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Sample records for mexican hat disposal

  1. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  2. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSPC documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

  3. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites will be cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Mexican Hat disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination of completion of remedial action for the disposal site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This LTSP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on two distinct types of activities: (1) site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity, and (2) monitoring of selected seeps to observe changes in flow rates and water quality. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat Disposal Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSP (based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program), documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

  5. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is a former uranium mill that is undergoing surface remediation in the form of on-site tailings stabilization. Contaminated surface materials from the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat site and are being consolidated with the Mexican Hat tailings. The scheduled completion of the tailings disposal cell is August 1995. Water is found in two geologic units at the site: the Halgaito Shale Formation and the Honaker Trail Formation. The tailings rest on the Halgaito Shale, and water contained in that unit is a result of milling activities and, to a lesser extent, water released from the tailings from compaction during remedial action construction of the disposal cell. Water in the Halgaito Shale flows through fractures and discharges at seeps along nearby arroyos. Flow from the seeps will diminish as water drains from the unit. Ground water in the lower unit, the Honaker Trail Formation, is protected from contamination by an upward hydraulic gradient. There are no nearby water supply wells because of widespread poor background ground water quality and quantity, and the San Juan River shows no impacts from the site. This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) recommends sampling six seeps and one upgradient monitor well compared in the Honaker Trail Formation. Samples will be taken in April 1994 (representative of high group water levels) and September 1994 (representative of low ground water levels). Analyses will be performed on filtered samples for plume indicator parameters.

  7. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

  8. Mexican Hat Wavelet Kernel ELM for Multiclass Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Tian-Lei

    2017-01-01

    Kernel extreme learning machine (KELM) is a novel feedforward neural network, which is widely used in classification problems. To some extent, it solves the existing problems of the invalid nodes and the large computational complexity in ELM. However, the traditional KELM classifier usually has a low test accuracy when it faces multiclass classification problems. In order to solve the above problem, a new classifier, Mexican Hat wavelet KELM classifier, is proposed in this paper. The proposed classifier successfully improves the training accuracy and reduces the training time in the multiclass classification problems. Moreover, the validity of the Mexican Hat wavelet as a kernel function of ELM is rigorously proved. Experimental results on different data sets show that the performance of the proposed classifier is significantly superior to the compared classifiers. PMID:28321249

  9. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

  10. UMTRA Project Site Observational Work Plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Surface cleanup activities at the Mexican Hat UMTRA processing site are nearing completion. Ground Water contamination at the Mexican Hat site is a result of uranium milling operations. The extent of residual process water has been identified, and it is limited to the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the site. Deeper aquifers are not affected because of an upward hydraulic gradient and the presence of a confining unit (the deeper aquifers are protected by hydrogeologic isolation). The uppermost unit is returning to its pre-milling, mainly unsaturated state. The unit that contains the contaminated water is not a ground water resource because it qualifies as Class III (limited use) based on limited yield. Ground water in the uppermost unit is currently not used and is not anticipated to be used as a ground water resource. The nearby San Juan River and a converted oil exploration well provide all of the water needs for the area. There are no current threats to human health or livestock; and, because the zone of contamination does not represent a ground water resource, none are anticipated in the future. There are, however, seeps where contaminated water is exposed at land surface. The seeps create potential exposure pathways for plants and wildlife. It is not known at this time if there is a risk to the environment. Additional investigations are needed and are described in this document to confirm the presence or absence of potential environmental risks. Additional hydrogeologic investigations are not required. The proposed ground water compliance strategy for the site is no remediation, because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer (which is also the zone of contamination) qualifies for supplemental standards based on Class III, limited yield, and because there are no threats to human health. Domestic and agricultural water is pumped from a deeper aquifer that is isolated from the contaminated zone.

  11. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  12. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  13. [Remedial action plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah]. Appendix F, Groundwater hydrology calculations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This document contains the ground water hydrology calculations for the remedial action plan for the codisposal and stabilization of uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. Included are calculations for the following: slug test analyses for monitor wells, analyses of packer tests, hydraulic gradients and ground water velocities, volume of released water, aquifer pumping test analysis, slug test analysis to determine hydraulic conductivity, and gradient calculations.

  14. The Mexican hat effect on the delamination buckling of a compressed thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Yun

    2014-12-01

    Because of the interaction between film and substrate, the film buckling stress can vary significantly, depending on the delamination geometry, the film and substrate mechanical properties. The Mexican hat effect indicates such interaction. An analytical method is presented, and related dimensional analysis shows that a single dimensionless parameter can effectively evaluate the effect.

  15. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of Mexican hat bands in van-der-Waals materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Darshana; Zahid, Ferdows; Lake, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Mexican hat dispersions are relatively common in few-layer two-dimensional materials. In one to four monolayers of the group-III chalcogenides (GaS, GaSe, InS, InSe) and Bi2Se3 the valence band undergoes a band inversion from a parabolic to an inverted Mexican hat dispersion as the film thickness is reduced from bulk to a single monolayer. The band inversion is robust against changes in stacking order, omission or inclusion of spin-orbit coupling and the choice of functional. The Mexican hat dispersion results in a 1/√{ E} singularity in the two-dimensional density of states and a step-function turn on in the density of modes. The largest radius of the ring of states occurs for a single monolayer of each material. The dispersion with the largest radius coincides with the maximum power factor and ZT for a material at room temperature. Ab-initio electronic structure calculations are used with a Landauer approach to calculate the thermoelectric transport coefficients. Analytical models of the Mexican hat and the parabolic dispersions are used for comparison and analysis. Vertically biased bilayer graphene could serve as an experimental test-bed for measuring this effect since the radius of the Mexican hat band edge increases linearly with vertical electric field. Support by the NSF and SRC-NRI Project 2204.001 (NSF-ECCS-1124733), FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a SRC program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and the use of XSEDE NSF Grant # OCI-1053575.

  16. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

  17. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Appendix D, Addenda D1--D7

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation foe the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Project Office, in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. the objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on-pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra-226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  18. Spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, and eventually of parity, in a σ-model with two Mexican hats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    A σ-model with two linked Mexican hats is discussed. This scenario could be realized in low-energy QCD when the ground state and the first excited (pseudo)scalar mesons are included, and where not only in the subspace of the ground states, but also in that of the first excited states, a Mexican hat potential is present. This possibility can change some basic features of a low-energy hadronic theory of QCD. It is also shown that spontaneous breaking of parity can occur in the vacuum for some parameter choice of the model.

  19. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

  20. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1989-01-01

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  1. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

  2. Bayesian estimation inherent in a Mexican-hat-type neural network.

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Brain functions, such as perception, motor control and learning, and decision making, have been explained based on a Bayesian framework, i.e., to decrease the effects of noise inherent in the human nervous system or external environment, our brain integrates sensory and a priori information in a Bayesian optimal manner. However, it remains unclear how Bayesian computations are implemented in the brain. Herein, I address this issue by analyzing a Mexican-hat-type neural network, which was used as a model of the visual cortex, motor cortex, and prefrontal cortex. I analytically demonstrate that the dynamics of an order parameter in the model corresponds exactly to a variational inference of a linear Gaussian state-space model, a Bayesian estimation, when the strength of recurrent synaptic connectivity is appropriately stronger than that of an external stimulus, a plausible condition in the brain. This exact correspondence can reveal the relationship between the parameters in the Bayesian estimation and those in the neural network, providing insight for understanding brain functions.

  3. Bayesian estimation inherent in a Mexican-hat-type neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Brain functions, such as perception, motor control and learning, and decision making, have been explained based on a Bayesian framework, i.e., to decrease the effects of noise inherent in the human nervous system or external environment, our brain integrates sensory and a priori information in a Bayesian optimal manner. However, it remains unclear how Bayesian computations are implemented in the brain. Herein, I address this issue by analyzing a Mexican-hat-type neural network, which was used as a model of the visual cortex, motor cortex, and prefrontal cortex. I analytically demonstrate that the dynamics of an order parameter in the model corresponds exactly to a variational inference of a linear Gaussian state-space model, a Bayesian estimation, when the strength of recurrent synaptic connectivity is appropriately stronger than that of an external stimulus, a plausible condition in the brain. This exact correspondence can reveal the relationship between the parameters in the Bayesian estimation and those in the neural network, providing insight for understanding brain functions.

  4. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

  5. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential.

    PubMed

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  6. Helper Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Special clothing is worn by "community helpers" such as police officers, nurses, firefighters, cafeteria workers, dentists, and waste management workers as they do their jobs. The special clothing allows workers to be safe. Therefore, exploring how hats help community workers do their jobs can be a way to introduce the idea of how the shape or…

  7. Hats Off.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    The materials in this lesson plan introduces students to the U.S. Navy by exploring the hats officers and enlisted personnel wear to work. The lesson is appropriate for students in grades 1-3 and was designed in accordance with local and national social studies standards. The lesson plan cites educational objectives and lists materials provided.…

  8. Program Transformation in HATS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1999-02-24

    HATS is a general purpose syntax derivation tree based transformation system in which transformation sequences are described in special purpose language. A powerful feature of this language is that unification is an explicit operation. By making unification explicit, an elegant framework arises in which to express complex application conditions which in turn enables refined control strategies to be realized. This paper gives an overview of HATS, focusing especially on the framework provided by the transformation language and its potential with respect to control and general purpose transformation.

  9. 30 CFR 56.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 56.15002 Section 56.15002 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or plant where falling...

  10. 30 CFR 57.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 57.15002 Section 57.15002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or...

  11. Transpositionally active episomal hAT elements

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background hAT elements and V(D)J recombination may have evolved from a common ancestral transposable element system. Extrachromosomal, circular forms of transposable elements (referred to here as episomal forms) have been reported yet their biological significance remains unknown. V(D)J signal joints, which resemble episomal transposable elements, have been considered non-recombinogenic products of V(D)J recombination and a safe way to dispose of excised chromosomal sequences. V(D)J signal joints can, however, participate in recombination reactions and the purpose of this study was to determine if hobo and Hermes episomal elements are also recombinogenic. Results Up to 50% of hobo/Hermes episomes contained two intact, inverted-terminal repeats and 86% of these contained from 1-1000 bp of intercalary DNA. Episomal hobo/Hermes elements were recovered from Musca domestica (a natural host of Hermes), Drosophila melanogaster (a natural host of hobo) and transgenic Drosophila melanogaster and Aedes aegypti (with autonomous Hermes elements). Episomal Hermes elements were recovered from unfertilized eggs of M. domestica and D. melanogaster demonstrating their potential for extrachromosomal, maternal transmission. Reintegration of episomal Hermes elements was observed in vitro and in vivo and the presence of Hermes episomes resulted in lower rates of canonical Hermes transposition in vivo. Conclusion Episomal hobo/Hermes elements are common products of element excision and can be maternally transmitted. Episomal forms of Hermes are capable of integration and also of influencing the transposition of canonical elements suggesting biological roles for these extrachromosomal elements in element transmission and regulation. PMID:20003420

  12. Mexican environments

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, L.; Nieder, P.

    1995-06-01

    This paper addresses the broad Mexican demographic/economic environment as it influences/interacts with the Mexican physical environment. Mexico is relatively resource-rich, but a high population yields a low per capita income, one sixth that of the United States an Canada, still above levels of most other American countries. The Mexican population has become highly urbanized, and population will continue to increase well into the next century. Mexico City will continue to dominate the Mexican urban hierarchy into the future, and the heavy concentration of people has resulted in a heavy concentration of environmental problems in the Mexico City region. A multi-billion-dollar program has been implemented with a goal of limiting air emissions in 2010 to the levels experienced in 1990. Numerous Mexican environmental problems exist beyond Mexico City, in border areas, and throughout Mexico, but qualified professionals and other resources needed for assessments and management are lacking. The authors conclude that continued economic/environmental cooperation among Canada, the United States, and Mexico will help Mexico to acquire resources needed to improve its infrastructure, environmental education, and environmental education, and environmental management, but the authors question whether Mexico, even with reduced population growth, will be able to attain levels of affluence currently enjoyed in the United State and Canada. They raise, but leave unanswered, the larger question of the level of environmentally sound development which is achievable, appropriate, and sustainable for Mexico and for the North American continent as a whole.

  13. Extrasolar planet search with the HAT network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Csák, B.; Gálfi, G.; Pál, A.

    2006-02-01

    We summarize the current status of the HAT Network project. Started up in 2003 with a single telescope, HATNet has grown to an array of six almost identical, fully automated, wide-field telescopes spread in geographical longitude, plus a higher resolution photometry follow-up instrument called TopHAT. The instruments are maintained and controlled from the Center for Astrophysics, and are fully dedicated to planetary transit and variability search. Photometric precision reaches 3mmag for stars at I≈8, and data from separate stations can be readily combined. TopHAT is able to achieve millimag follow-up photometry. As of June 2005, 100000 stars have been thoroughly analyzed (30000 with photometry better than 1%); numerous transit candidates have been found and followed up by spectroscopy or photometry. Most of these turned out to be false positives, with a few cases still pending.

  14. James J. Gallagher: Man in the White Hat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Jennifer L.; Robinson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    In classic Western movies, the good guy could be frequently identified by his trademark white Stetson hat, whereas the bad guy always wore black. James J. Gallagher wore many hats during his career that spanned over six decades; he too would be known as the "man in the white hat,"--trusted to do the right thing. From 1967 to 1970,…

  15. Disposable rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  16. Disposal rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  17. Disposable Scholarship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Fredrick

    2004-01-01

    The digital materials that faculty produce for their classrooms often are saved only to storage devices that might become obsolete in a few years. Without an institutional effort to provide access systems, storage, and services for their digital media, are campuses in danger of creating "Disposable Scholarship"? In this article, the author…

  18. HATS-31b through HATS-35b: Five Transiting Hot Jupiters Discovered By the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Brahm, R.; Hartman, J. D.; Espinoza, N.; Penev, K.; Ciceri, S.; Jordán, A.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Tan, T. G.; Tinney, C. G.; Wright, D. J.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Bailey, J.; Suc, V.; Durkan, S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of five new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered by the HATSouth survey, HATS-31b through HATS-35b. These planets orbit moderately bright stars with V magnitudes within the range of 11.9-14.4 mag while the planets span a range of masses of 0.88-1.22 {M}{{J}} and have somewhat inflated radii between 1.23 and 1.64 {R}{{J}}. These planets can be classified as typical hot Jupiters, with HATS-31b and HATS-35b being moderately inflated gas giant planets with radii of 1.64+/- 0.22 {R}{{J}} and {1.464}-0.044+0.069 {R}{{J}}, respectively, that can be used to constrain inflation mechanisms. All five systems present a higher Bayesian evidence for a fixed-circular-orbit model than for an eccentric orbit. The orbital periods range from 1.8209993+/- 0.0000016 day for HATS-35b) to 3.377960+/- 0.000012 day for HATS-31b. Additionally, HATS-35b orbits a relatively young F star with an age of 2.13+/- 0.51 Gyr. We discuss the analysis to derive the properties of these systems and compare them in the context of the sample of well-characterized transiting hot Jupiters known to date. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m and Euler1.2 m Telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopy and photometry for HAT-P-50--HAT-P-53 (Hartman+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; Bakos, G. A.; Bieryla, A.; Kovacs, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Sato, B.; Boisse, I.; Falco, E.; Everett, M. E.; Szklenar, T.; Fulton, B. J.; Shporer, A.; Kovacs, T.; Hansen, T.; Beky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-04-01

    The HATNet network consists of six identical fully automated instruments, with four at Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) in AZ, and two on the roof of the Submillimeter Array Hangar Building at Mauna Kea Observatory (MKO) in HI. The light-gathering elements of each instrument include an 11cm diameter telephoto lens, a Sloan r filter, and a 4K*4K front-side-illuminated CCD camera. Observations made in 2007 and early 2008 were carried out using a Cousins R filter. The instruments have a field of view of 10.6°*10.6° and a pixel scale of 9"/pixel at the center of an image. Additional time-series photometric measurements were obtained for all four of the systems using Keplercam on the FLWO 1.2m telescope. For HAT-P-50 we also obtained follow-up photometry with the CCD imager on the Byrne Observatory at Sedgwick (BOS) 0.8m telescope, located at Sedgwick Reserve in Santa Ynez Valley, CA, and operated by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope institute (LCOGT). HAT-P-50 was observed with HAT-10/G316 on 2008 Nov-2009 May, with HAT-5/G364 on 2009 May, with HAT-9/G364 on 2008 Dec-2009 May, with BOS on 2012 Feb 15, on 2012 Feb 21 and on 2012 Apr 08, and with Keplercam on 2012 Feb 18, on 2012 Nov 28, on 2012 Dec 23, on 2013 Jan 14, and on 2013 Jan 17. HAT-P-51 was observed with HAT-6/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-9/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-10/G165 on 2010 Sep-2011 Jan, with HAT-5/G165 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-8/G165 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-6/G209 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-9/G209 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-7/G210 on 2010 Nov-2011 Jan, and with Keplercam on 2011 Oct 21, on 2012 Jan 05, on 2012 Oct 05, on 2012 Oct 26, and on 2012 Nov 12. HAT-P-52 was observed with HAT-5/G212 on 2010 Sep-Nov, with HAT-8/G212 on 2010 Aug-Nov, and with Keplercam on 2010 Dec 23, on 2011 Sep 05, on 2011 Sep 27, on 2011 Nov 21, and on 2012 Jan 07. HAT-P-53 was observed with HAT-6/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-9/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with

  20. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  1. WARM SPITZER PHOTOMETRY OF THREE HOT JUPITERS: HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b AND HAT-P-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Lewis, Nikole K.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Sada, Pedro V.; Charbonneau, David; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2013-06-20

    We present Warm Spitzer/IRAC secondary eclipse time series photometry of three short-period transiting exoplanets, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b, in both the available 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b are Jupiter-mass objects orbiting an early K and an early G dwarf star, respectively. For HAT-P-3b we find eclipse depths of 0.112%+0.015%-0.030% (3.6 micron) and 0.094%+0.016%-0.009% (4.5 {mu}m). The HAT-P-4b values are 0.142%+0.014%-0.016% (3.6 micron) and 0.122%+0.012%-0.014% 4.5 {mu}m). The two planets' photometry is consistent with inefficient heat redistribution from their day to night sides (and low albedos), but it is inconclusive about possible temperature inversions in their atmospheres. HAT-P-12b is a Saturn-mass planet and is one of the coolest planets ever observed during secondary eclipse, along with the hot Neptune GJ 436b and the hot Saturn WASP-29b. We are able to place 3{sigma} upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth of HAT-P-12b in both wavelengths: <0.042% (3.6 {mu}m) and <0.085% (4.5 {mu}m). We discuss these results in the context of the Spitzer secondary eclipse measurements of GJ 436b and WASP-29b. It is possible that we do not detect the eclipses of HAT-P-12b due to high eccentricity, but find that weak planetary emission in these wavelengths is a more likely explanation. We place 3{sigma} upper limits on the |e cos {omega}| quantity (where e is eccentricity and {omega} is the argument of periapsis) for HAT-P-3b (<0.0081) and HAT-P-4b (<0.0042), based on the secondary eclipse timings.

  2. Six Thinking Hats: Argumentativeness and Response to Thinking Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, Walter John, III

    A study presents a perceptual model of thinking called the "Six Thinking Hats" and argumentativeness as a predictor of response to the model. The "Six Thinking Hats" model creates six artificial contexts for thinking, corresponding to the primary thought modes of objective, subjective, critical, and creative thinking, within a…

  3. Structure and evolution of the hAT transposon superfamily.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E; Lithwick, G; Levy, A A

    2001-07-01

    The maize transposon Activator (Ac) was the first mobile DNA element to be discovered. Since then, other elements were found that share similarity to Ac, suggesting that it belongs to a transposon superfamily named hAT after hobo from Drosophila, Ac from maize, and Tam3 from snapdragon. We addressed the structure and evolution of hAT elements by developing new tools for transposon mining and searching the public sequence databases for the hallmarks of hAT elements, namely the transposase and short terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) flanked by 8-bp host duplications. We found 147 hAT-related sequences in plants, animals, and fungi. Six conserved blocks could be identified in the transposase of most hAT elements. A total of 41 hAT sequences were flanked by TIRs and 8-bp host duplications and, out of these, 34 sequences had TIRs similar to the consensus determined in this work, suggesting that they are active or recently active transposons. Phylogenetic analysis and clustering of hAT sequences suggest that the hAT superfamily is very ancient, probably predating the plant-fungi-animal separation, and that, unlike previously proposed, there is no evidence that horizontal gene transfer was involved in the evolution of hAT elements.

  4. Spin-orbit inclinations of the exoplanetary systems HAT-P-8b, HAT-P-9b, HAT-P-16b, and HAT-P-23b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutou, C.; Díaz, R. F.; Udry, S.; Hébrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Santerne, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Arnold, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Eggenberger, A.; Forveille, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Martinez, P.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.; Ségransan, D.; Toublanc, D.; Troncin, J. P.; Vanhuysse, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2011-09-01

    We report the measurement of the spin-orbit angle of the extra-solar planets HAT-P-8 b, HAT-P-9 b, HAT-P-16 b, and HAT-P-23 b, based on spectroscopic observations performed at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope. Radial velocity measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect show the detection of an apparent prograde, aligned orbit for all systems. The projected spin-orbit angles are found to be λ = -17°+9.2-11.5, -16° ± 8°, -10° ± 16°, and +15° ± 22° for HAT-P-8, HAT-P-9, HAT-P-16, and HAT-P-23, respectively, with corresponding projected rotational velocities of 14.5 ± 0.8, 12.5 ± 1.8, 3.9 ± 0.8, and 7.8 ± 1.6 km s-1. These new results increase to 37 the number of accurately measured spin-orbit angles in transiting extrasolar systems. We conclude by drawing a tentative picture of the global behaviour of orbital alignement, involving the complexity and diversity of possible mechanisms. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE Consortium (program 10A.PNP.CONS).

  5. HATS-13b and HATS-14b: two transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Hartman, J. D.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Jordán, A.; Suc, V.; Bhatti, W.; Schmidt, B.; Sato, B.; Tan, T. G.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-13b and HATS-14b, which are two hot-Jupiter transiting planets discovered by the HATSouth survey. The host stars are quite similar to each other (HATS-13: V = 13.9 mag, M⋆ = 0.96 M⊙, R⋆ = 0.89 R⊙, Teff ≈ 5500 K, [Fe/H] = 0.05; HATS-14: V = 13.8 mag, M⋆ = 0.97 M⊙, R⋆ = 0.93 R⊙, Teff ≈ 5350 K, [Fe/H] = 0.33) and both the planets orbit around them with a period of ~3 days and a separation of ~0.04 au. However, even though they are irradiated in a similar way, the physical characteristics of the two planets are very different. HATS-13b, with a mass of Mp = 0.543 ± 0.072 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.212 ± 0.035 RJ, appears as an inflated planet, while HATS-14b, having a mass of Mp = 1.071 ± 0.070 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.039 ± 0.032 RJ, is only slightly larger in radius than Jupiter. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with (i) the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; (ii) the MPG 2.2 m and the (iii) Euler 1.2 m Telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla; (iv) the CTIO 0.9 m Telescope at the Observatory of Cerro Tololo.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Table A.1 and RV Tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A63

  6. Hat2p recognizes the histone H3 tail to specify the acetylation of the newly synthesized H3/H4 heterodimer by the Hat1p/Hat2p complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Li; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Chengliang; Fang, Qianglin; Wu, Han; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A.; Han, Zhifu; Zong, Shuai; Yu, You; Zhang, Xinyue; Parthun, Mark R.; Chai, Jijie; Xu, Rui-Ming; Yang, Maojun

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones are significant regulators of replication, transcription, and DNA repair. Particularly, newly synthesized histone H4 in H3/H4 heterodimers becomes acetylated on N-terminal lysine residues prior to its incorporation into chromatin. Previous studies have established that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex Hat1p/Hat2p medicates this modification. However, the mechanism of how Hat1p/Hat2p recognizes and facilitates the enzymatic activities on the newly assembled H3/H4 heterodimer remains unknown. Furthermore, Hat2p is a WD40 repeat protein, which is found in many histone modifier complexes. However, how the WD40 repeat proteins facilitate enzymatic activities of histone modification enzymes is unclear. In this study, we first solved the high-resolution crystal structure of a Hat1p/Hat2p/CoA/H4 peptide complex and found that the H4 tail interacts with both Hat1p and Hat2p, by which substrate recruitment is facilitated. We further discovered that H3 N-terminal peptides can bind to the Hat2p WD40 domain and solved the structure of the Hat1p/Hat2p/CoA/H4/H3 peptide complex. Moreover, the interaction with Hat2p requires unmodified Arg2/Lys4 and Lys9 on the H3 tail, suggesting a novel model to specify the activity of Hat1p/Hat2p toward newly synthesized H3/H4 heterodimers. Together, our study demonstrated the substrate recognition mechanism by the Hat1p/Hat2p complex, which is critical for DNA replication and other chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:24835250

  7. HATS-15b and HATS-16b: Two Massive Planets Transiting Old G Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Bakos, G.; Penev, K.; Brahm, R.; Zhou, G.; Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Suc, V.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S.; Thompson, I.; Tan, T. G.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved (∼10 Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9 V star (V=14.8 mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of 2.17\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.105\\quad +/- \\quad 0.040 {R}{{J}}, and it completes its orbit in about 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of 3.27\\quad +/- \\quad 0.19 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.30\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {R}{{J}}; it orbits around its G3 V parent star (V=13.8 mag) in ∼2.7 days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days, which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations performed at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile, with the Coralie and FEROS spectrographs mounted on the Euler-Swiss and MPG 2.2 m telescopes, respectively. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Based in part on data collected at Keck Telescope. Observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope are used in this paper.

  8. Spitzer Secondary Eclipses of HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Ryan A.; Harrington, J.; Hardin, M. R.; Madhusudhan, N.; Cubillos, P.; Blecic, J.; Bakos, G.; Hartman, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    HAT-P-13 b is a transiting hot Jupiter with a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.010) inhabiting a two-planet system. The two-planet arrangement provides an opportunity to probe the interior structure of HAT-P-13b. Under equilibrium-tide theory and confirmation that the apsides of planets b and c are in alignment, a measurement of the planet's eccentricity can be related to the planet's tidal Love number k2, which describes the central condensation of the planet's mass and its deformation under tidal effects. A measurement of k2 could constrain interior models of HAT-P-13b. HAT-P-13b's orbit is configured favorably for refinement of the eccentricity by secondary eclipse timing observations, which provide direct measurements of ecosω. In 2010, Spitzer observed two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b in the 3.6- and 4.5-μm IRAC bandpasses. We present secondary eclipse times and depths; joint models of the HAT-P-13 system that incorporate transit photometry and radial velocity data; and constraints on the atmospheric chemistry of HAT-P-13b that suggest solar-abundance composition without a thermal inversion. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA, which provided support for this work. This work was supported in part by NASA Planetary Atmospheres Grant NNX13AF38G.

  9. Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Canedo, Luis

    2008-08-11

    In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years.

  10. Bi-Directional Communication: A Critical Component of HAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Known problems with automation include lack of mode awareness, automation brittleness, and risk of miscalibrated trust. Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) is essential for improving these problems. This presentation outlines critical components for Human-Autonomy Teaming.

  11. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  12. Physiological, morphological and biochemical studies of glyphosate tolerance in Mexican Cologania (Cologania broussonetii (Balb.) DC.).

    PubMed

    Alcántara de la Cruz, Ricardo; Barro, Francisco; Domínguez-Valenzuela, José Alfredo; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, glyphosate-tolerant legumes have been used as cover crops for weed management in tropical areas of Mexico. Mexican cologania (Cologania broussonetii (Balb.) DC.) is an innate glyphosate-tolerant legume with a potential as a cover crop in temperate areas of the country. In this work, glyphosate tolerance was characterized in two Mexican cologania (a treated (T) and an untreated (UT)) populations as being representatives of the species, compared in turn to a glyphosate-susceptible hairy fleabane (S) (Conyza bonariensis (L.) Cronq.) population. Experiments revealed that T and UT Mexican cologania populations had a higher tolerance index (TI), and a lower shikimic acid accumulation and foliar retention than the hairy fleabane S population. Absorption and translocation, leaf morphology and metabolism studies were only carried out in the Mexican cologania T population and the hairy fleabane S population. The latter absorbed 37% more (14)C-glyphosate compared to the Mexican cologania T at 96 h after treatment (HAT). Mexican cologania T translocated less herbicide from the treated leaf to the remainder of the plant than hairy fleabane S. The Mexican cologania T presented a greater epicuticular wax coverage percentage than the hairy fleabane S. This morphological characteristic contributed to the low glyphosate absorption observed in the Mexican cologania. In addition, the Mexican cologania T metabolized glyphosate mainly into AMPA, formaldehyde and sarcosine. These results indicate that the high glyphosate tolerance observed in Mexican cologania is mainly due to the poor penetration and translocation of glyphosate into the active site, and the high glyphosate degradation into non-toxic substances.

  13. The Mexican American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Helen

    The purpose of this paper, prepared for the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights, is to indicate the types and ranges of problems facing the Mexican American community and to suggest ways in which these problems are peculiar to Mexican Americans. Specific examples are cited to illustrate major problems and personal experiences. Topics covered in the…

  14. Cultural Vignette: Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Mary Ellen; And Others

    Developed as part of a multicultural research project in the San Diego Community College District, this booklet presents the findings of a 10-member research team about various elements of Mexican-American culture. The areas covered are: (1) historical background on the Mexican heritage of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present…

  15. High Hats, Swiss Cheese, and Fluorescent Lighting?

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2002-08-30

    For DOE, PNNL is conducting a competitive procurement to promote market introduction of new residential recessed downlights (also known as ''recessed cans'' or ''high hats'') that are airtight, rated for insulated ceilings, and hard-wired for CFLs. This paper discusses the potential energy savings of new high-efficiency downlights, and the results of product testing to date. Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixtures in the United States, with 21.7 million fixtures sold in 2000. An estimated 350 million are currently installed in American homes. Recessed cans are relatively inexpensive, and provide an unobtrusive, directed source of light for kitchens, hallways, and living rooms. Recessed cans are energy-intensive in three ways. First, virtually all recessed cans currently installed in the residential sector use incandescent light sources, typically reflector-type lamps drawing 65-150 watts. Second, heat from incandescent lamps adds to air-conditioning loads. Third, most installed recessed cans are not airtight, so they allow conditioned air to escape from the living area into unconditioned spaces such as attics. Addressing both lighting energy use and air leakage in recessed cans has proven challenging. Lighting energy efficiency is greatly improved by using CFLs. Air leakage can be addressed by making fixtures airtight. But when CFLs are used in an airtight recessed can, heat generated by the lamp and ballast is trapped within the fixture. Excessive heat causes reduced light output and shorter lifespan of the CFL. The procurement was designed to overcome these technical challenges and make new products available in the marketplace.

  16. Hermitian hat wavelet design for singularity detection in the Paraguay river-level data analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.; Sa, Leonardo D.; Li, Weigang

    1997-04-01

    The direct differentiation of a noisy signal ds/dt is known to be inaccurate. Differentiation can be improved by employing the Dirac (delta) -function introduced into a convolution product denoted by (direct product) and then integrated by parts: ds/dt equals ds/dt (direct product) (delta) equals - s (direct product) d(delta) /dt. The Schwartz Gaussian representation of the delta function is then explicitly used in the differentiation. It turns out that such a convolution approach to the first and the second derivatives produces a pair of mother wavelets the combination of which is the complex generalization of the Mexican hat called a Hermitian hat wavelet. It is shown that the Hermitian filter is a single oscillation wavelet having much lower frequency bandwidth than the Mortlet or Gabor wavelet. As a result of Nyquist theorem, a fewer number of grid points would be needed for the discrete convolution operation. Therefore, the singularity characteristic will not be overly smeared and the noise can be smoothed away. The phase plot of the Hermitian wavelet transform in terms of the time scale and frequency domains reveal a bifurcation discontinuity of a noisy cusp singularity at the precise location of the singularity as well as the scale nature of the underlying dynamics. This phase plot is defined as (theta) (t/a) equals tan-1 [(ds/dt)/(-d2s/dt2] equals tan-1 [((d(delta) (t/a)dt) (direct product) s)/((d2(delta) (t/a)/dt2) (direct product) s)] applied to a real world data of the Paraguay river levels.

  17. HATS-25b through HATS-30b: A Half-dozen New Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters from the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, N.; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Jordán, A.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Rabus, M.; Penev, K.; Bento, J.; de Val-Borro, M.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Suc, V.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R.

    2016-10-01

    We report six new inflated hot Jupiters (HATS-25b through HATS-30b) discovered using the HATSouth global network of automated telescopes. The planets orbit stars with V magnitudes in the range of ˜12-14 and have masses in the largely populated 0.5{M}J{--}0.7{M}J region of parameter space but span a wide variety of radii, from 1.17{R}J to 1.75{R}J. HATS-25b, HATS-28b, HATS-29b, and HATS-30b are typical inflated hot Jupiters ({R}p=1.17{--}1.26{R}J) orbiting G-type stars in short period (P = 3.2-4.6 days) orbits. However, HATS-26b ({R}p=1.75{R}J, P=3.3024 days) and HATS-27b ({R}p=1.50{R}J, P=4.6370 days) stand out as highly inflated planets orbiting slightly evolved F stars just after and in the turn-off points, respectively, which are among the least dense hot Jupiters, with densities of 0.153 {{g}} {{cm}}-3 and 0.180 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, respectively. All the presented exoplanets but HATS-27b are good targets for future atmospheric characterization studies, while HATS-27b is a prime target for Rossiter—McLaughlin monitoring in order to determine its spin-orbit alignment given the brightness (V = 12.8) and stellar rotational velocity (v\\sin i≈ 9.3 km s-1) of the host star. These discoveries significantly increase the number of inflated hot Jupiters known, contributing to our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for hot Jupiter inflation. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory

  18. HAT-P-39b-HAT-P-41b: Three Highly Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Béky, B.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Kovács, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Quinn, S. N.; Bieryla, A.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Fűrész, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-11-01

    We report the discovery of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 11.1, 11.7, and 12.4) F stars. The planets HAT-P-39b through HAT-P-41b have periods of P = 3.5439 days, 4.4572 days, and 2.6940 days, masses of 0.60 M J, 0.62 M J, and 0.80 M J, and radii of 1.57 R J, 1.73 R J, and 1.68 R J, respectively. They orbit stars with masses of 1.40 M ⊙, 1.51 M ⊙, and 1.51 M ⊙, respectively. The three planets are members of an emerging population of highly inflated Jupiters with 0.4 M J < M < 1.5 M J and R > 1.5 R J. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A201Hr, A289Hr, and A284Hr), NASA (N049Hr, N018Hr, N167Hr, N029Hr, N108Hr, and N154Hr), and the NOAO Gemini/Keck time-exchange program (G329Hr). Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based in part on observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  19. Interviews with Mexican midwives.

    PubMed

    Bortin, S

    1993-01-01

    Mexican society contains a variety of indigenous cultures as well as European influences. Most babies in rural areas are delivered by midwives. Traditional midwives, government-trained and empirical midwives, nurse-midwives, and foreign-trained midwives all practice in Mexico. Nurse-midwives in one project are demonstrating their ability to meet the needs of urban childbearing women. A midwifery organization is developing under the leadership of midwives influenced by the contemporary midwifery movement in the United States. In this article, some traditional Mexican midwifery practices are discussed and interviews with several different Mexican midwives from a variety of backgrounds are presented.

  20. HAT-P-20b-HAT-P-23b: Four Massive Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Kipping, D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Béky, B.; Buchhave, L. A.; Perumpilly, G.; Everett, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of four relatively massive (2-7 M J) transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-20b orbits the moderately bright V = 11.339 K3 dwarf star GSC 1910-00239 on a circular orbit, with a period P = 2.875317 ± 0.000004 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455080.92661 ± 0.00021 (BJDUTC), and transit duration 0.0770 ± 0.0008 days. The host star has a mass of 0.76 ± 0.03 M ⊙, radius of 0.69 ± 0.02 R ⊙, effective temperature 4595 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.35 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 7.246 ± 0.187 M J and a radius of 0.867 ± 0.033 R J yielding a mean density of 13.78 ± 1.50 g cm-3. HAT-P-21b orbits the V = 11.685 G3 dwarf star GSC 3013-01229 on an eccentric (e = 0.228 ± 0.016) orbit, with a period P = 4.124481 ± 0.000007 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454996.41312 ± 0.00069, and transit duration 0.1530 ± 0.0027 days. The host star has a mass of 0.95 ± 0.04 M ⊙, radius of 1.10 ± 0.08 R ⊙, effective temperature 5588 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.01 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 4.063 ± 0.161 M J and a radius of 1.024 ± 0.092 R J yielding a mean density of 4.68+1.59 - 0.99 g cm-3. HAT-P-21b is a borderline object between the pM and pL class planets, and the transits occur near apastron. HAT-P-22b orbits the bright V = 9.732 G5 dwarf star HD 233731 on a circular orbit, with a period P = 3.212220 ± 0.000009 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454930.22001 ± 0.00025, and transit duration 0.1196 ± 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.92 ± 0.03 M ⊙, radius of 1.04 ± 0.04 R ⊙, effective temperature 5302 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.24 ± 0.08. The planet has a mass of 2.147 ± 0.061 M J and a compact radius of 1.080 ± 0.058 R J yielding a mean density of 2.11+0.40 - 0.29 g cm-3. The host star also harbors an M-dwarf companion at a wide separation. Finally, HAT-P-23b orbits the V = 12.432 G0 dwarf star GSC 1632-01396 on a close to circular orbit, with a period P = 1.212884 ± 0.000002 days

  1. The Active Latitudes of HAT-P-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brett; Hebb, Leslie; Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Transiting planets map the brightness of their host stars, as the flux lost during exoplanet transits is proportional to the integrated flux occulted by the planet. We analyze four years of Kepler short-cadence photometry of HAT-P-11 - an active K4 dwarf with a 29 day rotation period, orbited by a hot-Neptune. Due to its highly-misaligned orbit, the planet occults most stellar latitudes during each transit, and the latitude distribution of spots is encoded in the transit light curves. We model each spot occultation in transit to create a spot map of HAT-P-11, which reveals two active latitudes near ±17 degrees. We investigate whether the spot distribution changes in time, and we compare the spot latitude distributions of HAT-P-11 and the Sun throughout the solar activity cycle.

