model agreed with published data within 7%±0.4% (statistical uncertainty) for the deepest regions and 5%±0.1% for shallower regions. For iron the agreement was within 3%±0.1%. The ambient dose per therapeutic dose calculated with the Binary model, relative to the experimental data, was a ratio of 0.93±0.16 and 1.23±0.24 for two locations. The analytical model overestimated the dose by four orders of magnitude. These differences are attributed to the complexity of the geometry. Conclusion: The Binary and Bertini models gave comparable results, with the Binary model giving the best agreement with published data at large angle. Shielding data we calculated using the Binary model is useful for fast shielding calculations with other analytical models. This work was supported by

  3. Evaluation of irradiation effects of 16 MeV proton-irradiated 12Cr-1MoV steel by small punch (SP) tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, S.H.; Hong, J.H. ); Kim, I.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-06-15

    Recently, interest in small-scale specimens for testing irradiated materials has arisen in conjunction with the need to develop materials for fusion reactor materials and to study irradiation effects using an ion irradiation facility. Several attempts have been made to evaluate material property changes due to irradiation using a small specimen technique. The SP (small punch) test is an example of small-scale specimen test techniques, originally developed by Baik et al. to estimate DBTT (ductile-to-brittle transition temperature) using broken standard CVN (Charpy 5-notch) specimens. The objective of the present study is to evaluate 16 MeV proton irradiation effects on a fusion reactor candidate material in terms of changes in energy up to failure and J[sub IC] fracture toughness (SP J[sub IC]) by using a SP test technique and a J[sub IC] - [bar [epsilon

  4. Relative biological effectiveness of the 60-MeV therapeutic proton beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, Poland.

    PubMed

    Słonina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Swakoń, Jan; Kabat, Damian; Grzanka, Leszek; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Sowa, Urszula

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, the first one to operate in Poland. RBE was assessed at the surviving fractions (SFs) of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.37, for normal human fibroblasts from three cancer patients. The cells were irradiated near the Bragg peak of the pristine beam and at three depths within a 28.4-mm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). Reference radiation was provided by 6-MV X-rays. The mean RBE value at SF = 0.01 for fibroblasts irradiated near the Bragg peak of pristine beam ranged between 1.06 and 1.15. The mean RBE values at SF = 0.01 for these cells exposed at depths of 2, 15, and 27 mm of the SOBP ranged between 0.95-1.00, 0.97-1.02, and 1.05-1.11, respectively. A trend was observed for RBE values to increase with survival level and with depth in the SOBP: at SF = 0.37 and at the depth of 27 mm, RBE values attained their maximum (1.19-1.24). The RBE values estimated at SF = 0.01 using normal human fibroblasts for the 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the IFJ PAN in Kraków are close to values of 1.0 and 1.1, used in clinical practice.

  5. Measurement and modelling of radionuclide production in thick spherical targets irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Lange, H.J.; Leya, I.; Luepke, M.; Herpers, U.; Meltzow, B.; Roesel, R.; Filges, D.; Cloth, P.; Dragovitsch, P.

    1994-12-31

    Two thick spherical targets made of gabbro and of steel with radii of 25 and 10 cm, respectively, were isotropically irradiated with 1.6 GeV protons at the Saturne accelerator at Laboratoire National Saturne/Saclay in order to simulate the interactions of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) protons with stony and iron meteoroids. The artificial meteoroids contained large numbers of individual small targets of up to 27 elements, in which the depth-dependent production of residual nuclides was measured by {gamma}-, accelerator and conventional mass spectrometry. Theoretical production depth profiles were derived by folding depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary particles calculated by the HERMES code system with experimental and theoretical production rates shortcomings of the cross section data base can be distinguished and medium-energy neutron cross sections can be improved.

  6. Beam normal single spin asymmetry in forward angle inelastic electron-proton scattering using the q-weak apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, FNU

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (Bn) on H2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic Bn is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of Bn background studies, we made the first measurement of Bn in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be Bn = 42.82 +- 2.45 (stat) +- 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy Ebeam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 degrees, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. Bn from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma*DeltaDelta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ˜10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system has

  7. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    ., Nuruzzaman

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system

  8. Fine structure of resonance at E/sub x/-- 14 MeV in /sup 40/Ca

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, T.; Kishimoto, S.; Iwamoto, K.; Saeki, B.; Yuasa, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ogino, K.; Matsuki, S.; Fukuda, T.; Inoue, M.; and others

    1987-08-01

    The inelastic scattering of protons by /sup 40/Ca leading to a resonance at E/sub x/--14 MeV was studied at an incident energy of 65.1 MeV with an energy resolution of 23 keV. The resonance was found to consist of many discrete states, most of which were 2/sup +/ states, and exhausted 8% of the energy-weighted sum rule. Octupole strength of 1.8% of the energy-weighted sum rule was found, 4 times smaller than that observed in electron scattering.

  9. Measurement of the neutron fields produced by a 62 MeV proton beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amgarou, K.; Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Carinci, G.; Russo, S.

    2011-10-01

    The experimental characterization of the neutron fields produced as parasitic effect in medical accelerators is assuming an increased importance for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. Medical accelerators are diverse in terms of particle type (electrons or hadrons) and energy, but the radiation fields around them have in common (provided that a given threshold energy is reached) the presence of neutrons with energy span over several orders of magnitude. Due to the large variability of neutron energy, field or dosimetry measurements in these workplaces are very complex, and in general, cannot be performed with ready-to-use commercial instruments. In spite of its poor energy resolution, the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. The energy range of this instrument is limited to E<20 MeV if only polyethylene spheres are used, but can be extended to hundreds of MeV by including metal-loaded spheres (extended range BSS, indicated with ERBSS). With the aim of providing useful data to the scientific community involved in neutron measurements at hadron therapy facilities, an ERBSS experiment was carried out at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) of INFN—LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud), where a proton beam routinely used for ophthalmic cancer treatments is available. The 62 MeV beam was directed towards a PMMA phantom, simulating the patient, and two neutron measurement points were established at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam-line. Here the ERBSS of UAB (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona— Grup de Física de les Radiacions) and INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were exposed to characterize the "forward" and "sideward" proton-induced neutron fields. The use of two ERBSS characterized by different set of spheres, central detectors, and independently established and

  10. Proton-impact ionization cross sections of adenine measured at 0.5 and 2.0 MeV by electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-11-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections (DDCSs) of vapor-phase adenine molecules (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 0.5- and 2.0-MeV proton impact have been measured by the electron spectroscopy method. Electrons ejected from adenine were analyzed by a 45 Degree-Sign parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer over an energy range of 1.0-1000 eV at emission angles from 15 Degree-Sign to 165 Degree-Sign . Single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) and total ionization cross sections (TICSs) were also deduced. It was found from the Platzman plot, defined as SDCSs divided by the classical Rutherford knock-on cross sections per target electron, that the SDCSs at higher electron energies are proportional to the total number of valence electrons (50) of adenine, while those at low-energy electrons are highly enhanced due to dipole and higher-order interactions. The present results of TICS are in fairly good agreement with recent classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, and moreover, a simple analytical formula gives nearly equivalent cross sections in magnitude at the incident proton energies investigated.

  11. A SHORTCUT FORMULA FOR THE 230-MeV PROTON-INDUCED NEUTRON DOSE EQUIVALENT IN CONCRETE AFTER A METAL SHIELD, DERIVED FROM MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS WITH MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Taal, A; van der Kooij, A; Okx, W J C

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed with MCNPX to determine the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after a metal shield, a double-layered shielding configuration. In the simulations, a 230-MeV proton beam impinging on a copper target was used to produce the neutrons. For forward angles up to 30° with respect to the proton beam, it is found that the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after a metal layer can be expressed in a single formula. This single formula being the neutron dose equivalent formula for a single thick concrete shield enhanced with an additional exponential term. The exponent of this additional exponential term is related to the relative macroscopic neutron removal cross section of the metal with respect to the concrete. The single formula found fits MCNPX data for the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after layers of metal ranging from beryllium to lead. First attempts were made to make this shortcut formula applicable to alloys and compounds of metals.

  12. Proton-impact ionization cross sections of adenine measured at 0.5 and 2.0 MeV by electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-11-01

    Double-differential ionization cross sections (DDCSs) of vapor-phase adenine molecules (C5H5N5) by 0.5- and 2.0-MeV proton impact have been measured by the electron spectroscopy method. Electrons ejected from adenine were analyzed by a 45∘ parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer over an energy range of 1.0-1000 eV at emission angles from 15∘ to 165∘. Single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) and total ionization cross sections (TICSs) were also deduced. It was found from the Platzman plot, defined as SDCSs divided by the classical Rutherford knock-on cross sections per target electron, that the SDCSs at higher electron energies are proportional to the total number of valence electrons (50) of adenine, while those at low-energy electrons are highly enhanced due to dipole and higher-order interactions. The present results of TICS are in fairly good agreement with recent classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, and moreover, a simple analytical formula gives nearly equivalent cross sections in magnitude at the incident proton energies investigated.

  13. Measurement of proton induced thick target γ-ray yields on B, N, Na, Al and Si from 2.5 to 4.1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Ferraccioli, G.; Melon, B.; Nannini, A.; Perego, A.; Salvestrini, L.; Lagoyannis, A.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.

    2016-01-01

    Thick target yields for proton induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) on low-Z nuclei, namely B, N, Na, Al and Si, were measured for proton energies from 2.5 to 4.1 MeV and emission angles of 0°, 45° and 90°, at the 3 MV Tandetron laboratory of INFN-LABEC in Florence. The studied reactions were: 10B(p,α‧γ)7Be (Eγ = 429 keV), 10B(p,p‧γ)10B (Eγ = 718 keV) and 11B(p,p‧γ)11B (Eγ = 2125 keV) for boron; 14N(p,p‧γ)14N (Eγ = 2313 keV) for nitrogen; 23Na(p,p‧γ)23Na (Eγ = 441 and 1636 keV) and 23Na(p,α‧γ)20Ne (Eγ = 1634 keV) for sodium; 27Al(p,p‧γ)27Al (Eγ = 844 and 1014 keV) and 27Al(p,α‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV) for aluminum; 28Si(p,p‧γ)28Si (Eγ = 1779 keV) and 29Si(p,p‧γ)29Si (Eγ = 1273 keV) for silicon. The PIGE thick target yields have been measured with an overall uncertainty typically better than 10%. The use of the measured thick target yield to benchmark and validate experimental cross sections available in the literature is demonstrated.

  14. Measurements of proton induced γ-ray emission cross sections on MgF2 target in the energy range 1.95-3.05 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, I.; Siketić, Z.; Jakšić, M.; Bogdanović Radović, I.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present differential cross sections for γ-ray emission from the reactions 19F(p,p‧γ)19F (Eγ = 110, 197, 1236 and 1349 + 1357 keV), 24Mg(p,p‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV) and 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg (Eγ = 390, 585 and 975 keV). Differential cross sections were measured for proton energies from 1.95 to 3.05 MeV with a 15 keV step and beam energy resolution of 0.06%. Thin reference standard, 54.1 μg/cm2 of MgF2 deposited on thin Mylar foil with additionally evaporated 4 nm Au layer, was used as a target. The γ-rays were detected by a 20% relative efficiency HPGe detector placed at an angle of 135° with respect to the beam direction, while the backscattered protons were collected using silicon surface barrier detector placed at the scattering angle of 165°. Obtained cross sections were compared with the previously measured data available from the literature.

  15. Cross sections for production of the 15.10 MeV and other astrophysically significant gamma-ray lines through excitation and spallation of sup 12 C and sup 16 O with protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, F. L.; Werntz, C. W.; Crannell, C. J.; Trombka, J. I.; Chang, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The ratio of the flux of 15.10-MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.438-MeV gamma rays resulting from excitation of the corresponding states in C-12 as a sensitive measure of the spectrum of the exciting particles produced in solar flares and other cosmic sources. These gamma rays are produced predominantly by interactions with C-12 and O-16, both of which are relatively abundant in the solar photosphere. Gamma ray production cross sections for proton interactions have been reported previously for all important channels except for the production of 15.10-MeV gamma rays from O-16. The first reported measurement of the 15.10-MeV gamma ray production cross section from p + O-16 is presented here. The University of Maryland cyclotron was employed to produce 40-, 65-, and 86-MeV protons which interacted with CH2 and BeO targets. The resultant gamma ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector at 70, 90, 110, 125, and 140 degrees relative to the direction of the incident beam for each proton energy. Other gamma ray lines resulting from direct excitation and spallation reactions with C-12 and 0-16 were observed as well, and their gamma ray production cross sections described.

  16. Capsule Areal-Density Asymmetries and Time Evolution Inferred from 14.7-MeV Proton Line Structure in OMEGA D^3He Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. K.

    2002-11-01

    The fusion of D^3He in spherical capsule implosions results in copious production of 14.7-MeV protons. As these protons pass through the plasma, they lose energy. Importantly, this energy loss reflects the areal density (ρL) of the plasma transited. Up to 11 proton spectrometers simultaneously view D^3He implosions from different directions. While the burn-averaged and spatially averaged ρL for each implosion is typically between 50 to 75 mg/cm^2 within a group of similar implosions, there are often significant differences between the individual spectra of a given shot, in both their average implied ρL ( ˜50% about the mean) and in the low-energy tail. Some of these low-mode (ℓ ˜ 1) individual-shot asymmetries are attributable to laser drive asymmetry. However, for small amounts of energy imbalance (<=5% rms), the measured asymmetries are found to be uncorrelated with UV-measured laser imbalance. This indicates that other sources of asymmetry, such as capsule asymmetries, may play a role. In addition to nonuniformities, time evolution is the other important component to line broadening and spectral shape. To most clearly elucidate this effect, implosions of 24-μm-thick CH capsules were conducted. In a 400-ps period between first shock coalescence and compression, the spatially averaged ρL changes from ˜ 8 to ˜ 70 mg/cm^2. An important issue is whether the shell asymmetries could have already been established at the time of first shock coalescence. Supported in part by the U.S. D.O.E. Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion (Grant DE-FG03-99DP00300; Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), LLNL (subcontract B313975). (Petrasso: Visiting Senior Scientist at LLE.)

  17. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-06-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  18. Vector and Tensor Polarization Measurements for Deuteron-Proton and Deuteron-Neutron Quasifree Scattering Using the Polarized Deuteron + Deuteron Going to Deuteron + Proton + Neutron Breakup Reaction at 12 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felsher, Paul Daniel

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of vector and tensor analyzing powers A_{y}, A_ {yy} and A_{zz} for dp and dn quasifree scattering (QFS) have been made using the vec d+dto d+p+n breakup reaction at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. The experiment was conducted with a 12-MeV tensor-polarized deuteron beam incident on a gas cell filled with one bar deuterium. The momenta of two (deuteron-neutron, deuteron -proton or proton-neutron) of the three outgoing particles were measured simultaneously, thereby completely defining the reaction kinematics. Deuteron-proton coincidence data were taken at five laboratory angle pairs: (theta _{d},theta_{p}) = (+/-10.0^circ, mp10.0^circ), (+/-10.0, mp41.2 ^circ), (+/-17.0 ^circ,mp17.0 ^circ), (+/-17.0 ^circ,mp34.5 ^circ) and (+/-19.4 ^circ,mp19.4 ^circ). Deuteron-neutron and proton -neutron coincidence data were taken at three laboratory angle pairs: (theta_{d}, theta_{n}) = (theta _{n},theta_{n}) = (+/-17.0^ circ,mp17.0^circ ), (+/-17.0^ circ,mp34.5^circ ) and (+/-19.4^ circ,mp28.9^circ ). The angle pairs (theta_ {d},theta_{n}), (theta_{p},theta_ {n}) and (theta_ {d},theta_{p}) were chosen such that the reaction would be well-suited for observing dn and dp QFS. Deuteron-proton coincidence data were sorted into two-dimensional (2D) spectra of deuteron energy versus proton energy, while proton-neutron and deuteron -neutron data were sorted into 2D spectra of neutron time -of-flight versus proton energy and deuteron energy, respectively. Each 2D spectrum was projected onto the kinematically allowed locus. Analyzing powers were computed as a function of arc length S along the locus for A_{y }, A_{yy} and A_{zz}. Since four-nucleon calculations involving polarization observables for the vec d+dto d+p+n breakup reaction are not yet available, the data are compared to Impulse-Approximation (IA) calculations. The IA calculations included off-the-energy-shell deuteron -nucleon (dN) amplitudes as well as on-the-energy-shell dN amplitudes and also

  19. Experimental depth dose curves of a 67.5 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation

    PubMed Central

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Shin, Jungwook; Castenada, Carlos M.; Ramos-Méndez, José; Daftari, Inder K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure depth dose curves for a 67.5 ± 0.1 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: Depth dose curves were measured in 2 beam lines. Protons in the raw beam line traversed a Ta scattering foil, 0.1016 or 0.381 mm thick, a secondary emission monitor comprised of thin Al foils, and a thin Kapton exit window. The beam energy and peak width and the composition and density of material traversed by the beam were known with sufficient accuracy to permit benchmark quality measurements. Diodes for charged particle dosimetry from two different manufacturers were used to scan the depth dose curves with 0.003 mm depth reproducibility in a water tank placed 300 mm from the exit window. Depth in water was determined with an uncertainty of 0.15 mm, including the uncertainty in the water equivalent depth of the sensitive volume of the detector. Parallel-plate chambers were used to verify the accuracy of the shape of the Bragg peak and the peak-to-plateau ratio measured with the diodes. The uncertainty in the measured peak-to-plateau ratio was 4%. Depth dose curves were also measured with a diode for a Bragg curve and treatment beam spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) on the beam line used for eye treatment. The measurements were compared to Monte Carlo simulation done with geant4 using topas. Results: The 80% dose at the distal side of the Bragg peak for the thinner foil was at 37.47 ± 0.11 mm (average of measurement with diodes from two different manufacturers), compared to the simulated value of 37.20 mm. The 80% dose for the thicker foil was at 35.08 ± 0.15 mm, compared to the simulated value of 34.90 mm. The measured peak-to-plateau ratio was within one standard deviation experimental uncertainty of the simulated result for the thinnest foil and two standard deviations for the thickest foil. It was necessary to include the collimation in the simulation, which had a more pronounced effect on the peak-to-plateau ratio for the

  20. Experimental depth dose curves of a 67.5 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Faddegon, Bruce A. Ramos-Méndez, José; Daftari, Inder K.; Shin, Jungwook; Castenada, Carlos M.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To measure depth dose curves for a 67.5 ± 0.1 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: Depth dose curves were measured in 2 beam lines. Protons in the raw beam line traversed a Ta scattering foil, 0.1016 or 0.381 mm thick, a secondary emission monitor comprised of thin Al foils, and a thin Kapton exit window. The beam energy and peak width and the composition and density of material traversed by the beam were known with sufficient accuracy to permit benchmark quality measurements. Diodes for charged particle dosimetry from two different manufacturers were used to scan the depth dose curves with 0.003 mm depth reproducibility in a water tank placed 300 mm from the exit window. Depth in water was determined with an uncertainty of 0.15 mm, including the uncertainty in the water equivalent depth of the sensitive volume of the detector. Parallel-plate chambers were used to verify the accuracy of the shape of the Bragg peak and the peak-to-plateau ratio measured with the diodes. The uncertainty in the measured peak-to-plateau ratio was 4%. Depth dose curves were also measured with a diode for a Bragg curve and treatment beam spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) on the beam line used for eye treatment. The measurements were compared to Monte Carlo simulation done with GEANT4 using TOPAS. Results: The 80% dose at the distal side of the Bragg peak for the thinner foil was at 37.47 ± 0.11 mm (average of measurement with diodes from two different manufacturers), compared to the simulated value of 37.20 mm. The 80% dose for the thicker foil was at 35.08 ± 0.15 mm, compared to the simulated value of 34.90 mm. The measured peak-to-plateau ratio was within one standard deviation experimental uncertainty of the simulated result for the thinnest foil and two standard deviations for the thickest foil. It was necessary to include the collimation in the simulation, which had a more pronounced effect on the peak-to-plateau ratio for the

  1. Neutron spectral and angular distribution measurements for 113 and 256 MeV protons on range-thick Al and sup 238 U targets using the foil activation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Intasorn, A.

