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Sample records for mev proton inelastic

  1. Proton-nucleus total inelastic cross sections - An empirical formula for E greater than 10 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, J. R.; Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical formula for the total inelastic cross section of protons on nuclei with charge greater than 1 is presented. The formula is valid with a varying degree of accuracy down to proton energies of 10 MeV. At high energies (equal to or greater than 2 GeV) the formula reproduces experimental data to within reported errors (about 2%).

  2. Inelastic scattering of 61 MeV protons by pb-207

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owais, M.

    1976-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the excitation of the first four neutron-hole states and the doublet at 2.61 MeV by 61.2 MeV protons were measured. The data are analyzed in terms of both a purely collective model description and a microscopic model supplemented by macroscopic core polarization. A realistic two-body interaction is used and knock-on amplitudes are included. Core polarization is found to be important but represents a relatively smaller contribution than in most nuclei previously studied. A parallel analysis of similar data at lower proton bombarding energies reveals a surprisingly strong energy dependence of the reaction mechanisms.

  3. Elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized protons from carbon-12 at 400, 600, and 700 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1984-04-01

    Good resolution cross section and analyzing power (p vector, p') data for many states in /sup 12/C up to an excitation energy of 21 MeV and spanning a momentum transfer range of 0.3 to 2.1 fm/sup -1/ were obtained using the High Resolution Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at incident beam energies of 398, 597, and 698 MeV. Optical model potentials were obtained from the elastic scattering data. Inelastic data were analyzed in the Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation using the Love-Franey effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The energy dependent isoscalar natural parity cross sections were underestimated, while phase difficulties were encountered in fitting analyzing powers. The energy independent isovector natural parity cross sections were reasonably reproduced, but analyzing powers were not, the calculations yielding positive trends whereas the data are of opposite sign. The energy independent isoscalar and isovector unnatural parity cross sections were quite well reproduced up to moderate momentum transfers, and striking successes were observed for some analyzing power data. Systematics of energy dependence together with the results of the DWIA calculations permitted the assignment of spin, parity and isospin quantum numbers to states in the 18-21 MeV excitation region. 64 references.

  4. Inelastic Scattering Of Electrons By Protons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cone, A. A.; Chen, K. W.; Dunning, J. R. Jr.; Hartwig, G.; Ramsey, N. F.; Walker, J. K.; Wilson, R.

    1966-12-01

    The inelastic scattering of electrons by protons has been measured at incident electron energies up to 5 BeV/c and momentum transfers q{sup 2}=4(BeV/c){sup 2}. Excitation of known nucleon resonances at M=1238, 1512, 1688 and possibly 1920 MeV have been observed. The calculations for the resonance at M=1238 MeV have been compared with calculations by Adler based on the dispersion theory of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu. The agreement is good. Qualitative models are discussed for the other resonances.

  5. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  6. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Caciolli, A.; Calzolai, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, 19F(p,p')19F, from the first five excited levels of 19F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm2) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm2). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF2) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  7. Evaluation of proton inelastic reaction models in Geant4 for prompt gamma production during proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyasugiththan, Jeyasingam; Peterson, Stephen W.

    2015-10-01

    During proton beam radiotherapy, discrete secondary prompt gamma rays are induced by inelastic nuclear reactions between protons and nuclei in the human body. In recent years, the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit has played an important role in the development of a device for real time dose range verification purposes using prompt gamma radiation. Unfortunately the default physics models in Geant4 do not reliably replicate the measured prompt gamma emission. Determining a suitable physics model for low energy proton inelastic interactions will boost the accuracy of prompt gamma simulations. Among the built-in physics models, we found that the precompound model with a modified initial exciton state of 2 (1 particle, 1 hole) produced more accurate discrete gamma lines from the most important elements found within the body such as 16O, 12C and 14N when comparing them with the available gamma production cross section data. Using the modified physics model, we investigated the prompt gamma spectra produced in a water phantom by a 200 MeV pencil beam of protons. The spectra were attained using a LaBr3 detector with a time-of-flight (TOF) window and BGO active shield to reduce the secondary neutron and gamma background. The simulations show that a 2 ns TOF window could reduce 99% of the secondary neutron flux hitting the detector. The results show that using both timing and active shielding can remove up to 85% of the background radiation which includes a 33% reduction by BGO subtraction.

  8. Multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering and soft proton proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, K.

    1987-06-01

    We demonstrate how the theoretical knowledge about multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering can be incorporated into a multistring model for low p/sub t/ proton proton collisions. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Measurement of high energy resolution inelastic proton scattering at and close to zero degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, A.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Adachi, T.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Itahashi, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Popescu, L.; Rubio, B.; Saito, T.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Sasamoto, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Smit, F. D.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Zenhiro, J.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of inelastic proton scattering with high energy resolution at forward scattering angles including 0∘ are described. High-resolution halo-free beams were accelerated by the cyclotron complex at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics. Instrumental background events were minimized using the high-quality beam. The remaining instrumental background events were eliminated by applying a background subtraction method. As a result, clean spectra were obtained even for a heavy target nucleus such as Pb208. A high energy resolution of 20 keV (FWHM) and a scattering angle resolution of ±0.6∘ were achieved at an incident proton energy of 295 MeV.

  10. 150 MeV proton medical cyclotron design study.

    PubMed

    Burleigh, R J; Clark, D J; Flood, W S

    1975-01-01

    A brief design study has been done for a 150 MeV proton sector cyclotron. The object was to minimize cost but maintain good reliability and easy maintenance. The use of the proton beam would be for therapy, radiography and isotope production.

  11. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  12. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Merrill, F E; Campos, E; Espinoza, C; Hogan, G; Hollander, B; Lopez, J; Mariam, F G; Morley, D; Morris, C L; Murray, M; Saunders, A; Schwartz, C; Thompson, T N

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution. PMID:22047305

  13. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Campos, E.; Espinoza, C.; Hogan, G.; Hollander, B.; Lopez, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Morley, D.; Morris, C. L.; Murray, M.; Saunders, A.; Schwartz, C.; Thompson, T. N.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  14. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, F. E.; Campos, E.; Espinoza, C.; Hogan, G.; Hollander, B.; Lopez, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Morley, D.; Morris, C. L.; Murray, M.; Saunders, A.; Schwartz, C.; Thompson, T. N.

    2011-10-15

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  15. RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

    2007-11-27

    The use of HTS materials in high radiation environmentsrequires that the superconducting properties remain constant up to aradiation high dose. BSCCO-2223 samples from two manufacturers wereirradiated with 50 MeV protons at fluences of up to 5 x 1017 protons/cm2.The samples lost approximately 75 percent of their pre-irradiation Ic.This compares with Nb3Sn, which loses about 50 percent at the samedisplacements per atom.

  16. RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, Arno; Heibronn, L.H; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

    2007-11-01

    The use of HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that the superconducting properties remain constant up to a radiation high dose. BSCCO-2223 samples from two manufacturers were irradiated with 50 MeV protons at fluences of up to 5 x 10{sup 17} protons/cm{sup 2}. The samples lost approximately 75% of their pre-irradiation I{sub c}. This compares with Nb{sub 3}Sn, which loses about 50% at the same displacements per atom.

  17. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  18. Inclusive proton reactions at 164 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segel, R. E.; Chen, T.; Rutledge, L. L., Jr.; Maher, J. V.; Wiggins, John; Singh, P. P.; Debevec, P. T.

    1982-12-01

    Singles proton, deuteron, triton, 3He, and alpha spectra resulting from the bombardment of 27Al, 58Ni, 62Ni, and 208Pb targets were measured. Data were taken over the angular range 25°-150°. Most of the data were taken at a bombarding energy of 164 MeV; some data were taken at 100 MeV. The ratios of fast (>30 MeV) particle yields are p:d:t:3He:α~100:10:1:1:1. The deuteron spectra fall off more sharply with exit particle energy than do the proton spectra while tritons fall still more sharply, and the fast 3He and α spectra are similar in shape to the triton spectra. Fast particle angular distributions are all forward peaked with the forward peaking increasing with increasing outgoing particle energy. Angular distributions for the different particle species are quite similar and shapes of both spectral and angular distributions are rather independent of target. Proton and alpha evaporation peaks are prominent, deuterons less so, and evaporation peaks are not apparent in the triton and 3He spectra. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 164, 100 MeV p on 27Al, 58Ni, 62Ni, 208Pb; measured outgoing p, d, t, 3He, α spectra 25°<=θ<=150°.

  19. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  20. Dirac Calculations for Proton Inelastic Scattering at Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nohy, N. A.; El-Hammamy, M. N.; Aly, N. E.; Abdel-Moneim, A. M.; Hamza, A. F.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic proton inelastic scattering from different targets (16O, 24Mg, 28Si, 40Ca, 54Fe, 58Ni, 90Zr, 154Sm, 176Yb, and 208Pb) at intermediate energies is analyzed in the framework of phenomenological optical potentials based on the Dirac formalism. Parameters of the Dirac phenomenological potential with Woods Saxon (WS) shape are obtained. The first order vibrational collective model with one phonon is used to calculate the transition optical potentials to the first low-lying excited state (2+) of the investigated target nuclei. Also, the variation of deformation length (δ) with energy and mass number is studied. It is noticed that the deformation length increases slightly with energy at intermediate range.

  1. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from /sup 27/Al at 11, 14, and 17 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Whisnant, C.S.; Dave, J.H.; Gould, C.R.

    1984-11-01

    Fast neutron scattering cross sections have been measured for /sup 27/Al using a neutron time-of-flight facility. Angular distributions were measured at angles from 20/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/ in 5/sup 0/ increments, at incident neutron energies of 11, 14, and 17 MeV. Data are presented for elastic scattering and for inelastic scattering to the sum of the 0.84 and 1.01 MeV states, the 2.21 MeV state, and the sum of the 2.73, 2.98, and 3.00 MeV states. After correcting for compound nucleus effects, the elastic scattering cross sections are well reproduced by the spherical optical model using a linear energy dependence in the real well depth. The inelastic data are interpreted with a coupled channels calculation and the excited core model.

  2. MeV proton flux predictions near Saturn's D ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Roussos, E.; Kotova, A.; Cooper, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.

    2015-10-01

    Radiation belts of MeV protons have been observed just outward of Saturn's main rings. During the final stages of the mission, the Cassini spacecraft will pass through the gap between the main rings and the planet. Based on how the known radiation belts of Saturn are formed, it is expected that MeV protons will be present in this gap and also bounce through the tenuous D ring right outside the gap. At least one model has suggested that the intensity of MeV protons near the planet could be much larger than in the known belts. We model this inner radiation belt using a technique developed earlier to understand Saturn's known radiation belts. We find that the inner belt is very different from the outer belts in the sense that its intensity is limited by the densities of the D ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere, not by radial diffusion and satellite absorption. The atmospheric density is relatively well constrained by EUV occultations. Based on that we predict an intensity in the gap region that is well below that of the known belts. It is more difficult to do the same for the region magnetically connected to the D ring since its density is poorly constrained. We find that the intensity in this region can be comparable to the known belts. Such intensities pose no hazard to the mission since Cassini would only experience these fluxes on timescales of minutes but might affect scientific measurements by decreasing the signal-to-contamination ratio of instruments.

  3. Shielding measurements for a 230 MeV proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Energetic secondary neutrons produced as protons interact with accelerator components and patients dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton radiotherapy facilities. Due to the scarcity of data describing neutron production, attenuation, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent values, these parameters were measured for 230 MeV proton bombardment of stopping length Al, Fe, and Pb targets at emission angles of 0{degree}, 22{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree} in a thick concrete shield. Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters with volumes ranging from 1 cm{sup 3} to 1000 cm{sup 3} were used to obtain microdosimetric spectra from which absorbed dose and radiation quality are deduced. Does equivalent values and attenuation lengths determined at depth in the shield were found to vary sharply with angle, but were found to be independent of target material. Neutron dose and radiation length values are compared with Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations performed using the Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code (LAHET). Calculations used 230 MeV protons incident upon an Fe target in a shielding geometry similar to that used in the experiment. LAHET calculations overestimated measured attenuation values at 0{degree}, 22{degree}, and 45{degree}, yet correctly predicted the attenuation length at 90{degree}. Comparison of the mean radiation quality estimated with the Monte Carlo calculations with measurements suggest that neutron quality factors should be increased by a factor of 1.4. These results are useful for the shielding design of new facilities as well as for testing neutron production and transport calculations.

  4. Neutron induced inelastic cross sections of 150Sm for En = 1 to 35 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G E; Kawano, T; Becker, J A; Agvaanluvsan, U; Chadwick, M B; Cooper, J R; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Garrett, P E; Nelson, R O; Wu, C Y; Younes, W

    2006-08-16

    Cross-section measurements were made of prompt gamma-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 35 MeV) on an enriched (95.6%) {sup 150}Sm sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility. The prompt-reaction gamma rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were predicted using the Hauser-Feshbach statistical reaction code GNASH. Above E{sub n} {approx} 8 MeV the pre-equilibrium reaction process dominates the inelastic reaction. The spin distribution transferred in pre-equilibrium neutron-induced reactions was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). These pre-equilibrium spin distributions were incorporated into a new version of GNASH and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without pre-equilibrium effects is discussed.

  5. ETFE polymer bombarded with 1 MeV proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, M. A.; de Almeida, A.; Muntele, I.; Muntele, C.; Delalez, N.; Ila, D.

    2005-12-01

    The ethylenetetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) is a polymer formed by alternating ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene segments. It has high impact resistance and useful mechanical properties. ETFE can be used as components of pumps, valves, tie wraps, and electrical components. It can also be applied in the field of medical physics as intra venous catheters and as radiation dosimeter. When a material is exposed to the ionizing radiation, it suffers damage that depends on the type, energy and intensity of the radiation. In order to determine the radiation damage mechanism, ETFE films were bombarded with 1 MeV protons to the fluence between 1 × 1011 and 1 × 1016 protons/cm2 and the chemical species emitted during the bombardment were measured with residual gas analysis (RGA) and show that HF gas is the entity preferentially emitted. Optical absorption photospectrometry (OAP) and attenuated total reflectometry fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) shows quantitative chemical evidence of the damage. Our results show that damage is detectable at low proton fluence, but damage that can compromise the application in dosimetry occurs only for fluence greater than 1014 protons/cm2.

  6. Inclusive proton spectra and total reaction cross sections for proton-nucleus scattering at 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Current applications of multiple scattering theory to describe the elastic scattering of medium energy protons from nuclei have been shown to be quite successful in reproducing the experimental cross sections. These calculations use the impulse approximation, wherein the scattering from individual nucleons in the nucleus is described by the scattering amplitude for a free nucleon. Such an approximation restricts the inelastic channels to those initiated by nucleon-nucleon scattering. As a first step in determining the nature of p + nucleus scattering at 800 MeV, both total reaction cross sections and (p,p') inclusive cross sections were measured and compared to the free p + p cross sections for hydrogen, deuterium, calcium 40, carbon 12, and lead 208. It is concluded that as much as 85% of all reactions in a nucleus proceed from interactions with a single nucleon in the nucleus, and that the impulse approximation is a good starting point for a microscopic description of p + nucleus interactions at 800 MeV.

  7. Spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus reactions for incident proton energies near 1 GeV. At this energy, the dominant reaction mechanisms are (1) quasi-free knockout of one or more nucleons, and (2) pion production through the resonance. The cross section due to quasi-free knockout can be reasonably well understood theoretically in a multiple scattering picture, which uses measured NN amplitudes as input. Calculations of this sort were carried out in reference (10) using scalar NN amplitudes parameterized as Gaussians. The author has extended this picture to include spin dependent NN amplitudes. This allows calculation of all the spin observables, Ay, DLL, DSS, DNN, DLS, and DSL, as well as the cross section dsigma/dOmegadp due to quasi-free knockout of one or more particles. The cross section and polarization Ay have been measured at the LAMPF High Resolution Spectrometer at T/sub L/ = 800 MeV on SC. The theoretical results agree well with the data in the quasi-free region. The results for the remaining spin observables provide predictions for experiments which can be performed at LAMPF. By comparing the calculations with the data, it may be possible to separate the contribution due to a quasi-free knockout, and see a signature of quasi-free production in the spin observables.

  8. Angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Skoy, V. R.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Bogolyubov, E. P.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    The work is devoted to measuring the angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei. A portable ING-27 neutron generator (designed and fabricated at VNIIA, Moscow) with a built-in 64-pixel silicon α-detector was used as a source of tagged neutrons. The γ-rays of characteristic nuclear radiation from 12C were detected with a spectrometric system that consisted of 22 γ-detectors based on NaI(Tl) crystals arranged around the carbon target. The measured angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays is analyzed and compared with the results of other published experimental works.

  9. {sup {bold 6}}Li(vector)+{sup {bold 12}}C inelastic scattering at 30 and 50 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, P.L.; Kemper, K.W.; Green, P.V.; Mohajeri, K.; Myers, E.G.; Schmidt, B.G.; Hnizdo, V.

    1996-09-01

    A complete set of analyzing powers (AP`s), {ital iT}{sub 11}, {ital T}{sub 20}, {ital T}{sub 21}, and {ital T}{sub 22}, for 50 MeV {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li(vector),{sup 6}Li) elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}, 4.44 MeV), {sup 12}C(0{sup +}, 7.65 MeV), and {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}, 9.64 MeV) states over the center-of-mass (c.m.) angular range 10{degree}{endash}115{degree} is reported. In addition, cross sections for the excited states 3{sup +}(2.18 MeV), 2{sup +}(4.31 MeV), and 1{sup +}(5.65 MeV) of {sup 6}Li were measured by using the inverse-kinematics reaction {sup 6}Li({sup 12}C,{sup 12}C) at 100 MeV. A combined analysis of the new 50 MeV data and previous 30 MeV data has been carried out using the coupled-channels (CC) code FRESCO. The CC calculations use an optical potential with double-folded (DF) real central, Woods-Saxon imaginary central, and Thomas real spin-orbit (SO) potentials. Calculations include reorientation terms and coupling to the first three excited states of {sup 6}Li and the first two nonzerospin states of {sup 12}C. The {sup 6}Li coupling strengths were fixed by the measured {sup 6}Li excited-state cross sections. The elastic-scattering cross sections and A.P.`s are described well. The need for an explicit SO potential is apparent in the elastic and inelastic-scattering AP`s {ital iT}{sub 11}, more so at 30 MeV than at 50 MeV. The rank-2 AP`s up to 50{degree} c.m. arise mainly from ground-state reorientation effects. The DF potential normalization constant {ital N} approaches unity for the 50 MeV data. At both energies, the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}) cross sections are underestimated at large angles, and the description of the {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}) cross sections is poor in detail. The {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}) AP`s and the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}) {ital iT}{sub 11} are not reproduced at either energy. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Electric dipole response of nuclei studied by proton inelastic scattering: neutron thickness, symmetry energy, and pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, Atsushi; RCNP E282/E316/E326/E350/E376/E377 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. JSPS No. 25105509.

  11. Recent searches for superheavy elements in deep-inelastic reactions. [Approximately 7 MeV/. mu.

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Nitschke, J.M.

    1980-10-01

    New attempts have been made to synthesize superheavy elements (SHE) by nuclear reactions that may possibly form the products at low excitation energies. Survival of the superheavy elements would then be enhanced because of reduced losses from prompt fission. Classical and diffusion-model calculations of deep-inelastic reactions indicate there should be detectable yields of SHE formed with less than 30 MeV of excitation energy. Accordingly, superheavy elements have been sought in such reactions where targets of /sup 248/Cm and /sup 238/U have been irradiated with /sup 136/Xe and /sup 238/U ions. In the most recent experiments, targets of /sup 248/Cm metal (3.5 to 7 mg-cm/sup -2/) were bombarded with 1.8-GeV /sup 238/U ions from the UNILAC accelerator. The longer-lived SHE and actinides near the target Z were chemically separated, and the yields of a number of isotopes of Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm were measured. An upper limit of 30 nb was obtained for the formation of 1-h /sup 259/No. In addition to the off-line chemical recovery and search for SHE, an on-line experiment was performed to detect volatile SHE with half-lives of a minute or more. All experiments to produce and detect superheavy elements were much less than optimum because of premature failures in the Cm-metal targets. The outcome and status of these experiments and the implications of the actinide yields in estimating the chances for forming superheavy elements in the /sup 248/Cm + /sup 238/U reactions are discussed. 5 figures, 1 table.

  12. Proton-air inelastic cross section at S(1/2) = 30 TeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of the maxima of high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers in the atmosphere was measured as a function of atmospheric depth. From the exponential tail of this distribution, it was determined that the proton-air inelastic cross section at 30 TeV center-of-mass energy to be 540 + or - 40mb.

  13. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25meV resolution at the Cu K -edge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank-Uwe; Wille, Hans-Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-06-27

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the CuK-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25meV (FWHM) at 8981eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  14. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H- beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  15. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H‑ beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  16. High resolution inelastic gamma-ray measurements with a white neutron source from 1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced reactions have recently been made at the spallation neutron source at the WNR target area of LAMPF using germanium detectors. These experiments provide extensive excitation function data for inelastic neutron scattering as well as for other reactions such as (n,{alpha}), (n,n{alpha}), (n,p), (n,np), (n,nnp) and (n,xn) for 1 {le} {times} {le} 11. The continuous energy coverage available from 1 MeV to over 200 MeV is ideal for excitation function measurements and greatly extends the energy range for such data. The results of these measurements will provide a database for interpretation of gamma-ray spectra from the planned Mars Observer mission, aid in radiation transport calculations, allow verification of nuclear reaction models, and improve the evaluated neutron reaction data base.

  17. Inelastic Proton Scattering on 21Na in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Roby

    2009-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, S. Reeve, Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, A.G. Tuff, O. Roberts, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods, T. Davinson, G. J. Lotay, University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; H. Al Falou, G.C. Ball, M. Djongolov, A. Garnsworthy, G. Hackman, J.N. Orce, C.J. Pearson, S. Triambak, S.J. Williams, TRIUMF; C. Andreiou, D.S. Cross, N. Galinski, R. Kshetri, Simon Fraser University; C. Sumithrarachchi, M.A. Schumaker, University of Guelph; M.P. Jones, S.V. Rigby, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; T.E. Drake, University of Toronto; We describe an experiment and associated technique [1] to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. At the TRIUMF ISAC-II radioactive beam accelerator facility in Canada, particles inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics are detected with Bambino, a δE-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with the charged particles to cleanly select inelastic scattering events. We measured resonances above the alpha threshold in ^22Mg of relevance to the rate of break-out from the hot-CNO cycle via the reaction ^ 18Ne(α,p)^21Na. [1] PJ Woods et al. Rex-ISOLDE proposal 424 Cern (2003).

  18. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Boyer, B.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Das, I.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, R.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, S.; Kim, B.; Kim, T.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, K. S.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, M. V. D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, F.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass M X <200 GeV/ c 2) σ_{SD}/σ_{INEL} = 0.21 ± 0.03, 0.20^{+0.07}_{-0.08}, and 0.20^{+0.04}_{-0.07}, respectively at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 0.9, 2.76{, and }7 {TeV}; for double diffraction (for a pseudorapidity gap Δ η>3) σ DD/ σ INEL=0.11±0.03,0.12±0.05, and 0.12^{+0.05}_{-0.04}, respectively at √{s} = 0.9, 2.76{, and }7 {TeV}. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: σ_{INEL} = 62.8^{+2.4}_{-4.0} (model) ±1.2 (lumi) mb at √{s} = 2.76 {TeV} and 73.2^{+2.0}_{-4.6} (model) ±2.6 (lumi) {mb} at √{s} = 7 {TeV}. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared to previous measurements at proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders at lower energies, to measurements by other experiments at the LHC, and to theoretical models.

  19. Spherical momentum distribution of the protons in hexagonal ice from modeling of inelastic neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammini, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Andreani, C.; McBride, F.; Hodgson, A.; Adams, M. A.; Lin, L.; Car, R.

    2012-01-01

    The spherical momentum distribution of the protons in ice is extracted from a high resolution deep inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Following a recent path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study, data were successfully interpreted in terms of an anisotropic Gaussian model, with a statistical accuracy comparable to that of the model independent scheme used previously, but providing more detailed information on the three dimensional potential energy surface experienced by the proton. A recently proposed theoretical concept is also employed to directly calculate the mean force from the experimental neutron Compton profile, and to evaluate the accuracy required to unambiguously resolve and extract the effective proton potential from the experimental data.

  20. Spherical momentum distribution of the protons in hexagonal ice from modeling of inelastic neutron scattering data.

    PubMed

    Flammini, D; Pietropaolo, A; Senesi, R; Andreani, C; McBride, F; Hodgson, A; Adams, M A; Lin, L; Car, R

    2012-01-14

    The spherical momentum distribution of the protons in ice is extracted from a high resolution deep inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Following a recent path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study, data were successfully interpreted in terms of an anisotropic Gaussian model, with a statistical accuracy comparable to that of the model independent scheme used previously, but providing more detailed information on the three dimensional potential energy surface experienced by the proton. A recently proposed theoretical concept is also employed to directly calculate the mean force from the experimental neutron Compton profile, and to evaluate the accuracy required to unambiguously resolve and extract the effective proton potential from the experimental data. PMID:22260600

  1. The reaction proton deuteron yields triton pion at 470 and 590 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollhopf, W.; Lunke, C.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Roberts, W. K.; Kitching, P.; Olsen, W. C.; Priest, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary results from a study of the deuteron (proton, positive pion)triton reaction are reported. The differential cross section for this reaction was measured for a number of center of mass angles from 37 deg to 160 deg at incident proton energies of 470 and 590 MeV. The cross sections measured at 590 MeV agree with predictions made considering a two-nucleon process. The 470 MeV data shows a peak in the backward direction which is not predicted by this mechanism.

  2. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of >100 MeV Protons in Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-05-01

    Recently several studies have presented correlative evidence for a significant-to-dominant role for a flare-resident process in the acceleration of high-energy protons in large solar particle events. In one of these investigations, a high correlation between >100 MeV proton fluence and 35 GHz radio fluence is obtained by omitting large proton events associated with relatively weak flares; these outlying events are attributed to proton acceleration by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We argue that the strong CMEs and associated shocks observed for proton events on the main sequence of the scatter plot are equally likely to accelerate high-energy protons. In addition, we examine ratios of 0.5 MeV electron to >100 MeV proton intensities in large SEP events, associated with both well-connected and poorly-connected solar eruptions, to show that scaled-up versions of the small flares associated with classical impulsive SEP events are not significant accelerators of >100 MeV protons.

  3. Interplay of the elastic and inelastic channels in the 16O+27Al scattering at Elab = 280 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Nicolosi, D.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Lubian, J.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; de Faria, P. N.; Foti, A.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent data indicated a nuclear rainbow-like pattern in the elastic scattering of 16O + 27Al at E_{lab}=100 MeV that arises from couplings of the ground to the low-lying states of the 27Al nucleus. Similar effect was identified in the elastic angular distribution of 16O + 12C at E_{lab}=281 and 330 MeV. These experiments show a crucial role of microscopic details of nuclear structure in the elastic scattering of heavy ions at energies well above the Coulomb barrier. In this work we investigate the 16O + 27Al system at E_{lab}=280 MeV for which a coupled channel calculation predicts a pronounced nuclear rainbow-like structure. Obtained experimental data show evidences of an important coupling of the elastic channel to the inelastic. Coupled channel calculations reproduce the experimental angular distributions when a re-normalization factor on the real part of the optical potential is introduced. A proper theoretical approach still requires a high degree of accuracy for the nuclear structure models and new tools to deal with collective excitations.

  4. Inelastic scattering of 72,74Ni off a proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, M. L.; Doornenbal, P.; Obertelli, A.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Authelet, G.; Baba, H.; Calvet, D.; Château, F.; Corsi, A.; Delbart, A.; Gheller, J.-M.; Gillibert, A.; Isobe, T.; Lapoux, V.; Louchart, C.; Matsushita, M.; Momiyama, S.; Motobayashi, T.; Niikura, M.; Otsu, H.; Péron, C.; Peyaud, A.; Pollacco, E. C.; Roussé, J.-Y.; Sakurai, H.; Santamaria, C.; Sasano, M.; Shiga, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Taniuchi, R.; Uesaka, T.; Wang, H.; Yoneda, K.; Browne, F.; Chung, L. X.; Dombradi, Zs; Franchoo, S.; Giacoppo, F.; Gottardo, A.; Hadynska-Klek, K.; Korkulu, Z.; Koyama, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, J.; Lettmann, M.; Lozeva, R.; Matsui, K.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishimura, S.; Olivier, L.; Ota, S.; Patel, Z.; Sahin, E.; Shand, C. M.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefan, I.; Steppenbeck, D.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, D.; Vajta, Zs; Wu, J.; Xu, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Inelastic scattering of 72,74Ni off a proton target was performed at RIBF, RIKEN, Japan. The isotopes were produced by the fission of 238U on a thick Beryllium target and were then selected and identified on an event-by-event basis using the BigRIPS separator. Selected isotopes were focused onto the liquid hydrogen target of the MINOS device and gamma rays from the reactions were measured with the DALI2 array. The energy of the ions in the middle of the target was 213 MeV/u. Outgoing particles were identified using the ZeroDegree spectrometer. Here, we report on the current status of the data analysis and preliminary results for the proton inelastic scattering cross sections for both isotopes.

  5. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, [ital y][sub [ital cut

  6. Toward a QCD analysis of jet rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates defined by the JADE clustering algorithm are compared to perturbative Quantum chromodynamics (PQCD) and different Monte Carlo model predictions. The applicability of the jet-parton duality hypothesis is studied. We obtain hadronic jet rates which are approximately a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the parton level. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  7. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick beryllium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Alba, R.; Ricco, G.; Schillaci, M.; Barbagallo, M.; Boccaccio, P.; Celentano, A.; Colonna, N.; Cosentino, L.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Esposito, J.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Kostyukov, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Scuderi, V.; Viberti, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    The design of a low-power prototype of neutron amplifier recently proposed within the INFN-E project indicated the need for more accurate data on the neutron yield produced by a proton beam with energy of about 70 MeV impinging on a thick beryllium target. Such measurement was performed at the LNS superconducting cyclotron, covering a wide angular range from 0° to 150° and a complete neutron energy interval from thermal to beam energy. Neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV were measured by liquid scintillators exploiting their time of flight to determine the kinetic energy. For lower energy neutrons, down to thermal energy, a 3He detector was used. The obtained data are in good agreement with previous measurements at 0° using 66 MeV proton beam, covering neutron energies >10 MeV, as well as with measurements at few selected angles using protons of 46, 55 and 113 MeV energy. The present results extend the neutron yield data in the 60-70 MeV beam energy range. A comparison of measured yields to MCNP, FLUKA and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations was performed.

  8. 1000 MeV Proton beam therapy facility at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute Synchrocyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, N. K.; Gavrikov, Yu A.; Ivanov, E. M.; Karlin, D. L.; Khanzadeev, A. V.; Yalynych, N. N.; Riabov, G. A.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Vinogradov, V. M.

    2006-05-01

    Since 1975 proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron with fixed energy of 1000 MeV is used for the stereotaxic proton therapy of different head brain diseases. 1300 patients have been treated during this time. The advantage of high energy beam (1000 MeV) is low scattering of protons in the irradiated tissue. This factor allows to form the dose field with high edge gradients (20%/mm) that is especially important for the irradiation of the intra-cranium targets placed in immediate proximity to the life critical parts of the brain. Fixation of the 6 0mm diameter proton beam at the isodose centre with accuracy of ±1.0 mm, two-dimensional rotation technique of the irradiation provide a very high ratio of the dose in the irradiation zone to the dose at the object's surface equal to 200:1. The absorbed doses are: 120-150 Gy for normal hypophysis, 100-120 Gy for pituitary adenomas and 40-70 Gy for arterio-venous malformation at the rate of absorbed dose up to 50 Gy/min. In the paper the dynamics and the efficiency of 1000 MeV proton therapy treatment of the brain deceases are given. At present time the feasibility study is in progress with the goal to create a proton therapy on Bragg peak by means of the moderation of 1000 MeV proton beam in the absorber down to 200 MeV, energy required for radiotherapy of deep seated tumors.

  9. Database for inelastic collisions of sodium atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, K.; Schweinzer, J.; Bray, I.; Bridi, D.; Aumayr, F.

    2008-11-15

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data for inelastic collision processes of ground (3s) and excited (3p, 4s, 3d, 4p, 5s, 4d, and 4f) state Na atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions have been collected and critically assessed. In addition to existing data, electron-impact cross sections, for both excitation and ionization, have been calculated using the convergent close-coupling approach. In the case of proton-impact cross section, the database was enlarged by new atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations. Both electron-impact and proton-impact processes include excitation from the ground state and between excited states (n = 3-5). For electron-impact, ionization from all states is also considered. In the case of proton-impact electron loss, cross sections (the sum of ionization and single-electron charge transfer) are given. Well-established analytical formulae used to fit cross sections, published by Wutte et al. and Schweinzer et al. for collisions with lithium atoms, were adapted to sodium. The 'recommended cross sections' for the processes considered have been critically evaluated and fitted using the adapted analytical formulae. For each inelastic process the fit parameters determined are tabulated. We also present the assessed data in graphical form. The criteria for comprehensively evaluating the accuracy of the experimental data, theoretical calculations, and procedures used in determining the recommended cross sections are discussed.

  10. Proton irradiation of conventional and lithium solar cells - 11-37 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Carter, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Conventional n/p and lithium solar cells were irradiated with 11- to 37-MeV protons. The energy dependence of the solar cell degradation, calculated from electrical parameters and lifetime measurements, is shown to be very slight. Damage coefficients for the n/p cells are calculated. Annealing characteristics of both the lithium cells and the n/p cells are presented.

  11. 200 MeV proton radiography studies with a hand phantom using a prototype proton CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V; Feng, V; Hurley, F; Johnson, R P; Leary, C; Macafee, S; Plumb, A; Rykalin, V; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schubert, K; Schulte, R; Schultze, B; Steinberg, D; Witt, M; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2014-04-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton computed tomography (CT) scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality.

  12. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  13. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  14. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-15

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  15. A new proton fluence model for E greater than 10 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers describe a new engineering model for the fluence of protons with energies greater than 10 MeV. The data set used is a combination of observations made primarily from the Earth's surface between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of Earth between 1963 and 1985. With this data set we find that the distinction between ordinary proton events and anomalously large proton events made in earlier work disappears. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. In contrast to earlier models, results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event.

  16. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; et al

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather thanmore » the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.« less

  17. Filamentation control and collimation of laser accelerated MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, B.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Mandal, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Weng, S. M.; Murakami, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that the proton beam filamentation in dense plasma can be controlled in multi-layered (Al-CH-Al) sandwich targets. We observe up to three-fold reduction in the MeV proton beam divergence (~12°) from these targets as a result of decrease in filamentary structures in the proton beam profile. Strong self-generated resistive magnetic fields in targets with a high-Z transport layer are mainly responsible for this observed effect. Enhancement in the proton flux and energy is also observed from these targets. Supported by a matching 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and theoretical considerations, we suggest that these targets can be very effectively implemented to collimate proton beams useful for ion oncology applications or advanced fast igniter approach of inertial confinement fusion (ICF).

  18. Spin-Ml and El responses of nuclei probed by proton inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, Atsushi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    We pick up two studies on the nuclear responses from the recent experiments of high-resolution proton inelastic scattering at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University; 1) study of the nuclear symmetry and the neutron skin thickness by the measurement of energy electric dipole (El) response of 208Pb, and 2) study of the tensor correlation in the ground state by the measurement of the spin-Ml responses of even-even self-conjugate nuclei in the sd-shell nuclei.

  19. First measurements of jet production rates in deep-inelastic lepton-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.; Aied, S.; Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A.A.; Braun, H.M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S.K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M.C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V.W.; Jackson, H.E.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D.M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kobrak, H.G.E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Michael, D.G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Ramberg, E.J.; Roeser, A.; Ryan, J.; Salgado, C.W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schueler, K.P.; Seyerlein, H.J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P.H.; Stier, H.E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R.A.; Talaga, R.; T

    1992-08-17

    The first measurements of forward multijet rates in deep-inelastic lepton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490-GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. The jets were defined using the GADE algorithm. The measured rates are presented as a function of the jet resolution parameter {ital y}{sub cut}, and as a function of the virtual-photon--proton center-of-momentum energy {ital W}, in the range 13{le}{ital W}{le}33 GeV. Comparisons are made to the predictions of the Lund Monte Carlo programs and good agreement is obtained when QCD corrections are included in the model.

  20. First measurements of jet production rates in deep-inelastic lepton-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1992-08-01

    The first measurements of forward multijet rates in deep-inelastic lepton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490-GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. The jets were defined using the gade algorithm. The measured rates are presented as a function of the jet resolution parameter ycut, and as a function of the virtual-photon-proton center-of-momentum energy W, in the range 13<=W<=33 GeV. Comparisons are made to the predictions of the Lund Monte Carlo programs and good agreement is obtained when QCD corrections are included in the model.

  1. Absolute polarimeter for the proton-beam energy of 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A. N.; Atoian, G.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Nurushev, S. B.; Pylaev, F. S.; Raparia, D.; Runtso, M. F.; Stephenson, E.

    2013-12-15

    A polarimeter is upgraded and tested in a 200-MeV polarized-proton beam at the accelerator-collider facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The polarimeter is based on the elastic polarizedproton scattering on a carbon target at an angle of 16.2°, in which case the analyzing power is close to unity and was measured to a very high degree of precision. It is shown that, in the energy range of 190–205 MeV, the absolute polarization can be measured to a precision better than ±0.5%.

  2. Experimental evidence of the superfocusing effect for axially channeled MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motapothula, M.; Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2016-08-01

    Sub-Ångström focusing of megaelectronvolt (MeV) ions within axial channels was predicted over 10 years ago, but evidence proved elusive. We present experimental angular distributions of axially channeled MeV protons in a 55-nm-thick (001) silicon membrane through which multiple scattering is negligible. Fine angular structure is in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations based on three interaction potentials, providing indirect evidence of the existence of the superfocusing effect with flux enhancement of around 800 within a focused beam width of ˜20 pm .

  3. Transport mechanism of MeV protons in tapered glass capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Jun; Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Jaiyen, Sarawut; Polee, Chalermpong; Chankow, Nares

    2011-08-15

    To investigate the transport mechanism of MeV protons in tapered glass capillaries, spatially resolved energy spectra were measured for proton microbeams focused by 20-{mu}m-outlet capillaries having various taper angles. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were also performed to support the experiments and trace each particle in the capillary in more detail. The dependence of the proton energy distribution on the outgoing angle proved that the capillary-focused proton beam consists of two different components, protons traveling straight through the capillary without colliding with the capillary wall and protons scattered by the capillary inner wall. Moreover, the focusing effect of the tapered glass capillary was found to be mainly due to the scattered beam component. The MC simulations well reproduced the experimental results and showed that beam focusing ratios of 1.6-2.4 are possible with capillaries having a convex inner wall. The flight distance of the scattered proton in the capillary glass body was found to play an important role in determining transport efficiency of the protons through the capillary.

  4. Radiation pressure acceleration of protons to 93 MeV with circularly polarized petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Hyung Taek; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been a challenging task in laser-driven proton/ion acceleration due to its stringent requirements in laser and target conditions. The realization of radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration requires irradiating ultrathin targets with an ultrahigh contrast and ultraintense laser pulses. We report the generation of 93-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 800-nm 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 × 10 20 W / cm 2 to 15-nm-thick polymer targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We expect this clear demonstration of RPA to facilitate the realization of laser-driven proton/ion sources delivering energetic and short-pulse particle beams for novel applications.

  5. Isotopic production cross sections in proton-nucleus collisions at 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Machner, H.; Aschman, D.G.; Steyn, D.; Baruth-Ram, K.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Cowley, A.A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Nangu, B.M.; Spoelstra, B.; Pilcher, J.V.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-04-15

    Intermediate-mass fragments from the interaction of {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 197}Au with 200-MeV protons were measured in an angular range from 20 deg. to 120 deg. in the laboratory system. The fragments, ranging from isotopes of helium up to isotopes of carbon, were isotopically resolved. Double-differential cross sections, energy-differential cross sections, and total cross sections were extracted.

  6. Irradiation Effects of 22 and 240 MeV Protons on Several Transistors and Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulten, W. C.; Honaker, W. C.; Patterson, John L.

    1961-01-01

    The work covered in this report has been directed toward the investigation of the irradiation effects of 22 and 240 MeV protons on several transistors, solar cells, resistors, and condensers to be used in the space radiation environment. The experimental data indicated definite detrimental effects on transistors and solar cells but no apparent effects on the types of resistors and condensers tested. The detrimental effects are of two distinct types: transient and permanent.

  7. RF phase stability in the 100-MeV proton linac operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Kyung-Tae

    2015-02-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac of the Korea multi-purpose accelerator complex (KOMAC) has been operated to provide a proton beam to users. The 100-MeV linac consists of a 3-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator (RFQ), four 20-MeV drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks, two medium-energy beam-transmitter (MEBT) tanks, and seven 100-MeV DTL tanks. The requirements of the field stability are within ±1% in RF amplitude and ±1 degree in RF phase. The RF phase stability is influenced by a RF reference line, RF transmission lines, and a RF control system. The RF reference signal is chosen to be a 300-MHz local oscillator (LO) signal, and a rigid copper coaxial line with temperature control was installed for an RF reference distribution. A phase stability of ±0.1 degrees was measured under a temperature change of ±0.1 °C. A digital feedback control system with a field-programmable gate-array (FPGA) module was adopted for a high RF stability. The RF phase was maintained within ±0.1 degrees with a dummy cavity and was within ±0.3 degrees at RFQ operation. In the case of the 20-MeV DTL tanks, one klystron drives 4 tanks, and the input phases of 4 tanks were designed to be in phase. The input phases of 4 tanks were fixed within ±1 degree by adjusting a phase shifter in each waveguide.

  8. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  9. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  10. Radiation effects induced in pin photodiodes by 40- and 85-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becher, J.; Kernell, R. L.; Reft, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    PIN photodiodes were bombarded with 40- and 85-MeV protons to a fluence of 1.5 x 10 to the 11th power p/sq cm, and the resulting change in spectral response in the near infrared was determined. The photocurrent, dark current and pulse amplitude were measured as a function of proton fluence. Changes in these three measured properties are discussed in terms of changes in the diode's spectral response, minority carrier diffusion length and depletion width. A simple model of induced radiation effects is presented which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The model assumes that incident protons produce charged defects within the depletion region simulating donor type impurities.

  11. Results of hybrid photodiode irradiation by 200 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh A. et al.

    2001-12-03

    Hybrid Photodiodes (HPD, [1]) will be used as the photodetector for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) readout [2]. The HPDs are required to operate in a high radiation environment, where the HCAL detector will receive a total ionizing dose of about 330 rads and a fluence of 4 x 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} over a 10 year running period [3]. Effects of HPD irradiation by low energy neutrons were studied and reported previously [1]. In these studies, high energy protons are used to study possible effects of single event burnout [4], since high energy protons are more likely to induce large energy transfer within the HPD silicon. The HPDs were irradiated by 200 MeV protons at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility [IUCF, 5]. The results of the study are presented.

  12. PIN photodiodes irradiated with 40- and 85-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reft, C. S.; Becher, J.; Kernell, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    PIN photodiodes were bombarded with 40- and 85-MeV protons to a fluence of 1.5 x 10 to the 11th p/sq cm, and the resulting change in spectral response in the near infrared was determined. The photocurrent, dark current, and pulse amplitude were measured as a function of proton fluence. Changes in these three measured properties are discussed in terms of changes in the diode's spectral response, minority carrier diffusion length, and depletion width. A simple model of induced radiation effects is presented which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The model assumes that incident protons produce charged defects within the depletion region simulating donor type impurities.

  13. Studying the destruction of various fluoropolymers caused by MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntele, Claudiu I.; Allayarov, Sadulla R.; Muntele, Iulia C.; Ila, Daryush

    2007-08-01

    While fluoropolymers are normally used as anti-adherent coating, they are intensely investigated for potential use in various radiation dosimeter applications as well as space technology. In order to understand the discrepancy between high chemical and thermal stability and low radiation stability of various fluoropolymers, we are bombarding them with 1 MeV protons to fluences up to 2 × 1015 protons/cm2. During bombardment we are monitoring the emission of chemical species with a residual gas analyzer (RGA). The results we present here are a good indicator that material damage happens much earlier than 2 × 1015 protons/cm2 and that further work should be addressed at much smaller exposures.

  14. Single event upsets calculated from new ENDF/B-VI proton and neutron data up to 150 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Normand, E.

    1999-06-01

    Single-event upsets (SEU) in microelectronics are calculated from newly-developed silicon nuclear reaction recoil data that extend up to 150 MeV, for incident protons and neutrons. Calculated SEU cross sections are compared with measured data.

  15. Study of mixed-symmetry excitations in 96Ru via inelastic proton-scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, A.; Spieker, M.; Werner, V.; Ahn, T.; Anagnostatou, V.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Goddard, P.; Heinz, A.; Hughes, R. O.; Ilie, G.; Mineva, M. N.; Pickstone, S. G.; Petkov, P.; Radeck, D.; Ross, T.; Savran, D.; Zilges, A.

    2015-02-01

    Mixed-symmetry states of octupole (L = 3) and hexadecapole (L = 4) character have been recently proposed in the N = 52 isotones 92 Zr and 94Mo, based on strong M1 transitions to the lowest-lying 3- and 4+ states, respectively. In order to investigate similar excitations in the heaviest stable N = 52 isotone 96Ru, two inelastic proton-scattering experiments have been performed at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory (WNSL), Yale University, USA and the Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, Germany. From the combined data of both experiments, absolute E1, M1, and E2 transition strengths were extracted, allowing for the identification of candidates for MS octupole and hexadecapole states. The structure of the low-lying 4+ states is investigated by means of sdg-IBM-2 calculations.