  2. Geodetic VLBI Observations with the Hat Creek Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, D. B.; NASA/Gsfc Geodetic VLBI Group

    1993-05-01

    Geodetic VLBI observations made with the Hat Creek 85' antenna were important contributions to the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program (CDP). Among other things, the CDP studied motions of the Earth's crustal plates and deformation in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault in California. The 85' antenna was one of the three fundamental anchor points in California east of the San Andreas fault that were used from 1983 to 1991 to determine the motions at various mobile VLBI sites along the San Andreas and to determine the Pacific plate motions at Vandenberg Air Force Base and Ft. Ord (California) and Kauai (Hawaii). The Hat Creek site itself was found to be moving 10.6 +/- 0.4 (one sigma ) mm/yr to the WNW (PA 305deg ) with respect to a ``stable" eastern North America. Hat Creek is located near the western edge of the Northern Basin and Range province. Its motion is thought to be a combination of WNW extension across the Basin and Range, and a small component of NW elastic deformation due to the interaction between the North American and Pacific plates. Geodetic VLBI measurements from Hat Creek to the nearby Quincy and the more distant Ely (Nevada) and Platteville (Colorado) mobile sites were the key measurements in defining the extension rate for the Northern Basin and Range as 8 +/- 2 mm/yr (PA ~ 300deg ). Hat Creek was also the anchor point for measuring a 5 cm northward seismic displacement at the Ft. Ord mobile site due to the Loma Prieta earthquake. We will show the motion of California and Pacific basin sites for which Hat Creek contributed important data.

  3. Social factors in occupational health: a history of hard hats.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Beth; Levenstein, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is the least desirable way to ensure workplace safety, and it is difficult to use consistently. Hard hats are different; they have cachet and are often worn even when they are not required. We investigated the history of this personal protective equipment to see if there were any lessons that could be applied to other forms of PPE. We learned that what makes hard hats special are social factors that are specific to a certain time and place. The importance of social factors illuminates the requirement that cultural and social norms of workers be included in any kind of worker safety and health training.

  4. Shear buckling analysis of a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1994-01-01

    A buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to shear loading. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. The global shear buckling load was found to be several times higher than the local shear buckling load. The classical shear buckling theory for a flat plate was found to be useful in predicting the local shear buckling load of the hat-stiffened panel, and the predicted local shear buckling loads thus obtained compare favorably with the results of finite element analysis.

  5. ORBITAL ORIENTATIONS OF EXOPLANETS: HAT-P-4b IS PROGRADE AND HAT-P-14b IS RETROGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John Asher; Crepp, Justin R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Shporer, Avi; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2011-02-15

    We present observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for two exoplanetary systems, revealing the orientations of their orbits relative to the rotation axes of their parent stars. HAT-P-4b is prograde, with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of {lambda} = -4.9 {+-} 11.9 deg. In contrast, HAT-P-14b is retrograde, with {lambda} = 189.1 {+-} 5.1 deg. These results conform with a previously noted pattern among the stellar hosts of close-in giant planets: hotter stars have a wide range of obliquities and cooler stars have low obliquities. This, in turn, suggests that three-body dynamics and tidal dissipation are responsible for the short-period orbits of many exoplanets. In addition, our data revealed a third body in the HAT-P-4 system, which could be a second planet or a companion star.

  6. Drilling fluid disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, L.E.; Sanders, J.A.

    1981-12-01

    A maze of U.S. regulations and regulatory agencies coupled with uncertainty in interpretation of environmental data and an evolving system of disposal engineering will require industry action to monitor the area and derive a solid engineering basis for disposal of spent drilling fluid. A set of disposal methods with approximate costs is presented to serve as an initial guide for disposal. 16 refs.

  7. Tip60 HAT Action Mediates Environmental Enrichment Induced Cognitive Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songjun; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Iqbal, Sahira; Elefant, Felice

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) conditions have beneficial effects for reinstating cognitive ability in neuropathological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While EE benefits involve epigenetic gene control mechanisms that comprise histone acetylation, the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) involved remain largely unknown. Here, we examine a role for Tip60 HAT action in mediating activity- dependent beneficial neuroadaptations to EE using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that flies raised under EE conditions display enhanced MB axonal outgrowth, synaptic marker protein production, histone acetylation induction and transcriptional activation of cognition linked genes when compared to their genotypically identical siblings raised under isolated conditions. Further, these beneficial changes are impaired in both Tip60 HAT mutant flies and APP neurodegenerative flies. While EE conditions provide some beneficial neuroadaptive changes in the APP neurodegenerative fly MB, such positive changes are significantly enhanced by increasing MB Tip60 HAT levels. Our results implicate Tip60 as a critical mediator of EE-induced benefits, and provide broad insights into synergistic behavioral and epigenetic based therapeutic approaches for treatment of cognitive disorder. PMID:27454757

  8. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The test sequence was to measure electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case when a simulated lightning discharge strikes an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was conducted between 21 June and 17 July 1990. Thirty-six high rate-of-rise Marx generator discharges and eight high current bank discharges were injected onto three different test article configurations. Attach points included three locations on the top hat cover simulator and two locations on the mounting bolts. Top hat cover simulator and mounting bolt damage and grain cover damage was observed. Overall electric field levels were well below 30 kilowatts/meter. Electric field levels ranged from 184.7 to 345.9 volts/meter and magnetic field levels were calculated from 6.921 to 39.73 amperes/meter. It is recommended that the redesigned solid rocket motor top hat cover be used in Configuration 1 or Configuration 2 as an interim lightning protection device until a lightweight cover can be designed.

  9. HATS: A Design Procedure for Routine Business Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching students a basic design process for routine business documents like memos, letters, and reports. Outlines the design principles of HATS (Headings, Access, Typography, and Spacing), how they apply in before-and-after fashion to various documents, and discusses an assignment in which students redesign an existing…

  10. Degrees of Freedom and Three-Cornered Hats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    differences between the clocks. To our knowledge, there has been no method of determining a confidence interval for such a siability estimate. In this...paper, we present a method for determining the number of degrees of freedom of the estimate, which allows the assignment of a confidence interval to a three-cornered-hat stability estimate.

  11. Compressive buckling analysis of hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to uniaxial compression. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. It was found that the global buckling load was several times higher than the buckling load. The predicted local buckling loads compared favorably with both experimental data and finite-element analysis.

  12. Hats off to Problem-Solving with Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chi-Sing; Lin, Yu-Fen; Nelson, Judy; Eckstein, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how counselors can use de Bono's Six Thinking Hats problem-solving technique in their work with couples. Part 1 of the article focuses on an introduction to the technique, including a theoretical rationale and supporting research. Following a detailed description of the process of using the model as a…

  13. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  14. My Essential Booklist for Museum Educators Wearing Many Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Besides being a content expert, it is critical for today's museum educator to be a marketer, a collaborator, and to understand how people learn best in a museum environment. This article provides a list of six books that the author recommends as essential references for today's museum educator who must wear many hats. (Contains 3 notes.)

  15. Measurements of the UVR protection provided by hats used at school.

    PubMed

    Gies, Peter; Javorniczky, John; Roy, Colin; Henderson, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    The importance of protection against solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in childhood has lead to SunSmart policies at Australian schools, in particular primary schools, where children are encouraged and in many cases required to wear hats at school. Hat styles change regularly and the UVR protection provided by some of the hat types currently used and recommended for sun protection by the various Australian state cancer councils had not been previously evaluated. The UVR protection of the hats was measured using UVR sensitive polysulphone film badges attached to different facial sites on rotating headforms. The sun protection type hats included in this study were broad-brimmed hats, "bucket hats" and legionnaires hats. Baseball caps, which are very popular, were also included. The broad-brimmed hats and bucket hats provided the most UVR protection for the six different sites about the face and head. Legionnaires hats also provided satisfactory UVR protection, but the caps did not provide UVR protection to many of the facial sites. The highest measured UVR protection factors for facial sites other than the forehead were 8 to 10, indicating that, while some hats can be effective, they need to be used in combination with other forms of UVR protection.

  16. 49. Taken from highline; "McKinley hat" remains on "B" furnace; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Taken from high-line; "McKinley hat" remains on "B" furnace; no longer used, "McKinley hat was open receptacle with bell below. Hat carried charge to furnace top, dumping it to bell; bell locked onto furnace top, dropping charge into furnace. Looking east - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  17. Exoplanet Transits Registered at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory. I. HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-23b, and WASP-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Ramón-Fox, Felipe G.

    2016-02-01

    Forty transits of the exoplanets HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-23b, and WASP-10b were recorded with the 0.36 m telescope at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory. The images were captured with a standard Johnson-Cousins Rc and Ic and Sloan z’ filters and processed to obtain individual light curves of the events. These light curves were successfully combined for each system to obtain a resulting one of higher quality, but with a slightly larger time sampling rate. A reduction by a factor of about four in per-point scatter was typically achieved, resulting in combined light curves with a scatter of ∼1 mmag. The noise characteristics of the combined light curves were verified by comparing Allan variance plots of the residuals. The combined light curves for each system, along with radial velocity measurements from the literature when available, were modeled using a Monte Carlo method to obtain the essential parameters that characterize the systems. Our results for all these systems confirm the derived transit parameters (the planet-to-star radius ratio, {R}{{p}}/{R}*; the scaled semimajor axis, a/{R}*; the orbital inclination, i; in some cases the eccentricity, e; and argument of periastron of the orbit, ω), validating the methodology. This technique can be used by small college observatories equipped with modest-sized telescopes to help characterize known extrasolar planet systems. In some instances, the uncertainties of the essential transit parameters are also reduced. For HAT-P-23b, in particular, we derive a planet size 4.5 ± 1.0% smaller. We also derive improved linear periods for each system, useful for scheduling observations.

  18. Demythologizing the Mexican American Father

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.; Spodek, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This review presents recent studies on Mexican American fathers in the United Sates to provide researchers with an understanding of contemporary fatherhood of Mexican American individuals. It describes the myths that create methodological and conceptual problems in conducting research studies to characterize Mexican American fathers. It also…

  19. White Hats Chasing Black Hats: Careers in IT and the Skills Required to Get There. Advisory from Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Eric; Lawrence, Cameron; Clouse, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illuminate the exciting world in which "white hat crackers" operate and to suggest topics that can help prepare students to enter this high-demand field. While currently there is extraordinary demand for graduates to fill these positions that have relatively high starting salaries, employers find it difficult…

  20. The Prevalence of Hypertension in Older Mexicans and Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Eschbach, Karl A.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of hypertension in older Mexicans in the United States and Mexico. Design Stratified by sex, logistic regression models to predict physician diagnosed hypertension were conducted using the Hispanic EPESE (wave 3) and the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS- 70 years and older) datasets. Setting Five Southwestern States of Texas, Arizona, California, Colorado, and New Mexico in the United States. Participants Older Mexican and Mexican Americans ages 70 and over living in the United States and Mexico. Main Outcome Measures Physician diagnosed hypertension. Results Older Mexican and Mexican American women have a greater prevalence of hypertension than their male counterparts. Mexican women, who have migrated to the United States and returned to Mexico, have similarly high rates of hypertension as their female counterparts in the United States. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, obesity, and smoking, older Mexican and Mexican American women who have migrated or immigrated to the United States are at increased risk for hypertension. Conclusions Gender differences exist in hypertension risk for older Mexicans and Mexican Americans living in the United States and Mexico. Older women who migrate to the United States are at a particular risk for hypertension in both the United States and Mexico. PMID:18785442

  1. What's Values Got to Do with It? Thriving among Mexican/Mexican American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L.; Llamas, Jasmín; Consoli, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined traditional Mexican/Mexican American and perceived U.S. mainstream cultural values as predictors of thriving. One hundred twenty-four (37 men, 87 women) self-identified Mexican/Mexican American college students participated in the study. The traditional Mexican/Mexican American cultural values of family support and religion…

  2. The Long Duration Flight of the TopHat Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R.; Aguirre, J.; Bezaire, J.; Cheng, E.; Cordone, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Cottingham, D.; Crawford, T.; Fixsen, D.; Meyer, S. S.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    TopHat is a balloon-borne instrument designed to operate on the top of a balloon. From this location, the experiment could efficiently observe using a clean beam with extremely low sidelobes. The experiment was designed to scan a large portion of the sky directly above it and to map the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMBR) and thermal emission from galactic dust. The instrument used a one meter class telescope with a five band single pixel radiometer spanning the frequency range from 150-600 GHz. The radiometer used bolometric detectors operating at approx. 250 mK. Here, we will report on the flight of the TopHat experiment over Antarctica in January, 2001 and describe the scientific goals, the operation, and in-flight performance.

  3. Drilling fluid disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, L.E.; Sander, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the effect of the regulatory process on the selection and handling of drilling fluids for proper disposal. It is shown that a maze of regulations and regulatory agencies coupled with uncertainty in interpretation of environmental data and an evolving system of disposal engineering will require industry action to monitor the area and derive a solid engineering basis for disposal of spent drilling fluid. 16 refs.

  4. Mexican Folkart for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Graciela; And Others

    Directions, suggested materials, and illustrations are given for making paper mache pinatas and masks, cascarones, Ojos de Dios, maracas, dresser scarf embroidery, burlap murals, yarn designs, paper plate trays, paper cut designs, the poppy, sarape aprons, and paper Mexican dolls. Filled with candy and broken, the pinata is used on most Mexican…

  5. Notable Mexican American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Judith

    This paper describes the careers of four notable Mexican American women, including their educational and family backgrounds, achievements, and importance as role models for young Hispanic women. Marie Acosta-Colon's political activism began as a college student volunteering for presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy in 1968. Active in political…

  6. Exoplanet HAT-P-11b Secondary Transit Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted secondary eclipse observations of exoplanet HAT--11b, recently discovered by proposal G. Bakos and his colleagues. HAT-P-11b is the smallest transiting extrasolar planet yet found and one of only two known exo-Neptunes. We have observed the system at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Once the secondary eclipse is located through analysis of the data, we will make a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-1lb has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. A precise determination of the orbit phase for the secondary eclipse will also be of great utility for Kepler observations of this system at visible wavelengths.

  7. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  8. Disposables in downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Disposable equipment has been used for many years in the downstream processing industry, but mainly for filtration and buffer/media storage. Over the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the use of disposable concepts for chromatography, replacing steel and glass fixed systems with disposable plastic modules that can be discarded once exhausted, fouled or contaminated. These modules save on cleaning and validation costs, and their reduce footprints reduce buffer consumption, water for injection, labor and facility space, contributing to an overall reduction in expenditure that lowers the cost of goods. This chapter examines the practical and economic benefits of disposable modules in downstream processing.

  9. Deep sea waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Kester, D.R.; Burt, W.V.; Capuzzo, J.M.; Park, P.K.; Ketchum, B.W.; Duedall, I.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book presents papers on the marine disposal of wastes. Topics considered include incineration at sea, the modelling and biological effects of industrial wastes, microbial studies of ocean dumping, deep-sea mining wastes, the chemical analysis of ferromanganese nodules, and economic aspects of deep-sea disposal.

  10. Disposable Diapers Are OK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poore, Patricia

    1992-01-01

    A personal account of measuring the pros and cons of disposable diaper usage leads the author to differentiate between a garbage problem and environmental problem. Concludes the disposable diaper issue is a political and economic issue with a local environmental impact and well within our abilities to manage. (MCO)

  11. Disposal of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, W.R.

    1983-06-01

    Prior to 1974 the disposal of drilling fluids was not considered to be much of an environmental problem. In the past, disposal of drilling fluids was accomplished in various ways such as spreading on oil field lease roads to stabilize the road surface and control dust, spreading in the base of depressions of sandy land areas to increase water retention, and leaving the fluid in the reserve pit to be covered on closure of the pit. In recent years, some states have become concerned over the indescriminate dumping of drilling fluids into pits or unauthorized locations and have developed specific regulations to alleviate the perceived deterioration of environmental and groundwater quality from uncontrolled disposal practices. The disposal of drilling fluids in Kansas is discussed along with a newer method or treatment in drilling fluid disposal.

  12. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bhatti, W.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Falco, E.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M J, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R J. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M ⊙. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M J. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s-1 is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M J, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck

  13. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, AND HAT-P-46b: Three transiting hot Jupiters in possible multi-planet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; De Val-Borro, M.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Fischer, D. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M {sub J}, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R {sub J}. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M {sub ☉}. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M {sub J}. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s{sup –1} is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M {sub J}, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters.

  14. Disposal of Vessels at Sea

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vessel disposal general permits are issued by the EPA under the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act. Information is provided for vessel disposal permit applicants and where to dispose a vessel.

  15. [On Mexican medicinal plants].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Izaguirre-Avila, Raúl

    2009-12-01

    During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived here led, respectively, by the naturalist Martín Sessé and by the Italian mariner Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. The members collected a rich scientific material, which was carried to Madrid in 1820. At the end of XVIII century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his "American Garden". In the last years of the Colonial period, fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland, on the geographic distribution of the American plants, were published. At the end of the XIX century, the first researches on the Mexican medicinal botany were performed at the laboratory of the "Instituto Médico Nacional" under the leadership of doctor Fernando Altamirano, starting pharmacological studies in our country. During the first half of the XX century, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico, due to doctor Ignacio Chávez, initiative. Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition remains alive and vigorous in the modern scientific institutes of the country.

  16. Nucleosome competition reveals processive acetylation by the SAGA HAT module

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Alison E.; Cieniewicz, Anne M.; Taverna, Sean D.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator complex hyperacetylates histone tails in vivo in a manner that depends upon histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), a histone mark enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes. SAGA contains a separable subcomplex known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) module that contains the HAT, Gcn5, bound to Sgf29, Ada2, and Ada3. Sgf29 contains a tandem Tudor domain that recognizes H3K4me3-containing peptides and is required for histone hyperacetylation in vivo. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 recognition leads to lysine hyperacetylation is unknown, as in vitro studies show no effect of the H3K4me3 modification on histone peptide acetylation by Gcn5. To determine how H3K4me3 binding by Sgf29 leads to histone hyperacetylation by Gcn5, we used differential fluorescent labeling of histones to monitor acetylation of individual subpopulations of methylated and unmodified nucleosomes in a mixture. We find that the SAGA HAT module preferentially acetylates H3K4me3 nucleosomes in a mixture containing excess unmodified nucleosomes and that this effect requires the Tudor domain of Sgf29. The H3K4me3 mark promotes processive, multisite acetylation of histone H3 by Gcn5 that can account for the different acetylation patterns established by SAGA at promoters versus coding regions. Our results establish a model for Sgf29 function at gene promoters and define a mechanism governing crosstalk between histone modifications. PMID:26401015

  17. Toward Quality Education for Mexican Americans. Mexican American Education Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Burciaga, Cecilia Preciado; And Others

    The 6th and final report of the Mexican American Education Study (MAES) focuses on specific educational problems of Mexican American children in the Southwest and recommends actions at various governmental and educational levels to alleviate these. Information was gathered from: (1) a 1969 survey and 1970-71 field study; (2) a literature review;…

  18. Converging Forces: Mexican Culture and Clinical Issues of Mexican Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkelman, Jeanne M.

    Mexican women tend to have limited access to medical and mental health care resources. Some of the common clinical issues experienced by Mexican woman are psychological conflict, depression, anxiety, and psychosomatic symptoms. Appropriate treatment approaches for therapy varies depending on the nature of the presenting problem. If clinical issues…

  19. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduce Crew Operations (RCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2011-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all seeing dramatic increases in automation. However, while automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required to remain in the system for the foreseeable future. The collaboration between humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. This paper applies a methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project.

  20. Preparation of Size-Controlled Hat-Stacked Carbon Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Motomiya, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Tohji, K.

    2007-03-01

    Hat-stacked carbon nanofibers (H-CNFs) were size-separated using a multi-step microfiltration process employing polycarbonate membrane filters with respective cylindrical pore diameters of 2.0, 1.2 and 0.4 μm after being cut and dispersed in distilled water using sonication in a mixture of concentrated H2SO4 and HNO3. The average length of separated H-CNFs was 2.4 μm, 1.2 μm and 0.6 μm, respectively.

  1. INTRODUCING MEXICAN NEEDLETS FOR CMB ANALYSIS: ISSUES FOR PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH STANDARD NEEDLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Scodeller, S.; Rudjord, Oe.; Hansen, F. K.; Marinucci, D.; Geller, D.; Mayeli, A.

    2011-06-01

    Over the last few years, needlets have emerged as a useful tool for the analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Our aim in this paper is first to introduce into the CMB literature a different form of needlets, known as Mexican needlets, first discussed in the mathematical literature by Geller and Mayeli. We then proceed with an extensive study of the properties of both standard and Mexican needlets; these properties depend on some parameters which can be tuned in order to optimize the performance for a given application. Our second aim in this paper is then to give practical advice on how to adjust these parameters for WMAP and Planck data in order to achieve the best properties for a given problem in CMB data analysis. In particular, we investigate localization properties in real and harmonic space and propose a recipe for quantifying the influence of galactic and point-source masks on the needlet coefficients. We also show that for certain parameter values, the Mexican needlets provide a close approximation to the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelets (whence their name), with some advantages concerning their numerical implementation and derivation of their statistical properties.

  2. Dissecting the Molecular Roles of Histone Chaperones in Histone Acetylation by Type B Histone Acetyltransferases (HAT-B).

    PubMed

    Haigney, Allison; Ricketts, M Daniel; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-12-18

    The HAT-B enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines K5 and K12. HAT-B is a multisubunit complex composed of the histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) catalytic subunit and the Hat2 (rbap46) histone chaperone. Hat1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus as a member of a trimeric NuB4 complex containing Hat1, Hat2, and a histone H3-H4 specific histone chaperone called Hif1 (NASP). In addition to Hif1 and Hat2, Hat1 interacts with Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1), a histone chaperone that has been reported to be involved in both replication-dependent and -independent chromatin assembly. To elucidate the molecular roles of the Hif1 and Asf1 histone chaperones in HAT-B histone binding and acetyltransferase activity, we have characterized the stoichiometry and binding mode of Hif1 and Asf1 to HAT-B and the effect of this binding on the enzymatic activity of HAT-B. We find that Hif1 and Asf1 bind through different modes and independently to HAT-B, whereby Hif1 binds directly to Hat2, and Asf1 is only capable of interactions with HAT-B through contacts with histones H3-H4. We also demonstrate that HAT-B is significantly more active against an intact H3-H4 heterodimer over a histone H4 peptide, independent of either Hif1 or Asf1 binding. Mutational studies further demonstrate that HAT-B binding to the histone tail regions is not sufficient for this enhanced activity. Based on these data, we propose a model for HAT-B/histone chaperone assembly and acetylation of H3-H4 complexes.

  3. [Mexican migration policies after IRCA].

    PubMed

    Alba, F

    1999-01-01

    The evolution since 1964 of Mexican government policy regarding migrant workers in the US is discussed. For a decade after the "bracero" program was terminated by the US, the Mexican government attempted to encourage creation of another legal framework for migration, regarded as inevitable whether legal or clandestine. Around 1974-75, a more distant attitude, termed the "policy of no policy," acquired considerable support in Mexican government and academic circles. The no-policy strategy allowed Mexico to achieve certain objectives regarding migration without prompting US intervention in its internal affairs, as for example by a linkage of US migration policy to specific Mexican government actions. The 1986 passage of the US Immigration Reform and Control Act effectively ended the no-policy strategy that had allowed the Mexican government to count on the continued emigration of Mexican workers without compromising its position of promoting respect for migrant rights. The unilateral change in the status quo by the US led to substitution of the "policy of dialogue," a clear signal of the Mexican government's search for a new migration agreement. The policy of dialogue has entailed greater discussion of the two traditional Mexican objectives regarding migration. Some progress has apparently been made concerning migrant rights, but the second and less explicit objective, that of preventing abrupt changes in US immigration policy and in migratory flows, is harder to judge. The atmosphere of freer public debate in Mexico is politicizing migratory policy.

  4. The Chicanos; Mexican American Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Edward W., Ed.; Santibanez, James, Ed.

    Articles, fiction, and poetry that form a picture of Chicano life today are presented in this anthology of writings about Mexican Americans. Included are reminiscences of Mexican American childhood, accounts of Chicanos in the American school system, reports on strikes by Chicano workers, and poems and stories that reflect the hard realities of…

  5. On Being a Mexican American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Joe I.

    1994-01-01

    A well-acculturated migrant education program director reminisces about his Mexican upbringing in the United States, noting the persistence of his cultural heritage and the scars left by acts of segregation, prejudice, and racism. It is important for Mexican Americans to recognize that they are a unique group at a crossroads. They are not all…

  6. HATS9-b and HATS10-b: Two Compact Hot Jupiters in Field 7 of the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, R.; Jordán, A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Zhou, G.; Ciceri, S.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Sato, B.; Tan, T. G.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Suc, V.; Noyes, R. W.; Papp, I.; Lázár, J.; Sári, P.

    2015-07-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the HATSouth survey. HATS-9b orbits an old (10.8 ± 1.5 Gyr) V = 13.3 G dwarf star with a period P≈ 1.9153 days. The host star has a mass of 1.03 {M}⊙ , radius of 1.503 {R}⊙ , and effective temperature 5366 ± 70 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.837 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.065 {R}{{J}}, yielding a mean density of 0.85 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. HATS-10b orbits a V = 13.1 G dwarf star with a period P≈ 3.3128 days. The host star has a mass of 1.1 {M}⊙ , radius of 1.11 {R}⊙ , and effective temperature 5880 ± 120 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.53 {M}{{J}} and radius of 0.97 {R}{{J}}, yielding a mean density of 0.7 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. Both planets are compact in comparison with planets receiving similar irradiation from their host stars and lie in the nominal coordinates of Field 7 of K2, but only HATS-9b falls on working silicon. Future characterization of HATS-9b with the exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler telescope may provide measurements of its reflected light signature. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Based on observations obtained with the Apache

  7. The History of SETI at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, J.

    2006-12-01

    Since the first SETI search in 1960, observations have encountered an exponentially growing problem with radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by our own communication, entertainment, and military technologies. The signal processing equipment that is used for SETI has gotten much faster and more capable, yet the fraction of the possible search space that has been explored remains very small. More than 100 searches have been reported in the literature. Tarter (2001) has summarized the various search strategies and the SETI Institute maintains an updated search archive at http://www.seti.org/searcharchive. The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) at Hat Creek Radio Observatory will be the first instrument designed with SETI as a goal, and its speed and flexibility will permit a significant exploration of our local region of the Milky Way Galaxy, targeting ˜1 million stars for weak signals, as well as surveying for stronger signals from ˜40 billion distant stars, located in the direction of the galactic center and the surrounding 20 square degrees. Just as Jack Welch has been responsible for many of the innovations in the ATA and the SETI observations it will soon undertake, he has been the key to enabling SETI at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory for the past three decades.

  8. HAT-P-50b, HAT-P-51b, HAT-P-52b, and HAT-P-53b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters and a Transiting Hot Saturn From the HATNet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bieryla, A.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Sato, B.; Boisse, I.; Falco, E.; Everett, M. E.; Szklenar, T.; Fulton, B. J.; Shporer, A.; Kovács, T.; Hansen, T.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery and characterization of four transiting exoplanets by the HATNet survey. The planet HAT-P-50b has a mass of 1.35 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.29 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a bright (V=11.8 mag) M=1.27 {M}⊙ , R=1.70 {R}⊙ star every P=3.1220 days. The planet HAT-P-51b has a mass of 0.31 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.29 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=13.4 mag, M=0.98 {M}⊙ , R=1.04 {R}⊙ star with a period of P=4.2180 days. The planet HAT-P-52b has a mass of 0.82 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.01 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=14.1 mag, M=0.89 {M}⊙ , R=0.89 {R}⊙ star with a period of P=2.7536 days. The planet HAT-P-53b has a mass of 1.48 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.32 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=13.7 mag, M=1.09 {M}⊙ , R=1.21 {R}⊙ star with a period of P=1.9616 days. All four planets are consistent with having circular orbits and have masses and radii measured to better than 10% precision. The low stellar jitter and favorable {R}p/{R}\\star ratio for HAT-P-51 make it a promising target for measuring the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for a Saturn-mass planet. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A245Hr) and NASA (N154Hr, N130Hr). Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Based on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in AZ. Based on radial velocities obtained with the

  9. HAT-P-18b AND HAT-P-19b: TWO LOW-DENSITY SATURN-MASS PLANETS TRANSITING METAL-RICH K STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. A.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Fueresz, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Beky, B.; Stefanik, R. P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Csubry, Z.; Sato, B.; Kovacs, G.; Fischer, D. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-18b orbits the V = 12.759 K2 dwarf star GSC 2594-00646, with a period P = 5.508023 {+-} 0.000006 days, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2454715.02174 {+-} 0.00020 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1131 {+-} 0.0009 days. The host star has a mass of 0.77 {+-} 0.03 M{sub sun}, radius of 0.75 {+-} 0.04 R{sub sun}, effective temperature 4803 {+-} 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.10 {+-} 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.197 {+-} 0.013 M{sub J} and radius of 0.995 {+-} 0.052 R{sub J}, yielding a mean density of 0.25 {+-} 0.04 g cm{sup -3}. HAT-P-19b orbits the V = 12.901 K1 dwarf star GSC 2283-00589, with a period P = 4.008778 {+-} 0.000006 days, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2455091.53417 {+-} 0.00034 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1182 {+-} 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.84 {+-} 0.04 M{sub sun}, radius of 0.82 {+-} 0.05 R{sub sun}, effective temperature 4990 {+-} 130 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.23 {+-} 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.292 {+-} 0.018 M{sub J} and radius of 1.132 {+-} 0.072 R{sub J}, yielding a mean density of 0.25 {+-} 0.04 g cm{sup -3}. The radial velocity residuals for HAT-P-19 exhibit a linear trend in time, which indicates the presence of a third body in the system. Comparing these observations with theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b are each consistent with a hydrogen-helium-dominated gas giant planet with negligible core mass. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b join HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b in an emerging group of low-density Saturn-mass planets, with negligible inferred core masses. However, unlike HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b, both HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b orbit stars with super-solar metallicity. This calls into question the heretofore suggestive correlation between the inferred core mass and host star metallicity for Saturn-mass planets.

  10. A Bayesian Atmospheric Retrieval Performed on HAT-P-16b and WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Kathleen J.; Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan C.; Hardin, Matthew Ryan; Bowman, Oliver Oliver; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lenius, Maria; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio; Ariston Hardy, Ryan; Cameron, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    HAT-P-16b is a hot (equilibrium temperature 1626 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and efficient energy redistribution), 4.19 ± 0.09 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting an F8 star every 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days (Buchhave et al 2010). WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b is a cooler (1020 ± 17 K), 0.487 ± 0.018 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting a K3 star every 3.7224747 ± 0.0000065 days (Bakos et al. 2009, co-discovered by West et al. 2008). We observed secondary eclipses of both planets using the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm channels of the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (program ID 60003). We applied our Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code to constrain the temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric molecular abundances of the two planets. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  11. Giant Paperclip Necklaces, Soup-Can Rings and Cherry-Pie Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by the wearable sculpture art created by artist Marjorie Schick. Students used wallpaper paste and newspapers to create papier-mache for a mountain hat, a cherry-pie mask/hat, a "dress" shoe and a Cubistic mask. Cardboard was used in many of these things, in addition to being used as…

  12. Not Just Hats Anymore: Binomial Inversion and the Problem of Multiple Coincidences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathout, Leith

    2007-01-01

    The well-known "hats" problem, in which a number of people enter a restaurant and check their hats, and then receive them back at random, is often used to illustrate the concept of derangements, that is, permutations with no fixed points. In this paper, the problem is extended to multiple items of clothing, and a general solution to the problem of…

  13. WARM SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THREE HOT EXOPLANETS: XO-4b, HAT-P-6b, AND HAT-P-8b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Sada, Pedro V.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K.

    2012-02-10

    We analyze Warm Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera observations of the secondary eclipses of three planets, XO-4b, HAT-P-6b, and HAT-P-8b. We measure secondary eclipse amplitudes at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m for each target. XO-4b exhibits a stronger eclipse depth at 4.5 {mu}m than at 3.6 {mu}m, which is consistent with the presence of a temperature inversion. HAT-P-8b shows a stronger eclipse amplitude at 3.6 {mu}m and is best described by models without a temperature inversion. The eclipse depths of HAT-P-6b can be fitted with models with a small or no temperature inversion. We consider our results in the context of a postulated relationship between stellar activity and temperature inversion and a relationship between irradiation level and planet dayside temperature, as discussed by Knutson et al. and Cowan and Agol, respectively. Our results are consistent with these hypotheses, but do not significantly strengthen them. To measure accurate secondary eclipse central phases, we require accurate ephemerides. We obtain primary transit observations and supplement them with publicly available observations to update the orbital ephemerides of the three planets. Based on the secondary eclipse timing, we set upper boundaries for ecos ({omega}) for HAT-P-6b, HAT-P-8b, and XO-4b and find that the values are consistent with circular orbits.

  14. Supernova 1987 A - The nebular loops and 'Napoleon's Hat'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Wampler, E. J.

    1992-08-01

    We discuss observations of the circumstellar environment of SN 1987A that were obtained between August 1989 and January 1992 at ESO's New Technology Telescope. We find that the angular dimensions of the two nebular loops (Wampler et al., 1990) have not changed during this period. Therefore these loops are confined to a small region. The expansion velocity of the loops is less than about 40 km/s if the loops expanded with a uniform velocity from a common origin. This structure and velocity is hard to reproduce with existing wind interaction models. Our observations further suggest that the Napoleon's Hat nebula does not originate from the general background LMC dust, but from a bow shock dust whose origins are closely related to the stellar winds from the progenitor star of SN 1987A.

  15. One-Loop Calculations with BlackHat

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Forde, D.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2008-08-01

    We describe BlackHat, an automated C++ program for calculating one-loop amplitudes, and the techniques used in its construction. These include the unitarity method and on-shell recursion. The other ingredients are compact analytic formulae for tree amplitudes for four-dimensional helicity states. The program computes amplitudes numerically, using analytic formula only for the tree amplitudes, the starting point for the recursion, and the loop integrals. We make use of recently developed on-shell methods for evaluating coefficients of loop integrals, in particular a discrete Fourier projection as a means of improving numerical stability. We illustrate the good numerical stability of this approach by computing six-, seven- and eight-gluon amplitudes in QCD and comparing against known analytic results.

  16. Mapping HI and B at Hat Creek ... and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiles, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Hat Creek 85-foot telescope produced the first complete surveys of HI in the Northern sky--superseded only recently--and initiated measurements of the interstellar magnetic field using Zeeman splitting of the HI line in emission. These endeavors required state-of-the-art electronics and spectrometers. Here I review the role of the Berkeley Radio Astronomy Laboratory and its 85-foot telescope in their initiative roles for these three areas of science and technology and trace their evolution to the present. The present emphasizes the great single dishes of our times, the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for Zeeman splitting and Arecibo for HI mapping; Fourier-transform spectrometers using FPGA technology; and sustaining the future with the synergy of research and education.

  17. Transit timing analysis in the HAT-P-32 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeliger, M.; Dimitrov, D.; Kjurkchieva, D.; Mallonn, M.; Fernandez, M.; Kitze, M.; Casanova, V.; Maciejewski, G.; Ohlert, J. M.; Schmidt, J. G.; Pannicke, A.; Puchalski, D.; Göğüş, E.; Güver, T.; Bilir, S.; Ak, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Errmann, R.; Jensen, E.; Cohen, D.; Marschall, L.; Saral, G.; Bernt, I.; Derman, E.; Gałan, C.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of 45 transit observations obtained for the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-32b. The transits have been observed using several telescopes mainly throughout the YETI (Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative) network. In 25 cases, complete transit light curves with a timing precision better than 1.4 min have been obtained. These light curves have been used to refine the system properties, namely inclination i, planet-to-star radius ratio Rp/Rs, and the ratio between the semimajor axis and the stellar radius a/Rs. First analyses by Hartman et al. suggests the existence of a second planet in the system, thus we tried to find an additional body using the transit timing variation (TTV) technique. Taking also the literature data points into account, we can explain all mid-transit times by refining the linear ephemeris by 21 ms. Thus, we can exclude TTV amplitudes of more than ˜1.5 min.

  18. Friction pull plug welding: top hat plug design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R. (Inventor); Cantrell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction Pull Plug Welding is a solid state repair process for defects up to one inch in length, only requiring single sided tooling, or outside skin line (OSL), for preferred usage on flight hardware. The most prevalent defect associated with Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW) was a top side or inside skin line (ISL) lack of bonding. Bonding was not achieved at this location due to the reduction in both frictional heat and welding pressure between the plug and plate at the end of the weld. Thus, in order to eliminate the weld defects and increase the plug strength at the plug `top` a small `hat` section is added to the pull plug for added frictional heating and pressure.