    1989-07-01

    Second neutron yields, energy spectra, and angular distributions have been measured at seven angles from 0 to 150{degree} for 113 and 256 MeV protons stopped in range-thick targets of aluminum and depleted uranium ({sup 238}U). Thin foil stacks of ten different materials were activated by secondary neutrons at distances of 20--30 cm from the targets. Following each irradiation, 30--40 different activation products were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. These activation rates were then used to adjust neutron energy spectra calculated by the HETC computer code. Activation cross sections were taken from ENDF/BV below 20 MeV, from literature values tested in Be(d,n) fields up to 50 MeV, and from proton spallation data and calculations from 50--250 MeV. Spectral adjustments were made with the STAY'SL computer code using a least-squares technique to minimize {chi}{sup 2} for a covariance matrix determined from uncertainties in the measured activities, cross sections, and calculated flux spectra. Neutron scattering effects were estimated from foil packets irradiated at different distances from the target. Proton effects were measured with (p,n) reactions. Systematic differences were found between the adjusted and calculated neutron spectra, namely, that HETC underpredicts the neutron flux at back angles by a factor of 2--3 and slightly overpredicts the flux at forward angles. 19 refs., 23 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. An in-beam PET system for monitoring ion-beam therapy: test on phantoms using clinical 62 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarlinghi, N.; Sportelli, G.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Cecchetti, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Retico, A.; Romano, F.; Sala, P.; Straub, K.; Tramontana, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2014-04-01

    Ion therapy allows the delivery of highly conformal dose taking advantage of the sharp depth-dose distribution at the Bragg-peak. However, patient positioning errors and anatomical uncertainties can cause dose distortions. To exploit the full potential of ion therapy, an accurate monitoring system of the ion range is needed. Among the proposed methods to monitor the ion range, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has proven to be the most mature technique, allowing to reconstruct the β+ activity generated in the patient by the nuclear interaction of the ions, that can be acquired during or after the treatment. Taking advantages of the spatial correlation between positron emitters created along the ions path and the dose distribution, it is possible to reconstruct the ion range. Due to the high single rates generated during the beam extraction, the acquisition of the β+ activity is typically performed after the irradiation (cyclotron) or in between the synchrotron spills. Indeed the single photon rate can be one or more orders of magnitude higher than normal for cyclotron. Therefore, acquiring the activity during the beam irradiation requires a detector with a very short dead time. In this work, the DoPET detector, capable of sustaining the high event rate generated during the cyclotron irradiation, is presented. The capability of the system to acquire data during and after the irradiation will be demonstrated by showing the reconstructed activity for different PMMA irradiations performed using clinical dose rates and the 62 MeV proton beam at the CATANA-LNS-INFN. The reconstructed activity widths will be compared with the results obtained by simulating the proton beam interaction with the FLUKA Monte Carlo. The presented data are in good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo.

  3. Annual Cosmic Ray Spectra from 250 MeV up to 1.6 GeV from 1995 - 2014 Measured with the Electron Proton Helium Instrument onboard SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, P.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.

    2016-03-01

    The solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can be studied in detail by examining long-term variations of the GCR energy spectrum ( e.g. on the scales of a solar cycle). With almost 20 years of data, the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) onboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is well suited for this kind of investigation. Although the design of the instrument is optimised to measure proton and helium isotope spectra up to 50 MeV nucleon^{-1}, the capability exists to determine proton energy spectra from 250 MeV up to above 1.6 GeV. Therefore we developed a sophisticated inversion method to calculate such proton spectra. The method relies on a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument and a simplified spacecraft model that calculates the energy-response function of EPHIN for electrons, protons, and heavier ions. For validation purposes, proton spectra based on this method are compared to various balloon missions and space instrumentation. As a result we present annual galactic cosmic-ray spectra from 1995 to 2014.

  4. Effect of the energy of recoil atoms on conductivity compensation in moderately doped n-Si and n-SiC under irradiation with MeV electrons and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Emtsev, V. V.; Oganesyan, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    Processes of radiation defect formation and conductivity compensation in silicon and silicon carbide irradiated with 0.9 MeV electrons are considered in comparison with the electron irradiation at higher energies. The experimental values of the carrier removal rate at the electron energy of 0.9 MeV are nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the similar values of the parameter for higher energy electrons (6-9 MeV). At the same time, the formation cross-section of primary radiation defects (Frenkel pairs, FPs) is nearly energy-independent in this range. It is assumed that these differences are due to the influence exerted by the energy of primary knocked-on atoms (PKAs). As the PKA energy increases, the average distance between the genetically related FPs grows and, as a consequence, the fraction of FPs unrecombined under irradiation becomes larger. The FP recombination radius is estimated (∼1.1 nm), which makes it possible to ascertain the charge state of the recombining components. Second, the increase in the PKA energy enables formation of new, more complex secondary radiation defects. At electron energies exceeding 15 MeV, the average PKA energies are closer to the values obtained under irradiation with 1 MeV protons, compared with an electron irradiation at the same energy. As for the radiation-induced defect formation, the irradiation of silicon with MeV protons can be, in principle, regarded as a superposition of the irradiation with 1 MeV electrons and that with silicon ions having energy of ∼1 keV, with the ;source; of silicon ions generating these ions uniformly across the sample thickness.

  5. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N.; Thopan, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  6. Systematic study of three-nucleon force effects in the cross section of the deuteron-proton breakup at 130 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    St. Kistryn; E. Stephan; A. Biegun; K. Bodek; A. Deltuva; E. Epelbaum; K. Ermisch; W. Gloeckle; J. Golak; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; H. Kamada; M. Kis; B. Klos; A. Kozela; J. Kuros-Zolnierczuk; M. Mahjour-Shafiei; U.-G. Meissner; A. Micherdzinska; A. Nogga; P. U. Sauer; R. Skibinski; R. Sworst; H. Witala; J. Zejma; W. Zipper

    2005-08-11

    High precision cross-section data of the deuteron-proton breakup reaction at 130 MeV are presented for 72 kinematically complete configurations. The data cover a large region of the available phase space, divided into a systematic grid of kinematical variables. They are compared with theoretical predictions, in which the full dynamics of the three-nucleon (3N) system is obtained in three different ways: realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials are combined with model 3N forces (3NF's) or with an effective 3NF resulting from explicit treatment of the Delta-isobar excitation. Alternatively, the chiral perturbation theory approach is used at the next-to-next-to-leading order with all relevant NN and 3N contributions taken into account. The generated dynamics is then applied to calculate cross-section values by rigorous solution of the 3N Faddeev equations. The comparison of the calculated cross sections with the experimental data shows a clear preference for the predictions in which the 3NF's are included. The majority of the experimental data points is well reproduced by the theoretical predictions. The remaining discrepancies are investigated by inspecting cross sections integrated over certain kinematical variables. The procedure of global comparisons leads to establishing regularities in disagreements between the experimental data and the theoretically predicted values of the cross sections. They indicate deficiencies still present in the assumed models of the 3N system dynamics.

  7. Characterization of neutron and photon sources from a 10.5 MeV proton beam on [18O] enriched water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. F.; Townsend, L. W.; Alvord, C. W.

    2001-07-01

    The production of F-18 from a 10.5 MeV proton beam on oxygen-18 results in significant yields of neutrons and photons. In order to optimize personnel shielding that satisfies regulatory requirements, it is essential that both the intensity of both neutrons and of photons be determined as a function of energy and angle, which was accomplished by combining results from measurements and from calculations. Energy dependence for neutrons was estimated as a function by unfolding Bonner ball measurements, a hyper-pure germanium detector was used to obtain measurements of the photon spectra, and a well established computer program was used to obtain the calculated values. The radiation intensity was determined from calibrated survey meters for neutrons and for photons. The energy and angular dependence obtained from measurements and calculations agree within the uncertainty of the measurements, but calculated results, scaled by measurements, were used for input to radiation shield design studies. The neutron yield is sufficiently high to be of interest for several applications.

  8. Cascade phonon-assisted trapping of positrons by divacancies in n-FZ-Si(P) single crystals irradiated with 15 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Kessler, C.; Elsayed, M.; Oganesyan, G. A.; Kozlovski, V. V.

    2014-02-01

    The trapping of positrons by the radiation defects in moderately doped oxygen-lean n-FZ-Si(P) single crystal irradiated with 15 MeV protons has been investigated in a comparative way using the positron lifetime spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements. The experiments were carried out within a wide temperature interval ranging from 25 K - 29 K to 300 K. The positron trapping rate for divacancies was reconstructed in the course of many-stage isochronal annealing. The concentration and the charged states of divacancies (V2- and V2--) were estimated. The temperature dependency of the trapping cross section of positrons by the negatively charged divacancies is in a good agreement with the data of calculations based on the assumptions of the cascade phonon-assisted mechanism of exchange of the energy between the positron and acoustic long-wave phonons. Obeying ˜ T-3 law, the cross-section of the trapping of positrons by divacancies changes considerably ranging from ˜1.7×10-12 cm2 (66 - 100 K) to ˜2×10-14 cm2 (≈ 250 K). The characteristic length of trapping of the positron by V2-- divacancy was estimated to be l0(V2--)≈(3.4±0.2)×10-8 cm.

  9. Evaluation of cross sections for Lα x-ray production by up to 4 MeV protons in representative elements from silver to uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapicki, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    Over the last two decades, Lα x-ray production cross sections have been fitted with a number of empirical formulae. Cross sections obtained from these formulae are averaged and fitted to a new empirical formula. These new empirical cross sections are compared with the results of the plane-wave Born approximation and the ECPSSR theory of Brandt and Lapicki (1981 Phys. Rev. A 23 1717). They are also gauged by the ECPSSR theory that has been corrected with a united atom approach in slow collisions, evaluated with Dirac-Hartree-Slater instead of screened hydrogenic wavefunctions, modified for intra-shell couplings as well as the change of the atomic parameters due to multiple ionizations. The effects of appropriately normalized intra-shell coupling factors and of multiple ionization were found to be small and essentially offset each other. The role of different sets of atomic parameters in conversion of the predictions of these ionization theories for Lα x-ray production in elements from the 47 <= Z2 <= 92 range of target atoms bombarded by up to 4 MeV protons is examined, and the selection of the optimal combination of ionization theory and atomic parameters for a reliable data base for PIXE analysis of elements heavier than palladium is discussed.

  10. 1.00 MeV proton radiation resistance studies of single-junction and single gap dual-junction amorphous-silicon alloy solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdulaziz, Salman; Payson, J. S.; Li, Yang; Woodyard, James R.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation resistance of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H single-junction and a-Si:H dual-junction solar cells was conducted. The cells were irradiated with 1.00-MeV protons with fluences of 1.0 x 10 to the 14th, 5.0 x 10 to the 14th and 1.0 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm and characterized using I-V and quantum efficiency measurements. The radiation resistance of single-junction cells cannot be used to explain the behavior of dual-junction cells at a fluence of 1.0 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm. The a-Si H single-junction cells degraded the least of the three cells; a-SiGe:H single-junction cells showed the largest reduction in short-circuit current, while a-Si:H dual-junction cells exhibited the largest degradation in the open-circuit voltage. The quantum efficiency of the cells degraded more in the red part of the spectrum; the bottom junction degrades first in dual-junction cells.

  11. Measurement of the Inelastic Proton-Proton Cross Section at s=13 TeV with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.

    2016-10-26

    This Letter presents a measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section using 60 μ b -1 of p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy √ s of 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Inelastic interactions are selected using rings of plastic scintillators in the forward region ( 2.07 < | η | < 3.86 ) of the detector. A cross section of 68.1 ± 1.4 mb is measured in the fiducial region ξ = M $2\\atop{X}$ / s > 10 - 6 , where M X is the larger invariant mass of the two hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. In this ξ range the scintillators are highly efficient. For diffractive events this corresponds to cases where at least one proton dissociates to a system with M X > 13 GeV . The measured cross section is compared with a range of theoretical predictions. When extrapolated to the full phase space, a cross section of 78.1 ± 2.9 mb is measured, consistent with the inelastic cross section increasing with center-of-mass energy.

  12. The Relationship Between CME Properties in the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS Catalogs and ?25 MeV Solar Proton Event Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    overcome some of these problems. In particular, a spacecraft in quadrature with the solar source of an SEP event should observe the 'true' width and speed of the associated CME. However, STEREO CME parameters are derived using the CACTUS method, and cannot be directly compared with the LASCO CDAW catalog values that have been so widely used for many years. In this study, we will examine the relationship between the properties of CMEs in various catalogs and the intensities of a large sample of particle events that include ˜25 MeV protons in cycles 23 and 24. In particular, we will compare the proton intensity-speed relationships obtained using the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS LASCO catalogs, and also using the CACTUS values from whichever spacecraft (STEREO A, B or SOHO) is best in quadrature with the solar event. We will also examine whether there is any correlation between the width of the CMEs in the automated catalogs and proton intensity, and whether a combination of CME speed and width might improve the correlation with proton intensity.

  13. SU-E-T-408: Determination of KQ,Q0-Factors From Water and Graphite Calorimetry in a 60 MeV Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Rossomme, S; Renaud, J; Sarfehnia, A; Seuntjens, J; Lee, N; Thomas, R; Kacperek, A; Bertrand, D; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To reduce the uncertainty of the beam quality correction factor kQ,Q0, for scattered proton beams (SPB). This factor is used in dosimetry protocols, to determine absorbed dose-to-water with ionization chambers. For the Roos plane parallel chambers (RPPICs), the IAEA TRS-398 protocol estimates kQ,Q0-factor to be 1.004(for a beam quality Rres=2 g.cm{sup 2}), with an uncertainty of 2.1%. Methods: A graphite calorimeter (GCal), a water calorimeter (WCal) and RPPICs were exposed, in a single experiment, to a 60 MeV non-modulated SPB. RPPICs were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose-to-water in a 20 MeV electron beam. The calibration coefficient is traceable to NPL's absorbed dose standards. Chamber measurements were corrected for environmental conditions, recombination and polarity. The WCal corrections include heat loss, heat defect and vessel perturbation. The GCal corrections include heat loss and absorbed dose conversion. Except for heat loss correction and its uncertainty in the WCal system, all major corrections were included in the analysis. Other minor corrections, such as beam profile non-uniformity, are still to be evaluated. Experimental kQ,Q0-factors were derived by comparing the results obtained with both calorimeters and ionometry. Results: The absorbed dose-to-water from both calorimeters was found to be within 1.3% with an uncertainty of 1.2%. kQ,Q0-factor for a RPPIC was found to be 0.998 and 1.011, with a standard uncertainty of 1.4% and 0.9% when the dose is based on the GCal and the WCal, respectively. Conclusion: Results suggest the possibility to determine kQ,Q0-values for PPICs in SPB with a lower uncertainty than specified in the TRS-398 thereby helping to reduce uncertainty on absorbed dose-to-water. The agreement between calorimeters confirms the possibility to use GCal or WCal as primary standard in SPB. Because of the dose conversion, the use of GCal may lead to slightly higher

  14. Reaction mechanisms in {sup 16}O+{sup 40}Ca at an incident energy of E({sup 16}O) =86 MeV through inclusive measurements of {alpha} and proton spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Chinmay; Adhikari, S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Roy, S.; Behera, B. R.; Datta, S. K.

    2007-09-15

    The {alpha} and proton spectra from the {sup 16}O+{sup 40}Ca reaction is measured at E({sup 16}O) =86 MeV at several laboratory angles between 54 deg. and 138 deg. Analysis in terms of the statistical model for compound nuclear reactions show that an event-by-event calculation of the evaporation spectra removes discrepancy observed with standard calculations.

  15. 800-MeV magnetic-focused flash proton radiography for high-contrast imaging of low-density biologically-relevant targets using an inverse-scatter collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Allison, Jason; Espinoza, Camilo; Goett, John Jerome; Hogan, Gary; Hollander, Brian; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E.; Morley, Deborah; Morris, Chris; Murray, Matthew; Nedrow, Paul; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Sisneros, Thomas; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Wilde, Carl

    2016-03-01

    Proton radiography shows great promise as a tool to guide proton beam therapy (PBT) in real time. Here, we demonstrate two ways in which the technology may progress towards that goal. Firstly, with a proton beam that is 800 MeV in energy, target tissue receives a dose of radiation with very tight lateral constraint. This could present a benefit over the traditional treatment energies of ~200 MeV, where up to 1 cm of lateral tissue receives scattered radiation at the target. At 800 MeV, the beam travels completely through the object with minimal deflection, thus constraining lateral dose to a smaller area. The second novelty of this system is the utilization of magnetic quadrupole refocusing lenses that mitigate the blur caused by multiple Coulomb scattering within an object, enabling high resolution imaging of thick objects, such as the human body. This system is demonstrated on ex vivo salamander and zebrafish specimens, as well as on a realistic hand phantom. The resulting images provide contrast sufficient to visualize thin tissue, as well as fine detail within the target volumes, and the ability to measure small changes in density. Such a system, combined with PBT, would enable the delivery of a highly specific dose of radiation that is monitored and guided in real time.

  16. Cross Sections for the Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides with Protons up to 400 MeV for the Interpretation of Cosmic-Ray-produced Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiekel, Th.; Rosel, R.; Herpers, U.; Bodemann, R.; Leya, I.; Gloris, M.; Michel, R.; Dittrich, B.; Kubik, P.; Suter, M.

    1993-07-01

    Integral excitation functions of the cosmogenic nuclides are the basic requirement for the interpretation of interactions between cosmic ray particles and extraterrestrial and terrestrial matter. Together with the knowledge of primary and secondary particle fields inside an irradiated body, model calculations can be developed to interpret abundances of cosmogenic nuclides in dependencies of the irradiation history of the irradiated body and of the cosmic particle ray itself. The quality of those model calculations depends on the quality of the available cross-section database, which is neither comprehensive nor reliable for the most important nuclides like the long-lived radionuclides (i.e., 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca) and the stable rare gas isotopes. For a systematic investigation in this field of science we carried out several irradiation experiments with protons in the energy region between 45 MeV and 400 MeV at the Paul Scherrer Institut (Villigen, Switzerland) and the Laboratoire Nationale Saturne (Saclay, France) using the stacked foil technique. We included 21 different target elements with Z between 6 and 79 (C, N as Si3N4, O as SiO2, Mg, Al, Si, Ca as CaC2H2O4, Ti, V, Mn as Mn/Ni alloy, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Sr as SrF2, Y, Zr, Nb, Rh, Ba as Ba containing glass and Au) in our experiments. The proton fluxes were monitored via the reaction 27Al(p,3p3n)22Na using the evaluated data of [1]. Residual nuclides were measured by X-, gamma-, and after a chemical separation by accelerator mass spectrometry. In order to check the quality of our experimental procedures we included some target elements in our new experiments for which consistent excitation functions have already been determined [2,3,4]. Our new data show excellent agreement with the earlier measurements. We measured cross sections for more than 120 different reactions. Here we report on the results for target elements with Z up to 28. The exsisting database of experimental excitation functions for the production

  17. Cascade phonon-assisted trapping of positrons by divacancies in n-FZ-Si(P) single crystals irradiated with 15 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.; Oganesyan, G. A.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Kessler, C.; Elsayed, M.; Kozlovski, V. V.

    2014-02-21

    The trapping of positrons by the radiation defects in moderately doped oxygen-lean n-FZ-Si(P) single crystal irradiated with 15 MeV protons has been investigated in a comparative way using the positron lifetime spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements. The experiments were carried out within a wide temperature interval ranging from 25 K – 29 K to 300 K. The positron trapping rate for divacancies was reconstructed in the course of many-stage isochronal annealing. The concentration and the charged states of divacancies (V{sub 2}{sup −} and V{sub 2}{sup −−}) were estimated. The temperature dependency of the trapping cross section of positrons by the negatively charged divacancies is in a good agreement with the data of calculations based on the assumptions of the cascade phonon-assisted mechanism of exchange of the energy between the positron and acoustic long-wave phonons. Obeying ∼ T{sup −3} law, the cross-section of the trapping of positrons by divacancies changes considerably ranging from ∼1.7×10{sup −12} cm{sup 2} (66 – 100 K) to ∼2×10{sup −14} cm{sup 2} (≈ 250 K). The characteristic length of trapping of the positron by V{sub 2}{sup −−} divacancy was estimated to be l{sub 0}(V{sub 2}{sup −−})≈(3.4±0.2)×10{sup −8} cm.