  16. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  17. An 800-MeV proton radiography facility for dynamic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, N. S. P.; Ables, E.; Adams, Ken; Alrick, K. R.; Amann, J. F.; Balzar, Stephen; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Crow, M. L.; Cushing, S. B.; Eddleman, J. C.; Fife, T. T.; Flores, Paul; Fujino, D.; Gallegos, R. A.; Gray, N. T.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hogan, G. E.; Holmes, V. H.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Knudsson, J. N.; London, R. K.; Lopez, R. R.; McDonald, T. E.; McClelland, J. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Morley, K. B.; Morris, C. L.; Naivar, F. J.; Parker, E. L.; Park, H. S.; Pazuchanics, P. D.; Pillai, C.; Riedel, C. M.; Sarracino, J. S.; Shelley, F. E., Jr.; Stacy, H. L.; Takala, B. E.; Thompson, Richard; Tucker, H. E.; Yates, G. J.; Ziock, H.-J.; Zumbro, J. D.

    1999-11-01

    The capability has successfully been developed at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) to utilize a spatially and temporally prepared 800 MeV proton beam to produce proton radiographs. A series of proton bursts are transmitted through a dynamic object and transported, via a unique magnetic lens system, to an image plane. The magnetic lens system permits correcting for the effects of multiple coulomb scattering which would otherwise completely blur the spatially transmitted information at the image plane. The proton radiographs are recorded either on a time integrating film plate or with a recently developed multi-frame electronic imaging camera system. The latter technique permits obtaining a time dependent series of proton radiographs with time intervals (modulo 358 ns) up to many microseconds and variable time intervals between images. One electronically shuttered, intensified, CCD camera is required per image. These cameras can detect single protons interacting with a scintillating fiber optic array in the image plane but also have a dynamic range which permits recording radiographs with better than 5% statistics for observation of detailed density variations in the object. A number of tests have been carried out to characterize the quality of the proton radiography system for absolute mass determination, resolution, and dynamic range. Initial dynamic experiments characterized the temporal and spatial behavior of shock propagation in a high explosive sample with up to six images per experiment. Based on experience with the prototype system, a number of upgrades are being implemented including the anticipated capability for enhanced mass discrimination through differential multiple coulomb scattering radiographs and more images with improved imaging techniques.

  18. Nuclear excitation functions from 40 to 200 MeV proton irradiation of terbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Parker, Lauren A.; Jackman, Kevin R.; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 26 radionuclides, measured with 40-200 MeV proton irradiations of terbium foils. These data provide the basis for the production of medically relevant radionuclides (e.g., 152Tb, 155Tb, 155Eu, and 156Eu) and 153Gd, a potential source used in ongoing efforts to characterize stellar nucleosynthesis routes. Computational predictions from the ALICE2011, CEM03.03, Bertini, and INCL + ABLA codes are compared with newly measured data to contribute to the ongoing process of code development, and yields are calculated for selected radionuclides using measured data.

  19. Parity Nonconservation in Proton-water Scattering at 800 MeV

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nagle, D. E.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; Mischke, R. E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A. B.; Talaga, R.

    1982-01-01

    A search has been made for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an unpolarized water target. The result is for the longitudinal asymmetry, A{sub L} = +(6.6 +- 3.2) x 10{sup -7}. Control runs with Pb, using a thickness which gave equivalent beam broadening from Coulomb multiple scattering, but a factor of ten less nuclear interactions than the water target, gave A{sub L} = -(0.5 +- 6.0) x 10{sup -7}.

  20. Phenomenological optical potential analysis of proton-carbon elastic scattering at 200 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Differential cross sections for 200 MeV protons elastically scattered from C-12 were analyzed utilizing a local, complex, spin-dependent optical potential with a harmonic well radial dependence. Analyses were performed using the WKB and eikonal approximations. For the latter, first-order corrections to he phase shifts were incorporated to account for the spin-orbit contribution. Large disagreement between theory and experiment was observed when the usual Thomas form for the spin-orbit potential was utilized. Substantial improvement was obtained by allowing the parameters in the central and spin-orbit potential terms to vary independently.

  1. Neutron-proton spin-correlation parameter A sub z z at 68 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hammans, M.; Brogli-Gysin, C.; Burzynski, S.; Campbell, J.; Haffter, P.; Henneck, R.; Lorenzon, W.; Pickar, M.A.; Sick, I. ); Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; van den Brandt, B. )

    1991-05-06

    We report a first measurement of the spin-correlation parameter {ital A}{sub {ital z}{ital z}} in neutron-proton scattering at 67.5 MeV. The results, obtained in the angular range 105{degree}{le}{theta}{sub c.m.}{le}170{degree} with typical accuracies of 0.008, are highly sensitive to the {sup 3}{ital S}{sub 1}-{sup 3}{ital D}{sub 1} mixing parameter {epsilon}{sub 1}. A phase-shift analysis based on the current world data yields a value of {epsilon}{sub 1} significantly higher than predicted by modern potential models.

  2. Correlation between laser accelerated MeV proton and electron beams using simple fluid model for target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Tampo, M.; Awano, S.; Nakamura, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Bolton, P. R.; Kondo, K.; Mima, K.; Mori, Y.; Stephens, R. B.; Tanaka, K. A.; Kodama, R.

    2010-07-15

    High density energetic electrons that are created by intense laser plasma interactions drive MeV proton acceleration. The correlation between accelerated MeV protons and escaped electrons is experimentally investigated at laser intensities in the range of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with S-polarization. Observed proton maximum energies are linearly proportional to escaped electron slope temperatures with a scaling coefficient of about 10. In the context of the simple analytical fluid model for transverse normal sheath acceleration, hot electron sheath density near the target rear surface can be estimated if an empirical acceleration time is assumed.

  3. Results of using the axisymmetric RF focusing by means of field spatial harmonics at 7 MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyubkov, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    For several decades, axially symmetric channels with RF focusing by means of nonsynchronous spatial harmonics of the accelerating field are offered as an attractive alternative to proven and reliable RFQ linacs. In a number of works an effectiveness of channels with axially symmetric RF focusing by means of the nonsynchronous harmonics of the field was demonstrated in the proton energy range up to 2 MeV. An effectiveness of discussed channels for protons at energies up to 7 MeV is considered in this paper. Numerical simulation results of proton self-consistent dynamics in a channel with axisymmetric RF focusing are presented and discussed in this article.

  4. Fixed fluorescent images of an 80 MeV proton pencil beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warman, J. M.; de Haas, M. P.; Luthjens, L. H.; Denkova, A. G.; Kavatsyuk, O.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Kiewiet, H. H.; Brandenburg, S.

    2013-04-01

    We have used an organic radio-fluorogenic gel to make fixed fluorescent images of the track of an 80 MeV proton pencil beam NB this is not a scintillation effect; rather a small fraction of the molecules of the medium are converted permanently from a non-emissive to an emissive form. The spatial resolution of the images is better than 0.1 mm and the cuboid form of the gels allows the track to be viewed along the direction of the beam or transverse to it. The fluorescence diverges and increases in intensity with increasing depth up to the Bragg peak with 80-20% post-peak fall-off in 1.4±0.1 mm. From the effect of interposed polystyrene sheets on the proton range in the gel, its water equivalent thickness is determined to be 0.91.

  5. Measurement of the angular distribution of neutron-proton scattering at 10 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Bateman, F.B.; Grimes, S.M.; Brient, C.E.; Massey, T.N.; Wasson, O.A.; Carlson, A.D.; Zhou, H.

    1995-12-31

    The relative angular distribution of neutrons scattered from protons was measured at an incident neutron energy of 10 MeV at the Ohio University Accelerator Laboratory. An array of 11 detector telescopes at laboratory angles of 0 to 60 degrees was used to detect recoil protons from neutron interactions with a CH{sub 2} (polypropylene) target. Data for 7 of these telescopes were obtained with one set of electronics and are presented here. These data, from 108 to 180 degrees for the center-of-mass scattering angles, have a small slope which agrees better with angular distributions predicted by the Arndt phase shifts than with the ENDF/B-VI angular distribution.

  6. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-07-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on gold for production of (197m,197g,195m,195g, 193m,193g,192)Hg, (196m,196g(cum),195g(cum),194,191(cum))Au, (191(cum))Pt and (192)Ir were measured up to 65MeV proton energy, some of them for the first time. The new data are in acceptably good agreement with the recently published earlier experimental data in the overlapping energy region. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 (results in TENDL-2015 on-line library) and EMPIRE 3.2 code. PMID:27156194

  7. Experimental study of ion-beam self-pinched transport for MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, J.M.; Young, F.C.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Weber, B.V.

    1999-07-01

    A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV proton beam from a pinch-reflex ion diode on the Gamble II accelerator is used to test the concept of self-pinched ion transport. Self-pinched transport (SPT) uses the self-generated magnetic field from the ion beam to radially confine the ion beam. A proton beam is injected through a 3-cm radius aperture covered with a 2-{micro}m thick polycarbonate foil into a 10-cm radius transport region. The transport region is filled with helium at pressures of 30--250 mTorr, vacuum (10{sup {minus}4} Torr), or 1-Torr air. The beam is diagnosed with witness plates, multiple-pinhole-camera imaging onto radiochromic film, time- and space-resolved proton-scattering, and with prompt-{gamma} and nuclear-activation from LiF targets. Witness-plates and the multiple-pinhole-camera are used to determine the size, location, and uniformity of the beam at different distances from the injection aperture. A beam global divergence of 200 mrad is measured at 15 cm. At 50 cm, the beam fills the transport region. At 110 cm and 100- to 200-mTorr helium, there is evidence of beam filamentation. The measured increase in protons is consistent with the physical picture for SPT, and comparisons with IPROP simulations are in qualitative agreement with the measurements.

  8. A Monte Carlo Model for LET Spectra of 200 MeV Protons Used for Microelectronic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Culpepper, William X.

    2003-01-01

    The direct ionization Linear Energy Transfer (LET) for 200 MeV protons in silicon is much smaller than that for higher charged particles since LET increases as the square of the ion charge. However, occasionally the proton interacts with the silicon nuclei and produces a shower of fragments and a recoiling nucleus. When this happens, the LET produced is much greater than the direct ionization LET. Testing the single event effect susceptibility of components using energetic (200 MeV) protons is often the only viable option for system level testing commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) avionics that have not been designed for space environments. However, the question of how a system tested with protons will perform in a heavy ion environment arises. Here the concern is not only with prediction of on-orbit upset rate, but also about possibility of on-orbit failures that were not observed during proton testing.

  9. Independent isotopic yields in 25 MeV and 50 MeV proton-induced fission of natU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, H.; Gorelov, D.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Parkkonen, J.; Peräjärvi, K.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Simutkin, V.; Sonoda, T.; Weber, C.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-04-01

    Independent isotopic yields for elements from Zn to La in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were determined with the JYFLTRAP facility. In addition, isotopic yields for Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pd and Xe in the 50 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were measured. The deduced isotopic yield distributions are compared with a Rubchenya model, the GEF model with universal parameters and the semi-empirical Wahl model. Of these, the Rubchenya model gives the best overall agreement with the obtained data. Combining the isotopic yield data with mass yield data to obtain the absolute independent yields was attempted. The result depends on the mass yield distribution.

  10. Focused interplanetary transport of approximately 1 MeV solar energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.; Reames, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    We present a model of the focused transport of approximately 1 MeV solar energetic protons through interplanetary Alfven waves that the protons themselves amplify or damp. It is based on the quasi-linear theory but with a phenomenological pitch angle diffusion coefficient in the 'resonance gap.' For initial Alfven wave distributions that give mean free paths greater than approximately 0.5 AU for approximately 1 MeV protons in the inner heliosphere, the model predicts greater than roughly an order of magnitude amplification (damping) in the outward (inward) propagating resonant Alfven waves at less than or approximately equal to o.3 AU heliocentric distance. As the strength of proton source is increased, the peak differential proton intensity at approximately 1 MeV at 1 AU increases to a maximum of approximately 250 particles (/(sq cm)(s)(sr)(MeV)) and then decreases slowly. It may be attenuated by a factor of 5 or more relative to the case without wave evolution, provided that the proton source is sufficiently intense that the resulting peak differential intensity of approximately 1 MeV protons at 1 AU exceeds approximately 200 particles (/(sq cm)(s)(sr)(MeV)). Therefore, in large solar proton events, (1) one may have to take into account self-amplified waves in studying solar particle propagation, (2) the number of accelerated protons escaping from a flare or interplanetary shock may have been underestimated in past studies by a significant factor, and (3) accelerated protons escaping from a traveling interplanetary shock at r less than or approximately equal to 0.3 AU should amplify the ambient hydromagnetic waves siginificantly to make the shock an efficient accelerator, even if initially the mean free path is greater than or approximately equal to 1 AU.

  11. Formation of hydrogen atom in 2s state in proton-sodium inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, A. Elkilany

    2015-03-01

    The inelastic collision of protons with sodium atoms are treated for the first time within the framework of the coupled-static and frozen core approximations. The method is used for calculating partial and total cross-sections with the assumption that only two channels (elastic and hydrogen formation in 2s state) are open. In each case, the calculations are carried out for seven values of the total angular momentum ℓ(0 ≤ ℓ ≤ 6). The target is described using the Clementi Roetti wave functions within the framework of the one valence electron model. We use Lipmann-Swinger equation to solve the derived equations of the problem, then apply an iterative numerical method to obtain the code of computer to calculate iterative partial cross-sections. This can be done through calculating the reactance matrix at different values of considered energies to obtain the transition matrix that gives partial and total cross sections. The present results for total hydrogen (2s state) formation cross sections are in agreement with results of other available ones in wide range of incident energy.

  12. Complete Electric and Magnetic Dipole Response of 208Pb from Zero-Degree Inelastic Proton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Neumann-Cosel, P.

    2015-11-01

    Small-angle polarized proton scattering including 0° off 208Pb has been studied at the RCNP cyclotron with high energy resolution of the order of 25 keV (FWHM). The complete E1 strength distribution from 5 to 20 MeV could be extracted from the data and is found to agree well with available data. New E1 strength is found in the energy region above threshold inacessible in previous experiments. The total E1 polarizability as well as the properties of the pygmy dipole resonance could be determined with high precision providing important experimental constraints on the neutron skin thickness in 208Pb and the symmetry energy of neutron-rich matter. Additionally, information on the spin-M1 strength in 208Pb was obtained. Assuming dominance of the central spin-isospinflip part of the effective proton-nucleus interaction, the B(M1) transition strength can be derived. It corresponds well with data from electromagnetic probes indicating that the reaction can provide information on the poorly known spin-M1 resonance in heavy nuclei.

  13. Recombination characteristics in 2-3 MeV protons irradiated FZ Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Čeponis, T.; Uleckas, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Raisanen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Combined analysis of the carrier recombination and generation lifetime as well as reverse recovery durations ( τ RR), dependent on proton irradiation fluence in the range of 7×10 12-7×10 14 p/cm 2, has been performed in FZ silicon PIN diodes and wafer structures. A δ-layer and triangle profiles of radiation induced defects were formed by varying energy of protons in the range 2-3 MeV. Carrier decay constituents and values of recombination lifetime have been evaluated by employing a microwave probed photoconductivity transient technique, while deep levels spectra ascribed to generation lifetime variations have been examined by exploiting capacitance deep-level transient (DLTS) spectroscopy. Recombination lifetime decreases from several μs to few ns, while DLTS spectra show an increase in the amplitude of a DLTS peak at 170 K with irradiation fluence. Transforms of DLTS spectra and a decrease in density of the majority carrier traps have been revealed after 24 h isochronal anneals in the range of temperatures of 80-420 °C. Inhomogeneous depth distribution of recombination lifetime in proton irradiated samples has been revealed from the cross-sectional scans of the excess carrier lifetime measured by MW-PC technique and compared for δ-layer and triangle profiles of radiation induced defects. After isochronal anneals, the τ RR changes its behaviour as a function of irradiation fluence.

  14. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Near realtime forecasting of MeV protons on the basis of sub relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrenz, Johannes; Heber, Bernd; Kuehl, Patrick; Sarlanis, Christos; Malandraki, Olga; Posner, Arik

    2016-04-01

    A major impact on human and robotic space exploration activities is the sudden and prompt occurrence of solar energetic ion events. In order to provide up to an hour warning before these particles arrive at Earth, relativistic electron and below 50 MeV proton data from the Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN) on SOHO were used to implement the 'Relativistic Electron Alert System for Exploration (REleASE)'. It has been demonstrated that the analysis of relativistic electron time profiles provides a low miss and false alarm rate. High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis (HESPERIA) is a project funded within the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (PROTEC-1-2014 Call: Space Weather). Within this project the REleASE forecasting scheme was rewritten in the open access programming language PYTHON and will be made public. As a next step, we have analyzed the possibility to also use, along with relativistic electrons (v > 0.9 c) provided by SOHO, near-relativistic (v <0.8 c) electron measurements from other instruments like the Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). This would prove to be particularly useful during periods that SOHO does not provide continuous near real-time data. We show that the ACE/EPAM observations can be adapted to the REleASE forecasting scheme to provide reliable SEP forecasts. A comparison of measured and forecast proton intensities by SOHO/EPHIN and ACE/EPAM will be presented. In addition we investigated the false alarm rate and detection probability of solar ion events. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  16. Radiation effects on silicon bipolar transistors caused by 3-10 MeV protons and 20-60 MeV bromine ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingji; Geng, Hongbin; Lan, Mujie; Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu

    2010-03-01

    The current gain degradation in silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) was examined under irradiation with 3-10 MeV protons and 20-60 MeV bromine (Br) ions with various dose levels. To characterize the radiation damage of the NPN BJTs, the ionizing dose D i and displacement dose D d as a function of chip depth in the NPN BJTs were calculated for both the protons and Br ions with different energies. Based on the irradiation testing and calculated results, it is shown that the current gain degradation of NPN BJTs is sensitive to the ratio of D d/( D d+ D i) in the sensitive region given by protons and Br ions. The irradiation particles (protons and Br ions), which give larger D d/( D d+ D i) at a given total dose, would generate more severe damage to the NPN BJTs. The reciprocal of the gain variation as a function of the displacement dose was compared, showing that the Messenger-Spratt equation becomes relevant to describe the experimental data, when the ratio of the D d/( D d+ D i) are larger and the displacement dose are higher than a certain value.

  17. Radiation stability of ZrN under 2.6 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-07-01

    Zirconium nitride is a promising alternative material for the use as an inert matrix for transuranic fuel, but the knowledge of the radiation tolerance of ZrN is very limited. We have studied the radiation stability of ZrN using a 2.6 MeV proton beam at 800 °C. The irradiated microstructure and hardening were investigated and compared with annealed samples. A high density of nano-sized defects was observed in samples irradiated to doses of 0.35 and 0.75 dpa. Some defects were identified as vacancy-type pyramidal dislocation loops using lattice resolution imaging and Fourier-filter image processing. A very slight lattice expansion was noted for the sample with a dose of 0.75 dpa. Hardening effects were found for samples irradiated to both 0.35 and 0.75 dpa using Knoop indentation.

  18. M shell ionization of Ar induced in near-central collisions with MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavčič, M.; Banaś, D.

    2016-03-01

    High energy resolution {{K}}{β }{1,3} x-ray emission spectra of Ar induced in collisions with 0.75-3.0 MeV protons were measured using a complete in-vacuum curved-crystal x-ray emission spectrometer in Johansson geometry. The {{K}}{β }{1,3}{{{M}}}{1,2} satellite lines were clearly resolved in the measured spectra and their intensity relative to the parent {{K}}{β }{1,3} diagram line was used to extract the M shell single ionization probability for near-central collisions. The experimental values are compared to the theoretical predictions calculated within the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and also the binary encounter based geometrical model. Very good agreement with experimental data was achieved for the SCA values employing concise Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave functions for the description of valence M shell electrons.

  19. Vector and tensor analyzing powers in deuteron-proton breakup at 130 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, E.; Biegun, A.; Klos, B.; Micherdzinska, A.; Zipper, W.; Kistryn, St.; Sworst, R.; Bodek, K.; Ciepal, I.; Golak, J.; Skibinski, R.; Witala, H.; Wronska, A.; Zejma, J.; Deltuva, A.; Epelbaum, E.; Fonseca, A. C.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.

    2010-07-15

    High-precision data for vector and tensor analyzing powers for the {sup 1}H(d-vector,pp)n reaction at a 130-MeV deuteron beam energy have been measured over a large part of the phase space. Theoretical predictions based on various approaches to describe the three nucleon (3N) system reproduce very well the vector analyzing power data and no three-nucleon force effect is observed for these observables. Tensor analyzing powers are also very well reproduced by calculations in almost the whole studied region, but locally certain discrepancies are observed. For A{sub xy} such discrepancies usually appear, or are enhanced, when model 3N forces, TM99 or Urbana, are included. Problems of all theoretical approaches with describing A{sub xx} and A{sub yy} are limited to very small kinematical regions, usually characterized by the lowest energy of the relative motion of the two protons.

  20. Study on the microwave ion source of the 100-MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung

    2016-09-01

    A microwave ion source is used as an ion source for the 100-MeV proton accelerator at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC). The specifications of the ion source are a 50-keV energy and a 20-mA peak current. The plasma is operated in the CW mode by using a magnetron, and the pulse beam is extracted using a semiconductor switch located in the extraction power supply. The beam characteristics were measured based on the pulse voltage and current. A test stand was also installed to study the beam characteristics of the ion source off-line. In this paper, the pulse beam characteristics of the ion source are presented, and the installation of the test stand is reported.

  1. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, M S; Baba, M

    2016-08-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of (104m,104g,105g,106m,110m)Ag, (100,101)Pd, (99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102g,105)Rh and (103,97)Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed. PMID:27235887

  2. Study of the radioactivity induced in air by a 15-MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Braccini, S; Ereditato, A; Nesteruk, K P; Scampoli, P; Zihlmann, K

    2015-02-01

    Radioactivity induced by a 15-MeV proton beam extracted into air was studied at the beam transport line of the 18-MeV cyclotron at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). The produced radioactivity was calculated and measured by means of proportional counters located at the main exhaust of the laboratory. These devices were designed for precise assessment of air contamination for radiation protection purposes. The main produced isotopes were (11)C, (13)N and (14)O. Both measurements and calculations correspond to two different irradiation conditions. In the former, protons were allowed to travel for their full range in air. In the latter, they were stopped at the distance of 1.5 m by a beam dump. Radioactivity was measured continuously in the exhausted air starting from 2 min after the end of irradiation. For this reason, the short-lived (14)O isotope gave a negligible contribution to the measured activity. Good agreement was found between the measurements and the calculations within the estimated uncertainties. Currents in the range of 120-370 nA were extracted in air for 10-30 s producing activities of 9-22 MBq of (11)C and (13)N. The total activities for (11)C and (13)N per beam current and irradiation time for the former and the latter irradiation conditions were measured to be (3.60 ± 0.48) × 10(-3) MBq (nA s)(-1) and (2.89 ± 0.37) × 10(-3) MBq (nA s)(-1), respectively.

  3. Interlock system for machine protection of the KOMAC 100-MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Gi

    2015-02-01

    The 100-MeV proton linear accelerator of the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) has been developed. The beam service started this year after performing the beam commissioning. If the very sensitive and essential equipment is to be protected during machine operation, a machine interlock system is required, and the interlock system has been implemented. The purpose of the interlock system is to shut off the beam when the radio-frequency (RF) and ion source are unstable or a beam loss occurs. The interlock signal of the KOMAC linac includes a variety of sources, such as the beam loss, RF and high-voltage converter modulator faults, and fast closing valves of the vacuum window at the beam lines and so on. This system consists of a hardware-based interlock system using analog circuits and a software-based interlock system using an industrial programmable logic controller (PLC). The hardware-based interlock system has been fabricated, and the requirement has been satisfied with the results being within 10 µs. The software logic interlock system using the PLC has been connected to the framework of with the experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS) to integrate a variety of interlock signals and to control the machine components when an interlock occurs. This paper will describe the design and the construction of the machine interlock system for the KOMAC 100-MeV linac.

  4. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  5. Measurement of the Z31 contribution to the stopping power using MeV protons and antiprotons: The Barkas effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Möller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Uggerhöj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-04-01

    The stopping power for antiprotons has been measured for the first time. The antiproton stopping power of silicon is found to be 3%-19% lower than for equivelocity protons over the energy range 3.01 to 0.538 MeV. The ``Z31 contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons.

  6. Proton-proton correlations at small relative momentum in neon-nucleus collisions at E/A=400 and 800 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupieux, P.; Alard, J. P.; Augerat, J.; Babinet, R.; Bastid, N.; Brochard, F.; Charmensat, P.; De Marco, N.; Fanet, H.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Girard, J.; Gorodetzky, P.; Gosset, J.; Laspalles, C.; Lemaire, M. C.; L'Hote, D.; Lucas, B.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M. J.; Poitou, J.; Qassoud, D.; Racca, C.; Schimmerling, W.

    1988-01-01

    Proton-proton small angle correlations have been measured in neon-nucleus collisions, using the 4 pi detector Diogene, at 400 and 800 MeV per nucleon incident energies. Values of the size of the emitting region are obtained by comparison with the Koonin formula, taking into account the biases of the apparatus. The dependence of the density on target mass and incident energy is also analysed.

  7. Neutron and proton transition densities from 32,34S(p,p') at Ep=318 MeV. I. Isoscalar densities for 32S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. J.; Khandaker, M. A.; Boberg, P.; Feldman, A. E.; Flanders, B. S.; Hyman, S.; Seifert, H.; Karen, P.; Norum, B. E.; Welch, P.; Nanda, S.; Saha, A.

    1991-11-01

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers for low-lying states of 32S were measured using 318 MeV protons. The data were analyzed using an empirical effective interaction previously fitted to inelastic scattering data for 16O and 40Ca at the same energy. Transition densities for many states were fitted to the data using general expansions which permit evaluation of uncertainties due to statistical and normalization errors, penetrability and distortion, and incompleteness in momentum space. The accuracy of the procedure was tested by comparing isoscalar densities fitted to (p,p') data for 32S with proton densities fitted to (e,e') data. The good agreement between these analyses supports the quantitative accuracy of densities fitted to (p,p') data. Isoscalar densities were also fitted to data for several states of 32S for which no (e,e') data exist. We find that the experimental densities agree well with the shell model for the first 2+ state, but that the neutron density for the second 2+ state is distinctly different in shape. Good qualitative agreement between the data and the shell model is obtained for the first two 4+ states of 32S. Transition densities were also fitted to the data for the lowest 1-, 3-, and 5- states in 32S. The shape of the 1- transition density is complicated, but the very small matrix element agrees with the approximate selection rule that suppresses isoscalar E1 moments.

  8. Dynamic Pressure of Liquid Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl. D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    2000-02-01

    Described here are efforts to diagnose transient pressures generated by a short-pulse (about 0.5 microseconds) high intensity proton ({approximately} 2 * 10 14 per pulse) beam. Proton energy is 800-MeV. The tests were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR). Such capability is required for understanding target interaction for the Spallation Neutron Source project as described previously at this conference.1-4 The main approach to effect the pressure measurements utilized the deflection of a diaphragm in intimate contact with the mercury. There are a wide variety of diaphragm-deflection methods used in scientific and industrial applications. Many deflection-sensing approaches are typically used, including, for instance, capacitive and optical fiber techniques. It was found, however, that conventional pressure measurement using commercial pressure gages with electrical leads was not possible due to the intense nuclear radiation enviro nment. Earlier work with a fiber optic strain gauge demonstrated the viability of using fiber optics for this environment.

  9. Production of radionuclides in artificial meteorites irradiated isotropically with 600 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, R.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.; Herpers, U.

    1986-01-01

    The understanding of the production of cosmogenic nuclides in small meteorites (R is less than 40 cm) still is not satisfactory. The existing models for the calculation of depth dependent production rates do not distinguish between the different types of nucleons reacting in a meteorite. They rather use general depth dependent particle fluxes to which cross sections have to be adjusted to fit the measured radionuclide concentrations. Some of these models can not even be extended to zero meteorite sizes without logical contradictions. Therefore, a series of three thick target irradiations was started at the 600 MeV proton beam of the CERN isochronuous cyclotron in order to study the interactions of small stony meteorites with galactic protons. The homogeneous 4 pi irradiation technique used provides a realistic meteorite model which allows a direct comparison of the measured depth profiles with those in real meteorites. Moreover, by the simultaneous measurement of thin target production cross sections one can differentiate between the contributions of primary and secondary nucleons over the entire volume of the artificial meteorite.

  10. Limits on the antiproton/proton ratio in the cosmic radiation from 100 MeV to 1580 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, M. H.; Mckee, S.; Musser, J. A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.

    1990-01-01

    A search for antiprotons (p-bars) in the cosmic radiation with energies below 1580 MeV at the top of the atmosphere was performed using the PBAR balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer. No antiprotons were observed in 124,000 proton events. For the energy interval 100-640 MeV, an upper limit is reported to the p-bar/p ratio of 2.8 x 10 to the -5th at the top of the atmosphere, after correcting for instrumental efficiencies and contributions from secondary particles. No antiproton was observed in the energy interval 640-1580 MeV, which yields an upper limit to the p-bar/p ratio of 6.1 x 10. By combining both data sets, the limits on the p-bar/p ratio can be improved to 2.0 x 10 to the -5th. The detector performance and instrumental efficiencies of the individual detector components are discussed. A detail Monte Carlo calculation was used to evaluate the instrumental efficiency for both antiprotons and protons as a function of momentum.

  11. Study on strontium isotope abundance-ratio measurements by using a 13-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Rb-Sr dating method is used in dating Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. This method measures the 87Rb and the 87Sr concentrations by using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) [J. Hefne et al., Inter. J. Phys. Sci. 3(1), 28 (2008)]. In addition, it calculates the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio to increase the reliability of Rb-Sr dating. In this study, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was measured by using a 13-MeV proton accelerator. Proton kinetic energies are in the range of tens of megaelectronvolts, and protons have large absorption cross-sections for ( p, n) reactions with most substances. After absorbing a proton with such a high kinetic energy, an element is converted into a nuclide with its atomic number increased by one via nuclear transmutation. These nuclides usually have short half-lives and return to the original state through radioactive decay. When a strontium sample is irradiated with protons, nuclear transmutation occurs; thus, the strontium isotope present in the sample changes to a yttrium isotope, which is an activated radioisotope. Based on this, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was calculated by analyzing the gamma-rays emitted by each yttrium isotope. The KIRAMS-13 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Center of Chosun University, where 13-MeV protons can be extracted, was utilized in our experiment. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio was computed for samples irradiated with these protons, and the result was similar to the isotope ratio for the Standard Reference Material, i.e., 98.2 ± 3.4%. As part of the analysis, proton activation analyses were performed using 13-MeV protons, and the experimental results of this research suggest a possible approach for measuring the strontium-isotope abundance ratio of samples.

  12. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25meV resolution at the Cu K -edge

    SciTech Connect

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank-Uwe; Wille, Hans-Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-06-27

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the CuK-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25meV (FWHM) at 8981eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  13. The radial diffusion coefficient of 1.3 - 2.3 MeV protons in recurrent proton streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents anisotropy measurements of 1.3-2.3 MeV protons in the interplanetary space during recurrent events for which the radial intensity variation is measured within the radial range from about 0.3 to about 4 AU for the period from June, 1973 through April, 1976. The simultaneous measurements of the diffusive anisotropy and the radial gradient are used to make a direct estimate of the interplanetary radial diffusion coefficient, which is independent of any particular solution of the propagation equation. IMP 7 and 8 is required to be sunward of the earth and hence outside of the magnetosphere; if both spacecraft are sunward, measurements from the one farthest from the magnetosphere are used. The resulting values for the radial diffusivity coefficient near 1 AU lie in the range (3 to 9) x 10 to the 20th sq cm/sec, corresponding to scattering mean free paths between 0.03 and 0.1 AU with a mean of 0.06 AU.

  14. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25 meV resolution at the Cu K-edge.

    PubMed

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank Uwe; Wille, Hans Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the Cu K-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO₂) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25 meV (FWHM) at 8981 eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  15. Energy dependence of pion inelastic scattering from sup 208 Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, D.S. Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon ); Peterson, R.J. ); Seestrom, S.J.; Morris, C.L.; Plum, M.A. ); Zumbro, J.D. ); Williams, A.L.; Bryan, M.A.; McDonald, J.W.; Moore, C.F. )

    1991-11-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 208}Pb at {ital T}{sub {pi}}=120 and 250 MeV. Energy-dependent neutron- and proton-transition matrix elements for a range of excited states were extracted and tested for consistency, using several structure models.

  16. Development of the integrated control system for the microwave ion source of the PEFP 100-MeV proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Gi; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Jang, Ji-Ho; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2012-07-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 20-MeV proton linear accelerator is currently operating at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ion source of the 100-MeV proton linac needs at least a 100-hour operation time. To meet the goal, we have developed a microwave ion source that uses no filament. For the ion source, a remote control system has been developed by using experimental physics and the industrial control system (EPICS) software framework. The control system consists of a versa module europa (VME) and EPICS-based embedded applications running on a VxWorks real-time operating system. The main purpose of the control system is to control and monitor the operational variables of the components remotely and to protect operators from radiation exposure and the components from critical problems during beam extraction. We successfully performed the operation test of the control system to confirm the degree of safety during the hardware performance.

  17. Hydrogen release from 800 MeV proton-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, B. M.; Venhaus, T. J.; Causey, R. A.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    Tungsten irradiated in spallation neutron sources, such as those proposed for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project, will contain large quantities of generated helium and hydrogen gas. Tungsten used in proposed fusion reactors will also be exposed to neutrons, and the generated protium will be accompanied by deuterium and tritium diffusing in from the plasma-facing surface. The release kinetics of these gases during various off-normal scenarios involving loss of coolant and after heat-induced rises in temperature are of particular interest for both applications. To determine the release kinetics of hydrogen from tungsten, tungsten rods irradiated with 800 MeV protons in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to high exposures as part of the APT project have been examined. Hydrogen evolution from the tungsten has been measured using a dedicated mass-spectrometer system by subjecting the specimens to an essentially linear temperature ramp from ˜300 to ˜1500 K. Release profiles are compared with predictions obtained using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP4). The measurements show that for high proton doses, the majority of the hydrogen is released gradually, starting at about 900 K and reaching a maximum at about 1400 K, where it drops fairly rapidly. Comparisons with TMAP show quite reasonable agreement using a trap energy of 1.4 eV and a trap density of ˜7%. There is a small additional release fraction occurring at ˜550 K, which is believed to be associated with low-energy trapping at or near the surface, and, therefore, was not included in the bulk TMAP model.

  18. Proton-induced fragmentation of carbon at energies below 100 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Streibel, T.; Roecher, H.; Dreute, J.; Hirzebruch, S. E.; Huentrup, G.; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    Radiation effects caused by single cosmic ray particles have been studied for many years in radiobiological experiments for different biological objects and biological end-points. Additionally, single event effects in microelectronic devices have gained large interest. There are two fundamental mechanisms by which a single particle can cause radiation effects. On the one hand, a cosmic ray ion with high linear energy transfer can deposit a high dose along its path. On the other hand, in a nuclear collision, a high dose can be deposited by short range particles emitted from the target nucleus. In low earth orbits a large contribution to target fragmentation events originates from trapped protons which are encountered in the South Atlantic Anomaly. These protons have energies up to a few hundred MeV. We study the fragmentation of C, O and Si nuclei - the target nuclei of biological material and microelectronic devices - in nuclear collisions. Our aim is to measure production cross sections, energy spectra, emission directions and charge correlations of the emitted fragments. The present knowledge concerning these data is rather poor. M. Alurralde et al. have calculated cross sections and average energies of fragments produced from Si using the cascade-evaporation model. D.M. Ngo et al. have used the semiempirical cross section formula of Silberberg and Tsao to calculate fragment yields and the statistical model of Goldhaber to describe the reaction kinematics. Cross sections used in these models have uncertainties within a factor of two. Our data will help to test and improve existing models especially for energies below 300 MeV/nucleon. Charge correlations of fragments emitted in the same interaction are of particular importance, since high doses can be deposited if more than one heavy fragment with a short range is produced.

  19. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25 meV resolution at the Cu K-edge.

    PubMed

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank Uwe; Wille, Hans Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the Cu K-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO₂) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25 meV (FWHM) at 8981 eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal. PMID:26134800

  20. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  1. Positron probing of phosphorus-vacancy complexes in silicon irradiated with 15 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N.; Emtsev, V.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Elsayed, M.; Kessler, C.; Kozlovski, V.; Oganesyan, G.

    2015-06-01

    Defects in phosphorus-doped silicon samples of floating-zone material, n-FZ-Si(P), produced under irradiation with 15 MeV protons at room temperature are studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy over the temperature range of ∼ 30 K - 300 K and by low- temperature Hall effect measurements. After annealing of E-centersand divacancies, we detected for the first time high concentrations of positron traps which had not been observed earlier. These defects are isochronally annealed over the temperature interval of ∼ 320 °C - 700 °C they manifest themselves as electrically neutral deep donor centersin the material of n-type. A long-lived component of the positron lifetime, τ2(I2 < 60%) ∼ 280 ps, attributed to these centers, suggests a relaxed configuration involving two vacancies. The enthalpy and entropy of annealing of these centersare Ea ∼ 1.05(0.21) eV and ΔSm ≈ 3.1(0.6)kB, respectively. It is argued that the microstructure of the defect consists of two vacancies, VV, and one atom of phosphorus, P. The split configuration of the VPV complex is shortly discussed.

  2. {sup 7}Li(p,n) NUCLEAR DATA LIBRARY FOR INCIDENT PROTON ENERGIES TO 150 MEV

    SciTech Connect

    S. MASHNIK; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are considering the possibility of using the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA), constructed at LANSCE for the Accelerator Production of Tritium program (APT), as a neutron source. Evaluated nuclear data are needed for the p+{sup 7}Li reaction, to predict neutron production from thin and thick lithium targets. In this report we describe evaluation methods that make use of experimental data, and nuclear model calculations, to develop an ENDF-formatted data library for incident protons with energies up to 150 MeV. The important {sup 7}Li(p,n{sub 0}) and {sup 7}Li(p,n{sub 1}) reactions are evaluated from the experimental data, with their angular distributions represented using Lengendre polynomial expansions. The decay of the remaining reaction flux is estimated from GNASH nuclear model calculations. This leads to the emission of lower-energy neutrons and other charged particles and gamma-rays from preequilibrium and compound nucleus decay processes. The evaluated ENDF-data are described in detail, and illustrated in numerous figures. We also illustrate the use of these data in a representative application by a radiation transport simulation with the code MCNPX.

  3. Characteristics of a normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel dosimeter for a 72-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Jihye; Shin, Dongho; Kwon, Soo-Il

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of a normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel dosimeter for a 72-MeV proton beam were evaluated. A polymer gel dosimeter was synthesized using gelatin, methacrylic acid, hydroquinone, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride, and highly purified distilled water. The dosimeter was manufactured by placement in a polyethylene (PE) container. Irradiated dosimeters were analyzed to determine the transverse relaxation time (T2) using a 1.5-T MRI. A calibration curve was obtained as a function of the absorbed dose. A Bragg curve made by irradiating the gel with mono-energy was compared with the results for a parallel plate ionization chamber. The spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) range and distal dose fall-off (DDF) were comparatively analyzed by comparing the irradiated gel with a spread-out Bragg peak against with the ion chamber. Lastly, the gel's usefulness as a dosimeter for therapeutic radiation quality assurance was evaluated by obtaining its practical field size, flatness, and symmetry, through comparison of the profiles of the gel and ion chamber.

  4. Proton-induced production of residual radionuclides in natRe up to 2590 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Shams A. M.; Uosif, M. A. M.; Michel, R.; Herpers, U.; Malmborg, P.; Holmqvist, B.

    2013-03-01

    The excitation functions for residual nuclide production by proton reactions on rhenium was investigated using activated targets from irradiation experiments at the cyclotron of the Svedberg Laboratory at Uppsala up to 180 MeV and the higher energies were used at the Laboratoire Saturne at Saclay. The measured experimental results were compared with previous published and theoretical models calculations by the codes TALYS, INCL4+ABLA and Bertini/Dresner. A total of 5252 cross-section was determined covering 54 residual nuclides in the energy range from 78.2 to 2590 MeV.

  5. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV.

    PubMed

    Sjue, S K L; Mariam, F G; Merrill, F E; Morris, C L; Saunders, A

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets. PMID:26827356

  6. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  7. 225Ac and 223Ra production via 800 MeV proton irradiation of natural thorium targets.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Ballard, B; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Fassbender, M E; Goff, G S; Gritzo, R; Hemez, F M; Runde, W; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for the formation of (225,227)Ac, (223,225)Ra, and (227)Th via the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at a nominal proton energy of 800 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data for the production of (223,225)Ra, (227)Ac and (227)Th by this method were found in the literature. A comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows agreement within a factor of two. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra is a viable production method.

  8. 225Ac and 223Ra production via 800 MeV proton irradiation of natural thorium targets.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Ballard, B; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Fassbender, M E; Goff, G S; Gritzo, R; Hemez, F M; Runde, W; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for the formation of (225,227)Ac, (223,225)Ra, and (227)Th via the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at a nominal proton energy of 800 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data for the production of (223,225)Ra, (227)Ac and (227)Th by this method were found in the literature. A comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows agreement within a factor of two. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra is a viable production method. PMID:22944532

  9. Observational Search for >10 MeV Electrons in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Van Allen Probes Relativistic Proton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Any detection of ultra-relativistic electrons (>10 MeV) trapped in the inner magnetosphere is potentially a sensitive indicator of a unique particle acceleration process or of a unique particle source. The 24 March 1991 shock injection of >15 MeV electrons is a classic example of the former, while the latter includes measurements in low Earth orbit of >100 MeV electrons and positrons from cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. In this paper we use new instrumentation on the Van Allen Probes to survey the inner magnetosphere for signatures of ultra-relativistic electrons. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer, designed primarily for spectroscopy of 60 to 2000 MeV protons in the inner belt, nonetheless is capable of detecting minimum-ionizing electrons in a silicon detector stack. More critical to this survey is the instrument's Cherenkov radiator subsystem whose response to incident electrons ranges from a threshold near 10 MeV and reaches light saturation above 50 MeV. Together with the silicon detector system we are able to explore an energy range that has not been routinely studied in the context of the Earth's magnetosphere. We will report on quiet-time and storm-time signatures in regions of the inner magnetosphere that heretofore have not been explored with an orbit like that of Van Allen Probes. We will also quantitatively compare our electron energy spectra, or flux limits, with other measurements from Van Allen Probes and prior glimpses of high-energy electrons from low Earth orbit.

  10. Study of proton induced reactions on niobium targets up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Baba, M.; Corniani, E.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As Niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the integral excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 86,88,89Zr, 86,87mg,88Y and 85Sr in the energy range 30-70 MeV, some measured for the first time at this energy range. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE and with the literature data. The calculations have been carried out without any parameter adjustment. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  11. Routine production of copper-64 using 11.7MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, C. M.; Smith, S. V.; Asad, A. H.; Chan, S.; Price, R. I.

    2012-12-19

    Reliable production of copper-64 ({sup 64}Cu) was achieved by irradiating enriched nickel-64 ({sup 64}Ni, >94.8%) in an IBA 18/9 cyclotron. Nickel-64 (19.1 {+-} 3.0 mg) was electroplated onto an Au disc (125{mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15mm). Targets were irradiated with 11.7 MeV protons for 2 hours at 40{mu}A. Copper isotopes ({sup 60,61,62,64}Cu) were separated from target nickel and cobalt isotopes ({sup 55,57,61}Co) using a single ion exchange column, eluted with varying concentration of low HCl alcohol solutions. The {sup 64}Ni target material was recovered and reused. The {sup 64}Cu production rate was 1.46{+-}0.3MBq/{mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni(n = 10) (with a maximum of 2.6GBq of {sup 64}Cu isolated after 2hr irradiation at 40uA. Radionuclidic purity of the {sup 64}Cu was 98.7 {+-} 1.6 % at end of separation. Cu content was < 6mg/L (n = 21). The specific activity of {sup 64}Cu was determined by ICP-MS and by titration with Diamsar to be 28.9{+-}13.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.70{+-}0.35Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n = 10) and 13.1{+-}12.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.35{+-}0.32Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n 9), respectively; which are in agreement, however, further work is required.

  12. Response functions of Fuji imaging plates to monoenergetic protons in the energy range 0.6-3.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, T.; Denis-Petit, D.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Aleonard, M. M.

    2013-01-15

    We have measured the responses of Fuji MS, SR, and TR imaging plates (IPs) to protons with energies ranging from 0.6 to 3.2 MeV. Monoenergetic protons were produced with the 3.5 MV AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires de Faisceaux d'Ions en Region Aquitaine) accelerator at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). The IPs were irradiated with protons backscattered off a tantalum target. We present the photo-stimulated luminescence response of the IPs together with the fading measurements for these IPs. A method is applied to allow correction of fading effects for variable proton irradiation duration. Using the IP fading corrections, a model of the IP response function to protons was developed. The model enables extrapolation of the IP response to protons up to proton energies of 10 MeV. Our work is finally compared to previous works conducted on Fuji TR IP response to protons.

  13. Absolute calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) high-energy proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the absolute calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694

  14. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy 800 MeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sjue, Sky K. L.; Morris, Christopher L.; Merrill, Frank Edward; Mariam, Fesseha Gebre; Saunders, Alexander

    2016-01-14

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the protonimaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane.more » Furthermore, comparison with a series of static calibrationimages demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.« less

  15. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C. L.; Bourke, M.; Byler, D. D.; Chen, C. F.; Hogan, G.; Hunter, J. F.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; McClellan, K. J.; Merrill, F.; Morley, D. J.; Saunders, A.

    2013-02-15

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. We also show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods have been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 {mu}m has been demonstrate, 20 {mu}m seems feasible with minor changes) for tomography on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 {mu}m resolution but further development of sources, collimation, and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.

  16. Optically stimulated luminescence from Al 2O 3:C irradiated with 10-60 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmund, J. M.; Andersen, C. E.; Greilich, S.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Yukihara, E. G.; Jain, M.; Hajdas, W.; Mattsson, S.

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the potential use of Al 2O 3:C for medical proton dosimetry. Detector crystals coupled to fiber-optic cables were irradiated in proton beams with energies from 10 to 60 MeV. The key finding is that the initial intensity of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal is energy independent for small detectors (<0.5 mm) and relatively small doses (<0.3 Gy). This feature is related to the supralinearity of the detectors dose-response to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. The results show that our system can be used in medical proton dosimetry without LET-dependent correction factors in the dose and energy interval investigated.