  19. Friction pull plug welding: top hat plug design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R. (Inventor); Cantrell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Friction Pull Plug Welding is a solid state repair process for defects up to one inch in length, only requiring single sided tooling, or outside skin line (OSL), for preferred usage on flight hardware. The most prevalent defect associated with Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW) was a top side or inside skin line (ISL) lack of bonding. Bonding was not achieved at this location due to the reduction in both frictional heat and welding pressure between the plug and plate at the end of the weld. Thus, in order to eliminate the weld defects and increase the plug strength at the plug `top` a small `hat` section is added to the pull plug for added frictional heating and pressure.

  20. Secondary Eclipses of HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Ryan A.; Harrington, Joseph; Hardin, Matthew R.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Loredo, Thomas J.; Challener, Ryan C.; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Blecic, Jasmina

    2017-02-01

    We present Spitzer secondary-eclipse observations of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-13 b in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. HAT-P-13 b inhabits a two-planet system with a configuration that enables constraints on the planet’s second Love number, {k}2, from precise eccentricity measurements, which in turn constrains models of the planet’s interior structure. We exploit the direct measurements of e\\cos ω from our secondary-eclipse data and combine them with previously published radial velocity data to generate a refined model of the planet’s orbit and thus an improved estimate on the possible interval for {k}2. We report eclipse phases of 0.49154+/- 0.00080 and 0.49711+/- 0.00083 and corresponding e\\cos ω estimates of -0.0136+/- 0.0013 and -0.0048+/- 0.0013. Under the assumptions of previous work, our estimate of {k}2 of 0.81 ± 0.10 is consistent with the lower extremes of possible core masses found by previous models, including models with no solid core. This anomalous result challenges both interior models and the dynamical assumptions that enable them, including the essential assumption of apsidal alignment. We also report eclipse depths of 0.081% ± 0.008% in the 3.6 μm channel and 0.088% ± 0.028% in the 4.5 μm channel. These photometric results are non-uniquely consistent with solar-abundance composition without any thermal inversion.

  1. Immigration and Suicidal Behavior Among Mexicans and Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Breslau, Joshua; Su, Maxwell; Miller, Matthew; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined migration to the United States as a risk factor for suicidal behavior among people of Mexican origin. Methods. We pooled data from 2 nationally representative surveys in the United States (2001–2003; n = 1284) and Mexico (2001–2002; n = 5782). We used discrete time survival models to account for time-varying and time-invariant characteristics, including psychiatric disorders. Results. Risk for suicidal ideation was higher among Mexicans with a family member in the United States (odds ratio [OR] = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06, 2.11), Mexican-born immigrants who arrived in the United States at 12 years or younger (OR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.09, 3.09), and US-born Mexican Americans (OR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.03, 2.38) than among Mexicans with neither a history of migration to the United States nor a family member currently living there. Risk for suicide attempts was also higher among Mexicans with a family member in the United States (OR = 1.68; 95% CI = 1.13, 2.52) and US-born Mexican Americans (OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.06, 3.65). Selection bias caused by differential migration or differential return migration of persons at higher risk of suicidal ideation or attempt did not account for these findings. Conclusions. Public health efforts should focus on the impact of Mexico–US migration on family members of migrants and on US-born Mexican Americans. PMID:19150909

  2. Magnesium battery disposal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Louis; Atwater, Terrill

    1994-12-01

    This study assesses the disposal characteristics of U.S. Army procured military magnesium batteries under current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste identification regulations administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Magnesium batteries were tested at 100, 50, 10 and 0 percent remaining state of charge. Present findings indicate that magnesium batteries with less than 50 percent remaining charge do not exceed the federal regulatory limit of 5.0 mg/L for chromium. All other RCRA contaminates were below regulatory limits at all levels of remaining charge. Assay methods, findings, disposal requirements and design implications are discussed.

  3. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  4. 30 CFR 77.1710-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps... Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced miners. Hard hats or hard caps distinctively different in color from those worn by experienced miners shall be worn...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1720-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1720-1 Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced miners. Hard hats or hard caps distinctively different in...

  6. Mexican contributions to Noncommutative Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Vergara, J. David; Garcia-Compean, H.

    2006-09-25

    In this paper we summarize the Mexican contributions to the subject of Noncommutative theories. These contributions span several areas: Quantum Groups, Noncommutative Field Theories, Hopf algebra of renormalization, Deformation Quantization, Noncommutative Gravity, and Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics.

  7. Mexican Cartels: Threat and Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    just last summer, two Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) operatives were shot and injured while traveling to a Mexican military base. Their assailants...the CIA agents were traveling with a Mexican Navy officer and were in an Embassy vehicle with diplomatic plates47 calls into question whether these...internal business displacement from the violent northern region to the quieter interior is also occurring51. The bloodshed is also impacting tourism and

  8. Waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  9. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  10. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  11. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration

    EPA Science Inventory

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which ...

  12. Plumbing and Sewage Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine enlisted personnel with the principles of plumbing and sewage disposal used by Marine Hygiene Equipment Operators to perform their mission. The course contains three study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the…

  13. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) in Arkansas. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the PBA and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site- specific study. This dependent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at PBA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources, and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) in Hermiston, Oregon. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the Umatilla Depot Activity and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site-specific study. This independent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at UMDA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources; seismicity; and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Disposal of Liquid Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-13

    concentrate (formaldehydestrongly catalyzes the formation of nitrosamines from nitrite and secondary amines ). I ° Minimize concentrations of catalytically ...components, as interest in these compounds is relatively new. Therefore, methods for disposing of similar compounds such as triethanol- amine ...appears to have the greatest potential for accomplishing degradation of HAN- based liquid propellant residues in an economical, environmentally safe manner

  16. Alternative Trench Disposal Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhite, E.

    2001-09-05

    During Fiscal Year 2000, a number of activities were conducted to expand the use of trenches for disposal of low-level waste in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (LLWF). This document presents a summary and interpretation of these activities in the context of future work.

  17. Freud's Mexican readers.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    This essay presents an overview of artists and writers who read Freud's work in Mexico between 1920 and 1968. The focus is on cultural readings of Freud: non-clinical interpretations of psychoanalysis that applied Freud's theory to literary, artistic, philosophical, or religious questions. The essay focuses on Salvador Novo, one of the poets associated with the Contemporáneos group, and his reading of the "Three Essays in the Theory of Sexuality;" Raúl Carrancá y Trujillo, a judge and criminologist who used psychoanalysis in his work, including the trial of Trotky's assassin; Octavio Paz, a poet and intellectual who wrote an essay on Mexican history, "The Labyrinth of Solitude," as a response to "Moses and Monotheism;" and Gregorio Lemercier, a Benedictine monk who placed his monastery in group analysis. These unorthodox readings of Freud opened the door for some of the most daring intellectual experiments in the 20th century.

  18. Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.

  19. Dialing the Love Number of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter

    2015-05-01

    HAT-P-13b is Jupiter-mass transiting planet in a 0.04 AU orbit around its host star. It has an outer companion, HAT-P-13c, with a minimum mass of 14.7 MJup in a highly eccentric 1.2 AU orbit. These two companions form an isolated dynamical system with their host star [1]. The nature of this system allows the two bodies to settle into a fixed eccentricity state where the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b is directly related to its oblateness as described by the Love number, k2 [2]. In order to constrain the eccentricity, and therefore k2, of HAT-P-13b, we use the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the timing of its secondary eclipses at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We then simultaneously fit our secondary eclipse data in conjunction with previously measured radial velocity and transit data. Finally, we apply the fact that, if the orbits of HAT-P-13b and HAT-P-13c are coplanar, then their apsides are aligned [3]. The apsidal orientation of HAT-P-13c is much better constrained because of its high eccentricity, which helps break the degeneracy between the eccentricity and apsidal orientation in interpreting the measured secondary eclipse time. Our analysis allows us to measure the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b’s orbit with a precision approximately ten times better than that of previously published values, in the coplanar case, and allows us to place the first meaningful constraints on the core mass of HAT-P-13b.[1] Becker & Batygin 2013, ApJ 778, 100 [2] Wu & Goldreich 2002, ApJ 564, 1024 [3] Batygin+ 2009, ApJ 704, L49

  20. HATS-11b AND HATS-12b: Two Transiting Hot Jupiters Orbiting Subsolar Metallicity Stars Selected for the K2 Campaign 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabus, M.; Jordán, A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Espinoza, N.; Brahm, R.; Penev, K.; Ciceri, S.; Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Mancini, L.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Csbury, Z.; Sato, B.; Tan, T.-G.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Bento, J.; Suc, V.; Noyes, R.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets from the HATSouth survey. HATS-11, a V = 14.1 G0-star shows a periodic 12.9 mmag dip in its light curve every 3.6192 days and a radial velocity variation consistent with a Keplerian orbit. HATS-11 has a mass of 1.000+/- 0.060 {M}⊙ , a radius of 1.444+/- 0.057 {R}⊙ and an effective temperature of 6060+/- 150 K, while its companion is a 0.85+/- 0.12 {M}{{J}}, 1.510+/- 0.078 {R}{{J}} planet in a circular orbit. HATS-12 shows a periodic 5.1 mmag flux decrease every 3.1428 days and Keplerian RV variations around a V = 12.8 F-star. HATS-12 has a mass of 1.489+/- 0.071 {M}⊙ , a radius of 2.21+/- 0.21 {R}⊙ , and an effective temperature of 6408+/- 75 K. For HATS-12b, our measurements indicate that this is a 2.38+/- 0.11 {M}{{J}}, 1.35+/- 0.17 {R}{{J}} planet in a circular orbit. Both host stars show subsolar metallicities of -0.390+/- 0.060 dex and -0.100+/- 0.040 dex, respectively, and are (slightly) evolved stars. In fact, HATS-11 is among the most metal-poor and, HATS-12, with a {log}{g}\\star of 3.923+/- 0.065, is among the most evolved stars hosting a hot-Jupiter planet. Importantly, HATS-11 and HATS-12 have been observed in long cadence by Kepler as part of K2 campaign 7 (EPIC216414930 and EPIC218131080 respectively). The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on

  1. Radiant exposure level comparison between Gaussian and top hat beams in various scanning patterns.

    PubMed

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Yang, Yi; Le, Hanh N D; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-12-20

    The radiant exposure of optical irradiation beams with different scanning parameters has been theoretically studied. We analyzed the difference in radiant exposure introduced by Gaussian and top hat beams. Various parameters such as scanning pattern, aperture position, beam size and scan spacing were also introduced in this study. We found that Gaussian beams introduce higher calculated radiant exposure to the aperture than top hat beams for certain beam size to aperture size ratios. However, as the scan spacing decreases, the radiant exposure difference calculated from Gaussian and top hat beams diminishes.

  2. Disposal of Some Problem Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes procedures for the disposal of chemicals commonly used in secondary school chemistry laboratories. Special reference is given to inorganic salts. It is suggested that cyanides and other highly toxic salts should be disposed of by experts. (MA)

  3. Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Secondary-School United States History Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvucci, Linda K.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses coverage of Mexican history and Mexican Americans in 10 U.S. history textbooks approved for use in Texas. Criticizes the lack of complete information, ethnocentricity, and failure to present the Mexican point of view. Argues that U.S. history courses should cover topics of Mexican history, including Spanish colonialism, the Texas…

  4. Factors Affecting Career Decision Making of Mexican and Mexican-American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newlon, Betty J.; Borboa, Roman

    The purpose of this research was to identify the self-reported factors affecting the career decision making of Mexican and Mexican-American students. It was hypothesized that the factor clusters would differ between the two sample populations, Mexican and Mexican-American. It was also hypothesized that these clusters would differ from six clusters…

  5. Histone acetyltransferase HAT4 modulates navigation across G2/M and re-entry into G1 in Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Aarti; Chandra, Udita; Saha, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases impact multiple processes. This study investigates the role of histone acetyltransferase HAT4 in Leishmania donovani. Though HAT4 was dispensable for survival, its elimination decreased cell viability and caused cell cycle defects, with HAT4-nulls experiencing an unusually long G2/M. Survival of HAT4-nulls in macrophages was also substantially compromised. DNA microarray analysis revealed that HAT4 modestly regulated the expression of only a select number of genes, thus not being a major modulator of global gene expression. Significantly, cdc20 was among the downregulated genes. To ascertain if decreased expression of cdc20 was responsible for HAT4-null growth and cell cycle defects we expressed LdCdc20 ectopically in HAT4-nulls. We found this to alleviate the aberrant growth and cell cycle progression patterns displayed by HAT4-nulls, with cells navigating G2/M phase and re-entering G1 phase smoothly. HAT4-nulls expressing LdCdc20 ectopically showed survival rates comparable to wild type within macrophages, suggesting that G2/M defects were responsible for poor survival of HAT4-nulls within host cells also. These are the first data analyzing the in vivo functional role of HAT4 in any trypanosomatid. Our results directly demonstrate for the first time a role for Cdc20 in regulating trypanosomatid G2/M events, opening avenues for further research in this area. PMID:27272906

  6. Diaper area and disposable diapers.

    PubMed

    Erasala, G N; Romain, C; Merlay, I

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1960s, cloth diapers have been replaced by disposable diapers. The evolution of healthier skin in the diaper area has been demonstrated in parallel to that of disposable diapers. The improvements of disposable diapers--fit, dryness, comfort--have been based on the understanding of factors playing a role in the development of diaper dermatitis.

  7. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: FOUR TRANSITING PLANETS MORE MASSIVE THAN JUPITER ORBITING MODERATELY BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Torres, G.; Beky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenar, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Kovacs, G.; Shporer, A.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; and others

    2012-07-15

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M{sub J} and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M{sub J}), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 {+-} 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 {+-} 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters.

  8. Comparison of protein acetyltransferase action of CRTAase with the prototypes of HAT.

    PubMed

    Ponnan, Prija; Kumar, Ajit; Singh, Prabhjot; Gupta, Prachi; Joshi, Rini; Gaspari, Marco; Saso, Luciano; Prasad, Ashok K; Rastogi, Ramesh C; Parmar, Virinder S; Raj, Hanumantharao G

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory is credited for the discovery of enzymatic acetylation of protein, a phenomenon unknown till we identified an enzyme termed acetoxy drug: protein transacetylase (TAase), catalyzing the transfer of acetyl group from polyphenolic acetates to receptor proteins (RP). Later, TAase was identified as calreticulin (CR), an endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein. CR was termed calreticulin transacetylase (CRTAase). Our persistent study revealed that CR like other families of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) such as p300, Rtt109, PCAF, and ESA1, undergoes autoacetylation. The autoacetylated CR was characterized as a stable intermediate in CRTAase catalyzed protein acetylation, and similar was the case with ESA1. The autoacetylation of CR like that of HATs was found to enhance protein-protein interaction. CR like HAT-1, CBP, and p300 mediated the acylation of RP utilizing acetyl CoA and propionyl CoA as the substrates. The similarities between CRTAase and HATs in mediating protein acylation are highlighted in this review.

  9. Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) a decade later: a brief update on science and politics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Benedikt; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Blanken, Peter; Haasen, Christian; Rehm, Jürgen; Schechter, Martin T; Strang, John; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-07-01

    Since the initial Swiss heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) study conducted in the mid-1990s, several other jurisdictions in Europe and North America have implemented HAT trials. All of these studies embrace the same goal-investigating the utility of medical heroin prescribing for problematic opioid users-yet are distinct in various key details. This paper briefly reviews (initiated or completed) studies and their main parameters, including primary research objectives, design, target populations, outcome measures, current status and-where available-key results. We conclude this overview with some final observations on a decade of intensive HAT research in the jurisdictions examined, including the suggestion that there is a mounting onus on the realm of politics to translate the-largely positive-data from completed HAT science into corresponding policy and programming in order to expand effective treatment options for the high-risk population of illicit opioid users.

  10. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduced Crew Operations (RCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Air Force - NASA Bi-Annual Research Council Meeting, slides will be presented on recent Reduced Crew Operations (RCO) work. Unmanned aerial systems, robotics, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all examples of domains that are seeing dramatic increases in automation. While automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required, for the foreseeable future, to remain in the system. The collaboration with humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. A methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project is discussed.

  11. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduce Crew Operations (RCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems, robotics, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all examples of domains that are seeing dramatic increases in automation. While automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required, for the foreseeable future, to remain in the system. The collaboration with humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. This paper applies a methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project.

  12. FLOYDS Classification of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn as a Type II Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, G.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Sand, D.; Tartaglia, L.

    2017-02-01

    We obtained a spectrum of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn (ATel #10058) on 2017 February 8.7 UT with the robotic FLOYDS instrument mounted on the Las Cumbres Observatory 2-meter telescope in Siding Spring, Australia.

  13. Biomechanical study of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu-Tong; Jia, Lian-Shun; Chen, Tong-Yi

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical effect of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage (HCIFC). In this in vitro biomechanical study, 48 goat cervical spines (C2-5) were tested in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending with a nondestructive stiffness method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus, and three-dimensional displacement was measured. Autologous iliac bone and cervical spine intervertebral fusion cage were implanted according to manufacturers' information after complete discectomy (C3-4). Eight spines in each of the following groups were tested: intact, autologous iliac bone graft, Harms cage, SynCage C, carbon cage, and HCIFC. The mean apparent stiffness values were calculated from the corresponding load-displacement curves. Additionally, cage volume and volume-related stiffness were determined. The stiffness of the SynCage C was statistically greatest in all directions. After implantation of the HCIFC, flexion stiffness increased compared with that of the intact motion segment. There was no significant difference in stiffness between the HCIFC and carbon cage. The stiffness of the HCIFC was statistically higher than that of the Harms cage in axial rotation and significantly lower in flexion, extension, and lateral bending. Volume-related stiffness of all cages was higher than that of iliac bone graft. The Harms cage was highest in volume-related stiffness in all directions. The HCIFC can provide enough primary stability for cervical intervertebral fusion.

  14. Space disposal of nuclear wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, C. C.; Nixon, R. F.; Rice, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE has been studying several options for nuclear waste disposal, among them space disposal, which NASA has been assessing. Attention is given to space disposal destinations noting that a circular heliocentric orbit about halfway between Earth and Venus is the reference option in space disposal studies. Discussion also covers the waste form, showing that parameters to be considered include high waste loading, high thermal conductivity, thermochemical stability, resistance to leaching, fabrication, resistance to oxidation and to thermal shock. Finally, the Space Shuttle nuclear waste disposal mission profile is presented.

  15. HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b. Two inflated transiting hot Jupiters from the HATNet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Béky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Hansen, T.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Szklenár, T.; Falco, E.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Noyes, R. W.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We announce the discovery of two new transiting planets, and provide their accurate initial characterization. Methods: First identified from the HATNet wide-field photometric survey, these candidate transiting planets were then followed-up with a variety of photometric observations. Determining the planetary nature of the objects and characterizing the parameters of the systems were mainly done with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope at OHP and the TRES spectrograph at the 1.5 m telescope at FLWO. Results: HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b are typical hot Jupiters on circular orbits around early-G/late-F main sequence host stars, with periods of 4.641878 ± 0.000032 and 3.332687 ± 0.000015 days, masses of 1.044 ± 0.083 and 0.662 ± 0.060 MJ, and radii of 1.280 ± 0.153 and 1.28+0.062-0.033RJ, respectively. These discoveries increase the sample of planets with measured mean densities, which are needed to constrain theories of planetary interiors and atmospheres. Moreover, their hosts are relatively bright (V < 13.5), which facilitates further follow-up studies. Full Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A86The photometric/spectroscopic data presented in this paper are based in part on observations carried out by the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network, using telescopes operated at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), and at the Submillimeter Array (SMA) of SAO, by the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by SAO at FLWO, by the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (runs DDT-Dec. 2011), by the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los

  16. Mexican-American Cultural Assumptions and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carranza, E. Lou

    The search for presuppositions of a people's thought is not new. Octavio Paz and Samuel Ramos have both attempted to describe the assumptions underlying the Mexican character. Paz described Mexicans as private, defensive, and stoic, characteristics taken to the extreme in the "pachuco." Ramos, on the other hand, described Mexicans as…

  17. Mexican American Women in the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca Zinn, Maxine

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that the biased image of Mexican-American women in current literature can be improved by: locating Mexican-American females in precise organizational context; distinguishing between macro- and microanalytical levels; separating social structural from cultural phenomena; and relating Mexican-American women's studies to general feminist…

  18. NAFTA: The Mexican Economy, and Undocumented Migration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-28

    FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NAFTA , the Mexican Economy, and Undocumented Migration 5a...ABSTRACT NAFTA , The Mexican Economy, and Undocumented Migration The North American Free Trade Agreement is variously blamed for undocumented...potential, and recommends measures to increase the chances of positive results. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NAFTA , Mexican undocumented migration 16

  19. El Arte Culinario Mexicano (Mexican Culinary Art).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Michelle

    This unit in Mexican cooking can be used in Junior High School home economics classes to introduce students to Mexican culture or as a mini-course in Spanish at almost any level. It is divided into two parts. Part One provides historical background and information on basic foods, the Mexican market, shopping tips, regional cooking and customs.…

  20. Mexican-American Women: Diversity in Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Marleen E.

    Various literary views of the Mexican American woman have been presented over the past 150 years. Anglo treatment of Mexican American women in literature has varied from blatant prejudice or vague mystical eroticism in early portrayals to more realistic views of the Chicano in modern writing. The current identity crisis of Mexican Americans is…

  1. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  2. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  3. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  4. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  5. 47 CFR 22.957 - Mexican condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... States-Mexican border must have the following condition attached: This authorization is subject to the... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mexican condition. 22.957 Section 22.957... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.957 Mexican condition. Pursuant to an agreement between the...

  6. Using a Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT) system: experiences and perceptions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Castro, Heather K; Cross, Raymond K; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences and perceptions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who participated in an interactive, patient-centered computerized disease management program using the Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT) system. We conducted and analyzed qualitative exit interviews with 23 participants who used the system for six months. The HAT system was well accepted, increased patients' awareness about the disease and facilitated greater control of their IBD symptoms.

  7. Epigenetic Control of Learning and Memory in Drosophila by Tip60 HAT Action

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songjun; Wilf, Rona; Menon, Trisha; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Sarthi, Jessica; Elefant, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of epigenetic gene control mechanisms in the brain causes significant cognitive impairment that is a debilitating hallmark of most neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Histone acetylation is one of the best characterized of these epigenetic mechanisms that is critical for regulating learning- and memory- associated gene expression profiles, yet the specific histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that mediate these effects have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we investigate an epigenetic role for the HAT Tip60 in learning and memory formation using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that Tip60 is endogenously expressed in the Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the MB, and in the MB axonal lobes. Targeted loss of Tip60 HAT activity in the MB causes thinner and shorter axonal lobes while increasing Tip60 HAT levels cause no morphological defects. Functional consequences of both loss and gain of Tip60 HAT levels in the MB are evidenced by defects in immediate-recall memory. Our ChIP-Seq analysis reveals that Tip60 target genes are enriched for functions in cognitive processes, and, accordingly, key genes representing these pathways are misregulated in the Tip60 HAT mutant fly brain. Remarkably, we find that both learning and immediate-recall memory deficits that occur under AD-associated, amyloid precursor protein (APP)-induced neurodegenerative conditions can be effectively rescued by increasing Tip60 HAT levels specifically in the MB. Together, our findings uncover an epigenetic transcriptional regulatory role for Tip60 in cognitive function and highlight the potential of HAT activators as a therapeutic option for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25326235

  8. Landfill disposal systems

    PubMed Central

    Slimak, Karen M.

    1978-01-01

    The current status of landfill disposal of hazardous wastes in the United States is indicated by presenting descriptions of six operating landfills. These landfills illustrate the variety of techniques that exist in landfill disposal of hazardous wastes. Although some landfills more effectively isolate hazardous waste than others, all landfills must deal with the following problems. Leachate from hazardous waste landfills is generally highly polluted. Most landfills attempt to contain leachate at the site and prevent its discharge to surface or groundwaters. To retain leachate within a disposal area, subsurface barriers of materials such as concrete, asphalt, butyl rubber, vinyl, and clay are used. It is difficult to assure that these materials can seal a landfill indefinitely. When a subsurface barrier fails, the leachate enters the groundwater in a concentrated, narrow band which may bypass monitoring wells. Once a subsurface barrier has failed, repairs are time-consuming and costly, since the waste above the repair site may have to be removed. The central problem in landfill disposal is leachate control. Recent emphasis has been on developing subsurface barriers to contain the wastes and any leachate. Future emphasis should also be on techniques for removing water from hazardous wastes before they are placed in landfills, and on methods for preventing contact of the wastes with water during and after disposal operations. When leachate is eliminated, the problems of monitoring, and subsurface barrier failure and repair can be addressed, and a waste can be effectively isolated. A surface seal landfill design is recommended for maintaining the dry state of solid hazardous wastes and for controlling leachate. Any impervious liner is utilized over the top of the landfill to prevent surface water from seeping into the waste. The surface barrier is also the site where monitoring and maintenance activities are focused. Barrier failure can be detected by visual

  9. Diabetic nephropathy among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Subrata; Thameem, Farook; Alves, Tahira; Nolen, Jacqueline; Al-Shahrouri, Hania; Bansal, Shweta; Abboud, Hanna E.; Fanti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is growing rapidly worldwide as a consequence of the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Among U.S. ethnic groups, Mexican Americans have a disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of DN and associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In communities bordering Mexico, as many as 90% of Mexican American patients with ESRD also suffer from T2DM compared to only 50% of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Both socio-economic factors and genetic predisposition appear to have a strong influence on this association. In addition, certain pathogenetic and clinical features of T2DM and DN are different in Mexican Americans compared to NHW, raising questions as to whether the diagnostic and treatment strategies that are standard practice in the NHW patient population may not be applicable in Mexican Americans. This article reviews the epidemiology of DN in Mexican Americans, describes the pathophysiology and associated risk factors, and identifies gaps in our knowledge and understanding that needs to be addressed by future investigations. PMID:22445478

  10. Invited review: Artisanal Mexican cheeses.

    PubMed

    González-Córdova, Aarón F; Yescas, Carlos; Ortiz-Estrada, Ángel Martín; De la Rosa-Alcaraz, María de Los Ángeles; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this review is to present an overview of some of the most commonly consumed artisanal Mexican cheeses, as well as those cheeses that show potential for a protected designation of origin. A description is given for each of these cheeses, including information on their distinguishing characteristics that makes some of them potential candidates for achieving a protected designation of origin status. This distinction could help to expand their frontiers and allow them to become better known and appreciated in other parts of the world. Due to the scarcity of scientific studies concerning artisanal Mexican cheeses, which would ultimately aid in the standardization of manufacturing processes and in the establishment of regulations related to their production, more than 40 varieties of artisanal cheese are in danger of disappearing. To preserve these cheeses, it is necessary to address this challenge by working jointly with government, artisanal cheesemaking organizations, industry, academics, and commercial partners on the implementation of strategies to protect and preserve their artisanal means of production. With sufficient information, official Mexican regulations could be established that would encompass and regulate the manufacture of Mexican artisanal cheeses. Finally, as many Mexican artisanal cheeses are produced from raw milk, more scientific studies are required to show the role of the lactic acid bacteria and their antagonistic effect on pathogenic microorganisms during aging following cheese making.

  11. HAT-P-1: A Direct Glimpse into the Atmosphere of a Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    The HATNet project has discovered a transiting planet that is an extremely valuable target for reflected light observations {Bakos et al. 2006}. HAT-P-1b, with mass M_p=0.53 +/- 0.04 M_Jup, and radius R_p=1.20 +/- 0.05 R_Jup {Winn et al. 2007}, has a density comparable to that of HD 209458b. However, HAT-P-1b's P=4.46536 day orbital period is longer than that of HD 209458b. It is expected that the cloud composition and particulate size distribution of HAT-P-1b will differ from that of HD 209458b, due to the larger semimajor axis and lower effective temperature of HAT-P-1b. The resulting geometric albedo for HAT-P-1b should be larger than that of HD 209458b. Furthermore, HAT-P-1 orbits one component of a wide binary {ADS 16402A and ADS 16402B are G0V stars with 11.2" at 1.39 pc}, making this an ideal target for ultra-precise differential photometry. Therefore, we propose ACS/HRC slitless grism photometry near times of its secondary eclipse to make the first detection of reflected light from an extrasolar planet.Note: this program was awarded DD time in Cycle 15 but the observations were not executed before the ACS failed.Holman and Bakos are co-PIs on this proposal.

  12. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b: Two Low-density Saturn-mass Planets Transiting Metal-rich K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Sato, B.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Fischer, D. A.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Füresz, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Béky, B.; Stefanik, R. P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Csubry, Z.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-18b orbits the V = 12.759 K2 dwarf star GSC 2594-00646, with a period P = 5.508023 ± 0.000006 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454715.02174 ± 0.00020 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1131 ± 0.0009 days. The host star has a mass of 0.77 ± 0.03 M sun, radius of 0.75 ± 0.04 R sun, effective temperature 4803 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.10 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.197 ± 0.013 M J and radius of 0.995 ± 0.052 R J, yielding a mean density of 0.25 ± 0.04 g cm-3. HAT-P-19b orbits the V = 12.901 K1 dwarf star GSC 2283-00589, with a period P = 4.008778 ± 0.000006 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455091.53417 ± 0.00034 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1182 ± 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.84 ± 0.04 M sun, radius of 0.82 ± 0.05 R sun, effective temperature 4990 ± 130 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.23 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.292 ± 0.018 M J and radius of 1.132 ± 0.072 R J, yielding a mean density of 0.25 ± 0.04 g cm-3. The radial velocity residuals for HAT-P-19 exhibit a linear trend in time, which indicates the presence of a third body in the system. Comparing these observations with theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b are each consistent with a hydrogen-helium-dominated gas giant planet with negligible core mass. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b join HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b in an emerging group of low-density Saturn-mass planets, with negligible inferred core masses. However, unlike HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b, both HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b orbit stars with super-solar metallicity. This calls into question the heretofore suggestive correlation between the inferred core mass and host star metallicity for Saturn-mass planets. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A146Hr, A201Hr

  13. Effective Quenchers Are Required to Eliminate the Interference of Substrate: Cofactor Binding in the HAT Scintillation Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Liza; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) mediate the transfer of an acetyl group from the cofactor, acetyl-CoA, to the side chain amino group of specific lysines in diverse protein substrates, most notably nuclear histones. The deregulation of HATs is connected to a number of disease states. Reliable and rapid biochemical assays for HATs are critical for understanding biological functions of protein acetylation, as well as for screening small-molecule inhibitors of HAT enzymes. In this report, we present a scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for the measurement of HAT enzymatic activities. The acetyl donor was [3H]Ac-CoA, and a biotin-modified histone peptide served as the HAT substrate. After the HAT reaction, streptavidin-coated beads were added to induce proximity of acetylated substrate to the scintillant molecules. However, we observed strong nonspecific binding between the cofactor and the histone peptide substrates, which adversely complicated the SPA performance. To prevent this problem, a set of chemical agents were evaluated to eliminate the cofactor–substrate interaction, thus providing reliable SPA readings. With optimization, the SPA showed consistent and robust performance for HAT activity measurement and HAT inhibitor evaluation. Overall, this mix-and-measure assay does not require any washing procedure, can be utilized in the microplate format, and is well suited for high-throughput screening of HAT chemical modulators. PMID:26065557

  14. The Transmembrane Serine Protease HAT-like 4 Is Important for Epidermal Barrier Function to Prevent Body Fluid Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Hu, Yae; Yan, Ruhong; Dong, Liang; Jiang, Yizhi; Zhou, Zhichao; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Tiantian; Dong, Ningzheng; Wu, Qingyu

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteases are essential for epidermal integrity. Human airway trypsin-like protease 4 (HAT-L4) is a type II transmembrane serine protease. Currently, its biochemical property, cellular distribution and physiological function remain unknown. Here we examined HAT-L4 expression and function in vitro and in vivo. In Western analysis, HAT-L4 expressed in transfected CHO cells appeared as a 48-kDa protein. Flow cytometry confirmed HAT-L4 expression on the cell surface with the expected membrane topology. RT-PCR and immunostaining experiments indicated that HAT-L4 was expressed in epithelial cells and exocrine glands in tissues including skin, esophagus, trachea, tongue, eye, bladder, testis and uterus. In the skin, HAT-L4 expression was abundant in keratinocytes and sebaceous glands. We generated HAT-L4 knockout mice by disrupting the Tmprss11f gene encoding HAT-L4. HAT-L4 knockout mice were viable and fertile. No defects were found in HAT-L4 knockout mice in hair growth, wound healing, water repulsion and body temperature regulation. Compared with wild-type controls, HAT-L4-deficient newborn mice had greater body fluid loss and higher mortality in a trans-epidermal body fluid loss test. In metabolic studies, HAT-L4-deficient adult mice drank water more frequently than wild-type controls did. These results indicate that HAT-L4 is important in epidermal barrier function to prevent body fluid loss. PMID:28338078

  15. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  16. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  17. "The Mexican Culture" in the Education of the Mexican American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Maria Luisa

    1978-01-01

    This paper offers reasons for teaching Mexican culture in bilingual programs. The first section considers three important court decisions - Lau vs. Nichols, Serna vs. Portales Municipal Schools, and Keyes vs. School District N. 1, Denver, Colorado - and then discusses the extent of bilingual-bicultural education. The meaning of bicultural…

  18. Being Mexican: Strengths and Challenges of Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Krista M.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides outcomes of a qualitative inquiry with 20 adolescents of Mexican origin, all of whom have lived in the United States at least two years. Questions addressed the perceived strengths and challenges related to the participants' ethnic heritage. Findings indicated the greatest perceived challenge was discrimination. Strengths…

  19. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter Benjamin; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin James; Burrows, Adam Seth; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit due to the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Due to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity is in part dictated by its Love number, i.e. the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. We can therefore directly constrain the fraction of HAT-P-13b's mass contained in its core by measuring its orbital eccentricity. This method offers considerable advantages over the standard approach of inferring core size based on mass and radius measurements alone. In this study we derive new constraints on the value of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b is 0.00696 ± 0.00096. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find that the corresponding Love number is 0.31 (+0.11, -0.05). Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that the core mass lies between 0-25 Earth masses, with a most likely value of the core mass of 11 Earth masses. This is the tightest constraint, to date, on the core mass of an exoplanet. We also compare the measured secondary eclipse depths, in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands, to the predictions of a suite of atmosphere models and find that the depths are best matched by models with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day-night circulation.

  20. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology.

  1. Stigmatization of Overweight Mexican Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacardi-Gascon, Montserrat; Leon-Reyes, Maria Juana; Jimenez-Cruz, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the weight-based stigmatization of Mexican overweight (OW) and non-OW children by their mothers and peers, who rated both boys and girls with varying physical characteristics. Four hundred and thirty-two fifth and sixth graders and 342 mothers participated in the study. Children were administered a…

  2. Reading Exercises on Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almaraz, Felix D., Jr.; Almaraz, Maria O.

    Short biographical sketches and drawings of 30 prominent Mexican Americans are presented in this book of reading exercises. Written on a fourth or fifth grade level, the book includes figures representing a variety of occupations and fields of achievement: the arts, sports, business, journalism, education, entertainment, literature, medicine, law,…

  3. The Mexican Axolotl in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests and describes laboratory activities in which the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum Shaw) is used, including experiments in embryology and early development, growth and regeneration, neoteny and metamorphosis, genetics and coloration, anatomy and physiology, and behavior. Discusses care and maintenance of animals. (CS)

  4. Mexican High Energy Physics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olivo, J. C.; Napsuciale, M.; Pérez-Angón, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican High Energy Physics Network is one of CONACYT's thematic research networks, created with the aim of increasing the communication and cooperation of the scientific and technology communities of Mexico in strategic areas. In this report we review the evolution, challenges, achievements and opportunities faced by the network.

  5. Mexican Migration: Assessing Root Causes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Golding (Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2003), 105. 21 Leonardo Curzio , “Organized Crime and Political Campaign Finance in Mexico,” in... Curzio , Leonardo . Organize Crime and Political Campaign Finance in Mexico, in Organized Crime and Democratic Governability: Mexico and the U.S.- Mexican

  6. La Artesania Mexicana (Mexican Handicrafts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Bettina

    This booklet contains instructions in English and Spanish for making eleven typical Mexican craft articles. The instructions are accompanied by pen-and-ink drawings. The objects are (1) "La Rosa" (The Rose); (2) "El Crisantemo" (The Chrysanthemum); (3) "La Amapola" (The Poppy); (4) "Ojos de Dios" (God's Eyes); (5) "Ojitos con dos caras" (Two-Sided…

  7. HAT3-mediated acetylation of PCNA precedes PCNA monoubiquitination following exposure to UV radiation in Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devanand; Saha, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Histone modifications impact various processes. In examining histone acetyltranferase HAT3 of Leishmania donovani, we find elimination of HAT3 causes decreased cell viability due to defects in histone deposition, and aberrant cell cycle progression pattern. HAT3 associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), helping load PCNA onto chromatin in proliferating cells. HAT3-nulls show heightened sensitivity to UV radiation. Following UV exposure, PCNA cycles off/on chromatin only in cells expressing HAT3. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway prior to UV exposure allows accumulation of chromatin-bound PCNA, and reveals that HAT3-nulls are deficient in PCNA monoubiquitination as well as polyubiquitination. While poor monoubiquitination of PCNA may adversely affect translesion DNA synthesis-based repair processes, polyubiquitination deficiencies may result in continued retention of chromatin-bound PCNA, leading to genomic instability. On suppressing the proteasome pathway we also find that HAT3 mediates PCNA acetylation in response to UV. HAT3-mediated PCNA acetylation may serve as a flag for PCNA ubiquitination, thus aiding DNA repair. While PCNA acetylation has previously been linked to its degradation following UV exposure, this is the first report linking a HAT-mediated PCNA acetylation to PCNA monoubiquitination. These findings add a new dimension to our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating PCNA ubiquitination post-UV exposure in eukaryotes. PMID:25948582

  8. Locus-specific control of DNA resection and suppression of subtelomeric VSG recombination by HAT3 in the African trypanosome.