  18. Ranking and validation of the spallation models for description of intermediate mass fragment emission from p + Ag collisions at 480 MeV incident proton beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sushil K.; Kamys, Bogusław; Goldenbaum, Frank; Filges, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    Double-differential cross-sections d2σ/dΩ dE for isotopically identified intermediate mass fragments ( 6Li up to 27Mg from nuclear reactions induced by 480 MeV protons impinging on a silver target were analyzed in the frame of a two-step model. The first step of the reaction was described by the intranuclear cascade model INCL4.6 and the second one by four different models (ABLA07,GEM2, GEMINI++, and SMM). The experimental spectra reveal the presence of low-energy, isotropic as well as high-energy, forward-peaked contributions. The INCL4.6 model offers a possibility to describe the latter contribution for light intermediate mass fragments by coalescence of the emitted nucleons. The qualitative agreement of the model predictions with the data was observed but the high-energy tails of the spectra were significantly overestimated. The shape of the isotropic part of the spectra was reproduced by all four models. The GEM2 model strongly underestimated the value of the cross-sections for heavier IMF whereas the SMM and ABLA07 models generally overestimated the data. The best quantitative description of the data was offered by GEMINI++, however, a discrepancy between the data and the model cross-sections still remained for almost all reaction products, especially at forward angles. It indicates that non-equilibrium processes are present which cannot be reproduced by the applied models. The goodness of the data description was judged quantitatively using two statistical deviation factors, the H-factor and the M-factor, as a tool for ranking and validation of the theoretical models.

  19. Involvement of the Artemis Protein in the Relative Biological Efficiency Observed With the 76-MeV Proton Beam Used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay

    SciTech Connect

    Calugaru, Valentin; Nauraye, Catherine; Cordelières, Fabrice P.; Biard, Denis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Hall, Janet; Favaudon, Vincent; Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Previously we showed that the relative biological efficiency for induced cell killing by the 76-MeV beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay increased with depth throughout the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). To investigate the repair pathways underlying this increase, we used an isogenic human cell model in which individual DNA repair proteins have been depleted, and techniques dedicated to precise measurements of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: The 3-Gy surviving fractions of HeLa cells individually depleted of Ogg1, XRCC1, and PARP1 (the base excision repair/SSB repair pathway) or of ATM, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, and Artemis (nonhomologous end-joining pathway) were determined at the 3 positions previously defined in the SOBP. Quantification of incident SSBs and DSBs by the alkaline elution technique and 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence of γ-H2AX foci, respectively, was performed in SQ20 B cells. Results: We showed that the amount of SSBs and DSBs depends directly on the particle fluence and that the increase in relative biological efficiency observed in the distal part of the SOBP is due to a subset of lesions generated under these conditions, leading to cell death via a pathway in which the Artemis protein plays a central role. Conclusions: Because therapies like proton or carbon beams are now being used to treat cancer, it is even more important to dissect the mechanisms implicated in the repair of the lesions generated by these particles. Additionally, alteration of the expression or activity of the Artemis protein could be a novel therapeutic tool before high linear energy transfer irradiation treatment.

  20. Longitudinal and Transverse Inelastic Electron Scattering from 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, R.; Cafolla, A.; Day, D.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.; Wise, J. E.

    1980-04-01

    Inelastic-electron-scattering cross sections for 56Fe have been measured in the continuum region. The longitudinal and transverse inelastic response functions have been determined for vector momentum transfers, q, from 210-410 MeV/c and for energy losses 0<ω<=220 MeV.

  1. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-10-01

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV-24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. The difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  2. Comparisons of LET Distributions for Protons with Energies between50 and 200 MeV Determined Using a Spherical Tissue-EquivalentProportional Counter (TEPC) and a Position-Sensitive Silicon Spectrometer(RRMD-III)

    SciTech Connect

    Borak, Thomas B.; Doke, Tadayoshi; Fuse, T.; Guetersloh, StephenB.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hara, K.; Moyers, Michael; Suzuki, S.; Taddei, Phillip; Terasawa, K.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2004-12-01

    Experiments have been performed to measure the response of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a silicon-based LET spectrometer (RRMD-III) to protons with energies ranging from 50 200 MeV. This represents a large portion of the energy distribution for trapped protons encountered by astronauts in low-Earth orbit. The beam energies were obtained using plastic polycarbonate degraders with a monoenergetic beam that was extracted from a proton synchrotron. The LET spectrometer provided excellent agreement with the expected LET distribution emerging from the energy degraders. The TEPC cannot measure the LET distribution directly. However, the frequency mean value of lineal energy, y bar f, provided a good approximation to LET. This is in contrast to previous results for high-energy heavy ions wherey barf underestimated LET, whereas the dose-averaged lineal energy, y barD, provided a good approximation to LET.

  3. Isomeric cross-section ratio for the formation of 58Com,g in neutron, proton, deuteron, and alpha-particle induced reactions in the energy region up to 25 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudár, S.; Qaim, S. M.

    1996-06-01

    Excitation functions were determined for 58Fe(p,n)58Com, natFe(d,xn)58Com, 55Mn(α,n)58Com, and 59Co(n,2n)58Com reactions from the respective thresholds to 14.12 MeV in work with protons, 12.97 MeV with deuterons, 13 MeV with neutrons, and 25.52 MeV with alpha particles. The radioactivity of the activation product 58Com(T1/2=9.15 h) was determined by high resolution γ-ray and x-ray spectrometry. Using the present σm results and the (σm+σg) data reported earlier, the isomeric cross-section ratio σm/(σm+σg) was determined for each reaction. Statistical model calculations taking into account the precompound effects were performed for the above-mentioned four reactions as well as for the 58Ni(n,p)58Com,g process. A consistent set of model parameters was used. The isomeric cross-section ratio for the pair 58Com,g strongly depends on the level scheme and branching ratios of the known levels of 58Co. Different reactions produced different angular momentum distributions of the compound nucleus, resulting in different isomeric cross-section ratio at the same excitation of the compound nucleus. The ratio was found to be relatively high for target nuclei with high spin values.

  4. Characteristics of Protons Exiting from a Polyethylene Converter Irradiated by Neutrons with Energies between 1 keV and 10 MeV

    PubMed Central

    Nikezic, D.; Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo method has been used to determine the efficiency for proton production and to study the energy and angular distributions of the generated protons. The ENDF library of cross sections is used to simulate the interactions between the neutrons and the atoms in a polyethylene (PE) layer, while the ranges of protons with different energies in PE are determined using the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) computer code. The efficiency of proton production increases with the PE layer thickness. However the proton escaping from a certain polyethylene volume is highly dependent on the neutron energy and target thickness, except for a very thin PE layer. The energy and angular distributions of protons are also estimated in the present paper, showing that, for the range of energy and thickness considered, the proton flux escaping is dependent on the PE layer thickness, with the presence of an optimal thickness for a fixed primary neutron energy. PMID:27362656

  5. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, George F; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Paddison, Stephen J; Platzman, P. M.; Moravsky, Alexander P.; Adams, Mark A.; Mayers, Dr. Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave function responds to the details of the confinement, corresponds to a strongly anharmonic local potential, shows evidence in some cases of coherent delocalization in double wells, and involves changes in zero-point kinetic energy of the protons from 40 to +120 meV difference from that of bulk water at room temperature. This behavior appears to be a generic feature of nanoscale confinement. It is exhibited here in 16 A inner diameter carbon nanotubes, two different hydrated proton exchange membranes (PEMs), Nafion 1120 and Dow 858, and has been seen earlier in xerogel and 14 A diameter carbon nanotubes. The proton conductivity in the PEM samples correlates with the degree of coherent delocalization of the proton.

  6. K-italic-shell ionization cross sections for Al, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag by protons and oxygen ions in the energy range 0. 3--6. 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M.; Benka, O.

    1986-08-01

    Absolute K-italic-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for thin targets of Al, Ti, and Cu for protons in the energy range 0.3--2.0 MeV and for thin targets of Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag for oxygen ions in the energy range 1.36--6.4 Mev. The experimental results are compared to the perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) approximation with energy-loss (E), Coulomb (C), and relativistic (R) corrections, i.e., the ECPSSR approximation (Brandt and Lapicki), to the semiclassical approximation (Laegsgaard, Andersen, and Lund), and to a theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1s-italicsigma molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud (MS)). The proton results agree within 3% with empirical reference cross sections. Also, the ECPSSR provides best overall agreement for protons. For oxygen ions, ECPSSR and MS predict experimental results satisfactorily for scaled velocities xi> or =0.4. For lower scaled velocities, the experimental cross sections become considerably higher than theoretical predictions for Coulomb ionization. This deviation increases with increasing Z-italic/sub 1//Z/sub 2/; it cannot be explained by electron transfer to the projectile or by ionization due to target recoil atoms.

  7. Large Scale Accelerator Production of 225Ac: Effective Cross sections for 78-192 MeV Protons Incident on 232Th Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, Justin R; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Copping, Roy; Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M.; Radchenko, Valery; Cooley, Jason; Fassbender, Michael; Denton, David L.; Murphy, Karen E.; Owens, Allison C.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; John, Kevin D.; Nortier, Francois M.; Stracener, Daniel W; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2016-09-28

    Actinium-225 and 213Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of 225Ac. The high energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal target has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of 225Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of Th metal at beam energies between 78 and 200 MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes as well as for some of the fission products are presented. The cross sections for production of 225Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7 mb in the incident proton energy range of 78 to 192 MeV. Based on these data, production of Curie quantities of 225Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0 g cm-2232Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.

  8. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  9. Observation of the Quasifree Reactions 12C(π+/-, π+/-p) at 245 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasetzky, E.; Ashery, D.; Altman, A.; Yavin, A. I.; Schlepütz, F. W.; Powers, R. J.; Bertl, W.; Felawka, L.; Walter, H. K.; Winter, R. G.; Pluym, J. V. D.

    1981-05-01

    The inclusive reactions 12C(π+/-,π+/-p) were studied at 245 MeV over a broad kinematic range by coincidence measurement of the outgoing particles. The π+/--p angular correlations, proton energy spectra, and the ratio of positive- to negative-pion cross sections are all consistent with those expected from quasifree scattering. For positive pions, quasifree scattering accounts for (30 +/- 3)% of the inclusive pion inelastic scattering to backward angles. The rest is attributed to the (π+,π+n) reaction and to multistep processes.

  10. Characterization of moderator assembly dimension for accelerator boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors using {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons at proton energy of 2.5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Bengua, Gerard; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-06-15

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension are investigated for the usage of {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.5 MeV protons in boron newtron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors in the present study. The indexes checked are treatable protocol depth (TPD), which is the greatest depth of the region satisfying the dose requirements in BNCT protocol, proton current necessary to complete BNCT by 1 h irradiation, and the heat flux deposited in the Li target which should be removed. Assumed materials are D{sub 2}O for moderator, and mixture of polyethylene and LiF with 50 wt % for collimator. Dose distributions have been computed with MCNP 4B and 4C codes. Consequently, realized TPD does not show a monotonical tendency for the Li target diameter. However, the necessary proton current and heat flux in the Li target decreases as the Li target diameter increases, while this trend reverses at around 10 cm of the Li target diameter for the necessary proton current in the condition of this study. As to the moderator diameter, TPD does not exhibit an apparent dependence. On the other hand, necessary proton current and heat flux decrease as the moderator diameter increases, and this tendency saturates at around 60 cm of the moderator diameter in this study. As to the collimator, increase in inner diameter is suitable from the viewpoint of increasing TPD and decreasing necessary proton current and heat flux, while these indexes do not show apparent difference for collimator inner diameters over 14 cm for the parameters treated here. The practical viewpoint in selecting the parameters of moderator assembly dimension is to increase TPD, within the technically possible condition of accelerated proton current and heat removal from the Li target. In this process, the values for which the resultant characteristics mentioned above saturate or reverse would be important factors.

  11. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    DOE PAGES

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; ...

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased asmore » the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.« less

  12. Next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to jet cross sections and jet rates in deeply inelastic electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Graudenz, D. )

    1994-04-01

    Jet cross sections in deeply inelastic scattering in the case of transverse photon exchange for the production of (1+1) and (2+1) jets are calculated in next-to-leading-order QCD (here the +1'' stands for the target remnant jet, which is included in the jet definition). The jet definition scheme is based on a modified JADE cluster algorithm. The calculation of the (2+1) jet cross section is described in detail. Results for the virtual corrections as well as for the real initial- and final-state corrections are given explicitly. Numerical results are stated for jet cross sections as well as for the ratio [sigma][sub (2+1) jet]/[sigma][sub tot] that can be expected at E665 and DESY HERA. Furthermore the scale ambiguity of the calculated jet cross sections is studied and different parton density parametrizations are compared.

  13. Several features of the earthward and tailward streaming of energetic protons /0.29-0.5 MeV/ in the earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation represents an extension of a study conducted by Lui and Krimigis (1981) who have examined the question of transport of energetic protons measured by the Charged Particle Measurements Experiment on IMP 7 and 8 in the magnetotail. It has been shown that there is a substantial net earthward transport of these particles, with fluxes seemingly capable of replenishing the losses of outer radiation belt protons. In the current investigation the earlier study is extended by reporting several features of the earthward and tailward streaming of these energetic protons. Attention is given to selection criteria and isolation of magnetospheric protons, the dawn-dusk reversal in streaming anisotropy, the amplitude of streaming anisotropy, and spectral hardness.

  14. Proton beam simulation with MCNPX/CINDER'90: Germanium metal activation estimates below 30MeV relevant to the bulk production of arsenic radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, M; Taylor, W; Vieira, D; Nortier, M; Bach, H; John, K

    2012-01-01

    Germanium metal targets encapsulated in Nb shells were irradiated in a proton beam. Proton and secondary neutron beam fluences as well as radionuclide activity formation were modeled using MCNPX in combination with CINDER90. Targets were chemically processed using distillation and anion exchange. Good agreement between the measured radiochemical yields and MCNPX/CINDER90 estimates was observed. A target of pentavalent (73,74)As radioarsenic for neutron activation studies was prepared.

  15. Vibrations and reorientations of H2O molecules in [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 studied by Raman light scattering, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering and proton magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Lukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward; Florek-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Harańczyk, Hubert

    2014-04-24

    Vibrational-reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 was investigated by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), quasielastic and inelastic incoherent Neutron Scattering (QENS and IINS) methods. Neutron powder diffraction (NPD) measurements, performed simultaneously with QENS, did not indicated a change of the crystal structure at the phase transition (detected earlier by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at TC(h)=252.9 K (on heating) and at TC(c)=226.5K (on cooling)). Temperature dependence of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of νs(OH) band at ca. 3248 cm(-1) in the RS spectra indicated small discontinuity in the vicinity of phase transition temperature, what suggests that the observed phase transition may be associated with a change of the H2O reorientational dynamics. However, an activation energy value (Ea) for the reorientational motions of H2O ligands in both phases is nearly the same and equals to ca. 8 kJ mol(-1). The QENS peaks, registered for low temperature phase do not show any broadening. However, in the high temperature phase a small QENS broadening is clearly visible, what implies that the reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands undergoes a change at the phase transition. (1)H NMR line is a superposition of two powder Pake doublets, differentiated by a dipolar broadening, suggesting that there are two types of the water molecules in the crystal lattice of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 which are structurally not equivalent average distances between the interacting protons are: 1.39 and 1.18 Å. However, their reorientational dynamics is very similar (τc=3.3⋅10(-10) s). Activation energies for the reorientational motion of these both kinds of H2O ligands have nearly the same values in an experimental error limit: and equal to ca. 40 kJ mole(-1). The phase transition is not seen in the (1)H NMR spectra temperature dependencies. Infrared (IR), Raman (RS) and inelastic

  16. Sudden Intensity Increases and Radial Gradient Changes of Cosmic Ray Mev Electrons and Protons Observed at Voyager 1 Beyond 111 AU in the Heliosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B.; Lal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Voyager 1 has entered regions of different propagation conditions for energetic cosmic rays in the outer heliosheathat a distance of about 111 AU from the Sun. The low energy 614 MeV galactic electron intensity increased by 20over a time period 10 days and the electron radial intensity gradient abruptly decreased from 19AU to 8AU at2009.7 at a radial distance of 111.2 AU. At about 2011.2 at a distance of 116.6 AU a second abrupt intensity increase of25 was observed for electrons. After the second sudden electron increase the radial intensity gradient increased to18AU. This large positive gradient and the 13 day periodic variations of 200 MeV particles observed near theend of 2011 indicate that V1 is still within the overall heliospheric modulating region. The implications of these resultsregarding the proximity of the heliopause are discussed.

  17. Intermediate resonance of inelastic 12C + 12C scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamu, Tanimura

    1980-01-01

    The intermediate resonances observed in the inelastic 12C + 12C cross sections to the single and mutual 2 1+(4.43 MeV) excitations and the single 3 1- (9.64 MeV) excitation are studied by the coupled-channel method with the use of the coupling interaction derived by the folding procedure between 12C and 12C. It is shown that the model is successful in reproducing the gross structures of the inelastic cross sections and especially the correlated resonance energies of the inelastic channels. The inelastic resonances are shown to be due to the molecular resonances in an adiabatic potential between two 12C, which reproduces correctly the coupled channel resonances.

  18. Calculated neutron-induced cross sections for /sup 53/Cr from 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, K.; Hetrick, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Neutron-induced cross sections of /sup 53/Cr have been calculated in the energy regions from 1 to 20 MeV. The quantities obtained are the cross sections for the reactions (n,n'..gamma..), (n,2n), (n,np), (n,n..cap alpha..), (n,p..gamma..), (n,pn), (n,..cap alpha gamma..), (n,..cap alpha..n), (n,d), (n,t), (n,/sup 3/He), and (n,..gamma..), as well as the spectra of emitted neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and gamma rays. The precompound process was included above 5 MeV in addition to the compound process. For the inelastic scattering, the contribution of the direct interaction was calculated with DWBA. 36 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Enhancement of critical current density in a Ca0.85La0.15Fe(As0.92Sb0.08)2 superconductor with T c = 47 K through 3 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Akiyoshi; Mine, Akinori; Yamada, Tatsuhiro; Ohtake, Fumiaki; Akiyama, Hiroki; Sun, Yue; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Kitahama, Yutaka; Mizukami, Tasuku; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nohara, Minoru; Kitamura, Hisashi

    2016-05-01

    We examine the critical current density (J c) of Ca{}1-xLa x Fe(As{}1-ySb y )2, a 112-type iron-based superconductor (IBS) with {T}{{c}} = 47 K, via magneto-optical imaging and magnetization measurements. We assert that the large self-field J c of 2.2× {10}6 A cm- 2 at 2 K is a strong indication that it is a bulk superconductor with spatially homogeneous superconductivity. A 2.8-fold enhancement in J c to 6.2× {10}6 A cm- 2 was achieved through artificially engineering pinning centers by irradiating 3 MeV protons with a total dosage of 1.0× {10}16 {{cm}}-2. The results not only demonstrate the potential of 112-type IBSs for application but also enrich the current understanding of the role of artificial defects in IBSs.

  20. Thulium-169 neutron inelastic scattering cross section measurements via the (169)Tm(n,n'gamma) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young June

    1999-11-01

    A neutron inelastic scattering study for low-lying states of thulium-169 below 1 MeV has been pursued by the detection of gamma rays from the 169Tm(n,n'γ) reaction. The inelastic level cross sections, which are important to obtain nuclear potential parameters and to understand reaction mechanisms, were obtained in this study. Incident neutrons were generated by bombarding a metallic lithium target with protons from the Lowell Van de Graaff accelerator. A germanium detector was used for gamma-ray observation. Excitation functions were measured from 0.2 to 1 MeV in 50 keV intervals at a scattering angle of 125°. Gamma-ray production cross sections were obtained for 37 observed transitions from 16 levels. Gamma-ray angular distributions from 35° to 135°, in 10° steps were measured at a neutron energy of 750 keV. The angular distributions were fitted with Legendre polynomials of even (up to fourth) order. Neutron inelastic level cross sections were inferred from the excitation functions and the angular distributions. Because cross-section data from previous experimental or theoretical work were not available, no direct comparison with previous work was made. A comparison of the magnitude and behavior of the (n,inelastic) cross section for thulium with those of neighboring odd-A nuclei indicated reasonable agreement. A classical model for angular momentum transfer indicates that states with spin >=/(+) may be excited only through the compound nucleus process, but for states with spin <=/(-) compound nucleus and direct interaction processes may both participate in the excitation.