  17. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Chen, Ching-Fong; Hogan, Gary E.; Hunter, James F.; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morley, Deborah J.; Saunders, Alexander

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomography on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.

  18. An Observational Test of the Stability of Inner Belt Protons Above 60 Mev Using Measurements Separated By 41 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Looper, M. D.; Blake, J. B.; George, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    The relative stability of protons trapped in the inner Van Allen radiation belt is a unique signature of the near-Earth radiation environment. While the outer electron belt changes its topography and intensity on timescales of less than a day, calculations indicate that protons in the deepest portions of the inner belt can remain on drift shells for centuries. The long lifetimes for equatorially mirroring protons have never been experimentally verified because few missions traverse this challenging environment, and those that have attempted to quantify the proton flux there have faced potentially large backgrounds from penetrating protons outside the instrument field of view. Today, the Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) investigation on board the Van Allen Probes offers a background-free reference and hence a unique opportunity to compare the present state of inner belt protons with prior measurements. In this study we revisit one relatively clean, and possibly the most accurate historical dataset: a Cherenkov proton spectrometer that operated in a highly inclined 132x1932 km orbit in 1971. The OV1-20P proton spectrometer covered the energy range of ~65-550 MeV (completely within the RPS energy range), had good background rejection because of a fast scintillator coincidence requirement, but operated off of a flight battery for only 10 days. The short lifetime of the OV1-20P mission is the primary reason it did not have significant impact on subsequent studies of the inner belt. At the meeting we will report on a comparison of OV1-20P and RPS fluxes at the same magnetic field coordinates. Our 41-year measurement baseline is not anywhere near a continuous record of course, but it is rare in space science that we have the opportunity to measure a trapped radiation environment on the timescale of decades.

  19. Measurement of the free neutron-proton analyzing power and spin transfer parameters in the charge exchange region at 790 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ransome, R.D.

    1981-07-01

    The free neutron-proton analyzing power and the spin transfer parameters (K/sub NN/, K/sub SS/, K/sub SL/, and K/sub LL/) were measured at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility at 790 MeV between 165/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ center of mass. A 40% polarized neutron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target was used. The recoil protons were momentum analyzed with a magnetic spectrometer to isolate elastic scatters. A large solid angle carbon polarimeter was used to measure the proton polarization. The measurements are the first at this energy and are in basic agreement with pre-existing phase shift solutions. The proton-carbon analyzing power was measured between 500 and 750 MeV. An empirical fit to the proton-carbon analyzing power between 100 and 750 MeV was done.

  20. Inelastic Interactions of Proton with Emulsion Nuclei without Shower Particle Creation

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelsalam, A.; El-Nagdy, M. S.; Rashed, N.; Badawy, B. M.

    2007-02-14

    This paper presents exhaustively the general characteristics of the inelastic interactions of P, 4He and 7Li with emulsion nuclei distinguished without relativistic hadrons (ns = 0) in Lab. system. The dependence of these interactions on the projectile and target sizes is presented. It is found that, the probability of the events having (ns = 0) is dependent on projectile size and incident energy. The average no. of grey particles and black particles as well as the ratio / are displayed for different target size. The multiplicity distribution of different target fragments for the events having (ns = 0), ns {>=} 0 and those of complete destruction (Nh {>=} 28) are presented.

  1. Anisotropies in the interplanetary intensity of solar protons with energies greater than 0.3 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innanen, W. G.; Van Allen, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    By using Explorer 35 interplanetary observations of solar protons with energies greater than 0.3 MeV during ten selected solar events (1967-1970) the tine dependence of intensity and of the angular distribution of intensity has been studied for the first time in the sub-MeV range of energy. The respective contributions of diffusive and convective transport are resolved. Results are qualitatively similar to those of McCracken et al. (1968, 1971) in the energy range from 7.5to 45 MeV; but, as was expected, convective transport is found to be relatively more important at the lower energies. The convective component of the anisotropy vector yields values of the solar wind velocity in good agreement with directly measured values.

  2. Excitation functions of (nat)Zn(p,x) nuclear reactions with proton beam energy below 18 MeV.

    PubMed

    Asad, Ali H; Chan, Sun; Morandeau, Laurence; Cryer, David; Smith, Suzanne V; Price, Roger I

    2014-12-01

    We measured the excitation functions of (nat)Zn (p,x) reactions up to 17.6MeV, using the stacked-foils activation technique. High-purity natural zinc (and copper) foils were irradiated with proton beams generated by an 18MeV isochronous cyclotron. Activated foils were measured using high-purity Ge gamma spectroscopy to quantify the radionuclides (61)Cu, (66)Ga, (67)Ga, and (65)Zn produced from the reactions. Thick-target integral yields were also deduced from the measured excitation functions of the produced radioisotopes. These results were compared with the published literature and were found to be in good agreement with most reports, particularly those most recently compiled.

  3. Proton-induced cross sections relevant to production of 225Ac and 223Ra in natural thorium targets below 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Hemez, F; Ballard, B; Bach, H; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Dry, D; Fassbender, M E; Gulley, M S; Jackman, K R; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for (223,)(225)Ra, (225)Ac and (227)Th production by the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at proton energies below 200 MeV. Our measurements are in good agreement with previously published data and offer a complete excitation function for (223,)(225)Ra in the energy range above 90 MeV. Comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows reasonable-to-good agreement. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra below 200 MeV is a viable production method.

  4. Proton-induced cross sections relevant to production of 225Ac and 223Ra in natural thorium targets below 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Hemez, F; Ballard, B; Bach, H; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Dry, D; Fassbender, M E; Gulley, M S; Jackman, K R; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for (223,)(225)Ra, (225)Ac and (227)Th production by the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at proton energies below 200 MeV. Our measurements are in good agreement with previously published data and offer a complete excitation function for (223,)(225)Ra in the energy range above 90 MeV. Comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows reasonable-to-good agreement. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra below 200 MeV is a viable production method. PMID:22940414

  5. Comparison of radiation degradation induced by x-ray and 3-MeV protons in 65-nm CMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lili; Gerardin, Simone; Bagatin, Marta; Bisello, Dario; Mattiazzo, Serena; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The total ionizing dose (TID) response of 65-nm CMOS transistors is studied by 10-keV x-ray and 3-MeV protons up to 1 Grad (SiO2) total dose. The degradation levels induced by the two radiation sources are different to some extent. The main reason is the interface dose enhancement due to the thin gate oxide and the low energy photons. The holes’ recombination also contributes to the difference. Compared to these two mechanisms, the influence of the dose rate is negligible.

  6. Multimode approach to {sup 241}Am and {sup 237}Np fission induced by 660-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetyan, G. S. Balabekyan, A. R.; Demekhina, N. A.; Adam, J.

    2009-06-15

    The results obtained by measuring cross sections for the formation of fragments originating from {sup 241}Am and {sup 237}Np fission induced by 660-MeV protons are presented. The charge and mass distributions of fragments are analyzed within the multimode-fission model, symmetric and asymmetric fission channels being separated. The contributions of various fission components are estimated, and the fission cross sections for the {sup 241}Am and {sup 237}Np nuclei are calculated along with the fissilities of these nuclei.

  7. Deep inelastic neutron scattering from orthorhombic ordered HCl: Short-time proton dynamics and anomalous neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Senesi, R.; Colognesi, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2005-08-01

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements from orthorhombic ordered HCl are presented and analyzed in order to clarify the problem of an anomalous deficit in the neutron-proton cross section found in previous experiments on various materials. A reliable model for the HCl short-time single-particle dynamics, including atomic vibrational anisotropies and deviations from the impulsive approximation, is set up. The model HCl response function is transformed into simulated time-of-flight spectra, taking carefully into account the effects of instrumental resolution and the filter absorption profile used for neutron energy analysis. Finally, the experimental values of the anomalous reduction factor for the neutron-proton cross section are extracted by comparing simulated and experimental data. Results show a 34% reduction of the H cross section, varying with the scattering angle in a range centered at 53 deg. In addition, the same approximate procedure used in earlier studies is also employed, providing results in reasonable agreement with the more rigorous ones, and confirming the substantial reliability of the past work on this subject.

  8. Application of a PAGAT/MgCl2 gel for dose measurements in a 150 MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, T.; Hayashi, S.; Usui, S.; Kawamura, H.; Katahira, K.

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose response of polyacrylamide-based gel (PAGAT) when irradiated with clinical proton beams. Recently inorganic salt additive in gel has been reported to improve dose sensitivity substantially. We attempted to add MgCl2 (0.5M) to regular PAGAT gel in order to compensate its lower radiation sensitivity. The spin-spin relaxation rates (R2) as dose readout was calculated from MR imaging after irradiation with 150MeV proton beam. The dose sensitivity was discussed from the slope at dose-R2 response curve. As the result, the sensitivity of the gel with MgCl2 is approximately 3 times higher than that of regular PAGAT gel without spoiling dose response stability under the various irradiation conditions such as dose rate and dose integration.

  9. Dynamic Strain on Thin Diaphragms of a Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    1999-11-13

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometric fiber optic sensors were used to measure dynamic strains on thin diaphragms of a liquid mercury target, which was subjected to intense 800-MeV proton thermal shock tests. The mercury target is engineered with very thin end plates or diaphragms (either 0.6 mm or 1.9 mm) for studying large strain effects. During thermal shock tests, the mercury in the target interacted with an intense pulsed beam of 2.4x10{sup 13 protons}. The resulting pressure waves lead to large strains exceeding 250 microstrains on a 0.6-mm diaphragm. Significant factors relative to the accuracy of strain measurements are emphasized, such as the sensor air gap, alignment of sensors, and frequency response of the strain instrument. In this paper, dynamic strains measured on thin diaphragms are described and discussed.

  10. The first SEPServer event catalogue ~68-MeV solar proton events observed at 1 AU in 1996-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami; Valtonen, Eino; Heber, Bernd; Malandraki, Olga E.; Papaioannou, Athanasios; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Afanasiev, Alexander; Agueda, Neus; Aurass, Henry; Battarbee, Markus; Braune, Stephan; Dröge, Wolfgang; Ganse, Urs; Hamadache, Clarisse; Heynderickx, Daniel; Huttunen-Heikinmaa, Kalle; Kiener, Jürgen; Kilian, Patrick; Kopp, Andreas; Kouloumvakos, Athanasios; Maisala, Sami; Mishev, Alexander; Miteva, Rositsa; Nindos, Alexander; Oittinen, Tero; Raukunen, Osku; Riihonen, Esa; Rodríguez-Gasén, Rosa; Saloniemi, Oskari; Sanahuja, Blai; Scherer, Renate; Spanier, Felix; Tatischeff, Vincent; Tziotziou, Kostas; Usoskin, Ilya G.; Vilmer, Nicole

    2013-03-01

    SEPServer is a three-year collaborative project funded by the seventh framework programme (FP7-SPACE) of the European Union. The objective of the project is to provide access to state-of-the-art observations and analysis tools for the scientific community on solar energetic particle (SEP) events and related electromagnetic (EM) emissions. The project will eventually lead to better understanding of the particle acceleration and transport processes at the Sun and in the inner heliosphere. These processes lead to SEP events that form one of the key elements of space weather. In this paper we present the first results from the systematic analysis work performed on the following datasets: SOHO/ERNE, SOHO/EPHIN, ACE/EPAM, Wind/WAVES and GOES X-rays. A catalogue of SEP events at 1 AU, with complete coverage over solar cycle 23, based on high-energy (~68-MeV) protons from SOHO/ERNE and electron recordings of the events by SOHO/EPHIN and ACE/EPAM are presented. A total of 115 energetic particle events have been identified and analysed using velocity dispersion analysis (VDA) for protons and time-shifting analysis (TSA) for electrons and protons in order to infer the SEP release times at the Sun. EM observations during the times of the SEP event onset have been gathered and compared to the release time estimates of particles. Data from those events that occurred during the European day-time, i.e., those that also have observations from ground-based observatories included in SEPServer, are listed and a preliminary analysis of their associations is presented. We find that VDA results for protons can be a useful tool for the analysis of proton release times, but if the derived proton path length is out of a range of 1 AU < s ≲ 3 AU, the result of the analysis may be compromised, as indicated by the anti-correlation of the derived path length and release time delay from the associated X-ray flare. The average path length derived from VDA is about 1.9 times the nominal length

  11. Studies of the response of CR-39 track detectors to protons from a 3 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, L.; Cecchi, A.; Gori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Renzi, R.

    1991-01-01

    A Van de Graaff proton accelerator was tested for its application to the study of CR-39 SSNTD response to accelerated protons. The energies of the proton beams ranged from 0.2 to 2.3 MeV. Two different beam angles of incidence were taken into consideration for each proton energy (i.e. normal incidence and 45°). The complete procedure for the irradiation of a CR-39 sample required relatively little time and the results obtained — in agreement with others as reported in the literature — demonstrated that the Van de Graaff proton accelerator can find a useful application to the problem of neutron dosimetry using SSNTDs.

  12. Approximations for neutron emission spectra from proton collisions between 20 and 500 MeV on nuclei of A greater than or equal to 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrell, M. O.

    1973-01-01

    When high energy protons from solar proton events or trapped radiation belts impinge on spacecraft structures, secondary particles are emitted. The most pernicious secondaries, from either a biological or physical standpoint, are the cascade and evaporation neutrons because of their reaction with matter leading to radioactive materials in the spacecraft structures. Empirically determined cascade and evaporation neutron emission spectra for protons of energy between 20 and 500 MeV incident on all materials at or above carbon in mass number are presented.

  13. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y[sub cut], in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W [approx equal] 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x [approx equal] 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of [alpha][sub s], are studied.

  14. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y{sub cut}, in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W {approx_equal} 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x {approx_equal} 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of {alpha}{sub s}, are studied.

  15. Spin-rotation parameter Q for elastic scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from WO, UCa, and SYPb

    SciTech Connect

    Fergerson, R.W.

    1985-10-01

    The spin-rotation parameter Q was measured for WO, UCa, and SYPb using the 800 MeV proton beam produced at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The experiment was carried out using the High Resolution Spectrometer equipped with a focal-plane polarimeter to determine the scattered polarization components in all three directions. These data (when combined with previous cross section and analyzing power data) determine the amplitude describing the elastic scattering of protons from these spin-zero nuclei to within an overall phase. Q is shown to be more sensitive than either the cross section or analyzing power to differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic scattering theories that describe the proton-nucleus reaction in terms of fundamental proton-nucleon input. The nonrelativistic predictions for Q generally lie below the data but consistently have the correct structure. The relativistic predictions for the UCa and SYPb Q data are quite good (better than the nonrelativistic predictions). The relativistic predictions for the WO Q data show much more structure than is evident in the data. 51 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Design, performance, and calculated error of a Faraday cup for absolute beam current measurements of 600-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    A mobile self-contained Faraday cup system for beam current measurments of nominal 600 MeV protons was designed, constructed, and used at the NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The cup is of reentrant design with a length of 106.7 cm and an outside diameter of 20.32 cm. The inner diameter is 15.24 cm and the base thickness is 30.48 cm. The primary absorber is commercially available lead hermetically sealed in a 0.32-cm-thick copper jacket. Several possible systematic errors in using the cup are evaluated. The largest source of error arises from high-energy electrons which are ejected from the entrance window and enter the cup. A total systematic error of -0.83 percent is calculated to be the decrease from the true current value. From data obtained in calibrating helium-filled ion chambers with the Faraday cup, the mean energy required to produce one ion pair in helium is found to be 30.76 + or - 0.95 eV for nominal 600 MeV protons. This value agrees well, within experimental error, with reported values of 29.9 eV and 30.2 eV.

  17. Deuteron-proton breakup reaction at Ed=7.4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, H.; Nachabe, A. M.; Slobodrian, R. J.

    1986-04-01

    The reaction d+p-->p+p+n is investigated at Elabd=7.4 MeV. Calculations of the cross section are compared with recent kinematically complete measurements. The Coulomb potential is taken fully into account in the calculations based on the strong approximation of Mo/ller wave operator approach.

  18. Validity of the relativistic impulse approximation for elastic proton-nucleus scattering at energies lower than 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Hillhouse, G. C.; Meng, J.

    2008-07-15

    We present the first study to examine the validity of the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) for describing elastic proton-nucleus scattering at incident laboratory kinetic energies lower than 200 MeV. For simplicity we choose a {sup 208}Pb target, which is a spin-saturated spherical nucleus for which reliable nuclear structure models exist. Microscopic scalar and vector optical potentials are generated by folding invariant scalar and vector scattering nucleon-nucleon (NN) amplitudes, based on our recently developed relativistic meson-exchange model, with Lorentz scalar and vector densities resulting from the accurately calibrated PK1 relativistic mean field model of nuclear structure. It is seen that phenomenological Pauli blocking (PB) effects and density-dependent corrections to {sigma}N and {omega}N meson-nucleon coupling constants modify the RIA microscopic scalar and vector optical potentials so as to provide a consistent and quantitative description of all elastic scattering observables, namely, total reaction cross sections, differential cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation functions. In particular, the effect of PB becomes more significant at energies lower than 200 MeV, whereas phenomenological density-dependent corrections to the NN interaction also play an increasingly important role at energies lower than 100 MeV.

  19. Activation calculations for trapped protons below 200 MeV: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    Tables are given displaying of the results of the activation calculations of metal samples and other material aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility-1 (LDEF-1) and Spacelab-2 with the computer program, PTRAP4. The computer printouts give the reaction, the reactant product, the proton reaction cross sections as a function of the energy of the incident protons, and the activation as a function of distance into the sample from the exposed surface.

  20. Characterization of radiation damage caused by 23 MeV protons in Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengwei; Xu, Yupeng; Liu, Congzhan; Gu, Yudong; Xie, Fei; Li, Yanguo; Hu, Hongliang; Zhou, Xu; Lu, Xuefeng; Li, Xufang; Zhang, Shuo; Chang, Zhi; Zhang, Juan; Xu, Zhenling; Zhang, Yifei; Zhao, Jianling

    2016-06-01

    A automatic gain control system (AGC) is designed to continuously monitor and automatically control the gain of the phoswich detectors onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). It consists of a Am241 radioactive source and a photo-detector. The Am241 radioactive source is tagged within a plastic scintillator (BC440M). The scintillating photons produced by the decayed alpha particles from the radioactive source is readout by the photo-detector. The Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) produced by Hamamatsu is used as the photo-detector for AGC. To verify the feasibility of its application in space environment, four MPPCs (S10362-33-050C) were irradiated by a beam of 23 MeV protons. The integrated proton fluence that exposed to the four MPPC samples are 1.0 ×108 p cm-2 , 2.0 ×108 p cm-2 , 4.0 ×108 p cm-2 and 1.0 ×1010 p cm-2 respectively. It is found that the increment leakage current of the MPPC samples caused by irradiation damage increase linearly with the integrated fluence. The pulse-height resolution of the MPPC has deteriorated hardly after irradiation. When irradiated up to 1.1 ×109cm-2 1 MeV equivalent neutrons, the MPPC completely lost its photon-counting capability but could still work as a photo-detector for AGC. The MPPC fails as a photo-detector for the AGC when the irradiated 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluences is up to 2.7 ×1010cm-2 .

  1. Reinvestigation of the Direct Two-proton Decay of the Long-lived Isomer 94Agm [0.4 s, 6.7 MeV, (21+)

    SciTech Connect

    Cerny, J.; Moltz, D. M.; Lee, D. W.; Perajarvi, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Grossman, L. E.; Jeong, W.; Jewett, C.

    2009-03-05

    An attempt to confirm the reported direct one-proton and two-proton decays of the (21+) isomer at 6.7(5) MeV in 94Ag has been made. The 0.39(4) s half-life of the isomer permitted use of a helium-jet system to transport reaction products from the 40Ca + natNi reaction at 197 MeV to a low-background area; 24 gas Delta E-(Si) E detector telescopes were used to identify emitted protons down to 0.4 MeV. No evidence was obtained for two-proton radioactivity with a summed energy of 1.9(1) MeV and a branching ratio of 0.5(3)percent. Two groups of one-proton radioactivity from this isomer had also been reported; our data confirm the lower energy group at 0.79(3) MeV with its branching ratio of 1.9(5)percent.

  2. Phase shift analysis of all proton-proton scattering data below T sub lab =350 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bergervoet, J.R.; Campen, P.C. van; Klomp, R.A.M.; Kok, J. de; Rijken, T.A.; Stoks, V.G.J.; Swart, J.J. de )

    1990-04-01

    As a continuation of our 0--30 MeV analysis we present a multienergy phase shift analysis of all {ital pp} scattering data below {ital T}{sub lab}=350 MeV. In the description of all partial waves we take exactly into account the long-range potential consisting of the improved Coulomb potential (including the magnetic moment interaction), the vacuum polarization potential, and the tail of the one-pion-exchange potential. To describe the short-range interaction in the lower partial waves we use a {ital P}-matrix parametrization. The intermediate partial waves are treated either by optimal mapping techniques or by using the Nijmegen soft-core potential. The latter gives a better description of the data. The final data set comprises 1626 scattering observables. The best fit to this final data set results in {chi}{sup 2}/{ital N}{sub df}=1.117, where {ital N}{sub df}=1576 is the number of degrees of freedom. The {ital pp}{pi}{sup 0} pseudovector coupling constant is determined to be {ital f}{sub 0}{sup 2}=(74.9{plus minus}0.7){times}10{sup {minus}3}. Single-energy phase shifts and errors are also given.

  3. Radiobiological intercomparison of the 160 MeV and 230 MeV proton therapy beams at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Bradly G; Skarsgard, Lloyd D; Gerweck, Leo E; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Wong, Michelle; Durand, Ralph E; Nielson, Deanna; Bussiere, Marc R; Wagner, Miles; Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald; Suit, Herman D

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along the axis of two range-modulated proton beams (160 and 230 MeV). Both the depth and the dose dependence of RBE were investigated. Chinese hamster V79-WNRE cells, suspended in medium containing gelatin and cooled to 2 °C, were used to obtain complete survival curves at multiple positions throughout the entrance and 10 cm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). Simultaneous measurements of the survival response to (60)Co gamma rays served as the reference data for the proton RBE determinations. For both beams the RBE increased significantly with depth in the 10 cm SOBP, particularly in the distal half of the SOBP, then rose even more sharply at the distal edge, the most distal position measured. At a 4 Gy dose of gamma radiation (S = 0.34) the average RBE values for the entrance, proximal half, distal half and distal edge were 1.07 ± 0.01, 1.10 ± 0.01, 1.17 ± 0.01 and 1.21 ± 0.01, respectively, and essentially the same for both beams. At a 2 Gy dose of gamma radiation (S = 0.71) the average RBE values rose to 1.13 ± 0.03, 1.15 ± 0.02, 1.26 ± 0.02 and 1.30 ± 0.02, respectively, for the same four regions of the SOBP. The difference between the 4 Gy and 2 Gy RBE values reflects the dose dependence of RBE as measured in these V79-WNRE cells, which have a low α/β value, as do other widely used cell lines that also show dose-dependent RBE values. Late-responding tissues are also characterized by low α/β values, so it is possible that these cell lines may be predictive for the response of such tissues (e.g., spinal cord, optic nerve, kidney, liver, lung). However, in the very small number of studies of late-responding tissues performed to date there appears to be no evidence of an increased RBE for protons at low doses. Similarly, RBE measurements using early responding in vivo systems (mostly mouse jejunum, an early-responding tissue which has a large α/β ∼ 10 Gy) have

  4. Validation of nuclear models in Geant4 using the dose distribution of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam.

    PubMed

    Hall, David C; Makarova, Anastasia; Paganetti, Harald; Gottschalk, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    A proton pencil beam is associated with a surrounding low-dose envelope, originating from nuclear interactions. It is important for treatment planning systems to accurately model this envelope when performing dose calculations for pencil beam scanning treatments, and Monte Carlo (MC) codes are commonly used for this purpose. This work aims to validate the nuclear models employed by the Geant4 MC code, by comparing the simulated absolute dose distribution to a recent experiment of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam stopping in water. Striking agreement is observed over five orders of magnitude, with both the shape and normalisation well modelled. The normalisations of two depth dose curves are lower than experiment, though this could be explained by an experimental positioning error. The Geant4 neutron production model is also verified in the distal region. The entrance dose is poorly modelled, suggesting an unaccounted upstream source of low-energy protons. Recommendations are given for a follow-up experiment which could resolve these issues.

  5. Validation of nuclear models in Geant4 using the dose distribution of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David C.; Makarova, Anastasia; Paganetti, Harald; Gottschalk, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    A proton pencil beam is associated with a surrounding low-dose envelope, originating from nuclear interactions. It is important for treatment planning systems to accurately model this envelope when performing dose calculations for pencil beam scanning treatments, and Monte Carlo (MC) codes are commonly used for this purpose. This work aims to validate the nuclear models employed by the Geant4 MC code, by comparing the simulated absolute dose distribution to a recent experiment of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam stopping in water. Striking agreement is observed over five orders of magnitude, with both the shape and normalisation well modelled. The normalisations of two depth dose curves are lower than experiment, though this could be explained by an experimental positioning error. The Geant4 neutron production model is also verified in the distal region. The entrance dose is poorly modelled, suggesting an unaccounted upstream source of low-energy protons. Recommendations are given for a follow-up experiment which could resolve these issues.

  6. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed.

  8. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Chen, Ching-Fong; Hogan, Gary E.; Hunter, James F.; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Merrill, Frank E.; et al

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomographymore » on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.« less

  9. Validation of nuclear models in Geant4 using the dose distribution of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam.

    PubMed

    Hall, David C; Makarova, Anastasia; Paganetti, Harald; Gottschalk, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    A proton pencil beam is associated with a surrounding low-dose envelope, originating from nuclear interactions. It is important for treatment planning systems to accurately model this envelope when performing dose calculations for pencil beam scanning treatments, and Monte Carlo (MC) codes are commonly used for this purpose. This work aims to validate the nuclear models employed by the Geant4 MC code, by comparing the simulated absolute dose distribution to a recent experiment of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam stopping in water. Striking agreement is observed over five orders of magnitude, with both the shape and normalisation well modelled. The normalisations of two depth dose curves are lower than experiment, though this could be explained by an experimental positioning error. The Geant4 neutron production model is also verified in the distal region. The entrance dose is poorly modelled, suggesting an unaccounted upstream source of low-energy protons. Recommendations are given for a follow-up experiment which could resolve these issues. PMID:26611861

  10. Mechanisms of mutagenesis in human cells exposed to 55 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauny, S.; Wiese, C.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Protons represent the major type of charged particle radiation in spaceflight environments. The purpose of this study was to assess mutations arising in human lymphoid cells exposed to protons. Mutations were quantitated at the thymidine kinase (TK1) locus in cell lines derived from the same donor: TK6 cells (wt TP53) and WTK1 cells (mutant TP53). WTK1 cells were much more susceptible to mutagenesis following proton exposure than TK6 cells. Intragenic deletions were observed among early-arising TK1 mutants in TK6 cells, but not in WTK1 cells where all of the mutants arose by LOH. Deletion was the predominant mode of LOH in TK6 cells, while allelic recombination was the major mode of LOH in WTK1 cells. Deletions were of variable lengths, from <1 cM to 64 cM, while mutations that arose by allelic recombination often extended to the telomere. In summary, proton exposures elicited many types of mutations at an autosomal locus in human cells. Most involved large scale loss of genetic information, either through deletion or by recombination.

  11. The temperature dependence of void and bubble formation and growth in aluminium during 600 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victoria, M.; Green, W. V.; Singh, B. N.; Leffers, T.

    1984-05-01

    As a part of a continuing program, we report in the present paper results obtained from irradiating pure aluminium samples in the PIREX facility installed in the 600 MeV proton beam of the accelerator at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN). The aluminium foils have been irradiated at 8 different temperatures in the range from 130°-430°C, to displacement doses of up to 5 dpa and helium contents of over 1000 appm. The TEM examinations have shown that at all irradiation temperatures and displacement doses, helium bubbles are formed uniformly through the whole grain interior. No voids are observed at temperatures above 160° C. At all temperatures, irradiation induced dislocations have been observed, most of them linked to bubbles. At higher temperatures and doses, clear evidence of irradiation induced precipitation has been observed; the precipitates are normally decorated with helium bubbles.

  12. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  13. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN LOW ACTIVATION MARTENSITIC STEELS F82H AND OPTIMAX AFTER 800 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Y. DAI; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    Low-activation martensitic steels, F82H (mod.) and Optimax-A, have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons up to 5.9 dpa. The tensile properties and microstructure have been studied. The results show that radiation hardening increases continuously with irradiation dose. F82H has lesser irradiation hardening as compared to Optimax-A in the present work and DIN1.4926 from a previous study. The irradiation embrittlement effects are evident in the materials since the uniform elongation is reduced sharply to less than 2%. However, all the irradiated samples ruptured in a ductile-fracture mode. Defect clusters have been observed. The size and the density of defect clusters increase with the irradiation dose. Precipitates are amorphous after irradiation.

  14. Conductivity compensation in p-6H-SiC in irradiation with 8-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, A. A.; Kozlovski, V. V.; Belov, S. V.; Bogdanova, E. V.; Oganesyan, G. A.

    2011-09-15

    Carrier removal rate (V{sub d}) in p-6H-SiC in its irradiation with 8-MeV protons has been studied. The p-6H-SiC samples were produced by sublimation in vacuum. V{sub d} was determined by analysis of capacitance-voltage characteristics and from results of Hall effect measurements. It was found that complete compensation of samples with initial value of N{sub a} - N{sub d} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} occurs at an irradiation dose of {approx}1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. In this case, the carrier removal rate was {approx}130 cm{sup -1}.

  15. Results of 1 MeV proton irradiation of front and back surfaces of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Kachare, R.; Weizer, V. G.

    1987-01-01

    Several silicon solar cells with and without back surface fields (BSF), having thicknesses of 200 microns and 63 microns were irradiated with 1 MeV protons having fluences between 1 times 10 to the 10th power and 1 times 10 to the 12th power p/square cm. The irradiation was performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the front as well as back surfaces of the solar cells. The results of the back surface irradiations are analyzed using a model in which irradiation induced defects across the high-low (BSF) junction are considered. It is concluded that degradation of the high-low junction is responsible for the severe performance loss in thinner cells when irradiated from the rear.

  16. Experimental cross-sections for proton induced nuclear reactions on mercury up to 65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Szücs, Z.; Brezovcsik, K.

    2016-07-01

    Cross-sections for formation of activation products induced by protons on natural mercury targets were measured. Results for 196m,196g,197g(cum), 198m,198g,199g(cum), 200g(cum), 201,202Tl, 194g(cum), 195g(cum), 196g(cum), 198m,199g(cum) Au and 195m,197m,203Hg are presented up to 65 MeV incident particle energy, many of these for the first time. The experimental data are compared with literature values and with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 code (results taken from TENDL-2015 on-line library), thick target yields were derived and possible applications in biomedical sciences are discussed.

  17. Polarized-target asymmetry in pion-proton bremsstrahlung at 298 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, A.; Amsler, C.; Bistirlich, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Crowe, K.M.; Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; Haddock, R.P.; Konter, J.A.; Ljungfelt, S.; Loude, J.F.; Mango, S.; Meyer, C.A.; Perroud, J.P.; Riedlberger, J.; Renker, D.; Schaad, M.; Sober, D.I.; Truoel, P.; Weymuth, P. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley California 94720 Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen, Paul Scherrer Institut, Department of Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 10024 )

    1990-05-28

    First data are presented for the polarized-target asymmetry in the reaction {pi}{sup +}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup +}{ital p}{gamma} at an incident pion energy of 298 MeV. The geometry was chosen to maximize the sensitivity to the radiation of the magnetic dipole moment {mu}{sub {Delta}} of the {Delta}{sup ++}(1232 MeV). A fit of the asymmetry in the cross section {ital d}{sup 5}{sigma}/{ital d}{Omega}{sub {pi}} {ital d}{Omega}{sub {gamma}} {ital dk} as a function of the photon energy {ital k} to predictions from a recent isobar-model calculation with {mu}{sub {Delta}} as the only free parameter yields {mu}{sub {Delta}}=1.64({plus minus}0.19exp{Delta},{plus minus}0.14 theor){mu}{sub {ital p}}. Though this value agrees with bag-model corrections to the SU(6) prediction {mu}{sub {Delta}}=2{mu}{sub {ital p}}, further clarifications on the model dependence of the result are needed, in particular since the isobar model fails to describe both the cross section and the asymmetry at the highest photon energies.

  18. Calculating Variations in Biological Effectiveness for a 62 MeV Proton Beam.

    PubMed

    Carante, Mario Pietro; Ballarini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of radiation-induced cell death and chromosome aberrations [called BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations (BIANCA)] was further developed and applied to therapeutic protons. The model assumes a pivotal role of DNA cluster damage, which can lead to clonogenic cell death following three main steps: (i) a DNA "cluster lesion" (CL) produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d gives rise to chromosome aberrations; (iii) certain aberration types (dicentrics, rings, and large deletions) lead to clonogenic inactivation. The yield of CLs and the probability, f, that a chromosome fragment remains un-rejoined even if other fragment(s) are present within d, were adjustable parameters. The model, implemented as a MC code providing simulated dose-responses directly comparable with experimental data, was applied to pristine and modulated Bragg peaks of the proton beam used to treat eye melanoma at INFN-LNS in Catania, Italy. Experimental survival curves for AG01522 cells exposed to the Catania beam were reproduced, supporting the model assumptions. Furthermore, cell death and chromosome aberrations at different depths along a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose profile were predicted. Both endpoints showed an increase along the plateau, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the distal dose fall-off, due to low-energy protons. Cell death and chromosome aberrations were also predicted for V79 cells, in the same irradiation scenario as that used for AG01522 cells. In line with other studies, this work indicated that assuming a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along a proton SOBP may be sub-optimal. Furthermore, it provided qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the dependence of the beam effectiveness on the considered endpoint and dose. More generally, this work represents an example of therapeutic beam characterization avoiding the use of

  19. Forward-angle neutron-proton scattering at 96 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, C.; Blomgren, J.; Atac, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Pomp, S.; Oesterlund, M.; Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U.; Elmgren, K.; Jonsson, O.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Renberg, P.-U.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nilsson, L.; Olsson, N.

    2005-02-01

    The differential np scattering cross section has been measured at 96 MeV in the angular range {theta}{sub c.m.}=20 deg. -76 deg. Together with an earlier data set at the same energy, covering the angles {theta}{sub c.m.}=74 deg. -180 deg., a new data set has been formed in the angular range {theta}{sub c.m.}=20 deg. - 180 deg. This extended data set has been normalized to the experimental total np cross section, resulting in a renormalization of the earlier data of 0.7%, which is well within the reported normalization uncertainty for that experiment. A novel normalization technique has been investigated. The results on forward np scattering are in reasonable agreement with theory models and partial wave analyses and have been compared with data from the literature.

  20. Measurement of the inelastic cross section in proton-lead collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Toriashvili, T.; Bagaturia, I.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sudhakar, K.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. 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T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Trapani, P. 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P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Christian, A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-08-01

    The inelastic hadronic cross section in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L = 12.6 ± 0.4 nb-1, has been collected with an unbiased trigger for inclusive particle production. The cross section is obtained from the measured number of proton-lead collisions with hadronic activity produced in the pseudorapidity ranges 3 < η < 5 and/or - 5 < η < - 3, corrected for photon-induced contributions, experimental acceptance, and other instrumental effects. The inelastic cross section is measured to be σinel (pPb) = 2061 ± 3 (stat) ± 34 (syst) ± 72 (lumi) mb. Various Monte Carlo generators, commonly used in heavy ion and cosmic ray physics, are found to reproduce the data within uncertainties. The value of σinel (pPb) is compatible with that expected from the proton-proton cross section at 5.02 TeV scaled up within a simple Glauber approach to account for multiple scatterings in the lead nucleus, indicating that further net nuclear corrections are small.

  1. Cross-field diffusion of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect

    Costa Jr, Edio da; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Alves, Maria Virgínia; Echer, Ezequiel; Lakhina, Gurbax S. E-mail: costajr.e@gmail.com

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic field magnitude decreases (MDs) are observed in several regions of the interplanetary medium. In this paper, we characterize MDs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft instrumentation over the solar south pole by using magnetic field data to obtain the empirical size, magnetic field MD, and frequency of occurrence distribution functions. The interaction of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons with these MDs is investigated. Charged particle and MD interactions can be described by a geometrical model allowing the calculation of the guiding center shift after each interaction. Using the distribution functions for the MD characteristics, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain the cross-field diffusion coefficients as a function of particle kinetic energy. It is found that the protons under consideration cross-field diffuse at a rate of up to ≈11% of the Bohm rate. The same method used in this paper can be applied to other space regions where MDs are observed, once their local features are well known.

  2. Measurement of a 200 MeV proton beam using a polyurethane dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Malcolm; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey

    2006-12-01

    PRESAGETM (Heuris Pharma LLC, Skillman, NJ) is a three-dimensional polyurethane dosimeter containing a leuco dye that generates a color change when irradiated. The dosimeter is solid and does not require a container to maintain its shape. The dosimeter is transparent before irradiation and the maximum absorbance of the leuco dye occurs at 633 nm which is compatible with the OCT-OPUSTM laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of PRESAGETM to proton beam radiotherapy.

  3. Measurement of single and double spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on proton and deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Suman Bandhu

    The EG1-DVCS experiment with CLAS at Jefferson Lab collected semi-inclusive pion electro-production data on longitudinally polarized solid state NH3 and ND3 targets with longitudinally polarized electrons of approximately 6 GeV energy. Data on all three pion channels, pi +, pi-- and pi0, were collected simultaneously. The charged pions were identified by their time-of-flight information whereas the neutral pions were reconstructed from the invariant mass of two photons. The experiment covered a wide kinematic range: 1 GeV 2 ≤ Q2 ≤ 3.2 GeV2, 0.12 ≤ xB ≤ 0.48, 0.0 GeV ≤ Ph⊥ ≤ 1.0 GeV and 0.3 ≤ z ≤ 0.7. The beam single (ALU), target single (AUL) and beam-target double ( ALL) spin azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) off the proton and the deuteron extracted from the data are presented. The results of the azimuthal asymmetries for the proton are presented as a function of two variables: (xB, Ph⊥), (z, P h⊥) and (xB, z). Due to limited statistics, the azimuthal asymmetries for the deuteron are presented as a function of a single variable for the variables xB, z and Ph ⊥. Some theoretical and phenomenological predictions as well as earlier published results are compared with the results from this analysis. All the results are plotted and suitably tabulated for further analysis. The SIDIS azimuthal asymmetries are convolutions of fragmentation functions and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs). The TMDs describe transverse momenta and spins of quarks and gluons inside nucleons. They open a window on the contribution of the orbital angular momentum of the quarks and gluons to the total spin of the nucleons. The results presented in this work are sensitive to these leading twist TMDs: f 1, g1, h⊥ 1L, and h⊥ 1. The significant precision of the results from this analysis will highly constrain the extractions of the associated TMDs which will substantially contribute towards further

  4. RBE and genetic susceptibility of mouse and rat spermatogonial stem cells to protons, heavy charged particles and 1.5 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kaltenboeck, B.

    The main purpose of the present study is to provide data on RBE and genetic susceptibility in the mouse and the rat when exposed to protons, HZE particles and neutrons. Genetic damage from exposure to 50 MeV and 9 GeV protons, 4 GeV/nucleon helium ions, 4 GeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1.5 MeV neutrons was studied in adult (CBA × C57Bl/6J) F1 mice. Damage from 9 GeV protons and 4 GeV helium ions was studied in adult Wistar rats. The incidence of reciprocal translocations (RT) induced in the spermatogonial stem cells of each species was recorded. RBE values were derived by comparing linear regression coefficients from dose-responses within the same dose-range for each of the radiation types tested and 60Co γ-rays or by means of a direct nonparametric method. RT yields measured after mouse and rat spermatogonial irradiation with protons, heavy charged particles and neutrons fit the linear model of the dose-response relationship. Relative to 60Co γ-rays, RBE values are as follows for mouse spermatogonia: 0.9 for 50 MeV protons; 1.3 for 9 GeV protons; 0.7 for 4 GeV helium ions; and 1.3 for 4 GeV carbon ions. For rat spermatogonia, values were: 1.7 for 9 GeV protons and 1.3 for helium ions. Compared to mice irradiated using the same experimental design, rats were more susceptible to high-LET radiations, with susceptibility assessed by genetic damage to their spermatogonial stem cells. The RBE of 1.5 MeV neutron is about 6.6.

  5. Measurement of the ratio of differential cross sections for double and single ionization of He by (4{endash}10)-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaven, W.R.; Dilley, C.; Landers, A.; Kamber, E.Y.; Cocke, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the ratio of differential cross sections for the production of doubly and singly ionized He by fast protons at energies between 4 and 10 MeV. The ratio was measured as a function of proton scattering angle, from which the energy transfer was calculated using binary kinematics. The ratio is found to be near 1.25{percent}, nearly independent of either proton energy or energy transfer. This value is lower than that reported previously for a similar experiment, but in good agreement with recent Compton scattering and theoretical results. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Hugoniot Measurements at Low Pressures in Tin Using 800 MeV proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Cynthia; Hogan, Gary E; King, Nicholas S. P.; Kwiathowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; McNeil, Wendy Vogan; Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher; Rightley, Paul; Saunders, Alexander

    2009-08-05

    A 2cm long 8 mm diameter cylindrical tin target has been shocked to a pressure in the region of the {beta} {yields} {gamma} phase change using a small, low density PETN charge mounted on the opposite side of a stainless steel diaphragm. The density jump and shock velocity were measured radiographically as the shock wave moved through the sample and the pressure dropped, using the proton radiography facility at LANL. This provided a quasi-continuous record of the equations of state along the Hugoniot for the P1 wave from a shock velocity of 3.25 km/sec down to near the sound speed. Edge release effects were removed from the data using tomographic techniques. The data show evidence for a phase transition that extends over a broad pressure range. The data and analysis will be presented.

  7. HUGONIOT MEASUREMENTS AT LOW PRESSURES IN TIN USING 800 MeV PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G. E.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; McNeil, W. V.

    2009-12-28

    A 20 mm long 8 mm diameter cylindrical tin target has been shocked to a pressure just below the beta->gamma phase change, using a small, low density PETN charge mounted on the opposite side of a thin stainless steel diaphragm. The density jump and shock velocity were measured radiographically at multiple points as the shock wave moved though the sample and the pressure dropped, using the proton radiography facility at LANL. This provided a quasi-continuous record along the principal Hugoniot from a peak shock velocity of 3.27 km/sec to a minimum of 3.09 km/sec. Edge release effects were removed from the data using simple tomographic reconstruction techniques. The data and analysis are presented.

  8. Energy loss of MeV protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.

    1996-05-01

    A parameter-free model is presented to study the energy loss of fast protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces. The contributions to the energy loss from excitation of valence-band electrons and ionization of localized target-atom electronic states are calculated separately. The former is calculated from the induced surface wake potential using linear response theory and the specular-reflection model, while the latter is calculated in the first Born approximation. The results obtained are in good agreement with available experimental data. However, the experimental qualitative trend of the energy loss as a function of the angle of incidence is obtained when the valence-band electron model is replaced by localized target atom electron states, though with a worse quantitative agreement. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Microscopic description of proton scattering at 295 MeV from Pb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Rafi, Syed; Pachouri, Dipti; Sharma, Manjari; Haider, W.; Bhagwat, A.; Gambhir, Y. K.

    2011-09-15

    Microscopic analysis of the recently reported 295-MeV-proton scattering data from Pb isotopes and {sup 58}Ni is presented within the framework of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory. The effective interaction (g matrix) has been calculated using three Hamiltonians with Urbana v-14, Argonne v-18, and Ried93 internucleon potentials. The microscopic optical potential is calculated by folding the effective interactions over nucleon density distributions obtained in the relativistic mean field framework. The Argonne v-18 and Ried93 interactions have been used for the first time to calculate the nucleon-nucleus optical potential. The calculations reproduce the experiment well thus revalidating the use of microscopic optical potential in such analyses.

  10. The Elemental Analysis of Biological and Environmental Materials Using a 2MEV Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshed, Waheed

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A programme has been developed to simulate the proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) spectra and its uses have been described. The PIXE technique has been applied to the analysis of new biological reference materials which consist of IAEA human diet samples and NIST leaf samples. Homogeneity of these and two existing reference materials, IAEA soil -7 and Bowen's kale, has also been determined at the mug scale. A subsample representative of a material is ascertained by determination of sampling factors for the elements detected in the material. Proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) analysis in conjunction with PIXE has been employed to investigate F and other elemental concentrations found in human teeth samples. The mean F concentration in enamel and dentine parts of teeth followed an age dependent model. Concentrations of Ca and P were found to be higher in the enamel than in the dentine. Analysis of blood and its components in the study of elemental models in sickle cell disease in Nigerians has been carried out. Comparisons revealed that Cl, Ca and Cu were at higher levels whereas K, Fe, Zn and Rb were at lower levels in the whole blood of the sicklers compared to controls. Similar results were obtained for the erythrocytes except that Br was found at higher concentration in erythrocytes of the sicklers. Higher concentrations of Cl, K, Fe and Cu were also observed in plasma of the sicklers compared to controls. PIXE and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used in the characterization of the Harmattan dust particulates collected at Kano and Ife. Most of the elements were found to be at higher concentrations as compared to those found in Recife (Brazil) and Toronto (Canada). The value of total suspended particulate was above the relevant national air quality standards. PIXE in conjunction with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis was employed in the

  11. Optimized magnet for a 250 MeV proton radiotherapy cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Blosser, H.

    2001-12-01

    The NSCL accelerator group in 1993 carried out an extensive design study [1] for a K250 superconducting cyclotron for advanced cancer therapy. A private company ACCEL now offers cyclotrons based on this study on a commercial basis, and actual construction of a first such cyclotron is likely in the near future. In view of this, further optimization of the design of the superconducting magnet is currently underway. The configuration of the cyclotron has many similarities with previous NSCL-built superconducting cyclotrons—notable differences are the peak average field of 3 T (required by the focusing limit for protons) vs the 5 tesla of other MSU designs, and the use of four sectors rather than three to avoid the νr=3/2 stopband. The further optimization of the magnetic design described here keys on using the true 3D magnetic field program to more precisely match the design to an optimized orbital frequency configuration and to explore reducing the amount of spiral in the hills which then shortens the linear length of the rf elements and therefore reduces capacity and power consumption.