    PubMed

    Glover, Lucy; Horn, David

    2014-11-10

    The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, is a parasitic protozoan that achieves antigenic variation through DNA-repair processes involving Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) gene rearrangements at subtelomeres. Subtelomeric suppression of DNA repair operates in eukaryotes but little is known about these controls in trypanosomes. Here, we identify a trypanosome histone acetyltransferase (HAT3) and a deacetylase (SIR2rp1) required for efficient RAD51-dependent homologous recombination. HAT3 and SIR2rp1 were required for RAD51-focus assembly and disassembly, respectively, at a chromosome-internal locus and a synthetic defect indicated distinct contributions to DNA repair. Although HAT3 promoted chromosome-internal recombination, it suppressed subtelomeric VSG recombination, and these locus-specific effects were mediated through differential production of ssDNA by DNA resection; HAT3 promoted chromosome-internal resection but suppressed subtelomeric resection. Consistent with the resection defect, HAT3 was specifically required for the G2-checkpoint response at a chromosome-internal locus. HAT3 also promoted resection at a second chromosome-internal locus comprising tandem-duplicated genes. We conclude that HAT3 and SIR2rp1 can facilitate temporally distinct steps in DNA repair. HAT3 promotes ssDNA formation and recombination at chromosome-internal sites but has the opposite effect at a subtelomeric VSG. These locus-specific controls reveal compartmentalization of the T. brucei genome in terms of the DNA-damage response and suppression of antigenic variation by HAT3.

  9. HAT3-mediated acetylation of PCNA precedes PCNA monoubiquitination following exposure to UV radiation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devanand; Saha, Swati

    2015-06-23

    Histone modifications impact various processes. In examining histone acetyltranferase HAT3 of Leishmania donovani, we find elimination of HAT3 causes decreased cell viability due to defects in histone deposition, and aberrant cell cycle progression pattern. HAT3 associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), helping load PCNA onto chromatin in proliferating cells. HAT3-nulls show heightened sensitivity to UV radiation. Following UV exposure, PCNA cycles off/on chromatin only in cells expressing HAT3. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway prior to UV exposure allows accumulation of chromatin-bound PCNA, and reveals that HAT3-nulls are deficient in PCNA monoubiquitination as well as polyubiquitination. While poor monoubiquitination of PCNA may adversely affect translesion DNA synthesis-based repair processes, polyubiquitination deficiencies may result in continued retention of chromatin-bound PCNA, leading to genomic instability. On suppressing the proteasome pathway we also find that HAT3 mediates PCNA acetylation in response to UV. HAT3-mediated PCNA acetylation may serve as a flag for PCNA ubiquitination, thus aiding DNA repair. While PCNA acetylation has previously been linked to its degradation following UV exposure, this is the first report linking a HAT-mediated PCNA acetylation to PCNA monoubiquitination. These findings add a new dimension to our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating PCNA ubiquitination post-UV exposure in eukaryotes.

  10. Phylogenetic and Functional Characterization of the hAT Transposon Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Arensburger, Peter; Hice, Robert H.; Zhou, Liqin; Smith, Ryan C.; Tom, Ariane C.; Wright, Jennifer A.; Knapp, Joshua; O'Brochta, David A.; Craig, Nancy L.; Atkinson, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Transposons are found in virtually all organisms and play fundamental roles in genome evolution. They can also acquire new functions in the host organism and some have been developed as incisive genetic tools for transformation and mutagenesis. The hAT transposon superfamily contains members from the plant and animal kingdoms, some of which are active when introduced into new host organisms. We have identified two new active hAT transposons, AeBuster1, from the mosquito Aedes aegypti and TcBuster from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Activity of both transposons is illustrated by excision and transposition assays performed in Drosophila melanogaster and Ae. aegypti and by in vitro strand transfer assays. These two active insect transposons are more closely related to the Buster sequences identified in humans than they are to the previously identified active hAT transposons, Ac, Tam3, Tol2, hobo, and Hermes. We therefore reexamined the structural and functional relationships of hAT and hAT-like transposase sequences extracted from genome databases and found that the hAT superfamily is divided into at least two families. This division is supported by a difference in target-site selections generated by active transposons of each family. We name these families the Ac and Buster families after the first identified transposon or transposon-like sequence in each. We find that the recently discovered SPIN transposons of mammals are located within the family of Buster elements. PMID:21368277

  11. Military nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    A National Research Council (NRC) panel has endorsed a plan for a proposed underground military nuclear waste disposal facility located on a site near Carlsbad, N.M. The Department of Energy (DOE) asked NRC to evaluate the geologic suitability of the site.The NRC panel, chaired by Frank L. Parker of Vanderbilt University, concluded in its final report that “the important issues about the geology of the site have been resolved…” Those issues include the purity and volume of salt, the absence of brine pockets at the repository horizon in the areas excavated, the absence of breccia pipes and of toxic gases, and the nearly horizontal bedding of the salt. Thick underground salt beds have long been considered prime candidates for nuclear waste repositories. The existence of salt beds is believed to indicate long-term stability. In addition, the salt is flexible and will seal cracks and discontinuities over time.

  12. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  13. Acculturation, optimism, and relatively fewer depression symptoms among Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    González, Patricia; González, Gerardo M

    2008-10-01

    The mental health of individuals of Mexican origin may vary as a function of native status (i.e., Mexican born or U.S.A. born). Some have reported that Mexican Americans tend to display more depressive symptoms than Mexican immigrants. The present goal was to estimate the associations among acculturation and native status, and explore relative deprivation in the prevalence of depression. Participants included 153 individuals of Mexican origin who completed the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Revised Generalized Expectancy for Success Scale, and relative deprivation questions. Analyses indicated women and those scoring low on acculturation were significantly more likely to report depressive symptoms. Participants who felt they had relatively better family happiness than Euro-Americans reported lower depressive symptoms. So participants' sex, acculturation, and relative lack of depressive symptoms allow better understanding of depressive symptoms among these Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants.

  14. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  15. Disposable diapers: safe and effective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namita; Purthi, P K; Sachdev, Anupam; Gupta, Suresh

    2003-09-01

    Nappy rash is a common problem in infants due to their thinner skin, wetness, heat and friction under cloth nappy, fecal enzymes and alkaline urine. The disposable diapers containing Super Absorbent Material (SAM) reduce the incidence of nappy rash. SAM quickly absorbs urine and keeps the skin dry. Also disposable diapers prevent fecal contamination by absorbing the urine and containing stools.

  16. Nuclear waste disposal in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. E.; Causey, W. E.; Galloway, W. E.; Nelson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Work on nuclear waste disposal in space conducted by the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and contractors are reported. From the aggregate studies, it is concluded that space disposal of nuclear waste is technically feasible.

  17. Melter Disposal Strategic Planning Document

    SciTech Connect

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-09-25

    This document describes the proposed strategy for disposal of spent and failed melters from the tank waste treatment plant to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in Washington. It describes program management activities, disposal and transportation systems, leachate management, permitting, and safety authorization basis approvals needed to execute the strategy.

  18. Chemical Waste Management and Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Margaret-Ann

    1988-01-01

    Describes simple, efficient techniques for treating hazardous chemicals so that nontoxic and nonhazardous residues are formed. Discusses general rules for management of waste chemicals from school laboratories and general techniques for the disposal of waste or surplus chemicals. Lists specific disposal reactions. (CW)

  19. An Analytical Model for Top-Hat Long Transient Mode-Mismatched Thermal Lens Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaeian, M.; Rezaei, H.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a top-hat excitation beam gives rise to a more sensitive signal for the thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). Recently, a numerical model has been presented for a top- hat excitation beam in a dual-beam mod-mismatched TLS [Opt. Lett. 33(13), 1464-1466 (2008)]. In this work, we present a full analytical version of this model. Our model was based on a new solution of time-dependent heat equation for a finite radius cylindrical sample exposed to a top-hat excitation laser beam. The Fresnel diffraction integration method was then used to calculate on-axis probe-beam intensity variations due to thermal lensing by taking the aberrant nature of the thermal lens into account. The model was confirmed with experimental data of LSCAS-2 with an excellent agreement.

  20. A Common Proper Motion Stellar Companion to HAT-P-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Hirano, Teruyuki; Suenaga, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    We report that HAT-P-7 has a common proper motion stellar companion. The companion is located at approx. 3.9 arcsec to the east and estimated as an M5.5V dwarf based on its colors. We also confirm the presence of the third companion, which was first reported by Winn et al. (2009), based on long-term radial velocity measurements. We revisit the migration mechanism of HAT-P-7b given the presence of those companions, and propose sequential Kozai migration as a likely scenario in this system. This scenario may explain the reason for an outlier in the discussion of the spin-orbit alignment timescale for HAT-P-7b by Albrecht et al. (2012).

  1. Analysis and test of superplastically formed titanium hat-stiffened panels under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Randall C.; Royster, Dick M.; Bales, Thomas T.

    1987-01-01

    Four hat-stiffened titanium panels with two different stiffener configurations were fabricated by superplastic forming/weld brazing and tested under a moderately heavy compressive load. The panels had the same overall dimensions but differed in the shape of the hat-stiffener webs; three panels had stiffeners with flat webs and the other panel had stiffeners with beaded webs. Analysis indicated that the local buckling strain of the flat stiffener web was considerably lower than the general panel buckling strain or cap buckling strain. The analysis also showed that beading the webs of the hat stiffeners removed them as the critical element for local buckling and improved the buckling strain of the panels. The analytical extensional stiffness and failure loads compared very well with experimental results.

  2. The design of Top-Hat morphological filter and application to infrared target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Li, Jianxun; Peng, Zhang

    2006-04-01

    Automatic detection and track for infrared target is of great significance in modern world. In this paper, two novel methods which can develop optimizing Top-Hat morphological filtering parameters are presented for spot target detection. One is based on neural network. Its structuring element is a two-layer feed-forward network which is trained by a mass of sample nets. It regards Top-Hat operation as a whole and one layer, and defines the node of the output layer as the maximum gray-scale image vector after Top-Hat operation. The other is based on genetic algorithm. It adopts the interval discretization code and new primary and secondary mood crossover and mutation. Experimental results show that the identified probability of images (SNR is about 2) can reach more than 98% by this method.

  3. Measurement of nonlinear index by a relay-imaged top-hat Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, T.; Kurnit, N.A.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    1996-04-01

    Measurements of the nonlinear index of a number of optical materials of interest for the National Ignition Facility have been performed at 1,064 nm and 355 nm by a modified version of the ``top-hat`` technique and the results compared with the more standard gaussian-beam Z-scan technique. The top-hat technique has the advantages of higher sensitivity and smaller uncertainties introduced by beam-quality considerations. The authors have made what they feel to be an additional improvement by placing the defining aperture for the top hat at the front focal plane of the lens that focuses the beam into the sample and then reimaging the input aperture with a second lens onto a ccd camera. Reimaging eliminates diffraction fringes and provides a stationary image even for a wedged sample; recording the entire image permits minimization of spurious effects such as varying interference fringes.

  4. A Common Proper Motion Stellar Companion to HAT-P-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Hirano, Teruyuki; Suenaga, Takuya; Kandori, Ryo; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Suzuki, Ryuji; Ida, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Makiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken M.; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suto, Hiroshi; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John P.; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-12-01

    We report that HAT-P-7 has a common proper motion stellar companion. The companion is located at ˜3."9 to the east and estimated to be an M5.5V dwarf based on its colors. We also confirm the presence of a third companion, which was first reported by Winn et al. (2009, ApJ, 703, L99), based on long-term radial velocity measurements. We revisit the migration mechanism of HAT-P-7b given to the presence of those companions, and propose the sequential Kozai migration as a likely scenario in this system. This scenario may explain the reason for an outlier in the discussion of the spin-orbit alignment timescale for HAT-P-7b by Albrecht et al. (2012, ApJ, 757, 18).

  5. HATS-1b: THE FIRST TRANSITING PLANET DISCOVERED BY THE HATSouth SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Penev, K.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Conroy, P.; Jordan, A.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Mohler, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csak, B.; Beky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V = 12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period of P Almost-Equal-To 3.4465 days, mass of M{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.86 M{sub J}, and radius of R{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.30 R{sub J}. The host star has a mass of 0.99 M{sub Sun} and radius of 1.04 R{sub Sun }. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near-continuous coverage over several multi-day timespans, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets.

  6. Mexican Perspectives on Mexican-U.S. Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    administration of Mexican President Porfirio Diaz (1876 - 1911). He was a dictator whose pervasive and ruthless administration is considered an...placing the agricultural system in the hands of a few wealthy landowners. Porfirio Diaz accomplished his objectives by establishing an oligarchy...violent coup staged by Generals Victoriano Huerta and Felix Diax that overthrew the government of Porfirio Diaz ’ successor, President Francisco Madero

  7. Recent Outstanding and Ordinary Books about Mexico, Mexicans, and Mexican-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Isabel

    1984-01-01

    This bibliographic essay reviews recent books about Mexico written for serious students and/or young adult readers; recent books for children and young adults which reflect authors' misunderstanding of Mexico, Mexicans, and Mexican-Americans; and recent books about Mexico and Mexican-Americans that might appeal to young readers with special…

  8. The Health Beliefs of Mexican, Mexican American and Anglo American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Felipe G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with 102 urban Mexican, Mexican American, and Anglo American women to examine health-illness beliefs in five health domains as related to acculturation level: folk and hot-cold beliefs, beliefs of responsibility and control over own health, and cardiovascular disease and stress-illness beliefs. Mexican-origin women mildly…

  9. Flexural fatigue life prediction of closed hat-section using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Zia

    1989-01-01

    Straight or curved hat-section members are often used as structural stiffeners in aircraft. For instance, they are employed as stiffeners for the dorsal skin as well as in the aerial refueling adjacent area structure in F-106 aircraft. The flanges of the hat-section are connected to the aircraft skin. Thus, the portion of the skin closing the hat-section interacts with the section itself when resisting the stresses due to service loads. The flexural fatigue life of such a closed section is estimated using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics. It should be recognized that when a structural shape is subjected to bending, the fatigue life at the neutral axis is infinity since the normal stresses are zero at that location. Conversely, the fatigue life at the extreme fibers where the normal bending stresses are maximum can be expected to be finite. Thus, different fatigue life estimates can be visualized at various distances from the neural axis. The problem becomes compounded further when significant portions away from the neutral axis are stressed into plastic range. A theoretical analysis of the closed hat-section subjected to flexural cyclic loading is first conducted. The axial fatigue characteristics together with the related axial fatigue life formula and its inverted form given by Manson and Muralidharan are adopted for an aluminum alloy used in aircraft construction. A closed-form expression for predicting the flexural fatigue life is then derived for the closed hat-section including materially nonlinear action. A computer program is written to conduct a study of the variables such as the thicknesses of the hat-section and the skin, and the type of alloy used. The study has provided a fundamental understanding of the flexural fatigue life characteristics of a practical structural component used in aircraft when materially nonlinear action is present.

  10. Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

    2013-07-29

    Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

  11. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization - KVM-based infrastructure services at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Cortijo, D.

    2011-06-14

    Over the past 18 months, BNL has moved a large percentage of its Linux-based servers and services into a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) environment. This presentation will address our approach to virtualization, critical decision points, and a discussion of our implementation. Specific topics will include an overview of hardware and software requirements, networking, and storage; discussion of the decision of Red Hat solution over competing products (VMWare, Xen, etc); details on some of the features of RHEV - both current and on their roadmap; Review of performance and reliability gains since deployment completion; path forward for RHEV at BNL and caveats and potential problems.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Transit of HAT-P-5 (Southworth+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, J.; Mancini, L.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Bruni, I.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Barbieri, M.; Ruocco, N.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    We observed one full transit of HAT-P-5 on the night of 2010 August 23, using the 2.2-m telescope and BUSCA imager at Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory. BUSCA uses dichroics to split the incoming light into four wavelength intervals, which traverse different arms of the instrument and are incident on to four CCDs. We observed two transits of HAT-P-5 in 2011 May and July, using BFOSC mounted on the 1.52-m G.D. Cassini Telescope at Loiano Observatory, Italy. (2 data files).

  13. The New Photometric Observations for Transiting Exoplanet HAT-P-24b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Bin; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Gu, Sheng-Hong

    2014-04-01

    The transiting exoplanetary system HAT-P-24 was observed by using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatory and Hokoon Astronomical Centre, China in 2010 and 2012. Three new transit light curves are analyzed by means of MCMC technique, and the new physical parameters of the system are derived, which are compatible with the old ones in the discovery paper. The orbital period of HAT-P-24b is refined and no obvious TTV signal can be found from five transit events during 2010-2012.

  14. Land Disposal Restrictions for Hazardous Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The land disposal restrictions prohibits the land disposal of untreated hazardous wastes. EPA has specified either concentration levels or methods of treatment for hazardous constituents to meet before land disposal.

  15. WASP-35b, WASP-48b, AND HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b: TWO NEW PLANETS AND AN INDEPENDENT DISCOVERY OF A HAT PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, B.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; Anderson, D. R.; Smalley, B.; Barros, S. C. C.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Hebrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Lister, T. A.; Street, R. A.; Queloz, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Santerne, A.; West, R. G.; Butters, O.; Bento, J.; Fossati, L.; Haswell, C. A.

    2011-09-15

    We report the detection of WASP-35b, a planet transiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.15) star in the Southern hemisphere, WASP-48b, an inflated planet which may have spun-up its slightly evolved host star of 1.75 R{sub sun} in the Northern hemisphere, and the independent discovery of HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b, a new planet in the Northern hemisphere. Using WASP, RISE, Faulkes Telescope South, and TRAPPIST photometry, with CORALIE, SOPHIE, and NOT spectroscopy, we determine that WASP-35b has a mass of 0.72 {+-} 0.06 M{sub J} and radius of 1.32 {+-} 0.05R{sub J} , and orbits with a period of 3.16 days, WASP-48b has a mass of 0.98 {+-} 0.09 M{sub J} , radius of 1.67 {+-} 0.10 R{sub J} , and orbits in 2.14 days, while HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b, with an orbital period of 2.81 days, is found to have a mass of 0.76 {+-} 0.05 M{sub J} and radius of 1.42 {+-} 0.03 R{sub J} , agreeing with values of 0.71 {+-} 0.03 M{sub J} and 1.34 {+-} 0.07 R{sub J} reported for HAT-P-30b.

  16. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: Four Transiting Planets More Massive than Jupiter Orbiting Moderately Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Torres, G.; Béky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenár, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; Penev, K.; Everett, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Fűrész, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-07-01

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M J and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M J), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 ± 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 ± 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A289Hr) and NASA (N167Hr and N029Hr). Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  17. NAFTA and the Mexican Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-04

    their social and economic environment. The study states that NAFTA accelerated the transition of Mexico to a liberalized economy but did not create the...Trade Agreement (NAFTA), in effect since January 1994, plays a very strong role in the bilateral economic relationship between Mexico and the United...health issues. The effects of NAFTA on Mexico and the state of the Mexican economy have important impacts on U.S. economic and political interests. As

  18. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration.

    PubMed

    Holder, Amara L; Vejerano, Eric P; Zhou, Xinzhe; Marr, Linsey C

    2013-09-01

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which nanomaterials may enter incinerator waste streams and the fate of these nanomaterials during the incineration process. Although the literature on incineration of nanomaterials is scarce, results from studies of their behavior at high temperature or in combustion environments for other applications can help predict their fate within an incinerator. Preliminary evidence suggests nanomaterials may catalyze the formation or destruction of combustion by-products. Depending on their composition, nanomaterials may undergo physical and chemical transformations within the incinerator, impacting their partitioning within the incineration system (e.g., bottom ash, fly ash) and the effectiveness of control technology for removing them. These transformations may also drastically affect nanomaterial transport and impacts in the environment. Current regulations on incinerator emissions do not specifically address nanomaterials, but limits on particle and metal emissions may prove somewhat effective at reducing the release of nanomaterials in incinerator effluent. Control technology used to meet these regulations, such as fabric filters, electrostatic precipitators, and wet electrostatic scrubbers, are expected to be at least partially effective at removing nanomaterials from incinerator flue gas.

  19. Disposable diapers: a hygienic alternative.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Maithili; Malkani, Ram

    2003-11-01

    The use of disposable diapers has offered improved health care benefits. Urine and fecal matter leakage from the cloth nappies and the hand-to-mouth behavior in infants leads to many illnesses with a feco-oral mode of transmission. Also, the tender skin of the infant is more prone to nappy rash. The modern age disposable diapers, when compared to cloth nappy, have displayed a superior ability in containment of urine and feces, thereby reducing contamination and transmission of infection. Also disposable diapers contain Super Absorbent Material (SAM) that successfully reduces the incidence of nappy rash.

  20. Learning to Look, Learning to Read: Dr. Seuss'"The Cat in the Hat."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodmer, George

    1997-01-01

    States that "The Cat in the Hat" (1957), written from a basic 225 word list, explores the level of activity that a child needs to keep secret from the adult world, and is a picture book which is also nominally a "reader" and not a storybook. Includes questions for stimulating student response; encapsulates classic elements in…

  1. Children's Conception of Thermal Conduction--Or the Story of a Woollen Hat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Andrew; Ross, Keith

    1996-01-01

    Reports on discussions with a year 10-group, following their first lesson on heat energy transfer, that revealed they still had not realized that insulation acted as a barrier; instead they saw it as an active warming agent. Describes a teaching method based on a woollen hat that challenges their naive ideas. (Author/JRH)

  2. Six Thinking Hats and Social Workers' Innovative Competence: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azeez, Razaq Olugbenga

    2016-01-01

    Employees, no doubt, are the main force in organizations, and their innovative behaviours are vital for outcome efficacy. Innovative organisations, therefore, need creative employees who generate new ideas for product or process of innovation. This study investigated the effect of six thinking hats creativity technique on innovative competence of…

  3. Planet-induced Stellar Pulsations in HAT-P-2's Eccentric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Fuller, Jim; Antoci, Victoria; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Deming, Drake; Shporer, Avi; Batygin, Konstantin; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Burrows, Adam S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-02-01

    Extrasolar planets on eccentric short-period orbits provide a laboratory in which to study radiative and tidal interactions between a planet and its host star under extreme forcing conditions. Studying such systems probes how the planet’s atmosphere redistributes the time-varying heat flux from its host and how the host star responds to transient tidal distortion. Here, we report the insights into the planet–star interactions in HAT-P-2's eccentric planetary system gained from the analysis of ∼350 hr of 4.5 μm observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The observations show no sign of orbit-to-orbit variability nor of orbital evolution of the eccentric planetary companion, HAT-P-2 b. The extensive coverage allows us to better differentiate instrumental systematics from the transient heating of HAT-P-2 b’s 4.5 μm photosphere and yields the detection of stellar pulsations with an amplitude of approximately 40 ppm. These pulsation modes correspond to exact harmonics of the planet’s orbital frequency, indicative of a tidal origin. Transient tidal effects can excite pulsation modes in the envelope of a star, but, to date, such pulsations had only been detected in highly eccentric stellar binaries. Current stellar models are unable to reproduce HAT-P-2's pulsations, suggesting that our understanding of the interactions at play in this system is incomplete.

  4. Towards top-hat spatial shaping of ultrafast laser beam based on Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclair, Cyril; Faure, Nicolas; Houzet, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser micro machining of surfaces knows a gain of interest as it demonstrates efficient and precise processing with reduced side effects around the irradiated zone, and also because of the remarkable costs reduction and reliability improvements of nowadays commercially available sources. Controlling the intensity distribution spatially can offer a supplementary degree of flexibility and precision in achieving user-defined ablation spatial profile, drilling, cutting of materials or in-volume laser-induced modifications. In this scope, the possibility to generate a top-hat intensity distribution by spatially shaping the beam wavefront is studied in this work. An optimization of Zernike polynomials coefficients is conducted to numerically determine an adequate phase mask that shapes the laser intensity distribution following a targeted top hat distribution in the processing plane, usually at the focal length of a converging lens. The efficiency of the method is numerically investigated in the optimization by evaluation of the root mean square error (RMS) between the top-hat target and the calculated laser distribution in the far field. We numerically verify that acceptable top-hat beam shaping of various size can be achieved with a sufficient number of Zernike polynomials, opening the way to phase mask calculations adapted to the wavefront modulator ability to reproduce Zernike polynomials.

  5. Beyond Pilgrim Hats and Turkey Hands: Using Thanksgiving to Promote Citizenship and Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Erica M.; Montgomery, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    In many elementary classrooms, Thanksgiving is celebrated by donning homemade Pilgrim hats, grocery bag vests, and colorful construction-paper headdresses, as students join together to reenact the "first" Thanksgiving with a mock feast. Students compose journal entries on the topic, "what I am thankful for." These typical Thanksgiving activities,…

  6. Qualification test report bump protection hat (subassembly of T020/M509 head protective assembly)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The bump protection hat (BPH) was subjected to impact testing in which it underwent three impacts at 35 foot-pounds of energy. The impacts generated stress cracks, but no penetration. All impacts resulted in deflections of less than one-half inch. It was shown that the BPH is qualified for Skylab and the rescue vehicle.

  7. HATS-5b: A TRANSITING HOT SATURN FROM THE HATSouth SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Schmidt, B.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Jordán, A.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Mancini, L.; Mohler, M.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Buchhave, L.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Butler, R. P.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot Saturn orbiting a G-type star, by the HATSouth survey. HATS-5b has a mass of M{sub p} ≈ 0.24 M {sub J}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 0.91 R {sub J}, and transits its host star with a period of P ≈ 4.7634 days. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 M {sub ☉}, and radius of 0.87 R {sub ☉}. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b and the bright, photometrically quiet host star make this planet a favorable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas giants and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas giant population.

  8. WASP-12b AND HAT-P-8b are members of triple star systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bechter, Eric B.; Crepp, Justin R.; Matthews, Christopher T.; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Johnson, John Asher; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Philip S.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Morton, Timothy D.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2014-06-10

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate that WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary stars of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightnesses consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the hot Jupiter planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. and Crossfield et al. into two distinct sources separated by 84.3 ± 0.6 mas (21 ± 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al., is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3 ± 0.5 mas (15 ± 1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉} using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well studied planet hosts now represent higher-order multi-star systems with potentially complex dynamics, underscoring the importance of diffraction-limited imaging and providing additional context for understanding the migrant population of transiting hot Jupiters.

  9. Automatic Semantic Activation of Embedded Words: Is There a ''Hat'' in ''That''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, J.S.; Davis, C.J.; Hanley, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Participants semantically categorized target words that contain subsets (Experiment 1; e.g., target=hatch, subset=hat) or that are parts of supersets (Experiment 2; e.g., target=bee, superset=beer). In both experiments, the targets were categorized in a congruent condition (in which the subset-superset was associated with the same response, e.g.,…

  10. Test and Analysis of Composite Hat Stringer Pull-off Test Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; OBrien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1996-01-01

    Hat stringer pull-off tests were performed to evaluate the delamination failure mechanisms in the flange region for a rod-reinforced hat stringer section. A special test fixture was used to pull the hat off the stringer while reacting the pull-off load through roller supports at both stringer flanges. Microscopic examinations of the failed specimens revealed that failure occurred at the ply termination in the flange area where the flange of the stiffener is built up by adding 45/-45 tape plies on the top surface. Test results indicated that the as-manufactured microstructure in the flange region has a strong influence on the delamination initiation and the associated pull-off loads. Finite element models were created for each specimen with a detailed mesh based on micrographs of the critical location. A fracture mechanics approach and a mixed mode delamination criterion were used to predict the onset of delamination and the pull-off load. By modeling the critical local details of each specimen from micrographs, the model was able to accurately predict the hat stringer pull-off loads and replicate the variability in the test results.

  11. Photometric Observations and Study of the Transiting Exoplanetary System HAT-P-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, H. B.; Wang, X. B.; Gu, S. H.; Cameron, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    Three transit events of HAT-P-8 are observed by using the 1 m telescope of Yunnan Observatory and 2.4 m telescope of Lijiang Observing Station in 2009 and 2012, respectively. The observational data were reduced with the coarse de-correlation and SysRem algorithms in order to obtain high signal to noise ratio for the transit feature. The MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) technique is applied to analyze three transit light curves simultaneously, then the new parameters of HAT-P-8 system are derived. The new value of the radius for HAT-P-8b is smaller than the one given by Latham et al., but it is consistent with the value derived by Mancini et al. recently. By linear fitting to the 23 mid-transit times with high precision, the orbital period of HAT-P-8b is refined as P=3.0763461±0.0000021 d. No obvious TTV (Transit Timing Variation) signal can be found from the present (O-C) analysis.

  12. Photometric Observation and Study of the Transiting Exoplanetary System HAT-P-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hong-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Gu, Sheng-Hong; Cameron, Andrew Collier

    2014-07-01

    Three transit events of HAT-P-8 were observed by using the 1 m telescope of Yunnan Observatory and the 2.4 m telescope of Lijiang Astronomical Station in 2009 and 2012, respectively. The observational data are reduced with the coarse de-correlation and SysRem algorithms in order to improve the signal to noise ratio of the transit signals. The MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) technique is applied to analyzing the three transit light curves simultaneously, then the new parameters of the HAT-P-8 system are derived. The new value of the radius of HAT-P-8b is smaller than that given by Latham et al., while it is consistent with the value derived recently by Mancini et al. By linear fitting on the 23 high-precision mid-transit times, the orbital period of HAT-P-8b is refined as P =3.0763461±0.0000021 d, and from the (O - C) analysis no obvious TTV (Transit Timing Variation) signal has been detected.

  13. WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b are Members of Triple Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechter, Eric B.; Crepp, Justin R.; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Philip S.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Matthews, Christopher T.; Morton, Timothy D.

    2014-06-01

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate that WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary stars of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightnesses consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the hot Jupiter planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. and Crossfield et al. into two distinct sources separated by 84.3 ± 0.6 mas (21 ± 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al., is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3 ± 0.5 mas (15 ± 1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18 ± 0.02 M ⊙ using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well studied planet hosts now represent higher-order multi-star systems with potentially complex dynamics, underscoring the importance of diffraction-limited imaging and providing additional context for understanding the migrant population of transiting hot Jupiters.

  14. Recycling and Disposal of CFLs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Consumers can help prevent the release of mercury into the environment by taking advantage of available local options for recycling CFLs and other household hazardous wastes, rather than disposing of them in regular household trash.

  15. Ultimate disposal of scrubber wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohenour, B. C.

    1978-01-01

    Part of the initial concern with using the wet scrubbers on the hypergolic propellants was the subsequential disposal of the liquid wastes. To do this, consideration was given to all possible methods to reduce the volume of the wastes and stay within the guidelines established by the state and federal environmental protection agencies. One method that was proposed was the use of water hyacinths in disposal ponds to reduce the waste concentration in the effluent to less than EPA tolerable levels. This method was under consideration and even in use by private industry, municipal governments, and NASA for upgrading existing wastewater treatment facilities to a tertiary system. The use of water hyacinths in disposal ponds appears to be a very cost-effective method for reduction and disposal of hypergolic propellants.

  16. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes.

  17. Employment Hardship among Mexican-Origin Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    2005-01-01

    This study compares the prevalence and causes of employment hardship between Mexican-origin and White women. Data come from the March 1992, 1996, and 2000 Current Population Surveys. Using logistic regression, the author assesses whether there is a difference between Mexican-origin and White women in employment hardship, controlling for personal…

  18. The Mexican Armed Forces in Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    a keen awareness of the Mexican defense establishment. Dr. Jordi Diaz wrote on Mexican security and defense policy for his doctoral dissertation at...reconstruction, General Porfirio Díaz ascended to the presidency. Having experienced the political turmoil and violence of 19th century Mexico, once in office

  19. Mexican-Americans in the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Reynaldo L.; And Others

    Of the 10 million Mexican Americans in the United States, 90% reside in the southwestern states of California, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. Historically, the acquisition of Spanish speaking citizens by the U.S. has resulted from military conquest. Yet, Mexican Americans did not have a significant political voice until the high fatality…

  20. Mexicans of Detroit. Peopling of Michigan Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baba, Marietta Lynn; Abonyi, Malvina Hauk

    Tracing the background and history of Mexican Americans in Detroit, Michigan, the booklet briefly reviews the early stages of Meso-American history, the Spaniards' arrival in Mexico, colonial Mexico, Mexico's revolt for independence, and the internal turmoil in Mexico which continued until early in 1861. The accomplishments of such Mexicans as…

  1. Mexican Managers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2001-01-01

    Global managers in Mexico identified what their U.S. counterparts should know about Mexican culture to do business effectively. Suggested Mexican and U.S.cultures are exact opposites in many respects. Discussed differences in building business relationships, attitudes toward time, family and religious values, communication patterns, and…

  2. Stress Resilience among Border Mexican American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby; Vincent, Vern; Dugas, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors distinguishing Mexican American women living near the U.S.-Mexican border who are resilient to the experience of stress from those who are not. The study sample consisted of 418 participants ranging in age from 20 to 61 years. Data were gathered through a self-report survey instrument composed of…

  3. Mexican-Americans of South Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, William

    The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health sponsored and financed the Hidalgo Project on Differential Culture Change and Mental Health during the 4-year period from 1957 to 1961; this document is an abbreviated report of that study of Mexican-American culture in Hidalgo County, Texas. Acculturation levels of various classes of the Mexican-American…

  4. Mexican Celebrations. Latin American Culture Studies Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza-Lubeck, Maria; Salinas, Ana Maria

    Developed for elementary school children, this unit is designed to teach about Mexican American culture through the study of holidays celebrated throughout much of Latin America and the southwestern United States. The unit describes and provides background information about nine Mexican American holidays. Among the activities included are the…

  5. The First Mexican American Fictional Hero.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, James R.

    This paper describes the appearance of the first Mexican-American fictional hero in American literature. In 1878 a book entitled, "Live Boys; or, Charley and Nasho in Texas" was published in Boston; the book described the adventures of a Mexican-American hero called Nasho from the Southwestern United States. The author was Thomas…

  6. Teachers and Counselors for Mexican American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, C.L., Ed.

    The main problems confronting teachers of Mexican American children are the language and cultural barriers. Mexican American children are often limited in communication skills in both Spanish and English and hold different values and life styles than the Anglo American teacher. The "live now" attitude, which is characteristic of Latin cultures,…

  7. Crx activates opsin transcription by recruiting HAT-containing co-activators and promoting histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2008-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Crx is required for expression of many photoreceptor genes in the mammalian retina. The mechanism by which Crx activates transcription remains to be determined. Using protein–protein interaction assays, Crx was found to interact with three co-activator proteins (complexes): STAGA, Cbp and p300, all of which possess histone acetyl-transferase (HAT) activity. To determine the role of Crx–HAT interactions in target gene chromatin modification and transcriptional activation, quantitative RT–PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed on Crx target genes, rod and cone opsins, in developing mouse retina. Although cone opsins are transcribed earlier than rhodopsin during development, the transcription of each gene is preceded by the same sequence of events in their promoter and enhancer regions: (i) binding of Crx, followed by (ii) binding of HATs, (iii) the acetylation of histone H3, then (iv) binding of other photoreceptor transcription factors (Nrl and Nr2e3) and RNA polymerase II. In Crx knockout mice (Crx−/−), the association of HATs and AcH3 with target promoter/enhancer regions was significantly decreased, which correlates with aberrant opsin transcription and photoreceptor dysfunction in these mice. Similar changes to the opsin chromatin were seen in Y79 retinoblastoma cells, where opsin genes are barely transcribed. These defects in Y79 cells can be reversed by expressing a recombinant Crx or applying histone deacetylase inhibitors. Altogether, these results suggest that one mechanism for Crx-mediated transcriptional activation is to recruit HATs to photoreceptor gene chromatin for histone acetylation, thereby inducing and maintaining appropriate chromatin configurations for transcription. PMID:17656371

  8. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter B.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Wong, Ian

    2016-04-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit as a consequence of the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Owing to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity (eb) is in part dictated by its Love number ({k}{2b}), which is in turn a proxy for the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. Thus, the measurement of eb constrains {k}{2b} and allows us to place otherwise elusive constraints on the mass of HAT-P-13b's core (Mcore,b). In this study we derive new constraints on the value of eb by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that eb = 0.00700 ± 0.00100. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find the corresponding {k}{2b}={0.31}-0.05+0.08. Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that Mcore,b is less than 25 Earth masses (M⊕). The most likely value is Mcore,b = 11 M⊕, which is similar to the core mass theoretically required for runaway gas accretion. This is the tightest constraint to date on the core mass of a hot Jupiter. Additionally, we find that the measured secondary eclipse depths, which are in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, best match atmospheric model predictions with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day-night circulation.

  9. Mexican Immigrant Children in American Schools: A Brief Sketch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saragoza, Alex M.

    This essay outlines Mexican immigration to the United States, with particular reference to Mexican children and the implications for schooling. The ability of Mexican immigrants to obtain jobs and the nature of the work itself has changed drastically for the worse in recent years. Children of Mexican origin differ in numerous ways in part because…

  10. 40 CFR 191.24 - Disposal standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Ground-Water Protection § 191.24 Disposal standards. (a) Disposal systems. (1) General. Disposal systems for waste and...

  11. 40 CFR 191.24 - Disposal standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Ground-Water Protection § 191.24 Disposal standards. (a) Disposal systems. (1) General. Disposal systems for waste and...

  12. 40 CFR 191.24 - Disposal standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Ground-Water Protection § 191.24 Disposal standards. (a) Disposal systems. (1) General. Disposal systems for waste and...

  13. 40 CFR 191.24 - Disposal standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Ground-Water Protection § 191.24 Disposal standards. (a) Disposal systems. (1) General. Disposal systems for waste and...