  1. K -shell ionization cross sections for Si, P, K, Ca, Zn, and Ga by protons and carbon ions in the energy range 1--6. 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M. ); Smit, Z. ); Benka, O. )

    1990-01-01

    Absolute {ital K}-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for thin targets of Si, P, S, K, Ca, Zn, and Ga using carbon ions between 1.0 and 6.4 MeV and protons of 1 and 2 MeV. The dependence of x-ray production cross sections on target thickness was determined. The experimental results are compared to the semiclassical approximation (Laegsgaard, Andersen, and Lund in 3 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on the Physics of Electron and Atomic Collisions, Paris, 1977, edited by G. Watel (North-Holland, Amsterdam 1977)), to the theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1{ital s}{sigma} molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud, J. Phys. B. 18, 299 (1985)), to the perturbed stationary-state approximation with energy-loss, Coulomb, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR) (Brandt and Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23, 1717 (1981)), and to the modification of the ECPSSR approximation (MECPSSR) (Benka, Geretschlaeger, and Paul, J. Phys. (Paris) Suppl. 12, C9-251 (1987)). The results for carbon ions are also compared to the statistical molecular orbital theory of inner-shell ionization for symmetric or nearly symmetric atomic collisions (Mittelman and Wilets, Phys. Rev. 154, 12 (1967)).

  2. Proton decay from the isoscalar giant dipole resonance in {sup 58}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Hunyadi, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Fujimura, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Hara, K.; Itoh, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Okumura, S.; Li, T.; Garg, U.; Hoffman, J.; Nayak, B. K.; Akimune, H.; Gacsi, Z.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2009-10-15

    Proton decay from the 3({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) in {sup 58}Ni has been measured using the ({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}p) reaction at a bombarding energy of 386 MeV to investigate its decay properties. We have extracted the ISGDR strength under the coincidence condition between inelastically scattered {alpha} particles at forward angles and decay protons emitted at backward angles. Branching ratios for proton decay to low-lying states of {sup 57}Co have been determined, and the results compared with predictions of recent continuum-RPA calculations. The final-state spectra of protons decaying to the low-lying states in {sup 57}Co were analyzed for a more detailed understanding of the structure of the ISGDR. It is found that there are differences in the structure of the ISGDR as a function of excitation energy.

  3. Analysis of the radiation shielding of the bunker of a 230MeV proton cyclotron therapy facility; comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Sunil, C

    2016-04-01

    The neutron ambient dose equivalent outside the radiation shield of a proton therapy cyclotron vault is estimated using the unshielded dose equivalent rates and the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature and by simulations carried out with the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The source terms derived from the literature and that obtained from the FLUKA calculations differ by a factor of 2-3, while the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature differ by 20-40%. The instantaneous dose equivalent rates outside the shield differ by a few orders of magnitude, not only in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation results, but also with the results obtained by line of sight attenuation calculations with the different parameters obtained from the literature. The attenuation of neutrons caused by the presence of bulk iron, such as magnet yokes is expected to reduce the dose equivalent by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude outside the shield walls.

  4. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  5. Inelastic electron scattering from a moving nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.E.; Griffioen, K.

    1994-04-01

    The authors propose to measure inelastically scattered electrons in coincidence with spectator protons emitted backwards relative to the virtual photon direction in the reaction d(e, e{prime}p{sub s})X. In a simple spectator model, the backward proton has equal and opposite momentum to the neutron before it is struck, allowing the authors to study the dependence on kinematics and off-shell behaviour of the electron-nucleon inelastic cross section. If the photon couples to a quark in a 6-quark bag, a different dependence of the cross section on the kinematic variables (x, Q{sup 2}, and p{sub s}) can be observed. This proposed experiment requires large acceptance and beam energies above 6 GeV. It is ideally suited for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS).

  6. Proton Events at >~ 25 MeV in 2009 -2012 Observed by the STEREO High Energy Telescopes and/or near Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M.; Labrador, A. W.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Stone, E.

    2012-12-01

    About 130 individual solar energetic particle events that include protons with kinetic energies >~ 25 MeVhave been detected by the High Energy Telescopes on the STEREO Ahead and Behind spacecraft and/or near-Earth spacecraft (SoHO and ACE) since December, 2009. During this time the STEREO spacecraft have been 60 degrees or more ahead of or behind the Earth. Of these events, ~ 30% were detected at only one spacecraft, ~ 30% at only two spacecraft, and ~15% at all three spacecraft. In other cases, it is unclear whether events were observed at multiple spacecraft or not due to high particle intensities from prior events or due to data gaps. The events range from small events typically with a rapid rise and slower decay lasting around a day and observed by the best magnetically connected spacecraft, to large, extended events observed at multiple spacecraft. In some cases, they show rather prompt onsets at all spacecraft. Relatively small events, however, are sometimes seen at all three spacecraft. We summarize the properties of these events and the associated solar activity as determined by imaging and radio observations from the STEREO and near-Earth spacecraft.

  7. Determination of integral cross sections of 3 H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Our results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (~ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. We irradiated these foils in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ~ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (~ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (~ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 – 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U–10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006–2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. We then used anmore » ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 to measure the 3H β–spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.« less

  8. Determination of integral cross sections of 3 H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; Chauzova, M. V.; Kashirin, I. A.; Malinovskiy, S. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Mashnik, S. G.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Our results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (~ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. We irradiated these foils in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ~ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (~ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (~ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 – 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U–10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006–2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. We then used an ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 to measure the 3H β–spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.

  9. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  10. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  11. Filtered back-projection reconstruction for attenuation proton CT along most likely paths.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, C T; Létang, J M; Rit, S

    2016-05-07

    This work investigates the attenuation of a proton beam to reconstruct the map of the linear attenuation coefficient of a material which is mainly caused by the inelastic interactions of protons with matter. Attenuation proton computed tomography (pCT) suffers from a poor spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) of protons in matter, similarly to the conventional energy-loss pCT. We therefore adapted a recent filtered back-projection algorithm along the most likely path (MLP) of protons for energy-loss pCT (Rit et al 2013) to attenuation pCT assuming a pCT scanner that can track the position and the direction of protons before and after the scanned object. Monte Carlo simulations of pCT acquisitions of density and spatial resolution phantoms were performed to characterize the new algorithm using Geant4 (via Gate). Attenuation pCT assumes an energy-independent inelastic cross-section, and the impact of the energy dependence of the inelastic cross-section below 100 MeV showed a capping artifact when the residual energy was below 100 MeV behind the object. The statistical limitation has been determined analytically and it was found that the noise in attenuation pCT images is 411 times and 278 times higher than the noise in energy-loss pCT images for the same imaging dose at 200 MeV and 300 MeV, respectively. Comparison of the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT images with a conventional straight-line path binning showed that incorporating the MLP estimates during reconstruction improves the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT. Moreover, regardless of the significant noise in attenuation pCT images, the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT was better than that of conventional energy-loss pCT in some studied situations thanks to the interplay of MCS and attenuation known as the West-Sherwood effect.

  12. Filtered back-projection reconstruction for attenuation proton CT along most likely paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, C. T.; Létang, J. M.; Rit, S.

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the attenuation of a proton beam to reconstruct the map of the linear attenuation coefficient of a material which is mainly caused by the inelastic interactions of protons with matter. Attenuation proton computed tomography (pCT) suffers from a poor spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) of protons in matter, similarly to the conventional energy-loss pCT. We therefore adapted a recent filtered back-projection algorithm along the most likely path (MLP) of protons for energy-loss pCT (Rit et al 2013) to attenuation pCT assuming a pCT scanner that can track the position and the direction of protons before and after the scanned object. Monte Carlo simulations of pCT acquisitions of density and spatial resolution phantoms were performed to characterize the new algorithm using Geant4 (via Gate). Attenuation pCT assumes an energy-independent inelastic cross-section, and the impact of the energy dependence of the inelastic cross-section below 100 MeV showed a capping artifact when the residual energy was below 100 MeV behind the object. The statistical limitation has been determined analytically and it was found that the noise in attenuation pCT images is 411 times and 278 times higher than the noise in energy-loss pCT images for the same imaging dose at 200 MeV and 300 MeV, respectively. Comparison of the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT images with a conventional straight-line path binning showed that incorporating the MLP estimates during reconstruction improves the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT. Moreover, regardless of the significant noise in attenuation pCT images, the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT was better than that of conventional energy-loss pCT in some studied situations thanks to the interplay of MCS and attenuation known as the West-Sherwood effect.

  13. Electron and proton absorption calculations for a graphite/epoxy composite model. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Bethe-Bloch stopping power relations for inelastic collisions were used to determine the absorption of electron and proton energy in cured neat epoxy resin and the absorption of electron energy in a graphite/epoxy composite. Absorption of electron energy due to bremsstrahlung was determined. Electron energies from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV and proton energies from 0.3 to 1.75 MeV were used. Monoenergetic electron energy absorption profiles for models of pure graphite, cured neat epoxy resin, and graphite/epoxy composites are reported. A relation is determined for depth of uniform energy absorption in a composite as a function of fiber volume fraction and initial electron energy. Monoenergetic proton energy absorption profiles are reported for the neat resin model. A relation for total proton penetration in the epoxy resin as a function of initial proton energy is determined. Electron energy absorption in the composite due to bremsstrahlung is reported. Electron and proton energy absorption profiles in cured neat epoxy resin are reported for environments approximating geosynchronous earth orbit.

  14. Monte-Carlo simulation of soil carbon measurements by inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring soil carbon is critical for assessing the potential impact of different land management practices on carbon sequestration. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) of fast neutrons (with energy around 14 MeV) on carbon-12 nuclei produces gamma rays with energy of 4.43 MeV; this gamma flux ca...

  15. Determination of the radial gradient in the region 0.81-1.0 AU using both high- and low-energy /more than 10-GeV and more than 52-MeV/ detectors for the 1-AU monitor. [solar quiet measurements of alpha particles and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Bukata, R. P.; Rao, U. R.

    1974-01-01

    A determination of the radial gradient for alpha particles (31-46 MeV/nuc) and protons with energies above 7.5 MeV and 44-77 MeV in the region 1.0-0.81 AU is presented for the solar-quiet year 1966. The determinations are based on data from the Pioneer 6 space probe. Two different detectors are used: the Deep River neutron monitor and measurements of low energy protons made on the IMP-C satellite. The average energy response of the Deep River monitor is 16 GeV, whereas the IMP-C data is for protons with energies above 50 MeV. The resulting radial gradient is found to be nearly zero for the alpha particles and slightly negative for the protons. The same qualitative results were found using the IMP-C data and the Deep River neutron monitor to measure the temporal variation in the cosmic ray intensity. The present analysis indicates that detectors over a wide range of energies are suitable for measuring the radial gradient, providing sufficient statistical precision is obtained to evaluate short-term modulation and the azimuthal separation of the detectors is not great.

  16. Anomalous behavior of proton zero point motion in water confined in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Reiter, G; Burnham, C; Homouz, D; Platzman, P M; Mayers, J; Abdul-Redah, T; Moravsky, A P; Li, J C; Loong, C-K; Kolesnikov, A I

    2006-12-15

    The momentum distribution of the protons in ice Ih, ice VI, high density amorphous ice, and water in carbon nanotubes has been measured using deep inelastic neutron scattering. We find that at 5 K the kinetic energy of the protons is 35 meV less than that in ice Ih at the same temperature, and the high momentum tail of the distribution, characteristic of the molecular covalent bond, is not present. We observe a phase transition between 230 and 268 K to a phase that does resemble ice Ih. Although there is yet no model for water that explains the low temperature momentum distribution, our data reveal that the protons in the hydrogen bonds are coherently delocalized and that the low temperature phase is a qualitatively new phase of ice.

  17. Investigation of structure in Al23 via resonant proton scattering of Mg22+p and the 22Mg(p,γ) Al23 astrophysical reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Moon, J. Y.; Nishimura, M.; Iwasaki, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Lee, J. H.; Kato, S.; Gono, Y.; Lee, C. S.

    2007-11-01

    Proton resonant states in Al23 have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of Mg22+p with a Mg22 beam at 4.38 MeV/nucleon bombarding a thick (CH2)n target. The low-energy Mg22 beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). The energy spectra of recoiled protons were measured at average scattering angles of θlab≈4°,17° and 23°. A new state has been observed at Ex=3.00 MeV with a spin-parity assignment of (3/2+). In addition, resonant inelastic scattering has populated three more states at excitation energies of 3.14, 3.26, and 3.95 MeV, with proton decay to the first excited state in Mg22 being observed. The new state at 3.95 MeV has been assigned a spin-parity of Jπ=(7/2+). The resonant parameters were determined by an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions with a SAMMY-M6-BETA code. The core-excited structure of Al23 is discussed within a shell-model picture. The stellar reaction rate of the Mg22(p,γ)Al23 reaction has been reevaluated, and the revised total reaction rate is about 40% greater than the previous result for temperatures beyond T9=0.3.

  18. Inelastic electron scattering from 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J. E.; McCarthy, J. S.; Altemus, R.; Norum, B. E.; Whitney, R. R.; Heisenberg, J.; Dawson, J.; Schwentker, O.

    1985-05-01

    Inelastic electron scattering from 48Ca has been performed over a momentum transfer range from 0.6 to 3.0 fm-1 in both forward and backward directions. Form factors have been obtained for 25 levels up to 10 MeV excitation. Charge and current densities for 11 low lying electric transitions and current densities for two magnetic transitions have been reconstructed in Fourier Bessel analysis. Three high spin states observed in the region of 9 MeV excitation are found to have the dominant configuration ν(1g9/2,1f-17/2)8 - but with a total strength of only 36% predicted for the first 8- in a random-phase-approximation calculation. This is interpreted as evidence for particle-phonon coupling. Comparisons of the extracted densities are made with random-phase-approximation calculations using a zero-range, density-dependent Migdal interaction.

  19. Interatomic inelastic current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Tim; Solomon, Gemma C.; Hansen, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    In order to identify the location of an inelastic event and to distinguish between situations that are before or after this event, we derive equations for the interatomic inelastic transmission as a perturbation series in the electron-phonon interaction. This series contains both even and odd ordered corrections, and while the even ordered corrections can be thought as a Dyson's expansion of the interatomic elastic transmission in the electron-phonon self-energy, the odd ordered corrections represent something new. We explicitly derive expressions for the interatomic inelastic transmission up to second order and the 1st order correction represents the lowest order term of this new family of terms. We apply this to three model systems and are able to distinguish between situations before and after the inelastic event as steps in the 2nd order transmission. We also see that when the transmission is evaluated between atoms that are coupled by the electron-phonon interaction, the 1st and 2nd order terms must be added together to form a meaningful transmission. Within the limited scope of the models considered here, the 1st order term appears to be the signature of the inelastic event.

  20. Response functions for deep inelastic scattering from 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, M.; Williamson, C. F.; Wong, J.; Zimmerman, P. D.; Blatchley, C.; Finn, J. M.; Lerose, J.; Sioshansi, P.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.

    1983-08-01

    Deep inelastic electron scattering cross sections have been measured from 40Ca at energies between 100 and 375 MeV and at scattering angles of 90° and 140°. Longitudinal and transverse response functions at three-vector momentum transfers of 330, 370, and 410 MeV/c were extracted from these data using a Rosenbluth separation. The integrated longitudinal response functions for the three momentum transfers are found to have, respectively, 65%, 75%, and 90% of the longitudinal strength predicted by the Fermi gas model. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Deep inelastic electron scattering from 40Ca, extracted transverse and longitudinal response functions.

  1. Elastic/Inelastic Measurement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, Steven; Hicks, Sally; Vanhoy, Jeffrey; McEllistrem, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    The work scope involves the measurement of neutron scattering from natural sodium (23Na) and two isotopes of iron, 56Fe and 54Fe. Angular distributions, i.e., differential cross sections, of the scattered neutrons will be measured for 5 to 10 incident neutron energies per year. The work of the first year concentrates on 23Na, while the enriched iron samples are procured. Differential neutron scattering cross sections provide information to guide nuclear reaction model calculations in the low-­energy (few MeV) fast-­neutron region. This region lies just above the isolated resonance region, which in general is well studied; however, model calculations are difficult in this region because overlapping resonance structure is evident and direct nuclear reactions are becoming important. The standard optical model treatment exhibits good predictive ability for the wide-­region average cross sections but cannot treat the overlapping resonance features. In addition, models that do predict the direct reaction component must be guided by measurements to describe correctly the strength of the direct component, e.g., β2 must be known to describe the direct component of the scattering to the first excited state. Measurements of the elastic scattering differential cross sections guide the optical model calculations, while inelastic differential cross sections provide the crucial information for correctly describing the direct component. Activities occurring during the performance period are described.

  2. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  3. Deep inelastic electron scattering from iron 56 and other tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, R. M.

    1980-03-01

    Deep inelastic electron scattering data on iron 56 are presented for angles of 160 degrees, 140 degrees and 90 degrees and at incident energies ranging from 372 MeV to 100 MeV. Radiative contributions from real target bremsstrahlung and from the continuum are included. The data were separated into longitudinal, Sl(q, omega) and transverse, ST(q, omega) response functions. A Coulomb sum rule for constant q is formulated and compared with an independent particle model (Fermi gas). Short range correlations, finite size effects, effective momentum transfer and final state interactions are considered in an attempt to explain the observed discrepancies.

  4. Nucleon-induced excitation of collective bands in /sup 12/C and the application to neutron dosimetry at E/sub n/ > 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani Meigooni, A.

    1984-01-01

    This work involves the measurement and analysis of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross section from /sup 12/C at incident neutron energies between 20 and 26 MeV. These data cover an energy range that has not previously been investigated with neutrons and where the direct interaction mechanism should be dominant. These energies are also of particular interest in the fields of radiation protection and radio-therapy. The objectives of the present work are to analyze excitation of the measured collective states in /sup 12/C and to develop an energy dependent optical model potential that can be used to calculate quantities of importance to neutron dosimetry at all energies between 20 and 100 MeV. In addition, a separate series of experiments was performed using a large sample (47.45 gm) at 22 and 24 MeV to investigate the weakly excited states above the 3/sub 1/..sqrt..(9.641 MeV) level in /sup 12/C. Differential cross sections for nine excited states in the first 15 MeV excitation of /sup 12/C were resolved and measured. New rotation-vibration formalisms were developed to be used with the code ECIS79 in order to analyze the collective motions of /sup 12/C. Excellent agreement between experimental data and theoretical calculation is obtained for (a) the ground state rotation band, (b) O/sub 2//sup +/ (7.655 MeV) state using ..beta..-vibration plus breathing mode, (c) the 1/sub 1//sup -/ (10.84 MeV) and 2/sub 1//sup -/ (11.83 MeV) states using K/sup ..pi../ = 1/sup -/ octupole vibration, and (d) the 3/sub 1//sup -/ (9.64 MeV) and 4/sub 1//sup -/ (13.35 MeV) states using K/sup ..pi../ = 3/sup -/ octupole vibration. An energy dependent optical model potential has been obtained that describes the present neutron scattering data, differential proton scattering data of higher energies and total neutron cross sections between 20 and 100 MeV.

  5. Deep inelastic neutron scattering in condensed hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Celli, Milva; Zoppi, Marco

    1996-02-01

    The neutron cross-section of molecular hydrogen that is measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) is compared with two distinct models. One is a generalization of the molecular Young and Koppel model (1964) that takes into account the modification to the translational kinetic energy that is induced by quantum effects. The second model assumes a free particle wave function for the final state of the proton (C. Andreani et al., 1995). The comparison between these two models, and with the experimental results, provides information on the crossover between the molecular and atomic regime of hydrogen in DINS.