  12. Neutron scattering measurements in {sup 197}Au from 850 keV to 2.0 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, M.; Chen, J.; Egan, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross-sections for low lying levels in {sup 197}Au have been measured for incident neutron energies of 1.0 MeV, 1.5 MeV and 2.0 MeV. In addition, the total neutron cross sections in {sup 197}Au was measured from 850 keV to 1.5 MeV. For both experiments the UML 5.5 MV Van-de-Graaff accelerator with a Mobley post acceleration compression system, produced subnanosecond proton pulses which generated neutrons via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) {sup 7}Be reaction.

  13. High-Energy-Resolution Inelastic Electron and Proton Scattering and the Multiphonon Nature of Mixed-Symmetry 2{sup +} States in {sup 94}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Burda, O.; Kuhar, M.; Lenhardt, A.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Botha, N.; Fearick, R. W.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fransen, C.; Fujita, H.; Holt, J. D.; Pietralla, N.; Scholten, O.

    2007-08-31

    High-energy-resolution inelastic electron scattering (at the S-DALINAC) and proton scattering (at iThemba LABS) experiments permit a thorough test of the nature of proposed one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states of the nucleus {sup 94}Mo. The combined analysis reveals the one-phonon content of the mixed-symmetry state and its isovector character suggested by microscopic nuclear model calculations. The purity of two-phonon 2{sup +} states is extracted.

  14. [BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF FISSION SPECTRUM NEUTRONS AND PROTONS WITH ENERGIES OF 60-126 MEV DURING ACUTE AND PROLONGED IRRADIATION].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons of the fission spectrum are characterized by relatively high values of linear energy transfer (LET). Data about their effects on biological objects are used to evaluate the risk of delayed effects of accelerated ions within the same LET range that serve as an experimental model of the nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Additionally, risks of delayed consequences to cosmonaut's health and average lifetime from certain GCR fluxes and secondary neutrons can be also prognosticated. The article deals with comparative analysis of the literature on reduction of average lifespan (ALS) of animals exposed to neutron reactor spectrum, 60-126 MeV protons, and X- and γ-rays in a broad range of radiation intensity and duration. It was shown that a minimal lifespan reduction by 5% occurs due to a brief exposure to neutrons with the absorbed dose of 5 cGy, whereas same lifespan reduction due to hard X- and γ-radiation occurs after absorption of a minimal dose of 100 cGy. Therefore, according to the estimated minimal ALS reduction in mice, neutron effectiveness is 20-fold higher. Biological effectiveness of protons as regards ALS reduction is virtually equal to that of standard types of radiation. Exposure to X- and γ-radiation with decreasing daily doses, and increasing number of fractions and duration gives rise to an apparent trend toward a less dramatic ALS reduction in mice; on the contrary, exposure to neutrons of varying duration had no effect on threshold doses for the specified ALS reductions. Factors of relative biological effectiveness of neutrons reached 40. PMID:26934784

  15. [BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF FISSION SPECTRUM NEUTRONS AND PROTONS WITH ENERGIES OF 60-126 MEV DURING ACUTE AND PROLONGED IRRADIATION].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons of the fission spectrum are characterized by relatively high values of linear energy transfer (LET). Data about their effects on biological objects are used to evaluate the risk of delayed effects of accelerated ions within the same LET range that serve as an experimental model of the nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Additionally, risks of delayed consequences to cosmonaut's health and average lifetime from certain GCR fluxes and secondary neutrons can be also prognosticated. The article deals with comparative analysis of the literature on reduction of average lifespan (ALS) of animals exposed to neutron reactor spectrum, 60-126 MeV protons, and X- and γ-rays in a broad range of radiation intensity and duration. It was shown that a minimal lifespan reduction by 5% occurs due to a brief exposure to neutrons with the absorbed dose of 5 cGy, whereas same lifespan reduction due to hard X- and γ-radiation occurs after absorption of a minimal dose of 100 cGy. Therefore, according to the estimated minimal ALS reduction in mice, neutron effectiveness is 20-fold higher. Biological effectiveness of protons as regards ALS reduction is virtually equal to that of standard types of radiation. Exposure to X- and γ-radiation with decreasing daily doses, and increasing number of fractions and duration gives rise to an apparent trend toward a less dramatic ALS reduction in mice; on the contrary, exposure to neutrons of varying duration had no effect on threshold doses for the specified ALS reductions. Factors of relative biological effectiveness of neutrons reached 40.

  16. Measurement of Dynamic Strain on a Mercury Target Vessel During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.

    2001-01-11

    A mercury target vessel, designed to simulate some aspects of the eventual target design for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be built in Oak Ridge by the Department of Energy, was used in a test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to study the strain induced from thermal shock of bombarding protons. In the SNS, intense thermal shock loads are expected to cause an enormous rate of temperature rise ({approximately}10{sup 7} K/s), with resulting pressure waves in the mercury that may lead to large stresses on the thin walls of the mercury target. To guide the mercury target design and to benchmark the computer design codes, transient strain was measured using fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensors. Twenty strain sensors were attached in various axial and transverse orientations to a cylindrical stainless steel target vessel containing mercury. The vessel was 10 cm in diameter, about 15 cm long, and with a 5-cm radius hemispherical shell welded to the forward end. The test was done at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) beam facility on 30-31 January 1999. The sensors were attached with gauge lengths of about two centimeters, and were located in pairs in most areas, for redundancy and facilitation of data analysis. The 800-MeV proton deposition of 0.5--2.3 x 10{sup 13} over a full-width at half maximum beam size of {approximately}25 mm, produced axial strains peaking at a few microstrains, with transverse (hoop) strains more than an order of magnitude higher. We describe the experiments, including the sensors and measurement configuration, and discuss the strain data analysis.

  17. Orientation features of {sup 24}Mg(2+) aligned nuclei in (p, p) and (d, d) reactions at E{sub x} ≈ 7.5 MeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Galanina, L. I. Zelenskaya, N. S.; Lebedev, V. M.; Orlova, N. V.; Spassky, A. V.

    2015-09-15

    Experimental angular dependences of cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering and the result obtained by reconstructing the populations of magnetic sublevels, multipole-moment orientation tensors, and polarization tensors are presented for {sup 24}Mg (2{sup +}, 1.369 MeV) aligned nuclei produced in inelastic proton scattering at E{sub p} = 7.4 MeV. The experimental results in question are compared with the results of calculations based on the coupled-channel method and on the compound-nucleus model, the 3/2{sup +} resonance in the {sup 25}Al compound nucleus being taken into account. The orientation features of {sup 24}Mg (2{sup +}, 1.369 MeV) nuclei produced in inelastic proton and deuteron scattering on {sup 24}Mg at E{sub x} ≈ 7.5 MeV per nucleon are found to be generally similar despite a substantial difference in the respective differential cross sections.

  18. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  19. Production of /sup 81/Rb/sup 81m/Kr generators with 60-MeV protons at BLIP

    SciTech Connect

    Mausner, L.F.; Richards, P.

    1983-01-01

    By bombarding natural krypton gas with approx. 63 MeV protons, /sup 81/Rb is formed by (p,4n) reaction from high abundance /sup 84/Kr (57%) as well as some additional contribution from /sup 83/Kr (11.5%) and /sup 82/Kr (11.6%) by (p,3n) and (p,2n) reactions, respectively. The production rate of /sup 81/Rb is typically 1.5 mCi/..mu..Ah. This production rate is sufficient to create up to several hundred millicuries per run if necessary, enough for several high activity /sup 81/Rb/sup 81m/Kr generators. Presently generators that deliver 10 to 20 mCi to the lungs are produced weekly for on-site use. The only other important activity in the solution is Rb-82m (6.4 hr). Small amounts of Br-76 (16.1 hr), Br-77 (57 hr), Br-82 (35.5 hr), Rb-83 (86.2 d), and Rb-84 (33 d) were also present. The bromine impurities pose no problem since they are not trapped on the generator. Rb-82m and Rb-84 decay to stable Kr-82 and Kr-84 in the generator and do not interfere with Kr-81m studies.

  20. Neutron spectra produced by 30, 35 and 40 MeV proton beams at KIRAMS MC-50 cyclotron with a thick beryllium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Won; Bak, Sang-In; Ham, Cheolmin; In, Eun Jin; Kim, Do Yoon; Min, Kyung Joo; Zhou, Yujie; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrons over a wide range of energies are produced by bombarding a 1.05 cm thick beryllium target with protons of different energies delivered by the MC-50 Cyclotron of the Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). The neutron flux Φ(En) versus neutron energy En, produced by protons of 30, 35, and 40 MeV energies, was obtained by using the GEANT4 code with a data-based hadronic model. For the experimental validation of the simulated neutron spectra, a number of pure aluminum and iron oxide samples were irradiated with the neutrons produced by 30, 35, and 40 MeV protons at 20 μA beam current. The gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn produced, respectively, through 27Al(n,α)24Na and 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reactions were measured by a HPGe detector. The neutron flux Φ(En) at each neutron energy from the simulation was multiplied with the evaluated cross-sections σ(En) of the respective nuclear reaction, and the summation ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) was calculated over the neutron spectrum for each proton energy of 30, 35, and 40 MeV. The measured gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn were found in good agreement with the activities estimated by using the summed values of ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) along with other parameters in a neutron activation method.

  1. A comparison of 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma irradiation induced degradation in the electrical characteristics of N-channel MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Arshiya; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Pradeep, T. M.; Pushpa, N.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    N-channel depletion MOSFETs were irradiated with 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad(Si) to 100 Mrad(Si). The electrical characteristics of MOSFET such as threshold voltage (Vth), density of interface trapped charges (ΔNit), density of oxide trapped charges (ΔNot), transconductance (gm), mobility (μ), leakage current (IL) and drain saturation current (ID Sat) were studied as a function of dose. A considerable increase in ΔNit and ΔNot and decrease in Vth,gm, μ, and ID Sat was observed after irradiation. The results of 4 MeV Proton irradiation were compared with that of Co-60 gamma radiation and it is found that the degradation is more for the devices irradiated with 4 MeV Protons when compared with the Co-60 gamma radiation. This indicates that Protons induce more trapped charges in the field oxide region when compared to the gamma radiation.

  2. Measurement of neutron spectra generated from bombardment of 4 to 24 MeV protons on a thick 9Be target and estimation of neutron yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Sharma, S. C.; Ramjilal, Ninawe, N. G.; Sunil, C.; Gupta, A. K.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2014-06-01

    A systematic study on the measurement of neutron spectra emitted from the interaction of protons of various energies with a thick beryllium target has been carried out. The measurements were carried out in the forward direction (at 0° with respect to the direction of protons) using CR-39 detectors. The doses were estimated using the in-house image analyzing program autoTRAK_n, which works on the principle of luminosity variation in and around the track boundaries. A total of six different proton energies starting from 4 MeV to 24 MeV with an energy gap of 4 MeV were chosen for the study of the neutron yields and the estimation of doses. Nearly, 92% of the recoil tracks developed after chemical etching were circular in nature, but the size distributions of the recoil tracks were not found to be linearly dependent on the projectile energy. The neutron yield and dose values were found to be increasing linearly with increasing projectile energies. The response of CR-39 detector was also investigated at different beam currents at two different proton energies. A linear increase of neutron yield with beam current was observed.

  3. Measurement of neutron spectra generated from bombardment of 4 to 24 MeV protons on a thick ⁹Be target and estimation of neutron yields.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Sahoo, G S; Tripathy, S P; Sharma, S C; Ramjilal; Ninawe, N G; Sunil, C; Gupta, A K; Bandyopadhyay, T

    2014-06-01

    A systematic study on the measurement of neutron spectra emitted from the interaction of protons of various energies with a thick beryllium target has been carried out. The measurements were carried out in the forward direction (at 0° with respect to the direction of protons) using CR-39 detectors. The doses were estimated using the in-house image analyzing program autoTRAK_n, which works on the principle of luminosity variation in and around the track boundaries. A total of six different proton energies starting from 4 MeV to 24 MeV with an energy gap of 4 MeV were chosen for the study of the neutron yields and the estimation of doses. Nearly, 92% of the recoil tracks developed after chemical etching were circular in nature, but the size distributions of the recoil tracks were not found to be linearly dependent on the projectile energy. The neutron yield and dose values were found to be increasing linearly with increasing projectile energies. The response of CR-39 detector was also investigated at different beam currents at two different proton energies. A linear increase of neutron yield with beam current was observed. PMID:24985813

  4. Measurement of neutron spectra generated from bombardment of 4 to 24 MeV protons on a thick {sup 9}Be target and estimation of neutron yields

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P. E-mail: tripathy@barc.gov.in; Sunil, C.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Sharma, S. C.; Ramjilal,; Ninawe, N. G.; Gupta, A. K.

    2014-06-15

    A systematic study on the measurement of neutron spectra emitted from the interaction of protons of various energies with a thick beryllium target has been carried out. The measurements were carried out in the forward direction (at 0° with respect to the direction of protons) using CR-39 detectors. The doses were estimated using the in-house image analyzing program autoTRAK-n, which works on the principle of luminosity variation in and around the track boundaries. A total of six different proton energies starting from 4 MeV to 24 MeV with an energy gap of 4 MeV were chosen for the study of the neutron yields and the estimation of doses. Nearly, 92% of the recoil tracks developed after chemical etching were circular in nature, but the size distributions of the recoil tracks were not found to be linearly dependent on the projectile energy. The neutron yield and dose values were found to be increasing linearly with increasing projectile energies. The response of CR-39 detector was also investigated at different beam currents at two different proton energies. A linear increase of neutron yield with beam current was observed.

  5. Determination of the cross section of the proton, pion and neutron inelastic interaction with lead and carbon nuclei at 0.5 - 5.0 TeV energies (PION experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avakian, V. V.; Karagjozian, G. V.; Mamidjanian, E. A.; Keropian, M. I.; Martirosov, R. M.; Ovsepian, G. G.; Sokhoyan, S. O.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results on the cross section of the single pion, proton and neutron inelastic interaction with carbon and lead nuclei in the 0.5 to 5.0 TeV energy interval obtained on the PION installation (Mount Aragats, Armenia, 3250 m) are presented. For this purpose the (N pi)/(N p) and inelastic (p Fe)/(pi Fe) ratios measured directly on the installation as well as the calculated inelastic (p A)/(pi A) dependence on the target nucleus atomic numbers were used.

  6. Secondary neutron spectrum from 250-MeV passively scattered proton therapy: Measurement with an extended-range Bonner sphere system

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Burgett, E. A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are an unavoidable consequence of proton therapy. While the neutron dose is low compared to the primary proton dose, its presence and contribution to the patient dose is nonetheless important. The most detailed information on neutrons includes an evaluation of the neutron spectrum. However, the vast majority of the literature that has reported secondary neutron spectra in proton therapy is based on computational methods rather than measurements. This is largely due to the inherent limitations in the majority of neutron detectors, which are either not suitable for spectral measurements or have limited response at energies greater than 20 MeV. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to measure a secondary neutron spectrum from a proton therapy beam using a spectrometer that is sensitive to neutron energies over the entire neutron energy spectrum. Methods: The authors measured the secondary neutron spectrum from a 250-MeV passively scattered proton beam in air at a distance of 100 cm laterally from isocenter using an extended-range Bonner sphere (ERBS) measurement system. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated using measured fluence and fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Results: The neutron fluence spectrum had a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate energy continuum between the thermal and evaporation peaks. The H*(10) was dominated by the neutrons in the evaporation peak because of both their high abundance and the large quality conversion coefficients in that energy interval. The H*(10) 100 cm laterally from isocenter was 1.6 mSv per proton Gy (to isocenter). Approximately 35% of the dose equivalent was from neutrons with energies ≥20 MeV. Conclusions: The authors measured a neutron spectrum for external neutrons generated by a 250-MeV proton beam using an ERBS measurement system that was sensitive to neutrons over the entire

  7. MeV proton beams generated by 3 mJ ultrafast laser pulses at 0.5 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Nees, John; Easter, James; Thomas, Alexander; Krushelnick, Karl; Davis, Jack; Petrov, George

    2009-09-07

    Well-collimated proton beams are generated from bulk glass along the target normal direction by tightly focused 55 fs, 3 mJ pulses from a laser operating at 0.5 kHz repetition rate. Proton beams with energies of >265 keV have an emission angle of about 16 deg. full width at half maximum. Spectral measurements indicate proton energies exceeding 0.5 MeV with a flux of 3.2x10{sup 9} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} and the flux of measured protons with energies of greater than 90 keV is 8.5x10{sup 11} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} on center.

  8. Investigation of the Stability and 1.0 MeV Proton Radiation Resistance of Commercially Produced Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Alloy Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below 1E14 sq cm fluences above 1E14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed In dark I-V measurements. The current mechanism were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  9. Measurement of the inelastic proton–proton cross-section at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    PubMed Central

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D.C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H.S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S.P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A.E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S.P.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bobrovnikov, V.B.; Bocchetta, S.S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C.R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N.M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C.N.; Booth, P.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozhko, N.I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N.D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N.J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R.M.; Buckley, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of the rate of proton–proton interactions on the centre-of-mass collision energy, √s, is of fundamental importance for both hadron collider physics and particle astrophysics. The dependence cannot yet be calculated from first principles; therefore, experimental measurements are needed. Here we present the first measurement of the inelastic proton–proton interaction cross-section at a centre-of-mass energy, √s, of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected by requiring hits on scintillation counters mounted in the forward region of the detector. An inelastic cross-section of 60.3±2.1 mb is measured for ξ>5×10−6, where ξ is calculated from the invariant mass, MX, of hadrons selected using the largest rapidity gap in the event. For diffractive events, this corresponds to requiring at least one of the dissociation masses to be larger than 15.7 GeV. PMID:21897374

  10. Observation of a 500meV Collective Mode in La2-xSrxCuO4 and Nd2CuO4 Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. P.; Blumberg, G.; Kim, Young-June; Ellis, D. S.; Wakimoto, S.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Komiya, Seiki; Ando, Yoichi; Liang, B.; Greene, R. L.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.

    2008-03-01

    Utilizing resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, we report a previously unobserved mode in the excitation spectrum of La2-xSrxCuO4 and Nd2CuO4 at 500 meV. The mode is peaked around the (π, 0) point in reciprocal space and is observed to soften, and broaden, away from this point. Samples with x=0, 0.01, 0.05, and 0.17 were studied. The new mode is found to be rapidly suppressed with increasing Sr content and is absent at x=0.17, where it is replaced by a continuum of excitations. This mode is only observed when the incident x-ray polarization is normal to the CuO planes.

  11. Light response of YAP:Ce and LaBr3:Ce scintillators to 4-30 MeV protons for applications to Telescope Proton Recoil neutron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Cremona, A.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Ericsson, G.; Fazzi, A.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E.; Gorini, G.

    2016-06-01

    The light response of two thin inorganic scintillators based on YAP:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals has been measured with protons in the 4-8 MeV energy range at the Uppsala tandem accelerator and in the 8-26 MeV energy range at the Legnaro tandem accelerator. The crystals have been calibrated in situ with 137Cs and 60Co γ-ray sources. The relative light yields of protons with respect to gammas have been measured and are here reported to be (96±2)% and (80±2)% for YAP:Ce and LaBr3:Ce, respectively. The results open up to the development of a Telescope Proton Recoil spectrometer based on either of the two crystals as alternative to a silicon based spectrometer for applications to high neutron fluxes.

  12. Pitch Angle Distributions of 0.6-1.8 MeV Protons Observed by Voyager 1 at 85-87 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.B.; Krimigis, S.M.; Roelof, E.C.; Burlaga, L.F.; Ness, N.F.

    2004-09-15

    We combined daily averages of magnetic field vector data and 0.6-1.8 MeV proton angular intensity data to construct 32 pitch angle distributions (PADs) for measurements made by Voyager 1 (V1) at 85-87 AU. The PADs were observed during the period 2002.6-2003.1, when energetic particle instruments on V1 measured unusually high intensities. The angular data show large, mainly unidirectional beaming of protons most often in the -T direction, i.e., away from the sun in the sense of a spiral magnetic field. The mean anisotropy amplitude based on the 32 samples is 0.55{+-}0.21.

  13. Interplanetary-proton (0. 61 < ep < 3. 41 MeV) events observed with Pioneer 11, 1973-86 and out to 22. 4 AU. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Allen, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of interplanetary-proton events (0.61 to 3.41 MeV) is summarized in graphical and tabular form for the period April 1973-December 1986. The observations were obtained by an effectively continuous data stream from the University of Iowa instrument on the Ames Research Center/NASA spacecraft Pioneer 11 as it moved outward in the solar system from 1.0 to 22.4 AU. Two hundred and sixty-five distinct events are identified. The spectra and intensities of the protons, presumed to be originally of solar origin, are influenced dramatically by propagative and accelerative processes in the interplanetary medium.

  14. Experimental results from high-intensity sources of monochromatic X-rays generated by 10-38 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaldi, L.; Bassi, S.; Castiglioni, M.; Milazzo, M.; Silari, M.; Weckermann, B.

    1990-12-01

    The performance of a high intensity X-ray source generated by proton bombardment of pure elemental targets has been investigated experimentally. The K α yields of several thick targets of pure elemental composition have been measured at proton energies between 12 and 38 MeV. The measured yields ((3-5 × 10 10 photons/(s μA sr)) compare favourably with the expected values, while a sensible background contribution from nuclear processes asks for a careful experimental arrangement in order to use this source for XRF analyses.

  15. Cross-section for proton tritium scattering from 1.4 to 3.4 MeV at the laboratory angle of 165°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, X. J.; Ding, W.; Zhang, B.; Long, X. G.; Luo, S. Z.; Peng, S. M.; Hutton, R.; Shi, L. Q.

    2008-03-01

    The elastic scattering cross-section for proton scattering from tritium was measured at a laboratory angle of 165° and over an incident proton energy range from 1.4 to 3.4 MeV. A thin solid target containing 1.62 × 1017 T atoms/cm2 was prepared by absorption of tritium into a film of titanium on aluminium foil backing. The cross-section increases almost linearly with decreasing energy in the higher energy region of 2-3.4 MeV. The currently measured cross-section data are compared with data available in the literature values and they show a similarly linear trend in a similar higher energy range. The maximum difference in the cross-section at almost the same scattering angle between current data and the previous results is no worse than 2.3%.

  16. Maximum Proton Energy above 85 MeV from the Relativistic Interaction of Laser Pulses with Micrometer Thick CH2 Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Fiala, P.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Poth, P.; Schanz, V. A.; Tebartz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of laser-driven ion acceleration with micrometer and submicrometer thick plastic targets. Using laser pulses with high temporal contrast and an intensity of the order of 1020 W /cm2 we observe proton beams with cutoff energies in excess of 85 MeV and particle numbers of 109 in an energy bin of 1 MeV around this maximum. We show that applying the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism with submicrometer thick targets is a very robust way to achieve such high ion energies and particle fluxes. Our results are backed with 2D particle in cell simulations furthermore predicting cutoff energies above 200 MeV for acceleration based on relativistic transparency. This predicted regime can be probed after a few technically feasible adjustments of the laser and target parameters.

  17. Magnetic Nature of the 500 meV peak in La2−xSrxCuO4 Observed with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering at the Cu K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Ellis, D.S.; Kim, J.; Wakimoto, S.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Shvyd’ko, Y.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Ishii, K.; Ikeuchi, K.; Paramekanti, A.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2010-02-15

    We present a comprehensive study of the temperature and doping dependence of the 500 meV peak observed at q = ({pi},0) in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The intensity of this peak persists above the Neel temperature (T{sub N} = 320 K), but decreases gradually with increasing temperature, reaching zero at around T = 500 K. The peak energy decreases with temperature in close quantitative accord with the behavior of the two-magnon B{sub 1g} Raman peak in La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and, with suitable rescaling, agrees with the Raman peak shifts in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}. The overall dispersion of this excitation in the Brillouin zone is found to be in agreement with theoretical calculations for a two-magnon excitation. Upon doping, the peak intensity decreases analogous to the Raman mode intensity and appears to track the doping dependence of the spin-correlation length. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that the 500 meV mode is magnetic in character and is likely a two-magnon excitation.

  18. Comparison of Schroedinger and Dirac coupled-channels analyses of the sup 28 Si( p , p prime ) sup 28 Si reaction at 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    de Swiniarski, R.; Beatty, D.; Donoghue, E.; Fergerson, R.W.; Franey, M.; Gazzaly, M.; Glashausser, C.; Hintz, N.; Jones, K.W.; McClelland, J.B.; Nanda, S.; Plum, M. Serin Physics Laboratory, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM )

    1990-09-01

    Analyzing powers have been measured for elastic and inelastic scattering of 500-MeV protons from {sup 28}Si. These data for the first 0{sup +}, 2{sup +}, and 4{sup +} states and the corresponding cross-section data have been analyzed with both Schroedinger and Dirac equation phenomenological coupled-channels methods. Good, qualitatively similar, results are achieved with the two methods.

  19. LET dependence of the response of a PTW-60019 microDiamond detector in a 62MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, S; Denis, J M; Souris, K; Delor, A; Bartier, F; Dumont, D; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2016-09-01

    This study was initiated following conclusions from earlier experimental work, performed in a low-energy carbon ion beam, indicating a significant LET dependence of the response of a PTW-60019 microDiamond detector. The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison between the response of the same PTW-60019 microDiamond detector and an IBA Roos-type ionization chamber as a function of depth in a 62MeV proton beam. Even though proton beams are considered as low linear energy transfer (LET) beams, the LET value increases slightly in the Bragg peak region. Contrary to the observations made in the carbon ion beam, in the 62MeV proton beam good agreement is found between both detectors in both the plateau and the distal edge region. No significant LET dependent response of the PTW-60019 microDiamond detector is observed consistent with other findings for proton beams in the literature, despite this particular detector exhibiting a substantial LET dependence in a carbon ion beam. PMID:27567088

  20. Measurements of proton induced γ-ray emission cross-sections on Mg from 1.0 to 3.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, N.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Differential cross-section of proton induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 24Mg(p,p‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV), 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg (Eγ = 390, 585, 975 keV) and 26Mg(p,γ)27Al (Eγ = 1014 keV) were measured for proton energies from 1 to 3 MeV using a 60 μg/cm2 Mg target evaporated on a 40 μg/cm2 Ag thin film. The γ-rays were collected by a 50% relative efficiency HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction, while the backscattered protons were collected by an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165°. Simultaneous collection of γ-ray and RBS spectra is a great advantage of this approach which makes differential cross-section measurements independent on the collected beam charge. Measured cross-section values were compared with the previously reported data in the literature. Absolute γ-ray differential cross-sections were obtained with an overall systematic uncertainty of about ±6% and statistical uncertainty of less than ±5% for proton energies higher than 2.24 MeV.

  1. LET dependence of the response of a PTW-60019 microDiamond detector in a 62MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, S; Denis, J M; Souris, K; Delor, A; Bartier, F; Dumont, D; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2016-09-01

    This study was initiated following conclusions from earlier experimental work, performed in a low-energy carbon ion beam, indicating a significant LET dependence of the response of a PTW-60019 microDiamond detector. The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison between the response of the same PTW-60019 microDiamond detector and an IBA Roos-type ionization chamber as a function of depth in a 62MeV proton beam. Even though proton beams are considered as low linear energy transfer (LET) beams, the LET value increases slightly in the Bragg peak region. Contrary to the observations made in the carbon ion beam, in the 62MeV proton beam good agreement is found between both detectors in both the plateau and the distal edge region. No significant LET dependent response of the PTW-60019 microDiamond detector is observed consistent with other findings for proton beams in the literature, despite this particular detector exhibiting a substantial LET dependence in a carbon ion beam.

  2. Characterization of the energy distribution of neutrons generated by 5 MeV protons on a thick beryllium target at different emission angles.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Colautti, P; Esposito, J; Fazzi, A; Introini, M V; Pola, A

    2011-12-01

    Neutron energy spectra at different emission angles, between 0° and 120° from the Be(p,xn) reaction generated by a beryllium thick-target bombarded with 5 MeV protons, have been measured at the Legnaro Laboratories (LNL) of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics research (INFN). A new and quite compact recoil-proton spectrometer, based on a monolithic silicon telescope, coupled to a polyethylene converter, was efficiently used with respect to the traditional Time-of-Flight (TOF) technique. The measured distributions of recoil-protons were processed through an iterative unfolding algorithm in order to determine the neutron energy spectra at all the angles accounted for. The neutron energy spectrum measured at 0° resulted to be in good agreement with the only one so far available at the requested energy and measured years ago with TOF technique. Moreover, the results obtained at different emission angles resulted to be consistent with detailed past measurements performed at 4 MeV protons at the same angles by TOF techniques.

  3. Recovery of the chemical ordering in L1{sub 0} MnAl epitaxial thin films irradiated by 2 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Anuniwat, Nattawut; Cui, Yishen; Wolf, Stuart A.; Lu, Jiwei; Weaver, Bradley D.

    2013-03-11

    Epitaxial MnAl films with a high chemical ordering were synthesized and characterized during a series of irradiations by 2 MeV protons (H{sup +}). The chemical ordering was first reduced to a minimum at a total fluence (TF) of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, and consequently was recovered at the final total fluence of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. We attributed the recovery of chemical ordering to thermal effects and the enhanced diffusion caused by the high energy protons. In addition, the damages by the protons have little effect on the magnetic scattering processing in MnAl characterized by the anomalous Hall effect.

  4. Investigation of the stability and 1.0 MeV proton radiation resistance of commercially produced hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, K.R. II; Walters, M.R.; Woodyard, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2); fluences above 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2) require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  5. Investigation of the stability and 1.0 MeV proton radiation resistance of commercially produced hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters or fluences below 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2); fluences above 1(exp 14) cm(exp -2) require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  6. Response of human lymphocytes to proton radiation of 60 MeV compared to 250 kV X-rays by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, Justyna; Rawojć, Kamila; Panek, Agnieszka; Swakoń, Jan; Prasanna, Pataje G; Rydygier, Marzena

    2015-04-01

    Particle radiotherapy such as protons provides a new promising treatment modality to cancer. However, studies on its efficacy and risks are relatively sparse. Using the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay, we characterized response of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, obtained from health donors irradiated in vitro in the dose range: 0-4. 0 Gy, to therapeutic proton radiation of 60 MeV from AIC-144 isochronous cyclotron, by studying nuclear division index and DNA damage and compared them with X-rays. Peripheral blood lymphocytes show decreased ability to proliferate with increasing radiation doses for both radiation types, however, in contrast to X-rays, irradiation with protons resulted in a higher proliferation index at lower doses of 0.75 and 1.0 Gy. Protons are more effective in producing MN at doses above 1.75 Gy compared to X-rays. Dose-response curves for micronucleus incidence can be best described by a cubic model for protons, while for X-rays the response was linear. The differences in the energy spectrum and intracellular distribution of energy between radiation types are also apparent at the intracellular distribution of cytogenetic damage as seen by the distribution of various numbers of micronuclei in binucleated cells. Our studies, although preliminary, further contribute to the understanding of the mechanistic differences in the response of HPBL in terms of cellular proliferation and cytogenetic damage induced by protons and X-rays as well as intra-cellular distribution of energy and thus radiobiological effectiveness.

  7. The effects of 800 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion of tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel, and gold

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Kanner, G.; Daemen, L.

    1997-12-01

    Real time electrochemical data were acquired for tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel 304L, and gold targets during proton irradiation at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The goal of this research was to establish a better understanding of the corrosion properties of materials as a function of proton irradiation and gain insight into the mechanism of the observed phenomena. The following electrochemical observations were made during proton irradiation of W, Ta, SS304, and Au: (1) the open circuit potential of all materials increased with increasing proton fluence; (2) the corrosion rate (at the OCP) of W and SS304 increased with increasing proton fluence; (3) the passive dissolution rate for SS304 and Ta decreased with increasing proton fluence; (4) the anodic dissolution rate for W increased with increasing proton fluence; (5) the pitting potential for SS304 increased with proton fluence, which is an indication that the material is less susceptible to pitting attack during irradiation.

  8. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  9. Estimate of the radiation source term for 18F production via thick H218O targets bombarded with 18 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzate, Juan Ángel

    2015-12-01

    The positron-emitting radionuclide most important from the point of view of radiation protection is 18F. This isotope is usually produced by bombarding 18O-enriched water with protons. Currently there are few experimental data on the radiation source term generated during these reactions. In addition, presently there is no theoretical estimates of this source term, for use in radiation protection, validated by experimental data. Up till now this term is calculated by using nuclear interactions' simulation codes, such as ALICE91. An estimate of the energy spectra for neutrons and photons, induced by 18 MeV protons on H218O target, have been calculated by using MCNPX code with cross sections from release 0 of ENDF/B VII library for all materials except 18O, for which TENDL-2012 library was used. This estimate was validated against a recent experiment carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The calculated spectra have generally well reproduced experiments. The results show that the calculated radiation source term may be used to estimate the neutron activation of the accelerator components and the cyclotron building, to calculate the cyclotron shielding, and to carry out radiation protection evaluations in general, for the case of cyclotrons producing 18F by means of the 18O(p,n)18F nuclear reactions, for proton energies up to 18 MeV.

  10. Implementation of water calorimetry in a 180 MeV scanned pulsed proton beam including an experimental determination of kQ for a Farmer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Joakim

    2010-06-01

    Water calorimetric measurements have been performed in a 180 MeV scanned pulsed proton beam and the absorbed dose determined has been compared with the results obtained using two NE2571 Farmer chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. The depth of measurement in water corresponded to a residual range of Rres = 16.5 cm, corresponding to a mean energy of about 150 MeV. Ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of the absorbed dose to water in 60Co at the Swedish Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory, directly traceable to Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. The present experimental investigation has shown that water calorimetry is feasible in a high-energy scanned pulsed proton beam. When comparing the results obtained with water calorimetry and ionometry, the beam quality correction factor, kQ, could be determined for the two NE2571 ionization chambers used. The kQ-factor was found to be 1.032 ± 0.013, which is in good agreement with the factor tabulated in IAEA TRS-398 for this chamber type (1.039 ± 0.018). The present result has also been compared with a previously obtained result in a passively scattered proton beam having similar energy. This comparison yielded a 1.1% deviation, which is not significant considering the combined uncertainties of the two experimental determinations of kQ. The dominating contribution to the combined uncertainty stems from the correction factor for ion recombination in the scanned proton beam (1%), and further studies are required in order to reduce this uncertainty and reveal any possible differences in the kQ-factor between these two proton beam delivery techniques.

  11. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetisyan, E.; Belostotski, S.; Blok, H. P.; Borissov, A.; Bowles, J.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capiluppi, M.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; De Leo, R.; De Nardo, L.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Golembiovskaya, M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Imazu, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Kravchenko, P.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; López Ruiz, A.; Lorenzon, W.; Ma, B.-Q.; Mahon, D.; Makins, N. C. R.; Manaenkov, S. I.; Manfré, L.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Marukyan, H.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Movsisyan, A.; Murray, M.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrosyan, A.; Raithel, M.; Reimer, P. E.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanftl, F.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seitz, B.; Shibata, T.-A.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Terkulov, A.; Truty, R. M.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Yu, W.; Zagrebelnyy, V.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2013-01-01

    The azimuthal cos⁡ϕ and cos⁡2ϕ modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  12. RBE for late somatic effects in mice irradiated with 60 MeV protons relative to X-rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, E. B., Jr.; Clapp, N. K.; Bender, R. S.; Jernigan, M. C.; Upton, A. C.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the relative biological effectiveness of energetic protons for the induction of somatic effects in a mammal (mice) following whole body irradiation. The proton energy used approximates the mean energy for proton spectra accompanying solar events. The effects on longevity and the incidence of major neoplastic diseases are summarized. The results obtained suggest that medium energy proton irradiation is no more effective, and on the whole, probably less effective, than conventional X radiation for the induction of late radiation effects in the mouse.

  13. Stopping powers and energy loss straggling for (0.9-3.4) MeV protons in a kapton polyimide thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damache, S.; Djaroum, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Amari, L.; Moussa, D.

    2016-09-01

    The energy loss and energy loss straggling widths have been measured in transmission for Ep ≈ (0.9-3.4) MeV protons traversing a thin kapton polyimide foil. In a prior step, the thickness and non-uniformity of the target foil were carefully investigated. The overall relative uncertainties in the stopping power and energy loss straggling variance data amount, respectively, to less than 2% and 8%. The S(E) experimental data show to be in excellent agreement with available previous ones and with those compiled in the ICRU-49 report. They are fully consistent with the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner's binary collision theory of electronic stopping over the whole proton energy range explored. An average deviation of ∼2.5% relative to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 code, likely due to effects of valence electrons involving the Csbnd H, Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds, is however observed at low proton velocities. The measured energy loss straggling data, which are unique to our knowledge, are found to be in good agreement with values derived by the classical Bohr formula for Ep ≳ 1300 keV but they significantly exceed Bohr's collisional energy loss straggling at lower proton velocities where target electrons can no longer be considered as free. They also show to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston and Sigmund-Schinner theories over the low proton velocity region (Ep < 1300 keV). However, they are significantly overestimated by these theories over the intermediate and high proton velocity regions, which may be due to bunching effect by inner shell electrons of the polymer target. Besides, our energy loss straggling data are in better overall consistency with the Yang, O'Connor and Wang empirical formula for Ep > 1300 keV, while deviations above the latter amounting up to ∼18% are observed at lower proton velocities.

  14. Characterization techniques for fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators and beam studies using the KURRI 150 MeV proton FFAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, S. L.; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Rogers, C.; Prior, C. R.; Volat, L.; Haj Tahar, M.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Uesugi, T.; Mori, Y.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we describe the methods and tools used to characterize a 150 MeV proton scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Many of the techniques used are unique to this class of machine and are thus of relevance to any future FFAG accelerator. For the first time we detail systematic studies undertaken to improve the beam quality of the FFAG. The control of beam quality in this manner is crucial to demonstrating high power operation of FFAG accelerators in future.

  15. Holmium-161 produced using 11.6 MeV protons: A practical source of narrow-band X-rays.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Bryan J; Mendenhall, Marcus H

    2010-10-01

    We present a novel technique to produce narrow-band X-rays by preparing (161)Ho from the bombardment of dysprosium foil by 11.6 MeV protons. The activated foil produces predominantly 45-55 keV X-rays, which are suitable for activating iodinated radio-sensitizing agents (e.g. IUdR) for oncological therapy. We demonstrate that clinically useful quantities of the nuclide are easily produced with a medical cyclotron which is far from the current state of the art.

  16. Proton beam simulation with MCNPX: Gallium metal activation estimates below 30 MeV relevant to the bulk production of 68Ge and 65Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, M.; Arzumanov, A.; Jamriska, D. J.; Lyssukhin, S. N.; Trellue, H.; Waters, L. S.

    2007-08-01

    Several gallium metal targets containing Ga metal encapsulated in Nb shells were irradiated in a 30 MeV cyclotron beam. Proton and secondary neutron beam fluences as well as radionuclide activity formation were modeled using MCNP-X in combination with CINDER90. Targets were chemically processed using two anion exchange steps. Good agreement between measured radiochemical yields and MCNPX/CINDER estimates was observed. The separation principle introduced in this work was utilized for a small 68Ge/Ga generator column for 68Ga labeling purposes.

  17. The streaming of 1.3 - 2.3 MeV cosmic-ray protons during periods between prompt solar particle events. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    The anisotropy of 1.3 to 2.3 MeV protons in interplanetary space was measured using the Caltech electron/isotope spectrometer aboard IMP-7 for 317 6 hour periods from 72/273 to 74/2. Periods dominated by prompt solar particle events are not included. The convective and diffusive anisotropies were determined from the observed anisotropy using concurrent solar wind speed measurements and observed energy spectra. The diffusive flow of particles was found to be typically toward the sun, indicating a positive radial gradient in the particle density. This anisotropy was inconsistent with previously proposed sources of low energy proton increases seen at 1 AU which involve continual solar acceleration. The typical properties of this new component of low-energy cosmic rays were determined for this period which is near solar minimum.

  18. Oxidation of SO2 and formation of water droplets under irradiation of 20 MeV protons in N2/H2O/SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Shigeo; Nakai, Yoichi; Funada, Shuhei; Tanikawa, Hideomi; Harayama, Isao; Kobara, Hitomi; Sasa, Kimikazu; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Hvelplund, Preben

    2015-12-01

    We have performed an experiment on charged droplet formation in a humidified N2 gas with trace SO2 concentration and induced by 20 MeV proton irradiation. It is thought that SO2 reacts with the chemical species, such as OH radicals, generated through the reactions triggered by N2+ production. Both droplet number and droplet size increased with SO2 consumption for the proton irradiation. The total charged droplet numbers entering the differential mobility analyzer per unit time were proportional to the 0.68 power of the SO2 consumption. These two findings suggest that coagulation among the small droplets contributes to the formation of the droplets. The charged droplet volume detected per unit time is proportional to the SO2 consumption, which indicates that a constant amount of sulfur atoms is contained in a unit volume of droplet, regardless of different droplet-size distributions depending on the SO2 consumption.

  19. Investigation of the radiation resistance of triple-junction a-Si:H alloy solar cells irradiated with 1.00 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of 1.00 MeV proton irradiation on hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells is reported for the first time. The cells were designed for radiation resistance studies and included 0.35 cm(sup 2) active areas on 1.0 by 2.0 cm(sup 2) glass superstrates. Three cells were irradiated through the bottom contact at each of six fluences between 5.10E12 and 1.46E15 cm(sup -2). The effect of the irradiations was determined with light current-voltage measurements. Proton irradiation degraded the cell power densities from 8.0 to 98 percent for the fluences investigated. Annealing irradiated cells at 200 C for two hours restored the power densities to better than 90 percent. The cells exhibited radiation resistances which are superior to cells reported in the literature for fluences less than 1E14 cm(sup -2).

  20. Exclusive studies of 130-270 MeV {sup 3}He- and 200-MeV proton-induced reactions on {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup 197}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Ginger, D. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Hsi, W.-C.; Hudan, S.; Cornell, E.; Souza, R. T. de; Viola, V. E.; Korteling, R. G.

    2008-09-15

    Exclusive light-charged-particle and IMF spectra have been measured with the ISiS detector array for bombardments of {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Ag, and {sup 197}Au nuclei with 130-270-MeV {sup 3}He and 200-MeV protons. The results are consistent with previous interpretations based on inclusive data that describe the global yield of complex fragments in terms of a time-dependent process. The emission mechanism for energetic nonequilibrium fragments observed at forward angles with momenta up to twice the beam momentum is also investigated. This poorly understood mechanism, for which the angular distributions indicate formation on a time scale comparable to the nuclear transit time, are accompanied primarily by thermal-like emissions. The data are most consistent with a schematic picture in which nonequilibrium fragments are formed in a localized region of the target nucleus at an early stage in the energy-dissipation process, where the combined effects of high energy density and Fermi motion produce the observed suprathermal spectra.

  1. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  2. Neutron and light-charged-particle productions in proton-induced reactions on 208Pb at 62.9 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertin, A.; Marie, N.; Auduc, S.; Blideanu, V.; Delbar, Th.; Eudes, P.; Foucher, Y.; Haddad, F.; Kirchner, T.; Le Brun, Ch.; Lebrun, C.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecolley, J. F.; Ledoux, X.; Lefèbvres, F.; Lefort, T.; Louvel, M.; Ninane, A.; Patin, Y.; Pras, Ph.; Rivière, G.; Varignon, C.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrons and light charged particles produced in 62.9MeV proton-induced reactions on 208Pb were measured during a single experiment performed at the CYCLONE facility in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Two independent experimental set-ups were used to extract double differential cross-sections for neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, 3He and alpha-particles. Charged particles were detected using a set of Si- Si- CsI telescopes from 25° to 155°, by step of 10 degrees. Neutrons were measured using shielded DeMoN counters, liquid NE213 scintillators, at 24°, 35°, 55°, 80° and 120°. These data allowed the determination of angle differential, energy differential and total production cross-sections. A comparison with theoretical calculations (MCNPX, FLUKA and TALYS) has been performed. It shows that the neutron and proton production rates are well predicted by MCNPX, using the INCL4 option. All the other codes underestimate the neutron production whereas they overestimate the proton one. For composite particles, which represent 17% of the charged particle total reaction cross-section, neither the shape nor the amplitude of the cross-sections are correctly predicted by the models.

  3. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K.; Klassen, Norman V.; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-01

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 °C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR20,10 = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, Rres = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in 60Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the kQ values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm-2 depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated kQ values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (wair/e)Q of 33.6 J C-1 ± 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (wair/e)Q value by the same amount.

  4. Response of CR-39 to 0.9-2.5 MeV protons for KOH and NaOH etching solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, F.; Mianji, F.; Faghihi, R.; Taheri, M.; Ansarinejad, A.

    2016-03-01

    In some circumstances passive detecting methods are the only or preferable measuring approaches. For instance, defining particles' energy profile inside the objects being irradiated with heavy ions and measuring fluence of neutrons or heavy particles in space missions are the cases covered by these methods. In this paper the ability of polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) track detector (commercially known as CR-39) for passive spectrometry of proton particles is studied. Furthermore, the effect of KOH and NaOH as commonly used chemical etching solutions on the response of the detector is investigated. The experiments were carried out with protons in the energy range of 0.94-2.5 MeV generated by a Van de Graaff accelerator. Then, the exposed track dosimeters were etched in the two aforementioned etchants through similar procedure with the same normality of 6.25 N and the same temperature of 85 °C. Formation of the tracks was precisely investigated and the track diameters were recorded following every etching step for each solution using a multistage etching process. The results showed that the proposed method can be efficiently used for the spectrometry of protons over a wider dynamic range and with a reasonable accuracy. Moreover, NaOH and KOH outperformed each other over different regions of the proton energy range. The detection efficiency of both etchants was approximately 100%.