  14. How a hat may affect 3-month-olds' recognition of a face: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Bulf, Hermann; Valenza, Eloisa; Turati, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that infants' face recognition rests on a robust face representation that is resilient to a variety of facial transformations such as rotations in depth, motion, occlusion or deprivation of inner/outer features. Here, we investigated whether 3-month-old infants' ability to represent the invariant aspects of a face is affected by the presence of an external add-on element, i.e. a hat. Using a visual habituation task, three experiments were carried out in which face recognition was investigated by manipulating the presence/absence of a hat during face encoding (i.e. habituation phase) and face recognition (i.e. test phase). An eye-tracker system was used to record the time infants spent looking at face-relevant information compared to the hat. The results showed that infants' face recognition was not affected by the presence of the external element when the type of the hat did not vary between the habituation and test phases, and when both the novel and the familiar face wore the same hat during the test phase (Experiment 1). Infants' ability to recognize the invariant aspects of a face was preserved also when the hat was absent in the habituation phase and the same hat was shown only during the test phase (Experiment 2). Conversely, when the novel face identity competed with a novel hat, the hat triggered the infants' attention, interfering with the recognition process and preventing the infants' preference for the novel face during the test phase (Experiment 3). Findings from the current study shed light on how faces and objects are processed when they are simultaneously presented in the same visual scene, contributing to an understanding of how infants respond to the multiple and composite information available in their surrounding environment.

  15. 10 CFR 61.51 - Disposal site design for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposal site design for land disposal. 61.51 Section 61.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.51 Disposal site design for...

  16. 10 CFR 61.51 - Disposal site design for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposal site design for land disposal. 61.51 Section 61.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.51 Disposal site design for...

  17. 10 CFR 61.51 - Disposal site design for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disposal site design for land disposal. 61.51 Section 61.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.51 Disposal site design for...

  18. 10 CFR 61.51 - Disposal site design for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disposal site design for land disposal. 61.51 Section 61.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.51 Disposal site design for...

  19. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    SciTech Connect

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H.; Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B.

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  20. HATS-17b: A Transiting Compact Warm Jupiter in a 16.3 Day Circular Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, R.; Jordán, A.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Espinoza, N.; Rabus, M.; Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Ciceri, S.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Tan, T. G.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Bento, J.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Rojas, F.; Suc, V.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-04-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-17b, the first transiting warm Jupiter of the HATSouth network. HATS-17b transits its bright (V = 12.4) G-type ({M}\\star = 1.131+/- 0.030 {M}⊙ , {R}\\star = {1.091}-0.046+0.070 {R}⊙ ) metal-rich ([Fe/H] = +0.3 dex) host star in a circular orbit with a period of P = 16.2546 days. HATS-17b has a very compact radius of 0.777+/- 0.056 {R}{{J}} given its Jupiter-like mass of 1.338+/- 0.065 {M}{{J}}. Up to 50% of the mass of HATS-17b may be composed of heavy elements in order to explain its high density with current models of planetary structure. HATS-17b is the longest period transiting planet discovered to date by a ground-based photometric survey, and is one of the brightest transiting warm Jupiter systems known. The brightness of HATS-17 will allow detailed follow-up observations to characterize the orbital geometry of the system and the atmosphere of the planet. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the MPG 2.2 m telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla and with the 3.9 m AAT in Siding Spring Observatory. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Based on observations taken with the HARPS spectrograph (ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla) under programme 097.C-0571.

  1. Ethnopharmacology of Mexican asteraceae (Compositae).

    PubMed

    Heinrich, M; Robles, M; West, J E; Ortiz de Montellano, B R; Rodriguez, E

    1998-01-01

    Traditional herbal remedies have increased in popularity in Europe and the United States in recent years but have always been important to people living in rural Mexico and to their Mexican American/Chicano descendants in the United States. Mexican American patients will often be ingesting herbal teas at the same time that they are being treated for their ailments with antibiotics or antiinflammatory agents. The plant family Asteraceae (Compositae) has contributed the largest number of plants to this pharmacopoeia; the reasons for the importance of this family include its large number of species in Mexico and its wide array of natural products that are useful in the treatment of the maladies that have afflicted the inhabitants of rural Mexico. These natural products include sesquiterpene lactones, polyacetylenes, alkaloids, monoterpenes, and various phenolics such as flavonoids. In this review, we emphasize the sesquiterpene lactones, a large group of compounds with antiinflammatory properties and the ability to relax smooth muscles and thereby relieve gastrointestinal distress. These compounds also readily form adducts with glutathione or free thiols and can thereby affect the metabolism, activity, and toxicology of a wide array of pharmacological agents.

  2. [Contributions of the Mexican electrovectorcardiography].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    We narrate the main stages of the long journey that led to the structuring of modern electrovectorcardiography based on the fundamentals established by Willem Einthoven (1860-1927), who held the physiology chair of the Leyden University (The Netherlands), and presented his string electrocardiograph in 1901. The Mexican electrovectorcardiography became strong thanks to the endeavor of Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares, a disciple of F.N. Wilson of Ann Arbor. Dr. Sodi Pallares founded the Mexican School of Electrovectorcardiography, which was a cornerstone in the field and was widely recognized internationally for several decades. This fact is due to the rational and not empirical approach to the electrical exploration of the heart, thanks to the application of the inductive-deductive Galilean procedure. It was then possible to obtain these results, through the study of myocardial depolarization and repolarization processes, under normal conditions and with bundle branch block, performed by Dr. Gustavo A. Medrano and collaborators, in the 1950 decade. The electrovectorcardiographic manifestations of the non complicated myocardial infarct were the object of studies, as well as those of the infarction complicated with rhythm and conduction disorders. Likewise, proximal and distal or peripheral blocks were studied. The current disciples of that School are now studying of cardiac arrhythmias with promising results.

  3. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available.

  4. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  5. DOSE ASSESSMENTS FROM THE DISPOSAL OF LOW ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeling the long-term performance of the RCRA-C disposal cell and potential doses to off-site receptors is used to derive maximum radionuclide specific concentrations in the wastes that would enable these wastes to be disposed of safely using the RCRA-C disposal cell technology. Modeling potential exposures to derive these waste acceptance concentrations involves modeling exposures to workers during storage, treatment and disposal of the wastes, as well as exposures to individuals after disposal operations have ceased. Post facility closure exposures can result from the slow expected degradation of the disposal cell over long time periods (one thousand years after disposal) and in advertent human intrusion. Provide a means of determining waste acceptance radionuclide concentrations for disposal of debris from radiological dispersal device incidents as well as low-activity wastes generated in commercial, medical and research activities, potentially serve as the technical basis for guidance on disposal of these materials.

  6. High-power Er:YAG laser with quasi-top-hat output beam.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Mackenzie, J I; Hayes, J R; Clarkson, W A

    2012-05-01

    A simple method for simultaneously exciting the fundamental (TEM00) transverse mode and first order Laguerre-Gaussian (LG01) donut mode in an end-pumped solid-state laser to yield a quasi-top-hat output beam is reported. This approach has been applied to an Er:YAG laser, in-band pumped by an Er,Yb fiber laser, yielding 9.6 W of continuous-wave output at 1645 nm in a top-hat-like beam with beam propagation factor (M2)<2.1 for 24 W of incident pump power at 1532 nm. The corresponding slope efficiency with respect to incident pump power was 49%. The prospects of further scaling of output power and improved overall efficiency are considered.

  7. Origin of the Napoleon's hat nebula around SN1987A and implications for the progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Fabian, A. C.; Stevens, I. R.

    1991-11-01

    A simple geometrical model for the emission nebula around SN1987A, whose morphology has been likened to Napoleon's hat, is presented. The model consists of a ring and a truncated double cone. When the effects of light travel time are included, the model reproduces the important topological structures of the nebula and makes detailed quantitative predictions for its future appearance. In particular, the hat-shaped northern rim is simply explained as the interaction of the light front with the northern cone. To explain the origin of the double cone, it is argued that the progenitor of SN1987A was in a binary system: its strong wind, colliding with a weaker wind from the companion star, created an asymptotic shock surface that was spread out into the required geometry by the rotation of the binary.

  8. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulus, M. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum weight hat-stiffened and open corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programming technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience suggests that most of the theoretical weight saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  9. Time-resolved thermal mirror technique with top-hat cw laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Astrath, Francine B; Astrath, Nelson G; Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Malacarne, Luis C; Pedreira, P R B; Baesso, Mauro L

    2008-08-04

    A theoretical model was developed for time-resolved thermal mirror spectroscopy under top-hat cw laser excitation that induced a nanoscale surface displacement of a low absorption sample. An additional phase shift to the electrical field of a TEM(00) probe beam reflected from the surface displacement was derived, and Fresnel diffraction theory was used to calculate the propagation of the probe beam. With the theory, optical and thermal properties of three glasses were measured, and found to be consistent with literature values. With a top-hat excitation, an experimental apparatus was developed for either a single thermal mirror or a single thermal lens measurement. Furthermore, the apparatus was used for concurrent measurements of thermal mirror and thermal lens. More physical properties could be measured using the concurrent measurements.

  10. Kepler's optical phase curve of the exoplanet HAT-P-7b.

    PubMed

    Borucki, W J; Koch, D; Jenkins, J; Sasselov, D; Gilliland, R; Batalha, N; Latham, D W; Caldwell, D; Basri, G; Brown, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Cochran, W D; DeVore, E; Dunham, E; Dupree, A K; Gautier, T; Geary, J; Gould, A; Howell, S; Kjeldsen, H; Lissauer, J; Marcy, G; Meibom, S; Morrison, D; Tarter, J

    2009-08-07

    Ten days of photometric data were obtained during the commissioning phase of the Kepler mission, including data for the previously known giant transiting exoplanet HAT-P-7b. The data for HAT-P-7b show a smooth rise and fall of light from the planet as it orbits its star, punctuated by a drop of 130 +/- 11 parts per million in flux when the planet passes behind its star. We interpret this as the phase variation of the dayside thermal emission plus reflected light from the planet as it orbits its star and is occulted. The depth of the occultation is similar in photometric precision to the detection of a transiting Earth-size planet for which the mission was designed.

  11. HAT-P-7: A Retrograde or Polar Orbit, and a Third Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Johnson, John Asher; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Crossfield, Ian J.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    We showed that the exoplanet HAT-P-7b has an extremely tilted orbit, with a true angle of at least 86 degrees with respect to its parent star's equatorial plane, and a strong possibility of retrograde motion. We also report evidence for an additional planet or companion star. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect was found to be a blueshift during the first half of the transit and a redshift during the second half, an inversion of the usual pattern, implying that the angle between the sky-projected orbital and stellar angular momentum vectors is 182.5 plus or minus 9.4 degrees. The third body is implicated by excess RV variation of the host star over 2 yr. Some possible explanations for the tilted orbit of HAT-P-7b are a close encounter with another planet, the Kozai effect, and resonant capture by an inward-migrating outer planet.

  12. The Red Hat Society: Exploring the role of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives.

    PubMed

    Mackay Yarnal, Careen

    2006-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on play. Yet, the role of play in older adults' lives has received limited attention. Strikingly absent is research on play and older women. Missing from the literature is how older women use play as a liminal context for social interaction and communitas. This is odd because by 2030 one in four American women will be over the age of sixty-five. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the roles of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives. The focus is the Red Hat Society, a social group for women over age 50 that fosters play and fun. Using qualitative interviews with focus groups and participant observation of a regional Red Hat Society event, the study highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses of current conceptualizations of play, liminality, and communitas.

  13. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 2. Appendix A: Resistance measurements. Appendix B: Lightning test data plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Resistance measurements are given in graphical for when a simulated lightning discharge strikes on an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was to measure the electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case.

  14. The diversification and activity of hAT transposons in Musa genomes.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Gerhard; Heitkam, Tony; Seibt, Kathrin M; Nouroz, Faisal; Müller-Stoermer, Manuela; Heslop-Harrison, John S; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Sequencing of plant genomes often identified the hAT superfamily as the largest group of DNA transposons. Nevertheless, detailed information on the diversity, abundance and chromosomal localization of plant hAT families are rare. By in silico analyses of the reference genome assembly and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences, respectively, we performed the classification and molecular characterization of hAT transposon families in Musa acuminata. Musa hAT transposons are organized in three families designated MuhAT I, MuhAT II and MuhAT III. In total, 70 complete autonomous elements of the MuhAT I and MuhAT II families were detected, while no autonomous MuhAT III transposons were found. Based on the terminal inverted repeat (TIR)-specific sequence information of the autonomous transposons, 1722 MuhAT I- and MuhAT II-specific miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MuhMITEs) were identified. Autonomous MuhAT I and MuhAT II elements are only moderately abundant in the sections of the genus Musa, while the corresponding MITEs exhibit an amplification in Musa genomes. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), autonomous MuhAT transposons as well as MuhMITEs were localized in subtelomeric, most likely gene-rich regions of M. acuminata chromosomes. A comparison of homoeologous regions of M. acuminata and Musa balbisiana BACs revealed the species-specific mobility of MuhMITEs. In particular, the activity of MuhMITEs II showing transduplications of genomic sequences might indicate the presence of active MuhAT transposons, thus suggesting a potential role of MuhMITEs as modulators of genome evolution of Musa.

  15. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Hannah; Sing, David; Deming, Drake; Kataria, Tiffany; Lopez, Eric

    2016-10-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  16. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Hannah R.; Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Deming, Drake; Nikolov, Nikolay; Lopez, Eric; Tremblin, Pascal; Skalid Amundsen, David; Lewis, Nikole K.; Mandell, Avi; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Knutson, Heather; Benneke, Björn; Evans, Tom M.

    2017-01-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  17. A lower radius and mass for the transiting extrasolar planet HAT-P-8 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S.; Fortney, J. J.; Morley, C. V.; Dittmann, J. A.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Bruni, I.; Barbieri, M.; Evans, D. F.; D'Ago, G.; Nikolov, N.; Henning, Th.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The extrasolar planet HAT-P-8 b was thought to be one of the more inflated transiting hot Jupiters. Aims: By using new and existing photometric data, we computed precise estimates of the physical properties of the system. Methods: We present photometric observations comprising eleven light curves covering six transit events, obtained using five medium-class telescopes and telescope-defocussing technique. One transit was simultaneously obtained through four optical filters, and two transits were followed contemporaneously from two observatories. We modelled these and seven published datasets using the jktebop code. The physical parameters of the system were obtained from these results and from published spectroscopic measurements. In addition, we investigated the theoretically-predicted variation of the apparent planetary radius as a function of wavelength, covering the range 330-960 nm. Results: We find that HAT-P-8 b has a significantly lower radius (1.321 ± 0.037 RJup) and mass (1.275 ± 0.053 MJup) compared to previous estimates (1.50-0.06+0.08 R_{Jup} and 1.52-0.16+0.18 M_{Jup} respectively). We also detect a radius variation in the optical bands that, when compared with synthetic spectra of the planet, may indicate the presence of a strong optical absorber, perhaps TiO and VO gases, near the terminator of HAT-P-8 b. Conclusions: These new results imply that HAT-P-8 b is not significantly inflated, and that its position in the planetary mass-radius diagram is congruent with those of many other transiting extrasolar planets. Full Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A11

  18. HATS-5b: A Transiting Hot Saturn from the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; Mohler, M.; Csubry, Z.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Schmidt, B.; Butler, R. P.; Shectman, S.; Thompson, I.; Crane, J.; Sato, B.; Csák, B.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.; Nikolov, N.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot Saturn orbiting a G-type star, by the HATSouth survey. HATS-5b has a mass of Mp ≈ 0.24 M J, radius of Rp ≈ 0.91 R J, and transits its host star with a period of P ≈ 4.7634 days. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 M ⊙, and radius of 0.87 R ⊙. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b and the bright, photometrically quiet host star make this planet a favorable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas giants and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas giant population. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  19. The discovery of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn with PROMPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, L.; Sand, D.; Valenti, S.; Reichart, D. E.; Haislip, J. B.; Kouprianov, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report the discovery of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn. The object was discovered on 2017-02-08.29 UT at R 18.10 mag (absolute magnitude -14.94 mag, assuming a distance modulus of 32.87 mag and a Galactic foreground extinction of 0.17 mag), during the ongoing D20.8 mag) on 2017-02-07.23 UT or in prior imaging of the field.

  20. HAT-South: A Global Network of Southern Hemisphere Automated Telescopes to Detect Transiting Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G.; Afonso, C.; Henning, T.; Jordán, A.; Holman, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Sackett, P. D.; Sasselov, D.; Kovács, Gábor; Csubry, Z.; Pál, A.

    2009-02-01

    HAT-South is a network of six identical, fully automated wide field telescopes, to be located at three sites (Chile: Las Campanas, Australia: Siding Springs, and Namibia: HESS site) in the Southern hemisphere. The primary purpose of the network is to detect and characterize a large number of extra-solar planets transiting nearby bright stars, and to explore their diversity. Operation of HAT-South is a collaboration among the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) and the Australian National University (ANU). The network is expected to be ready for initial science operations in 2009. The three sites will permit near round-the-clock monitoring of selected fields, and the continuous data-stream will greatly enhance recovery of transits. HAT-South will be sensitive to planetary transits down to R≈14 across a 128 square-degrees combined field of view, thereby targeting a large number of dwarfs with feasible confirmation-mode follow-up. We anticipate a yearly detection rate of approximately 25 planets transiting bright stars.

  1. Formulating robust linear regression estimation as a one-class LDA criterion: discriminative hat matrix.

    PubMed

    Dufrenois, F; Noyer, J C

    2013-02-01

    Linear discriminant analysis, such as Fisher's criterion, is a statistical learning tool traditionally devoted to separating a training dataset into two or even several classes by the way of linear decision boundaries. In this paper, we show that this tool can formalize the robust linear regression problem as a robust estimator will do. More precisely, we develop a one-class Fischer's criterion in which the maximization provides both the regression parameters and the separation of the data in two classes: typical data and atypical data or outliers. This new criterion is built on the statistical properties of the subspace decomposition of the hat matrix. From this angle, we improve the discriminative properties of the hat matrix which is traditionally used as outlier diagnostic measure in linear regression. Naturally, we call this new approach discriminative hat matrix. The proposed algorithm is fully nonsupervised and needs only the initialization of one parameter. Synthetic and real datasets are used to study the performance both in terms of regression and classification of the proposed approach. We also illustrate its potential application to image recognition and fundamental matrix estimation in computer vision.

  2. The Hat Yai 2000 flood: the worst flood in Thai history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supharatid, Seree

    2006-02-01

    Hat Yai, the largest commercial and tourist city in southern Thailand, is subjected to regular flood events, primarily during the northeast monsoon period. Flooding in this region is recognized as a serious disaster in terms of frequency, rate of risk, and affected areas. The monsoon of 21-25 November 2000 caused extremely heavy rain in the southern part of Thailand, resulting in a great flood occupying Hat Yai. This caused significant damage. Therefore, the use of both structural and non-structural measures is mandatory to reduce the economic losses and the risk for society. This paper investigates two modelling approaches for flood prevention and mitigation of Hat Yai city. First, a hard computing approach by a physically distributed model was applied to study the flood behaviour in a two-dimensional floodplain flow. Second, a soft computing approach using a neuro-genetic algorithm was used to develop a flood-forecasting tool. It was found that the great flood of 2000 can be simulated well by the FLO-2D model. Computed discharges and flood level in the floodplain are close to the observed data. Countermeasures using diversion canals are guaranteed to accelerate the floodwater drainage to Songkla Lake, significantly reducing the flood impact to the people. In addition, the flood forecasting technique developed in this study can give satisfactory results. This would be very useful as a flood-warning tool for the community

  3. On Variable Geometric Factor Systems for Top-Hat Electrostatic Space Plasma Analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kataria, Dhiren O.; Collinson, Glyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Even in the relatively small region of space that is the Earth's magnetosphere, ion and electron fluxes can vary by several orders of magnitude. Top-hat electrostatic analyzers currently do not possess the dynamic range required to sample plasma under all conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare, through computer simulation, three new electrostatic methods that would allow the sensitivity of a sensor to be varied through control of its geometric factor (GF) (much like an aperture on a camera). The methods studied were inner filter plates, split hemispherical analyzer (SHA) and top-cap electrode. This is the first discussion of the filter plate concept and also the first study where all three systems are studied within a common analyzer design, so that their relative merits could be fairly compared. Filter plates were found to have the important advantage that they facilitate the reduction in instrument sensitivity whilst keeping all other instrument parameters constant. However, it was discovered that filter plates have numerous disadvantages that make such a system impracticable for a top-hat electrostatic analyzer. It was found that both the top-cap electrode and SHA are promising variable geometric factor system (VGFS) concepts for implementation into a top-hat electrostatic analyzer, each with distinct advantages over the other.

  4. HATS-4b: A dense hot Jupiter transiting a super metal-rich G star

    SciTech Connect

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; De Val Borro, M.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Sato, B.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of M{sub p} ≈ 1.32 M {sub Jup}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 1.02 R {sub Jup}, and density of ρ {sub p} = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm{sup –3} ≈1.24 ρ{sub Jup}. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M {sub ☉}, a radius of 0.92 R {sub ☉}, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M {sub J} and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M {sub ⊕}. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  5. INDEPENDENT DISCOVERY OF THE TRANSITING EXOPLANET HAT-P-14b

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, E. K.; Barros, S. C. C.; Pollacco, D.; Faedi, F.; McCormac, J.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Enoch, B.; Skillen, I.; Stempels, H. C.; Boisse, I.; Hebrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Sorensen, P.; Street, R. A.; Anderson, D.; Bento, J.; Butters, O. W.; Haswell, C. A.; Hebb, L.

    2011-05-15

    We present SuperWASP observations of HAT-P-14b, a hot Jupiter discovered by Torres et al. The planet was found independently by the SuperWASP team and named WASP-27b after follow-up observations had secured the discovery, but prior to the publication by Torres et al. Our analysis of HAT-P-14/WASP-27 is in good agreement with the values found by Torres et al. and we provide additional evidence against astronomical false positives. Due to the brightness of the host star, V{sub mag} = 10, HAT-P-14b is an attractive candidate for further characterization observations. The planet has a high impact parameter and the primary transit is close to grazing. This could readily reveal small deviations in the orbital parameters indicating the presence of a third body in the system, which may be causing the small but significant orbital eccentricity. Our results suggest that the planet may undergo a grazing secondary eclipse. However, even a non-detection would tightly constrain the system parameters.

  6. A spin-orbit alignment for the hot Jupiter HATS-3b

    SciTech Connect

    Addison, B. C.; Tinney, C. G.; Wright, D. J.; Bayliss, D.

    2014-09-10

    We have measured the alignment between the orbit of HATS-3b (a recently discovered, slightly inflated Hot Jupiter) and the spin axis of its host star. Data were obtained using the CYCLOPS2 optical-fiber bundle and its simultaneous calibration system feeding the UCLES spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The sky-projected spin-orbit angle of λ = 3° ± 25° was determined from spectroscopic measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This is the first exoplanet discovered through the HATSouth transit survey to have its spin-orbit angle measured. Our results indicate that the orbital plane of HATS-3b is consistent with being aligned to the spin axis of its host star. The low obliquity of the HATS-3 system, which has a relatively hot mid F-type host star, agrees with the general trend observed for Hot Jupiter host stars with effective temperatures >6250 K to have randomly distributed spin-orbit angles.

  7. Detection of the Secondary Eclipse of Exoplanet HAT P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. K.; Deming, L. D.; Bakos, G.; Harrington, J.; Madhusudhan, N.; Noyes, R.; Seager, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have successfully conducted secondary eclipse observations of exoplanet HAT-P-11b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. HAT-P-11b was, until very recently, the smallest transiting extrasolar planet yet found and one of only two known exo-Neptunes. We observed the system at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Having detected the secondary eclipse, we are at present making a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-11b has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi-major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will serve to clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. A precise determination of the orbit phase for the secondary eclipse will also be of great utility for Kepler observations of this system at visible wavelengths.

  8. Discovery of the secondary eclipse of HAT-P-11 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, K. F.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2017-01-01

    We report the detection of the secondary eclipse of HAT-P-11 b, a Neptune-sized planet orbiting an active K4 dwarf. Using all available short-cadence data of the Kepler mission, we derive refined planetary ephemeris increasing their precision by more than an order of magnitude. Our simultaneous primary and secondary transit modeling results in improved transit and orbital parameters. In particular, the precise timing of the secondary eclipse allows to pin down the orbital eccentricity to . The secondary eclipse depth of ppm corresponds to a 5.5σ detection and results in a geometric albedo of 0.39 ± 0.07 for HAT-P-11 b, close to Neptune's value, which may indicate further resemblances between these two bodies. Due to the substantial orbital eccentricity, the planetary equilibrium temperature is expected to change significantly with orbital position and ought to vary between 630 K and 950 K, depending on the details of heat redistribution in the atmosphere of HAT-P-11 b.

  9. Disposing of Canada's used fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the permanent disposal of used nuclear fuel in a waste vault located 500 to 1,000 m deep in the Precambrian granitic rock of the Canadian Shield. The specific objectives of the program are to develop and demonstrate the technology to site, design, build, and operate a disposal facility in a way that creates no, or negligible, burden on future generations. In addition, the program must develop a methodology to evaluate the performance of the disposal system against safety criteria and demonstrate that sites are likely to exist in the Canadian Shield that satisfy regulatory criteria. These criteria are very stringent. As in other national high-level waste management programs, the Canadian concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel wastes employs a multiple barrier system for isolating contaminants from the environment. The current phase of the work is generic in nature and is not site specific. Research and development (R and D) has advanced to the point where the generic concept will be evaluated under the Canadian environmental assessment review process, which involves public hearings and independent scientific review.

  10. Geological considerations in hazardouswaste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, K.; Gilkeson, R.H.; Johnson, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Present regulations assume that long-term isolation of hazardous wastes - including toxic chemical, biological, radioactive, flammable and explosive wastes - may be effected by disposal in landfills that have liners of very low hydraulic conductivity. In reality, total isolation of wastes in humid areas is not possible; some migration of leachate from wastes buried in the gound will always occur. Regulations should provide performance standards applicable on a site-by-site basis rather than rigid criteria for site selection and design. The performance standards should take into account several factors: (1) the categories, segregation, degradation and toxicity of the wastes; (2) the site hydrogeology, which governs the direction and rate of contaminant transport; (3) the attenuation of contaminants by geochemical interactions with geologic materials; and (4) the release rate of unattenuated pollutants to surface or groundwater. An adequate monitoring system is essential. The system should both test the extent to which the operation of the site meets performance standards and provide sufficient warning of pollution problems to allow implementation of remedial measures. In recent years there has been a trend away from numerous, small disposal sites toward fewer and larger sites. The size of a disposal site should be based on the attenuation capacity of the geologic material, which has a finite, though generally not well-defined, limit. For slowly degradable wastes, engineered sites with leachate-collection systems appear to be only a temporary solution since the leachate collected will also require final disposal. ?? 1981.

  11. Ocean Disposal of Dredged Material

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Permits and authorizations for the ocean dumping of dredged material is issued by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Information is provided about where to dispose dredged material and the process for obtaining an ocean dumping permit for dredged material.

  12. HANDBOOK: SEPTAGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal purpose of the handbook is to present an up-to-date review of available design, performance, operation and maintenance, cost, and energy information pertaining to the receiving, treatment, and disposal of septage. Septage is the liquid and solid material pumped from...

  13. Spin-orbit alignment for KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b via Doppler tomography with TRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, George; Latham, David W.; Bieryla, Allyson; Beatty, Thomas G.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We present Doppler tomographic analyses for the spectroscopic transits of KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b, two hot-Jupiters orbiting rapidly rotating F-dwarf host stars. These include analyses of archival Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) observations for KELT-7b, and a new TRES transit observation of HAT-P-56b. We report spin-orbit aligned geometries for KELT-7b (2.7° ± 0.6°) and HAT-P-56b (8° ± 2°). The host stars KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are among some of the most rapidly rotating planet-hosting stars known. We examine the tidal re-alignment model for the evolution of the spin-orbit angle in the context of the spin rates of these stars. We find no evidence that the rotation rates of KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 have been modified by star-planet tidal interactions, suggesting that the spin-orbit angle of systems around these hot stars may represent their primordial configuration. In fact, KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are two of three systems in supersynchronous, spin-orbit aligned states, where the rotation periods of the host stars are faster than the orbital periods of the planets.

  14. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling Analysis of Hypersonic Aircraft Hat-Stiffened Panels With Varying Face Sheet Geometry and Fiber Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal buckling behavior of monolithic and metal-matrix composite hat-stiffened panels were investigated. The panels have three types of face-sheet geometry: Flat face sheet, microdented face sheet, and microbulged face sheet. The metal-matrix composite panels have three types of face-sheet layups, each of which is combined with various types of hat composite layups. Finite-element method was used in the eigenvalue extractions for both mechanical and thermal buckling. The thermal buckling analysis required both eigenvalue and material property iterations. Graphical methods of the dual iterations are shown. The mechanical and thermal buckling strengths of the hat-stiffened panels with different face-sheet geometry are compared. It was found that by just microdenting or microbulging of the face sheet, the axial, shear, and thermal buckling strengths of both types of hat-stiffened panels could be enhanced considerably. This effect is more conspicuous for the monolithic panels. For the metal-matrix composite panels, the effect of fiber orientations on the panel buckling strengths was investigated in great detail, and various composite layup combinations offering, high panel buckling strengths are presented. The axial buckling strength of the metal-matrix panel was sensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation. However, the lateral, shear, and thermal buckling strengths were insensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation.

  15. Mexican Oil: Its History, Development and Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-02

    Porfirio Diaz ....... .............. 2 II. THE INITIAL DEVELOPMENT ..... ......... 6 Oil Development During the Porfiriato. 6 Oil Development in...oil and for some time Mexican internal and foreign policy was strengthened by having oil. FROM THE ANCIENT AZTECS UNTIL GENERAL PORFIRIO DIAZ . Before...of Mexican oil. 2 Before the General Porfirio Diaz period some discoveries had been made in the coastal region of the Gulf of Mexico. In 1859 a - 3

  16. Narcocultura: A Threat to Mexican National Security?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Gallos Valientes: Examining Violence in Mexican Popular Music," TRANS Revista Transcultural de Musica (Red de Revistas Cientificas de America Latina...34Los Gallos Valientes: Examining Violence in Mexican Popular Music," TRANS Revista Transcultural de Musica (Red de Revistas Cientificas de America...Popular Music.” TRANS Revista Transcultural de Musica (Red de Revistas Cientificas de America Latina y el Caribe, Espana y Portugal), December 2006

  17. Epianthropochory in Mexican weed communities.

    PubMed

    Vibrans, H

    1999-04-01

    The diaspores of the 50 most important maize field weed species (agrestals) in a traditional maize-growing area of south-central Mexico (region of Puebla and Tlaxcala) were analyzed for morphological adaptations to long-distance dispersal. Adaptations to wind-dispersal were absent and to endozoochory were minimal. Most species had no visible adaptations and are presumably transported with mud. However, about one-quarter of the taxa, particularly the tall and dominant ones, relied at least partially on burrs with hooks or awns. The possible vectors for these exo- or epizoochorous species are discussed: the most likely regular dispersers are humans (epianthropochory). Interviews with farmers confirm this conclusion. Using humans as vectors allows the plant to transport relatively large seeds to favorable habitats (directed dispersal). The importance of this relatively rare dispersal adaptation in Mexican maize field weeds leads to questions on the origin and evolution of these agrestals.

  18. The Mexican national satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Ruiz, M. E.; Briskman, R. D.

    1983-10-01

    The satellites, tracking, telemetry, command, and monitoring facilities, and the earth station complex for the Mexican national satellite system, Morelos, are described. The spacecraft are intended to provide educational television, rural telephony, data transmission, and business and industrial services. Scheduled for 1985 launch, the satellites will be placed in GEO and use the C and Ku bands with 12 narrow band and six wideband transponders. Spin-stabilized and solar cell powered, the functional mass will be 666 kg, including propellant. The solar panels will provide 940 W of power and 830 W will be available from NiCd batteries during eclipse conditions. The earth station will be located at Iztapalapa, which will have a 12 m antenna, redundant uplink and downlink radios, and command and ranging equipment. Back-up capability will be provided by a station at Tulancingo. Ku band and C band stations are in planning.

  19. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being

  20. Disposal requirements for PCB waste

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on october 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. PCB materials that are no longer in use and have been declared a waste must be disposed of according to the requirements found at 40 CFR 761.60. These requirements establish disposal options for a multitude of PCB materials including soil and debris, liquid PCBs, sludges and slurries, containers, transformers, capacitors, hydraulic machines, and other electrical equipment. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning disposal requirements for PCBs. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

  1. HATS-8b: A Low-density Transiting Super-Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Zhou, G.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Espinoza, N.; Csubry, Z.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Ciceri, S.; Noyes, R. W.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Suc, V.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-08-01

    HATS-8b is a low density transiting super-Neptune discovered as part of the HATSouth project. The planet orbits its solar-like G-dwarf host (V = 14.03+/- 0.10, {T}{eff} = 5679+/- 50 K) with a period of 3.5839 days. HATS-8b is the third lowest-mass transiting exoplanet to be discovered from a wide-field ground-based search, and with a mass of 0.138+/- 0.019 {M}{{J}} it is approximately halfway between the masses of Neptune and Saturn. However, HATS-8b has a radius of {0.873}-0.075+0.123 {R}{{J}}, resulting in a bulk density of just 0.259+/- 0.091 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. The metallicity of the host star is super-solar ([{Fe}/{{H}}] = 0.210+/- 0.080), providing evidence against the idea that low-density exoplanets form from metal-poor environments. The low density and large radius of HATS-8b results in an atmospheric scale height of almost 1000 km, and in addition to this there is an excellent reference star of nearly equal magnitude at just 19″ separation in the sky. These factors make HATS-8b an exciting target for future atmospheric characterization studies, particularly for long-slit transmission spectroscopy. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located in LCO, Chile. The work is based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope and the ESO 3.6 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained using the facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  2. Characterization of the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab and the M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ming; Wright, Jason T.; Curtis, Jason; O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Johnathan; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Hinkley, Sasha; Law, Nicholas M.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Showman, Adam P.; Burruss, Rick

    2014-12-01

    We report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab, taken with Hale/Wide-field Infra-Red Camera (WIRC) in H and K{sub S} bands and with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We carried out adaptive optics imaging of the planet host star HAT-P-32A and its companion HAT-P-32B in the near-IR and the visible. We clearly resolve the two stars from each other and find a separation of 2.''923 ± 0.''004 and a position angle 110.°64 ± 0.°12. We measure the flux ratios of the binary in g'r'i'z' and H and K{sub S} bands, and determine T {sub eff}= 3565 ± 82 K for the companion star, corresponding to an M1.5 dwarf. We use PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models to correct the dilution of the secondary eclipse depths of the hot Jupiter due to the presence of the M1.5 companion. We also improve the secondary eclipse photometry by accounting for the non-classical, flux-dependent nonlinearity of the WIRC IR detector in the H band. We measure planet-to-star flux ratios of 0.090% ± 0.033%, 0.178% ± 0.057%, 0.364% ± 0.016%, and 0.438% ± 0.020% in the H, K{sub S} , 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. We compare these with planetary atmospheric models, and find they prefer an atmosphere with a temperature inversion and inefficient heat redistribution. However, we also find that the data are equally well described by a blackbody model for the planet with T {sub p} = 2042 ± 50 K. Finally, we measure a secondary eclipse timing offset of 0.3 ± 1.3 minutes from the predicted mid-eclipse time, which constrains e = 0.0072{sub −0.0064}{sup +0.0700} when combined with radial velocity data and is more consistent with a circular orbit.

  3. Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  4. A Comparison of Delinquent and Nondelinquent Anglo-Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Mexican Nationals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megargee, Edwin I.; Rosenquist, Carl M.

    Some 50 adjudicated male delinquents, aged 12-17, and 50 nondelinquent comparison subjects from the same lower class neighborhoods were selected from each of three cultural groups: (1) Mexican nationals, (2) Mexican-Americans, and (3) Anglo-Americans. Sociological and demographic data were collected. A standard psychological test battery,…

  5. Bullying of Mexican Immigrant Students by Mexican American Students: An Examination of Intracultural Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Julian J.; Bauman, Sheri; Guillory, Raphael M.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study using qualitative methods to investigate intracultural bullying, specifically, bullying between Mexican American (MA) and Mexican immigrant (MI) high school students. Previous research has reported specific cultural conflicts and discrimination within ethnic groups due to differences in acculturation. The purpose of…

  6. Living on the Line: Mexican and Mexican American Attitudes toward Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Noreen M.; Blankenship, Charlene J.; Sanchez, Gabriel; Carlson, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    This study examined attitudes toward people with disabilities (PWD) among Mexicans and Mexican Americans at the U.S.-Mexico border. Participants (N = 160) were surveyed using the "Questions About Disability Survey" (QADS). A factor analysis identified five factors that accounted for 49% of the variance: Maleficent God; Social…

  7. Political Participation and Social Capital among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Central Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albarracin, Julia; Valeva, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the influence of bridging and bonding social capital in political participation while controlling for sociodemographic and psychological factors among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Illinois. Bridging social capital significantly predicted two types of participation. Participants who felt their lives were linked to those of…

  8. Fair Start Program: Outreach to Mexican and Mexican American Farmworker Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters-Smith, Carol; Larner, Mary

    This presentation describes a home visiting health education program serving Mexican and Mexican-American migrant farmworkers in Florida. The purposes of the program were to educate farmworker families about pregnancy, childbirth, nutrition, and child development, and to encourage the use of preventive health care services. Home visitors were…

  9. Mexican-American and Mexican National Farm Workers: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael V.

    This paper is concerned with the scholarly treatment accorded to Mexican American and Mexican National farm workers by historical, legal, social work, and social science journals. Only those articles published after the arbitrary date of 1960 are reviewed due to space and time limitations. Works published since then are briefly summarized and…

  10. Alternatives for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Waste.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    originating activity by DTIC. Address your request for additional copies to: Defense Technical Information Center Cameron Station Alexandria, Virginia 22314 0...LIST OF TABLES Table Title Page 1 Specific Activity of Depleted Uranium Sand Mixture ......... .................. 8 2 Disposal at Department of Energy...exceed the allowable limits for on-site disposal. This material must be disposed of at a commercial low-level radio- active waste disposal site. Because

  11. Concept for Underground Disposal of Nuclear Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Packaged waste placed in empty oil-shale mines. Concept for disposal of nuclear waste economically synergistic with earlier proposal concerning backfilling of oil-shale mines. New disposal concept superior to earlier schemes for disposal in hard-rock and salt mines because less uncertainty about ability of oil-shale mine to contain waste safely for millenium.