  6. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Polifka, Richard

    2015-04-10

    The QCD factorization theorem in diffraction is tested by comparing diffractive jet production data to QCD predictions based on fits to inclusive diffractive cross section data. H1 measured dijet production with a leading proton detected in the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS), both in deep-inelastic scattering and in photoproduction. The DIS measurements are complemented by measurements of dijet production with an associated rapidity gap and in a data sample selected with a leading proton in the Forward Proton Spectrometer (FPS)

  7. SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, N; Tian, Z; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package gPMC has been previously developed and high computational efficiency was achieved. This abstract reports our recent improvements on this package in terms of accuracy, functionality, and code portability. Methods: In the latest version of gPMC, nuclear interaction cross section database was updated to include data from TOPAS/Geant4. Inelastic interaction model, particularly the proton scattering angle distribution, was updated to improve overall simulation accuracy. Calculation of dose averaged LET (LETd) was implemented. gPMC was ported onto an OpenCL environment to enable portability across different computing devices (GPUs from different vendors and CPUs). We also performed comprehensive tests of the code accuracy. Dose from electro-magnetic (EM) interaction channel, primary and secondary proton doses and fluences were scored and compared with those computed by TOPAS. Results: In a homogeneous water phantom with 100 and 200 MeV beams, mean dose differences in EM channel computed by gPMC and by TOPAS were 0.28% and 0.65% of the corresponding maximum dose, respectively. With the Geant4 nuclear interaction cross section data, mean difference of primary proton dose was 0.84% for the 200 MeV case and 0.78% for the 100 MeV case. After updating inelastic interaction model, maximum difference of secondary proton fluence and dose were 0.08% and 0.5% for the 200 MeV beam, and 0.04% and 0.2% for the 100 MeV beam. In a test case with a 150MeV proton beam, the mean difference between LETd computed by gPMC and TOPAS was 0.96% within the proton range. With the OpenCL implementation, gPMC is executable on AMD and Nvidia GPUs, as well as on Intel CPU in single or multiple threads. Results on different platforms agreed within statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: Several improvements have been implemented in the latest version of gPMC, which enhanced its accuracy, functionality, and code portability.

  8. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  9. A fast numerical method for calculating the 3D proton dose profile in a single-ring wobbling spreading system.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Z; Afarideh, H; Sadighi-Bonabi, R

    2011-09-01

    Based on the determination of protons fluence at the phantom's surface, a 3D dose distribution is calculated inside a water phantom using a fast method. The dose contribution of secondary particles, originating from inelastic nuclear interactions, is also taken into account. This is achieved by assuming that 60% of the energy transferred to secondary particles is locally absorbed. Secondary radiation delivers approximately 16.8% of the total dose in the plateau region of the Bragg curve for monoenergetic protons of energy 190 MeV. The physical dose beyond the Bragg peak is obtained for a proton beam of 190 MeV using a Geant4 simulation. It is found that the dose beyond the Bragg peak is <0.02% of the maximum dose and is mainly delivered by protons produced via reactions of the secondary neutrons. The relative dose profile is also calculated by simulation of the proposed beam line in Geant4 code. The dose profile produced by our method agrees, within 2%, with the results predicted by the Fermi Eyges distribution function and the results of the Geant4 simulation. It is expected that the fast numerical approach proposed herein may be utilised in 3D deterministic treatment planning programs, to model proton propagation in order to analyse the effect of modifying the beam line.

  10. Production of excitons in grazing collisions of protons with LiF surfaces: An onion model

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2011-12-15

    In this work we evaluate the production of excitons of a lithium fluoride crystal induced by proton impact in the intermediate and high energy regime (from 100 keV to 1 MeV). A simple model is proposed to account for the influence of the Coulomb grid of the target by dressing crystal ions to transform them in what we call onions. The excited states of these onions can be interpreted as excitons. Within this model, total cross section and stopping power are calculated by using the first Born and the continuum distorted-wave (CDW) eikonal initial-state (EIS) approximations. We found that between 7 and 30 excitons per incident proton are produced in grazing collisions with LiF surfaces, becoming a relevant mechanism of inelastic transitions.

  11. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-15

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  12. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Iris

    2014-05-01

    The "proton structure" is a wide field. Discussed are predominantly the precision measurements of the proton structure functions at HERA and some of their implications for the LHC measurements. In addition, a discussion of what a proton structure function represents is provided. Finally, a connection to nuclear physics is attempted. This contribution is an updated reprint of a contribution to "Deep Inelastic Scattering 2012".1

  13. Obtaining 3-150 MeV Focused Particle Microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Dymnikov, Alexander D.

    2003-08-26

    The number of nuclear microprobe setups is growing steadily and its potential in research fields such as biomedicine, material science and geology is being established. The most existing microprobe lenses can focus a proton beam up to energy of 30 MeV. The studies reported here deal with magnetic quadrupole systems such as Russian Separated Quadruplet for obtaining 3-150 MeV proton microbeams. For a given magnetic field in the quarupole lenses optimal parameters of microprobes for different energies of protons are obtained. The smallest beam spot size and appropriate geometry of the focusing and matching slit systems have been found for three different emittances.

  14. Giant resonances in {sup 116}Sn from 240 MeV {sup 6}Li scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; Tokimoto, Y.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2009-02-15

    Giant resonances in {sup 116}Sn were measured by inelastic scattering of {sup 6}Li ions at E{sub {sup 6}Li}=240 MeV over the angle range 0 deg. - 6 deg. Isoscalar E0-E3 strength distributions were obtained with a double folding model analysis. A total of 106{sub -11}{sup +27}% of the E0 EWSR was found in the excitation energy range from 8 MeV to 30 MeV with a centroid (m{sub 1}/m{sub 0}) energy 15.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.35} MeV in agreement with results obtained with {alpha} inelastic scattering.

  15. Intermediate Energy Proton Nucleus Scattering from CALCIUM-40, ZIRCONIUM-90 and LEAD-208.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lawrence

    In recent years, there has been much interest in studying proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate bombarding energies. We focus on two main themes in this thesis. Firstly, we examine the importance of measuring scattering observables out to high momentum transfers where they become sensitive to the matter distribution in the interior of the nucleus. Here, we find that nuclear medium and exchange effects are needed, especially at lower proton kinetic energies (~ 200 MeV). Secondly, we focus on the remarkable and systematic agreement between experimental data and theory when a consistent microscopic approach is used. As part of our study, we have made high momentum transfer measurements at TRIUMF for proton elastic and inelastic scattering from ^{40} Ca, ^{90}Zr and ^{208}Pb. Differential cross sections and analyzing powers are presented for proton kinetic energies of 200, 362 and 400 MeV out to a maximum momentum transfer of q~ 4.8 fm^{-1}, well above the typical limit of ~2.5 fm ^{-1}. Our elastic data are analyzed with a nonrelativistic microscopic optical model based on the Hamburg density -dependent two-body interaction (Ge83a) and on the Decharge and Gogny (De87) theoretical ground states, and involve no adjustable parameters. The calculations show surprisingly good agreement with data as it follows the cross section through typically 9 orders of magnitude and reproduces the oscillations in the analyzing power out to high q for a number of target nuclei and at various bombarding energies. The success of the elastic calculations also suggests that the theoretical model(s) are sufficiently well understood that nuclear structure problems can now be investigated. We study this aspect mainly through the low-lying natural -parity 3^- and 5^ - transitions. The inelastic data are analyzed with distorted-wave Born approximation calculations using the same nonrelativistic density-dependent interaction to drive the transition, the same optical model potential to distort

  16. Proton maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensley, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    New calculations are reported which confirm the ability of an a priori random, initial-phase proton beam to drive a simple, single-stage microwave cavity maser or transit-time oscillator (TTO) to saturation conversion efficiencies of about 11 percent. The required initial TE(011) mode field can be provided from beam ramp-up bandwidth of excitation to a low level from an external source. A saturation field of 45 tesla and output power of 0.2 TW are calculated using an electron insulation field of 10 tesla and a 3 MeV, 400 Ka/sq cm beam. Results are compared to those for an electron beam of the same energy and geometry, and it is shown that proton beams potentially can provide a three order of magnitude increase in overall microwave power production density over that obtainable from electron beam TTOs.

  17. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  18. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  19. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  20. Discovering inelastic thermal relic dark matter at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Krnjaic, Gordan; Shuve, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Dark Matter particles with inelastic interactions are ubiquitous in extensions of the Standard Model, yet remain challenging to fully probe with existing strategies. We propose a series of powerful searches at hadron and lepton colliders that are sensitive to inelastic dark matter dynamics. In representative models featuring either a massive dark photon or a magnetic dipole interaction, we find that the LHC and BABAR could offer strong sensitivity to the thermal relic dark matter parameter space for dark matter masses between ˜100 MeV and 100 GeV and fractional mass-splittings above the percent level; future searches at Belle II with a dedicated monophoton trigger could also offer sensitivity to thermal relic scenarios with masses below a few GeV. Thermal scenarios with either larger masses or splittings are largely ruled out; lower masses remain viable yet may be accessible with other search strategies.

  1. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  2. Phenomenology of deep-inelastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1983-03-01

    The field of heavy-ion deep-inelastic reactions is reviewed with particular attention to the experimental picture. The most important degrees of freedom involved in the process are identified and illustrated with relevant experiments. Energy dissipation and mass transfer are discussed in terms of particles and/or phonons exchanged in the process. The equilibration of the fragment neutron-to-proton ratios is inspected for evidence of giant isovector resonances. The angular momentum effects are observed in the fragment angular distributions and the angular momentum transfer is inferred from the magnitude and alignment of the fragments spins. The possible sources of light particles accompanying the deep-inelastic reactions are discussed. The use of the sequentially emitted particles as angular momentum probes is illustrated. The significance and uses of a thermalized component emitted by the dinucleus is reviewed. The possible presence of Fermi jets in the prompt component is shown to be critical to the justification of the one-body theories.

  3. Interaction of intermediate-energy protons with {sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg nuclei within the multiple-scattering model

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, Yu. A.; Mikhailyuk, V. P.; Pilipenko, V. V.

    2011-04-15

    Observables of the elastic and inelastic scattering of 800- and 250-MeV protons on {sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg nuclei were calculated on the basis of the theory of multiple diffractive scattering and the dispersive {alpha}-cluster model. The {sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg nuclei were assumed to consist of a core ({sup 16}O nucleus) and additional alpha-particle clusters, which could be situated with the highest probability both in the vicinity of the center of mass of the core and outside the core. The multiparticle densities of these nuclei and single-particle nucleon-distribution densities as obtained from the dispersive {alpha}-cluster model were used in the calculations. The differential cross sections and polarizations for elastic and inelastic p{sup 20}Ne and p{sup 24}Mg scattering at the energy of 800 MeV are in better agreement with experimental data than the analogous calculations at the energy of 250 MeV. The spin-rotation functions calculated in the singleparticle approximation for elastic p{sup 20}Ne and p{sup 24}Mg scattering at these two energy values differ qualitatively from their counterparts calculated on the basis of the dispersive {alpha}-cluster model.

  4. NEW APPROACHES: Deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, J.

    1998-01-01

    Feynman diagrams can be used to explain deep inelastic scattering, but it must be remembered that the emission and absorption of a photon are not independent events - the underlying field is important.

  5. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  6. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  7. 16O+12C resonances within the strong absorption region for Ec.m.>23 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachcinski, C. M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Berkowitz, G. M.; Freifelder, R. H.; Gai, M.; Renner, T. R.; Uhlhorn, C. D.

    1980-07-01

    Excitation functions for 12C(16O, 16O)12C elastic and inelastic scattering have been measured in the energy range 23<=Ec.m.<=32 MeV. Two strong structures at Ec.m.=25.5 and 29.6 MeV are observed in the 12C + 16O(3-,6.13 MeV) exit channel; angular correlation measurements at these energies suggest spin assignments of 15- and 16+, respectively. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 12C(16O, 16O*)12C*; Ec.m.=23-32 MeV, θc.m.(16O)=130°-155° measured σ(E) angular correlations.

  8. INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING AT ULTRAHIGH PRESSURES.

    SciTech Connect

    MAO, H.K.; HEMLEY, J.; KAO, C.C.

    2000-08-28

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) provides high-pressure research with an arsenal of analytical capabilities for key measurements that were previously unattainable, and high pressure research provides IXS with numerous applications where the technique has unique advantages over other methods. High-pressure investigations can now be conducted using non-resonant IXS, resonant IXS, nuclear resonant IXS, and x-ray emission spectroscopy with energy resolutions of 100 meV to 1 eV for electronic transitions and 1 to 10 meV for phonon studies. By pressure-tuning materials over a wide range, we are able to investigate fundamental physics of electron gases, strongly correlated electron systems, high-energy electronic excitations, and phonons in energy and momentum space. The results will have a profound influence on materials applications as well as providing basic information for understanding the deep interior of the Earth and other planets.

  9. SU-E-J-142: Prompt Gamma Emission Measurements From a Passively Scattered Proton Beam On Targets Containing 16O, 12C and 14N

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyasugiththan, J; Peterson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the prompt gamma emission from the important elements found in tissue ({sup 16}O,{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N) in a clinical passive-scatter treatment environment. Methods: The targets (composed of water, Perspex, graphite and liquid nitrogen) were irradiated with a 200 MeV passive-scatter proton beam and the discrete prompt gamma energy spectra was detected by a high resolution 2′ × 2′ LaBr. detector. In order to reduce the high level of radiation produced by the beam line elements, the detector was surrounded by 10 cm of lead to attenuate the scattered gamma-rays entering the detector with an extra 5 cm thick layer of lead added along the beam direction. A 10 cm thick collimator with a 5 cm × 10 cm rectangular opening was also used. Results: The prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were clearly identified as a Result of the inelastic nuclear reaction between the protons and the 16O atoms found in the water target. The 6.13 MeV peak was 5% higher than the peak at 4.44 MeV for the water target. The 4.44 MeV peak was the only identified emission in the prompt gamma energy spectra from the graphite target ({sup 12}C). The expected 2.313 MeV peak form the{sup 14}N (liquid nitrogen target) was identified, but the other expected {sup 14}N peaks could not be resolved. Conclusion: Prompt gamma measurements with a passive-scatter proton beam are possible, but the presence of a high amount of background radiation from the patient final collimator presents a challenge at the treatment isocenter. The prominent prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were identified from the water, Perspex and graphite targets. The prompt gammas from the liquid nitrogen target were difficult to see, but may not be significant in the in-vivo verification process.

  10. Solar Gamma Rays Above 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes which lead to the production of gamma rays with energy greater than 8 MeV in solar flares are reviewed and evaluated. Excited states produced by inelastic scattering, charge exchange, and spallation reactions in the abundant nuclear species are considered in order to identify nuclear lines which may contribute to the Gamma ray spectrum of solar flares. The flux of 15.11 MeV Gamma rays relative to the flux of 4.44 MeV Gamma rays from the de-excitation of the corresponding states in C12 is calculated for a number of assumed distributions of exciting particles. This flux ratio is a sensitive diagnostic of accelerated particle spectra. Other high energy nuclear levels are not so isolated as the 15.11 MeV state and are not expected to be so strong. The spectrum of Gamma rays from the decay of Pi dey is sensitive to the energy distribution of particles accelerated to energies greater than 100 MeV.

  11. History of the ZGS 500 MeV booster.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; Martin; R.; Kustom, R.

    2006-05-09

    The history of the design and construction of the Argonne 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron from 1969 to 1982 is described. This accelerator has since been in steady use for the past 25 years to power the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS).

  12. Structure in the Proton and the Neutron

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hofstadter, R.

    1958-06-01

    A survey of the recent work on the structures of the proton and the neutron carried out by high-energy electron-scattering methods is presented. Early work established finite size effects in the proton and led to information about the charge and magnetic density distributions in the proton. The rms size was established to be close to (0.77 plus or minus 0.10) x 10{sup -13} cm, and the density distributions of charge and anomalous magnetic moment were shown to be approximately of the same shape. The form factors could be described in terms of several alternative models given, for example, by an exponential, gaussian, hollow exponential, hollow gaussian, etc., distribution of densities. Many other shapes were excluded by the experimental data. Recent work by Bumiller and Hofstadter now fixes one among these models that is appropriate to the proton and provides an extremely good fit at all angles between energies of 200 and 650 Mev. The new evidence clearly favors the exponential model with rms radius (0.80 plus or minus 0.04) 10{sup -13} cm. Recent studies of the proton have attempted to answer the question: how closely similar are the charge and magnetic form factors? This work now shows that the distributions have the same sizes and shapes to within 10 per cent, and each distribution is given very closely by the exponential model described above with radius (0.80 plus or minus 0.04) x 10{sup -13}. Certain other similar models will be discussed. Early work on the inelastic continuum in the deuteron established that the neutron's magnetic structure was extended and not a point. It was further shown that the neutron's size was approximately the same as that of the proton. This work has recently been extended by Yearian and Hofstadter to a determination of the variation of the neutron's magnetic form factor over the range where the proton's form factor is known. The new results show: (1) the neutron is not a point, (2) the neutron's magnetic structure has a size lying

  13. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections from air shower data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the fluctuations in depth of maximum development of cosmic ray air showers, corrected for the effects of mixed primary composition and shower development fluctuations, yield values of the inelastic proton-air cross section for laboratory energies in the range 10 to the 8th power to 10 to the 10th power GeV. From these values of proton-air cross section, corresponding values of the proton-proton total cross section are derived by means of Glauber theory and geometrical scaling. The resulting values of proton-proton cross section are inconsistent with a well known 1n(2)s extrapolation of ISR data which is consistent with SPS data; they indicate a less rapid rate of increase in the interval 540 sq root of s 100000 GeV.

  14. Color dipole cross section and inelastic structure function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Kim, C. S.; Luu, Minh Vu; Reno, Mary Hall

    2014-11-01

    Instead of starting from a theoretically motivated form of the color dipole cross section in the dipole picture of deep inelastic scattering, we start with a parametrization of the deep inelastic structure function for electromagnetic scattering with protons, and then extract the color dipole cross section. Using the parametrizations of F 2(ξ = x or W 2 , Q 2) by Donnachie-Landshoff and Block et al., we find the dipole cross section from an approximate form of the presumed dipole cross section convoluted with the perturbative photon wave function for virtual photon splitting into a color dipole with massless quarks. The color dipole cross section determined this way reproduces the original structure function within about 10% for 0 .1 GeV2 ≤ Q 2 ≤10 GeV2. We discuss the dipole cross section at large and small dipole sizes and compare our results with other parametrizations.

  15. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  16. A dose calculation algorithm with correction for proton-nucleus interactions in non-water materials for proton radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Sato, S.; Kohno, R.

    2016-01-01

    In treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, the dose measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling by stopping power ratio {ρ\\text{S}} . Since the body tissues are chemically different from water, this approximation may cause dose calculation errors, especially due to differences in nuclear interactions. We proposed and validated an algorithm for correcting these errors. The dose in water is decomposed into three constituents according to the physical interactions of protons in water: the dose from primary protons continuously slowing down by electromagnetic interactions, the dose from protons scattered by elastic and/or inelastic interactions, and the dose resulting from nonelastic interactions. The proportions of the three dose constituents differ between body tissues and water. We determine correction factors for the proportion of dose constituents with Monte Carlo simulations in various standard body tissues, and formulated them as functions of their {ρ\\text{S}} for patient dose calculation. The influence of nuclear interactions on dose was assessed by comparing the Monte Carlo simulated dose and the uncorrected dose in common phantom materials. The influence around the Bragg peak amounted to  -6% for polytetrafluoroethylene and 0.3% for polyethylene. The validity of the correction method was confirmed by comparing the simulated and corrected doses in the materials. The deviation was below 0.8% for all materials. The accuracy of the correction factors derived with Monte Carlo simulations was separately verified through irradiation experiments with a 235 MeV proton beam using common phantom materials. The corrected doses agreed with the measurements within 0.4% for all materials except graphite. The influence on tumor dose was assessed in a prostate case. The dose reduction in the tumor was below 0.5%. Our results verify that this algorithm is practical and accurate for proton radiotherapy treatment planning, and

  17. Transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy ion induced transfer reactions are usually considered to fall into two categories. Quasi-elastic processes, on one hand, are characterized by small energy transfers, with one-nucleon transfer reactions being a typical example. These processes are dominant for grazing collisions, and are generally described within simple one-step DWBA calculations. Deep inelastic reactions, on the other hand, occur for more central collisions where the interaction time is longer and subsequently more energy and particles can be exchanged. Quasi-elastic collisions dominate transfer reactions induced by light heavy ions (e.g., /sup 16/O) at energies not too high above the barrier, while deep inelastic collisions are observed mainly in reactions induced by heavier projectiles (Kr, Xe). In this contribution, we discuss the transition between these two processes for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb. /sup 48/Ti is located between light (/sup 16/O) and heavy (Kr) projectiles and should be well suited for a study of the interrelation between quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions. The experiments were performed with a 300 MeV /sup 48/Ti beam obtained from the Argonne National Laboratory superconducting linac. The outgoing particles were momentum analyzed in a split pole magnetic spectrograph and detected in the focal plane by a position sensitive ionization chamber. The specific energy loss, the magnetic rigidity and the total energy of the outgoing particles were measured enabling mass and Z-identification. The energy resolution was about 3 MeV, determined by the thickness of the /sup 208/Pb target, and thus excluded study of transfer reactions to discrete final states. Angular distributions were measured in the range theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ to 80/sup 0/ in steps of 5/sup 0/. 8 refs.