  5. Effect of irradiation with MeV protons and electrons on the conductivity compensation and photoluminescence of moderately doped p-4H-SiC (CVD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A. Bogdanova, E. V.; Seredova, N. V.

    2015-09-15

    The compensation of moderately doped p-4H-SiC samples grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method under irradiation with 0.9-MeV electrons and 15-MeV protons is studied. The experimentally measured carrier removal rates are 1.2–1.6 cm{sup –1} for electrons and 240–260 cm{sup –1} for protons. The dependence of the concentration of uncompensated acceptors and donors, measured in the study, demonstrates a linear decrease with increasing irradiation dose to the point of complete compensation. This run of the dependence shows that compensation of the samples is due to the transition of carriers to deep centers formed by primary radiation-induced defects. It is demonstrated that, in contrast to n-SiC (CVD), primary defects in the carbon sublattice of moderately doped p-SiC (CVD) only cannot account for the compensation process. In p-SiC, either primary defects in the silicon sublattice, or defects in both sublattices are responsible for conductivity compensation. Also, photoluminescence spectra are examined in relation to the irradiation dose.

  6. Energy dependence of proton induced fission cross sections for heavy nuclei in the energy range 200-1000 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, A. A.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Vovchenko, V. G.; Gavrikov, Yu. A.; Poliakov, V. V.; Tverskoy, M. G.; Fedorov, O. Ya.; Chestnov, Yu. A.; Shchetkovskiy, A. I.; Shvedchikov, A. V.; Doroshenko, A. Yu.; Fukahori, T.

    2006-09-15

    Total cross sections for proton induced fission of {sup nat}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu nuclei were measured in the range 200-1000 MeV with an energy step of 100 MeV. The experiment was carried out at 1 GeV in a PNPI synchrocyclotron. Complementary fragments of the binary fission from a thin target were detected in coincidence by two parallel plate avalanche counters (PPAC) located close to the target. An assembly of the two PPACs and with the target in between them was placed directly into the beam, which provided a large solid angle acceptance. The beam monitoring system employed a scintillation counter telescope that was used for direct proton counting as well as for registration of the elastic pp-scattering events from the auxiliary (CH{sub 2}){sub n} target. The measured energy dependence of the total fission cross sections is presented. The results are compared with other available experimental data as well as with calculations in the frame of the cascade-evaporation model.

  7. Production of (28)Mg by bombardment of (nat)Cl with 200MeV protons: Proof-of-concept study for a stacked LiCl target.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, N P; Steyn, G F; Vermeulen, C; van Rooyen, T J

    2016-09-01

    A stacked target consisting of ten Al-encapsulated LiCl discs, for producing (28)Mg via the (nat)Cl(p,X)(28)Mg process in the energy region 50-200MeV, is described. This target was irradiated with a 200MeV beam at an intensity of 100nA, providing information on both yield and outscattering losses. Results of a Monte Carlo modelling of the beam and target, by means of the code MCNPX, are also presented. Similar Al-encapsulated LiCl discs were individually irradiated with 66MeV proton beams of 65 and 90μA, respectively, to study their behaviour under high-intensity bombardment. Once removed from the Al encapsulation, the (28)Mg can be separated from the LiCl target material efficiently, using a 12.5cm x 1cm(2) column containing Purolite S950 chelating resin. The eluate contains (7)Be but no other measurable radio-contaminants. The removal of the (7)Be contaminant is performed by cation exchange chromatography in malate media, with (28)Mg being retained by the resin and (7)Be eluted. PMID:27372806

  8. Double beta decay of Uranium-238: Proton reactions of {sup 238}U in 5--12 MeV range. Final report, April 15, 1987--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Turkevich, A.; Economou, T.E.

    1993-06-01

    This report is in two parts. The first part reports on the experimental work determining the half-life for double beta decay of {sup 238}U to {sup 238}PU to be (2.0 {plus_minus} 0.6) {times} 10{sup 21} years. This is the first evidence for a third mode of decay of this heaviest naturally occurring nucleus. This rate is about 10{sup 6} times slower than spontaneous fission, which itself is about 10{sup 6} times slower than alpha decay. The implication of this double beta decay to neutrino masses depends on uncertain theoretical calculations of the rate for such a heavy nucleus. The second part reports on yields of principal fission products from 5.6, 7.3, 9.4, and 11.5 MeV proton interactions with {sup 238}U. The yields at 11.5 MeV are similar to those from 14 MeV neutron fission of {sup 238}U. At the same time, the production cross sections of {sup 238}Np at the same energies are determined. This nuclide is produced as often as fission at the lowest energy but only 3.8% as often at the highest energy.

  9. Relative Biological Effectiveness Variation Along Monoenergetic and Modulated Bragg Peaks of a 62-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beam: A Preclinical Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I.; Perozziello, Francesca M.; Manti, Lorenzo; Currell, Frederick J.; Hanton, Fiona; McMahon, Stephen J.; Kavanagh, Joy N.; Cirrone, Giuseppe Antonio Pablo; Romano, Francesco; Prise, Kevin M.; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The biological optimization of proton therapy can be achieved only through a detailed evaluation of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) variations along the full range of the Bragg curve. The clinically used RBE value of 1.1 represents a broad average, which disregards the steep rise of linear energy transfer (LET) at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). With particular attention to the key endpoint of cell survival, our work presents a comparative investigation of cell killing RBE variations along monoenergetic (pristine) and modulated (SOBP) beams using human normal and radioresistant cells with the aim to investigate the RBE dependence on LET and intrinsic radiosensitvity. Methods and Materials: Human fibroblasts (AG01522) and glioma (U87) cells were irradiated at 6 depth positions along pristine and modulated 62-MeV proton beams at the INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy). Cell killing RBE variations were measured using standard clonogenic assays and were further validated using Monte Carlo simulations and the local effect model (LEM). Results: We observed significant cell killing RBE variations along the proton beam path, particularly in the distal region showing strong dose dependence. Experimental RBE values were in excellent agreement with the LEM predicted values, indicating dose-averaged LET as a suitable predictor of proton biological effectiveness. Data were also used to validate a parameterized RBE model. Conclusions: The predicted biological dose delivered to a tumor region, based on the variable RBE inferred from the data, varies significantly with respect to the clinically used constant RBE of 1.1. The significant RBE increase at the distal end suggests also a potential to enhance optimization of treatment modalities such as LET painting of hypoxic tumors. The study highlights the limitation of adoption of a constant RBE for proton therapy and suggests approaches for fast implementation of RBE models in treatment planning.

  10. A track structure model of optically stimulated luminescence from Al 2O 3:C irradiated with 10-60 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andersen, Claus E.; Greilich, Steffen

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal from Al2O3:C irradiated with 10-60 MeV protons to estimate the potential use of this material as a proton dosimeter. After irradiation, OSL decay curves were read out and we used both the initial part and the total area of these curves as response signal. A precondition for optimal proton dosimetry is an LET-independent response and the experimental data showed such an independence at 0.3 Gy for the initial OSL signal. To understand the experimental results, we applied target and track structure theory. Here, the OSL signal is considered to be a result of target activation and the OSL proton signal is calculated from the OSL gamma signal and a radial dose distribution around the proton track. Although several simplifications were made to ease calculations, the classic track structure theory can qualitatively account for all the main features of the experimental data. We estimate a target radius to be between 30 and 150 nm and associate this radius with a charge migration distance in the crystal. The model calculations suggest that the dose and LET-dependency of the OSL signal is a result of an unique mixture of one- and two-hit targets. This implies that the initial OSL signal from Al2O3:C in general is not LET-independent at 0.3 Gy or lower doses. However, a mixture of the initial and total OSL signal could provide an LET-independent response in a given LET and dose interval.

  11. Critical current density of Nb3Sn wires after irradiation with 65MeV and 24GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, T.; Scheuerlein, C.; Richter, D.; Bottura, L.; Ballarino, A.; Flükiger, R.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial Nb3Sn wires with Ti and Ta additives (RRP process) and with Ta additives (PIT process) with a diameter of 1 mm have been irradiated at room temperature with protons of 65 MeV and of 24 GeV at various fluences up to 1×1021 p/m2. A steady increase of Jc vs. fluence was observed for all the wires up to the highest fluence. The observed increase of Jc at 4.2K in all wires was quite similar in spite of the very different proton energies. With increasing fluence. the radiation induced pinning force was found to increase. the enhancement Jc/Jco after 5.04×1020 p/m2 reaching 1.4 for Ta and 1.8 for Ti alloyed wires at 10T. The present results were quantitatively analysed by assuming a radiation induced point pinning mechanism in addition to grain boundary pinning. The results are compared with those of an ongoing neutron irradiation study undertaken on the same Nb3Sn wires in collaboration with the Atominstitut Vienna. Proton irradiation was found to produce considerably higher damage than neutron irradiation.

  12. K{alpha} x-ray satellite lines of Si induced in collisions with 1-3-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Kavcic, Matjaz

    2003-08-01

    The K{alpha} x-ray emission spectra of Si bombarded by 1-3-MeV protons were measured with a crystal spectrometer in Johansson geometry, enabling energy resolution below the natural linewidth of the measured K{alpha} line. The K{alpha}L{sup 1} and K{alpha}L{sup 2} (K{alpha}L{sup 1,2}) x-ray satellite lines appearing in these spectra as a result of the radiative decay of atomic states with one hole in the K shell and one or two in the L subshells were precisely measured. The energies and intensities of the main components that could be resolved within the satellite lines are given. It has been demonstrated that the latter do not depend on proton energy and are essentially the same as in photon-induced spectra. The overall K{alpha}L{sup 1} satellite intensity relative to the K{alpha} diagram line has been used to deduce the L-shell ionization probabilities induced in near-central proton collisions. The experimental values were compared to the theoretical values calculated with the semiclassical approximation, with the three-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo model, and the classical binary-encounter-based geometrical model.

  13. Correlated analysis of 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals using photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Wang, Yuhan; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Fu, Xu; Guo, Na; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV protons in CdZnTe crystals has been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques. A notable quenching of PL intensity is observed in the regions irradiated with a fluence of 6 × 1013 p/cm2, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. Moreover, the intensity of emission peak Dcomplex centered at 1.48 eV dominates in the PL spectrum obtained from irradiated regions, ascribed to the increase of interstitial dislocation loops and A centers. The intensity of TSC spectra in irradiated regions decreases compared to the virgin regions, resulting from the charge collection inefficiency caused by proton-induced recombination centers. By comparing the intensity of identified traps obtained from numerical fitting using simultaneous multiple peak analysis (SIMPA) method, it suggests that proton irradiation under such dose can introduce high density of dislocation and A-centers in CdZnTe crystals, consistent with PL results.

  14. Effects of high-dose 40 MeV proton irradiation on the electroluminescent and electrical performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, Rohit; Allums, K.K.; Abernathy, C.R.; Pearton, S.J.; Kim, Jihyun; Ren, F.; Dwivedi, R.; Fogarty, T.N.; Wilkins, R.

    2004-10-11

    InGaN multi-quantum-well light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the form of unpackaged die with emission wavelengths from 410 to 525 nm were irradiated with 40 MeV protons to doses of 5x10{sup 9}-5x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. The highest dose is equivalent to more than 100 years in low-earth orbit. The projected range of these protons is >50 {mu}m in GaN and thus they traverse the entire active region. The electroluminescent intensity from the LEDs decreased by only 15%-25% even for the highest doses and the reverse breakdown voltage increased by 1-2 V from their control values of {approx}21-29 V. The percentage change in breakdown voltage and electroluminescence intensity was independent of the initial emission wavelength over the range investigated, within experimental error. The GaN LEDs exhibit extremely good stability to these high-energy proton irradiations with no measurable change in contact resistance or contact morphology.

  15. Acceleration of protons to above 6 MeV using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pomerantz, I.; Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Gordon, D.; Sprangel, P.; Zigler, A.

    2012-07-09

    A scheme is presented for using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets for the generation of fast protons. This novel method may relax the requirements for very high laser intensities, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based ion acceleration system.

  16. SU-E-T-554: Monte Carlo Calculation of Source Terms and Attenuation Lengths for Neutrons Produced by 50–200 MeV Protons On Brass

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Mendez, J; Faddegon, B; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used TOPAS (TOPAS wraps and extends Geant4 for medical physicists) to compare Geant4 physics models with published data for neutron shielding calculations. Subsequently, we calculated the source terms and attenuation lengths (shielding data) of the total ambient dose equivalent (TADE) in concrete for neutrons produced by protons in brass. Methods: Stage1: The Bertini and Binary nuclear models available in Geant4 were compared with published attenuation at depth of the TADE in concrete and iron. Stage2: Shielding data of the TADE in concrete was calculated for 50– 200 MeV proton beams on brass. Stage3: Shielding data from Stage2 was extrapolated for 235 MeV proton beams. This data was used in a point-line-source analytical model to calculate the ambient dose per unit therapeutic dose at two locations inside one treatment room at the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center. Finally, we compared these results with experimental data and full TOPAS simulations. Results: At larger angles (∼130o) the TADE in concrete calculated with the Bertini model was about 9 times larger than that calculated with the Binary model. The attenuation length in concrete calculated with the Binary model agreed with published data within 7%±0.4% (statistical uncertainty) for the deepest regions and 5%±0.1% for shallower regions. For iron the agreement was within 3%±0.1%. The ambient dose per therapeutic dose calculated with the Binary model, relative to the experimental data, was a ratio of 0.93±0.16 and 1.23±0.24 for two locations. The analytical model overestimated the dose by four orders of magnitude. These differences are attributed to the complexity of the geometry. Conclusion: The Binary and Bertini models gave comparable results, with the Binary model giving the best agreement with published data at large angle. Shielding data we calculated using the Binary model is useful for fast shielding calculations with other analytical models. This work was supported by

  17. Production cross sections of products in the proton induced reactions on natNd in the energy region up to 45 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Chul; Kim, Kwangsoo; Song, Tae-Yung; Lee, Young-Ouk; Kim, Guinyun

    2015-11-01

    The production cross sections of 141,143,144,146,148m,148g,149,150Pm, 139m,147,149Nd, 138m,142gPr, and 139gCe in the natNd(p,x) reactions were determined by a stacked-foil activation technique for the proton energy range up to 45 MeV using the MC-50 cyclotron of Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured cross sections were compared with literature data as well as data from the TENDL-2014 library based on TALYS 1.6. The production cross sections of the above radionuclides are slightly higher than the literature data but are in general agreement with values in TENDL-2014 library except for 148mPm, 148gPm, 139mNd, and 142gPr. The thick target integral yields of the produced radionuclides were also deducted from the measured cross sections.

  18. Measurement of Recoil Losses and Ranges for Spallation Products Produced in Proton Interactions with Al, Si, Mg at 200 and 500 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with extraterrestrial materials to produce a variety of spallation products. If these cosmogenic nuclides are produced within an inclusion in such material, then an important consideration is the loss of the product nuclei, which recoil out of the inclusion. Of course, at the same time, some atoms of the product nuclei under study may be knocked into the inclusion from the surrounding material, which is likely to have a different composition to that of the inclusion [1]. For example, Ne-21 would be produced in presolar grains, such as SiC, when irradiated in interstellar space. However, to calculate a presolar age, one needs to know how much 21Ne is retained in the grain. For small grains, the recoil losses might be large [2, 3] To study this effect under laboratory conditions, recoil measurements were made using protons with energies from 66 - 1600 MeV on Si, Al and Ba targets [3, 4, 5].

  19. Measurement and modelling of radionuclide production in thick spherical targets irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Lange, H.J.; Leya, I.; Luepke, M.; Herpers, U.; Meltzow, B.; Roesel, R.; Filges, D.; Cloth, P.; Dragovitsch, P.

    1994-12-31

    Two thick spherical targets made of gabbro and of steel with radii of 25 and 10 cm, respectively, were isotropically irradiated with 1.6 GeV protons at the Saturne accelerator at Laboratoire National Saturne/Saclay in order to simulate the interactions of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) protons with stony and iron meteoroids. The artificial meteoroids contained large numbers of individual small targets of up to 27 elements, in which the depth-dependent production of residual nuclides was measured by {gamma}-, accelerator and conventional mass spectrometry. Theoretical production depth profiles were derived by folding depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary particles calculated by the HERMES code system with experimental and theoretical production rates shortcomings of the cross section data base can be distinguished and medium-energy neutron cross sections can be improved.

  20. Relative biological effectiveness of the 60-MeV therapeutic proton beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, Poland.

    PubMed

    Słonina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Swakoń, Jan; Kabat, Damian; Grzanka, Leszek; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Sowa, Urszula

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, the first one to operate in Poland. RBE was assessed at the surviving fractions (SFs) of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.37, for normal human fibroblasts from three cancer patients. The cells were irradiated near the Bragg peak of the pristine beam and at three depths within a 28.4-mm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). Reference radiation was provided by 6-MV X-rays. The mean RBE value at SF = 0.01 for fibroblasts irradiated near the Bragg peak of pristine beam ranged between 1.06 and 1.15. The mean RBE values at SF = 0.01 for these cells exposed at depths of 2, 15, and 27 mm of the SOBP ranged between 0.95-1.00, 0.97-1.02, and 1.05-1.11, respectively. A trend was observed for RBE values to increase with survival level and with depth in the SOBP: at SF = 0.37 and at the depth of 27 mm, RBE values attained their maximum (1.19-1.24). The RBE values estimated at SF = 0.01 using normal human fibroblasts for the 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the IFJ PAN in Kraków are close to values of 1.0 and 1.1, used in clinical practice.

  1. Relative biological effectiveness of the 60-MeV therapeutic proton beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, Poland.

    PubMed

    Słonina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Swakoń, Jan; Kabat, Damian; Grzanka, Leszek; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Sowa, Urszula

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, the first one to operate in Poland. RBE was assessed at the surviving fractions (SFs) of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.37, for normal human fibroblasts from three cancer patients. The cells were irradiated near the Bragg peak of the pristine beam and at three depths within a 28.4-mm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). Reference radiation was provided by 6-MV X-rays. The mean RBE value at SF = 0.01 for fibroblasts irradiated near the Bragg peak of pristine beam ranged between 1.06 and 1.15. The mean RBE values at SF = 0.01 for these cells exposed at depths of 2, 15, and 27 mm of the SOBP ranged between 0.95-1.00, 0.97-1.02, and 1.05-1.11, respectively. A trend was observed for RBE values to increase with survival level and with depth in the SOBP: at SF = 0.37 and at the depth of 27 mm, RBE values attained their maximum (1.19-1.24). The RBE values estimated at SF = 0.01 using normal human fibroblasts for the 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the IFJ PAN in Kraków are close to values of 1.0 and 1.1, used in clinical practice. PMID:25037857

  2. Measurement of the inelastic branch of the stellar 14O(α,p)17F reaction occurring in the explosive burning in Novae and X-ray bursters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Woods, P. J.; Davinson, T.; Aliotta, M.; Buescler, J.; Clement, E.; Delahaye, P.; Hass, M.; Jenkins, D. G.; Kumar, V.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Neyskens, P.; Raabe, R.; Robinson, A. P.; van der Walle, J.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.

    2010-03-01

    The inelastic component of the key astrophysical resonance (1-, E=6.15 MeV) in the 14O(α,p)17F reaction has been studied by using the resonant scattering of 17F+p. The experiment was done at REX-ISOLDE CERN with the Miniball setup. The thick target method in inverse kinematics was utilized in the present experiment where a 44.2 MeV 17F beam bombarded a˜40μm thick (CH2)n target. The inelastic scattering protons in coincidence with the de-excited 495 keV γ rays have been clearly seen and they are from the inelastic branch to the first excited state in 17F following decay of the 1- resonance in 18Ne. Some preliminary results are reported.

  3. Beam normal single spin asymmetry in forward angle inelastic electron-proton scattering using the q-weak apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, FNU

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (Bn) on H2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic Bn is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of Bn background studies, we made the first measurement of Bn in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be Bn = 42.82 +- 2.45 (stat) +- 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy Ebeam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 degrees, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. Bn from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma*DeltaDelta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ˜10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system has

  4. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    ., Nuruzzaman

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system

  5. A large, precise set of polarization observables for deuteron-proton breakup at 130 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, E.; Biegun, A.; Klos, B.; Micherdzinska, A.; Zipper, W.; Kistryn, St.; Bodek, K.; Ciepal, I.; Golak, J.; Skibinski, R.; Sworst, R.; Witala, H.; Zejma, J.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Deltuva, A.; Fonseca, A. C.; Epelbaum, E.; Nogga, A.

    2008-04-29

    High precision vector A{sub x},A{sub y} and tensor A{sub xx},A{sub xy},A{sub yy} analyzing powers for the {sup 1}H(d-vector,pp)n breakup reaction were measured at 130 MeV beam energy with the detection system covering a large part of the phase space. Results are compared with rigorous theoretical calculations based on realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, also with a so-called three-nucleon force included, as well as on chiral perturbation theory. Theoretical predictions generally describe the data quite well, but in some regions discrepancies have been observed, which indicate incompleteness of the present-day treatment of three nucleon dynamics.

  6. Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Transport Calculations Involving Incident Neutrons and Protons of Energy Up to 100 MeV.

    1993-08-09

    Version 00 This data base was developed for use in Monte Carlo or discrete ordinate transport codes, for example, the general Monte Carlo code MCNP. Various modules of the NJOY processing code system have been enhanced to permit processing of the ENDF/B-VI formatted evaluations into both continuous-energy and multi-group format. The transport data files for all 18 projectile-plus-target systems have been processed through NJOY, and coupled multi-particle, multi-group transport libraries for MCNP now exist. Inmore » addition, pointwise MCNP libraries to 100 MeV for incident neutrons have been prepared for the nine targets. The production version of the MCNP code is being modified to handle the new pointwise libraries. The production version of MCNP already supports the use of coupled multi-group libraries.« less

  7. Measurement of the neutron fields produced by a 62 MeV proton beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amgarou, K.; Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Carinci, G.; Russo, S.

    2011-10-01

    The experimental characterization of the neutron fields produced as parasitic effect in medical accelerators is assuming an increased importance for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. Medical accelerators are diverse in terms of particle type (electrons or hadrons) and energy, but the radiation fields around them have in common (provided that a given threshold energy is reached) the presence of neutrons with energy span over several orders of magnitude. Due to the large variability of neutron energy, field or dosimetry measurements in these workplaces are very complex, and in general, cannot be performed with ready-to-use commercial instruments. In spite of its poor energy resolution, the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. The energy range of this instrument is limited to E<20 MeV if only polyethylene spheres are used, but can be extended to hundreds of MeV by including metal-loaded spheres (extended range BSS, indicated with ERBSS). With the aim of providing useful data to the scientific community involved in neutron measurements at hadron therapy facilities, an ERBSS experiment was carried out at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) of INFN—LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud), where a proton beam routinely used for ophthalmic cancer treatments is available. The 62 MeV beam was directed towards a PMMA phantom, simulating the patient, and two neutron measurement points were established at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam-line. Here the ERBSS of UAB (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona— Grup de Física de les Radiacions) and INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were exposed to characterize the "forward" and "sideward" proton-induced neutron fields. The use of two ERBSS characterized by different set of spheres, central detectors, and independently established and

  8. Proton-impact ionization cross sections of adenine measured at 0.5 and 2.0 MeV by electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-11-01

    Double-differential ionization cross sections (DDCSs) of vapor-phase adenine molecules (C5H5N5) by 0.5- and 2.0-MeV proton impact have been measured by the electron spectroscopy method. Electrons ejected from adenine were analyzed by a 45∘ parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer over an energy range of 1.0-1000 eV at emission angles from 15∘ to 165∘. Single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) and total ionization cross sections (TICSs) were also deduced. It was found from the Platzman plot, defined as SDCSs divided by the classical Rutherford knock-on cross sections per target electron, that the SDCSs at higher electron energies are proportional to the total number of valence electrons (50) of adenine, while those at low-energy electrons are highly enhanced due to dipole and higher-order interactions. The present results of TICS are in fairly good agreement with recent classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, and moreover, a simple analytical formula gives nearly equivalent cross sections in magnitude at the incident proton energies investigated.

  9. Stopping power and energy loss straggling of thin Formvar foil for 0.3-2.7 MeV protons and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammeri, S.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ourabah, S.; Msimanga, M.; Chekirine, M.; Guesmia, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stopping power and energy loss straggling data for protons (1H+) and alpha particles (4He+) crossing Formvar thin polymeric foils (thickness of ˜0.3 μm) have been measured in the energy range (0.3-2.7) MeV by using the indirect transmission technique. The determined stopping power data were compared to SRIM-2010, PSTAR or ASTAR calculation codes and then analyzed in term of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionization potential . A resulting value of ≈(69.2±1.8) eV was deduced from proton stopping data. The measured straggling data were corrected from surface roughness effects due to target thickness inhomogeneity observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The obtained data were then compared to derived straggling values by Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston's classical theories or by Yang's empirical formula. A deviation of ˜40%-80% from the Bohr's straggling value has been observed for all reported energies, suggesting that the Bohr theory cannot be correctly applied to describe the electronic energy loss straggling process with the used low thickness of Formvar foil. The inner-shell contribution of target electrons to energy loss process is also advanced to explain the observed deviation from experiment in case of He+ ions. Finally, the reliability of Bragg's additivity rule was discussed in case of stopping power and straggling results.

  10. Measurement of proton induced thick target γ-ray yields on B, N, Na, Al and Si from 2.5 to 4.1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Ferraccioli, G.; Melon, B.; Nannini, A.; Perego, A.; Salvestrini, L.; Lagoyannis, A.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.

    2016-01-01

    Thick target yields for proton induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) on low-Z nuclei, namely B, N, Na, Al and Si, were measured for proton energies from 2.5 to 4.1 MeV and emission angles of 0°, 45° and 90°, at the 3 MV Tandetron laboratory of INFN-LABEC in Florence. The studied reactions were: 10B(p,α‧γ)7Be (Eγ = 429 keV), 10B(p,p‧γ)10B (Eγ = 718 keV) and 11B(p,p‧γ)11B (Eγ = 2125 keV) for boron; 14N(p,p‧γ)14N (Eγ = 2313 keV) for nitrogen; 23Na(p,p‧γ)23Na (Eγ = 441 and 1636 keV) and 23Na(p,α‧γ)20Ne (Eγ = 1634 keV) for sodium; 27Al(p,p‧γ)27Al (Eγ = 844 and 1014 keV) and 27Al(p,α‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV) for aluminum; 28Si(p,p‧γ)28Si (Eγ = 1779 keV) and 29Si(p,p‧γ)29Si (Eγ = 1273 keV) for silicon. The PIGE thick target yields have been measured with an overall uncertainty typically better than 10%. The use of the measured thick target yield to benchmark and validate experimental cross sections available in the literature is demonstrated.

  11. Proton-impact ionization cross sections of adenine measured at 0.5 and 2.0 MeV by electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-11-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections (DDCSs) of vapor-phase adenine molecules (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 0.5- and 2.0-MeV proton impact have been measured by the electron spectroscopy method. Electrons ejected from adenine were analyzed by a 45 Degree-Sign parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer over an energy range of 1.0-1000 eV at emission angles from 15 Degree-Sign to 165 Degree-Sign . Single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) and total ionization cross sections (TICSs) were also deduced. It was found from the Platzman plot, defined as SDCSs divided by the classical Rutherford knock-on cross sections per target electron, that the SDCSs at higher electron energies are proportional to the total number of valence electrons (50) of adenine, while those at low-energy electrons are highly enhanced due to dipole and higher-order interactions. The present results of TICS are in fairly good agreement with recent classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, and moreover, a simple analytical formula gives nearly equivalent cross sections in magnitude at the incident proton energies investigated.

  12. Cross sections for production of the 15.10 MeV and other astrophysically significant gamma-ray lines through excitation and spallation of sup 12 C and sup 16 O with protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, F. L.; Werntz, C. W.; Crannell, C. J.; Trombka, J. I.; Chang, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The ratio of the flux of 15.10-MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.438-MeV gamma rays resulting from excitation of the corresponding states in C-12 as a sensitive measure of the spectrum of the exciting particles produced in solar flares and other cosmic sources. These gamma rays are produced predominantly by interactions with C-12 and O-16, both of which are relatively abundant in the solar photosphere. Gamma ray production cross sections for proton interactions have been reported previously for all important channels except for the production of 15.10-MeV gamma rays from O-16. The first reported measurement of the 15.10-MeV gamma ray production cross section from p + O-16 is presented here. The University of Maryland cyclotron was employed to produce 40-, 65-, and 86-MeV protons which interacted with CH2 and BeO targets. The resultant gamma ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector at 70, 90, 110, 125, and 140 degrees relative to the direction of the incident beam for each proton energy. Other gamma ray lines resulting from direct excitation and spallation reactions with C-12 and 0-16 were observed as well, and their gamma ray production cross sections described.

  13. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen.

    PubMed

    Jana, M R; Chung, M; Freemire, B; Hanlet, P; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Palmer, M; Schwarz, T; Tollestrup, A; Torun, Y; Yonehara, K

    2013-06-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and∕or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  14. Impact of x-ray dose on the CR-39 response to 1-9 MeV protons with application to proton spectroscopy at OMEGA and NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.

    2014-10-01

    CR-39 is a clear plastic nuclear track detector utilized in many nuclear diagnostics fielded in large-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray fluences in ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. A thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray machine was used to expose CR-39 to various x-ray doses to determine their impact on the CR-39 response to protons. This x-ray machine emits Cu- α line-radiation at 8 keV and has been absolutely calibrated using radiochromic film. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to D3He-protons generated by the MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays. For example, a dose of 60 +/- 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of 53% in the track diameter, while a dose of 5 +/- 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of 7.5% in the track diameter. Doses of approximately 5Gy are typical on CR-39 detectors used to diagnose ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF. The resulting data will be used to evaluate how x-ray doses received by CR-39 in OMEGA and NIF experiments affect the recorded data. This undergraduate research was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLE, and LLNL.

  15. Experimental depth dose curves of a 67.5 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation

    PubMed Central

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Shin, Jungwook; Castenada, Carlos M.; Ramos-Méndez, José; Daftari, Inder K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure depth dose curves for a 67.5 ± 0.1 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: Depth dose curves were measured in 2 beam lines. Protons in the raw beam line traversed a Ta scattering foil, 0.1016 or 0.381 mm thick, a secondary emission monitor comprised of thin Al foils, and a thin Kapton exit window. The beam energy and peak width and the composition and density of material traversed by the beam were known with sufficient accuracy to permit benchmark quality measurements. Diodes for charged particle dosimetry from two different manufacturers were used to scan the depth dose curves with 0.003 mm depth reproducibility in a water tank placed 300 mm from the exit window. Depth in water was determined with an uncertainty of 0.15 mm, including the uncertainty in the water equivalent depth of the sensitive volume of the detector. Parallel-plate chambers were used to verify the accuracy of the shape of the Bragg peak and the peak-to-plateau ratio measured with the diodes. The uncertainty in the measured peak-to-plateau ratio was 4%. Depth dose curves were also measured with a diode for a Bragg curve and treatment beam spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) on the beam line used for eye treatment. The measurements were compared to Monte Carlo simulation done with geant4 using topas. Results: The 80% dose at the distal side of the Bragg peak for the thinner foil was at 37.47 ± 0.11 mm (average of measurement with diodes from two different manufacturers), compared to the simulated value of 37.20 mm. The 80% dose for the thicker foil was at 35.08 ± 0.15 mm, compared to the simulated value of 34.90 mm. The measured peak-to-plateau ratio was within one standard deviation experimental uncertainty of the simulated result for the thinnest foil and two standard deviations for the thickest foil. It was necessary to include the collimation in the simulation, which had a more pronounced effect on the peak-to-plateau ratio for the

  16. Efficient production of a collimated MeV proton beam from a polyimide target driven by an intense femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Yogo, A.; Orimo, S.; Ogura, K.; Ma, J.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kiriyama, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Choi, I. W.; Kim, C. M.; Jeong, T. M.; Yu, T. J.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Hafz, N.; Pae, K. H.

    2008-05-15

    High-flux energetic protons whose maximum energies are up to 4 MeV are generated by an intense femtosecond titanium:sapphire laser pulse interacting with 7.5, 12.5, and 25 {mu}m thick polyimide tape targets. Laser pulse with an energy of 1.7 J and with a duration of 34 fs is focused with an f/3.4 parabolic mirror giving an intensity of 3x10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}. The main pulse to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) intensity contrast ratio is 2.5x10{sup 7}. The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the proton kinetic energies is achieved to be {approx}3%, which is comparable to or even higher than those achieved in the previous works; using nanometer-thick targets, in combination with the short-pulse lasers that have almost the same pulse width and the intensity but different main pulse to ASE intensity contrast of {approx}10{sup 10} [Neely et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 021502 (2006)], in which the authors claim that the main mechanism is target normal sheath acceleration; or using the 7.5 {mu}m thick polyimide target, in combination with the short-pulse laser, which has almost the same pulse width and the intensity, but the main pulse to ASE intensity contrast ratio was controlled to be 2.5x10{sup 5} [Yogo et al., Phys. Rev. E 77, 016401 (2008)], in which the authors claim the efficient acceleration by the mechanism of the underdense plasma model. The contrast ratio of the present experiment is in between these two experiments. The possible mechanism of this regime is discussed.

  17. Neutron spectral and angular distribution measurements for 113 and 256 MeV protons on range-thick Al and sup 238 U targets using the foil activation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Intasorn, A.

    1989-07-01

    Second neutron yields, energy spectra, and angular distributions have been measured at seven angles from 0 to 150{degree} for 113 and 256 MeV protons stopped in range-thick targets of aluminum and depleted uranium ({sup 238}U). Thin foil stacks of ten different materials were activated by secondary neutrons at distances of 20--30 cm from the targets. Following each irradiation, 30--40 different activation products were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. These activation rates were then used to adjust neutron energy spectra calculated by the HETC computer code. Activation cross sections were taken from ENDF/BV below 20 MeV, from literature values tested in Be(d,n) fields up to 50 MeV, and from proton spallation data and calculations from 50--250 MeV. Spectral adjustments were made with the STAY'SL computer code using a least-squares technique to minimize {chi}{sup 2} for a covariance matrix determined from uncertainties in the measured activities, cross sections, and calculated flux spectra. Neutron scattering effects were estimated from foil packets irradiated at different distances from the target. Proton effects were measured with (p,n) reactions. Systematic differences were found between the adjusted and calculated neutron spectra, namely, that HETC underpredicts the neutron flux at back angles by a factor of 2--3 and slightly overpredicts the flux at forward angles. 19 refs., 23 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Annual Cosmic Ray Spectra from 250 MeV up to 1.6 GeV from 1995 - 2014 Measured with the Electron Proton Helium Instrument onboard SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, P.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.

    2016-03-01

    The solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can be studied in detail by examining long-term variations of the GCR energy spectrum ( e.g. on the scales of a solar cycle). With almost 20 years of data, the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) onboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is well suited for this kind of investigation. Although the design of the instrument is optimised to measure proton and helium isotope spectra up to 50 MeV nucleon^{-1}, the capability exists to determine proton energy spectra from 250 MeV up to above 1.6 GeV. Therefore we developed a sophisticated inversion method to calculate such proton spectra. The method relies on a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument and a simplified spacecraft model that calculates the energy-response function of EPHIN for electrons, protons, and heavier ions. For validation purposes, proton spectra based on this method are compared to various balloon missions and space instrumentation. As a result we present annual galactic cosmic-ray spectra from 1995 to 2014.

  19. Evaluation of cross sections for Lα x-ray production by up to 4 MeV protons in representative elements from silver to uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapicki, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    Over the last two decades, Lα x-ray production cross sections have been fitted with a number of empirical formulae. Cross sections obtained from these formulae are averaged and fitted to a new empirical formula. These new empirical cross sections are compared with the results of the plane-wave Born approximation and the ECPSSR theory of Brandt and Lapicki (1981 Phys. Rev. A 23 1717). They are also gauged by the ECPSSR theory that has been corrected with a united atom approach in slow collisions, evaluated with Dirac-Hartree-Slater instead of screened hydrogenic wavefunctions, modified for intra-shell couplings as well as the change of the atomic parameters due to multiple ionizations. The effects of appropriately normalized intra-shell coupling factors and of multiple ionization were found to be small and essentially offset each other. The role of different sets of atomic parameters in conversion of the predictions of these ionization theories for Lα x-ray production in elements from the 47 <= Z2 <= 92 range of target atoms bombarded by up to 4 MeV protons is examined, and the selection of the optimal combination of ionization theory and atomic parameters for a reliable data base for PIXE analysis of elements heavier than palladium is discussed.

  20. M -shell x-ray production by 0. 6--4. 0-MeV protons in ten elements from hafnium to thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Pajek, M. ); Kobzev, A.P.; Sandrik, R.; Skrypnik, A.V. ); Ilkhamov, R.A.; Khusmurodov, S.H. ); Lapicki, G. )

    1990-07-01

    {ital M}-shell x-ray production cross sections for selected heavy elements, namely, {sub 72}Hf, {sub 73}Ta, {sub 74}W, {sub 75}Re, {sub 76}Os, {sub 77}Ir, {sub 78}Pt, {sub 79}Au, {sub 83}Bi, and {sub 90}Th, were measured for protons of energy 0.6--4.0 MeV. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of the first Born and semiclassical approximations for {ital M}-shell ionization; these data are also compared with the theory that accounts for the projectile's energy loss and Coulomb deflection as well as for the target's {ital M}-shell electron perturbed stationary state and relativistic nature (ECPSSR). Generally, fair agreement between the data and the ECPSSR theory is found. Some systematical discrepancies observed for the lightest elements (Hf, Ta, and W) are explained as possible ambiguities in the {ital M}-shell Coster-Kronig factors and fluorescence yields, which were used to convert theoretical {ital M}-subshell ionization cross sections to the total {ital M}-x-ray production cross sections. The experimental total {ital M}-shell ionization cross sections were obtained from measured {ital M}-x-ray cross sections using the proposed approximate average fluorescence yield {bar {omega}}{sub {ital M}} that relies on two fluorescence yields and the Coster-Kronig factor for {ital only} {ital M}{sub 4} and {ital M}{sub 5} subshells.

  1. North/South Hemispheric Periodicities in the {>} 25 MeV Solar Proton Event Rate During the Rising and Peak Phases of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2016-08-01

    We present evidence that >25~MeV solar proton events show a clustering in time at intervals of about six months that persisted during the rising and peak phases of Solar Cycle 24. This phenomenon is most clearly demonstrated by considering events originating in the northern or southern solar hemispheres separately. We examine how these variations in the solar energetic particle (SEP) event rate are related to other phenomena, such as hemispheric sunspot numbers and areas, rates of coronal mass ejections, and the mean solar magnetic field. Most obviously, the SEP event rate closely follows the sunspot number and area in the same hemisphere. The variations of about six months are associated with features in many of the other parameters we examine, indicating that they are just one signature of the episodic development of Cycle 24. They may be related to periodicities of about 150 days reported in various solar and interplanetary phenomena during previous solar cycles. The clear presence of periodicities of about six months in Cycle 24 that evolve independently in each hemisphere contradicts a scenario suggested by McIntosh et al. ( Nature Com. 6, 6491, 2015) for the variational timescales of solar magnetism.

  2. 1.00 MeV proton radiation resistance studies of single-junction and single gap dual-junction amorphous-silicon alloy solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdulaziz, Salman; Payson, J. S.; Li, Yang; Woodyard, James R.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation resistance of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H single-junction and a-Si:H dual-junction solar cells was conducted. The cells were irradiated with 1.00-MeV protons with fluences of 1.0 x 10 to the 14th, 5.0 x 10 to the 14th and 1.0 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm and characterized using I-V and quantum efficiency measurements. The radiation resistance of single-junction cells cannot be used to explain the behavior of dual-junction cells at a fluence of 1.0 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm. The a-Si H single-junction cells degraded the least of the three cells; a-SiGe:H single-junction cells showed the largest reduction in short-circuit current, while a-Si:H dual-junction cells exhibited the largest degradation in the open-circuit voltage. The quantum efficiency of the cells degraded more in the red part of the spectrum; the bottom junction degrades first in dual-junction cells.

  3. Cascade phonon-assisted trapping of positrons by divacancies in n-FZ-Si(P) single crystals irradiated with 15 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Kessler, C.; Elsayed, M.; Oganesyan, G. A.; Kozlovski, V. V.

    2014-02-01

    The trapping of positrons by the radiation defects in moderately doped oxygen-lean n-FZ-Si(P) single crystal irradiated with 15 MeV protons has been investigated in a comparative way using the positron lifetime spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements. The experiments were carried out within a wide temperature interval ranging from 25 K - 29 K to 300 K. The positron trapping rate for divacancies was reconstructed in the course of many-stage isochronal annealing. The concentration and the charged states of divacancies (V2- and V2--) were estimated. The temperature dependency of the trapping cross section of positrons by the negatively charged divacancies is in a good agreement with the data of calculations based on the assumptions of the cascade phonon-assisted mechanism of exchange of the energy between the positron and acoustic long-wave phonons. Obeying ˜ T-3 law, the cross-section of the trapping of positrons by divacancies changes considerably ranging from ˜1.7×10-12 cm2 (66 - 100 K) to ˜2×10-14 cm2 (≈ 250 K). The characteristic length of trapping of the positron by V2-- divacancy was estimated to be l0(V2--)≈(3.4±0.2)×10-8 cm.

  4. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N.; Thopan, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  5. Effect of the energy of recoil atoms on conductivity compensation in moderately doped n-Si and n-SiC under irradiation with MeV electrons and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Emtsev, V. V.; Oganesyan, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    Processes of radiation defect formation and conductivity compensation in silicon and silicon carbide irradiated with 0.9 MeV electrons are considered in comparison with the electron irradiation at higher energies. The experimental values of the carrier removal rate at the electron energy of 0.9 MeV are nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the similar values of the parameter for higher energy electrons (6-9 MeV). At the same time, the formation cross-section of primary radiation defects (Frenkel pairs, FPs) is nearly energy-independent in this range. It is assumed that these differences are due to the influence exerted by the energy of primary knocked-on atoms (PKAs). As the PKA energy increases, the average distance between the genetically related FPs grows and, as a consequence, the fraction of FPs unrecombined under irradiation becomes larger. The FP recombination radius is estimated (∼1.1 nm), which makes it possible to ascertain the charge state of the recombining components. Second, the increase in the PKA energy enables formation of new, more complex secondary radiation defects. At electron energies exceeding 15 MeV, the average PKA energies are closer to the values obtained under irradiation with 1 MeV protons, compared with an electron irradiation at the same energy. As for the radiation-induced defect formation, the irradiation of silicon with MeV protons can be, in principle, regarded as a superposition of the irradiation with 1 MeV electrons and that with silicon ions having energy of ∼1 keV, with the "source" of silicon ions generating these ions uniformly across the sample thickness.

  6. The Relationship Between CME Properties in the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS Catalogs and ?25 MeV Solar Proton Event Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    overcome some of these problems. In particular, a spacecraft in quadrature with the solar source of an SEP event should observe the 'true' width and speed of the associated CME. However, STEREO CME parameters are derived using the CACTUS method, and cannot be directly compared with the LASCO CDAW catalog values that have been so widely used for many years. In this study, we will examine the relationship between the properties of CMEs in various catalogs and the intensities of a large sample of particle events that include ˜25 MeV protons in cycles 23 and 24. In particular, we will compare the proton intensity-speed relationships obtained using the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS LASCO catalogs, and also using the CACTUS values from whichever spacecraft (STEREO A, B or SOHO) is best in quadrature with the solar event. We will also examine whether there is any correlation between the width of the CMEs in the automated catalogs and proton intensity, and whether a combination of CME speed and width might improve the correlation with proton intensity.

  7. SU-E-T-408: Determination of KQ,Q0-Factors From Water and Graphite Calorimetry in a 60 MeV Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Rossomme, S; Renaud, J; Sarfehnia, A; Seuntjens, J; Lee, N; Thomas, R; Kacperek, A; Bertrand, D; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To reduce the uncertainty of the beam quality correction factor kQ,Q0, for scattered proton beams (SPB). This factor is used in dosimetry protocols, to determine absorbed dose-to-water with ionization chambers. For the Roos plane parallel chambers (RPPICs), the IAEA TRS-398 protocol estimates kQ,Q0-factor to be 1.004(for a beam quality Rres=2 g.cm{sup 2}), with an uncertainty of 2.1%. Methods: A graphite calorimeter (GCal), a water calorimeter (WCal) and RPPICs were exposed, in a single experiment, to a 60 MeV non-modulated SPB. RPPICs were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose-to-water in a 20 MeV electron beam. The calibration coefficient is traceable to NPL's absorbed dose standards. Chamber measurements were corrected for environmental conditions, recombination and polarity. The WCal corrections include heat loss, heat defect and vessel perturbation. The GCal corrections include heat loss and absorbed dose conversion. Except for heat loss correction and its uncertainty in the WCal system, all major corrections were included in the analysis. Other minor corrections, such as beam profile non-uniformity, are still to be evaluated. Experimental kQ,Q0-factors were derived by comparing the results obtained with both calorimeters and ionometry. Results: The absorbed dose-to-water from both calorimeters was found to be within 1.3% with an uncertainty of 1.2%. kQ,Q0-factor for a RPPIC was found to be 0.998 and 1.011, with a standard uncertainty of 1.4% and 0.9% when the dose is based on the GCal and the WCal, respectively. Conclusion: Results suggest the possibility to determine kQ,Q0-values for PPICs in SPB with a lower uncertainty than specified in the TRS-398 thereby helping to reduce uncertainty on absorbed dose-to-water. The agreement between calorimeters confirms the possibility to use GCal or WCal as primary standard in SPB. Because of the dose conversion, the use of GCal may lead to slightly higher

  8. Spatial measure of reaction size in proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Makoto; Iwasaki, Masataka; Otani, Reiji; Tomita, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The microscopic coupled-channel (MCC) calculations for proton + 12C inelastic scattering are performed in the energy range of Ep = 29.95 MeV to 65 MeV. The nuclear interactions for the proton -12C system are constructed from the folding model, which employs the internal wave function of 12C, obtained from the 3α resonating group method (3α RGM), and an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction of the density-dependent Michigan three-range Yukawa (DDM3Y). The MCC calculation with the 3α RGM + DDM3Y nicely reproduces all of the differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering in the angular range of θc.m. = 30° to 120°. We introduce a scattering radius, which characterizes a spatial size of the scattering area, from partial wave decompositions of an angle-integrated cross section. The scattering radii for the elastic scattering and the various inelastic channels, which involve the rotational or vibrational excitations and the 3α excitations in 12C, are derived. We found that the scattering radii for the inelastic channels with a well developed 3α structure are strongly enhanced in comparison to the scattering radii for the elastic and collective channels. This enhancement of the scattering radius for the 3α channel strongly suggests that the scattering radius is sensitive to a size of the intrinsic structure of the finally excited state in the scattering process.