  12. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  13. Improved characterisation of exoplanets discovered in wide-field surveys: HAT-P-29b and HAT-P-31b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchetto, M.; Fossey, S.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years a large population of exoplanets has been discovered thanks to ground-based surveys such as WASP and HATnet. These are typically relatively big planets in close orbits to their parent star that produce transit light curves with depths of up to a few percent which can be well observed using relatively smal-aperture ground-based telescopes. Due to the large number of planets discovered, systematic followup of most of these targets is often lacking. Moreover, in some discovery papers the characterisation of the planet is made with partial-transit follow-up light curves or relies entirely on the wide-field survey photometry, leading to relatively large uncertainties in the derived planetary parameters. We present followup photometry for two such cases, HAT-P-29b and HAT-P-31b, obtained with a 35-cm telescope based at UCL's University of London Observatory between 2011 and 2012. We find that our light curves are able to provide more accurate and/or precise parameters than those published. Follow-up observations are also important to monitor effects such as transit timing variations (TTVs), which can provide evidence for the presence of other planets in the system, and we explore the current limits on TTV detections for the two planets discussed here. The use of small-aperture telescopes provides an efficient and cost-effective way to improve the characterisation of known exoplanets, leading to an improvement in the statistical properties of these samples; and might also lead to the discovery of new exoplanets through TTV monitoring.

  14. Mexican-American Adolescent Inhalant Abuse: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, A. Gary; Stephens, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Drawing from literature on differences between the Mexican American experience and that of other groups, offers a model to explain the higher rates of inhalant abuse among Mexican American youth. Considers cultural, ecological, structural, and economic factors. (Author/GC)

  15. The Mexican American Political Conference Urges Participation in National Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcelo, Cosme Juan, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Participants of the second semiannual meeting of the Arizona Mexican American Political Conference, held in Tucson on September 24, 1977, discussed the Mexican American influence and involvement in local, state, and national politics. (NQ)

  16. Attitudes of Mexican Americans toward irregular immigration.

    PubMed

    Polinard, J L; Wrinkle, R D; Garza, R D

    1984-01-01

    This inquiry focuses on the attitudes of 314 Mexican Americans toward issues relating to current US immigration policy. Telephone and personal interviews were conducted in Hidalgo and Travis counties, Texas, with Mexican-Americans. Virtually all respondent groups oppose an increased rate of immigration, consider illegal immigration to be an important problem, support stricter enforcement of immigration laws, and believe that undocumented workers take jobs no one else wants. Half of the respondents identify illegal immigration as a regional rather than a personal problem. At the same time, the data suggest significant differences in both direction and intensity of attitudes between Mexican Americans of different generations, income, occupational levels, and region. There is general opposition to the requirement of a national identity card, but widespread support for penalizing employers of undocumented workers and for granting amnesty to undocumented workers. These findings allow an examination of the extent to which the Mexican American leadership, which has been overwhelmingly opposed to the Simpson-Mazzoli bill, accurately reflects the views of the Mexican American people. The leadership and the population at large agree on 2 of the 3 issues, amnesty and the national identity card, but disagree on employer sanctions. 1st, it may be that the leadership holds the kinds of jobs for which undocumented workers are unlikely to compete, so they may not feel threatened. 2nd, they may feel that instituting employer sanctions will create incentives for employers to discriminate in their hiring practices against all Latino-looking job applicants. Non-elite Mexican Americans who support employer sanctions may believe that the only way they can compete for jobs is to make it impossible for elites to be hired. Both groups appear to fear that, regardless of the specifics of immigration reform, Mexican Americans are likely to encounter increased discrimination in the job market.

  17. Disposable remote zero headspace extractor

    DOEpatents

    Hand, Julie J.; Roberts, Mark P.

    2006-03-21

    The remote zero headspace extractor uses a sampling container inside a stainless steel vessel to perform toxicity characteristics leaching procedure to analyze volatile organic compounds. The system uses an in line filter for ease of replacement. This eliminates cleaning and disassembly of the extractor. All connections are made with quick connect fittings which can be easily replaced. After use, the bag can be removed and disposed of, and a new sampling container is inserted for the next extraction.

  18. Diabetes Risk Assessment in Mexicans and Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Velasco Mondragon, Hector E.; Charlton, R. William; Peart, Tasha; Burguete-Garcia, Ana I.; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio; Hsueh, Wen-Chi

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Parental diabetes history is a well-known risk factor for type 2 diabetes and considered strong evidence for a genetic basis of type 2 diabetes. Whether this relationship is affected by other known risk factors, specifically obesity, remains unclear, possibly due to a relative paucity of lean diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This issue was investigated using data from a high-risk population from Mexico (National Health Survey 2000, n = 27,349), with observations replicated using U.S. citizens of Mexican descent from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2002 and 2003–2004 (n = 1,568). RESULTS As expected, positive parental diabetes was a significant risk factor for type 2 diabetes, regardless of age, sex, or adiposity level. However, positive parental diabetes conferred greater risk in leaner individuals than in their overweight peers (P = 0.001). In other words, the effect of BMI on type 2 diabetes risk was smaller in the presence of parental diabetes history. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that parental diabetes is a stronger risk factor for type 2 diabetes in the absence of obesity. Thus, studies in lean diabetic patients could help identify type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes. This study reinforces the concept that parental diabetes and BMI are independent type 2 diabetes risk factors and suggests that glycemic screening may be helpful in assessing type 2 diabetes risk in individuals with parental diabetes history, regardless of their overweight status. PMID:20628089

  19. SPS salvage and disposal alternatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A wide range of salvage options exist for the satellite power system (SPS) satellite, ranging from use in and beyond geosynchronous orbit to use in low Earth orbit to return and use on Earth. The satellite might be used intact to provide for various purposes, it might be cannibalized, or it might be melted down to supply materials for space- or ground-based products. The use of SPS beyond its nominal lifetime provides value that can be deducted from the SPS capital investment cost. It is shown that the present value of the salvage value of the SPS satellites, referenced to the system initial operation data, is likely to be on the order of five to ten percent of its on-orbit capital cost. (Given a 30 year satellite lifetime and a four percent discount rate, the theoretical maximum salvage value is 30.8 percent of the initial capital cost). The SPS demonstration satellite is available some 30 years earlier than the first full-scale SPS satellite and has a likely salvage value on the order of 80 percent of its on site capital cost. In the event that it becomes desirable to dispose of either the demonstration or full-scale SPS satellite, a number of disposal options appear to exist for which intact disposal costs are less than one percent of capital costs.

  20. Two Decades of Mexican Particle Physics at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    2003-06-01

    This report is a view from Fermilab of Mexican particle physics at the Laboratory since about 1980; it is not intended to be a history of Mexican particle physics: that topic is outside the expertise of the writer. The period 1980 to the present coincides with the growth of Mexican experimental particle physics from essentially no activity to its current state where Mexican groups take part in experiments at several of the world's major laboratories.

  1. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Charbonneau, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear

  2. Orbital Phase Variations of the Eccentric Giant Planet HAT-P-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Showman, Adam P.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Charbonneau, David; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fischer, Debra A.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hartman, Joel D.; Hinkley, Sasha; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Kao, Melodie; Langton, Jonathan; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 μm data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 μm that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 ± 0.28, 5.84 ± 0.39, and 4.68 ± 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% ± 0.0089%, 0.1162% ± 0.0080%, and 0.1888% ± 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% ± 0.0072%, 0.1031% ± 0.0061%, 0.071%^{+0.029%}_{-0.013%}, and 0.1392% ± 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 ± 0.00048) and argument of periapse (ω = 188.°09 ± 0.°39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear trend in the radial velocity data. This trend suggests the presence

  3. Strong selection at MHC in Mexicans since admixture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mexicans are a recent admixture of Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans. We performed local ancestry analysis of Mexican samples from two genome-wide association studies obtained from dbGaP, and discovered that at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region Mexicans have excessive African ance...

  4. Green Medicine: Traditional Mexican-American Herbal Remedies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Eliseo

    Traditional Mexican American herbal potions and remedies and their history are explained in an introductory book for the general reader. The importance of curanderismo, or green medicine, in Mexican and Mexican American cultures is explored. A brief history traces the herbal aspects of curanderismo through Mayan and Aztec cultures, the Spanish…

  5. Mexican Americans: A Brief Look at Their History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava, Julian

    This short survey begins with a definition of the Mexican American and some of the questions asked by the general public about his culture and aims. It outlines the history of the United States' involvement with Mexico and explains the experience of the Mexican Americans after the end of the Mexican War in 1848. Their ethnic origins and the rich…

  6. Employment Instability and Earnings of Mexican-Origin Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    1998-01-01

    Draws on the 1987 Current Population Survey to examine the effect of employment instability on earnings of 1,755 Mexican-origin men. Results show unequivocally that Whites received higher returns to education than did Mexican Americans, and that employment instability exerted a heavier penalty on Mexican-origin workers than Whites. (Author/SAS)

  7. Unemployment and Underemployment among Mexican-Origin Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    1994-01-01

    Current Population Survey data reveal that the incidence of underemployment for Mexican American males was twice as high as white males, and underemployment was 1.6 times higher for Mexican American females than white females. Joblessness among Mexican Americans accounted for less than one-third of their underemployment. Young and poorly educated…

  8. Los Dos Mundos: Rural Mexican Americans, Another America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    This book explores race relations between Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans in "Middlewest," a fictitious name for an actual rural Idaho community with the highest proportion of Mexican Americans in the state. Many Mexican Americans in this predominantly agricultural area are current or former migrant workers. The first chapter…

  9. Filial Responsibility Expectations among Mexican American Undergraduates: Gender and Biculturalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Bonnie; Chavez, Mary; Quintana, Fernando; Salinas, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    How Mexican American college students perceive responsibility for parental care is important as Mexican American elders' numbers increase. The authors applied mixed methods to investigate the impact of gender and biculturalism within this group. Two hundred and eighty-six Mexican American undergraduates completed the Hamon Filial Responsibility…

  10. A Qualitative Study of Mexican American Adolescents and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornos, Laura B.; Mika, Virginia Seguin; Bayles, Bryan; Serrano, Alberto C.; Jimenez, Roberto L.; Villarreal, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Depressive disorders are present in a high percentage of Mexican American adolescents. Among the US Mexican American population, suicide is the fourth leading cause of death among 10- to 19-year-olds. Little research, however, has focused on Mexican American adolescents' knowledge and views about depression and seeking help for depression. Results…

  11. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be granted... this method near the Canadian and Mexican borders. No stations are allowed within 5 miles of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination....

  12. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be granted... this method near the Canadian and Mexican borders. No stations are allowed within 5 miles of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination....

  13. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be granted... this method near the Canadian and Mexican borders. No stations are allowed within 5 miles of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination....

  14. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be granted... this method near the Canadian and Mexican borders. No stations are allowed within 5 miles of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination....

  15. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be granted... this method near the Canadian and Mexican borders. No stations are allowed within 5 miles of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination....

  16. Cultural and Social Predictors of Psychological Distress in Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Jacqueline M.; Burnam, M. Audrey

    Studies of relative levels of psychological distress among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites have found mixed results, possibly due to cultural differences within Mexican American samples which may confound potential ethnic differences. The hypothesis that differences in psychological distress between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic…

  17. Conceptualizing Parent Involvement: Low-Income Mexican Immigrant Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the conceptualization of low-income Mexican immigrant parents about their parental involvement and the family-school connection, (b) identify the influences on low-income Mexican immigrant parents' approach to parent involvement, and (c) identify the ways that Mexican immigrant parents…

  18. The Representation of "Curanderismo" in Selected Mexican American Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabon, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    "Curanderismo," a Mexican folk practice, is a prevalent subject in Mexican American literature. Because much of the presence of "curanderismo" in Mexican American literature is only explored in ethnographic studies, the purpose of this study is to examine the artistic representation of "curanderismo" in the novels "Bless Me, Ultima" by Rudolfo…

  19. Legal Status and Wage Disparities for Mexican Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Matthew; Greenman, Emily; Farkas, George

    2010-01-01

    This article employs a unique method of inferring the legal status of Mexican immigrants in the Survey of Income and Program Participation to offer new evidence of the role of legal authorization in the United States on workers' wages. We estimate wage trajectories for four groups: documented Mexican immigrants, undocumented Mexican immigrants,…

  20. Depression and Acculturation in Mexican-American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masten, William G.

    It has been postulated that the result of the Mexican woman's inability to live up to the stiff requirements of her culture should show itself in depressive trends. These theories are often applied to the Mexican-American female as well. The aim of this study was to determine if acculturation is related to depression in Mexican-American females. A…

  1. The Chicanos: A History of Mexican Americans. American Century Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Matt S.; Rivera, Feliciano

    To identify the Mexican American as a member of a unique cultural group is the purpose of this history of the Chicanos. The history of the Mexican American is divided into 5 broad time periods: the Indo-Hispanic period, during which there was a blending of the Indian and Spanish cultures; the Mexican period, a time of political activity which…

  2. Folk Arts in the Home: New Mexican Tinwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Aurelia; Sullivan, Laura Temple

    New Mexican tinwork is a folk art tradition that developed out of Mexican and European silver work. Due to a lack of silver in New Mexico, tin became the material of choice. Rooted in European Hispanic traditions, this contemporary craft is yet another example of the resourceful ingenuity and adaptation that characterizes many New Mexican folk…

  3. HATS-2b: A transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a K-type star showing starspot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler-Fischer, M.; Mancini, L.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; Nikolov, N.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Buchhave, L. A.; Béky, B.; Suc, V.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Papp, I.; Lázár, J.; Sári, P.; Conroy, P.

    2013-10-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-2b, the second transiting extrasolar planet detected by the HATSouth survey. HATS-2b is moving on a circular orbit around a V = 13.6 mag, K-type dwarf star (GSC 6665-00236), at a separation of 0.0230 ± 0.0003 AU and with a period of 1.3541 days. The planetary parameters have been robustly determined using a simultaneous fit of the HATSouth, MPG/ESO 2.2 m/GROND, Faulkes Telescope South/Spectral transit photometry, and MPG/ESO 2.2 m/FEROS, Euler 1.2 m/CORALIE, AAT 3.9 m/CYCLOPS radial-velocity measurements. HATS-2b has a mass of 1.37 ± 0.16 MJ, a radius of 1.14 ± 0.03 RJ, and an equilibrium temperature of 1567 ± 30 K. The host star has a mass of 0.88 ± 0.04 M⊙ and a radius of 0.89 ± 0.02 R⊙, and it shows starspot activity. We characterized the stellar activity by analyzing two photometric follow-up transit light curves taken with the GROND instrument, both obtained simultaneously in four optical bands (covering the wavelength range of 3860-9520 Å). The two light curves contain anomalies compatible with starspots on the photosphere of the host star along the same transit chord. Tables of the individual photometric measurements are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A55

  4. HATS-1b: The First Transiting Planet Discovered by the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Mohler, M.; Zhou, G.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Hartman, J. D.; Mancini, L.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Conroy, P.; Noyes, R. W.; Sasselov, D. D.; Schmidt, B.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V = 12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period of P ≈ 3.4465 days, mass of Mp ≈ 1.86 M J, and radius of Rp ≈ 1.30 R J. The host star has a mass of 0.99 M ⊙ and radius of 1.04 R ⊙. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near-continuous coverage over several multi-day timespans, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute, is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based on observations made with the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. FEROS ID programmes: P087.A-9014(A), P088.A-9008(A), P089.A-9008(A), P087.C-0508(A). GROND ID programme: 089.A-9006(A). This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  5. HATS-18b: An Extreme Short-period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18b: a 1.980+/- 0.077 {M}{{J}}, {1.337}-0.049+0.102 {R}{{J}} planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037+/- 0.047 {M}⊙ and radius {1.020}-0.031+0.057 {R}⊙ ) with V=14.067+/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range of 6.5≲ {{log}}10({Q}* /{k}2)≲ 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star-planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic, or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the MPG 2.2 m telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  6. Refined System Parameters and TTV Study of Transiting Exoplanetary System HAT-P-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Leilei; Gu, Shenghong; Wang, Xiaobin; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Cao, Dongtao; Wang, Yibo; Xiang, Yue; Hui, Ho-Keung; Kwok, Chi-Tai; Yeung, Bill; Ng, Eric; Grau Horta, Ferran

    2017-01-01

    We report new photometric observations of the transiting exoplanetary system HAT-P-20, obtained using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatories and Ho Koon Nature Education cum Astronomical Centre, China, from 2010 to 2013, and Observatori Ca l’Ou, Sant Marti Sesgueioles, Spain, from 2013 to 2015. The observed data are corrected for systematic errors according to the coarse de-correlation and SYSREM algorithms, so as to enhance the signal of the transit events. In order to consistently model the star spots and transits of this exoplanetary system, we develop a highly efficient tool STMT based on the analytic models of Mandel & Agol and Montalto et al. The physical parameters of HAT-P-20 are refined by homogeneously analyzing our new data, the radial velocity data, and the earlier photometric data in the literature with the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. New radii and masses of both host star and planet are larger than those in the discovery paper due to the discrepancy of the radius among K-dwarfs between predicted values by standard stellar models and empirical calibration from observations. Through the analysis of all available mid-transit times calculated with the normal model and spotted model, we conclude that the periodic transit timing variations in these transit events revealed by employing the normal model are probably induced by spot crossing events. From the analysis of the distribution of occulted spots by HAT-P-20b, we constrain the misaligned architecture between the planetary orbit and the spin of the host star.

  7. Mexican forest fires and their decadal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Graciela

    2016-11-01

    A high forest fire season of two to three years is regularly observed each decade in Mexican forests. This seems to be related to the presence of the El Niño phenomenon and to the amount of total solar irradiance. In this study, the results of a multi-cross wavelet analysis are reported based on the occurrence of Mexican forest fires, El Niño and the total solar irradiance for the period 1970-2014. The analysis shows that Mexican forest fires and the strongest El Niño phenomena occur mostly around the minima of the solar cycle. This suggests that the total solar irradiance minima provide the appropriate climatological conditions for the occurrence of these forest fires. The next high season for Mexican forest fires could start in the next solar minimum, which will take place between the years 2017 and 2019. A complementary space analysis based on MODIS active fire data for Mexican forest fires from 2005 to 2014 shows that most of these fires occur in cedar and pine forests, on savannas and pasturelands, and in the central jungles of the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

  8. [The management of aortic root replacement using the Top-Hat/Gelweave composite graft].

    PubMed

    Imada, T; Morishige, N; Nonaka, K; Yamanaka, J

    2000-06-01

    Composite graft replacement of the aortic root has become a routine procedure for annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and aortic valve insufficiency (AR) with aortic dissection and the results have improved. We treated six cases of aortic root reconstruction using the Carrel patch method in 1998. The Top-Hat/Gelweave Composite graft fit together well and the procedure is technically similar to standard valve replacement. Upon measuring the valve size a Gelweave graft 1 mm larger than the valve size should be selected. There were no incidence of hemorrhage or postoperative hemolysis. Further long-term follow-up is necessary.

  9. Multi-jet Cross Sections at NLO with BlackHat and Sherpa

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2009-05-20

    In this talk, we report on a recent next-to-leading order QCD calculation of the production of a W boson in association with three jets at hadron colliders. The computation is performed by combining two programs, BlackHat for the computation of the virtual one-loop matrix elements and Sherpa for the real emission part. The addition of NLO corrections greatly reduces the factorization and renormalization scale dependence of the theory prediction for this process. This result demonstrates the applicability of unitarity-based methods for hadron collider physics.

  10. Mexican plants and human fertility.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, P

    1979-07-01

    Synthetic steroids are obtainable cheaply and in abundance from sapogenins, substances originating from plants of the Discorea family. Some 40 years ago, Russell Marker, an American chemist, discovered this source, which grows abundantly in Mexican jungles and is now exploited and cultivated commercially. Today synthetic steroids prepared from extracts from a wide range of vegetable sources are used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, allergies, inflammatory diseases, sterility, and various heart conditions, and form the basis of modern oral contraceptives. Nevertheless, oral contraceptives in current use are still fairly costly, and women have to be educated in their use. What is needed urgently is a cheaper contraceptive pill with a long-term effect, and research is continuing. For example, scientists from the People's Republic of China have reported significant anti-fertility effects associated with 2 substances, anordin and dinordin, prepared with steroids derived from the sisal plants Agave sisilana and Agave americana. These agents, whose anti-fertility properties have been confirmed by scientists in Sweden and the United States, constitute a new family of contraceptives with the great advantage of having to be taken only once or twice instead of 20 times per month necessary with the ordinary pill. Also from China, scientists have reported the effectiveness of gossypol as an orally administered male contraceptive, although gossypol is not a steroid. It may become, however, a leading candidate for a male contraceptive.

  11. Mexican Space Weather Service (SCIESMEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; De la Luz, V.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Corona-Romero, P.; Gonzalez, L. X.

    2015-12-01

    Recent modifications of the Civil Protection Law in Mexico include now specific mentions to space hazards and space weather phenomena. During the last few years, the UN has promoted international cooperation on Space Weather awareness, studies and monitoring. Internal and external conditions motivated the creation of a Space Weather Service in Mexico (SCIESMEX). The SCIESMEX (www.sciesmex.unam.mx) is operated by the Geophysics Institute at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The UNAM has the experience of operating several critical national services, including the National Seismological Service (SSN); besides that has a well established scientific group with expertise in space physics and solar- terrestrial phenomena. The SCIESMEX is also related with the recent creation of the Mexican Space Agency (AEM). The project combines a network of different ground instruments covering solar, interplanetary, geomagnetic, and ionospheric observations. The SCIESMEX has already in operation computing infrastructure running the web application, a virtual observatory and a high performance computing server to run numerical models. SCIESMEX participates in the International Space Environment Services (ISES) and in the Inter-progamme Coordination Team on Space Weather (ICTSW) of the Word Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  12. A Six-Wave Study of the Consistency of Mexican/Mexican American Preadolescents' Lifetime Substance Use Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, David A.; Kulis, Stephen; Elek, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    In the Fall of 2004, 1,948 5th grade students from Phoenix, AZ enrolled in an evaluation of a school-based, substance use prevention intervention. To assess the consistency of Mexican and Mexican-American students' self-reports of lifetime substance use, the present study analyzed data reported by 1,418 students who reported Mexican ancestry and…

  13. Craniofacial Secular Change in Recent Mexican Migrants.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Katherine; Stull, Kyra E; Hefner, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    Research by economists suggests that recent Mexican migrants are better educated and have higher socioeconomic status (SES) than previous migrants. Because factors associated with higher SES and improved education can lead to positive secular changes in overall body form, secular changes in the craniofacial complex were analyzed within a recent migrant group from Mexico. The Mexican group represents individuals in the act of migration, not yet influenced by the American environment, and thus can serve as a starting point for future studies of secular change in this population group. The excavation of a historic Hispanic cemetery in Tucson, Arizona, also allows for a comparison between historic Hispanics and recent migrants to explore craniofacial trends over a broad time period, as both groups originate from Mexico. The present research addresses two main questions: (1) Are cranial secular changes evident in recent Mexican migrants? (2) Are historic Hispanics and recent Mexican migrants similar? By studying secular changes within a migrant population group, secular trends may be detected, which will be important for understanding the biological variation of the migrants themselves and will serve as a preliminary investigation of secular change within Mexican migrants. The comparison of a sample of recent Mexican migrants with a historic Hispanic sample, predominantly of Mexican origin, allows us to explore morphological similarities and differences between early and recent Mexicans within the United States. Vault and face size and a total of 82 craniofacial interlandmark distances were used to explore secular changes within the recent Mexican migrants (females, n = 38; males, n = 178) and to explore the morphological similarities between historic Hispanics (females, n = 54; males, n = 58) and recent migrants. Sexes were separated, and multivariate adaptive regression splines and basis splines (quadratic with one knot) were used to assess the direction and magnitude

  14. [Echinoderms (Echinodermata) of the Mexican Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solis-Marín, Francisco A; Durán-González, Alicia; Ahearn, Cynthia Gust; Buitrón Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Torres-Vega, Juan

    2005-12-01

    A systematic list of the echinoderms of the Mexican Caribbean based on museum specimens of the Colección Nacional de Equinodermos, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. is presented. This list reveals an important echinoderm biodiversity in the Mexican Caribbean, where five of the six echinoderm classes are represented. A total of 178 echinoderm species is recorded, distributed in 113 genera, 51 families and 22 orders. 30 new records for the Mexican Caribbean are presents: Crínoidea (three), Asteroidea (two), Ophiuroidea (eleven), Echinoidea (one), Holothuroidea (thirteen).

  15. Fracking, wastewater disposal, and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    In the modern oil and gas industry, fracking of low-permeability reservoirs has resulted in a considerable increase in the production of oil and natural gas, but these fluid-injection activities also can induce earthquakes. Earthquakes induced by fracking are an inevitable consequence of the injection of fluid at high pressure, where the intent is to enhance permeability by creating a system of cracks and fissures that allow hydrocarbons to flow to the borehole. The micro-earthquakes induced during these highly-controlled procedures are generally much too small to be felt at the surface; indeed, the creation or reactivation of a large fault would be contrary to the goal of enhancing permeability evenly throughout the formation. Accordingly, the few case histories for which fracking has resulted in felt earthquakes have been due to unintended fault reactivation. Of greater consequence for inducing earthquakes, modern techniques for producing hydrocarbons, including fracking, have resulted in considerable quantities of coproduced wastewater, primarily formation brines. This wastewater is commonly disposed by injection into deep aquifers having high permeability and porosity. As reported in many case histories, pore pressure increases due to wastewater injection were channeled from the target aquifers into fault zones that were, in effect, lubricated, resulting in earthquake slip. These fault zones are often located in the brittle crystalline rocks in the basement. Magnitudes of earthquakes induced by wastewater disposal often exceed 4, the threshold for structural damage. Even though only a small fraction of disposal wells induce earthquakes large enough to be of concern to the public, there are so many of these wells that this source of seismicity contributes significantly to the seismic hazard in the United States, especially east of the Rocky Mountains where standards of building construction are generally not designed to resist shaking from large earthquakes.

  16. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, Scott Leroy; Chu, Shaoping; Harp, Dylan Robert; Perry, Frank Vinton; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  17. The earnings of Mexican immigrants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Borjas, G J

    1996-10-01

    "This paper documents the trends in the earnings of Mexican immigrants during the 1970-1990 period. The empirical evidence indicates that there has been a decline in the relative wage of successive Mexican immigrant waves in the past three decades and that little wage convergence occurs between the typical Mexican immigrant and the typical native worker. The data also suggest that the increasing importance of Mexican immigration is partly responsible for the deterioration in relative skills observed in the aggregate immigrant population, but that there has also been a decline in relative skills even among non-Mexican immigrants."

  18. The Transit Light Curve Project. VII. The Not-So-Bloated Exoplanet HAT-P-1b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Bakos, Gaspar Á.; Pál, András; Johnson, John Asher; Williams, Peter K. G.; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi; Fernandez, José; Latham, David W.; Gillon, Michael

    2007-10-01

    We present photometry of the G0 star HAT-P-1 during six transits of its close-in giant planet, and we refine the estimates of the system parameters. Relative to Jupiter's properties, HAT-P-1b is 1.20 ± 0.05 times larger, and its surface gravity is 2.7 ± 0.2 times weaker. Although it remains the case that HAT-P-1b is among the least dense of the known sample of transiting exoplanets, its properties are in accord with previously published models of strongly irradiated, coreless, solar-composition giant planets. The times of the transits have a typical accuracy of 1 minute and do not depart significantly from a constant period.

  19. Characterization of new hAT transposable elements in 12 Drosophila genomes.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Ortiz, Mauro; Loreto, Elgion Lucio Silva

    2009-01-01

    In silico searches for sequences homologous to hAT elements in 12 Drosophila genomes have allowed us to identify 37 new hAT elements (8 in D. ananassae, 11 in D. mojavensis, 2 in D. sechellia, 1 in D. simulans, 2 in D. virilis, 3 in D. yakuba, 3 in D. persimilis, 1 in D. grimshawi, 5 in D. willistoni and 1 in D. pseudobscura). The size of these elements varies from 2,359 to 4,962 bp and the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) show lengths ranging from 10 to 24 bp. Several elements show intact transposase ORFs, suggesting that they are active. Conserved amino acid motifs were identified that correspond to those important for transposase activity. These elements are highly variable and phylogenetic analysis showed that they can be clustered into four different families. Incongruencies were observed between the phylogenies of the transposable elements and those of their hosts, suggesting that horizontal transfer may have occurred between some of the species.

  20. Synthesis of isothiazol-3-one derivatives as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases (HATs).

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Stephen; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Rowlands, Martin G; Aherne, G Wynne; Workman, Paul; Jarman, Michael; McDonald, Edward

    2009-01-15

    High-throughput screening led to the identification of isothiazolones 1 and 2 as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with IC50s of 3 microM and 5 microM, respectively. Analogues of these hit compounds with variations of the N-phenyl group, and with variety of substituents at C-4, C-5 of the thiazolone ring, were prepared and assayed for inhibition of the HAT enzyme PCAF. Potency is modestly favoured when the N-aryl group is electron deficient (4-pyridyl derivative 10 has IC(50)=1.5 microM); alkyl substitution at C-4 has little effect, whilst similar substitution at C-5 causes a significant drop in potency. The ring-fused compound 38 has activity (IC(50)=6.1 microM) to encourage further exploration of this bicyclic structure. The foregoing SAR is consistent with an inhibitory mechanism involving cleavage of the S-N bond of the isothiazolone ring by a catalytically important thiol residue.

  1. The nature of the Napoleon's Hat nebula of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Dyson, J. E.; Kahn, F. D.

    1993-03-01

    The interstellar and circumstellar environment of SN 1987A is modeled. The geometries of Napoleon's Hat nebula and the dark bay suggest that there is relative motion between the SN progenitor and the surrounding ISM. Most of the dark bay can be identified with the bubble produced by the fast blue supergiant (BSG) wind before the red supergiant (RSG) stage. The relative motion between the star and the ISM is the primary reason for the star being at the edge of this bubble. After the first BSG stage, the star evolves to the RSG stage; the wind velocity is now typically 10 km/s and the mass loss rate is around 10 exp -5 solar mass/yr. The star eventually breaks through the bubble produced in the early BSG stage and starts to interact directly with the ISM outside, thus producing Napoleon's Hat. The success of this model is convincing proof of the BSG-RSG-BSG evolutionary model for the SN 1987A progenitors, and shows that is has moved from the site where it was formed.

  2. The 'chef's hat' appearance of the femoral head in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Aktas, S; Wheeler, D; Sussman, M D

    2000-04-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by failure of membranous ossification. The condition is due to a mutation of the cbfa1 gene on chromosome 6 which has a role in the development of osteoblasts from the mesenchymal cells. In their growing years, these patients have an unusual shape of the femoral head reminiscent of a 'chef's hat'. In order to confirm the consistency of this sign, we have reviewed the radiographs of 28 patients with CCD. All except three had this appearance. The sign was also seen in patients with coxa vara associated with a variety of other conditions. The chef's hat sign may occur secondary to the particular mechanical environment created by coxa vara as well as abnormal cellular function in patients with CCD. Although coxa vara has some influence on the shape of the femoral head, it is not entirely responsible for its morphology since it was present in only six of the 28 patients with CCD.

  3. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight-saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum-weight hat-stiffened and open-corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programing technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience to date suggests that most of the theoretical weight-saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  4. Structural Performance of a Compressively Loaded Foam-Core Hat-Stiffened Textile Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Dexter, Benson H.

    1996-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as a stiffener core material has been designed and developed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept is fabricated from textile composite material forms with a resin transfer molding process. This foam-filled hat-stiffener concept is structurally more efficient than most other prismatically stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The panel design is based on woven/stitched and braided graphite-fiber textile preforms, an epoxy resin system, and Rohacell foam core. The structural response of this panel design was evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimen tests suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has excellent damage tolerance characteristics compared to a similar panel design made from preimpregnated graphite-epoxy tape material.

  5. The refined physical properties of transiting exoplanetary system WASP-11/HAT-P-10

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiao-bin; Gu, Sheng-hong; Wang, Yi-bo; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Hui, Ho-Keung; Kwok, Chi-Tai; Yeung, Bill; Leung, Kam-Cheung

    2014-04-01

    The transiting exoplanetary system WASP-11/HAT-P-10 was observed using the CCD camera at Yunnan Observatories, China from 2008 to 2011, and four new transit light curves were obtained. Combined with published radial velocity measurements, the new transit light curves are analyzed along with available photometric data from the literature using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, and the refined physical parameters of the system are derived, which are compatible with the results of two discovery groups, respectively. The planet mass is M{sub p} = 0.526 ± 0.019 M{sub J} , which is the same as West et al.'s value, and more accurately, the planet radius R{sub p} = 0.999{sub −0.018}{sup +0.029} R{sub J} is identical to the value of Bakos et al. The new result confirms that the planet orbit is circular. By collecting 19 available mid-transit epochs with higher precision, we make an orbital period analysis for WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b, and derive a new value for its orbital period, P = 3.72247669 days. Through an (O – C) study based on these mid-transit epochs, no obvious transit timing variation signal can be found for this system during 2008-2012.

  6. A Bayesian analysis of HAT-P-7b using the EXONEST algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) is revolutionizing the way we view our universe. High-precision photometric data provided by the Kepler Space Telescope (Kepler) enables not only the detection of such planets, but also their characterization. This presents a unique opportunity to apply Bayesian methods to better characterize the multitude of previously confirmed exoplanets. This paper focuses on applying the EXONEST algorithm to characterize the transiting short-period-hot-Jupiter, HAT-P-7b (also referred to as Kepler-2b). EXONEST evaluates a suite of exoplanet photometric models by applying Bayesian Model Selection, which is implemented with the MultiNest algorithm. These models take into account planetary effects, such as reflected light and thermal emissions, as well as the effect of the planetary motion on the host star, such as Doppler beaming, or boosting, of light from the reflex motion of the host star, and photometric variations due to the planet-induced ellipsoidal shape of the host star. By calculating model evidences, one can determine which model best describes the observed data, thus identifying which effects dominate the planetary system. Presented are parameter estimates and model evidences for HAT-P-7b.

  7. Is lightning a possible source of the radio emission on HAT-P-11b?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, G.; Rimmer, P. B.; Helling, Ch.

    2016-09-01

    Lightning induced radio emission has been observed on Solar system planets. There have been many attempts to observe exoplanets in the radio wavelength, however, no unequivocal detection has been reported. Lecavelier des Etangs et al. carried out radio transit observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b, and suggested that a small part of the radio flux can be attributed to the planet. Here, we assume that this signal is real, and study if this radio emission could be caused by lightning with similar energetic properties like in the Solar system. We find that a lightning storm with 3.8 × 106 times larger flash densities than the Earth-storms with the largest lightning activity is needed to produce the observed signal from HAT-P-11b. The optical emission of such thunderstorm would be comparable to that of the host star. We show that HCN produced by lightning chemistry is observable 2-3 yr after the storm, which produces signatures in the L (3.0-4.0 μm) and N (7.5-14.5 μm) infrared bands. We conclude that it is unlikely that the observed radio signal was produced by lightning, however, future, combined radio and infrared observations may lead to lightning detection on planets outside the Solar system.

  8. Free radical scavenger properties of α-mangostin: thermodynamics and kinetics of HAT and RAF mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana; Galano, Annia; Vargas, Rubicelia

    2011-11-03

    Mangosteen is a tropical fruit that presents beneficial effects on human health since it is rich in anthocyanins and xanthones, which are considered bioactive compounds that have been described as good free radical scavengers. One of its most active compounds is α-mangostin. In this report, a theoretical study on the free radical scavenger capacity of α-mangostin and its monoanion is analyzed using the density functional theory approximation. Two well-known reaction mechanisms are investigated: the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and the radical adduct formation (RAF). Two other mechanisms are also considered: sequential electron proton Transfer (SEPT) and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET). According to thermodynamics and kinetics, α-mangostin and its deprotonated form are good free radical scavenger through the HAT mechanism, with the anionic (deprotonated) form being more reactive than the neutral one. Their capacity to scavenge OOH free radical is similar to that of carotenes, higher than that of allicin, much higher than that of melatonin and N-acetylcysteine amide, and about 15 times lower than that of 2-propenesulfenic acid.

  9. FURTHER CONSTRAINTS ON THE OPTICAL TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF HAT-P-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Montalto, M.; Santos, N. C.; Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Alonso, R.; Iro, N.; Desidera, S.