  18. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  19. Measurements of 67Ga production cross section induced by protons on natZn in the low energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, J. A.; Miranda, P. A.; Morales, J. R.; Cancino, S. A.; Correa, R.

    2015-02-01

    The experimental production cross section for the reaction natZn(p,x)67Ga has been measured in the energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV. The methodology used in this work is based on characteristic X-ray emitted after irradiation by the daughter nuclei that decays by electron capture (EC) and the use of a complementary PIXE experiment. By doing so, expressions needed to determine cross section values are simplified since experimental factors such as geometric setup and an detector efficiency are avoided. 67Ga is a radionuclide particularly suited for this method since it decays by electron capture in 100% and the subsequent characteristic X-ray emission is easily detected. Natural zinc targets were fabricated by PVD technique and afterwards their thicknesses were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Cross sections measurements were carried out by using the Van de Graaff accelerator located at Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile. It was found that our data for the natZn(p,x)67Ga reaction are, in general, in good agreement when compared to existing experimental data and to those calculated ALICE/ASH nuclear code. On the other hand, values predicted by Talys-1.6 are showing systematically lower magnitudes than our measured data.

  20. Design of a proton microbeam of the PEFP

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Yong Hwan; Chang, Ji Ho; Kim, Kui Young

    2008-02-15

    The PEFP has been developing a 100 MeV proton linear accelerator and user facilities for 20 and 100 MeV proton beams. At one end of the five 20 MeV proton beam lines, a proton microbeam construction was considered for an application in the fields of material, biological, and medical sciences. To develop the proton microbeam, realization of a few MeV proton beam with a few tens of microamperes in diameter of a beam spot was essentially required. In this report, the basic descriptions of the proton microbeam which is composed of an energy degrader, slits, magnetic lens, a target chamber, and detectors are presented including a consideration of unfavorable aspects concerning some specific characteristics of a linear accelerator, such as pulse mode operation and fixed energy. Some calculation results from a Monte Carlo simulation by using the SRIM2006 and the TURTLE codes are also included.

  1. Design of a proton microbeam of the PEFPa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Yong Hwan; Chang, Ji Ho; Kim, Kui Young

    2008-02-01

    The PEFP has been developing a 100MeV proton linear accelerator and user facilities for 20 and 100MeV proton beams. At one end of the five 20MeV proton beam lines, a proton microbeam construction was considered for an application in the fields of material, biological, and medical sciences. To develop the proton microbeam, realization of a few MeV proton beam with a few tens of microamperes in diameter of a beam spot was essentially required. In this report, the basic descriptions of the proton microbeam which is composed of an energy degrader, slits, magnetic lens, a target chamber, and detectors are presented including a consideration of unfavorable aspects concerning some specific characteristics of a linear accelerator, such as pulse mode operation and fixed energy. Some calculation results from a Monte Carlo simulation by using the SRIM2006 and the TURTLE codes are also included.

  2. Inelastic diffraction at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-03-01

    The relativistic scattering was one of the scientific fields where Academician V.G. Kadyshevsky has made an important and highly cited contribution [1]. In this paper we discuss the high-energy dependencies of diffractive and non-diffractive inelastic cross-sections in view of the recent LHC data which reveal a presence of the reflective scattering mode.

  3. Inelastic stopping for deuterons in warm Al plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Liu, Chun-Lei; Liu, Ling; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-06-01

    The inelastic stopping is studied for deuterons in the Al plasmas with a fixed density 0.02 g cm-3 at 7 different temperatures from 2.7 to 64 eV within the projectile energy range from 100 keV u-1 to 10 MeV u-1 from our model (He and Wang 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 063111). All the results are compared in detail with those from the isolated ion model where all the bound electrons are assumed in the ground state and the target ions are in almost the same charge states as those in the plasmas. The relativistic plane wave Born approximation is tested by much improved methods and found to be able to describe well the inelastic processes in the plasmas. The relevant result of the inelastic stopping is found to reflect the joint effect of the transition probability, electron occupation number and transition energy. It is found that the transitions of the deeply bound states play a dominant role to the inelastic stopping in the two models. The results due to all the excitation and de-excitation and those due to all the ionization and three body recombination in the plasmas are usually lower and higher than those for the corresponding isolated ions, respectively. It is demonstrated that models with target ions in the ground state could agree well with experiments in plasmas at a high enough projectile energy provided by a proper choice of the charge state of the target ion. The obvious difference between our model and Casas et al's model (Casas et al 2013 Phys. Rev. E 88 033102) is seen for the stopping with the projectile energy around 100 keV u-1 due to the different physical picture underlying them, which is helpful to probe which model proves more reliable in future experiments.

  4. Proton therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Furukawa, S.; Kawachi, K.; Kanai, T.; Ohara, H.; Kitagawa, T.; Inada, T.

    1985-01-01

    There are two facilities for clinical trials with protons in Japan: the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, and the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center (PARMS), University of Tsukuba. At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, patient treatment with the 70 MeV proton beam began in November 1979, and 29 patients were treated through December 1984. Of 11 patients who received protons only, 9 have had local control of the tumor. Two of the 9 patients, suffering from recurrent tumor after radical photon beam irradiation, developed complications after proton treatment. In the patients treated with photons or neutrons followed by proton boost, tumors were controlled in 12 of 18 patients (66.6%), and no complications were observed in this series. Malignant melanoma could not be controlled with the proton beam. A spot-beam-scanning system for protons has been effectively used in the clinical trials to minimize the dose to the normal tissues and to concentrate the dose in the target volume. At the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center, University of Tsukuba, treatment with a vertical 250 MeV proton beam was begun in April 1983, and 22 patients were treated through February 1984. Local control of the tumor was observed in 14 of 22 patients (63.6%), whereas there was no local control in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. There have been no severe complications in patients treated at PARMS. The results suggest that local control of tumors will be better with proton beams than with photon beams, whereas additional modalities are required to manage radioresistant tumors.

  5. Experimental constraints on non-linearities induced by two-photon effects in elastic and inelastic Rosenbluth separations

    SciTech Connect

    Vladas Tvaskis; John Arrington; Michael Christy; Rolf Ent; Cynthia Keppel; Yongguang Liang; Grahame Vittorini

    2006-01-26

    The effects of two-photon exchange corrections, suggested to explain the difference between measurements of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors using the polarization transfer and Rosenbluth techniques, have been studied in elastic and inelastic scattering data. Such corrections could introduce epsilon-dependent non-linearities in inelastic Rosenbluth separations, where epsilon is the virtual photon polarization parameter. It is concluded that such non-linear effects are consistent with zero for elastic, resonance, and deep-inelastic scattering for all Q{sup 2} and W{sup 2} values measured.

  6. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  7. NLO QCD corrections to graviton induced deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, W. J.; Vryonidou, E.

    2011-06-01

    We consider Next-to-Leading-Order QCD corrections to ADD graviton exchange relevant for Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. We calculate the relevant NLO structure functions by calculating the virtual and real corrections for a set of graviton interaction diagrams, demonstrating the expected cancellation of the UV and IR divergences. We compare the NLO and LO results at the centre-of-mass energy relevant to HERA experiments as well as for the proposed higher energy lepton-proton collider, LHeC, which has a higher fundamental scale reach.

  8. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  9. Earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    We report the measurement of the energy and angular distributions of earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV at 40 deg N geomagnetic latitude from a balloon at 120,000 ft, below 4.65 g/sq cm. The albedo-neutron omnidirectional energy distribution is flat to 50 MeV, then decreases with energy. The absolute neutron energy distribution is of the correct strength and shape for the albedo neutrons to be the source of the protons trapped in earth's inner radiation belt.

  10. Very energetic protons in Saturn's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.

    1980-01-01

    Very energetic protons are trapped in the inner Saturnian radiation belt. The University of California at San Diego instrument on Pioneer 11 has definitely identified protons of energy greater than 80 MeV on channel M3 and has tentatively detected protons of energy greater than 600 MeV on channel C3. The spatial distribution of the protons is distinct from that of the trapped electrons, the main difference being that the protons are strongly absorbed by the innermost moons and that the electrons are not. The source strength for injecting protons by the decay of cosmic ray albedo neutrons generated in the rings of Saturn has been estimated. The required proton lifetime is approximately 20 years.

  11. Inelastic behavior of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N.; Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    A more accurate procedure was developed for the determination of the inelastic behavior of structural components. The actual stress-strain curve for the mathematical of the structure was utilized to generate the force-deformation relationships for the structural elements, rather than using simplified models such as elastic-plastic, bilinear and trilinear approximations. relationships were generated for beam elements with various types of cross sections. In the generational of these curves, stress or load reversals, kinematic hardening and hysteretic behavior were taken into account. Intersections between loading and unloading branches were determined through an iterative process. Using the inelastic properties obtained, the plastic static response of some simple structural systems composed of beam elements was computed. Results were compared with known solutions, indicating a considerable improvement over response predictions obtained by means of simplified approximations used in previous investigations.

  12. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  13. Measurement of inelastic cross sections in relativistic deuteron-on-lead reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zamani, M.; Stoulos, S.; Fragopoulou, M.; Krivopustov, M.

    2010-10-15

    The inelastic cross section of deuterons hitting a lead target has been determined by the beam attenuation technique. A spallation neutron source based on a lead target was irradiated with 1.6- and 2.5-GeV deuterons. Solid-state nuclear track detectors as well as the activation method were used to obtain the neutron and proton distribution along the surface of the source. The attenuation coefficient was estimated by fitting the experimental data and taking into account the buildup effect and the beam attenuation. Using the attenuation coefficient, the interaction length and then the inelastic cross section of deuterons on lead reaction were determined.

  14. Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The reduced cross sections for e+p deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different center-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q2, were obtained in the region 0.13≤y ≤0.75, where y denotes the inelasticity and 5≤Q2≤110 GeV2. The proton structure functions F2 and FL were extracted from the measured cross sections.

  15. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

    2010-01-01

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  16. Neutron beams from protons on beryllium.

    PubMed

    Bewley, D K; Meulders, J P; Octave-Prignot, M; Page, B C

    1980-09-01

    Measurements of dose rate and penetration in water have been made for neutron beams produced by 30--75 MeV protons on beryllium. The effects of Polythene filters added on the target side of the collimator have also been studied. A neutron beam comparable with a photon beam from a 4--8 MeV linear accelerator can be produced with p/Be neutrons plus 5 cm Polythene filtrations, with protons in the range 50--75 MeV. This is a more economical method than use of the d/Be reaction.

  17. Low-energy cosmic ray protons from nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    The intensity of low-energy (less than 100 MeV) protons from nuclear interactions of higher-energy (above 100 MeV) cosmic rays with the interstellar medium is calculated. The resultant intensity in the 10- to 100-MeV range is larger by a factor of 3-5 than the observed proton intensity near earth. The calculated intensity from nuclear interactions constitutes a lower limit on the actual proton intensity in interstellar space.

  18. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore » inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  19. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  20. Improved constraints on inelastic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang E-mail: mwinkler@ph.tum.de

    2009-09-01

    We perform an extensive study of the DAMA annual modulation data in the context of inelastic dark matter. We find that inelastic dark matter with mass m{sub χ}∼>15 GeV is excluded at the 95% confidence level by the combination of DAMA spectral information and results from other direct detection experiments. However, at smaller m{sub χ}, inelastic dark matter constitutes a possible solution to the DAMA puzzle.

  1. Fission time scales from anisotropic in-plane distributions in 100Mo+100Mo and 120Sn+120Sn collisions around 20A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, G.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.; Wessels, J. P.; Charity, R. J.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Stelzer, H.

    1993-10-01

    The characteristics of the fission step following a binary deep-inelastic interaction have been reconstructed for three-body events detected in the reaction 100Mo+100Mo at 18.7A MeV and 12-Sn+120Sn at 18.4A MeV. The observed anisotropy of the in-plane angular distributions points to the fast decay of a rotating (and strongly deformed) nuclear object formed at the end of the deep-inelastic interaction. The derived time scale of the process indicates that asymmetric divisions are faster than symmetric ones.

  2. Use of inelastic analysis in cask design

    SciTech Connect

    AMMERMAN,DOUGLAS J.; BREIVIK,NICOLE L.

    2000-05-15

    In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of inelastic analysis are discussed. Example calculations and designs showing the implications and significance of factors affecting inelastic analysis are given. From the results described in this paper it can be seen that inelastic analysis provides an improved method for the design of casks. It can also be seen that additional code and standards work is needed to give designers guidance in the use of inelastic analysis. Development of these codes and standards is an area where there is a definite need for additional work. The authors hope that this paper will help to define the areas where that need is most acute.

  3. Data analysis for Skylab proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The data from a proton spectrometer flown aboard Skylab is examined. The instrument is sensitive to protons in the energy range 18 to 400 MeV. A partial failure of the spectrometer restricted spectral analysis to two energy bands, 18 to 27 MeV and 27 to 400 MeV. The directional data showed that a Gaussian angular distribution parameter of at least 70 degrees is required for the low energy band and at least 40 degrees for the high energy band. The data, integrated over angle, indicate that the AP3 model extrapolated down to 18-27 MeV is high by factors of 2 to 5 over most of the B-L space mapped. In the 27 to 400 MeV range, the AP3 model is 20 to 100 percent low at low and high values of L, and is high at medium L values in the B-L space mapped.

  4. Primordial 4He constraints on inelastic macro dark matter revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, David M.; Allwright, Gwyneth; Mafune, Mpho; Manikumar, Samyukta; Weltman, Amanda

    2016-11-01

    At present, the best model for the evolution of the cosmos requires that dark matter make up approximately 25% of the energy content of the Universe. Most approaches to explain the microscopic nature of dark matter, to date, have assumed its composition to be of intrinsically weakly interacting particles; however, this need not be the case to have consistency with all extant observations. Given decades of inconclusive evidence to support any dark matter candidate, there is strong motivation to consider alternatives to the standard particle scenario. One such example is macro dark matter, a class of candidates (macros) that could interact strongly with the particles of the Standard Model, have large masses and physical sizes, and yet behave as dark matter. Macros that scatter completely inelastically could have altered the primordial production of the elements, and macro charge-dependent constraints have been obtained previously. Here we reconsider the phenomenology of inelastically interacting macros on the abundance of primordially produced 4He and revise previous constraints by also taking into account improved measurements of the primordial 4He abundance. The constraints derived here are limited in applicability to only leptophobic macros that have a surface potential V (RX)≳0.5 MeV . However, an important conclusion from our analysis is that even neutral macros would likely affect the abundance of the light elements. Therefore, constraints on that scenario are possible and are currently an open question.

  5. Out of Field Doses in Clinical Photon and Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubančák, Ján

    2010-01-01

    Out-of-field doses in homogenous cubical polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were studied in this work. Measurements were performed in clinical 171 MeV proton and megavoltae photon beam. As detectors, CaSO:Dy thermoluminescent detectors were used. According to expectancy, results showed that out-of-field doses are substantially lower for clinical proton beam in comparison with clinical proton beam.

  6. Extension of PENELOPE to protons: Simulation of nuclear reactions and benchmark with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Sorriaux, J.; Vynckier, S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Describing the implementation of nuclear reactions in the extension of the Monte Carlo code (MC) PENELOPE to protons (PENH) and benchmarking with Geant4.Methods: PENH is based on mixed-simulation mechanics for both elastic and inelastic electromagnetic collisions (EM). The adopted differential cross sections for EM elastic collisions are calculated using the eikonal approximation with the Dirac–Hartree–Fock–Slater atomic potential. Cross sections for EM inelastic collisions are computed within the relativistic Born approximation, using the Sternheimer–Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength. Nuclear elastic and inelastic collisions were simulated using explicitly the scattering analysis interactive dialin database for {sup 1}H and ICRU 63 data for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, {sup 16}O, {sup 31}P, and {sup 40}Ca. Secondary protons, alphas, and deuterons were all simulated as protons, with the energy adapted to ensure consistent range. Prompt gamma emission can also be simulated upon user request. Simulations were performed in a water phantom with nuclear interactions switched off or on and integral depth–dose distributions were compared. Binary-cascade and precompound models were used for Geant4. Initial energies of 100 and 250 MeV were considered. For cases with no nuclear interactions simulated, additional simulations in a water phantom with tight resolution (1 mm in all directions) were performed with FLUKA. Finally, integral depth–dose distributions for a 250 MeV energy were computed with Geant4 and PENH in a homogeneous phantom with, first, ICRU striated muscle and, second, ICRU compact bone.Results: For simulations with EM collisions only, integral depth–dose distributions were within 1%/1 mm for doses higher than 10% of the Bragg-peak dose. For central-axis depth–dose and lateral profiles in a phantom with tight resolution, there are significant deviations between Geant4 and PENH (up to 60%/1 cm for depth

  7. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  8. Measurement of reaction rate distributions in a plastic phantom irradiated by 40- and 65-MEV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Y; Nakashima, H; Sakamoto, Y; Tanaka, S

    1997-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions in a plastic phantom were measured with solid state nuclear track detectors and a fission counter for 40- and 65-MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by the 7Li(p,n) reactions with 43- and 68-MeV protons at AVF cyclotron of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Measured distributions were compared with calculated ones.

  9. Inelastic behavior in polycarbonate blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Polycarbonate offers a challenging opportunity because of its industrial importance from carbon nano-tubes, ceramics and to Electrophotography. Anti-plasticization shows anomalous inelastic behavior in brittle ductile transition and in stress strain, stress strain rate response. Poly (methylmethacrylate), polystyrene, and polycarbonate are strongly rate dependent, Nano-indentation is a way of determining surface deformation and effect of strain and strain rate behavior of complex surfaces. Hardness and modulus depend on the indentation depth or load, exhibiting the well-known Indentation Size Effect (ISE). A decrease in the hardness with increasing indentation depth or load has been observed in numerous micro or nano-indentation tests on various materials such as metals, diamond-like carbon, polymers, ceramics, etc. which may be called the normal ISE. The inverse ISE has also been reported, in which the hardness increases with increasing indentation depth or load. There are unique properties such as indentation affects resulting in strain softening and strain hardening. There is differentiation in structure with the depth exhibited in variation of Tg. Hertzian and non-linear deformation models including usage of Finite Element Method offer opportunity in analyzing nano-indentation. Presence of diamine in polycarbonate results in making the surface and bulk brittle and acts as an anti-plasticizer by increasing its modulus, yield stress and reducing strain to break. Data on modulus and hardness of polycarbonate and blends of diamine as function of depth (strain) and strain rate are presented and compared to inelastic models.

  10. AXAF Detector Backgrounds Produced By Cosmic Ray Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, K. L.; Dietz, K. L.; O'Dell, S. L.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    One of the science instruments on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), planned for launch in 1998 into a highly elliptical (10,000 km x 140,000 km) orbit, is a microchannel plate High Resolution Camera (HRC). This detector is designed to provide imaging and spectroscopic observations of x-rays emitted by stellar sources in the 0.1 to 10 keV energy range. Described here are analyses made to determine the expected time-dependent detector background from prompt and delayed (activation) radiation initiated by galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton interactions in the spacecraft and payload. Numerical simulations were made using the coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, analysis software, and data bases shown. The major codes are HETC for nucleon-meson transport, EGS for simulating electromagnetic cascades, and MORSE for low-energy (less than 15 MeV) neutron transport. The simulation follows the transport history of photons in the energy range from - 100 GeV down to approx. 0.1 keV due to gamma-ray sources from neutral pion decay, high-energy (spallation) collisions, and low-energy neutron inelastic scattering and capture reactions. Also included is radioisotope production and the tracking of gamma-rays, electrons, and positrons from induced radioactivity.