  9. The influence of crystallinity degree on the glycine decomposition induced by 1 MeV proton bombardment in space analog conditions.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Sergio; Mendes, Luiz A V; Bordalo, Vinicius; Guaman, Christian F M; Ponciano, Cássia R; da Silveira, Enio F

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is the simplest proteinaceous amino acid and is present in all life-forms on Earth. In aqueous solutions, it appears mainly as zwitterion glycine (+NH3CH2COO-); however, in solid phase, it may be found in amorphous or crystalline (α, β, and γ) forms. The crystalline forms differ from each other by the packing of zwitterions in the unitary cells and by the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. This molecular species has been extensively detected in carbonaceous meteorites and was recently observed in the cometary samples returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. In space, glycine is exposed to several radiation fields at different temperatures. We present an experimental study on the destruction of zwitterionic glycine crystals at room temperature by 1 MeV protons, in which the dependence of the destruction rates of the α-glycine and β-glycine crystals on bombardment fluence is investigated. The samples were analyzed in situ by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry at different proton fluences. The experiments occurred under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at the Van de Graaff accelerator lab at the Pontifical Catholic University at Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Brazil. For low fluences, the dissociation cross section of α-glycine was observed to be 2.5×10(-14) cm2, a value roughly 5 times higher than the dissociation cross section found for β-glycine. The estimated half-lives of α-glycine and β-glycine zwitterionic forms extrapolated to the Earth orbit environment are 9×10(5) and 4×10(6) years, respectively. In the diffuse interstellar medium the estimated values are 1 order of magnitude lower. These results suggest that pristine interstellar β-glycine is the one most likely to survive the hostile environments of space radiation. A small feature around 1650-1700 cm(-1), tentatively attributed to an amide functional group, was observed in the IR spectra of irradiated samples, suggesting that cosmic rays may induce peptide bond synthesis in

  10. The influence of crystallinity degree on the glycine decomposition induced by 1 MeV proton bombardment in space analog conditions.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Sergio; Mendes, Luiz A V; Bordalo, Vinicius; Guaman, Christian F M; Ponciano, Cássia R; da Silveira, Enio F

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is the simplest proteinaceous amino acid and is present in all life-forms on Earth. In aqueous solutions, it appears mainly as zwitterion glycine (+NH3CH2COO-); however, in solid phase, it may be found in amorphous or crystalline (α, β, and γ) forms. The crystalline forms differ from each other by the packing of zwitterions in the unitary cells and by the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. This molecular species has been extensively detected in carbonaceous meteorites and was recently observed in the cometary samples returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. In space, glycine is exposed to several radiation fields at different temperatures. We present an experimental study on the destruction of zwitterionic glycine crystals at room temperature by 1 MeV protons, in which the dependence of the destruction rates of the α-glycine and β-glycine crystals on bombardment fluence is investigated. The samples were analyzed in situ by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry at different proton fluences. The experiments occurred under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at the Van de Graaff accelerator lab at the Pontifical Catholic University at Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Brazil. For low fluences, the dissociation cross section of α-glycine was observed to be 2.5×10(-14) cm2, a value roughly 5 times higher than the dissociation cross section found for β-glycine. The estimated half-lives of α-glycine and β-glycine zwitterionic forms extrapolated to the Earth orbit environment are 9×10(5) and 4×10(6) years, respectively. In the diffuse interstellar medium the estimated values are 1 order of magnitude lower. These results suggest that pristine interstellar β-glycine is the one most likely to survive the hostile environments of space radiation. A small feature around 1650-1700 cm(-1), tentatively attributed to an amide functional group, was observed in the IR spectra of irradiated samples, suggesting that cosmic rays may induce peptide bond synthesis in

  11. Cross Sections for the Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides with Protons up to 400 MeV for the Interpretation of Cosmic-Ray-produced Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiekel, Th.; Rosel, R.; Herpers, U.; Bodemann, R.; Leya, I.; Gloris, M.; Michel, R.; Dittrich, B.; Kubik, P.; Suter, M.

    1993-07-01

    Integral excitation functions of the cosmogenic nuclides are the basic requirement for the interpretation of interactions between cosmic ray particles and extraterrestrial and terrestrial matter. Together with the knowledge of primary and secondary particle fields inside an irradiated body, model calculations can be developed to interpret abundances of cosmogenic nuclides in dependencies of the irradiation history of the irradiated body and of the cosmic particle ray itself. The quality of those model calculations depends on the quality of the available cross-section database, which is neither comprehensive nor reliable for the most important nuclides like the long-lived radionuclides (i.e., 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca) and the stable rare gas isotopes. For a systematic investigation in this field of science we carried out several irradiation experiments with protons in the energy region between 45 MeV and 400 MeV at the Paul Scherrer Institut (Villigen, Switzerland) and the Laboratoire Nationale Saturne (Saclay, France) using the stacked foil technique. We included 21 different target elements with Z between 6 and 79 (C, N as Si3N4, O as SiO2, Mg, Al, Si, Ca as CaC2H2O4, Ti, V, Mn as Mn/Ni alloy, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Sr as SrF2, Y, Zr, Nb, Rh, Ba as Ba containing glass and Au) in our experiments. The proton fluxes were monitored via the reaction 27Al(p,3p3n)22Na using the evaluated data of [1]. Residual nuclides were measured by X-, gamma-, and after a chemical separation by accelerator mass spectrometry. In order to check the quality of our experimental procedures we included some target elements in our new experiments for which consistent excitation functions have already been determined [2,3,4]. Our new data show excellent agreement with the earlier measurements. We measured cross sections for more than 120 different reactions. Here we report on the results for target elements with Z up to 28. The exsisting database of experimental excitation functions for the production

  12. 800-MeV magnetic-focused flash proton radiography for high-contrast imaging of low-density biologically-relevant targets using an inverse-scatter collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Allison, Jason; Espinoza, Camilo; Goett, John Jerome; Hogan, Gary; Hollander, Brian; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E.; Morley, Deborah; Morris, Chris; Murray, Matthew; Nedrow, Paul; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Sisneros, Thomas; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Wilde, Carl

    2016-03-01

    Proton radiography shows great promise as a tool to guide proton beam therapy (PBT) in real time. Here, we demonstrate two ways in which the technology may progress towards that goal. Firstly, with a proton beam that is 800 MeV in energy, target tissue receives a dose of radiation with very tight lateral constraint. This could present a benefit over the traditional treatment energies of ~200 MeV, where up to 1 cm of lateral tissue receives scattered radiation at the target. At 800 MeV, the beam travels completely through the object with minimal deflection, thus constraining lateral dose to a smaller area. The second novelty of this system is the utilization of magnetic quadrupole refocusing lenses that mitigate the blur caused by multiple Coulomb scattering within an object, enabling high resolution imaging of thick objects, such as the human body. This system is demonstrated on ex vivo salamander and zebrafish specimens, as well as on a realistic hand phantom. The resulting images provide contrast sufficient to visualize thin tissue, as well as fine detail within the target volumes, and the ability to measure small changes in density. Such a system, combined with PBT, would enable the delivery of a highly specific dose of radiation that is monitored and guided in real time.

  13. Involvement of the Artemis Protein in the Relative Biological Efficiency Observed With the 76-MeV Proton Beam Used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay

    SciTech Connect

    Calugaru, Valentin; Nauraye, Catherine; Cordelières, Fabrice P.; Biard, Denis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Hall, Janet; Favaudon, Vincent; Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Previously we showed that the relative biological efficiency for induced cell killing by the 76-MeV beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay increased with depth throughout the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). To investigate the repair pathways underlying this increase, we used an isogenic human cell model in which individual DNA repair proteins have been depleted, and techniques dedicated to precise measurements of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: The 3-Gy surviving fractions of HeLa cells individually depleted of Ogg1, XRCC1, and PARP1 (the base excision repair/SSB repair pathway) or of ATM, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, and Artemis (nonhomologous end-joining pathway) were determined at the 3 positions previously defined in the SOBP. Quantification of incident SSBs and DSBs by the alkaline elution technique and 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence of γ-H2AX foci, respectively, was performed in SQ20 B cells. Results: We showed that the amount of SSBs and DSBs depends directly on the particle fluence and that the increase in relative biological efficiency observed in the distal part of the SOBP is due to a subset of lesions generated under these conditions, leading to cell death via a pathway in which the Artemis protein plays a central role. Conclusions: Because therapies like proton or carbon beams are now being used to treat cancer, it is even more important to dissect the mechanisms implicated in the repair of the lesions generated by these particles. Additionally, alteration of the expression or activity of the Artemis protein could be a novel therapeutic tool before high linear energy transfer irradiation treatment.

  14. Cascade phonon-assisted trapping of positrons by divacancies in n-FZ-Si(P) single crystals irradiated with 15 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.; Oganesyan, G. A.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Kessler, C.; Elsayed, M.; Kozlovski, V. V.

    2014-02-21

    The trapping of positrons by the radiation defects in moderately doped oxygen-lean n-FZ-Si(P) single crystal irradiated with 15 MeV protons has been investigated in a comparative way using the positron lifetime spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements. The experiments were carried out within a wide temperature interval ranging from 25 K – 29 K to 300 K. The positron trapping rate for divacancies was reconstructed in the course of many-stage isochronal annealing. The concentration and the charged states of divacancies (V{sub 2}{sup −} and V{sub 2}{sup −−}) were estimated. The temperature dependency of the trapping cross section of positrons by the negatively charged divacancies is in a good agreement with the data of calculations based on the assumptions of the cascade phonon-assisted mechanism of exchange of the energy between the positron and acoustic long-wave phonons. Obeying ∼ T{sup −3} law, the cross-section of the trapping of positrons by divacancies changes considerably ranging from ∼1.7×10{sup −12} cm{sup 2} (66 – 100 K) to ∼2×10{sup −14} cm{sup 2} (≈ 250 K). The characteristic length of trapping of the positron by V{sub 2}{sup −−} divacancy was estimated to be l{sub 0}(V{sub 2}{sup −−})≈(3.4±0.2)×10{sup −8} cm.

  15. Ranking and validation of the spallation models for description of intermediate mass fragment emission from p + Ag collisions at 480 MeV incident proton beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sushil K.; Kamys, Bogusław; Goldenbaum, Frank; Filges, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    Double-differential cross-sections d2σ/dΩ dE for isotopically identified intermediate mass fragments ( 6Li up to 27Mg from nuclear reactions induced by 480 MeV protons impinging on a silver target were analyzed in the frame of a two-step model. The first step of the reaction was described by the intranuclear cascade model INCL4.6 and the second one by four different models (ABLA07,GEM2, GEMINI++, and SMM). The experimental spectra reveal the presence of low-energy, isotropic as well as high-energy, forward-peaked contributions. The INCL4.6 model offers a possibility to describe the latter contribution for light intermediate mass fragments by coalescence of the emitted nucleons. The qualitative agreement of the model predictions with the data was observed but the high-energy tails of the spectra were significantly overestimated. The shape of the isotropic part of the spectra was reproduced by all four models. The GEM2 model strongly underestimated the value of the cross-sections for heavier IMF whereas the SMM and ABLA07 models generally overestimated the data. The best quantitative description of the data was offered by GEMINI++, however, a discrepancy between the data and the model cross-sections still remained for almost all reaction products, especially at forward angles. It indicates that non-equilibrium processes are present which cannot be reproduced by the applied models. The goodness of the data description was judged quantitatively using two statistical deviation factors, the H-factor and the M-factor, as a tool for ranking and validation of the theoretical models.

  16. Effects of 100MeV protons delivered at 0.5 or 1cGy/min on the in vivo induction of early and delayed chromosomal damage.

    PubMed

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Honikel, Louise M; Reungpatthanaphong, Paiboon; Tungjai, Montree; Golightly, Marc; Whorton, Elbert B

    2013-08-30

    Little is known about in vivo cytogenetic effects of protons delivered at the dose and dose rates encountered in space. We determined the effects of 100MeV protons, one of the most abundant type of protons produced during solar particle events (SPE), on the induction of chromosome aberrations (CAs) in bone marrow (BM) cells collected at early (3 and 24h) and late (6 months) time-points from groups of BALB/cJ mice (a known radiosensitive strain) exposed whole-body to 0 (sham-controls), 0.5, or 1.0Gy of 100MeV protons, delivered at 0.5 or 1.0cGy/min. These doses and dose-rates are comparable to those produced during SPE events. Additionally, groups of mice were exposed to 0 or 1Gy of (137)Cs γ rays (delivered at 1cGy/min) as a reference radiation. The kinetics of formation/reduction of gamma-histone 2-AX (γH2AX) were determined in BM cells collected at 1.5, 3, and 24h post-irradiation to assess the early-response. There were five mice per treatment-group per harvest-time. Our data indicated that the kinetics of γH2AX formation/reduction differed, depending on the dose and dose rate of protons. Highly significant numbers of abnormal cells and chromatid breaks (p<0.01), related to those in sham-control groups, were detected in BM cells collected at each time-point, regardless of dose or dose-rate. The finding of significant increases in the frequencies of delayed non-clonal and clonal CAs in BM cells collected at a late time-point from exposed mice suggested that 0.5 or 1Gy of 100MeV protons is capable of inducing genomic instability in BM cells. However, the extent of effects induced by these two low dose rates was comparable. Further, the results showed that the in vivo cytogenetic effects induced by 1Gy of 100MeV protons or (137)Cs γ rays (delivered at 1cGy/min) were similar.

  17. 100-MeV proton beam intensity measurement by Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila; Jung, Nam-Suk; Oh, Joo-Hee; Lee, Hee-Seock

    2016-05-01

    The proton beam intensity of a 100-MeV proton linac at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) was measured by an Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions to determine the accuracy and precision of beam intensity measurement using Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of Au, Al foils and Pb plates. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in Au foils were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The FLUKA code was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of protons onto the front surface of Au foils located at three different depth points of the target and also to investigate the condition of incident beam on the target. A good agreement was found between the beam intensity measurements using the activation analysis method at three different depth points of the target. An excellent agreement was also observed between the beam intensity measurements using the Au activation analysis method and the dosimetry method using Gafchromic film.

  18. Comparisons of LET Distributions for Protons with Energies between50 and 200 MeV Determined Using a Spherical Tissue-EquivalentProportional Counter (TEPC) and a Position-Sensitive Silicon Spectrometer(RRMD-III)

    SciTech Connect

    Borak, Thomas B.; Doke, Tadayoshi; Fuse, T.; Guetersloh, StephenB.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hara, K.; Moyers, Michael; Suzuki, S.; Taddei, Phillip; Terasawa, K.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2004-12-01

    Experiments have been performed to measure the response of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a silicon-based LET spectrometer (RRMD-III) to protons with energies ranging from 50 200 MeV. This represents a large portion of the energy distribution for trapped protons encountered by astronauts in low-Earth orbit. The beam energies were obtained using plastic polycarbonate degraders with a monoenergetic beam that was extracted from a proton synchrotron. The LET spectrometer provided excellent agreement with the expected LET distribution emerging from the energy degraders. The TEPC cannot measure the LET distribution directly. However, the frequency mean value of lineal energy, y bar f, provided a good approximation to LET. This is in contrast to previous results for high-energy heavy ions wherey barf underestimated LET, whereas the dose-averaged lineal energy, y barD, provided a good approximation to LET.

  19. Characteristics of Protons Exiting from a Polyethylene Converter Irradiated by Neutrons with Energies between 1 keV and 10 MeV.

    PubMed

    Nikezic, D; Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, D; Yu, K N

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo method has been used to determine the efficiency for proton production and to study the energy and angular distributions of the generated protons. The ENDF library of cross sections is used to simulate the interactions between the neutrons and the atoms in a polyethylene (PE) layer, while the ranges of protons with different energies in PE are determined using the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) computer code. The efficiency of proton production increases with the PE layer thickness. However the proton escaping from a certain polyethylene volume is highly dependent on the neutron energy and target thickness, except for a very thin PE layer. The energy and angular distributions of protons are also estimated in the present paper, showing that, for the range of energy and thickness considered, the proton flux escaping is dependent on the PE layer thickness, with the presence of an optimal thickness for a fixed primary neutron energy. PMID:27362656

  20. Characteristics of Protons Exiting from a Polyethylene Converter Irradiated by Neutrons with Energies between 1 keV and 10 MeV

    PubMed Central

    Nikezic, D.; Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo method has been used to determine the efficiency for proton production and to study the energy and angular distributions of the generated protons. The ENDF library of cross sections is used to simulate the interactions between the neutrons and the atoms in a polyethylene (PE) layer, while the ranges of protons with different energies in PE are determined using the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) computer code. The efficiency of proton production increases with the PE layer thickness. However the proton escaping from a certain polyethylene volume is highly dependent on the neutron energy and target thickness, except for a very thin PE layer. The energy and angular distributions of protons are also estimated in the present paper, showing that, for the range of energy and thickness considered, the proton flux escaping is dependent on the PE layer thickness, with the presence of an optimal thickness for a fixed primary neutron energy. PMID:27362656

  1. Characteristics of Protons Exiting from a Polyethylene Converter Irradiated by Neutrons with Energies between 1 keV and 10 MeV.

    PubMed

    Nikezic, D; Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, D; Yu, K N

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo method has been used to determine the efficiency for proton production and to study the energy and angular distributions of the generated protons. The ENDF library of cross sections is used to simulate the interactions between the neutrons and the atoms in a polyethylene (PE) layer, while the ranges of protons with different energies in PE are determined using the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) computer code. The efficiency of proton production increases with the PE layer thickness. However the proton escaping from a certain polyethylene volume is highly dependent on the neutron energy and target thickness, except for a very thin PE layer. The energy and angular distributions of protons are also estimated in the present paper, showing that, for the range of energy and thickness considered, the proton flux escaping is dependent on the PE layer thickness, with the presence of an optimal thickness for a fixed primary neutron energy.

  2. K-italic-shell ionization cross sections for Al, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag by protons and oxygen ions in the energy range 0. 3--6. 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M.; Benka, O.

    1986-08-01

    Absolute K-italic-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for thin targets of Al, Ti, and Cu for protons in the energy range 0.3--2.0 MeV and for thin targets of Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag for oxygen ions in the energy range 1.36--6.4 Mev. The experimental results are compared to the perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) approximation with energy-loss (E), Coulomb (C), and relativistic (R) corrections, i.e., the ECPSSR approximation (Brandt and Lapicki), to the semiclassical approximation (Laegsgaard, Andersen, and Lund), and to a theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1s-italicsigma molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud (MS)). The proton results agree within 3% with empirical reference cross sections. Also, the ECPSSR provides best overall agreement for protons. For oxygen ions, ECPSSR and MS predict experimental results satisfactorily for scaled velocities xi> or =0.4. For lower scaled velocities, the experimental cross sections become considerably higher than theoretical predictions for Coulomb ionization. This deviation increases with increasing Z-italic/sub 1//Z/sub 2/; it cannot be explained by electron transfer to the projectile or by ionization due to target recoil atoms.

  3. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, George F; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Paddison, Stephen J; Platzman, P. M.; Moravsky, Alexander P.; Adams, Mark A.; Mayers, Dr. Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave function responds to the details of the confinement, corresponds to a strongly anharmonic local potential, shows evidence in some cases of coherent delocalization in double wells, and involves changes in zero-point kinetic energy of the protons from 40 to +120 meV difference from that of bulk water at room temperature. This behavior appears to be a generic feature of nanoscale confinement. It is exhibited here in 16 A inner diameter carbon nanotubes, two different hydrated proton exchange membranes (PEMs), Nafion 1120 and Dow 858, and has been seen earlier in xerogel and 14 A diameter carbon nanotubes. The proton conductivity in the PEM samples correlates with the degree of coherent delocalization of the proton.

  4. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  5. Characterization of moderator assembly dimension for accelerator boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors using 7Li(p, n) neutrons at proton energy of 2.5 MeV.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Bengua, Gerard; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-06-01

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension are investigated for the usage of 7Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.5 MeV protons in boron newtron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors in the present study. The indexes checked are treatable protocol depth (TPD), which is the greatest depth of the region satisfying the dose requirements in BNCT protocol, proton current necessary to complete BNCT by 1 h irradiation, and the heat flux deposited in the Li target which should be removed. Assumed materials are D2O for moderator, and mixture of polyethylene and LiF with 50 wt % for collimator. Dose distributions have been computed with MCNP 4B and 4C codes. Consequently, realized TPD does not show a monotonical tendency for the Li target diameter. However, the necessary proton current and heat flux in the Li target decreases as the Li target diameter increases, while this trend reverses at around 10 cm of the Li target diameter for the necessary proton current in the condition of this study. As to the moderator diameter, TPD does not exhibit an apparent dependence. On the other hand, necessary proton current and heat flux decrease as the moderator diameter increases, and this tendency saturates at around 60 cm of the moderator diameter in this study. As to the collimator, increase in inner diameter is suitable from the viewpoint of increasing TPD and decreasing necessary proton current and heat flux, while these indexes do not show apparent difference for collimator inner diameters over 14 cm for the parameters treated here. The practical viewpoint in selecting the parameters of moderator assembly dimension is to increase TPD, within the technically possible condition of accelerated proton current and heat removal from the Li target. In this process, the values for which the resultant characteristics mentioned above saturate or reverse would be important factors. PMID:16872076

  6. Characterization of moderator assembly dimension for accelerator boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors using {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons at proton energy of 2.5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Bengua, Gerard; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-06-15

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension are investigated for the usage of {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.5 MeV protons in boron newtron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors in the present study. The indexes checked are treatable protocol depth (TPD), which is the greatest depth of the region satisfying the dose requirements in BNCT protocol, proton current necessary to complete BNCT by 1 h irradiation, and the heat flux deposited in the Li target which should be removed. Assumed materials are D{sub 2}O for moderator, and mixture of polyethylene and LiF with 50 wt % for collimator. Dose distributions have been computed with MCNP 4B and 4C codes. Consequently, realized TPD does not show a monotonical tendency for the Li target diameter. However, the necessary proton current and heat flux in the Li target decreases as the Li target diameter increases, while this trend reverses at around 10 cm of the Li target diameter for the necessary proton current in the condition of this study. As to the moderator diameter, TPD does not exhibit an apparent dependence. On the other hand, necessary proton current and heat flux decrease as the moderator diameter increases, and this tendency saturates at around 60 cm of the moderator diameter in this study. As to the collimator, increase in inner diameter is suitable from the viewpoint of increasing TPD and decreasing necessary proton current and heat flux, while these indexes do not show apparent difference for collimator inner diameters over 14 cm for the parameters treated here. The practical viewpoint in selecting the parameters of moderator assembly dimension is to increase TPD, within the technically possible condition of accelerated proton current and heat removal from the Li target. In this process, the values for which the resultant characteristics mentioned above saturate or reverse would be important factors.

  7. Measurement of the cross sections for the production of the isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co from natural and enriched germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gurentsov, V. I.; Zhuykov, B. L.; Kianovsky, S. V.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kohanuk, V. M.; Yanovich, E. A.

    2010-07-15

    The cross sections for the production of the radioactive isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co in metallic germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons were measured, the experiments being performed both with germanium of natural isotopic composition and germanium enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge. The targets were irradiated with a proton beam at the facility for the production of radionuclides at the accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow). The data obtained will further be used to calculate the background of radioactive isotopes formed by nuclear cascades of cosmic-ray muons in new-generation experiments devoted to searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at underground laboratories.

  8. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; et al

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased asmore » the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.« less

  9. Next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to jet cross sections and jet rates in deeply inelastic electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Graudenz, D. )

    1994-04-01

    Jet cross sections in deeply inelastic scattering in the case of transverse photon exchange for the production of (1+1) and (2+1) jets are calculated in next-to-leading-order QCD (here the +1'' stands for the target remnant jet, which is included in the jet definition). The jet definition scheme is based on a modified JADE cluster algorithm. The calculation of the (2+1) jet cross section is described in detail. Results for the virtual corrections as well as for the real initial- and final-state corrections are given explicitly. Numerical results are stated for jet cross sections as well as for the ratio [sigma][sub (2+1) jet]/[sigma][sub tot] that can be expected at E665 and DESY HERA. Furthermore the scale ambiguity of the calculated jet cross sections is studied and different parton density parametrizations are compared.

  10. Dose distributions in a human head phantom for neutron capture therapy using moderated neutrons from the 2.5 MeV proton-7Li reaction or from fission of 235U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2001-10-01

    The feasibility of neutron capture therapy (NCT) using an accelerator-based neutron source of the 7Li(p,n) reaction produced by 2.5 MeV protons was investigated by comparing the neutron beam tailored by both the Hiroshima University radiological research accelerator (HIRRAC) and the heavy water neutron irradiation facility in the Kyoto University reactor (KUR-HWNIF) from the viewpoint of the contamination dose ratios of the fast neutrons and the gamma rays. These contamination ratios to the boron dose were estimated in a water phantom of 20 cm diameter and 20 cm length to simulate a human head, with experiments by the same techniques for NCT in KUR-HWNIF and/or the simulation calculations by the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code system version 4B (MCNP-4B). It was found that the 7Li(p,n) neutrons produced by 2.5 MeV protons combined with 20, 25 or 30 cm thick D2O moderators of 20 cm diameter could make irradiation fields for NCT with depth-dose characteristics similar to those from the epithermal neutron beam at the KUR-HWNIF.

  11. Proton beam simulation with MCNPX/CINDER'90: Germanium metal activation estimates below 30MeV relevant to the bulk production of arsenic radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, M; Taylor, W; Vieira, D; Nortier, M; Bach, H; John, K

    2012-01-01

    Germanium metal targets encapsulated in Nb shells were irradiated in a proton beam. Proton and secondary neutron beam fluences as well as radionuclide activity formation were modeled using MCNPX in combination with CINDER90. Targets were chemically processed using distillation and anion exchange. Good agreement between the measured radiochemical yields and MCNPX/CINDER90 estimates was observed. A target of pentavalent (73,74)As radioarsenic for neutron activation studies was prepared.

  12. Proton beam simulation with MCNPX/CINDER'90: Germanium metal activation estimates below 30MeV relevant to the bulk production of arsenic radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, M; Taylor, W; Vieira, D; Nortier, M; Bach, H; John, K

    2012-01-01

    Germanium metal targets encapsulated in Nb shells were irradiated in a proton beam. Proton and secondary neutron beam fluences as well as radionuclide activity formation were modeled using MCNPX in combination with CINDER90. Targets were chemically processed using distillation and anion exchange. Good agreement between the measured radiochemical yields and MCNPX/CINDER90 estimates was observed. A target of pentavalent (73,74)As radioarsenic for neutron activation studies was prepared. PMID:21890369

  13. Changes in the structural and thermal properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride-chlorotrifluoroethylene) irradiated with 4 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arjun; Kishore, Prateek; Singh, Manjit; Srivastava, Alok

    2015-10-01

    The radiation effects on semicrystalline poly(vinylidene fluoride-chlorotrifluoroethylene) copolymer [poly(VDF-CTFE)] induced by proton beam irradiation were investigated. The poly(VDF-CTFE) films were exposed to 4 MeV protons at different fluence in the range of 2.7 × 1013 to 65.0 × 1013 protons/cm2. Changes in the chemical structural and thermal properties of pristine films as well as irradiated samples were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and thermal analytical techniques, namely Thermogravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), respectively. FTIR spectroscopic data revealed two new bands at 1650 and 1747 cm-1 for irradiated samples whose intensities gradually increased with increasing ion fluence from 2.7 × 1013 to 27.0 × 1013 protons/cm2 due to the formation of carbon-carbon double bonds. The thermal stability was found to decrease after proton irradiation due to chain-scission. DSC data revealed that the proton irradiation was found to change in heat of fusion and crystallinity depending upon the applied dose.

  14. Confirmatory experiments for the United States Department of Energy Accelerator Production of Tritium Program: Neutron, triton and radionuclide production by thick targets of lead and tungsten bombarded by 800 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.; Cappiello, M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D.; Laird, R.; Mayo, D.; Waters, L.; Zoeller, C.; Staples, P.

    1994-10-01

    Neutron and Triton Production by 800 MeV Protons: The experiments presented in this report were performed in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility in order to provide data to benchmark and validate physics simulations used in the APT target/blanket design. An experimental apparatus was built that incorporated many of the features of the neutron source region of the {sup 3}He target/blanket. Those features included a tungsten neutron source, flux traps, neutron moderator, lead backstop, lead multiplying annulus, neutron absorbing blanket and a combination neutron de-coupler and tritium producing gas ({sup 3}He). The experiments were performed in two separate proton irradiations each with approximately 100 nA-hr of 800 MeV protons. The first irradiation was made with a small neutron moderating blanket, allowing the authors to measure tritium production in the {sup 3}He gas by sampling, and counting the amount of tritium. The second irradiation was performed with a large neutron moderating blanket (light water with a 1% manganese sulfate solution) that allowed them to measure both the tritium production in the central region and the total neutron production. The authors did this by sampling and counting the tritium produced and by measuring the activation of the manganese solution. Results of the three tritium production measurements show large disagreements with each other and therefore with the values predicted using the LAHET-MCNP code system. The source of the discrepancies may lie with the sampling system or adsorption on the tungsten surfaces. The authors discuss tests that may resolve that issue. The data for the total neutron production measurement is much more consistent. Those results show excellent agreement between calculation and experiment.

  15. Vibrations and reorientations of H2O molecules in [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 studied by Raman light scattering, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering and proton magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Lukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward; Florek-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Harańczyk, Hubert

    2014-04-24

    Vibrational-reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 was investigated by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), quasielastic and inelastic incoherent Neutron Scattering (QENS and IINS) methods. Neutron powder diffraction (NPD) measurements, performed simultaneously with QENS, did not indicated a change of the crystal structure at the phase transition (detected earlier by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at TC(h)=252.9 K (on heating) and at TC(c)=226.5K (on cooling)). Temperature dependence of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of νs(OH) band at ca. 3248 cm(-1) in the RS spectra indicated small discontinuity in the vicinity of phase transition temperature, what suggests that the observed phase transition may be associated with a change of the H2O reorientational dynamics. However, an activation energy value (Ea) for the reorientational motions of H2O ligands in both phases is nearly the same and equals to ca. 8 kJ mol(-1). The QENS peaks, registered for low temperature phase do not show any broadening. However, in the high temperature phase a small QENS broadening is clearly visible, what implies that the reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands undergoes a change at the phase transition. (1)H NMR line is a superposition of two powder Pake doublets, differentiated by a dipolar broadening, suggesting that there are two types of the water molecules in the crystal lattice of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 which are structurally not equivalent average distances between the interacting protons are: 1.39 and 1.18 Å. However, their reorientational dynamics is very similar (τc=3.3⋅10(-10) s). Activation energies for the reorientational motion of these both kinds of H2O ligands have nearly the same values in an experimental error limit: and equal to ca. 40 kJ mole(-1). The phase transition is not seen in the (1)H NMR spectra temperature dependencies. Infrared (IR), Raman (RS) and inelastic

  16. Corrections for the polarization-dependent efficiency and new neutron-proton analyzing power data at 7.6 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisel, G. J.; Braun, R. T.; Tornow, W.

    2010-08-01

    We present new corrections for the polarization-dependent efficiency (PDE), which introduces a false asymmetry into measurements of n-p analyzing power Ay(θ) caused by double scattering in the neutron side detectors. To accomplish this, we created a new database of C12(n⃗,n) Ay(θ) by using a combination of fits to data, phase-shift analysis, and R-matrix analysis. Our recorrection for PDE of previously reported n-p Ay(θ) data at 7.6 and 12.0 MeV and new data at 7.6 MeV indicate that we have achieved a superior representation of C12(n⃗,n). Our results continue to suggest a possible charge dependence of the pion-nucleon coupling constant.

  17. Corrections for the polarization-dependent efficiency and new neutron-proton analyzing power data at 7.6 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Weisel, G. J.; Braun, R. T.; Tornow, W.

    2010-08-15

    We present new corrections for the polarization-dependent efficiency (PDE), which introduces a false asymmetry into measurements of n-p analyzing power A{sub y}({theta}) caused by double scattering in the neutron side detectors. To accomplish this, we created a new database of {sup 12}C(n-vector,n) A{sub y}({theta}) by using a combination of fits to data, phase-shift analysis, and R-matrix analysis. Our recorrection for PDE of previously reported n-p A{sub y}({theta}) data at 7.6 and 12.0 MeV and new data at 7.6 MeV indicate that we have achieved a superior representation of {sup 12}C(n-vector,n). Our results continue to suggest a possible charge dependence of the pion-nucleon coupling constant.

  18. Sudden Intensity Increases and Radial Gradient Changes of Cosmic Ray Mev Electrons and Protons Observed at Voyager 1 Beyond 111 AU in the Heliosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B.; Lal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Voyager 1 has entered regions of different propagation conditions for energetic cosmic rays in the outer heliosheathat a distance of about 111 AU from the Sun. The low energy 614 MeV galactic electron intensity increased by 20over a time period 10 days and the electron radial intensity gradient abruptly decreased from 19AU to 8AU at2009.7 at a radial distance of 111.2 AU. At about 2011.2 at a distance of 116.6 AU a second abrupt intensity increase of25 was observed for electrons. After the second sudden electron increase the radial intensity gradient increased to18AU. This large positive gradient and the 13 day periodic variations of 200 MeV particles observed near theend of 2011 indicate that V1 is still within the overall heliospheric modulating region. The implications of these resultsregarding the proximity of the heliopause are discussed.

  19. Measurements of the {Delta}(1232) transition form factor and the ratio {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} from inelastic electron-proton and electron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.E.; Andivahis, L.; Lung, A.; Arnold, R.G.; Keppel, C.; Rock, S.E.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.; Tao, L.H.; Stuart, L.M.; Gomez, J.; Stuart, L.M.; Dietrich, F.S.; Chang, C.C.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.; Peterson, G.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Dodge, W.R.; Griffioen, K.A.; Petratos, G.G.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Stuart, L.M.; Gearhart, R.; Kuhn, S.E.; Alster, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Hyde-Wright, C.E.; Swartz, K.

    1998-08-01

    Measurements of inclusive electron-scattering cross sections using hydrogen and deuterium targets in the region of the {Delta}(1232) resonance are reported. A global fit to these new data and previous data in the resonance region is also reported for the proton. Transition form factors have been extracted from the proton cross sections for this experiment over the four-momentum transfer squared range 1.64{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}6.75 (GeV/c){sup 2} and from previous data over the range 2.41{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}9.82 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results confirm previous reports that the {Delta}(1232) transition form factor decreases more rapidly with Q{sup 2} than expected from perturbative QCD. The ratio of {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} in the {Delta}(1232) resonance region has been extracted from the deuteron data for this experiment in the range 1.64{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}3.75 (GeV/c){sup 2} and for a previous experiment in the range 2.4{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}7.9 (GeV/c){sup 2}. A study has been made of the model dependence of these results. This ratio {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for {Delta}(1232) production is slightly less than unity, while {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for the nonresonant cross sections is approximately 0.5, which is consistent with deep inelastic scattering results. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Calculated neutron-induced cross sections for /sup 53/Cr from 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, K.; Hetrick, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Neutron-induced cross sections of /sup 53/Cr have been calculated in the energy regions from 1 to 20 MeV. The quantities obtained are the cross sections for the reactions (n,n'..gamma..), (n,2n), (n,np), (n,n..cap alpha..), (n,p..gamma..), (n,pn), (n,..cap alpha gamma..), (n,..cap alpha..n), (n,d), (n,t), (n,/sup 3/He), and (n,..gamma..), as well as the spectra of emitted neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and gamma rays. The precompound process was included above 5 MeV in addition to the compound process. For the inelastic scattering, the contribution of the direct interaction was calculated with DWBA. 36 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Neutron scattering cross sections from /sup 14/N and /sup 9/Be at 11, 14, and 17 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Templon, J.A.; Dave, J.H.; Gould, C.R.; Singkarat, S.

    1985-12-01

    Neutron scattering cross sections were measured for /sup 14/N and /sup 9/Be at incident neutron energies of 11, 14, and 17 MeV using time-of-flight methods. Angular distributions for /sup 14/N and /sup 9/Be elastic scattering and /sup 9/Be inelastic scattering to the 2.429-MeV excited state were obtained betwee 20 and 160 deg in 5-deg increments. The data were corrected for finite geometry effects using a Monte Carlo simulation code. Lengendre polynomial coefficients deduced by fitting the experimental data are tabulated. The results of a spherical optical model analysis for the /sup 14/N data are reported. Coulomb correction terms are obtained from a comparison of neutron and proton elastic scattering data for /sup 14/N.

  2. Prospects of warm dense matter research at HiRadMat facility at CERN using 440 MeV SPS proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Blanco Sancho, J.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of heating of a solid copper cylinder by the 440 GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. The beam is made of 288 proton bunches while each bunch comprises of 1.15·1011 so that the total number of protons in the beam is about 1.3·1013. The bunch length is 0.5 ns while two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns so that the beam duration is 7.2 μs. Particle intensity distribution in the transverse direction is a Gaussian and the beam can be focused to a spot size with σ = 0.1 mm-1.0 mm. In this paper we present results using two values of σ, namely 0.2 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. The target length is 1.5 m with a radius = 5 cm and is facially irradiated by the beam. The energy deposition code FLUKA and the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code BIG2 are employed using a suitable iteration time to simulate the hydrodynamic and the thermodynamic response of the target. The primary purpose of this work was to design fixed target experiments for the machine protection studies at the HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) facility at CERN. However this work has shown that large samples of High Energy Density (HED) matter will be generated in such experiments which suggests an additional application of this facility. In the present paper we emphasize the possibility of doing HED physics experiments at the HiRadMat in the future.

  3. K -shell ionization cross sections for Si, P, K, Ca, Zn, and Ga by protons and carbon ions in the energy range 1--6. 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M. ); Smit, Z. ); Benka, O. )

    1990-01-01

    Absolute {ital K}-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for thin targets of Si, P, S, K, Ca, Zn, and Ga using carbon ions between 1.0 and 6.4 MeV and protons of 1 and 2 MeV. The dependence of x-ray production cross sections on target thickness was determined. The experimental results are compared to the semiclassical approximation (Laegsgaard, Andersen, and Lund in 3 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on the Physics of Electron and Atomic Collisions, Paris, 1977, edited by G. Watel (North-Holland, Amsterdam 1977)), to the theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1{ital s}{sigma} molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud, J. Phys. B. 18, 299 (1985)), to the perturbed stationary-state approximation with energy-loss, Coulomb, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR) (Brandt and Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23, 1717 (1981)), and to the modification of the ECPSSR approximation (MECPSSR) (Benka, Geretschlaeger, and Paul, J. Phys. (Paris) Suppl. 12, C9-251 (1987)). The results for carbon ions are also compared to the statistical molecular orbital theory of inner-shell ionization for symmetric or nearly symmetric atomic collisions (Mittelman and Wilets, Phys. Rev. 154, 12 (1967)).

  4. Proton-recoil detectors for time-of-flight measurements of neutrons with kinetic energies from some tens of keV to a few MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, R.; Grosse, E.; Heidel, K.; Hutsch, J.; Junghans, A. R.; Klug, J.; Légrády, D.; Nolte, R.; Röttger, S.; Sobiella, M.; Wagner, A.

    2007-06-01

    For experiments at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE, where neutrons in the kinetic energy region from some tens of keV to a few MeV will be produced by bremsstrahlung, neutron-time-of-flight detectors have been developed. These detectors are made from the plastic scintillator material EJ-200. Efficiency calibration showed more than 10% efficiency for kinetic energies down to 30 keV. The calibration was done at the "accelerator facility for fast neutron research" at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig, using pulsed quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields with a well-determined fluence. The low detection threshold was obtained by coincident readout of two Hamamatsu R2059-01 photomultiplier tubes per scintillator and by triggering just below the single-photo-electron peak of these photomultiplier tubes, which additionally gives a well-reproduceable detection threshold.

  5. Pion inelastic scattering from sup 20 Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Burlein, M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-12-01

    Angular distributions for {sup 20}Ne({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime}) were measured on the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Data were taken with both {pi}{sup {plus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} over an angular range of 12{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=180 MeV and with {pi}{sup +} from 15{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=120 MeV. The data were analyzed using both the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the coupled-channels impulse approximation (CCIA) with collective transition densities. In addition, microscopic transition densities were used in the DWIA analysis for states in the lowest rotational bands. The transitions to the 6.73-MeV 0{sup +} and several 1{sup {minus}} states, including the states at 5.79 MeV and 8.71 MeV, were studied using several models for the transition density. Strong evidence for the importance of two-step routes in pion inelastic scattering was seen in several angular distributions, including the 5.79-MeV 1{sup {minus}}, the first three 4{sup +} states, and the 8.78-MeV 6{sup +}. 100 refs., 81 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Stretched-state excitations with the (neutron,proton) reaction at 278 MeV on carbon-14, magnesium-26 and silicon-30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Dong

    1997-11-01

    The reactions 12C(n,p)12B,/ 14C(n,p)14B,/ 16O(n,p)16N,/ 26Mg(n,p)26Na and 30Si(n,p)30Al were studied at a neutron energy of 278 MeV using the charge-exchange facility at the TRIUMF accelerator laboratory in Vancouver, Canada. Excitation-energy spectra and differential cross sections for the observed excitations in these reactions were extracted over the momentum-transfer range from 1.2 to 2.5 fm-1 (θlab in 19o,/ 23o,/ 27o,/ 31o and 35o). The primary goal of this work was the study of T = 2 'stretched' particle-hole states, more specifically (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- states excited in 14B,/ (/nu f7/2,/pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 26Na, and (/nu f7/2,/ /pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 30Al. The identification of these states was based on: (1) comparison of the experimental cross section angular distribution with theoretical differential cross sections calculated with the distorted-wave-impulse approximation (DWIA); (2) comparison of the measured excitation energies with excitation energies of analog stretched states; and (3) comparison of the spectroscopic strength for these (n,p) reactions to (p,n) and (e,e') spectroscopic strengths. The T = 1 (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- 'stretched' states excited in 12B and 16N were also studied. For the 12C(n,p)12B reaction (on targets of CH2 and graphite), 4/sp- T = 1 strength at Ex = 4.25 MeV was observed and found to be consistent with previous measurements; this state was used for calibrating excitation-energy scales for the other targets and as a consistency check among the different experimental runs for this project.

  7. Characterizing proton beam of 6.7 MeV LEDA RFQ by fitting HEBT wire-scanner profiles to improved model.

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, W. P.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, Robert; Rybarcyk, L. J.; Schneider, J. D.; Young, L. M.

    2002-01-01

    Quadrupole scans in the HEBT of the 6.7 MeV LEDA RFQ were analyzed to characterize the transverse phase space at the RFQ exit. In previous work, the profiles measured by the wire scanner were fit to various models (HEBT simulations from the RFQ exit to the wire scanner) in an effort to determine the transverse Courant-Snyder parameters (a, p, and t) at the RFQ exit. Unfortunately, at the larger quadrupole settings, the measured profiles showed features that were not present in the simulations. This made good fits impossible. Here we describe our latest analysis, which resulted in very good fits by using an improved model for the beam at the RFQ exit. The model beam was generated by the RFQ simulation code TOUTATIS. In the fitting code, this beam was distorted by linear transformations that changed the Courant-Snyder parameters to whatever values were required by the nonlinear optimizer while preserving the high-order features of the phase-space distribution. This present success indicates that there has not been any missing physics in the codes, which gives us increased confidence in our accelerator designs. In addition, we have learned that details in the RFQ beam can make a significant difference in observed behavior downstream of the RFQ.

  8. Analysis of the radiation shielding of the bunker of a 230MeV proton cyclotron therapy facility; comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Sunil, C

    2016-04-01

    The neutron ambient dose equivalent outside the radiation shield of a proton therapy cyclotron vault is estimated using the unshielded dose equivalent rates and the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature and by simulations carried out with the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The source terms derived from the literature and that obtained from the FLUKA calculations differ by a factor of 2-3, while the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature differ by 20-40%. The instantaneous dose equivalent rates outside the shield differ by a few orders of magnitude, not only in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation results, but also with the results obtained by line of sight attenuation calculations with the different parameters obtained from the literature. The attenuation of neutrons caused by the presence of bulk iron, such as magnet yokes is expected to reduce the dose equivalent by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude outside the shield walls. PMID:26844542

  9. Dose-rate influence on the defect production in MeV proton-implanted float-zone and epitaxial n-type silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévêque, P.; Hallén, A.; Pellegrino, P.; Svensson, B. G.; Privitera, V.

    2002-01-01

    The production of stable vacancy-related point defects in proton-implanted float-zone and epitaxial silicon has been studied in the low dose range (⩽10 10/cm 2) as a function of dose-rate. The well-known "inverse dose-rate" effect has been observed in both types of materials with a decrease in the concentration of vacancy-related defects as the dose-rate increases. The effect is less pronounced in oxygen lean epitaxial silicon. Moreover, a continuous decrease of the vacancy-related defect concentration as a function of the flux was measured while a threshold was expected according to previous studies. Both of these results can be explained by a simple calculation, taking into account the influence of the oxygen concentration as well as the influence of the diffusion coefficient of point defects on the "inverse dose-rate" effect.

  10. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  11. Proton-transfer dynamics in the hydrogen bond. Inelastic neutron scattering, infrared and Raman spectra of KH(CF 3COO) 2 and CsH(CF 3COO) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillaux, F.; Tomkinson, J.