    2015-09-20

    We report on novel observations of HAT-P-1 aimed at constraining the optical transmission spectrum of the atmosphere of its transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanet. Ground-based differential spectrophotometry was performed over two transit windows using the DOLORES spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Our measurements imply an average planet to star radius ratio equal to R{sub p}/R{sub *} = (0.1159 ± 0.0005). This result is consistent with the value obtained from recent near-infrared measurements of this object, but differs from previously reported optical measurements, being lower by around 4.4 exoplanet scale heights. Analyzing the data over five different spectral bins of ∼600 Å wide, we observed a single peaked spectrum (3.7 σ level) with a blue cutoff corresponding to the blue edge of the broad absorption wing of sodium and an increased absorption in the region in-between 6180 and 7400 Å. We also infer that the width of the broad absorption wings due to alkali metals is likely narrower than the one implied by solar abundance clear atmospheric models. We interpret the result as evidence that HAT-P-1b has a partially clear atmosphere at optical wavelengths with a more modest contribution from an optical absorber than previously reported.

  10. A Bayesian analysis of HAT-P-7b using the EXONEST algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2015-01-13

    The study of exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) is revolutionizing the way we view our universe. High-precision photometric data provided by the Kepler Space Telescope (Kepler) enables not only the detection of such planets, but also their characterization. This presents a unique opportunity to apply Bayesian methods to better characterize the multitude of previously confirmed exoplanets. This paper focuses on applying the EXONEST algorithm to characterize the transiting short-period-hot-Jupiter, HAT-P-7b (also referred to as Kepler-2b). EXONEST evaluates a suite of exoplanet photometric models by applying Bayesian Model Selection, which is implemented with the MultiNest algorithm. These models take into account planetary effects, such as reflected light and thermal emissions, as well as the effect of the planetary motion on the host star, such as Doppler beaming, or boosting, of light from the reflex motion of the host star, and photometric variations due to the planet-induced ellipsoidal shape of the host star. By calculating model evidences, one can determine which model best describes the observed data, thus identifying which effects dominate the planetary system. Presented are parameter estimates and model evidences for HAT-P-7b.

  11. HATS-3b: AN INFLATED HOT JUPITER TRANSITING AN F-TYPE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Schmidt, B.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Jordán, A.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V = 12.4 F dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479 days, mass of M{sub p} = 1.07 M {sub J}, and radius of R{sub p} = 1.38 R {sub J}. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsin i = 9.0 km s{sup –1}), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low-/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces log g and T {sub eff} parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km s{sup –1}.

  12. An investigation of higher-order effects in modeling exoplanet HAT-P-7b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Susan Anne

    In its search for Earth-like planets, NASA's Kepler mission observed over 200,000 stars. Among these systems were the class of planets known as the "hot Jupiters." These are giant gaseous planets with periods less than 10 days. Here I present an analysis of the Kepler observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-7b, a hot Jupiter with an orbital period of 2.2 days, a mass of 1.8 MJ, and a radius of 1.5 RJ. Due to its very close proximity to its host star, the planet has a day-side temperature of 2800 K and a night-side temperature of 1950 K. The tight orbit also causes planetary reflection, as well as higher-order effects in the system such as ellipsoidal variations, Doppler beaming, and gravity darkening. My thesis explores these effects on the Kepler HAT-P-7 light curve using the state of the art Eclipsing Light Curve (ELC) code. The "short cadence" data from Kepler contain 2 million measurements, which I phase folded and binned to get robust uncertainties, resulting in a final data set with 2,704 points. Because of the exquisitely high precision of the data (few ppm level), the physical effects mentioned above need to be accounted for. Including these effects enables me to accurately solve for the system parameters.

  13. Transmission Spectroscopy of HAT-P-32Ab with GTC/OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nortmann, Lisa; Pallé, Enric; Murgas, Felipe; Dreizler, Stefan; Iro, Nicolas; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    I will present one of the latest results of our GTC exoplanet transit spectroscopy survey. Over the last years our group has obtained ground-based optical (538 nm - 918 nm) spectrophotometric transit observations for several hot Jupiters including HAT-P-32Ab using the OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy) instrument at the Spanish 10-meter telescope GTC.I will discuss the source, nature and proper correction of instrument specific systematic noise we found to affect our data. After its correction, we were able to yield high quality results with a precision between 482 and 1703 ppm depending on the wavelength channel. We measure a flat optical transmission spectrum for HAT-P-32Ab, consistent with the results of Gibson et al. (2013, MNRAS, 436, 2974) obtained with GMOS at Gemini-North. This independent reproduction of consistent results re-establishes faith in the reliability of ground-based transmission spectroscopy and emphasizes the high potential of OSIRIS at the GTC as a tool to complement current and future space-based observations.

  14. THE OBLIQUE ORBIT OF THE SUPER-NEPTUNE HAT-P-11b

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Shporer, Avi; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.

    2010-11-10

    We find the orbit of the Neptune-sized exoplanet HAT-P-11b to be highly inclined relative to the equatorial plane of its host star. This conclusion is based on spectroscopic observations of two transits, which allowed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect to be detected with an amplitude of 1.5 m s{sup -1}. The sky-projected obliquity is 103{sup +26} {sub -10} deg. This is the smallest exoplanet for which spin-orbit alignment has been measured. The result favors a migration scenario involving few-body interactions followed by tidal dissipation. This finding also conforms with the pattern that the systems with the weakest tidal interactions have the widest spread in obliquities. We predict that the high obliquity of HAT-P-11 will be manifest in transit light curves from the Kepler spacecraft: starspot-crossing anomalies will recur at most once per stellar rotation period, rather than once per orbital period as they would for a well-aligned system.

  15. Implications of the Secondary Eclipse of Exoplanet HAT-P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Deming, L. D.; Bakos, G.; Harrington, J.; Madhusudhan, N.; Noyes, R.; Seager, S.

    2010-01-01

    We observed exoplanet HAT-P-11b and have successfully detected its secondary eclipse. We conducted observations using the Spitzer Space Telescope in the post-cryo mission at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Having detected the secondary eclipse, we are at present making a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-11b is one of only two known exo-Neptunes and has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi-major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will serve to clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. We discuss implications of these observations.

  16. Top hat electrostatic analyzer for far-field electric propulsion plume diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, Allen L.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-15

    The design, development, and testing of the top hat electric propulsion plume analyzer (TOPAZ) are presented for far-field electric propulsion plume diagnostics. The trend towards high-power thruster development will require plume diagnostic techniques capable of measuring high-energy particles as well as low-energy ions produced from charge-exchange collisions due to elevated facility background pressures. TOPAZ incorporates a 'top hat' design with a geometrical analyzer constant of 100 resulting in a wide energy range and a high-energy resolution. SIMION, an ion trajectory analysis program, was used to predict characteristics of the analyzer. An ion beam accelerator system confirms the computational results. TOPAZ provides an energy resolution of 2.7%, field of view of 112 deg. x 26 deg. (azimuthal by elevation) with an angular resolution in each direction of 2 deg., and a demonstrated energy-per-charge acceptance range of 5-15 keV. An energy profile measurement of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster demonstrates instrument operation in a Hall thruster plume.

  17. HATS-7b: A Hot Super Neptune Transiting a Quiet K Dwarf Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Brahm, R.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Jordán, A.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Csubry, Z.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Isaacson, H.; Noyes, R. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Suc, V.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-7b, a transiting Super-Neptune with a mass of 0.120 ± 0.012 {M}{{J}}, a radius of {0.563}-0.034+0.046 {R}{{J}}, and an orbital period of 3.1853 days. The host star is a moderately bright (V=13.340\\+/- 0.010 mag, {K}S=10.976\\+/- 0.026 mag) K dwarf star with a mass of 0.849 ± 0.027 {M}⊙ , a radius of {0.815}-0.035+0.049 {R}⊙ , and a metallicity of [{Fe}/{{H}}] =+0.250\\+/- 0.080. The star is photometrically quiet to within the precision of the HATSouth measurements, has low RV jitter, and shows no evidence for chromospheric activity in its spectrum. HATS-7b is the second smallest radius planet discovered by a wide-field ground-based transit survey, and one of only a handful of Neptune-size planets with mass and radius determined to 10% precision. Theoretical modeling of HATS-7b yields a hydrogen-helium fraction of 18 ± 4% (rock-iron core and H2-He envelope), or 9 ± 4% (ice core and H2-He envelope), i.e., it has a composition broadly similar to that of Uranus and Neptune, and very different from that of Saturn, which has 75% of its mass in H2-He. Based on a sample of transiting exoplanets with accurately (<20%) determined parameters, we establish approximate power-law relations for the envelopes of the mass-density distribution of exoplanets. HATS-7b, which, together with the recently discovered HATS-8b, is one of the first two transiting super-Neptunes discovered in the Southern sky, is a prime target for additional follow-up observations with Southern hemisphere facilities to characterize the atmospheres of Super-Neptunes (which we define as objects with mass greater than that of Neptune, and smaller than halfway between that of Neptune and Saturn, i.e., 0.054 {M}{{J}}\\lt {M}{{p}}\\lt 0.18 {M}{{J}}). The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia

  18. The Mexican American Cultural Values scales for Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Knight, George P.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Saenz, Delia S.; Bonds, Darya D.; Germán, Miguelina; Deardorff, Julianna; Roosa, Mark W.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluates the properties of a measure of culturally linked values of Mexican Americans in early adolescence and adulthood. The items measure were derived from qualitative data provided by focus groups in which Mexican Americans’ (adolescents, mothers and fathers) perceptions of key values were discussed. The focus groups and a preliminary item refinement resulted in the fifty-item Mexican American Cultural Values Scales (identical for adolescents and adults) that includes nine value subscales. Analyses of data from two large previously published studies sampling Mexican American adolescents, mothers, and fathers provided evidence of the expected two correlated higher order factor structures, reliability, and construct validity of the subscales of the Mexican American Cultural Values Scales as indicators of values that are frequently associated with Mexican/Mexican American culture. The utility of this measure for use in longitudinal research, and in resolving some important theoretical questions regarding dual cultural adaptation, are discussed. PMID:20644653

  19. HAT-P-17b,c: A TRANSITING, ECCENTRIC, HOT SATURN AND A LONG-PERIOD, COLD JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Beky, B.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Perumpilly, G.; Shporer, A.; Mazeh, T.; Kovacs, Geza; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Butler, R. P.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I. E-mail: gbakos@cfa.harvard.edu; and others

    2012-04-20

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-17b,c, a multi-planet system with an inner transiting planet in a short-period, eccentric orbit and an outer planet in a 4.4 yr, nearly circular orbit. The inner planet, HAT-P-17b, transits the bright V = 10.54 early K dwarf star GSC 2717-00417, with an orbital period P = 10.338523 {+-} 0.000009 days, orbital eccentricity e = 0.342 {+-} 0.006, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2454801.16943 {+-} 0.00020 (BJD: barycentric Julian dates throughout the paper are calculated from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)), and transit duration 0.1690 {+-} 0.0009 days. HAT-P-17b has a mass of 0.534 {+-} 0.018 M{sub J} and radius of 1.010 {+-} 0.029 R{sub J} yielding a mean density of 0.64 {+-} 0.05 g cm{sup -3}. This planet has a relatively low equilibrium temperature in the range 780-927 K, making it an attractive target for follow-up spectroscopic studies. The outer planet, HAT-P-17c, has a significantly longer orbital period P{sub 2} = 1610 {+-} 20 days and a minimum mass m{sub 2}sin i{sub 2} = 1.31{sup +0.18}{sub -0.15} M{sub J}. The orbital inclination of HAT-P-17c is unknown as transits have not been observed and may not be present. The host star has a mass of 0.86 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }, radius of 0.84 {+-} 0.02 R{sub Sun }, effective temperature 5246 {+-} 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.00 {+-} 0.08. HAT-P-17 is the second multi-planet system detected from ground-based transit surveys.

  20. Participatory management of waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Noosorn, Narongsak

    2005-05-01

    The general objective of this study was to develop a sustainable waste disposal management model in Yom riverside communities by creating a sense of ownership in the project among the villagers and encourage the community to identify problems based on their socio-cultural background. The participatory approach was applied in developing a continual learning process between the researcher and stakeholders. The Tub Phueng community of Si Samrong, Sukhothai Province was selected as the location for this study. From the population of 240 households in the area, 40 stakeholders were selected to be on the research team. The team found that the waste in this community was comprised of 4 categories: 1. Occupation: discarded insecticide containers used for farming activities; 2. Consumption: plastic bags and wrappers form pre-packed foods; 3. Traditional activities: after holding ceremonies and festivities, the waste was dumped in the river; and 4. Environmental hygiene: waste water from washing, bathing, toileting, cooking and cleaning was directly drained into the Yom River. The sustainable waste disposal model developed to manage these problems included building simple waste-water treatment wells, digging garbage holes, prosecuting people who throw garbage into the river, withdrawing privileges from people who throw garbage into the river, and establishing a garbage center. Most of the villagers were satisfied with the proposed model, looked forward to the expected positive changes, and thought this kind of solution would be easy to put into practice.

  1. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Michael D.; Klapperick, Robert L.; Bell, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The ice punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container.

  2. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-20

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  3. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications. PMID:26586153

  4. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, M.D.; Klapperick, R.L.; Bell, C.

    1993-12-21

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The device punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container. 7 figures.

  5. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  6. Solution of Newly Observed Transit of the Exoplanet Hat-P-24B:No TTV and TDV Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana; Dimitrov, Dinko; Ibryamov, Sunay

    2016-01-01

    We present photometric observations of transit of the exoplanet HAT-P-24b using the Rozhen 2 m telescope. Its solution gives relative stellar radius r_s=0.1304 (a/R_s = 7.669), relative planet radius r_p=0.01304 and orbital inclination of 90°. The calculated planet radius is R_p = 1.316 R_J and corresponds to planet density of ρ_p = 0.37 g cm^{-3}. Our parameter values are between those of the previous two solutions. We did not find evidences of TTV and TDV signals of HAT-P-24b.

  7. Protective neighborhoods: neighborhood proportion of Mexican Americans and depressive symptoms in very old Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Gerst, Kerstin; Miranda, Patricia Y; Eschbach, Karl; Sheffield, Kristin M; Peek, M Kristen; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2011-02-01

    Research indicates that neighborhood context can have a significant effect on the health of older adults. The evidence suggests that there may be physical health benefits afforded to Mexican Americans living in ethnically homogenous neighborhoods, despite the relatively high economic risk in such neighborhoods, but few studies have considered the effect of neighborhood ethnic density on mental health outcomes in older adults. This study evaluated the association between neighborhoods with a high proportion of Mexican Americans and depressive symptoms in very old Mexican Americans. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine data from Wave 5 (2004/05) of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly. Subjects included 1,875 community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged 75 and older living in 386 neighborhoods in five states in the southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas). Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (α=0.88). Results showed that, in very old men, there was a significant negative association between percentage of Mexican Americans in the neighborhood and depressive symptoms (P=.01). In women, the direction of the association was the same, but the effect was not significant. These findings suggest that the proportion of Mexican Americans in the neighborhood matter more for very old Mexican American men than women. Further research may inform screening and treatment for depressive symptoms based on differences in neighborhood composition. Recommendations include culturally customized programs that offer older Mexican Americans greater mobility and access to programs and opportunities in culturally identifiable neighborhoods.

  8. Food Acculturation Drives Dietary Differences among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Non-Hispanic Whites123

    PubMed Central

    Batis, Carolina; Hernandez-Barrera, Lucia; Barquera, Simon; Rivera, Juan A.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of food acculturation on Mexican Americans’ (MA) diets, taking the Mexican diet as reference. We used nationally representative samples of children (2–11 y) and female adolescents and adults (12–49 y) from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999 and NHANES 1999–2006 to compare the diets of Mexicans (n = 5678), MA born in Mexico (MAMX) (n = 1488), MA born in the United States (MAUS) (n = 3654), and non-Hispanic white Americans (NH-White) (n = 5473). One 24-h diet recall was used to examine the percentage consuming and percentage energy consumed from selected food groups. Most of the food groups analyzed displayed a fairly linear increase or decrease in percent energy/capita intake in this order: Mexican, MAMX, MAUS, NH-White. However, few significant differences were observed among the US subpopulations, especially among MAUS and NH-Whites. Overall, compared to Mexicans, the US subpopulations had greater intakes of saturated fat, sugar, dessert and salty snacks, pizza and French fries, low-fat meat and fish, high-fiber bread, and low-fat milk, as well as decreased intakes of corn tortillas, low-fiber bread, high-fat milk, and Mexican fast food. Furthermore, the patterns were similar in all age groups. Although we found a mix of positive and negative aspects of food acculturation, the overall proportion of energy obtained from unhealthy foods was higher among the US subpopulations. Our findings indicate that within one generation in the US, the influence of the Mexican diet is almost lost. In addition, our results reinforce the need to discourage critical unhealthful components of the American diet among MA. PMID:21880951

  9. Subjective Social Status, Mental and Psychosocial Health, and Birth Weight Differences in Mexican-American and Mexican Immigrant Women.

    PubMed

    Fleuriet, K Jill; Sunil, T S

    2015-12-01

    Recent Mexican immigrant women on average have an unexpectedly low incidence of low birth weight (LBW). Birth weights decline and LBW incidence increases in post-immigrant generations. This pilot project tested the hypothesis that subjective social status (SSS) of pregnant women predicts variation in birth weight between Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women. 300 low-income pregnant Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women in South Texas were surveyed for SSS, depression, pregnancy-related anxiety, perceived social stress and self-esteem and subsequent birth weight. No significant difference in SSS levels between pregnant Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women were found. However, SSS better predicted variation in birth weight across both groups than mental and psychosocial health variables. Results suggest distinct relationships among SSS, mental and psychosocial health that could impact birth weight. They underscore the relevance of a multilevel, biopsychosocial analytical framework to studying LBW.

  10. Responsible Appliance Disposal Program: 2012 Annual Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presents 2011 summary and findings for Responsible Appliance Disposal partners participation in following best practices related to reduction of emissions, prevention of releases of hazardous materials, etc.

  11. Radioactive waste disposal in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. R.

    In order to find the optimal solution to waste disposal problems, it is necessary to make comparisons between disposal media. It has become obvious to many within the scientific community that the single medium approach leads to over protection of one medium at the expense of the others. Cross media comparisons are being conducted in the Department of Energy ocean disposal programs for several radioactive wastes. Investigations in three areas address model development, comparisons of laboratory tests with field results and predictions, and research needs in marine disposal of radioactive waste. Tabulated data are included on composition of liquid high level waste and concentration of some natural radionuclides in the sea.

  12. Responsible Appliance Disposal Program: 2014 Annual Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presents 2014 summary and findings for Responsible Appliance Disposal partners participation in following best practices related to reduction of emissions, prevention of releases of hazardous materials, etc.

  13. Responsible Appliance Disposal Program: 2010 Annual Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presents 2010 summary and findings for Responsible Appliance Disposal partners participation in following best practices related to reduction of emissions, prevention of releases of hazardous materials, etc.

  14. Effects from past solid waste disposal practices.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L J; Daniel, D E; Abeele, W V; Ledbetter, J O; Hansen, W R

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviews documented environmental effects experience from the disposal of solid waste materials in the U.S. Selected case histories are discussed that illustrate waste migration and its actual or potential effects on human or environmental health. Principal conclusions resulting from this review were: solid waste materials do migrate beyond the geometric confines of the initial placement location; environmental effects have been experienced from disposal of municipal, agricultural, and toxic chemical wastes; and utilization of presently known science and engineering principles in sitting and operating solid waste disposal facilities would make a significant improvement in the containment capability of shallow land disposal facilities. PMID:367769

  15. Responsible Appliance Disposal Program: 2008 Annual Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presents 2008 summary and findings for Responsible Appliance Disposal partners participation in following best practices related to reduction of emissions, prevention of releases of hazardous materials, etc.

  16. Responsible Appliance Disposal Program: 2007 Annual Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presents 2007 summary and findings for Responsible Appliance Disposal partners participation in following best practices related to reduction of emissions, prevention of releases of hazardous materials, etc.

  17. Responsible Appliance Disposal Program: 2013 Annual Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presents 2013 summary and findings for Responsible Appliance Disposal partners participation in following best practices related to reduction of emissions, prevention of releases of hazardous materials, etc.

  18. 10 CFR 61.52 - Land disposal facility operation and disposal site closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) The boundaries and locations of each disposal unit (e.g., trenches) must be accurately located and... forth in the approved site closure plan must be carried out as each disposal unit (e.g., each trench)...

  19. 10 CFR 61.52 - Land disposal facility operation and disposal site closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) The boundaries and locations of each disposal unit (e.g., trenches) must be accurately located and... forth in the approved site closure plan must be carried out as each disposal unit (e.g., each trench)...

  20. 10 CFR 61.52 - Land disposal facility operation and disposal site closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) The boundaries and locations of each disposal unit (e.g., trenches) must be accurately located and... forth in the approved site closure plan must be carried out as each disposal unit (e.g., each trench)...

  1. 10 CFR 61.52 - Land disposal facility operation and disposal site closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) The boundaries and locations of each disposal unit (e.g., trenches) must be accurately located and... forth in the approved site closure plan must be carried out as each disposal unit (e.g., each trench)...

  2. 10 CFR 61.52 - Land disposal facility operation and disposal site closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) The boundaries and locations of each disposal unit (e.g., trenches) must be accurately located and... forth in the approved site closure plan must be carried out as each disposal unit (e.g., each trench)...

  3. Mexican-American Bibliography. Bilingual Bicultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueba, Henry T.

    Three hundred and six books and articles published between 1919 and 1973 are listed in this bibliography covering Mexican Americans and bilingual bicultural education. It is divided into 3 major sections: (1) social sciences, (2) education, and (3) bibliographies. The works deal with history, sociology, anthropology, economics, linguistics,…

  4. Black/Mexican-American Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Council on Human Relations, TX.

    The Black/Mexican-American Project has two general goals congruent with the purpose of the Emergency School Assistance Program, under which it was funded: (1) to identify points of tension and cooperation between minority students in the Houston Independent School District; and (2) to suggest ways of improving relations between the minorities. So…

  5. Open Access to Mexican Academic Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adame, Silvia I.; Llorens, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the metadata harvester software development. This system provides access to reliable and quality educational resources, shared by Mexican Universities through their repositories, to anyone with Internet Access. We present the conceptual and contextual framework, followed by the technical basis, the results and…

  6. Socioeconomic differences in obesity among Mexican adolescents

    PubMed Central

    ULLMANN, S. HEIDI; BUTTENHEIM, ALISON M.; GOLDMAN, NOREEN; PEBLEY, ANNE R.; WONG, REBECA

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigate socioeconomic disparities in adolescent obesity in Mexico. Three questions are addressed. First, what is the social patterning of obesity among Mexican adolescents? Second, what are the separate and joint associations of maternal and paternal education with adolescent obesity net of household wealth? Third, are there differences in socioeconomic status (SES) gradients among Mexican boys and girls, rural residents and non-rural residents? Methods Using data from the Mexican National Health Survey 2000 we examined the slope and direction of the association between SES and adolescent obesity. We also estimated models for sub-populations to examine differences in the social gradients in obesity by sex and non-rural residence. Results We find that household economic status (asset ownership and housing quality) is positively associated with adolescent obesity. High paternal education is related to lower obesity risk, whereas the association between maternal education and obesity is positive, but not always significant. Conclusion The household wealth components of SES appear to predispose Mexican adolescents to higher obesity risk. The effects of parental education are more complex. These findings have important policy implications in Mexico and the United States. PMID:20883181

  7. The Mexican American Heritage: With Writing Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Carlos M.

    Written by a Los Angeles history teacher frustrated by the lack of culturally relevant materials, this book covers some of the most interesting events in the history of Mexico and the heritage of Mexican Americans. Chapters are: (1) Indian Mexico (Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs); (2) La Conquista (Cortes and Moctezuma, conquest…

  8. Barreda, Vasconcelos, and Mexican Educational Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirius, John

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the contributions to Mexican education of Gabino Barredas' positivism between 1867-1898 and the contributions of Jose Vasconcelos during the 1920s. Discusses the secondary curriculum reforms of Barreda's era and the vocational education and the education for women and adults during the Vasconcelos era. (SB)

  9. Mexican Americans: Sons of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Ruth S.

    Concerned with the Mexican Americans, who constitute the largest ethnic group in the southwestern United States, this book traces the history of these people from the early explorations and colonizing efforts of the Spanish in North and South America during the 16th century to the present. Major divisions of this book are the Introduction,…

  10. The Mexican Armed Forces in Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Jordi Diaz wrote on Mexican security and defense policy for his doctoral dissertation at the University of Toronto, and continues to broaden his...reconstruction, mostly carried out by the military. In 1876, during this process of reconstruction, General Porfirio Díaz ascended to the presidency. Having

  11. Coping with Discrimination among Mexican Descent Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lisa M.; Romero, Andrea J.

    2008-01-01

    The current research is designed to explore the relationship among discrimination stress, coping strategies, and self-esteem among Mexican descent youth (N = 73, age 11-15 years). Results suggest that primary control engagement and disengagement coping strategies are positively associated with discrimination stress. Furthermore, self-esteem is…

  12. Merchange of Labor. The Mexican Bracero Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto

    The subject of this study is the more or less seasonal influx of Mexican (bracero) laborers to work in agriculture in California between 1942 and 1960. The migration began as a joint effort between the governments of Mexico and the United States to ease the manpower shortage created by World War II. Dire needs of these migrants, and their…

  13. Rio Grande Wetbacks: Mexican Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norquest, Carrol

    Farmers in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas saw a rise of wetback labor in the 1930s and 40s. The wetback laborers were Mexicans who had crossed the Rio Grande and were in the United States illegally to work. Carrol Norquest, a farmer in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, employed wetbacks regularly. In this book, Mr. Norquest writes about the…

  14. Cultural Challenges Faced by Mexican Immigrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zugel, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This purpose of this investigation is to explore the cultural challenges faced by Mexican immigrant students through the study of current literature. Four themes emerged as a result of the investigation: dominant pedagogy, educational skills, deficit model, and student identities. The themes are discussed and suggestions are made as to how these…

  15. Mexican-American: Movements and Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larralde, Carlos

    Biographical studies of 20 influential Chicano leaders trace Mexican American history from 1848 to the present. The book is organized chronologically by four historical periods: (1) The Cortinista Movement, 1848-1876; (2) The Teresita Movement, 1888-1905; (3) The Magonista Movement, 1904-1919; and (4) The Chicano Activists, 1920 ;o the present.…

  16. Human Services for Mexican-American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Andres A., Comp.

    A compilation of five readings uses the Chicano perspective to analyze the interaction between Mexican American families, their children, and the institutions charged with the child welfare concerns of the society, and to attempt to reverse the existing negative and destructive views that lead to insensitive and ineffective services. A variety of…

  17. Educating for Bilinguals in Mexican Transnational Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patrick H.; Martinez-Leon, Natalia

    2003-01-01

    Describes the educational situation facing "retornado" families and children, Mexican transnational immigrants moving between New York City and Puebla, Mexico. Examines factors underlying the current lack of first language and second language instruction for the Spanish-English bilinguals returning to live in Mexico. Offers suggestions…

  18. Profile of the Mexican American Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotera, Martha

    The second largest group of minority women in the U.S., Mexican American women share multitudinous histories, vast differences in lifestyles, experiences and realities. A Chicana may have recently arrived from Mexico, or her ancestors may have been in the Southwest since 1520 (or before) or in the Midwest since the 1880's. She may be rural, urban,…

  19. The Undocumented Mexican Worker: A Social Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca-Ramirez, Reynaldo; Bryan, Dexter Edward

    1980-01-01

    Although presented by the press as a new phenomenon, the presence of undocumented Mexican workers in the United States is deeply rooted in history. While current policies tend to view illegal immigration as a social problem, the phenomenon persists because it benefits, politically and economically, both Mexico and the U.S. (Author/GC)

  20. An International Student's Guide to Mexican Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Alan, Ed.; Salazar, Sylvia Ortega, Ed.

    This guide for students interested in studying at Mexican universities covers 50 universities including all state universities, the National University of Mexico, as well as a representative selection of the leading private universities. Introductory material provides a brief history of Mexico, a discussion of differences from and similarities to…

  1. Educational Research and the Mexican American Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Juan M., Ed.; Merino, Rene A., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This annual theme issue is devoted to articles on educational research pertaining to the Mexican American child. In addition, there is an article proposing strategies for recruiting Hispanics in teacher education, and a poem recalling a childhood experience. Titles and authors are: (1) "Motivation for Learning English: Differences Between Non- and…

  2. Conflict Resolution between Mexican Origin Adolescent Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoren, Sarah E.; Thayer, Shawna M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated correlates of adolescents' sibling conflict resolution strategies in 246, two-parent Mexican origin families. Specifically, we examined links between siblings' conflict resolution strategies and sibling dyad characteristics, siblings' cultural orientations and values, and sibling relationship qualities. Data were gathered during…

  3. Feminism and Mexican American Adolescent Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Lisa Y.; Carrubba, Maria D.; Good, Glenn E.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Feminist Identity Development Scale (FIDS) and the Attitudes Toward Feminism and the Womens Movement Scale (FWM) with 389 Mexican American 11th-grade and 12th-grade women. Results indicated internal consistency coefficients of .61, .62, .76, and .77 for the FIDS Passive Acceptance, Revelation,…

  4. Cholas, Mexican-American Girls, and Gangs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary G.

    1994-01-01

    Interviews with 21 present and former female gang members illustrate the lives of Mexican American girls in the gang milieu of the San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles, California). Gang structure, activities, and reasons for joining are discussed, along with the gang as a source of support. (SLD)

  5. CONSUMER EDUCATION FOR MEXICAN-AMERICANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GROMATZKY, IRENE

    CONSUMER EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES WERE ALWAYS MEANT TO BE AVAILABLE TO ALL INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES. HOWEVER, THOSE WITH THE GREATEST FINANCIAL NEED, INCLUDING MANY MEXICAN AMERICANS, OFTEN RECEIVE THE LEAST AMOUNT OF ASSISTANCE, DUE TO THE LACK OF SKILLED PERSONS TO BREAK THROUGH COMMUNICATION BARRIERS. WHILE PLANNING…

  6. A Critical Bibliography of Mexican American Proverbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arora, Shirley L.

    1982-01-01

    The 19-item bibliography surveys the compilations of Mexican-American proverbs published to date and describes each entry (categorized by region--California, New Mexico, Texas, Mexico) in terms of type and quantity of material included, presence or absence of interpretive comments or translations, sources, organization, and accuracy of…

  7. The Mexican American Child in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Richard Fajardo

    The over-representation of minority group children, particularly Mexican Americans, in special education has been well documented. The use of standardized, norm-referenced, psychological assessment measures has created obstacles to the advancement of minority group individuals in American society. This is especially true since results from such…

  8. Civic Engagement Patterns of Undocumented Mexican Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, William; Espinoza, Roberta; Ramos, Karina; Coronado, Heidi; Cortes, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the civic engagement of undocumented Mexican students. Civic engagement was defined as providing a social service, activism, tutoring, and functionary work. Survey data results (n = 126) suggest that despite high feelings of rejection because of their undocumented status, part-time employment, and household responsibilities,…

  9. Psychology for the Mexican or the Masses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Guerrero, Rogelio

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the impact of traditional cultural beliefs, called historic-sociocultural premises (HSCPs), on peoples' interpersonal and emotional lives. Results indicated that people in Mexican societies hold similar sociocultural premises and that HSCPs are related to how people cope with stress, personality traits, and vocational choice. (LLL)

  10. Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

    2007-01-01

    There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

  11. The Mexican-American and Dramatic Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Hector M.

    In the area of the arts, the Mexican American has discovered a rich cultural heritage which gives him a strong sense of pride and a deep feeling of satisfaction. A new interest in the literature of Mexico and the Southwestern states of Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and California has started the Chicano people reading classic and modern…

  12. Alcatraz Disposal Site Investigation. Report 3. San Francisco Bay- Alcatraz Disposal Site Erodibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    MISCELLANEOUS PAPER HL-86-1 ALCATRAZ DISPOSAL SITE INVESTIGATION in Report 3 91X FILE COP’Y SAN FRANCISCO BAY- ALCATRAZ DISPOSAL SITE ERODIBILITY (V...Street ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO San Francisco, CA 94105-1905 ________________ 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Alcatraz Disposal Site...Investigation; Report 3, San Francisco Day- Alcatraz Disposal Site Teeter, Allen M. 13a TYPE OF REPORT 113b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, A4oiith

  13. Paleomagnetic, geochronologic, and petrologic data discriminate tholeiitic basalts of the northern Hat Creek graben, northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffler, L. J.; Champion, D. E.; Calvert, A. T.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic mapping carried out in 2010-2012 under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Geological Survey and Pacific Gas and Electric Company provides the framework for geochronologic, paleomagnetic, and petrologic studies of the widespread low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT) basalts that inundate low topography between higher-elevation remnants of >1 Ma calc-alkaline volcanoes in the northern part of the Hat Creek graben. These tholeiitic basalts are monotonously similar in appearance and cannot be distinguished one from another with any confidence in the field or petrographically. They are, however, distinctive in age, paleomagnetic secular directions, and major-element compositions, allowing us to map three major tholeiitic units: the basalt of Rocky Ledge (40Ar/39Ar determinations on 3 different exposures give 203.2 ± 13.7 ka, 186.8 ± 12.5 ka, and 203.9 ± 15.2 ka; weighted average 197 ± 8 ka), the basalt of Rock Spring (545.7 ± 6.7 ka), and the basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (647.3 ± 21.7 ka). These tholeiitic units are overlain to the east by the calc-alkaline basalt west of Six Mile Hill (53.5 ± 2.0 ka) and to the south by the calc-alkaline basaltic andesite of Cinder Butte (38 ± 7 ka) and the tholeiitic Hat Creek Basalt (24 ± 6 ka). These latter two ages are from Turrin et al. (2007); all other ages are new 40Ar/39Ar determinations from the USGS geochronology laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Paleomagnetic directions of the tholeiitic basalt of Rocky Ledge (16 sites) cluster tightly at inclination and declination of 63° and 349°, respectively. Inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Rock Spring (3 sites) cluster at 43° and 14°, whereas inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (7 sites) cluster at 54° and 5°. On Pearce diagrams of the chemical compositions (e.g., Ti vs. Mg; P/K vs. Ti/K), the three units plot in distinct fields with no overlap

  14. Role of Jade-1 in the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) HBO1 complex.

    PubMed

    Foy, Rebecca L; Song, Ihn Young; Chitalia, Vipul C; Cohen, Herbert T; Saksouk, Nehme; Cayrou, Christelle; Vaziri, Cyrus; Côté, Jacques; Panchenko, Maria V

    2008-10-24

    Regulation of global chromatin acetylation is important for chromatin remodeling. A small family of Jade proteins includes Jade-1L, Jade-2, and Jade-3, each bearing two mid-molecule tandem plant homology domain (PHD) zinc fingers. We previously demonstrated that the short isoform of Jade-1L protein, Jade-1, is associated with endogenous histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. It has been found that Jade-1L/2/3 proteins co-purify with a novel HAT complex, consisting of HBO1, ING4/5, and Eaf6. We investigated a role for Jade-1/1L in the HBO1 complex. When overexpressed individually, neither Jade-1/1L nor HBO1 affected histone acetylation. However, co-expression of Jade-1/1L and HBO1 increased acetylation of the bulk of endogenous histone H4 in epithelial cells in a synergistic manner, suggesting that Jade1/1L positively regulates HBO1 HAT activity. Conversely, small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of endogenous Jade resulted in reduced levels of H4 acetylation. Moreover, HBO1-mediated H4 acetylation activity was enhanced severalfold by the presence of Jade-1/1L in vitro. The removal of PHD fingers affected neither binding nor mutual Jade-1-HBO1 stabilization but completely abrogated the synergistic Jade-1/1L- and HBO1-mediated histone H4 acetylation in live cells and in vitro with reconstituted oligonucleosome substrates. Therefore, PHDs are necessary for Jade-1/1L-induced acetylation of nucleosomal histones by HBO1. In contrast to Jade-1/1L, the PHD zinc finger protein ING4/5 failed to synergize with HBO1 to promote histone acetylation. The physical interaction of ING4/5 with HBO1 occurred in the presence of Jade-1L or Jade-3 but not with the Jade-1 short isoform. In summary, this study demonstrates that Jade-1/1L are crucial co-factors for HBO1-mediated histone H4 acetylation.

  15. HATS-4b: A Dense Hot Jupiter Transiting a Super Metal-rich G star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Sato, B.; Csubry, Z.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Buchhave, L.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R. W.; Béky, B.; Butler, R. P.; Shectman, S.; Crane, J.; Thompson, I.; Williams, A.; Martin, R.; Contreras, C.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of Mp ≈ 1.32 M Jup, radius of Rp ≈ 1.02 R Jup, and density of ρ p = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm-3 ≈1.24 ρJup. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M ⊙, a radius of 0.92 R ⊙, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M J and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M ⊕. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institution is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at LCO, Chile. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations made with the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  16. Deep Borehole Disposal Safety Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Stein, Emily; Price, Laura L.; MacKinnon, Robert J.; Tillman, Jack Bruce

    2016-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary safety analysis for the deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept, using a safety case framework. A safety case is an integrated collection of qualitative and quantitative arguments, evidence, and analyses that substantiate the safety, and the level of confidence in the safety, of a geologic repository. This safety case framework for DBD follows the outline of the elements of a safety case, and identifies the types of information that will be required to satisfy these elements. At this very preliminary phase of development, the DBD safety case focuses on the generic feasibility of the DBD concept. It is based on potential system designs, waste forms, engineering, and geologic conditions; however, no specific site or regulatory framework exists. It will progress to a site-specific safety case as the DBD concept advances into a site-specific phase, progressing through consent-based site selection and site investigation and characterization.