  11. Generalized upper bound for inelastic diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-01-01

    For inelastic diffraction, we obtain an upper bound valid for the whole range of the elastic scattering amplitude variation allowed by unitarity. We discuss the energy dependence of the inelastic diffractive cross-section on the base of this bound and recent Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data.

  12. Modeling secondary particle tracks generated by intermediate- and low-energy protons in water with the Low-Energy Particle Track Simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Traore, Ali; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Using a recent extension of the Low-Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) Monte Carlo code, we model the slowing-down of heavy charged particles propagating in water, combined with an explicit molecular-level description of radiation effects due to the formation of secondary electrons, their propagation through the medium, and electron-induced molecular dissociations. As a case study, we consider the transport of protons with the initial energy of 1 MeV until their thermalization, so that we cover the energy range that contributes mainly to the energy deposition in the Bragg peak region. In order to include protons into the simulation procedure, a comprehensive dataset of integral and differential cross sections of elastic and inelastic scattering of intermediate- and low-energy protons from water molecules is created. Experimental and theoretical cross sections available in the literature are carefully examined, compared and verified. The ionization cross section by protons includes recent experimental measurements of the production of different charged fragments.

  13. Hamilton's principle as inequality for inelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lv, Q. C.; Liu, Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies with conservative external forces. Inelasticity is described by internal variable theory by Rice (J Mech Phys Solids 19:433-455, 1971), and the influence of strain change on the temperature field is ignored. Unlike Hamilton's principle for elastic bodies which has an explicit Lagrangian, Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies generally has no an explicit Lagrangian. Based on the entropy inequality, a quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies is established in the form of inequality and with an explicit Lagrangian, which is just the Lagrangian for elastic bodies by replacing the strain energy with free energy. The quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies states that the actual motion is distinguished by making the action an maximum. The evolution equations of internal variables can not be recovered from the quasi Hamilton's principle.

  14. Production of and in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; SVN, M. Keil; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhuo, Zhou; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The production of the strange and double-strange baryon resonances (, ) has been measured at mid-rapidity ( ) in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. Transverse momentum spectra for inelastic collisions are compared to QCD-inspired models, which in general underpredict the data. A search for the pentaquark, decaying in the channel, has been carried out but no evidence is seen.

  15. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Specific Features of the Phase Transitions in (NH4)2WO2F4

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Lev S; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Flerov, I. N.; Laptash, N. M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxyfluoride (NH4)2WO2F4 has been studied by the inelastic neutron scattering method over a wide temperature range 10 300 K at two initial neutron energies of 15 and 60 meV. The role of tetrahedral ammonium groups in the mechanism of sequential phase transitions at T1 = 201 K and T2 = 160 K has been discussed.

  16. Elastic pd scattering at 316, 364, 470, and 590 MeV in the backward hemisphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alder, J. C.; Dollhoff, W.; Lunke, C.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Roberts, W. K.; Kitching, P.; Moss, G.; Olsen, W. C.; Priest, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The elastic pd differential cross section at center-of-mass angles between 91 and 164 deg was determined for 316, 364, 470, and 590 MeV proton scattering in a backward hemisphere. For the three largest energies, the cross sections were within 10% of each other at any given angle larger than 130 deg. The extrapolated 180 deg differential cross section remained nearly constant from 316 to 590 MeV.

  17. Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Selesnick, RS; Baker, DN; Jaynes, AN; Kanekal, SG; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Fennell, J; Blake, JB

    2015-01-01

    No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (tens of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable; thus, for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher-energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope on board Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, provides, for the first time, quantified upper limits on MeV electron fluxes in various energy ranges in the inner belt. These upper limits are rather different from flux levels in the AE8 and AE9 models, which were developed based on older data sources. For 1.7, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV electrons, the upper limits are about 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted model fluxes. The implication of this difference is profound in that unless there are extreme solar wind conditions, which have not happened yet since the launch of Van Allen Probes, significant enhancements of MeV electrons do not occur in the inner belt even though such enhancements are commonly seen in the outer belt. Key Points Quantified upper limit of MeV electrons in the inner belt Actual MeV electron intensity likely much lower than the upper limit More detailed understanding of relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere PMID:26167446

  18. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  19. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  20. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    DOE PAGES

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; ...

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleusmore » rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.« less

  1. Production of Ξ- in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, N. Mohammad; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ- has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  2. Production of Ξ{sup −} in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Nasir, N. Mohammad Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ{sup −} has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  3. Measurements of transverse momentum in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Griffioen

    2012-12-01

    With mounting experimental evidence that only a small fraction of the proton's spin comes from the spins of its quarks and gluons, the quest for orbital angular momentum has begun. The parton distributions relevant to this depend on transverse quark momenta. Recent CLAS semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements probe these new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions using longitudinally polarized beams and targets and detecting {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0} in the final state.

  4. Modeling of Anisotropic Inelastic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J.; Nath, D.S.; Brown, A.A.; Casey, J.

    2000-02-25

    An experimental capability, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is being used to study the yield behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The objective of our research is to develop better constitutive equations for polycrystalline metals. We are experimentally determining the multidimensional yield surface of the material, both in its initial state and as it evolves during large inelastic deformations. These experiments provide a more complete picture of material behavior than can be obtained from traditional uniaxial tests. Experimental results show that actual material response can differ significantly from that predicted by simple idealized models. These results are being used to develop improved constitutive models of anisotropic plasticity for use in continuum computer codes.

  5. Particle production in the Color Glass Condensate: from electron-proton DIS to proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2014-06-01

    We study single inclusive hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions in the CGC framework. The parameters in the calculation are obtained by fitting electron-proton deep inelastic scattering data. The obtained dipole-proton amplitude is generalized to dipole-nucleus scattering without any additional nuclear parameters other than the Woods-Saxon distribution. We show that it is possible to use an initial condition without an anomalous dimension and still obtain a good description of the HERA inclusive cross section and LHC single particle production measurements. We argue that one must consistently use the proton transverse area as measured by a high virtuality probe in DIS also for the single inclusive cross section in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions, and obtain a nuclear modification factor RpA that at midrapidity approaches unity at large momenta and at all energies.

  6. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  7. Observation of isoscalar multipole strengths in exotic doubly-magic 56Ni in inelastic α scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, S.; Gibelin, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Achouri, N. L.; Akimune, H.; Bastin, B.; Boretzky, K.; Bouzomita, H.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Damoy, S.; Delaunay, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Fujiwara, M.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Kamalou, O.; Khan, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lhoutellier, G.; Libin, J. F.; Lukyanov, S.; Mazurek, K.; Najafi, M. A.; Pancin, J.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Perrot, L.; Raabe, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roger, T.; Sambi, S.; Savajols, H.; Senoville, M.; Stodel, C.; Suen, L.; Thomas, J. C.; Vandebrouck, M.; Van de Walle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) compression modes have been studied in the doubly-magic unstable nucleus 56Ni. They were measured by inelastic α-particle scattering in inverse kinematics at 50 MeV/u with the MAYA active target at the GANIL facility. The centroid of the ISGMR has been obtained at Ex = 19.1 ± 0.5 MeV. Evidence for the low-lying part of the ISGDR has been found at Ex = 17.4 ± 0.7 MeV. The strength distribution for the dipole mode shows similarity with the prediction from the Hartree-Fock (HF) based random-phase approximation (RPA) [1]. These measurements confirm inelastic α-particle scattering as a suitable probe for exciting the ISGMR and the ISGDR modes in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  8. Simulations of proton beam characteristics for ELIMED Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikal, Jan; Limpouch, Jiri; Klimo, Ondrej; Vyskocil, Jiri; Margarone, Daniele; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    ELIMED Beamline should demonstrate the capability of laser-based particle accelerators for medical applications, mainly for proton radiotherapy of tumours which requires a sufficient number of accelerated protons with energy about 60 MeV at least. In this contribution, we study the acceleration of protons by laser pulse with parameters accessible for ELIMED Beamline (intensity ∼ 1022 W/cm2, pulse length ∼ 30 fs). In our two-dimensional particle-incell simulations, we observed higher energies of protons for linear than for circular polarization. Oblique incidence of the laser pulse on target does not seem to be favourable for proton acceleration at such high intensities as the accelerated protons are deflected from target normal axis and their energy and numbers are slightly decreased. The expected numbers of accelerated protons in the energy interval 60 MeV ± 5% are calculated between 109 and 1010 per laser shot with estimated proton beam divergence about 20° (FWHM).

  9. Deep Inelastic Scattering results from the first year of HERA operation

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, S.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first year of operation of the HERA electron-proton collider has resulted in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) Physics results from both the H1 and ZEUS experiments. Reported here are the H1 and ZEUS measurements of the proton structure function F{sub 2} at higher Q{sup 2} and lower x than previously reported from fixed target experiments. Also included are the results of QCD studies on hadronic final states and jets, and the observation of high Q{sup 2} charged current events from both experiments. Finally, the observation of events with large rapidity gaps by the ZEUS collaboration is also reported.

  10. Production of Neutron-Unbound States in Intermediate - Fragments from Nitrogen + Silver Reactions at E/a = 35 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence Harvey

    The populations of neutron-unbound states and of bound states in intermediate-mass fragments have been measured at 15^circ, 31 ^circ, and 64^circ from the ^{14}N + Ag reaction at E/A = 35 MeV. The data are identified in terms of the reaction mechanism producing them, which is either a deep-inelastic mechanism or a quasielastic mechanism. In order to test the assumption that the deep -inelastic data are produced from a thermal source, the unbound-state/bound-state population ratios of deep-inelastic fragments are compared to the predictions of a thermal sequential decay model. Most, but not all, of the deep -inelastic population ratios are fitted with model calculations that assume a source temperature between 2.5 and 3.4 MeV. Three or more populations from the same isotope were measured for ^{13}C, ^ {12}B, and ^{10} Be. The deep-inelastic populations from ^{13}C and ^{10 }Be were fitted with a single temperature, while the deep-inelastic populations from ^ {12}B were not fitted. There is enough of the deep-inelastic data that is not fitted with the predictions of a thermal model that the assumption of a thermal source for the production of deep-inelastic fragments may be incorrect, or there may be other effects present which alter the thermal properties of the data. The dependence of the unbound-state/bound-state population ratio on the fragment kinetic energy shows a difference between the quasielastic and deep-inelastic data. For quasielastic fragments whose mass is near the mass of the beam, the ratio decreases towards zero as the fragment velocity approaches the beam velocity. In contrast, the ratio for half-beam mass quasielastic fragments is constant or only slightly decreasing as the kinetic energy increases. The ratio for deep-inelastic fragments is approximately constant as a function of kinetic energy, independent of fragment mass. The amount of feeding from several neutron-unbound channels into bound states is measured and compared to the sequential

  11. Energy dissipation in heavy systems: the transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; van den Berg, A.; Kolata, J.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Kutschera, W.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Yntema, J.L.; Lee, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of medium mass projectiles (A = 28 - 64) with /sup 208/Pb has been studied using a split-pole spectrograph which allows single mass and charge identification. The reaction process in all systems studied so far is dominated by quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions, especially at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition to the quasi-elastic component deep inelastic contributions are present in all reaction channels. The good mass and charge separation allows to generate Wilczynski plots for individual channels; for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb we observe that the transition between the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic reactions occurs around Q = -(30 to 35) MeV.

  12. The effect of Jupiter's satellites on the diffusion of protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Proton diffusion data are calculated for the Jovian satellites Amalthea, Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, assuming an equatorial magnetic field at Jupiter's surface of 10 gauss. The cyclotron radius, bounce period, and drift period are calculated for 1 MeV protons. These characteristics and the proton energy at the satellite, mean life near the satellite before impact, and diffusion time are also calculated for 100 MeV protons which conserve their first adiabatic invariant. The longitudinal distance between successive bounces is of the order of a few satellite radii.

  13. Photon-jet cross sections in deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurenche, P.; Fontannaz, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present the complete next-to-leading order calculation of isolated prompt photon production in association with a jet in deep-inelastic scattering. The calculation involves, direct, resolved, and fragmentation contributions. It is shown that defining the transverse momenta in the proton virtual-photon frame (CM), as usually done, or in the laboratory frame, as done in some experiments, is not equivalent and leads to important differences concerning the perturbative approach. In fact, using the latter frame may preclude, under certain conditions, the calculation of the next-to-leading order correction to the important resolved component. A comparison with the latest ZEUS data is performed and good agreement is found in the perturbatively stable regions.

  14. Ringlike inelastic events in cosmic rays and accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dremin, I. M.; Orlov, A. M.; Tretyakova, M. I.

    1985-01-01

    In cosmic rays and in accelerators there were observed single inelastic processes with densely produced (azimuthally isotropic) groups of particles exhibiting spikes in the pseudorapidity plot of an individual event (i.e. ringlike events). Theoretically the existence of such processes was predicted as a consequence of Cerenkov gluon radiation or, more generally, of deconfinement radiation. Nowadays some tens of such events have been accumulated at 400 GeV and at 150 TeV. Analyzing ringlike events in proton-nucleon interactions at 400 GeV/c it is shown that they exhibit striking irregularity in the positions of pseudorapidity spikes' centers which tend to lie mostly at 55,90 and 125 deg in cms. It implies rather small deconfinement lengths of the order of some fermi.

  15. Relative degradation of near infrared avalanche photodiodes from proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes are compared for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural differences between devices.

  16. Solution of a Simple Inelastic Scattering Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Stephen K.

    1975-01-01

    Provides an analytical solution of a model representing the collision of an atom with a harmonic oscillator, interacting via a repulsive square well potential. Presents results for various energies and strengths of inelastic scattering. (Author/CP)

  17. Nuclear interaction cross sections for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, M. B.; Jones, D. T. L.; Arendse, G. J.; Cowley, A. A.; Richter, W. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Newman, R. T.; Pilcher, J. V.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F.; Koen, JW; Stander, JA

    Model calculations of proton-induced nuclear reaction cross sections are described for biologically-important targets. Measurements made at the National Accelerator Centre are presented for double-differential proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha particle spectra, for 150 and 200 MeV protons incident on C, N, and O. These data are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and absorbed dose in proton therapy. Data relevant to the use of positron emission tomography to locate the Bragg peak are also described.

  18. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  19. Radiation damage of F8 lead glass with 20 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. D.; Mitchell, R. E.; McChesney, P.; Shepherd, M. R.; Frye, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    Using a 20 MeV linear accelerator, we investigate the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the optical transparency of F8 lead glass. Specifically, we measure the change in attenuation length as a function of radiation dose. Comparing our results to similar work that utilized a proton beam, we conclude that F8 lead glass is more susceptible to proton damage than electron damage.

  20. Response of LaBr3(Ce) scintillators to 2.5 MeV fusion neutrons.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, C; Nocente, M; Tardocchi, M; Croci, G; Giacomelli, L; Angelone, M; Pillon, M; Villari, S; Weller, A; Petrizzi, L; Gorini, G

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of the response of LaBr3(Ce) to 2.5 MeV neutrons have been carried out at the Frascati Neutron Generator and at tokamak facilities with deuterium plasmas. The observed spectrum has been interpreted by means of a Monte Carlo model. It is found that the main contributor to the measured response is neutron inelastic scattering on (79)Br, (81)Br, and (139)La. An extrapolation of the count rate response to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium plasmas is also presented. The results are of relevance for the design of γ-ray diagnostics of fusion burning plasmas.

  1. Response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators to 2.5 MeV fusion neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Villari, S.; Weller, A.; Petrizzi, L.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-12-15

    Measurements of the response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) to 2.5 MeV neutrons have been carried out at the Frascati Neutron Generator and at tokamak facilities with deuterium plasmas. The observed spectrum has been interpreted by means of a Monte Carlo model. It is found that the main contributor to the measured response is neutron inelastic scattering on {sup 79}Br, {sup 81}Br, and {sup 139}La. An extrapolation of the count rate response to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium plasmas is also presented. The results are of relevance for the design of γ-ray diagnostics of fusion burning plasmas.

  2. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  4. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinburnn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 0.09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 MeV and for three differential proton spectra of the type approximately E(- alpha). It is concluded that, even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar39 radioactivity.

  5. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  6. Inelastic final-state interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like “Watson’s theorem” holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B→Kπ fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  7. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  8. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  9. The Excitation of High Spin States with Quasielastic and Deep Inelastic Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Clinton Neal

    1988-12-01

    The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 220 MeV ^{22 }Ne beam on a ^{170} Er target was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum multiplicity spectrometer and six DeltaE-E particle telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

  10. The excitation of high spin states with quasi-elastic and deep inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of populating high spin states using reactions induced by a 220 MeV {sup 22}Ne beam on a {sup 170}Er target was studied. The experiment was carried out using a multidetector array for high resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, a 14 element sum multiplicity spectrometer and six {Delta}E-E particle telescopes. Detailed information was obtained concerning the reaction mechanisms associated with various reaction channels. Deep inelastic collisions are shown to be a promising tool for high spin spectroscopy in regions of the chart of nuclides which are not accessible by other reactions.

  11. Bent crystal analyzer without grooves for inelastic scattering -- first experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, V.I.; Macrander, A.T.

    1996-11-01

    A new design of a bent crystal analyzer for high energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering has been recently proposed. It has been theoretically predicted that an analyzer with reflecting planes at a certain angle with respect to a crystal surface, bent with two different radii of curvature, will have the same energy resolution as a perfect crystal. The first experimental measurement obtained at the Advanced Photon Source of a bandwidth of such an analyzer is presented. The overall energy resolution of the analyzer and monochromator observed with a narrow beam is equal to 16.4 meV (FWHM) at 13.84 KeV.

  12. Inelastic neutrino scattering off stable even-even Mo isotopes at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasi, K. G.; Kosmas, T. S.; Divari, P. C.

    2010-04-01

    Inelastic neutrino scattering cross sections for the even-even Mo isotopes (contents of the MOON detector at Japan), at low and intermediate electron neutrino energies ( ɛi≤100 MeV), are calculated. MOON is a next-generation double beta and neutrino-less double-beta-decay experiment which is also a promising facility for low-energy neutrino detection. The nuclear wave functions required in this work have been constructed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) and the results presented refer to 92Mo, 94Mo, 96Mo, 98Mo and 100Mo isotopes.

  13. Proton resonance scattering of 7Be

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Niikura, M.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.

    2006-07-12

    We have studied the proton resonance scattering of 7Be by using a pure 7Be beam produced at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator; CNS stands for Center of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). The excitation function of 8B was measured up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, with the thick-target method. The excited states of 8B higher than 3.5 MeV were not known by the past experiments. This proton elastic scattering is also of importance in relation with the 7Be(p,{gamma})8B reaction, which is a key reaction in the standard solar model.

  14. Proton radiation damage in vertical junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. H.; Statler, R. L.

    A comparative experimental study of proton radiation damage in silicon vertical junction (VJ) and silicon planar solar cells was performed at three energies, 1-MeV, 2-MeV, and 3.5-MeV, for a normal incidence monoenergetic proton beam. Proton fluence levels up to 3 x 10 to the 12th protons/sq cm were achieved, with solar cell I-V characterization measurements performed at incremental fluences, using a recently calibrated Spectrolab X-25L Solar Simulator. The VJ cells were made from 0.4 ohm-cm silicon, while the planar cells were made from 10 ohm-cm silicon and had a back surface reflector. The VJ cells proved to be more radiation resistant than the baseline planar cells, and the damage data from various proton energies indicate that the vertical junction concept does work effectively for maintaining high collection efficiency despite heavy radiation exposure.