    1991-12-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared and Raman spectra of potassium and cesium hydrogen bistrifluoroacetate (KH(CF 3COO) 2 and CsH(CF 3COO) 2, respectively) at 20 K are reported. In both crystals H(CF 3COO) 2- centrosymmetric dimers are linked by strong hydrogen bonds, whose lengths are 2.435 and 2.38 Å, respectively. The principal OH modes appear at the same frequencies for both compounds. The OH stretching band shapes are similar in infrared and in INS. The submaxima are attributed to interactions with other internal modes. Below 200 cm -1, the cesium salt shows three narrow bands which emerge from the density-of-states. They are assigned to localized modes involving the proton. A sharp band at 87 cm -1 corresponds to the "tunnelling" transition in a quasi-symmetric double-minimum potential with a barrier height of 1340 cm -1. The other two narrow bands, at 36 and 49 cm -1, are assigned to the internal torsions of coupled CF 3COO groups. Potential barriers are estimated. A detailed band-shape analysis of the OH bending modes provides clear indications of different dynamics for the two salts. KH(CF 3COO) 2 is rather stiff and phonon wings involving the whole lattice density-of-states are observed for the δOH mode but not for the γOH mode. For this latter, the observed combinations indicate a dynamical coupling with the internal torsion. CsH(CF 3COO) 2 is rather soft and recoil occurs. The INS intensities of the OH bending modes are decreased by Debye-Waller factors and their frequencies are shifted upwards. The estimated masses of the recoiling particles are consistent with strong dynamical coupling of the γOH with the torsional mode on the one hand, and of the δOH with translational modes on the other. The polarizability of the counter ion appears to play a leading role in proton dynamics.

  12. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  13. Determination of integral cross sections of 3H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; Chauzova, M. V.; Kashirin, I. A.; Malinovskiy, S. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Mashnik, S. G.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (˜ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. These foils have been irradiated in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ˜ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (˜ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (˜ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 - 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U-10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006-2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. An ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 was used to measure the 3H β-spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.

  14. Inelastic electron scattering from a moving nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.E.; Griffioen, K.

    1994-04-01

    The authors propose to measure inelastically scattered electrons in coincidence with spectator protons emitted backwards relative to the virtual photon direction in the reaction d(e, e{prime}p{sub s})X. In a simple spectator model, the backward proton has equal and opposite momentum to the neutron before it is struck, allowing the authors to study the dependence on kinematics and off-shell behaviour of the electron-nucleon inelastic cross section. If the photon couples to a quark in a 6-quark bag, a different dependence of the cross section on the kinematic variables (x, Q{sup 2}, and p{sub s}) can be observed. This proposed experiment requires large acceptance and beam energies above 6 GeV. It is ideally suited for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS).

  15. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  16. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  17. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  18. Filtered back-projection reconstruction for attenuation proton CT along most likely paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, C. T.; Létang, J. M.; Rit, S.

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the attenuation of a proton beam to reconstruct the map of the linear attenuation coefficient of a material which is mainly caused by the inelastic interactions of protons with matter. Attenuation proton computed tomography (pCT) suffers from a poor spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) of protons in matter, similarly to the conventional energy-loss pCT. We therefore adapted a recent filtered back-projection algorithm along the most likely path (MLP) of protons for energy-loss pCT (Rit et al 2013) to attenuation pCT assuming a pCT scanner that can track the position and the direction of protons before and after the scanned object. Monte Carlo simulations of pCT acquisitions of density and spatial resolution phantoms were performed to characterize the new algorithm using Geant4 (via Gate). Attenuation pCT assumes an energy-independent inelastic cross-section, and the impact of the energy dependence of the inelastic cross-section below 100 MeV showed a capping artifact when the residual energy was below 100 MeV behind the object. The statistical limitation has been determined analytically and it was found that the noise in attenuation pCT images is 411 times and 278 times higher than the noise in energy-loss pCT images for the same imaging dose at 200 MeV and 300 MeV, respectively. Comparison of the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT images with a conventional straight-line path binning showed that incorporating the MLP estimates during reconstruction improves the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT. Moreover, regardless of the significant noise in attenuation pCT images, the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT was better than that of conventional energy-loss pCT in some studied situations thanks to the interplay of MCS and attenuation known as the West-Sherwood effect.

  19. Semi-empirical and empirical L X-ray production cross sections for elements with 50 ⩽ Z ⩽ 92 for protons of 0.5 3.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekab, M.; Kahoul, A.

    2006-04-01

    We present in this contribution, semi-empirical production cross sections of the main X-ray lines Lα, Lβ and Lγ for elements from Sn to U and for protons with energies varying from 0.5 to 3.0 MeV. The theoretical X-ray production cross sections are firstly calculated from the theoretical ionization cross sections of the L i ( i = 1, 2, 3) subshell within the ECPSSR theory. The semi-empirical Lα, Lβ and Lγ cross sections are then deduced by fitting the available experimental data normalized to their corresponding theoretical values and give the better representation of the experimental data in some cases. On the other hand, the experimental data are directly fitted to deduce the empirical L X-ray production cross sections. A comparison is made between the semi-empirical cross sections, the empirical cross sections reported in this work and the empirical ones reported by Reis and Jesus [M.A. Reis, A.P. Jesus, Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables 63 (1996) 1] and those of Strivay and Weber [Strivay, G. Weber, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 190 (2002) 112].

  20. Response of metallic glasses Fe/sub 40/Ni/sub 40/P/sub 14/B/sub 6/ and Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/ to irradiation with 800-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Cost, J.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    Metallic glasses with compositions of Fe/sub 40/Ni/sub 40/P/sub 14/B/sub 6/ and Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/ were irradiated in the 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility while the electrical resistance and length changes were monitored. The resistance and the length of the first alloy were both found to increase and saturate with dose to ..delta..R/R approx. = 5 x 10/sup -3/ and ..delta..L/L approx. = 2 x 10/sup -3/. For the second alloy the total dose of 1.1 x 10/sup 19/ p/cm/sup 2/, which was calculated to give roughly 0.12 dpa, was slightly less than that required for saturation. No annealing of these increases was observed for anneals from room temperature to 250/sup 0/C. These results are interpreted in terms of a model in which collision cascades create small regions of increased atomic disorder which fully overlap each other at saturation.

  1. Determination of the radial gradient in the region 0.81-1.0 AU using both high- and low-energy /more than 10-GeV and more than 52-MeV/ detectors for the 1-AU monitor. [solar quiet measurements of alpha particles and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Bukata, R. P.; Rao, U. R.

    1974-01-01

    A determination of the radial gradient for alpha particles (31-46 MeV/nuc) and protons with energies above 7.5 MeV and 44-77 MeV in the region 1.0-0.81 AU is presented for the solar-quiet year 1966. The determinations are based on data from the Pioneer 6 space probe. Two different detectors are used: the Deep River neutron monitor and measurements of low energy protons made on the IMP-C satellite. The average energy response of the Deep River monitor is 16 GeV, whereas the IMP-C data is for protons with energies above 50 MeV. The resulting radial gradient is found to be nearly zero for the alpha particles and slightly negative for the protons. The same qualitative results were found using the IMP-C data and the Deep River neutron monitor to measure the temporal variation in the cosmic ray intensity. The present analysis indicates that detectors over a wide range of energies are suitable for measuring the radial gradient, providing sufficient statistical precision is obtained to evaluate short-term modulation and the azimuthal separation of the detectors is not great.

  2. Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering studies of proton-conducting materials: Sn(HPO 4) 2·H 2O and HM(SO 4) 2·H 2O, M = Fe, In . Part II. The vibrational spectrum of H 3O +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Deborah J.; Penfold, Jeffrey; Tomkinson, John; Rozière, Jacques

    1989-06-01

    The vibrational spectra of the proton conductors Sn(HPO 4) 2·H 2O, HFe(SO 4) 2·H 2O, and HIn(SO 4) 2·H 2O have been investigated by incoherent inelastic neutron-scattering spectroscopy at 20 K. Torsional and other rotational motion and internal deformation modes of H 3O + have been identified in the trivalent metal acid sulphate monohydrates. The spectroscopic data on Sn(HPO 4) 2·H 2O are consistent with the presence of covalent POH hydrogen bonded to the water molecule.

  3. Monte-Carlo simulation of soil carbon measurements by inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring soil carbon is critical for assessing the potential impact of different land management practices on carbon sequestration. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) of fast neutrons (with energy around 14 MeV) on carbon-12 nuclei produces gamma rays with energy of 4.43 MeV; this gamma flux ca...

  4. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  5. Investigation of structure in Al23 via resonant proton scattering of Mg22+p and the 22Mg(p,γ) Al23 astrophysical reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Moon, J. Y.; Nishimura, M.; Iwasaki, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Lee, J. H.; Kato, S.; Gono, Y.; Lee, C. S.

    2007-11-01

    Proton resonant states in Al23 have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of Mg22+p with a Mg22 beam at 4.38 MeV/nucleon bombarding a thick (CH2)n target. The low-energy Mg22 beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). The energy spectra of recoiled protons were measured at average scattering angles of θlab≈4°,17° and 23°. A new state has been observed at Ex=3.00 MeV with a spin-parity assignment of (3/2+). In addition, resonant inelastic scattering has populated three more states at excitation energies of 3.14, 3.26, and 3.95 MeV, with proton decay to the first excited state in Mg22 being observed. The new state at 3.95 MeV has been assigned a spin-parity of Jπ=(7/2+). The resonant parameters were determined by an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions with a SAMMY-M6-BETA code. The core-excited structure of Al23 is discussed within a shell-model picture. The stellar reaction rate of the Mg22(p,γ)Al23 reaction has been reevaluated, and the revised total reaction rate is about 40% greater than the previous result for temperatures beyond T9=0.3.

  6. Determination of partial-wave inelasticities for elastic pion-nucleon scattering with the aid of experimental data on π N → ππ N processes in the beam-momentum range 300 < P beam < 500 MeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, V. A.; Sherman, S. G.

    2008-11-01

    The partial-wave inelasticity parameters of the amplitude for elastic pion-nucleon scattering are determined with the aid of the phenomenological amplitude for inelastic π N → ππ N processes in the energy range extending to the threshold for the production of two pions. The resulting inelasticity parameters are compared with their counterparts derived from modern partial-wave analyses. The largest inelastic-scattering cross section in the P11 wave is in excellent agreement with the analogous value from the analysis performed at the George Washington University in 2006. For other waves, however, the present results differ in the majority of cases from respective values given by partial-wave analyses (the distinctions are especially large for the isospin-3/2 amplitudes).

  7. Weak-coupling structure of proton resonant states in 23Al studied with RI beam at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Michimasa, S.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Gono, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Kato, S.

    2006-07-01

    Proton resonances in 23Al have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of 22Mg+p by using a 4.38 MeV/nucleon 22Mg beam bombarding a thick Hydrogen target. The low-energy 22Mg beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). A new resonant state due to elastic scattering was observed at Ex = 3.00 MeV with a Jπ = (3/2+) assignment. Other three excited states due to resonant inelastic scattering at 3.14, 3.26 and 3.95 MeV were identified and all mainly decay to the first excited state in 22Mg by the proton emissions. The newly observed 3.95-MeV state probably has a spin-parity of Jπ = (7/2+). The resonant properties were determined from an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. The weak-coupling structure in 23Al is discussed in conjunction with a shell-model calculation.

  8. Inelastic neutron scattering from carbon, iron, yttrium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Cecilia; Blomgren, Jan; Hellesen, Carl; Öhrn, Angelica; Pomp, Stephan

    2012-02-01

    Double-differential cross sections and angular distributions of inelastic neutron scattering on 12C, 56Fe, 89Y and 208Pb have been measured at 96 MeV at The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. Results on elastic neutron scattering at 96 MeV from these nuclei have been reported previously [1-3]. To obtain the inelastic cross sections, a forward-folding technique has been applied. A physically reasonable trial spectrum has been folded with the response function of the detector system and the output has been compared with the experimental data. To create the trial spectrum, a Gaussian has been used for the elastic part and the PRECO code [4-7] for the inelastic part. Other models were tested for the pre-equilibrium contribution and the method was found to be model independent. The response function of the detector setup has been obtained experimentally at the smallest possible angle, in this case at 9 deg. The resulting preliminary inelastic scattering data cover an excitation energy range up to 45 MeV and the angular intervals 28 to 58 degrees for 12C, 26 to 65 degrees for 56Fe and 26 to 52 degrees for 89Y and 208Pb. The preliminary results are discussed and compared to several model codes as well as existing experimental data for (n,n'x), (n,p'x) and (p,p'x). Possible improvements of the analysis are also discussed.

  9. Structure of the low-lying 2/sup +/ states in /sup 14/C from inelastic pion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.C.; Chakravarti, S.; Dehnhard, D.; Ellis, P.J.; Holtkamp, D.B.; Lung, L.; Seestrom-Morris, S.J.; Baer, H.; Morris, C.L.; Greene, S.J.; and others

    1988-04-01

    Differential cross sections for inelastic pion scattering from /sup 14/C measured at T/sub ..pi../ = 164 MeV, for the 2/sub 1//sup +/ and 2/sub 2//sup +/ states and an unresolved peak at 10.4 MeV, were analyzed by distorted-wave impulse approximation and coupled-channel calculations using transition densities derived from large scale shell model calculations. The pion and B(E2) data showed strong quenching of the isovector component for the 2/sub 1//sup +/ transition, which required different effective charges for the p and sd shells. The pion data for the 2/sub 2//sup +/ are an order of magnitude smaller than for the 2/sub 1//sup +/ state, and this was understood in terms of strong cancellations between the neutron and proton transition amplitudes. This transition was found to be very sensitive to details of the calculations. The 10.4 MeV data were consistent with the excitation of a 3/sup -/ state.

  10. Analysis of the physical interactions of therapeutic proton beams in water with the use of Geant4 Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Morávek, Zdenek; Bogner, Ludwig

    2009-01-01

    The processes that occur when protons traverse a medium are investigated theoretically for a full therapeutic range of energies [20 MeV, 220 MeV]. The investigation is undertaken using the Geant4 toolkit for water medium. The beam is simulated only inside the phantom, effects of beamline are included in the overall beam properties as lateral width and momentum bandwidth. Every energy deposition is catalogued according to the particle and the process that caused it. The catalogued depositions are analysed statistically. There are only few important processes such as proton ionisation and nuclear scattering (elastic/inelastic) that constitute the main features of the energy distribution. At the same time processes concerning electrons are used very often without obvious effect to the result. Such processes can be therefore approximated in the simulation codes in order to improve the performance of the code. Neutron depositions are most important before the Bragg peak, still they are by an order of magnitude smaller than those of protons. In the region behind the Bragg peak only a small number of neutrons is created in the simulation and their energy contribution through secondary protons is by orders smaller than the effect of proton-produced secondary protons within the Bragg peak. Hence, the effects of neutrons created in the calculation volume can be neglected. PMID:19761094

  11. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  12. Inelastic Scattering Form Factors

    1992-01-01

    ATHENA-IV computes form factors for inelastic scattering calculations, using single-particle wave functions that are eigenstates of motion in either a Woods-Saxon potential well or a harmonic oscillator well. Two-body forces of Gauss, Coulomb, Yukawa, and a sum of cut-off Yukawa radial dependences are available.

  13. Deep inelastic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nucleon structure as seen in the context of deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The lectures begin with consideration of the quark-parton model. The model forms the basis of understanding lepton-nucleon inelastic scattering. As improved data in lepton-nucleon scattering at high energies became available, the quark-parton model failed to explain some crucial features of these data. At approximately the same time a candidate theory of strong interactions based on a SU(3) gauge theory of color was being discussed in the literature, and new ideas on the explanation of inelastic scattering data became popular. A new theory of strong interactions, now called quantum chromodynamics provides a new framework for understanding the data, with a much stronger theoretical foundation, and seems to explain well the features of the data. The lectures conclude with a look at some recent experiments which provide new data at very high energies. These lectures are concerned primarily with charged lepton inelastic scattering and to a lesser extent with neutrino results. Furthermore, due to time and space limitations, topics such as final state hadron studies, and multi-muon production are omitted here. The lectures concentrate on the more central issues: the quark-parton model and concepts of scaling, scale breaking and the ideas of quantum chromodynamics, the Q/sup 2/ dependence of structure function, moments, and the important parameter R.

  14. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Polifka, Richard

    2015-04-10

    The QCD factorization theorem in diffraction is tested by comparing diffractive jet production data to QCD predictions based on fits to inclusive diffractive cross section data. H1 measured dijet production with a leading proton detected in the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS), both in deep-inelastic scattering and in photoproduction. The DIS measurements are complemented by measurements of dijet production with an associated rapidity gap and in a data sample selected with a leading proton in the Forward Proton Spectrometer (FPS)

  15. Production of excitons in grazing collisions of protons with LiF surfaces: An onion model

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2011-12-15

    In this work we evaluate the production of excitons of a lithium fluoride crystal induced by proton impact in the intermediate and high energy regime (from 100 keV to 1 MeV). A simple model is proposed to account for the influence of the Coulomb grid of the target by dressing crystal ions to transform them in what we call onions. The excited states of these onions can be interpreted as excitons. Within this model, total cross section and stopping power are calculated by using the first Born and the continuum distorted-wave (CDW) eikonal initial-state (EIS) approximations. We found that between 7 and 30 excitons per incident proton are produced in grazing collisions with LiF surfaces, becoming a relevant mechanism of inelastic transitions.

  16. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-15

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  17. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  18. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  19. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  20. Inelastic and Dynamic Fracture and Stress Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Large deformation inelastic stress analysis and inelastic and dynamic crack propagation research work is summarized. The salient topics of interest in engine structure analysis that are discussed herein include: (1) a path-independent integral (T) in inelastic fracture mechanics, (2) analysis of dynamic crack propagation, (3) generalization of constitutive relations of inelasticity for finite deformations , (4) complementary energy approaches in inelastic analyses, and (5) objectivity of time integration schemes in inelastic stress analysis.

  1. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-01

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  2. A model independent approach to inelastic dark matter scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barello, G.; Chang, Spencer; Newby, Christopher A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a model independent analysis of inelastic dark matter transitions at direct detection experiments by modifying the elastic methodology of Fitzpatrick et al. By analyzing the kinematics of inelastic transitions, we find the relevant variables to describe these scattering processes, the primary change being a modification of the v→⊥ variable. Taking this into account, we list the relevant scattering matrix elements and modify the Mathematica package of Anand et al. to calculate the necessary form factors. As an application, we determine the matrix elements of inelastic scattering for spin transitions between a fermion to fermion, scalar to vector, and scalar to scalar. Finally, we consider fits to the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal for the magnetic inelastic dark matter scenario as well as a model independent scan over relativistic operators, constraining them with limits from direct detection experiments. In the magnetic inelastic dark matter scenario or if the dark matter couples through relativistic operators involving only protons, we find that experiments with xenon and germanium targets can have consistently small rates. However, limits from iodine experiments are much more constraining, leaving small regions of allowed parameter space. We point out that existing uncertainties in the iodine quenching factor strongly affects the constraints, motivating further study to pin down the correct values.

  3. Polarization transfer in inelastic scattering and pionic models of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, T.A.; Jones, K.W.; McClelland, J.B.; Moss, J.M.; Rees, L.B.; Tanaka, N.; Bacher, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the experiment reported was to make a precise test of the enhanced pion field model in a medium-energy scattering experiment. The quantity probed is the spin-longitudinal response function, a measure of the nuclear pion density which is used explicitly in the pion-excess models of the EMC effect. The point of reference used is deuterium. The spin-dependent response functions for heavy targets and /sup 2/H are compared using identical experimental techniques. The technique of complete polarization transfer is used to separate the spin-longitudinal and spin-transverse response in the continuum. The experiment consisted of precise determinations of the polarization transfer coefficients for 500 MeV protons inelastically scattered from Pb, Ca, and /sup 2/H. The experiment utilized longitudinal, sideways, and normal polarized beams in conjunction with final polarization analysis from the focal-plane polarimeter of the high-resolution spectrometer. Quantities constructed from these data are the longitudinal and transverse spin-flip probabilities. Calculations were performed of the ratio of longitudinal to transverse response functions and of the EMC effect with the same model. No evidence was found for collectivity in the isovector spin-longitudinal response function. 10 refs. (LEW)

  4. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  5. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M. R.

    2006-04-11

    A number of the most recent results from the wealth of precision HERA data on high transverse energy jet production in deep inelastic scattering are reviewed. These measurements are confronted with predictions from next-to-leading order (NLO) Quantum Chromodynamics and allow the extraction of the strong coupling constant, {alpha}s, and have been used in QCD fits of the parton distribution functions in the proton.

  6. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  7. On the high energy proton spectrum measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.; Ito, A.; Macfall, J.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Tonwar, S. C.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yodh, G. B.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1977-01-01

    The steepening of the proton spectrum beyond 1000 GeV and the rise in inelastic cross sections between 20 and 600 GeV observed by the PROTON-1-2-3 satellite experiments were explained by systematic effects of energy dependent albedo (backscatter) from the calorimeter.

  8. Study of Protonic Mobility in CaHPO 4·2H 2O (Brushite) and CaHPO 4(Monetite) by Infrared Spectroscopy and Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortet, L.; Gavarri, J. R.; Nihoul, G.; Dianoux, A. J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the first quasi-elastic neutron scattering analysis of proton mobility in the solid electrolyte CaHPO4·2H2O (brushite). We have studied this hydrated phosphate, in powder state, from 190 to 520 K, using an incident wavelength of 5.12 Å. The time of flight spectra are converted inS(Q,ω) structure factor and inelastic frequency distributionP(Q,ω) in the energy range 0-200 meV (0-1600 cm)-1. A quasi-elastic contribution is clearly evidenced above room temperature; it is fitted with a jump model, involving hydrogen bonds. The quasi-elastic and inelastic scattering data are compared with FTIR results. Two kinds of motions are determined: jumps of acidic protons on hydrogen bonds and vibrations of lattice water molecules associated with the motion of their hydrogen atom on hydrogen bonds (Ea≈0.145 eV). Above 450 K the dehydration of the compound is accompanied by the appearance of a long-range diffusive motion and by the disappearance of some low-frequency inelastic bands.

  9. Phenomenology of deep-inelastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1983-03-01

    The field of heavy-ion deep-inelastic reactions is reviewed with particular attention to the experimental picture. The most important degrees of freedom involved in the process are identified and illustrated with relevant experiments. Energy dissipation and mass transfer are discussed in terms of particles and/or phonons exchanged in the process. The equilibration of the fragment neutron-to-proton ratios is inspected for evidence of giant isovector resonances. The angular momentum effects are observed in the fragment angular distributions and the angular momentum transfer is inferred from the magnitude and alignment of the fragments spins. The possible sources of light particles accompanying the deep-inelastic reactions are discussed. The use of the sequentially emitted particles as angular momentum probes is illustrated. The significance and uses of a thermalized component emitted by the dinucleus is reviewed. The possible presence of Fermi jets in the prompt component is shown to be critical to the justification of the one-body theories.

  10. Observations of solar flare gamma-rays and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-rays (4 to 7 MeV) and protons (8 to 500 MeV) were simultaneously observed from six flares on 1 Apr., 4 Apr., 27, Apr. 13, May 1981, 1 Feb. and 6 June 1982 by the Hinotori and GMS satellites. The relationship between 4 to 7 MeV gamma-ray fluences and peak 16 to 34 MeV proton fluxes for these flares are analyzed. It does not reveal an apparent correlation between these two parameters. The present result implies that the protons producing gamma-rays and the protons observed near the Earth do not always belong to the same population.

  11. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  12. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  13. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  14. Where is the proton's spin

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future. 33 refs.

  15. Structure in the Proton and the Neutron

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hofstadter, R.

    1958-06-01

    A survey of the recent work on the structures of the proton and the neutron carried out by high-energy electron-scattering methods is presented. Early work established finite size effects in the proton and led to information about the charge and magnetic density distributions in the proton. The rms size was established to be close to (0.77 plus or minus 0.10) x 10{sup -13} cm, and the density distributions of charge and anomalous magnetic moment were shown to be approximately of the same shape. The form factors could be described in terms of several alternative models given, for example, by an exponential, gaussian, hollow exponential, hollow gaussian, etc., distribution of densities. Many other shapes were excluded by the experimental data. Recent work by Bumiller and Hofstadter now fixes one among these models that is appropriate to the proton and provides an extremely good fit at all angles between energies of 200 and 650 Mev. The new evidence clearly favors the exponential model with rms radius (0.80 plus or minus 0.04) 10{sup -13} cm. Recent studies of the proton have attempted to answer the question: how closely similar are the charge and magnetic form factors? This work now shows that the distributions have the same sizes and shapes to within 10 per cent, and each distribution is given very closely by the exponential model described above with radius (0.80 plus or minus 0.04) x 10{sup -13}. Certain other similar models will be discussed. Early work on the inelastic continuum in the deuteron established that the neutron's magnetic structure was extended and not a point. It was further shown that the neutron's size was approximately the same as that of the proton. This work has recently been extended by Yearian and Hofstadter to a determination of the variation of the neutron's magnetic form factor over the range where the proton's form factor is known. The new results show: (1) the neutron is not a point, (2) the neutron's magnetic structure has a size lying

  16. SU-E-J-142: Prompt Gamma Emission Measurements From a Passively Scattered Proton Beam On Targets Containing 16O, 12C and 14N

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyasugiththan, J; Peterson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the prompt gamma emission from the important elements found in tissue ({sup 16}O,{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N) in a clinical passive-scatter treatment environment. Methods: The targets (composed of water, Perspex, graphite and liquid nitrogen) were irradiated with a 200 MeV passive-scatter proton beam and the discrete prompt gamma energy spectra was detected by a high resolution 2′ × 2′ LaBr. detector. In order to reduce the high level of radiation produced by the beam line elements, the detector was surrounded by 10 cm of lead to attenuate the scattered gamma-rays entering the detector with an extra 5 cm thick layer of lead added along the beam direction. A 10 cm thick collimator with a 5 cm × 10 cm rectangular opening was also used. Results: The prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were clearly identified as a Result of the inelastic nuclear reaction between the protons and the 16O atoms found in the water target. The 6.13 MeV peak was 5% higher than the peak at 4.44 MeV for the water target. The 4.44 MeV peak was the only identified emission in the prompt gamma energy spectra from the graphite target ({sup 12}C). The expected 2.313 MeV peak form the{sup 14}N (liquid nitrogen target) was identified, but the other expected {sup 14}N peaks could not be resolved. Conclusion: Prompt gamma measurements with a passive-scatter proton beam are possible, but the presence of a high amount of background radiation from the patient final collimator presents a challenge at the treatment isocenter. The prominent prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were identified from the water, Perspex and graphite targets. The prompt gammas from the liquid nitrogen target were difficult to see, but may not be significant in the in-vivo verification process.

  17. History of the ZGS 500 MeV booster.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; Martin; R.; Kustom, R.

    2006-05-09

    The history of the design and construction of the Argonne 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron from 1969 to 1982 is described. This accelerator has since been in steady use for the past 25 years to power the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS).

  18. Solar Gamma Rays Above 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes which lead to the production of gamma rays with energy greater than 8 MeV in solar flares are reviewed and evaluated. Excited states produced by inelastic scattering, charge exchange, and spallation reactions in the abundant nuclear species are considered in order to identify nuclear lines which may contribute to the Gamma ray spectrum of solar flares. The flux of 15.11 MeV Gamma rays relative to the flux of 4.44 MeV Gamma rays from the de-excitation of the corresponding states in C12 is calculated for a number of assumed distributions of exciting particles. This flux ratio is a sensitive diagnostic of accelerated particle spectra. Other high energy nuclear levels are not so isolated as the 15.11 MeV state and are not expected to be so strong. The spectrum of Gamma rays from the decay of Pi dey is sensitive to the energy distribution of particles accelerated to energies greater than 100 MeV.

  19. A dose calculation algorithm with correction for proton-nucleus interactions in non-water materials for proton radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Sato, S.; Kohno, R.

    2016-01-01

    In treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, the dose measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling by stopping power ratio {ρ\\text{S}} . Since the body tissues are chemically different from water, this approximation may cause dose calculation errors, especially due to differences in nuclear interactions. We proposed and validated an algorithm for correcting these errors. The dose in water is decomposed into three constituents according to the physical interactions of protons in water: the dose from primary protons continuously slowing down by electromagnetic interactions, the dose from protons scattered by elastic and/or inelastic interactions, and the dose resulting from nonelastic interactions. The proportions of the three dose constituents differ between body tissues and water. We determine correction factors for the proportion of dose constituents with Monte Carlo simulations in various standard body tissues, and formulated them as functions of their {ρ\\text{S}} for patient dose calculation. The influence of nuclear interactions on dose was assessed by comparing the Monte Carlo simulated dose and the uncorrected dose in common phantom materials. The influence around the Bragg peak amounted to  -6% for polytetrafluoroethylene and 0.3% for polyethylene. The validity of the correction method was confirmed by comparing the simulated and corrected doses in the materials. The deviation was below 0.8% for all materials. The accuracy of the correction factors derived with Monte Carlo simulations was separately verified through irradiation experiments with a 235 MeV proton beam using common phantom materials. The corrected doses agreed with the measurements within 0.4% for all materials except graphite. The influence on tumor dose was assessed in a prostate case. The dose reduction in the tumor was below 0.5%. Our results verify that this algorithm is practical and accurate for proton radiotherapy treatment planning, and

  20. Design of a proton microbeam of the PEFP

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Yong Hwan; Chang, Ji Ho; Kim, Kui Young

    2008-02-15

    The PEFP has been developing a 100 MeV proton linear accelerator and user facilities for 20 and 100 MeV proton beams. At one end of the five 20 MeV proton beam lines, a proton microbeam construction was considered for an application in the fields of material, biological, and medical sciences. To develop the proton microbeam, realization of a few MeV proton beam with a few tens of microamperes in diameter of a beam spot was essentially required. In this report, the basic descriptions of the proton microbeam which is composed of an energy degrader, slits, magnetic lens, a target chamber, and detectors are presented including a consideration of unfavorable aspects concerning some specific characteristics of a linear accelerator, such as pulse mode operation and fixed energy. Some calculation results from a Monte Carlo simulation by using the SRIM2006 and the TURTLE codes are also included.

  1. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  2. Time-dependent 2.2 MeV and 0.5 MeV lines from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1975-01-01

    The time dependences of the 2.2 MeV and 0.51 MeV gamma ray lines from solar flares are calculated and the results are compared with observations of the 1972, August 4 and 7 flares. Time lag between the nuclear reactions and the formation of these two lines are caused, respectively, by capture of the neutrons, and by deceleration of the positrons and decay of the radioactive nuclei. Results show that the calculation is consistent with the observed rise of the 2.2 MeV line on August 4, and it does not require different time dependences for the accelerated protons and electrons in the flare region. The above lags can explain the delayed gamma ray emission observed on August 7. Positrons of energies greater than about 10 MeV could be detected in interplanetary space following large solar flares.

  3. {gamma}-ray production by proton and {alpha}-particle induced reactions on {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Belhout, A.; Kiener, J.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Fitoussi, C.; Gounelle, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Sereville, N. de; Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Chabot, M.; Hammache, F.; Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.

    2007-09-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections for proton and {alpha}-particle interactions with {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe have been measured in the energy range 5-25 MeV with proton beams and 5-40 MeV with {alpha}-particle beams. Isotopically pure foils of {sup 24}Mg and foils of natural isotopical composition of C, MgO, and Fe have been used. {gamma}-ray angular distributions were obtained with five high-purity Ge detectors with bismuth germanate Compton shields placed at angles of 45 deg. to 157.5 deg. Cross sections for more than 50 different {gamma}-ray transitions were extracted, and for many of them no data have been published before. Comparison of present data with data available in the literature shows mostly good to excellent agreement. In addition to the production cross sections, high-statistics, low-background line shapes of the 4.438 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma} ray from inelastic scattering off {sup 12}C and spallation of {sup 16}O were obtained. Comparison with nuclear reaction calculations shows that these data place interesting constraints on nuclear reaction models.

  4. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  5. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  6. Transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy ion induced transfer reactions are usually considered to fall into two categories. Quasi-elastic processes, on one hand, are characterized by small energy transfers, with one-nucleon transfer reactions being a typical example. These processes are dominant for grazing collisions, and are generally described within simple one-step DWBA calculations. Deep inelastic reactions, on the other hand, occur for more central collisions where the interaction time is longer and subsequently more energy and particles can be exchanged. Quasi-elastic collisions dominate transfer reactions induced by light heavy ions (e.g., /sup 16/O) at energies not too high above the barrier, while deep inelastic collisions are observed mainly in reactions induced by heavier projectiles (Kr, Xe). In this contribution, we discuss the transition between these two processes for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb. /sup 48/Ti is located between light (/sup 16/O) and heavy (Kr) projectiles and should be well suited for a study of the interrelation between quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions. The experiments were performed with a 300 MeV /sup 48/Ti beam obtained from the Argonne National Laboratory superconducting linac. The outgoing particles were momentum analyzed in a split pole magnetic spectrograph and detected in the focal plane by a position sensitive ionization chamber. The specific energy loss, the magnetic rigidity and the total energy of the outgoing particles were measured enabling mass and Z-identification. The energy resolution was about 3 MeV, determined by the thickness of the /sup 208/Pb target, and thus excluded study of transfer reactions to discrete final states. Angular distributions were measured in the range theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ to 80/sup 0/ in steps of 5/sup 0/. 8 refs.

  7. Investigation of structure in {sup 23}Al via resonant proton scattering of {sup 22}Mg+p and the {sup 22}Mg(p,{gamma}) {sup 23}Al astrophysical reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Gono, Y.; Kato, S.

    2007-11-15

    Proton resonant states in {sup 23}Al have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of {sup 22}Mg+p with a {sup 22}Mg beam at 4.38 MeV/nucleon bombarding a thick (CH{sub 2}){sub n} target. The low-energy {sup 22}Mg beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). The energy spectra of recoiled protons were measured at average scattering angles of {theta}{sub lab}{approx_equal} 4 deg., 17 deg. and 23 deg. A new state has been observed at E{sub x}=3.00 MeV with a spin-parity assignment of (3/2{sup +}). In addition, resonant inelastic scattering has populated three more states at excitation energies of 3.14, 3.26, and 3.95 MeV, with proton decay to the first excited state in {sup 22}Mg being observed. The new state at 3.95 MeV has been assigned a spin-parity of J{sup {pi}}=(7/2{sup +}). The resonant parameters were determined by an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions with a SAMMY-M6-BETA code. The core-excited structure of {sup 23}Al is discussed within a shell-model picture. The stellar reaction rate of the {sup 22}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Al reaction has been reevaluated, and the revised total reaction rate is about 40% greater than the previous result for temperatures beyond T{sub 9}=0.3.

  8. Optimization of production yields, radionuclidic purity and hotcell shielding of SPECT and PET radionuclides produced by proton irradiation in variable energy 30 MeV cyclotrons--Part 67Ga.

    PubMed

    Adam-Rebeles, R; Van den Winkel, P; De Vis, L

    2007-09-01

    Optimization of the production parameters (incident and exit proton energy, thickness of the (68)Zn target layer, decay time to start chemical processing of an irradiated target after the end of bombardment) and of the thickness of the lead shield of the processing hotcell for the cyclotron production of (67)Ga by the (68)Zn(p,2n) threshold reaction are accomplished by powerful divide et impera and binary search algorithms with the Pharmacopoeia radionuclidic purity of the (67)Ga-citrate radiopharmaceutical at a reference time and the locally accepted dose rate level for the controlled area as boundary conditions. Two sets of equations are presented (one associated with the maximum production rate, the other with the use of a minimum target layer thickness) that allow the expression of the optimized production parameters, the radionuclide yields satisfying the Pharmacopoeia requirements at the start of distribution and the necessary shielding as a function of the required activity at the start of distribution and of the maximum allowable beam current on target.

  9. Very energetic protons in Saturn's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.

    1980-01-01

    Very energetic protons are trapped in the inner Saturnian radiation belt. The University of California at San Diego instrument on Pioneer 11 has definitely identified protons of energy greater than 80 MeV on channel M3 and has tentatively detected protons of energy greater than 600 MeV on channel C3. The spatial distribution of the protons is distinct from that of the trapped electrons, the main difference being that the protons are strongly absorbed by the innermost moons and that the electrons are not. The source strength for injecting protons by the decay of cosmic ray albedo neutrons generated in the rings of Saturn has been estimated. The required proton lifetime is approximately 20 years.

  10. Inelastic mode of polarised reflectometer REFLEX-P for observation of surface phonons and magnons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, D. A.; Bodnarchuk, V. I.; Peresedov, V. F.; Zhuravlev, V. V.; Schebetov, A. F.

    2000-03-01

    A new mode of the time-of-flight polarised neutron reflectometer for investigation of inelastic interaction between thermal neutrons and surface excitations via reflection by thin films is described. Using the direct inelastic method with rotating monochromator ( Δλ/λ=4×10 -2/λ, ΔE/E=0.09×10 -2×E 1/2, [λ]= Å, [E] =meV) and time-of-flight energy analysis the upper limit of the probability of thermal neutron - surface phonon inelastic collision for the Ni/Ti multilayer structure in the energy transfer region near the maximum of state density function of bulk Ni has been estimated experimentally.

  11. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  12. Earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    We report the measurement of the energy and angular distributions of earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV at 40 deg N geomagnetic latitude from a balloon at 120,000 ft, below 4.65 g/sq cm. The albedo-neutron omnidirectional energy distribution is flat to 50 MeV, then decreases with energy. The absolute neutron energy distribution is of the correct strength and shape for the albedo neutrons to be the source of the protons trapped in earth's inner radiation belt.

  13. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  14. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  15. Inelastic behavior of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N.; Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    A more accurate procedure was developed for the determination of the inelastic behavior of structural components. The actual stress-strain curve for the mathematical of the structure was utilized to generate the force-deformation relationships for the structural elements, rather than using simplified models such as elastic-plastic, bilinear and trilinear approximations. relationships were generated for beam elements with various types of cross sections. In the generational of these curves, stress or load reversals, kinematic hardening and hysteretic behavior were taken into account. Intersections between loading and unloading branches were determined through an iterative process. Using the inelastic properties obtained, the plastic static response of some simple structural systems composed of beam elements was computed. Results were compared with known solutions, indicating a considerable improvement over response predictions obtained by means of simplified approximations used in previous investigations.

  16. Resonance Region Structure Functions and Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Carl E. Carlson, Benjamin C. Rislow

    2012-04-01

    The primary motive of parity violating deep inelastic scattering experiments has been to test the standard model, particularly the axial couplings to the quarks, in the scaling region. The measurements can also test for the validity of models for the off-diagonal structure functions $F_{1,2,3}^{\\gamma Z}(x,Q^2)$ in the resonance region. The off-diagonal structure functions are important for the accurate calculation of the $\\gamma Z$-box correction to the weak charge of the proton. Currently, with no data to determine $F_{1,2,3}^{\\gamma Z}(x,Q^2)$ directly, models are constructed by modifying existing fits to electromagnetic data. We present the asymmetry value for deuteron and proton target predicted by several different $F_{1,2,3}^{\\gamma Z}(x,Q^2)$ models, and demonstrate that there are notable disagreements.

  17. Measurement of inelastic cross sections in relativistic deuteron-on-lead reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zamani, M.; Stoulos, S.; Fragopoulou, M.; Krivopustov, M.

    2010-10-15

    The inelastic cross section of deuterons hitting a lead target has been determined by the beam attenuation technique. A spallation neutron source based on a lead target was irradiated with 1.6- and 2.5-GeV deuterons. Solid-state nuclear track detectors as well as the activation method were used to obtain the neutron and proton distribution along the surface of the source. The attenuation coefficient was estimated by fitting the experimental data and taking into account the buildup effect and the beam attenuation. Using the attenuation coefficient, the interaction length and then the inelastic cross section of deuterons on lead reaction were determined.

  18. Low-energy cosmic ray protons from nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    The intensity of low-energy (less than 100 MeV) protons from nuclear interactions of higher-energy (above 100 MeV) cosmic rays with the interstellar medium is calculated. The resultant intensity in the 10- to 100-MeV range is larger by a factor of 3-5 than the observed proton intensity near earth. The calculated intensity from nuclear interactions constitutes a lower limit on the actual proton intensity in interstellar space.

  19. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore » inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  20. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  1. Data analysis for Skylab proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The data from a proton spectrometer flown aboard Skylab is examined. The instrument is sensitive to protons in the energy range 18 to 400 MeV. A partial failure of the spectrometer restricted spectral analysis to two energy bands, 18 to 27 MeV and 27 to 400 MeV. The directional data showed that a Gaussian angular distribution parameter of at least 70 degrees is required for the low energy band and at least 40 degrees for the high energy band. The data, integrated over angle, indicate that the AP3 model extrapolated down to 18-27 MeV is high by factors of 2 to 5 over most of the B-L space mapped. In the 27 to 400 MeV range, the AP3 model is 20 to 100 percent low at low and high values of L, and is high at medium L values in the B-L space mapped.

  2. Inelastic work and thermomechanical coupling in viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krempl, E.

    1983-01-01

    The inelastic deformation of engineering alloys was recently shown to be rate (time)-dependent at room temperature. Experiments reported herein demonstrate that inelastic strain path length is a suitable measure for the modeling of work hardening for these materials, whereas inelastic work is not appropriate. The measured deformation induced temperature change is well predicted by a previously proposed theory of thermomechanical coupling. It has been derived by neglecting the stored energy of cold work and by assuming tha the internal energy expression for thermoelasticity is valid even when the mechanical deformation is inelastic.

  3. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  4. Time-dependent 2.2-MeV and 0.5-MeV lines from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1975-01-01

    The time dependences of the 2.2- and 0.51-MeV gamma-ray lines from solar flares are calculated, and the results are compared with observations of the 1972 August 4 and 7 flares. The time lag between the nuclear reactions and the formation of these two lines is caused by capture of the neutrons and subsequent deceleration of the positrons and decay of the radioactive nuclei. Our main results are that the calculation is consistent with the observed rise of the 2.2-MeV line on August 4, and it does not require different time dependences for the accelerated protons and high-energy electrons in the flare region. The above lags can explain the delayed gamma-ray emission observed on August 7. Positrons of energies greater than about 10 MeV could be detected in interplanetary space following large solar flares.

  5. Out of Field Doses in Clinical Photon and Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubančák, Ján

    2010-01-01

    Out-of-field doses in homogenous cubical polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were studied in this work. Measurements were performed in clinical 171 MeV proton and megavoltae photon beam. As detectors, CaSO:Dy thermoluminescent detectors were used. According to expectancy, results showed that out-of-field doses are substantially lower for clinical proton beam in comparison with clinical proton beam.

  6. Fission time scales from anisotropic in-plane distributions in 100Mo+100Mo and 120Sn+120Sn collisions around 20A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, G.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.; Wessels, J. P.; Charity, R. J.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Stelzer, H.

    1993-10-01

    The characteristics of the fission step following a binary deep-inelastic interaction have been reconstructed for three-body events detected in the reaction 100Mo+100Mo at 18.7A MeV and 12-Sn+120Sn at 18.4A MeV. The observed anisotropy of the in-plane angular distributions points to the fast decay of a rotating (and strongly deformed) nuclear object formed at the end of the deep-inelastic interaction. The derived time scale of the process indicates that asymmetric divisions are faster than symmetric ones.

  7. Extension of PENELOPE to protons: Simulation of nuclear reactions and benchmark with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Sorriaux, J.; Vynckier, S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Describing the implementation of nuclear reactions in the extension of the Monte Carlo code (MC) PENELOPE to protons (PENH) and benchmarking with Geant4.Methods: PENH is based on mixed-simulation mechanics for both elastic and inelastic electromagnetic collisions (EM). The adopted differential cross sections for EM elastic collisions are calculated using the eikonal approximation with the Dirac–Hartree–Fock–Slater atomic potential. Cross sections for EM inelastic collisions are computed within the relativistic Born approximation, using the Sternheimer–Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength. Nuclear elastic and inelastic collisions were simulated using explicitly the scattering analysis interactive dialin database for {sup 1}H and ICRU 63 data for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, {sup 16}O, {sup 31}P, and {sup 40}Ca. Secondary protons, alphas, and deuterons were all simulated as protons, with the energy adapted to ensure consistent range. Prompt gamma emission can also be simulated upon user request. Simulations were performed in a water phantom with nuclear interactions switched off or on and integral depth–dose distributions were compared. Binary-cascade and precompound models were used for Geant4. Initial energies of 100 and 250 MeV were considered. For cases with no nuclear interactions simulated, additional simulations in a water phantom with tight resolution (1 mm in all directions) were performed with FLUKA. Finally, integral depth–dose distributions for a 250 MeV energy were computed with Geant4 and PENH in a homogeneous phantom with, first, ICRU striated muscle and, second, ICRU compact bone.Results: For simulations with EM collisions only, integral depth–dose distributions were within 1%/1 mm for doses higher than 10% of the Bragg-peak dose. For central-axis depth–dose and lateral profiles in a phantom with tight resolution, there are significant deviations between Geant4 and PENH (up to 60%/1 cm for depth

  8. AXAF Detector Backgrounds Produced By Cosmic Ray Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, K. L.; Dietz, K. L.; O'Dell, S. L.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    One of the science instruments on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), planned for launch in 1998 into a highly elliptical (10,000 km x 140,000 km) orbit, is a microchannel plate High Resolution Camera (HRC). This detector is designed to provide imaging and spectroscopic observations of x-rays emitted by stellar sources in the 0.1 to 10 keV energy range. Described here are analyses made to determine the expected time-dependent detector background from prompt and delayed (activation) radiation initiated by galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton interactions in the spacecraft and payload. Numerical simulations were made using the coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, analysis software, and data bases shown. The major codes are HETC for nucleon-meson transport, EGS for simulating electromagnetic cascades, and MORSE for low-energy (less than 15 MeV) neutron transport. The simulation follows the transport history of photons in the energy range from - 100 GeV down to approx. 0.1 keV due to gamma-ray sources from neutral pion decay, high-energy (spallation) collisions, and low-energy neutron inelastic scattering and capture reactions. Also included is radioisotope production and the tracking of gamma-rays, electrons, and positrons from induced radioactivity.