  17. Magnesite disposal of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Wendt, C.H.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we report our progress on developing a method for carbon dioxide disposal whose purpose it is to maintain coal energy competitive even is environmental and political pressures will require a drastic reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. In contrast to most other methods, our approach is not aiming at a partial solution of the problem, or at buying time for phasing out fossil energy. Instead, its purpose is to obtain a complete and economic solution of the problem, and thus maintain access to the vast fossil energy reservoir. A successful development of this technology would guarantee energy availability for many centuries even if world economic growth the most optimistic estimates that have been put forward. Our approach differs from all others in that we are developing an industrial process which chemically binds the carbon dioxide in an exothermic reaction into a mineral carbonate that is thermodynamically stable and environmentally benign.

  18. NEP processing, operations, and disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancati, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Several recent studies by ASAO/NPO staff members at LeRC and by other organizations have highlighted the potential benefits of using Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) as the primary transportation means for some of the proposed missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. These include the potential to reduce initial mass in orbit and Mars transit time. Modular NEP configurations also introduce fully redundant main propulsion to Mars flight systems adding several abort or fall back options not otherwise available. Recent studies have also identified mission operations, such as on orbital assembly, refurbishment, and reactor disposal, as important discriminators for propulsion system evaluation. This study is intended to identify and assess 'end-to-end' operational issues associated with using NEP for transporting crews and cargo between Earth and Mars. We also include some consideration of lunar cargo transfer as well.

  19. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-18

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  20. meso-[{Ru(phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+: a high-affinity DNA hairpin probe {HAT = 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline}.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jayden A; Morgan, Joy L; Turley, Adam G; Collins, J Grant; Keene, F Richard

    2006-07-14

    1H NMR spectroscopy and fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assays have been used to investigate the DNA-binding abilities of two series of dinuclear polypyridyl ruthenium(II) complexes of the form [{Ru(L)2}2(mu-BL)]4+ {L = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me2bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), or 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me2phen); BL = 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm) or 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene (HAT)}. Preliminary FID surveys of these metal complexes against a variety of different oligonucleotides revealed that those complexes based upon the HAT bridging ligand induced greater fluorescence decreases in dye-bound DNA than did their bpm-bridged counterparts, suggesting a higher binding affinity by the HAT-bridged species. Furthermore, the greatest fluorescence decreases were typically observed in an oligonucleotide featuring a six-base hairpin loop. The apparent binding affinity of the metal complexes was also found to be a function of the stereochemistry and identity of the terminal ligands of the complex. The meso (DeltaLambda) stereoisomer generally induced greater fluorescence decreases than did either enantiomer (DeltaDelta or LambdaLambda), phen-based terminal ligands performed better than bpy-based terminal ligands, and those terminal ligands with methyl substituents demonstrated stronger apparent binding than did their non-methylated analogues. NMR experiments on meso-[{Ru(phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+ and meso-[{Ru(Me2phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+ demonstrated that both complexes bound with high affinity to the six-base hairpin oligonucleotide at the stem-loop interface and provided evidence to support stronger binding by the methylated species. meso-[{Ru(phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+ was found to bind poorly to duplex DNA and smaller four-base hairpin loops in FID and NMR experiments, whereas FID data suggest that the methylated analogue binds relatively strongly to most oligonucleotide sequences (the four- and six-base hairpins in particular). These

  1. 10 CFR 61.51 - Disposal site design for land disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... extent practicable water infiltration, to direct percolating or surface water away from the disposed... must direct surface water drainage away from disposal units at velocities and gradients which will not result in erosion that will require ongoing active maintenance in the future. (6) The disposal site...

  2. DOSE ASSESSMENTS FROM THE DISPOSAL OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTES IN RCRA-C DISPOSAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the long-term performance of the RCRA-C disposal cell and potential doses to off-site receptors is used to derive maximum radionuclide specific concentrations in the wastes that would enable these wastes to be disposed of safely using the RCRA-C disposal cell technology....

  3. A Disposable Blood Cyanide Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Mahon, Sari B.; Ma, Jian; Brenner, Matthew; Wang, Jian-Hua; Boss, Gerry R.

    2013-01-01

    Deaths due to smoke inhalation in fires are often due to poisoning by HCN. Rapid administration of antidotes can result in complete resuscitation of the patient but judicious dosing requires the knowledge of the level of cyanide exposure. Rapid sensitive means for blood cyanide quantitation are needed. Hydroxocyanocobinamide (OH(CN)Cbi) reacts with cyanide rapidly; this is accompanied by a large spectral change. The disposable device consists of a pair of nested petri dish bottoms and a single top that fits the outer bottom dish. The top cover has a diametrically strung porous polypropylene membrane tube filled with aqueous OH(CN)Cbi. One end of the tube terminates in an amber (583 nm) light emitting diode; the other end in a photodiode via an acrylic optical fiber. An aliquot of the blood sample is put in the inner dish, the assembly covered and acid is added through a port in the cover. Evolved HCN diffuses into the OH(CN)Cbi solution and the absorbance in the long path porous membrane tube cell is measured within 160s. The LOD was 0.047, 1.0, 0.15, 5.0 and 2.2 μM, respectively, for water (1 mL), bovine blood (100 μL, 1 mL), and rabbit blood (20μL, 50 μL). RSDs were < 10% in all cases and the linear range extended from 0.5 to 200 μM. The method was validated against a microdiffusion approach and applied to the measurement of cyanide in rabbit and human blood. The disposable device permits field measurement of blood cyanide in < 4 min. PMID:23473259

  4. Effectiveness of GNSS disposal strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, E. M.; Rossi, A.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Anselmo, L.; Pardini, C.; Colombo, C.; Lewis, H. G.; Daquin, J.; Deleflie, F.; Vasile, M.; Zuiani, F.; Merz, K.

    2014-06-01

    The management of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and of the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) region as a whole is a subject that cannot be deferred, due to the growing exploitation and launch rate in that orbital regime. The advent of the European Galileo and the Chinese Beidou constellations significantly added complexity to the system and calls for an adequate global view on the four constellations present in operation. The operation procedures, including maintenance and disposal practices, of the constellations currently deployed were analyzed in order to asses a proper reference simulation scenario. The complex dynamics of the MEO region with all the geopotential and lunisolar resonances was studied to better identify the proper end-of-life orbit for every proposed strategy, taking into account and, whenever possible, exploiting the orbital dynamics in this peculiar region of space. The possibility to exploit low thrust propulsion or non gravitational perturbations with passive de-orbiting devices (and a combination of the two) was analyzed, in view of possible applications in the design of the future generations of the constellations satellites. Several upgrades in the long-term evolution software SDM and DAMAGE were undertaken to properly handle the constellation simulations in every aspect from constellation maintenance to orbital dynamics. A thorough approach considering the full time evolving covariance matrix associated with every object was implemented in SDM to compute the collision risk and associated maneuver rate for the constellation satellites. Once the software upgrades will be completed, the effectiveness of the different disposal strategies will be analyzed in terms of residual collision risk and avoidance maneuvers rate. This work was performed under the ESA/GSP Contract no. 4000107201/12/F/MOS.

  5. Inhibition of Different Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) Uncovers Transcription-Dependent and -Independent Acetylation-Mediated Mechanisms in Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied…

  6. The Effect of Six Thinking Hats on Student Success in Teaching Subjects Related to Sustainable Development in Geography Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of six thinking hats technique in teaching subjects related to sustainable development in geography classes. The study was in both a quantitative and qualitative form. The quantitative part of the study was designed according to pre-test, post-test control group research model, and in the qualitative…

  7. Lumbar disc herniations: the predictive value of the Health Attribution Test (HAT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI).

    PubMed

    Herron, L D; Turner, J A; Weiner, P

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-one patients who were treated for lumbar disc herniation with chymopapain chemonucleolysis were evaluated preoperatively by means of the Health Attribution Test (HAT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). There were 54 good, 10 fair, and 27 poor results after chemo-nucleolysis. Nineteen patients subsequently underwent lumbar laminectomy and discectomy and the ultimate outcome for the entire series including these laminectomy patients was 66 good, 10 fair, and 15 poor results. The fair/poor chemonucleolysis outcome patients scored significantly lower than did the good outcome patients on the HAT Powerful Others and significantly higher on the Chance scale. Patients with fair or poor outcomes after chemonucleolysis only scored significantly higher on the Hypochondriasis, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Paranoia, and Hypomania scales in preoperative MMPI testing. Good versus fair/poor ultimate outcome patients differed significantly on preoperative MMPI Hypochondriasis, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Paranoia, Psychasthenia, Schizophrenia, Hypomania, and Social Introversion scales. These groups also differed significantly on preoperative HAT Internal and Chance scales. Further analyses found the MMPI to be a slightly better predictor of chemonucleolysis outcome and much better predictor of ultimate outcome than the HAT.

  8. Energy level alignment at the interface of NPB/HAT-CN/graphene for flexible organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eonseok; Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Kang, Seong Jun; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is highly promising as an electrode for flexible optoelectronic devices due to its excellent conductivity and transparency. However, it is necessary to tailor its work function with a charge injection layer in order to obtain favorable energy level alignment for efficient charge injection. An adequate charge injection layer can only be chosen with the understanding of the interfacial electronic structure between a charge transport layer and an electrode. In this study, we investigated the energy level alignment of N,N‧-diphenyl-1,1‧-biphenyl-4,4‧-diamine (NPB)/hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN)/graphene using in situ ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The effective work function of graphene was significantly increased by 0.94 eV by the HAT-CN hole injection layer (HIL) due to the interface dipole formation. In addition, the charge generation barrier (CGB) between NPB and HAT-CN, which plays a decisive role in charge injection efficiency with a charge generation HIL, was measured to be 0.66 eV. This CGB on graphene is the same as the CGBs on other electrodes, and smaller than that of the widely-used MoO3 HIL. Therefore, HAT-CN could be a promising HIL for efficient flexible organic light-emitting diodes with a graphene anode.

  9. The Six Thinking Hat Model--A Tool for Participation in Community Development, the Experience of an NGO in Cambodia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, S.

    1996-01-01

    A nongovernmental organization involved in community development in Cambodia adapted De Bono's six thinking hat model to build staff capacity and develop a framework for open-ended conversations. It proved useful for comprehensive analysis of problems and preventing conflicts. (SK)

  10. Survey of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hAT transposons and MITE-like hATpin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Gerhard; Krebs, Carmen; Diez, Mercedes; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Genome-wide analyses of repetitive DNA suggest a significant impact particularly of transposable elements on genome size and evolution of virtually all eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of the hAT transposon superfamily of the sugar beet (B. vulgaris) genome, using molecular, bioinformatic and cytogenetic approaches. We identified 81 transposase-coding sequences, three of which are part of structurally intact but nonfunctional hAT transposons (BvhAT), in a B. vulgaris BAC library as well as in whole genome sequencing-derived data sets. Additionally, 116 complete and 497 truncated non-autonomous BvhAT derivatives lacking the transposase gene were in silico-detected. The 116 complete derivatives were subdivided into four BvhATpin groups each characterized by a distinct terminal inverted repeat motif. Both BvhAT and BvhATpin transposons are specific for species of the genus Beta and closely related species, showing a localization on B. vulgaris chromosomes predominantely in euchromatic regions. The lack of any BvhAT transposase function together with the high degree of degeneration observed for the BvhAT and the BvhATpin genomic fraction contrasts with the abundance and activity of autonomous and non-autonomous hAT transposons revealed in other plant species. This indicates a possible genus-specific structural and functional repression of the hAT transposon superfamily during Beta diversification and evolution.

  11. Design and evaluation of a bolted joint for a discrete carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Carl Q.; Baker, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prefabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0% strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166% of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7% strain and at 110% of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7% in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  12. Design and Evaluation of a Bolted Joint for a Discrete Carbon-Epoxy Rod-Reinforced Hat Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1996-01-01

    The use of pre-fabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0 percent strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166 percent of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7 percent strain and at 110 percent of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7 percent in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  13. Development of a helmet/helmet-display-unit alignment tool (HAT) for the Apache helmet and display unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, William; Statz, Jonathan; Estes, Victor; Booms, Shawn; Martin, John S.; Harding, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Project Manager (PM) Apache Block III contacted the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL), Fort Rucker, Alabama, requesting assistance to evaluate and find solutions to a government-developed Helmet Display Unit (HDU) device called the Mock HDU for helmet alignment of the Apache Advanced Integrated Helmet (AAIH). The AAIH is a modified Head Gear Unit No. 56 for Personnel (HGU-56/P) to replace the current Integrated Helmet and Sighting System (IHADSS). The current flashlight-based HDU simulator for helmet/HDU alignment was no longer in production or available. Proper helmet/HDU alignment is critical to position the right eye in the small HDU eye box to obtain image alignment and full field of view (FOV). The initial approach of the PM to developing a helmet/HDU fitting device (Mock HDU) was to duplicate the optical characteristics of the current tactical HDU using less complex optics. However, the results produced questionable alignment, FOV, and distortion issues, with cost and development time overruns. After evaluating the Mock HDU, USAARL proposed a cost effective, less complex optical design called the Helmet/HDU Alignment Tool (HAT). This paper will show the development, components, and evaluations of the HAT compared to the current flashlight HDU simulator device. The laboratory evaluations included FOV measurements and alignment accuracies compared to tactical HDUs. The Apache helmet fitter technicians and Apache pilots compared the HAT to the current flashlight based HDU and ranked the HAT superior.

  14. An Overview of HATS: A Language Independent High Assurance Transformation System

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1998-10-16

    Transformations that are based on syntax directed rewriting systems can have a significant impact on the construction of high assurance systems. However, in order for a transformational approach to be useful to a particular problem domain, a (general) transformation system must be adapted to the notation of that particular domain. A transformation system that can be easily adapted to various domain notations has the potential of having a wide range of applicability. In this paper we dissus why transforrmtion is attractive horn a high assurance perspective, as well as some issues surrounding automated transformation within specific problem domains. We then give an overview of a language independent High Assurance Transformation System (HATS) that is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  15. High-harmonic and terahertz wave spectroscopy (HATS) for aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yindong; Meng, Chao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Lü, Zhihui; Zhang, Dongwen; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-12-01

    We present the experimental and theoretical details of our recent published letter Huang et al (2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 123002) on synchronized high-harmonic and terahertz-wave spectroscopy (HATS) from nonadiabatically aligned nitrogen molecules in dual-color laser fields. By associating alignment-angle dependent terahertz wave generation (TWG) with high harmonic generation (HHG), the angular differential photoionization cross section (PICS) for molecules can be reconstructed. The angles at which the PICS’s minima are located show great convergence between the theoretical predictions and the experimentally deduced results when choosing a suitable internuclear distance. We also show the optimal relative phase between the dual-color laser fields for TWG does not change with the alignment angle at a precision of about 50 attoseconds. This all-optical method provides an alternative for investigating molecular structures and dynamics.

  16. All or nothing... or just a hat? Farmers' sun protection behaviors.

    PubMed

    Silk, Kami J; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2006-04-01

    Farmers have an increased risk for developing skin cancers and thus comprise an important audience for messages that address sun protection practices. This project examines sun protection behaviors of farmers from southeastern Georgia and uses those measured behaviors to conduct a cluster analysis. Farmers (N = 480) were clustered into three groups using six variables that measured their frequency of sun protective and purchasing behaviors. The three groups were characterized as either engaging heavily in sun protective behaviors, engaging in none of the recommended sun protective behaviors, or only wearing hats as a sun protective behavior. Practitioners seeking to develop health message interventions that target farming populations should consider the current behaviors of subgroups of farmers when developing audience segments to tailor messages aimed at increasing sun protective behaviors. Practical recommendations for message content targeted toward the subgroups of farmers are provided.

  17. "It's your badge of inclusion": the Red Hat Society as a gendered subculture of aging.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anne E; Pai, Manacy; Redmond, Rebecca

    2012-12-01

    Although studies document the health-enhancing effects of social engagement, they reveal little about the underlying mechanisms operating within specific organizational contexts. Limited attention is given to the role of inequality--particularly age and gender--in shaping either the organizations to which we belong or their consequences for our well-being. We address this issue by examining the Red Hat Society, a social organization for middle-aged and older women. Interviews with members (n=52) illustrate how age and gender inequality interact to shape the organization, which can be viewed as a gendered subculture of aging. Drawing on this framework, we discuss four processes through which participation generates benefits for older women involved in age- and gender-segregated organizations: enhancing social networks, countering invisibility, creating positive frames for aging experiences, and promoting youthful identities.

  18. Simulated response of top-hat electrostatic analysers - importance of phase-space resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Rossana; Bruno, Roberto; D'Amicis, Raffaella; Federica Marcucci, Maria; Servidio, Sergio; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We use a numerical code able to reproduce the angular/energy response of a typical electrostatic analyzer of top-hat type starting from velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by numerical imulations.The simulations are based on the Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) numerical algorithm which integrates the Vlasov equation for the ion distribution function in multi-dimensional geometry in phase space, while the electrons are treated as a fluid. Virtual satellites launched through the simulation box measure the particle VDFs. Such VDFs are interpolated into a spacecraft reference frame and moved from the simulation Cartesian grid to energy-angular coordinates to mimic the response of a real electrostatic sensor in the solar wind and in the magnetosheath for different conditions. We discuss the results of this study with respect to the importance of phase-space resolution for a space plasma experiment meant to investigate kinetic plasma regime.

  19. HAT-P-55b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a Sun-Like Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncher, D.; Buchhave, L. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bieryla, A.; Kovács, T.; Boisse, I.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Falco, E.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a new transiting extrasolar planet, HAT-P-55b. The planet orbits a V = 13.207 +/- 0.039 sun-like star with a mass of 1.013 +/- 0.037 solar masses, a radius of 1.011 +/- 0.036 solar radii and a metallicity of -0.03 +/- 0.08. The planet itself is a typical hot Jupiter with a period of 3.5852467 +/- 0.0000064 days, a mass of 0.582 +/- 0.056 Jupiter masses and a radius of 1.182 +/- 0.055 Jupiter radii. This discovery adds to the increasing sample of transiting planets with measured bulk densities, which is needed to put constraints on models of planetary structure and formation theories.

  20. Single-strain-gage force/stiffness buckling prediction techniques on a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Larry D.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    1991-01-01

    Predicting the buckling characteristics of a test panel is necessary to ensure panel integrity during a test program. A single-strain-gage buckling prediction method was developed on a hat-stiffened, monolithic titanium buckling panel. The method is an adaptation of the original force/stiffness method which requires back-to-back gages. The single-gage method was developed because the test panel did not have back-to-back gages. The method was used to predict buckling loads and temperatures under various heating and loading conditions. The results correlated well with a finite element buckling analysis. The single-gage force/stiffness method was a valid real-time and post-test buckling prediction technique.

  1. Automatic nuclear bud detection using ellipse fitting, moving sticks or top-hat transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Sun, C; Vallotton, P; Fenech, M; Pham, T D

    2013-11-01

    Micronucleus assays are extensively used by biologists to assess genotoxicity and to monitor human exposure to genotoxic materials. As recent studies suggested that nuclear buds can be a new source of micronuclei formed in interphase, the quantification of nuclear buds, which are micronucleus like objects that are attached to the nuclei in interphase, in normal and control group is needed. Three automatic nuclear bud detection algorithms fit for different situations are proposed in this paper. One is based on ellipse fitting, one is based on a stick model and the other is based on the top-hat transform. Comparison of the three methods is also given in this paper. Experimental results showed that the proposed algorithms are all effective and efficient for nuclear bud detection.

  2. THE DISCOVERY OF ELLIPSOIDAL VARIATIONS IN THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF HAT-P-7

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Jenkins, Jon; Rowe, Jason F.; Koch, David; Borucki, William J.

    2010-04-20

    We present an analysis of the early Kepler observations of the previously discovered transiting planet HAT-P-7b. The light curve shows the transit of the star, the occultation of the planet, and the orbit phase-dependent light from the planet. In addition, phase-dependent light from the star is present, known as 'ellipsoidal variations'. The very nearby planet (only four stellar radii away) gravitationally distorts the star and results in a flux modulation twice per orbit. The ellipsoidal variations can confuse interpretation of the planetary phase curve if not self-consistently included in the modeling. We fit the light curve using the Roche potential approximation and derive improved planet and orbit parameters.

  3. The 4-flap Jester’s Hat Technique for Nipple Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Economides, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Macrothelia, or nipple hypertrophy, is a condition that may cause severe psychological distress to those who suffer from it. Although effective in their primary goal of reducing nipple diameter and projection, previously reported techniques in nipple reduction suffer from imperfect aesthetic outcomes with noticeable scarring patterns, anatomically anomalous shape, and a smoothing of the natural ruffles of the nipple. We propose a simple technique to nipple reduction that improves upon previous techniques and creates a more naturally appearing nipple. A 4-flap technique resembling a jester’s hat is described whereby suture lines are concealed within the central nipple to recreate the naturally ruffled appearance of a native nipple. Four patients have undergone this technique at a single institution with 100% patient satisfaction and no postoperative complications. Nipple sensation was maintained in all patients postoperatively. A 4-flap nipple reduction technique is a viable alternative to previously described techniques, which may offer more anatomically congruent results. PMID:28280674

  4. Properties of extrasolar planets and their host stars: A case study of HAT-P-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, V.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Aerts, C.

    2012-12-01

    Data from the Kepler satellite (Q0-Q11) are used to study HAT-P-7. The satellite's data are extremely valuable for asteroseismic studies of stars and for observing planetary transits; in this work we do both. An asteroseismic study of the host star improves the accuracy of the stellar parameters derived by Christensen-Dalsgaard et al. (2010), who followed largely the same procedure but based the analysis on only one month of Kepler data. The stellar information is combined with transit observations, phase variations and occultations to derive planetary parameters. In particular, we confirm the presence of ellipsoidal variations as discovered by Welsh et al. (2010), but revise their magnitude, and we revise the occultation depth (Borucki et al. 2009) which leads to different planetary temperature estimates. All other stellar and planetary parameters are now more accurately determined.

  5. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses.

  6. A near-infrared transmission spectrum for the warm Saturn HAT-P-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Line, Michael R.; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee

    2013-12-01

    We present a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera-3 (WFC3) transmission spectrum for the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-12b. This warm (1000 K) sub-Saturn-mass planet has a smaller mass and a lower temperature than the hot Jupiters that have been studied so far. We find that the planet's measured transmission spectrum lacks the expected water absorption feature for a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere and is instead best described by a model with high-altitude clouds. Using a frequentist hypothesis testing procedure, we can rule out a hydrogen-dominated cloud-free atmosphere to 4.9σ. When combined with other recent WFC3 studies, our observations suggest that clouds may be common in exoplanetary atmospheres.

  7. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provisions of this section, shall, to the maximum extent practicable, not be disposed of onto sea ice, ice... and domestic liquid wastes may be discharged directly into the sea, taking into account the... treatment processes are used, the by-product of such treatment may be disposed of into the sea...

  8. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provisions of this section, shall, to the maximum extent practicable, not be disposed of onto sea ice, ice... and domestic liquid wastes may be discharged directly into the sea, taking into account the... treatment processes are used, the by-product of such treatment may be disposed of into the sea...

  9. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provisions of this section, shall, to the maximum extent practicable, not be disposed of onto sea ice, ice... and domestic liquid wastes may be discharged directly into the sea, taking into account the... treatment processes are used, the by-product of such treatment may be disposed of into the sea...

  10. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provisions of this section, shall, to the maximum extent practicable, not be disposed of onto sea ice, ice... and domestic liquid wastes may be discharged directly into the sea, taking into account the... treatment processes are used, the by-product of such treatment may be disposed of into the sea...

  11. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provisions of this section, shall, to the maximum extent practicable, not be disposed of onto sea ice, ice... and domestic liquid wastes may be discharged directly into the sea, taking into account the... treatment processes are used, the by-product of such treatment may be disposed of into the sea...

  12. Medications at School: Disposing of Pharmaceutical Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Howard; Haste, Nina M.; Berry, Angela T.; Tran, Jennifer; Singh, Renu F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This project quantified and categorized medications left unclaimed by students at the end of the school year. It determined the feasibility of a model medication disposal program and assessed school nurses' perceptions of environmentally responsible medication disposal. Methods: At a large urban school district all unclaimed…

  13. Petroleum Engineering Techniques for HLW Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    van den Broek, W. M. G. T.

    2002-02-25

    This paper describes why petroleum engineering techniques are of importance and can be used for underground disposal of HLW (high-level radioactive waste). It is focused on rock salt as a geological host medium in combination with disposal of the HLW canisters in boreholes drilled from the surface. Both permanent disposal and disposal with the option to retrieve the waste are considered. The paper starts with a description of the disposal procedure. Next disposal in deep boreholes is treated. Then the possible use of deviated boreholes and of multiple boreholes is discussed. Also waste isolation aspects and the implications of the HLW heat generation are treated. It appears that the use of deep boreholes can be beneficial, and also that--to a certain extent--borehole deviation offers possibilities. The benefits of using multiple boreholes are questionable for permanent disposal, while this technique cannot be applied for retrievable disposal. For the use of casing material, the additional temperature rise due to the HLW heat generation must be taken into account.

  14. 7 CFR 3203.10 - Disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT... PURSUANT TO SECTION 14220 OF THE 2008 FARM BILL § 3203.10 Disposal. When property received under this part is no longer needed by the recipient, it must be disposed of in an environmentally sound manner...

  15. Tritium waste disposal technology in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Albenesius, E.L.; Towler, O.A.

    1983-01-01

    Tritium waste disposal methods in the US range from disposal of low specific activity waste along with other low-level waste in shallow land burial facilities, to disposal of kilocurie amounts in specially designed triple containers in 65' deep augered holes located in an aird region of the US. Total estimated curies disposed of are 500,000 in commercial burial sites and 10 million curies in defense related sites. At three disposal sites in humid areas, tritium has migrated into the ground water, and at one arid site tritium vapor has been detected emerging from the soil above the disposal area. Leaching tests on tritium containing waste show that tritium in the form of HTO leaches readily from most waste forms, but that leaching rates of tritiated water into polymer impregnated concrete are reduced by as much as a factor of ten. Tests on improved tritium containment are ongoing. Disposal costs for tritium waste are 7 to 10 dollars per cubic foot for shallow land burial of low specific activity tritium waste, and 10 to 20 dollars per cubic foot for disposal of high specific activity waste. The cost of packaging the high specific activity waste is 150 to 300 dollars per cubic foot. 18 references.

  16. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Hari S.; Chu, Shaoping; Reimus, Paul William; Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Karra, Satish; Dittrich, Timothy M.

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  17. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  18. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  19. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  20. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  1. Sewage Disposal in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayotamuno, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    This survey of the Port Harcourt, Nigeria, sewage disposal system exemplifies sewage disposal in the developing world. Results reveal that some well-constructed and maintained drains, as well as many open drains and septic tanks, expose women and children to the possibility of direct contact with parasitic organisms and threaten water resources.…

  2. HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b: Two Transiting Inflated Hot Jupiters and Observational Evidence for the Reinflation of Close-in Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Penev, K.; Bieryla, A.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Torres, G.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Buchhave, L.; Kovács, T.; Quinn, S.; Howard, A. W.; Isaacson, H.; Fulton, B. J.; Everett, M. E.; Esquerdo, G.; Béky, B.; Szklenar, T.; Falco, E.; Santerne, A.; Boisse, I.; Hébrard, G.; Burrows, A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-12-01

    We present the discovery of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, with orbital periods of 2.6055 and 2.9721 days, masses of 0.527+/- 0.083 {M}{{J}} and 0.783+/- 0.057 {M}{{J}}, and inflated radii of 1.89+/- 0.13 {R}{{J}} and {1.59}-0.10+0.16 {R}{{J}}, respectively. They orbit moderately bright (V=13.145+/- 0.029 and V=12.993+/- 0.052) stars of mass 1.212+/- 0.050 {M}⊙ and {1.255}-0.054+0.107 {M}⊙ . The stars are at the main-sequence turnoff. While it is well known that the radii of close-in giant planets are correlated with their equilibrium temperatures, whether or not the radii of planets increase in time as their hosts evolve and become more luminous is an open question. Looking at the broader sample of well-characterized close-in transiting giant planets, we find that there is a statistically significant correlation between planetary radii and the fractional ages of their host stars, with a false-alarm probability of only 0.0041%. We find that the correlation between the radii of planets and the fractional ages of their hosts is fully explained by the known correlation between planetary radii and their present-day equilibrium temperatures; however, if the zero-age main-sequence equilibrium temperature is used in place of the present-day equilibrium temperature, then a correlation with age must also be included to explain the planetary radii. This suggests that, after contracting during the pre-main-sequence, close-in giant planets are reinflated over time due to the increasing level of irradiation received from their host stars. Prior theoretical work indicates that such a dynamic response to irradiation requires a significant fraction of the incident energy to be deposited deep within the planetary interiors. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology

  3. Trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values among Mexican American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Knight, George P; Basilio, Camille D; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A; Liu, Yu; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2014-12-01

    Mexican Americans are one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States, yet we have limited knowledge regarding changes (i.e., developmental trajectories) in cultural orientation based upon their exposure to the Mexican American and mainstream cultures. We examined the parallel trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values in a sample of 749 Mexican American adolescents (49 % female) across assessments during the fifth grade (approximately 11 years of age), the seventh grade (approximately 13 years of age) and the tenth grade (approximately 16 years of age). We expected that these values would change over this developmental period and this longitudinal approach is more appropriate than the often used median split classification to identify distinct types of acculturation. We found four distinct acculturation trajectory groups: two trajectory groups that were increasing slightly with age in the endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was relatively stable in Mexican American cultural values while the other was declining in their endorsement of these values; and two trajectory groups that were declining substantially with age in their endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was also declining in Mexican American cultural values and the other which was stable in these values. These four trajectory groups differed in expected ways on a number of theoretically related cultural variables, but were not highly consistent with the median split classifications. The findings highlight the need to utilize longitudinal data to examine the developmental changes of Mexican American individual's adaptation to the ethnic and mainstream culture in order to understand more fully the processes of acculturation and enculturation.

  4. Kepler and Ground-Based Transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro V.; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W.; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.; Jennings, Donald E.; Haase, Plynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp = 4.31 R xor 0.06 R xor and Rs = 0.683 R solar mass 0.009 R solar mass, both about 3 sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases 0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12 deg 5 deg to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  5. HATS-3b: An Inflated Hot Jupiter Transiting an F-type Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Noyes, R. W.; Schmidt, B.; Conroy, P.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Sackett, P. D.; Sasselov, D. D.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V = 12.4 F dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479 days, mass of Mp = 1.07 M J, and radius of Rp = 1.38 R J. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsin i = 9.0 km s-1), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low-/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces log g and T eff parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km s-1. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU.

  6. SPITZER IRAC SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF THE TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANET HAT-P-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen; Deming, Drake; Harrington, Jospeph; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bowman, William C.; Nymeyer, Sarah; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Bakos, Gaspar A.

    2010-01-01

    We report Spitzer/IRAC photometry of the transiting giant exoplanet HAT-P-1b during its secondary eclipse. This planet lies near the postulated boundary between the pM and pL-class of hot Jupiters, and is important as a test of models for temperature inversions in hot Jupiter atmospheres. We derive eclipse depths for HAT-P-1b, in units of the stellar flux, that are: 0.080% +- 0.008% [3.6 mum], 0.135% +- 0.022% [4.5 mum], 0.203% +- 0.031% [5.8 mum], and 0.238% +- 0.040% [8.0 mum]. These values are best fit using an atmosphere with a modest temperature inversion, intermediate between the archetype inverted atmosphere (HD 209458b) and a model without an inversion. The observations also suggest that this planet is radiating a large fraction of the available stellar irradiance on its dayside, with little available for redistribution by circulation. This planet has sometimes been speculated to be inflated by tidal dissipation, based on its large radius in discovery observations, and on a non-zero orbital eccentricity allowed by the radial velocity data. The timing of the secondary eclipse is very sensitive to orbital eccentricity, and we find that the central phase of the eclipse is 0.4999 +- 0.0005. The difference between the expected and observed phase indicates that the orbit is close to circular, with a 3sigma limit of |e cos omega| < 0.002.

  7. "More fatal than powder and shot": dysentery in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War, 1846-48.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Vincent J

    2009-01-01

    In terms of deaths due to disease, the Mexican War (1846-48) was the deadliest of all American wars. Nearly 13% of the entire U.S. force perished from disease. Of the total 12,535 war deaths, 10,986 (88%) were due to infectious diseases (overwhelmingly dysentery, both bacterial and amoebic); seven men died from disease for every man killed by Mexican musket balls. Camp pollution was the greatest error committed by U.S. troops in the Mexican War. The indifference of line officers and recruits to the need for proper sanitation and military hygiene fueled the dysentery outbreaks, and the poor conditions in military hospitals contributed further to the spread of disease. This defect in military culture undermined the health of the army and led to medical disaster. Disease caused an enormous drain on the U.S. Army's resources, eroded troop morale, and influenced strategy and tactics. As we enter the 21st century, dysentery is still a major public health threat, killing hundreds of thousands of people annually-primarily children in developing countries where personal hygiene is poor and disposal of human and animal wastes is indiscriminate.

  8. Mexican ceratopsids: Considerations on their diversity and biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Sylva, Héctor E.; Frey, Eberhard; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, José Rubén; González-González, Arturo H.

    2017-04-01

    During the past decade, three taxa of ceratopsid ornithischians have been described from Mexico. Apparently, this group experienced a regional diversification in this area. To date Mexican Ceratopsia are represented by three species, one of which is a centrosaurine and two are chasmosaurines. Here we provide a critical review on Mexican ceratopsians and formally name a new centrosaurine ceratopsid species from the Campanian Aguja Formation as Yehuecauhceratops mudei. We also discuss possible causes for the rapid endemic diversification of Mexican ceratopsians.

  9. 32 CFR 644.503 - Methods of disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.503 Methods of disposal. Standing timber, crops, sand, gravel, or stone-quarried products,...

  10. 32 CFR 644.503 - Methods of disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.503 Methods of disposal. Standing timber, crops, sand, gravel, or stone-quarried products,...

  11. 32 CFR 644.503 - Methods of disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.503 Methods of disposal. Standing timber, crops, sand, gravel, or stone-quarried products,...

  12. 32 CFR 644.503 - Methods of disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.503 Methods of disposal. Standing timber, crops, sand, gravel, or stone-quarried products,...

  13. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  14. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  15. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  16. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  17. The relationship between Mexican American cultural values and resilience among Mexican American college students: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L; Llamas, Jasmin D

    2013-10-01

    The current study investigated the role of cultural values in the resilience of Mexican American college students. Utilizing mixed methodology, 124 self-identified Mexican American college students were asked to complete an online survey, including a demographic questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, Mexican American Cultural Values Scale, and 2 open-ended questions concerning overcoming adversity and cultural values. As hypothesized, Mexican American traditional cultural values (Familismo, Respeto, Religiosidad, and Traditional Gender Roles) predicted resilience, with Familismo accounting for the majority of the variance. Consensual qualitative research (Hill, Thompson, & Nutt Williams, 1997) was used to identify emergent domains and themes within the open-ended question responses. Traditional Mexican American Value themes included Familismo, Ethnic Identity, Religiosidad, Perseverance, and Respeto. Results highlight the important role that certain Mexican American cultural values play in providing strength for overcoming adversities.

  18. Imbalance between HAT and HDAC Activities in the PBMCs of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis or Rheumatoid Arthritis and Influence of HDAC Inhibitors on TNF Alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Toussirot, Eric; Abbas, Wasim; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Tissot, Marion; Jeudy, Alicia; Baud, Lucile; Bertolini, Ewa; Wendling, Daniel; Herbein, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acetylation or deacetylation of histone proteins may modulate cytokine gene transcription such as TNF alpha (TNF). We evaluated the balance between histone deacetytlase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared to healthy controls (HC) and determined the influence of HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A -TSA- or Sirtinol -Sirt-) on these enzymatic activities and on the PBMC production of TNF. Methods 52 patients with RA, 21 with AS and 38 HC were evaluated. HAT and HDAC activities were measured on nuclear extracts from PBMC using colorimetric assays. Enzymatic activities were determined prior to and after ex vivo treatment of PBMC by TSA or Sirt. TNF levels were evaluated in PBMC culture supernatants in the absence or presence of TSA or Sirt. Results HAT and HDAC activities were significantly reduced in AS, while these activities reached similar levels in RA and HC. Ex vivo treatment of PBMC by HDACi tended to decrease HDAC expression in HC, but Sirt significantly reduced HAT in RA. TNF production by PBMC was significantly down-regulated by Sirt in HC and AS patients. Conclusion HAT and HDAC were disturbed in AS while no major changes were found in RA. HDACi may modulate HDAC and HAT PBMC expression, especially Sirt in RA. Sirtinol was able to down regulate TNF production by PBMC in HC and AS. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities might provide the rationale for the development of HDACi in the therapeutic approach to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:24039666

  19. Processing Irradiated Beryllium For Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    T. J. Tranter; R. D. Tillotson; N. R. Mann; G. R. Longhurst

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a process for decontaminating irradiated beryllium that will allow it to be disposed of through normal radwaste channels. Thus, the primary objectives of this ongoing study are to remove the transuranic (TRU) isotopes to less than 100 nCi/g and remove {sup 60}Co, and {sup 137}Cs, to levels that will allow the beryllium to be contact handled. One possible approach that appears to have the most promise is aqueous dissolution and separation of the isotopes by selected solvent extraction followed by precipitation, resulting in a granular form for the beryllium that may be fixed to prevent it from becoming respirable and therefore hazardous. Beryllium metal was dissolved in nitric and fluorboric acids. Isotopes of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs were then added to make a surrogate beryllium waste solution. A series of batch contacts was performed with the spiked simulant using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) and polyethylene glycol diluted with sulfone to extract the isotopes of Cs and Sr. Another series of batch contacts was performed using a combination of octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in tributyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with dodecane for extracting the isotopes of Pu and Am. The results indicate that greater than 99.9% removal can be achieved for each isotope with only three contact stages.

  20. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.