  15. Fast Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections in THORIUM-232.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarcia, Christopher Albert

    Fast neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for levels between 700-1550-keV excitation energy in the actinide nucleus, ('232)Th, have been measured using the (n,n') time-of-flight technique. Two series of measurements were undertaken using neutrons with a typical energy spread of 8-10 keV, generated by the ('7)Li(p,n)('7)Be reaction. These measurments for 125(DEGREES)-differential scattering cross sections were performed over the incident neutron energy regions of (i) 0.950-1.550 MeV, in 50-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.200 -0.400-MeV scattered neutrons and (ii) 1.200-2.000 MeV, in 100-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.400-0.800-MeV scattered neutrons. Over these scattered energy regions, an overall energy resolution of less than 15 keV was maintained. The relative neutron fluence was determined for each individual measurement, by positioning the main detector at 0(DEGREES) to view the primary neutron flux. Relative normalization was achieved by measuring the direct neutron flux from the lithium target with a fixed overhead monitor detector in both measurements. Main detector response was determined by comparison with a ('235)U fission chamber of known efficiency. Techniques for unfolding the complicated spectra obtained from these (n,n') studies were developed, employing user interactive computer codes to (i) generate simulated scattered neutron group response functions, (ii) subtract background effects from the measured spectra, (iii) approximate the background subtracted spectra in a weighted least-squares fashion by a superposition of response functions and (iv) make corrections for neutron absorption, finite scatterer size effects and multiple neutron scattering. Support codes consisting of graphics interaction packages, data file manipulation and transfer utility routines were created to assist in the spectral analysis procedure. Excitation function and angular distribution

  16. A 600 MeV cyclotron for radioactive beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1993-05-17

    The magnetic field design for a 600 MeV proton cyclotron is described. The cyclotron has a single stage, a normal conducting magnet coil and a 9.8 m outside yoke diameter. It has 8 sectors, with a transition to 4 sectors in the center region. The magnetic field design was done using 1958 Harwell rectangular ridge system measurements and was compared with recent 3-dimensional field calculations with the program TOSCA at NSCL. The center region 4--8 sector transition focussing was also checked with TOSCA.

  17. Reaction Li-6/p, pt/ at 590 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollhopf, W.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Lunke, C.; Kitching, P.; Olsen, W. C.; Priest, J. R.; Roberts, W. K.

    1973-01-01

    A lithium target enriched to 95.6 per cent of Li-6 and 0.685 cm thick was bombarded in the 590-MeV proton beam of a synchrocyclotron. Coincident events were detected in a double telescope arrangement. The characteristics of the unobserved three-nucleon residual system calculated for each event include the missing energy, the longitudinal recoil, and the transverse recoil. The cross-section data obtained indicate that zero recoil momentum for the unobserved three-nucleon recoil system is the most likely situation.

  18. Polarization observables in deuteron photodisintegration below 360 MeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Glister, J.; Ron, G.; Lee, B. W.; Gilman, R.; Sarty, A. J.; Arrington, J.; Solvignon, P.

    2011-03-07

    High precision measurements of induced and transferred recoil proton polarization in d({rvec y}, {rvec p})n have been performed for photon energies of 277-357 MeV and {theta}cm = 20{sup o}-120{sup o}. The measurements were motivated by a longstanding discrepancy between meson-baryon model calculations and data at higher energies. At the low energies of this experiment, theory continues to fail to reproduce the data, indicating that either something is missing in the calculations and/or there is a problem with the accuracy of the nucleon-nucleon potential being used.

  19. Polarization observables in deuteron photodisintegration below 360 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Glister, J.; Ron, G.; Lee, B. W.; ...

    2011-02-03

    We performed high precision measurements of induced and transferred recoil proton polarization in d(more » $$\\vec{γ}$$, $$\\vec{p}$$)n for photon energies of 277--357 MeV and θcm = 20 ° -- 120 °. The measurements were motivated by a longstanding discrepancy between meson-baryon model calculations and data at higher energies. Moreover, at the low energies of this experiment, theory continues to fail to reproduce the data, indicating that either something is missing in the calculations and/or there is a problem with the accuracy of the nucleon-nucleon potential being used.« less

  20. Polarization observables in deuteron photodisintegration below 360 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Glister, J.; Ron, G.; Lee, B. W.; Gilman, R.; Sarty, A. J.; Strauch, S.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Piasetzky, E.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, W.; Arrington, J.; Arenhövel, H.; Beck, A.; Benmokhtar, F.; Berman, B. L.; Boeglin, W.; Brash, E.; Camsonne, A.; Calarco, J.; Chen, J. P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Coman, L.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; Dumas, J.; Dutta, C.; Feuerbach, R.; Freyberger, A.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Hansen, J. -O.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Ilieva, Y.; de Jager, C. W.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M. K.; Kang, Hyekoo; Kelleher, A.; Khrosinkova, E.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Markowitz, P.; May-Tal Beck, S.; McCullough, E.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Norum, B. E.; Oh, Y.; Olson, M.; Paolone, M.; Paschke, K.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Potokar, M.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Pomerantz, I.; Puckett, A.; Punjabi, V.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Reyhan, M.; Roche, J.; Rousseau, Y.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Schwamb, M.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Shneor, R.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Song, J.; Sparks, R.; Subedi, R.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhan, X.; Zhu, X.

    2011-02-03

    We performed high precision measurements of induced and transferred recoil proton polarization in d($\\vec{γ}$, $\\vec{p}$)n for photon energies of 277--357 MeV and θcm = 20 ° -- 120 °. The measurements were motivated by a longstanding discrepancy between meson-baryon model calculations and data at higher energies. Moreover, at the low energies of this experiment, theory continues to fail to reproduce the data, indicating that either something is missing in the calculations and/or there is a problem with the accuracy of the nucleon-nucleon potential being used.

  1. Pion in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Povh, B.

    2008-10-13

    The forward neutron production in the ep collisions at 300 GeV measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at DESY has been used to estimate the total probability for the proton fluctuation into n{pi}{sup +} and p{pi}{sup 0}. The probability found is on the order of the 30%. This number is compared with the numbers of obtained for the probability of quark fluctuation into {pi}{sup +} from several alternative DIS processes (Gottfried sum rule, polarized structure function) and the axial-vector coupling constant, where the pion fluctuation is believed to play an important role.

  2. Operation of the TRIUMF Proton Therapy Facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmore, E. W.; Evans, B.; Mouat, M.; Duzenli, C.; Ma, R.; Pickles, T.; Paton, K.

    1997-05-01

    The Proton Therapy Facility at TRIUMF is now in routine operation treating ocular tumours using 70 MeV protons extracted from the 500 MeV H^- cyclotron. This paper describes the proton beam line, treatment control, and dosimetry systems which are designed to provide accurate therapeutic dose delivery. The reproducibility of the shape and range of the unmodulated Bragg peak for various operating conditions of the cyclotron is discussed, along with the technique for producing a uniform modulated or spread-out Bragg peak. The patient positioning chair, which has six motorized degrees of freedom, the patient mask and bite-block, and the X-ray verification system ensure sub-millimeter positioning accuracy. Patient treatments are scheduled one week per month with the treatment dose of 50 proton-Gy delivered in four daily fractions.

  3. DPA damage analysis for 14-MeV neutrons on PFC materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-woo; Lee, Bo-young; Ko, Seung-kook; Kim, Hee-soo; Noh, Seung-jung

    2015-06-01

    The dpa (displacement per atom) damage for 14-MeV neutron in a pfc materials was simulated using MCNPX/SPECTER code. The dpa values in the main components of the structural material SS316L, Fe, Cr and Ni, were calculated to analyze the effect of nuclear damage. According to the neutron wall load for ITER design base, a neutron flux of 3.5 × 1013 neutrons/cm2·sec was applied. The simulated dpa values were found to be as 3.0 dpa/fpy for Fe, 2.9 dpa/fpy for Cr and 3.1 dpa/fpy for Ni. For practical experiments, the simulated dpa values due to the irradiation damage of 17-MeV protons were found to be as 0.67 dpa at the peak and 0.05 at the surface for SS316L using by SRIM code at the same fluence. For the 17-MeV proton irradiation, the Bragg peak appears at a 0.64-mm depth. Also, SS316L specimens irradiated by a 17-MeV proton beam with a fluence of 1016 protons/cm2 were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Proton Therapy SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen ... a nucleus, which holds two types of particles—protons and neutrons. The nucleus is surrounded by electrons. ...

  5. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  6. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  7. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  8. FastPixN, a new integrated pixel chip for a future fast version of the IRSN - recoil proton telescope.

    PubMed

    Kachel, M; Husson, D; Higueret, S; Taforeau, J; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    A first prototype of recoil proton telescope (RPT) is currently working at the AMANDE facility, being developed as a collaboration between IPHC Strasbourg and the LNE-IRSN. The device, able to measure both energy and fluence of neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV, has to be improved further, in order to reduce the considerable inelastic background generated by the neutrons inside the RPT itself. To achieve faster running cycles, the present complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor pixels used for proton tracking are to be replaced by a new integrated chip, specially developed for this application. The authors present a first version of this new element, with individual pixels readout at a 200-MHz frequency, with a fast 4-bit ADC for each column of 64 pixels. The measured performances point to a complete frame treatment in only 12.6 µs. With a readout speed multiplied by a factor 400 over the existing device, the authors expect a considerable improvement of the telescope at AMANDE, with the potential to reach neutron fluence rates up to 10(7) n cm(-2) s(-1) or more.

  9. Physics with tagged forward protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip,K.

    2009-08-30

    The physics reach of the STAR detector at RHIC has been extended to include elastic and inelastic diffraction measurements with tagged forward protons. This program has started at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run.

  10. Final-State Interactions and Single-Spin Asymmetries in Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hwang, Dae Sung; Schmidt, Ivan; /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso

    2007-11-14

    Recent measurements from the HERMES and SMC collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries A{sub UL} and A{sub UT} of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction {gamma}*(q)p {yields} {pi}X. We show that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system leads to single-spin asymmetries in deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality q{sup 2} at fixed x{sub bj}. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with J{sup z}{sub p} = {+-}1/2 to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum L{sup z} of the proton's constituents and thus is distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. The single-spin asymmetry which arises from such final-state interactions does not factorize into a product of structure function and fragmentation function, and it is not related to the transversity distribution {delta}q(x;Q) which correlates transversely polarized quarks with the spin of the transversely polarized target nucleon.

  11. Two-photon exchange correction in elastic unpolarized electron-proton scattering at small momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomalak, O.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the two-photon exchange (TPE) correction to the unpolarized elastic electron-proton scattering at small momentum transfer Q2 . We account for the inelastic intermediate states approximating the double virtual Compton scattering by the unpolarized forward virtual Compton scattering. The unpolarized proton structure functions are used as input for the numerical evaluation of the inelastic contribution. Our calculation reproduces the leading terms in the Q2 expansion of the TPE correction and goes beyond this approximation by keeping the full Q2 dependence of the proton structure functions. In the range of small momentum transfer, our result is in good agreement with the empirical TPE fit to existing data.

  12. Inelastic X-ray scattering investigations of lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO1-xFysuperconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tacon, Mathieu; Forrest, T. R.; Rüegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Noffsinger, J.; Walters, A. C.; Toulemonde, P.; Palenzona, A.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Karpinski, J.; Hill, J. P.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D. F.

    2011-05-01

    We report measurements of the phonon density of states as probed with inelastic X-ray scattering in SmFeAsO1-xFy powders. An unexpected strong renormalization of phonon branches around 23 meV is observed as fluorine is substituted for oxygen. Phonon dispersion measurements on SmFeAsO1-xFy single crystals allow us to identify the 21 meV A1g in-phase (Sm,As) and the 26 meV B1g (Fe,O) modes to be responsible for this renormalization, and may reveal unusual electron-phonon coupling through the spin channel in iron-based superconductors.

  13. Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Selesnick, R S; Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Kanekal, S G; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Fennell, J; Blake, J B

    2015-02-01

    No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (tens of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable; thus, for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher-energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope on board Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, provides, for the first time, quantified upper limits on MeV electron fluxes in various energy ranges in the inner belt. These upper limits are rather different from flux levels in the AE8 and AE9 models, which were developed based on older data sources. For 1.7, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV electrons, the upper limits are about 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted model fluxes. The implication of this difference is profound in that unless there are extreme solar wind conditions, which have not happened yet since the launch of Van Allen Probes, significant enhancements of MeV electrons do not occur in the inner belt even though such enhancements are commonly seen in the outer belt.

  14. High-energy proton radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The experiments and theories to explain the high-energy protons trapped in the earth's radiation belt are reviewed. The theory of cosmic ray albedo neutron decay injection of protons into the radiation belt is discussed. Radial diffusion and change in the earth's dipole moment are considered along with losses of protons by ionization and nuclear collision. It is found that the measured albedo neutron escape current is sufficient to supply trapped protons above 30 MeV. The theoretical calculations of the trapped protons are in agreement with the measurements for L less than or equal to 1.7 both on and off the equator. For L greater than or equal to 1.7, additional trapped proton differential energy measurements should be made before the theory can be adequately tested. It appears that an additional loss mechanism such as pitch angle scattering may be required.

  15. YAG(Ce) crystal characterization with proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipala, V.; Randazzo, N.; Aiello, S.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Russo, M.; Stancampiano, C.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Romano, F.; Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M.; Bashkirov, V. A.; Schulte, R. W.

    2011-10-01

    A YAG(Ce) crystal has been characterized with a proton beam up to 100 MeV. Tests were performed to investigate the possibility of using this detector as a proton calorimeter. A crystal size has been chosen that is able to stop up to 200 MeV. Energy resolution and light response have been measured at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud with a proton beam up to 60 MeV and a spatial homogeneity study of the crystal has been performed at Loma Linda University Medical Center with a 100 MeV proton beam. The YAG(Ce) crystal showed a good energy resolution equal to 3.7% at 60 MeV and measurements, performed in the 30-60 MeV proton energy range, were fitted by Birks' equation. Using a silicon tracker to determine the particle entry point in the crystal, a spatial homogeneity value of 1.7% in the light response has been measured.

  16. Three-body calculation of elastic and inelastic scattering of deuterons on 24Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2016-03-01

    Deuteron-nucleus scattering is described using exact three-particle equations. The theory is formulated in an extended Hilbert space allowing the excitation of the target nucleus. Alt, Grassberger, and Sandhas equations for transition operators are solved in the momentum-space framework including the Coulomb interaction via the screening and renormalization method. The calculations are performed for elastic and inelastic scattering of deuterons on 24Mg using the rotational model for the excitation potential. A reasonable agreement with the experimental data for the first excited state 2+ of 24Mg is achieved when the quadrupole deformation parameter β2 = 0.47 is used. This new value is more consistent with the inelastic proton scattering data requiring β2 ≈ 0.5 than previous determinations β2 ≈ 0.4 based on two-body deuteron-nucleus models.

  17. Measurement of D ± production in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    Charm production in deep inelastic ep scattering was measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. Charm quarks were identified by reconstructing D ± mesons in the D ± → K ∓π±π± decay channel. Lifetime information was used to reduce combinatorial background substantially. Differential cross sections were measured in the kinematic region 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, 0 .02 < y < 0 .7, 1 .5 < p T ( D ±) < 15 GeV and | η( D ±)| < 1 .6, where Q 2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity, and p T ( D ±) and η( D ±) are the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity of the D ± meson, respectively. Next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the data. The charm contribution, F_2^{{coverline{c}}} , to the proton structure-function F 2 was extracted.

  18. Fast drift kilometric radio bursts and solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Kahler, S. W.; Cane, H. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Stone, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Initial results of a comparative study of major fast drift kilometric bursts and solar proton events from Sep. 1978 to Feb. 1983 are presented. It was found that only about half of all intense, long duration ( 40 min above 500 sfu) 1 MHz bursts can be associated with F 20 MeV proton events. However, for the subset of such fast drift bursts accompanied by metric Type 2 and/or 4 activity (approximately 40% of the total), the degree of association with 20 MeV events is 80%. For the reverse association, it was found that proton events with J( 20 MeV) 0.01 1 pr cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1)MeV(-1) were typically (approximately 80% of the time) preceded by intense 1 MHz bursts that exceeded the 500 sfu level for times 20 min (median duration approximately 35 min).

  19. Dynamics of water studied by coherent and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Teixeira, J.

    1991-11-01

    This paper reviews the more recent results obtained on the dynamics of water by neutron scattering and shows that some information can be obtained by this technique at the microscopic level of the hydrogen bond. It also accounts for some very recent results obtained with the hydrated protein C-phycocyanin. Incoherent quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering by water has been performed in a temperature range extending to the supercooled state. The analysis of the quasi-elastic spectrum separates two main components and gives two characteristic times, one of them being related to the hydrogen-bond lifetime. The inelastic spectra extend until 600 meV, i.e. covering the intramolecular vibration region, showing for the first time the stretching band. Collective excitations propagating at 3310 m s -1 have been observed by coherent inelastic neutron scattering. This result was predicted by previous computer molecular dynamics simulations of water. The data are interpreted as a manifestation of short wavelength collective modes propagating within patches of highly bonded water molecules, and distinct from the ordinary sound wave.

  20. Proton-Conducting Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Jamie; Simmons, Jason; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-03-01

    Vehicles powered by polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are an exciting alternative to current fossil fuel technology. The membranes in these cells serve as both charge transporter, ferrying protons from the anode to the cathode, and gas diffusion barrier, preventing the backflow of oxygen to the anode. Currently, hydrated sulfonated polymers are the preferred material for these membranes. The presence of water, however, limits the operating temperature to 100 C, reducing the electrode kinetics and CO tolerance of the entire system. In an effort to increase the efficiency and operating temperature of these fuel cells, we are investigating the proton conductivity of new host/guest materials based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) loaded with imidazole. These thermally stable frameworks provide well-defined pores that accommodate imidazole networks and form proton-conducting pathways. Here, we will present the structure and proton dynamics of these materials as elucidated by elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements.

  1. Design and construction of a compact microwave proton source for a proton linac.

    PubMed

    Hong, I S; Park, B S; Jang, J H; Kwon, H J; Cho, Y S; Hwang, Y S

    2010-02-01

    A 100 MeV, 20 mA proton linear accelerator is being developed by the Proton Engineering Frontier Project at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. 20 MeV acceleration system using radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac was already developed and has been tested. To operate this acceleration system with a long time, more reliable proton source is needed. A compact microwave proton source was proposed and has been designed and constructed as a prototype ion source for the 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. The design of microwave power injection system is based on the microwave proton injector at LANL and CEA. The wave power from a 2.45 GHz, 2 kW magnetron source is introduced into a compact plasma chamber with 7 cm diameter and 5 cm length through a standard tapered, double-ridged waveguide (WRD250) and a quartz window. The microwave power supply is installed on high voltage platform. Axial magnetic fields up to 1 kG can be provided with a water-cooled solenoid coil. A single-hole three electrode extraction system is designed for an extraction current up to 30 mA at a 50 kV extraction voltage. The design and initial operations of the proton source are presented.

  2. Design and construction of a compact microwave proton source for a proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, I. S.; Park, B. S.; Jang, J. H.; Kwon, H. J.; Cho, Y. S.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2010-02-15

    A 100 MeV, 20 mA proton linear accelerator is being developed by the Proton Engineering Frontier Project at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. 20 MeV acceleration system using radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac was already developed and has been tested. To operate this acceleration system with a long time, more reliable proton source is needed. A compact microwave proton source was proposed and has been designed and constructed as a prototype ion source for the 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. The design of microwave power injection system is based on the microwave proton injector at LANL and CEA. The wave power from a 2.45 GHz, 2 kW magnetron source is introduced into a compact plasma chamber with 7 cm diameter and 5 cm length through a standard tapered, double-ridged waveguide (WRD250) and a quartz window. The microwave power supply is installed on high voltage platform. Axial magnetic fields up to 1 kG can be provided with a water-cooled solenoid coil. A single-hole three electrode extraction system is designed for an extraction current up to 30 mA at a 50 kV extraction voltage. The design and initial operations of the proton source are presented.

  3. Limitations of 14 MeV neutron simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kley, W.; Bishop, G. R.; Sinha, A.

    1988-07-01

    A D-T fusion cycle produces five times more neutrons per unit of energy released than a fission cycle, with about twice the damage energy and the capability to produce ten times more hydrogen, helium and transmutation products than fission neutrons. They determine, together with other parameters, the lifetime of the construction materials for the low plasma-density fusion reactors (tokamak, tandem-mirror, etc.), which require a first wall. For the economie feasibility of fusion power reactors the first wall and blanket materials must withstand a dose approaching 300 to 400 dpa. Arguments are presented that demonstrate that today's simulation techniques using existing fission reactors and charged particle beams are excellent tools to study the underlying basic physical phenomena of the evolving damage structures but are not sufficient to provide a valid technological data base for the design of economie fusion power reactors. It is shown than an optimized spallation neutron source based on a continuous beam of 600 MeV, 6 mA protons is suitable to simulate first wall conditions. Comparing it with FMIT the 35 MeV, 100 mA D + -Li neutron source, we arrive at the following figure of merit: FM = {(dpa·volume) EURAC}/{(dpa