  9. Inelastic neutron scatter iron concentrations of the moon from orbital gamma ray data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A., Jr.; Bielefeld, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The considered investigation is concerned with the relation between KREEP and thermal neutron flux depression. The Fe(n, n-prime gamma) concentrations of selected lunar regions were calculated by energy-band analysis of the 0.803-0.872 MeV band. The result of the investigation will be used to evaluate the reliability of the previously determined Fe(n, gamma) values. A 0.803-0.872 MeV band was isolated from the Apollo 15 and 16 orbital gamma ray spectra. Preliminary regression analysis of regional ground truth count rates and Fe concentrations showed this energy interval to be optimum for the 0.8467 MeV inelastic scatter (n, n-prime gamma)Fe peak.

  10. Optimization of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) proton beam energy for BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    The reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7} Be has been proposed as an accelerator-based source of neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). This reaction has a large steep resonance for proton energies of about 2.3 MeV which ends at about 2.5 MeV. It has generally been accepted that one should use 2.5 MeV protons to get the highest yield of neutrons for BNCT. This paper suggests that for BNCT the optimum proton energy may be about 2.3 MeV and that a proton energy of about 2.2 MeV will provide the same useful neutron fluence outside a thinner moderator as the neutron fluence from a 2.5 MeV proton beam with a thicker moderator.

  11. Production of and in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; SVN, M. Keil; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhuo, Zhou; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The production of the strange and double-strange baryon resonances (, ) has been measured at mid-rapidity ( ) in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. Transverse momentum spectra for inelastic collisions are compared to QCD-inspired models, which in general underpredict the data. A search for the pentaquark, decaying in the channel, has been carried out but no evidence is seen.

  12. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung calculation: Comparison with recent high-precision experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yi; Liou, M.K.; Schreiber, W.M.

    2005-08-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung cross sections and analyzing powers have been calculated at 190 MeV by using a one-boson-exchange model. The results are compared with the recently published high-precision Kernfysisch-Versneller-Instituut (KVI) data. Satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment has been found.

  13. Measurement of inner radiation belt electrons with kinetic energy above 1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2015-10-01

    Data from the Proton-Electron Telescope on the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite, taken during 1992-2009, are analyzed for evidence of inner radiation belt electrons with kinetic energy E > 1 MeV. It is found that most of the data from a detector combination with a nominal energy threshold of 1 MeV were, in fact, caused by a chance coincidence response to lower energy electrons or high-energy protons. In particular, there was no detection of inner belt or slot region electrons above 1 MeV following the 2003 Halloween storm injection, though they may have been present. However, by restricting data to a less-stable, low-altitude trapping region, a persistent presence of inner belt electrons in the energy range 1 to 1.6 MeV is demonstrated. Their soft, exponential energy spectra are consistent with extrapolation of lower energy measurements.

  14. Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Selesnick, RS; Baker, DN; Jaynes, AN; Kanekal, SG; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Fennell, J; Blake, JB

    2015-01-01

    No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (tens of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable; thus, for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher-energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope on board Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, provides, for the first time, quantified upper limits on MeV electron fluxes in various energy ranges in the inner belt. These upper limits are rather different from flux levels in the AE8 and AE9 models, which were developed based on older data sources. For 1.7, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV electrons, the upper limits are about 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted model fluxes. The implication of this difference is profound in that unless there are extreme solar wind conditions, which have not happened yet since the launch of Van Allen Probes, significant enhancements of MeV electrons do not occur in the inner belt even though such enhancements are commonly seen in the outer belt. Key Points Quantified upper limit of MeV electrons in the inner belt Actual MeV electron intensity likely much lower than the upper limit More detailed understanding of relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere PMID:26167446

  15. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleusmore » rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.« less

  16. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  17. The alpha optical potential at 1,370 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauhoff, W.

    1986-06-01

    Data for elastic scattering of alpha particles from12C and Ca-isotopes at 1,370 MeV are analyzed in terms of a phenomenological optical potential. No evidence is found for deviations of the real part from the usual Woods-Saxon shape, as it is the case for proton scattering at corresponding energies. A further increase in nuclear transparency is found compared to 700 MeV.

  18. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  19. Measurements of transverse momentum in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Griffioen

    2012-12-01

    With mounting experimental evidence that only a small fraction of the proton's spin comes from the spins of its quarks and gluons, the quest for orbital angular momentum has begun. The parton distributions relevant to this depend on transverse quark momenta. Recent CLAS semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements probe these new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions using longitudinally polarized beams and targets and detecting {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0} in the final state.

  20. Modeling of Anisotropic Inelastic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J.; Nath, D.S.; Brown, A.A.; Casey, J.

    2000-02-25

    An experimental capability, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is being used to study the yield behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The objective of our research is to develop better constitutive equations for polycrystalline metals. We are experimentally determining the multidimensional yield surface of the material, both in its initial state and as it evolves during large inelastic deformations. These experiments provide a more complete picture of material behavior than can be obtained from traditional uniaxial tests. Experimental results show that actual material response can differ significantly from that predicted by simple idealized models. These results are being used to develop improved constitutive models of anisotropic plasticity for use in continuum computer codes.

  1. Phonon dynamics and inelastic neutron scattering of sodium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Zbiri, M.; Rols, S.; Schober, H.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    Sodium niobate (NaNbO3) exhibits an extremely complex sequence of structural phase transitions in the perovskite family and therefore provides an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions. We report temperature dependence of inelastic neutron scattering measurements of phonon densities of states in sodium niobate. The measurements are carried out in various crystallographic phases of this material at various temperatures from 300 to 1048 K. The phonon spectra exhibit peaks centered on 19, 37, 51, 70, and 105 meV. Interestingly, the peak near 70 meV shifts significantly towards lower energy with increasing temperature, while the other peaks do not exhibit any appreciable shift. The phonon spectra at 783 K show prominent change and become more diffusive as compared to those at 303 K. In order to better analyze these features, we have performed first-principles lattice dynamics calculations based on the density functional theory. The computed phonon density of states is found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on our calculation we are able to assign the characteristic Raman modes in the antiferroelectric phase, which are due to the folding of the T (ω = 95 cm-1) and Δ (ω = 129 cm-1) points of the cubic Brillouin zone, to the A1g symmetry.

  2. Deep Inelastic Scattering results from the first year of HERA operation

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, S.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first year of operation of the HERA electron-proton collider has resulted in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) Physics results from both the H1 and ZEUS experiments. Reported here are the H1 and ZEUS measurements of the proton structure function F{sub 2} at higher Q{sup 2} and lower x than previously reported from fixed target experiments. Also included are the results of QCD studies on hadronic final states and jets, and the observation of high Q{sup 2} charged current events from both experiments. Finally, the observation of events with large rapidity gaps by the ZEUS collaboration is also reported.

  3. Polarized lepton deep-inelastic scattering from few-nucleon targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    1989-06-01

    The structure functions for deep-inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized few-nucleon targets (nucleon, 2H, 3He) are calculated in a parton model. Spin-dependent quark distributions constructed along the lines of Carlitz-Kaur model are used. The asymmetry for scattering from polarized 3He is small in magnitude and dominated by the neutron contribution. For 2H, cancellation between proton and neutron contributions leads to a very small asymmetry below x≈0.1. Otherwise the asymmetry is large but dominated by the proton.

  4. Proton and heavy ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Larsson, B

    1975-01-01

    Penetrating ion beams are considered interesting supplements to the types of radiation, mostly electrons and gamma rays, that have dominated in radiation research and radiotherapy during the last decades. Biomedical experimentations and clinical studies ar larger ion accelerators (100-1000 MeV/amu) are therefore undertaken in order to exploit their possible clinical use in cancer therapy. It is concluded that an accelerator that permits effective use of protons (ca. 200 MeV) and deutrons (ca. 50 MeV, for neutron therapy) located in a central hospital would represent a convenient tool for clinical investigations at a larger scale. PMID:1201773

  5. Elastic scattering of polarised deuterons from 16O at 200, 400 and 700 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sen, Nguyen; Yanlin, Ye; Arvieux, J.; Gaillard, G.; Bonin, B.; Boudard, A.; Bruge, G.; Lugol, J. C.; Hasegawa, T.; Soga, F.; Antonuk, L. E.; Cameron, J. M.; Lam, S. T.; Neilson, G. C.; Roy, G.; Sheppard, D. M.; Babinet, R.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions of cross section, and Ay and Ayy analysing powers were measured for polarised deuteron elastic scattering from 16O at 200, 400 and 700 MeV. The data at 200 MeV bear evidence of the nuclear rainbow phenomenon while those at 400 and 700 MeV are reminiscent of the proton scattering results at equivalent energies. The data were analysed in terms of the optical model. The real central potential shape changes from an attractive Woods-Saxon form at 200 MeV to a wine-bottle-bottom form with a repulsive interior at 700 MeV. The total reaction cross sections deduced display a clear nuclear transparency effect in the present energy domain in agreement with predictions from the Glauber theory optical limit. Comparison with previous results for 40Ca and 58Ni targets is made.

  6. Dynamic color screening in diffractive deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelman, Gunnar; Pasechnik, Roman; Werder, Dominik

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel Monte Carlo implementation of dynamic color screening via multiple exchanges of semisoft gluons as a basic QCD mechanism to understand diffractive electron-proton scattering at the HERA collider. Based on the kinematics of individual events in the standard QCD description of deep inelastic scattering at the parton level, which at low x is dominantly gluon initiated, the probability is evaluated for additional exchanges of softer gluons resulting in an overall color singlet exchange leading to a forward proton and a rapidity gap as the characteristic observables for diffractive scattering. The probability depends on the impact parameter of the soft exchanges and varies with the transverse size of the hard scattering subsystem and is therefore influenced by different QCD effects. We account for matrix elements and parton shower evolution either via conventional DGLAP log Q2 evolution with collinear factorization or CCFM small x evolution with k⊥ factorization and discuss the sensitivity to the gluon density distribution in the proton and the importance of large log x contributions. The overall result is, with only two model parameters which have theoretically motivated values, a satisfactory description of the observed diffractive cross section at HERA obtained in a wide kinematical range.

  7. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  8. Observation of isoscalar multipole strengths in exotic doubly-magic 56Ni in inelastic α scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, S.; Gibelin, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Achouri, N. L.; Akimune, H.; Bastin, B.; Boretzky, K.; Bouzomita, H.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Damoy, S.; Delaunay, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Fujiwara, M.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Kamalou, O.; Khan, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lhoutellier, G.; Libin, J. F.; Lukyanov, S.; Mazurek, K.; Najafi, M. A.; Pancin, J.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Perrot, L.; Raabe, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roger, T.; Sambi, S.; Savajols, H.; Senoville, M.; Stodel, C.; Suen, L.; Thomas, J. C.; Vandebrouck, M.; Van de Walle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) compression modes have been studied in the doubly-magic unstable nucleus 56Ni. They were measured by inelastic α-particle scattering in inverse kinematics at 50 MeV/u with the MAYA active target at the GANIL facility. The centroid of the ISGMR has been obtained at Ex = 19.1 ± 0.5 MeV. Evidence for the low-lying part of the ISGDR has been found at Ex = 17.4 ± 0.7 MeV. The strength distribution for the dipole mode shows similarity with the prediction from the Hartree-Fock (HF) based random-phase approximation (RPA) [1]. These measurements confirm inelastic α-particle scattering as a suitable probe for exciting the ISGMR and the ISGDR modes in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  9. Relative degradation of near infrared avalanche photodiodes from proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes are compared for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural differences between devices.

  10. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  11. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  12. Ringlike inelastic events in cosmic rays and accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dremin, I. M.; Orlov, A. M.; Tretyakova, M. I.

    1985-01-01

    In cosmic rays and in accelerators there were observed single inelastic processes with densely produced (azimuthally isotropic) groups of particles exhibiting spikes in the pseudorapidity plot of an individual event (i.e. ringlike events). Theoretically the existence of such processes was predicted as a consequence of Cerenkov gluon radiation or, more generally, of deconfinement radiation. Nowadays some tens of such events have been accumulated at 400 GeV and at 150 TeV. Analyzing ringlike events in proton-nucleon interactions at 400 GeV/c it is shown that they exhibit striking irregularity in the positions of pseudorapidity spikes' centers which tend to lie mostly at 55,90 and 125 deg in cms. It implies rather small deconfinement lengths of the order of some fermi.

  13. Energy dissipation in heavy systems: the transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; van den Berg, A.; Kolata, J.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Kutschera, W.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Yntema, J.L.; Lee, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of medium mass projectiles (A = 28 - 64) with /sup 208/Pb has been studied using a split-pole spectrograph which allows single mass and charge identification. The reaction process in all systems studied so far is dominated by quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions, especially at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition to the quasi-elastic component deep inelastic contributions are present in all reaction channels. The good mass and charge separation allows to generate Wilczynski plots for individual channels; for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb we observe that the transition between the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic reactions occurs around Q = -(30 to 35) MeV.

  14. Solution of a Simple Inelastic Scattering Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Stephen K.

    1975-01-01

    Provides an analytical solution of a model representing the collision of an atom with a harmonic oscillator, interacting via a repulsive square well potential. Presents results for various energies and strengths of inelastic scattering. (Author/CP)

  15. Quantum chromodynamics and deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-08-01

    Moments of deep-inelastic structure functions, parton distributions and parton fragmentation functions are discussed in the context of Quantum Chromodynamics with particular emphasis put on higher order corrections. A brief discussion of higher twist contributions is also given.

  16. Inelastic diffraction and equivalence of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.

    1991-09-01

    A new approach to diffraction, based on the concept of equivalent states, is applied to the inclusive inelastic scattering. Differences from the classical description of Good and Walker are pointed out.

  17. Rovibrationally Inelastic Collisions of Ultracold Lithium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, William; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We have calculated cross sections for rovibrationally inelastic collisions of Li2 A(1) 1Σu+ colliding with neon and xenon on ab initio potentials. We find that the inelastic cross section can be very large and increasing at low collision velocity. This behavior is very well modeled as a Langevin process. The total inelastic cross section is a sizable fraction of the total capture cross section, typically about a third. For Li2 - Xe, the total inelastic rate constants are several thousand square angstroms, and level-to-level rate constants are several hundred square angstroms at collision speeds below 1000 cm/s, implying that such collisions might be observable in photoassociated lithium dimer.

  18. Impact of Solar Proton Events on High Latitude Ionospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the ionospheric response to the solar protons which are accelerated to different energies (MeV-GeV) and thought to be originated at the solar atmosphere during the various energetic phenomena knows as solar transients viz. Solar Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). These transients are believed to be a manifestation of same energy release processes from a highly complex condition in the magnetic field configuration on the solar surface. We have taken six solar proton events (SPE) of solar cycle 23rd for analysis in the various energy bands of the protons. In order to find the ionospheric responses to these incoming solar protons ionospheric total electron content (TEC) is taken as the characteristic parameter. We have taken the data observed by GOES satellites which provides the data for different energy channels (0.8-4 MeV, 4-9 MeV, 9-15 MeV, 15-40 MeV, 40-80 MeV, 80-165 MeV, and 165-500 MeV). The enhancement in peak TEC (∆TEC) was then obtained for the high latitude station Davis (Lat-68.35, Lon 77.58). To find the association of this enhancement with proton flux characteristics we derived the correspondence between spectral indices and ∆TEC. We obtained a strong correlation (0.84) to exist between the spectral indices and ∆TEC.

  19. Proton resonance scattering of 7Be

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Niikura, M.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.

    2006-07-12

    We have studied the proton resonance scattering of 7Be by using a pure 7Be beam produced at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator; CNS stands for Center of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). The excitation function of 8B was measured up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, with the thick-target method. The excited states of 8B higher than 3.5 MeV were not known by the past experiments. This proton elastic scattering is also of importance in relation with the 7Be(p,{gamma})8B reaction, which is a key reaction in the standard solar model.

  20. Proton resonance scattering of 7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Niikura, M.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied the proton resonance scattering of 7Be by using a pure 7Be beam produced at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator; CNS stands for Center of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). The excitation function of 8B was measured up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, with the thick-target method. The excited states of 8B higher than 3.5 MeV were not known by the past experiments. This proton elastic scattering is also of importance in relation with the 7Be(p,γ)8B reaction, which is a key reaction in the standard solar model.

  1. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinburnn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 0.09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 MeV and for three differential proton spectra of the type approximately E(- alpha). It is concluded that, even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar39 radioactivity.

  2. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  4. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  5. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  6. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... direction of the tumor. A machine called a synchrotron or cyclotron creates and speeds up the protons. ... redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should ...

  7. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L; Chung, Kiwhan; Greene, Steven J; Hogan, Gary E; Makela, Mark; Mariam, Fesseha; Milner, Edward C; Murray, Matthew; Saunders, Alexander; Spaulding, Randy; Wang, Zhehui; Waters, Laurie; Wysocki, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  8. Response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators to 2.5 MeV fusion neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Villari, S.; Weller, A.; Petrizzi, L.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-12-15

    Measurements of the response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) to 2.5 MeV neutrons have been carried out at the Frascati Neutron Generator and at tokamak facilities with deuterium plasmas. The observed spectrum has been interpreted by means of a Monte Carlo model. It is found that the main contributor to the measured response is neutron inelastic scattering on {sup 79}Br, {sup 81}Br, and {sup 139}La. An extrapolation of the count rate response to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium plasmas is also presented. The results are of relevance for the design of γ-ray diagnostics of fusion burning plasmas.

  9. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  10. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of the organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Kodituwakku, C. N.; Burns, C. A.; Said, A. H.; Sinn, H.; Wang, X.; Gog, T.; Casa, D. M.; Tuel, M.; Western Michigan Univ.; DESY, Hasylab

    2008-01-01

    We report resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on polycrystalline and single crystal samples of the organic semiconductor {beta}-copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as well as time dependent density functional theory calculations of the electronic properties of the CuPc molecule. Resonant and nonresonant excitations were measured along the three crystal axes with 120 meV resolution. We observe molecular excitations as well as charge-transfer excitons along certain crystal directions and compare our data with the calculations. Our results demonstrate that RIXS is a powerful tool for studying excitons and other electronic excitations in organic semiconductors.

  11. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-15

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%.

  12. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  13. Polarization observables in deuteron photodisintegration below 360 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Glister, J.; Ron, G.; Lee, B. W.; Gilman, R.; Sarty, A. J.; Strauch, S.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Piasetzky, E.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, W.; Arrington, J.; Arenhövel, H.; Beck, A.; Benmokhtar, F.; Berman, B. L.; Boeglin, W.; Brash, E.; Camsonne, A.; Calarco, J.; Chen, J. P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Coman, L.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; Dumas, J.; Dutta, C.; Feuerbach, R.; Freyberger, A.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Hansen, J. -O.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Ilieva, Y.; de Jager, C. W.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M. K.; Kang, Hyekoo; Kelleher, A.; Khrosinkova, E.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Markowitz, P.; May-Tal Beck, S.; McCullough, E.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Norum, B. E.; Oh, Y.; Olson, M.; Paolone, M.; Paschke, K.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Potokar, M.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Pomerantz, I.; Puckett, A.; Punjabi, V.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Reyhan, M.; Roche, J.; Rousseau, Y.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Schwamb, M.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Shneor, R.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Song, J.; Sparks, R.; Subedi, R.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhan, X.; Zhu, X.

    2011-02-03

    We performed high precision measurements of induced and transferred recoil proton polarization in d($\\vec{γ}$, $\\vec{p}$)n for photon energies of 277--357 MeV and θcm = 20 ° -- 120 °. The measurements were motivated by a longstanding discrepancy between meson-baryon model calculations and data at higher energies. Moreover, at the low energies of this experiment, theory continues to fail to reproduce the data, indicating that either something is missing in the calculations and/or there is a problem with the accuracy of the nucleon-nucleon potential being used.

  14. Polarization observables in deuteron photodisintegration below 360 MeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Glister, J.; Ron, G.; Lee, B. W.; Gilman, R.; Sarty, A. J.; Strauch, S.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Piasetzky, E.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, W.; et al

    2011-02-03

    We performed high precision measurements of induced and transferred recoil proton polarization in d(more » $$\\vec{γ}$$, $$\\vec{p}$$)n for photon energies of 277--357 MeV and θcm = 20 ° -- 120 °. The measurements were motivated by a longstanding discrepancy between meson-baryon model calculations and data at higher energies. Moreover, at the low energies of this experiment, theory continues to fail to reproduce the data, indicating that either something is missing in the calculations and/or there is a problem with the accuracy of the nucleon-nucleon potential being used.« less

  15. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  16. Pion in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Povh, B.

    2008-10-13

    The forward neutron production in the ep collisions at 300 GeV measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at DESY has been used to estimate the total probability for the proton fluctuation into n{pi}{sup +} and p{pi}{sup 0}. The probability found is on the order of the 30%. This number is compared with the numbers of obtained for the probability of quark fluctuation into {pi}{sup +} from several alternative DIS processes (Gottfried sum rule, polarized structure function) and the axial-vector coupling constant, where the pion fluctuation is believed to play an important role.

  17. Physics with tagged forward protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip,K.

    2009-08-30

    The physics reach of the STAR detector at RHIC has been extended to include elastic and inelastic diffraction measurements with tagged forward protons. This program has started at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run.

  18. DPA damage analysis for 14-MeV neutrons on PFC materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-woo; Lee, Bo-young; Ko, Seung-kook; Kim, Hee-soo; Noh, Seung-jung

    2015-06-01

    The dpa (displacement per atom) damage for 14-MeV neutron in a pfc materials was simulated using MCNPX/SPECTER code. The dpa values in the main components of the structural material SS316L, Fe, Cr and Ni, were calculated to analyze the effect of nuclear damage. According to the neutron wall load for ITER design base, a neutron flux of 3.5 × 1013 neutrons/cm2·sec was applied. The simulated dpa values were found to be as 3.0 dpa/fpy for Fe, 2.9 dpa/fpy for Cr and 3.1 dpa/fpy for Ni. For practical experiments, the simulated dpa values due to the irradiation damage of 17-MeV protons were found to be as 0.67 dpa at the peak and 0.05 at the surface for SS316L using by SRIM code at the same fluence. For the 17-MeV proton irradiation, the Bragg peak appears at a 0.64-mm depth. Also, SS316L specimens irradiated by a 17-MeV proton beam with a fluence of 1016 protons/cm2 were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Resonant inelastic hard x-ray scattering with diced analyzer crystals and position-sensitive detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Huotari, S.; Albergamo, F.; Vanko, Gy.; Verbeni, R.; Monaco, G.

    2006-05-15

    A novel design of a high-resolution spectrometer is proposed for emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic hard x-ray scattering applications. The spectrometer is based on a Rowland circle geometry with a diced analyzer crystal and a position-sensitive detector. The individual flat crystallites of the diced analyzer introduce a well-defined linear position-energy relationship within the analyzer focus. This effect can be exploited to measure emission spectra with an unprecedented resolution. For demonstration, a spectrometer was constructed using a diced Si(553) analyzer working at the Cu K edge with an intrinsic resolution of 60 meV. With the proposed design, spectrometers operating at the K edges of 3d transition metals can have intrinsic resolutions below 100 meV even with analyzer crystals not working in Bragg-backscattering conditions.

  20. Resonance frequency control for the KOMAC 100-MeV drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung

    2015-02-01

    A 100-MeV proton accelerator has been developed, and the operation and beam service started at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) in July 2013. The accelerator consists of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a 100-MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The resonance frequencies of the DTL tanks are controlled by using the resonance frequency control cooling system (RCCS), installed at every DTL tank. Until now, the RCCS has been operating in the constant temperature mode. If the system is to be stabilized better, the RCCS must be operated in the frequency control mode. For this purpose, studies, including the relation between the resonance frequency and RCCS operation temperature, were done under various conditions. In this paper, the preparations for the frequency control loop of the RCCS are described.

  1. FastPixN, a new integrated pixel chip for a future fast version of the IRSN - recoil proton telescope.

    PubMed

    Kachel, M; Husson, D; Higueret, S; Taforeau, J; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    A first prototype of recoil proton telescope (RPT) is currently working at the AMANDE facility, being developed as a collaboration between IPHC Strasbourg and the LNE-IRSN. The device, able to measure both energy and fluence of neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV, has to be improved further, in order to reduce the considerable inelastic background generated by the neutrons inside the RPT itself. To achieve faster running cycles, the present complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor pixels used for proton tracking are to be replaced by a new integrated chip, specially developed for this application. The authors present a first version of this new element, with individual pixels readout at a 200-MHz frequency, with a fast 4-bit ADC for each column of 64 pixels. The measured performances point to a complete frame treatment in only 12.6 µs. With a readout speed multiplied by a factor 400 over the existing device, the authors expect a considerable improvement of the telescope at AMANDE, with the potential to reach neutron fluence rates up to 10(7) n cm(-2) s(-1) or more.

  2. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy for topological insulators.

    PubMed

    She, Jian-Huang; Fransson, Jonas; Bishop, A R; Balatsky, Alexander V

    2013-01-11

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful spectroscopy that allows one to investigate the nature of local excitations and energy transfer in the system of interest. We study inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy for topological insulators and investigate the role of inelastic scattering on the Dirac node states on the surface of topological insulators. Local inelastic scattering is shown to significantly modify the Dirac node spectrum. In the weak coupling limit, peaks and steps are induced in second derivative d2I/dV2. In the strong coupling limit, the local negative-U centers are formed at impurity sites, and the Dirac cone structure is fully destroyed locally. At intermediate coupling, resonance peaks emerge. We map out the evolution of the resonance peaks from weak to strong coupling, which interpolate nicely between the two limits. There is a sudden qualitative change of behavior at intermediate coupling, indicating the possible existence of a local quantum phase transition. We also find that, even for a simple local phonon mode, the inherent coupling of spin and orbital degrees in topological insulators leads to the spin-polarized texture in inelastic Friedel oscillations induced by the local mode.

  3. Design and construction of a compact microwave proton source for a proton linac.

    PubMed

    Hong, I S; Park, B S; Jang, J H; Kwon, H J; Cho, Y S; Hwang, Y S

    2010-02-01

    A 100 MeV, 20 mA proton linear accelerator is being developed by the Proton Engineering Frontier Project at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. 20 MeV acceleration system using radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac was already developed and has been tested. To operate this acceleration system with a long time, more reliable proton source is needed. A compact microwave proton source was proposed and has been designed and constructed as a prototype ion source for the 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. The design of microwave power injection system is based on the microwave proton injector at LANL and CEA. The wave power from a 2.45 GHz, 2 kW magnetron source is introduced into a compact plasma chamber with 7 cm diameter and 5 cm length through a standard tapered, double-ridged waveguide (WRD250) and a quartz window. The microwave power supply is installed on high voltage platform. Axial magnetic fields up to 1 kG can be provided with a water-cooled solenoid coil. A single-hole three electrode extraction system is designed for an extraction current up to 30 mA at a 50 kV extraction voltage. The design and initial operations of the proton source are presented.

  4. Design and construction of a compact microwave proton source for a proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, I. S.; Park, B. S.; Jang, J. H.; Kwon, H. J.; Cho, Y. S.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2010-02-15

    A 100 MeV, 20 mA proton linear accelerator is being developed by the Proton Engineering Frontier Project at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. 20 MeV acceleration system using radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac was already developed and has been tested. To operate this acceleration system with a long time, more reliable proton source is needed. A compact microwave proton source was proposed and has been designed and constructed as a prototype ion source for the 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. The design of microwave power injection system is based on the microwave proton injector at LANL and CEA. The wave power from a 2.45 GHz, 2 kW magnetron source is introduced into a compact plasma chamber with 7 cm diameter and 5 cm length through a standard tapered, double-ridged waveguide (WRD250) and a quartz window. The microwave power supply is installed on high voltage platform. Axial magnetic fields up to 1 kG can be provided with a water-cooled solenoid coil. A single-hole three electrode extraction system is designed for an extraction current up to 30 mA at a 50 kV extraction voltage. The design and initial operations of the proton source are presented.

  5. The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

  6. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Investigations of Lattice Dynamics in SmFeAsO1-xFy Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Le Tacon, M.; Forrest, T.R.; Ruegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Noffsinger, J.; Walters, A.C.; Toulemonde, P.; Palenzona, A.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Karpinski, J.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2010-05-23

    We report measurements of the phonon density of states as measured with inelastic x-ray scattering in SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub y} powders. An unexpected strong renormalization of phonon branches around 23 meV is observed as fluorine is substituted for oxygen. Phonon dispersion measurements on SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub y} single crystals allow us to identify the 21 meV A{sub 1g} in-phase (Sm,As) and the 26 meV B{sub 1g} (Fe,O) modes to be responsible for this renormalization, and may reaveal unusual electron-phonon coupling through the spin channel in iron-based superconductors.

  7. Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  8. [Radiobiological effects of total mice irradiation with Bragg's peak protons].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Molokanov, A G; Ushakov, I B; Bulynina, T M; Vorozhtsova, S V; Abrosimova, A N; Kryuchkova, D M; Gaevsky, V N

    2013-01-01

    Outbred CD-1 female mice were irradiated in a proton beam (171 MeV, 5 Gy) on the phasotron at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia). Radiation was delivered in two points of the depth dose distribution: at the beam entry and on Bragg's peak. Technical requirements for studying the effects of Bragg's peak protons on organism of experimental animals were specified. It was recognized that protons with high linear energy transfer (mean LET = 1.6 keV/microm) cause a more severe damaging effect to the hemopoietic system and cytogenetic apparatus in bone marrow cells as compared with entry protons and 60Co gamma-quanta. It was shown that recovery of the main hemopoietic organs and immunity as well as elimination of chromosomal aberrations take more time following irradiation with Bragg's peak protons but not protons with the energy of 171 MeV.

  9. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Rygg, J R; Zylstra, A B; Séguin, F H; LePape, S; Bachmann, B; Craxton, R S; Garcia, E M; Kong, Y Z; Gatu-Johnson, M; Khan, S F; Lahmann, B J; McKenty, P W; Petrasso, R D; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Sayre, D B; Sio, H W

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the (3)He(d,p)(4)He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10(10) protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)(3)He reactions also show 2 × 10(10) isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons. PMID:26628185

  10. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  11. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. R.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (1010 protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (˜13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)3He reactions also show 2 × 1010 isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  12. Inelastic Neutron Scattering on Multiferroics NdFe3(BO3)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Shohei; Soda, Minoru; Itoh, Shinichi; Yokoo, Tetsuya; Ohgushi, Kenya; Kawana, Daichi; Masuda, Takatsugu

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiment is performed on single crystals of multiferroics NdFe3(11BO3)4 to explore the magnetic excitations. Fe-centered dispersive excitation with the band width of 5 meV is observed along the crystallographic c∗ direction and that of 3 meV is along the a∗ direction. The energy gap of 0.57 meV due to an axial-type anisotropy is ob- served at the AF zone center. The energy of Nd-centered flat excitation is 1 meV. Furthermore, anticrossing of the Fe- and Nd-centered excitations is observed, meaning the existence of the f -d coupling, i.e., the interaction between the Nd3+ and Fe3+ moments. Spin-wave analysis on the observed neutron spectrum revealed the underlying magnetic Hamiltonian in NdFe3(11BO3)4. Discussion on the axial-type anisotropy in the ab - plane based on the magnetic model leads to the conclusion that the anisotropy of the Nd3+ ion plays a main role in the determination of the structures of both magnetic moment and electric polarization in NdFe3(BO3)4.

  13. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  14. High Power Proton Accelerator Development at KAERI and its Vacuum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Ho; Park, Mi Young; Kim, Kui Young; Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Jun Yeon; Cho, Yong-Sub

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP), approved and launched by the Korean government in July 2002, includes a 100 MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) development and programs for its utilization and application. The main goals in the first phase of the project, spanning from 2002 to 2005, were the design of a 100 MeV proton linac and the development of a 20 MeV linac consisting of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a 20 MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The 50 keV injector and 3 MeV RFQ have been installed and tested, and the 20 MeV DTL is being assembled, tuned and under a beam test. At the same time, the utilization programs using the proton beam have been planned, and some are now under way. The vacuum system of the 20 MeV proton linac and its related issues, especially in operation with a high duty, are discussed in detail.

  15. Calculation of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent induced by medium energy neutrons and protons and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Bishop, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to determine the absorbed dose and dose equivalent for 592-MeV protons incident on a cylindrical phantom and for neutrons from 580-MeV proton-Be collisions incident on a semi-infinite phantom. For both configurations, the calculated depth dependence of the absorbed dose is in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 degrees continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 degrees split arc proton therapy (two 90 degrees arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  17. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sengbusch, E.; Perez-Andujar, A.; DeLuca, P. M. Jr.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-02-15

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 deg. continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 deg. split arc proton therapy (two 90 degree sign arcs) using CT profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  18. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, E.; Pérez-Andújar, A.; DeLuca, P. M.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180° continuous arc proton therapy and for 180° split arc proton therapy (two 90° arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the proton kinetic

  19. Polarized proton beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.

    2010-10-04

    The polarized beam for RHIC is produced in the optically-pumped polarized H{sup -} ion source and then accelerated in Linac to 200 MeV for strip-injection to Booster and further accelerated 24.3 GeV in AGS for injection in RHIC. In 2009 Run polarized protons was successfully accelerated to 250 GeV beam energy. The beam polarization of about 60% at 100 GeV beam energy and 36-42% at 250 GeV beam energy was measured with the H-jet and p-Carbon CNI polarimeters. The gluon contribution to the proton spin was studied in collisions of longitudinally polarized proton beams at 100 x 100 GeV. At 250 x 250 GeV an intermediate boson W production with the longitudinally polarized beams was studied for the first time.

  20. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Fesseha G.

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  1. Space Environments and Effects: Trapped Proton Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, S. L.; Kauffman, W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An improved model of the Earth's trapped proton environment has been developed. This model, designated Trapped Proton Model version 1 (TPM-1), determines the omnidirectional flux of protons with energy between 1 and 100 MeV throughout near-Earth space. The model also incorporates a true solar cycle dependence. The model consists of several data files and computer software to read them. There are three versions of the mo'del: a FORTRAN-Callable library, a stand-alone model, and a Web-based model.

  2. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  3. Energy Dependence of SEP Electron and Proton Onset Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, P. A.; Xie, H.; Gopalswamy, N.; St Cyr, O. C.

    2015-12-01

    We study the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events that were detected by GOES in the > 10 MeV energy channel during December 2006 to March 2014. Using multi-spacecraft observations from STEREO A, B and SOHO, we are able to determine accurately the solar particle release (SPR) time of SEP electrons and protons. We first compute connection angles (CA) between the solar events and magnetic foot-points connecting to each spacecraft. By choosing the smallest CA, we derive the electron and proton SPRs using electron fluxes from the SOHO Electron Proton and Helium Instrument (EPHIN), proton fluxes from the SOHO Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electron instrument (ERNE), and from the High Energy Telescope (HET) on STEREO. It is found that: 1) the 0.25 MeV-0.7 MeV electron SPRs are ~10 min earlier than 2.64 MeV - 10.4 Mev electron SPRs; 2) the proton SPRs inferred from high-energy channels (> 50 MeV) are similar to electron SPRs; 3) the proton SPRs inferred from lower energy channel (10 - 16.9 MeV) can be either ~ 7 min earlier than or delayed from the electron SPRs for tens of minutes to hours, especially for SEPs with large pre-event background flux levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of large scattering and high background levels on SPRs and made suggested corrections for the background effect on SPR times. We also find that for some large SEP events, the observed EPHIN electron and ERNE proton intensity profiles show a double-peak feature. The onset of the first peak corresponds well to the associated Type III and metric Type II onset and tends to be nearly scattering-free.

  4. Elastic and inelastic scattering of neutrons from 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Anthony Paul; McEllistrem, M. T.; Liu, S. H.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Peters, E. E.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Harrison, T. D.; Rice, B. G.; Thompson, B. K.; Hicks, S. F.; Howard, T. J.; Jackson, D. T.; Lenzen, P. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Pecha, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattered neutrons from 56Fe have been measured at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (www.pa.uky.edu/accelerator) for incident neutron energies between 2.0 and 8.0 MeV and for the angular range 30° to 150°. Time-of-flight techniques and pulse-shape discrimination were employed for enhancing the neutron energy spectra and for reducing background. An overview of the experimental procedures and data analysis for the conversion of neutron yields to differential cross sections will be presented. These include the determination of the energy-dependent detection efficiencies, the normalization of the measured differential cross sections, and the attenuation and multiple scattering corrections. Our results will also be compared to evaluated cross section databases and reaction model calculations using the TALYS code. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Universities Program: NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05, and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  5. Amorphous polymorphis in ice investigated by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, H.; Koza, M.; Tölle, A.; Fujara, F.; Angell, C. A.; Böhmer, R.

    High-density I lda and low-density I lda amorphous have been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) with emphasis on the energy window from 0.5 to 20 meV. At variance with earlier measurements the spectra in the I lda phase show a simple ω2 behaviour in the acoustic region and the temperature dependence is found to be harmonic. I lda converts with a strongly temperature-dependent rate towards I lda ice. We have investigated in detail the time evolution of both the static and dynamic response functions at several temperatures. Elastic small-angle signals indicate the presence of strong heterogeneties at the early stages of the conversion process. At least two different time scales are present in the transition. The structural changes are reflected in the frequency distribution. The first peak in the phonon density-of-states softens appreciably when going from I lda to I lda. In the acoustic region there is evidence that I lda is softer than both I lda and crystalline cubic ice I c. No signs of a fast ps process related to melting can be detected in the dynamics.

  6. Measurement of the ratio {σ n}/{σ p} in inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at very low χ and Q2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.; Fermilab E665 Collaboration

    1993-07-01

    We present results on the cross-section ratio for inelastic muon scattering on neutrons and protons as a function of Bjorken chi;. The data extend to χ values two orders of magnitude smaller than in previous measurements, down to 2×10 -5, for Q2>0.01 GeV 2. The ratio is consistent with unity throughout this new range.

  7. Internal spin structure of the proton from high energy polarized e-p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, V.W.; Baum, G.; Bergstroem, M.R.

    1981-02-01

    A review is given of experimental knowledge of the spin dependent structure functions of the proton, which is based on inclusive high energy scattering of longitudinal polarized electrons by longitudinally polarized protons in both the deep inelastic and resonance regions, and includes preliminary results from our most recent SLAC experiment. Implications for scaling, sum rules, models of proton structure, and the hyperfine structure interval in hydrogen are given. Possible future directions of research are indicated.

  8. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  9. Interplanetary proton fluence model - JPL 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Spitale, G.; Wang, J.; Gabriel, S.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an updated predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with energies respectively greater than 1, 4, 10, 30, and 60 MeV. This has been the first opportunity to derive a model from a data set that has been collected in space over a long enough period of time to produce a valid sample of solar proton events. The model provides a quantitative basis for estimating the exposures to solar protons of spacecraft during missions of varying length and of surfaces and atmospheres of solar system objects. The data sets contain several major proton events comparable to the 1972 event. For the cases of the over 10 and over 30 MeV particles, the fluences are somewhat lower than in our earlier model No over 1, over 4, and over 60 MeV proton fluence models have been published in the literature previously. We present our results in a convenient graphical form which may be used to calculate the 1 AU fluence expected at a given confidence level as a function of the length of the exposure. A method of extending this estimate to other heliocentric distances is described.

  10. Deep inelastic scattering near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.; Chan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic scattering was recently observed in heavy ion reactions at incident energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Traditional models of this process are based on frictional forces and are designed to predict the features of deep inelastic processes at energies above the barrier. They cannot be applied at energies below the barrier where the nuclear overlap is small and friction is negligible. The presence of deep inelastic scattering at these energies requires a different explanation. The first observation of deep inelastic scattering near the barrier was in the systems {sup 124,112}Sn + {sup 58,64}Ni by Wolfs et al. We previously extended these measurements to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni and currently measured the system {sup 124}Xe + {sup 58}Ni. We obtained better statistics, better mass and energy resolution, and more complete angular coverage in the Xe + Ni measurements. The cross sections and angular distributions are similar in all of the Sn + Ni and Xe + Ni systems. The data are currently being analyzed and compared with new theoretical calculations. They will be part of the thesis of J. Gehring.

  11. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  12. The dynamic inelastic response of delaminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.

    1996-12-01

    A generalized theory for laminated plates with delaminations is used to consider the influence of inelastic deformations on the dynamic behavior of composite plates with delaminations. The laminate model is based on a generalized displacement formulation implemented at the layer level. The delamination behavior can be modeled using any general interfacial fracture law: however, for the current work a linear model is employed. The interfacial displacement jumps are expressed in an internally consistent fashion in terms of the fundamental unknown interfacial tractions. The current theory imposes no restrictions on the size, location, distribution, or direction of growth of the delaminations. The proposed theory is used to consider the inelastic, dynamic response of delaminated plates in cylindrical bending subjected to a ramp and hold type of loading. The individual layers in the current study are assumed to be either titanium or aluminum. The inelastic response of both materials is modeled using the unified viscoplastic theory of Bodner and Partom. It is shown that the presence of both inelastic behavior and delamination can have a significant influence on the plate response. In particular it is shown that these mechanisms are strongly interactive. This result emphasizes the need to consider both mechanisms simultaneously.

  13. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  14. Neutron inelastic scattering by amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Thaper, C.L.; Sinha, S.K.; Dasannacharya, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on normal, N-deuterated glycine, normal and N-deuterated alanine, L-valine, L-tyrosine and, L-phenylalanine at 100 K, are reported. Coupling of the external modes to different hydrogens is discussed.

  15. Little Boy neutron spectrum below 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.E.; Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The leakage neutron spectrum from the Little Boy replica has been measured from 12 keV to 3 MeV using a high-resolution /sup 3/He ionization chamber, and from 1 keV to 3 MeV using proton-recoil proportional counters. The /sup 3/He-spectrometer measurements were made at distances of 0.75 and 2.0 m from the active center and at angles of 0/sup 0/, 45/sup 0/, and 90/sup 0/ with respect to the axis of the assembly. Proton-recoil measurments were made at 90/sup 0/ to the assembly axis at distances of 0.75 and 2.0 m, with a shielded measurement made at 2.0 m to estimate background due to scattering. The /sup 3/He spectrometer was calibrated at Los Alamos using monoenergetic /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be neutrons to generate a family of response functions. The proton-recoil counters were calibrated at Argonne by studying the capture of thermal neutrons by nitrogen in the counters, by observation of the 24-keV neutron resonance in iron, and by relating to the known hydrogen content of the counters. The neutron spectrum from Little Boy was found to be highly structured, with peaks corresponding to minima in the iron total neutron cross section. In particular, influence of the 24-keV iron window was evident in both sets of spectra. The measurements provide information for dosimetry calculations and also a valuable intercomparison of neutron spectrometry using the two different detector types. Spectra measured with both detectors are in essential agreement. 8 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  17. High and low energy proton radiation damage in p/n InP MOCVD solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Weinberg, Irving; Scheiman, Dave; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    InP p(+)nn(+) MOCVD solar cells were irradiated with 0.2 MeV and 10 MeV protons to a fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. The degradation of power output, IV behavior, carrier concentration and defect concentration were observed at intermediate points throughout the irradiations. The 0.2 MeV proton irradiated solar cells suffered much greater and more rapid degradation in power output than those irradiated with 10 meV protons. The efficiency losses were accompanied by larger increases in the recombination currents in the 0.2 MeV proton irradiated solar cells. The low energy proton irradiations also had a larger impact on the series resistance of the solar cells. Despite the radiation induced damage, the carrier concentration in the base of the solar cells showed no reduction after 10 MeV or 0.2 MeV proton irradiations and even increased during irradiation with 0.2 MeV protons. In a DLTS study of the irradiated samples, the minority carrier defects H4 and H5 at E(v) + 0.33 and E(v) + 0.52 eV and the majority carrier defects E7 and E10 at E(c)- 0.39 and E(c)-0.74 eV, were observed. The defect introduction rates for the 0.2 MeV proton irradiations were about 20 times higher than for the 10 MeV proton irradiations. The defect E10, observed here after irradiation, has been shown to act as a donor in irradiated n-type InP and may be responsible for obscuring carrier removal. The results of this study are consistent with the much greater damage produced by low energy protons whose limited range causes them to stop in the active region of the solar cell.

  18. Measurement of proton momentum distributions using a direct geometry instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Andreani, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of inelastic neutron scattering measurements on bulk water and ice using the direct geometry SEQUOIA chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (USA), with incident energy Ei= 6 eV. In this set up the measurements allow to access the Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering regime. The scattering is centred at the proton recoil energy given by the impulse approximation, and the shape of the recoil peak conveys information on the proton momentum distribution in the system. The comparison with the performance of inverse geometry instruments, such as VESUVIO at the ISIS source (UK), shows that complementary information can be accessed by the use of direct and inverse geometry instruments. Analysis of the neutron Compton profiles shows that the proton kinetic energy in ice at 271 K is larger than in room temperature liquid water, in agreement with previous measurements on VESUVIO.

  19. Quantum Behavior of Water Protons in Protein Hydration Shell

    PubMed Central

    Pagnotta, S.E.; Bruni, F.; Senesi, R.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum effects on the water proton dynamics over the surface of a hydrated protein are measured by means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy and deep inelastic neutron scattering. Dielectric spectroscopy indicates a reduced energy barrier for a hydrogenated protein sample compared to a deuterated one, along with a large and temperature-dependent isotopic ratio, in good agreement with theoretical studies. Recent deep inelastic neutron scattering data have been reanalyzed, and now show that the momentum distribution of water protons reflects a characteristic delocalization at ambient temperatures. These experimental findings might have far-reaching implications for enzymatic catalysis involving proton transfer processes, as in the case of the lysozyme protein studied in this report. PMID:19254553

  20. Pointing of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Risse, E.; Kalachnikov, M.P.; Nickles, P.V.; Sandner, W.; Schramm, U.; Habs, D.; Witte, J.; Schnuerer, M.

    2006-03-15

    Small fluctuations in the acceleration sheath change the pointing of a proton beam accelerated from the rear side of a laser irradiated thin aluminum foil. The proton acceleration was produced with 40 fs pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser at an intensity of approximately 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. This observation has been made with a high spatial resolution Thomson spectrometer. The proton beam pointing has appeared stable in the energy range between the high energy cutoff (3 MeV) and 50% of this value. Deviations of the beam position at lower energies changes in a range of 0-3 mrad. The recorded pictures show wiggled and continuous proton traces which imply a release of the proton beam from the acceleration zone with a velocity chirp.