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Sample records for mexicans puerto ricans

  1. Aging and Generational Patterns of Alcohol Consumption among Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Mainland Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sandra A.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    1994-01-01

    Used data from Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to describe life-course patterns of alcohol consumption among Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans, and Puerto Ricans residing in mainland United States. Found age differences in patterns of consumption among Mexican American and Puerto Rican males that reflect aging effects. Found…

  2. Childhood Asthma Prevalence among Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans: Implications for Behavioral Intervention Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, A. Magdalena

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1982-84, were used to examine lifetime prevalence (LTP) of childhood asthma among Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans. LTP was related to Puerto Rican ethnicity, birth outside U.S. mainland, low weight for age, male gender, poverty, urban residence, and single parenthood. Implications…

  3. Childhood Asthma Prevalence among Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans: Implications for Behavioral Intervention Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, A. Magdalena

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1982-84, were used to examine lifetime prevalence (LTP) of childhood asthma among Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans. LTP was related to Puerto Rican ethnicity, birth outside U.S. mainland, low weight for age, male gender, poverty, urban residence, and single parenthood. Implications…

  4. Lower bronchodilator responsiveness in Puerto Rican than in Mexican subjects with asthma.

    PubMed

    Burchard, Esteban González; Avila, Pedro C; Nazario, Sylvette; Casal, Jesus; Torres, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Toscano, Monica; Sylvia, Jody Senter; Alioto, MariaElena; Salazar, Michael; Gomez, Ivan; Fagan, Joanne K; Salas, Jorge; Lilly, Craig; Matallana, Henry; Ziv, Elad; Castro, Richard; Selman, Moises; Chapela, Rocio; Sheppard, Dean; Weiss, Scott T; Ford, Jean G; Boushey, Homer A; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Drazen, Jeffrey M; Silverman, Edwin K

    2004-02-01

    In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans have the highest and lowest asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality, respectively. To determine whether ethnicity-specific differences in therapeutic response, clinical response, and/or genetic factors contribute to differences in asthma outcomes, we compared asthma-related clinical characteristics among 684 Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals with asthma recruited from San Francisco, New York City, Puerto Rico, and Mexico City. Puerto Ricans with asthma had reduced lung function, greater morbidity, and longer asthma duration than did Mexicans with asthma. Bronchodilator responsiveness, measured as percentage change from baseline FEV1, was significantly lower among Puerto Ricans with asthma than among Mexicans with asthma. Puerto Ricans with asthma had on average 7.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6 to 9.9; p < 0.001) lower bronchodilator reversibility in FEV1, higher risk of an emergency department visit in the previous year (odds ratio, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.6 to 4.3; p < 0.001), and of previous hospitalization for asthma (odds ratio, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.2; p = 0.009) than Mexicans. Subgroup analysis corroborated that Puerto Ricans with asthma had more severe disease than did Mexicans on the basis of lung function measurements, responsiveness to beta2-adrenergic agonists, and health care use. We conclude that Puerto Ricans with asthma respond less to albuterol than do Mexicans with asthma. These findings underscore the need for additional research on racial/ethnic differences in asthma morbidity and response to therapy.

  5. Extended Family Ties among Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Whites: Superintegration or Disintegration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkisian, Natalia; Gerena, Mariana; Gerstel, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    Addressing recent theoretical debates, this study examined the differences in extended family integration among Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Whites, as well as the importance of culture and structure in explaining these differences. Our findings showed Whites and Latinos/as have distinctive patterns of extended family integration: Mexicans and…

  6. Ethnic-specific differences in bronchodilator responsiveness among African Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Mexicans with asthma.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Mariam; Thyne, Shannon; Choudhry, Shweta; Tsai, Hui-ju; Navarro, Daniel; Castro, Richard A; Nazario, Sylvette; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Casal, Jesus; Torres, Alfonso; Chapela, Rocio; Watson, H Geoffrey; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael; Avila, Pedro C; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Burchard, Esteban González

    2007-10-01

    Socioeconomic and environmental differences do not fully explain differences in asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality among Puerto Ricans, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. Differences in response to albuterol may be a factor. We compared bronchodilator responsiveness between these three populations. All groups demonstrated below expected responsiveness. Puerto Ricans of all ages and African American children with moderate-to-severe asthma demonstrated the lowest responsiveness overall. Among subjects with moderate-to-severe asthma, children were even less likely than adults to show the expected bronchodilator response. We conclude that ethnic-specific differences in bronchodilator drug responsiveness exist between Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and African Americans with asthma. This may be of importance in asthma management.

  7. 1973 ATLAS Curriculum Guide for Mexican-American and Puerto Rican Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide, developed by the Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies, provides an interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented approach to Mexican-American and Puerto Rican Studies. Unit one contains a list of cognitive and affective objectives and evaluation suggestions. Units two through six provide content materials and include a…

  8. Contemporary Puerto Rican, Cuban-in-Exile, and Mexican-American Literature in a Pluralistic Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Gerard R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the attitudes of the Spanish-speaking people living in the United States as expressed in their prose, poetry, and drama. The scope of the paper includes the literature of Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexican Americans in the United States written between 1960 and 1973. The literature is surveyed to uncover…

  9. Macronutrient intakes among adult Hispanics: a comparison of Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans, and mainland Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed Central

    Loria, C M; Bush, T L; Carroll, M D; Looker, A C; McDowell, M A; Johnson, C L; Sempos, C T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to compare energy and macronutrient intakes between adult Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans, mainland Puerto Ricans, and non-Hispanics. METHODS. Age-specific mean intakes were estimated based on 24-hour recalls from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) (1982 to 1984) and the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) (1976 to 1980) and were compared with the use of t tests. RESULTS. Mexican Americans had higher total fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat intakes than did Puerto Ricans and older Cuban Americans. Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans had similar intakes, except for younger Cuban Americans, who had higher total and saturated fat and lower carbohydrate intakes. Cholesterol intakes among Mexican American men and 60- to 74-year-old women were higher than those among other Hispanic groups. Carbohydrate and protein intakes were higher among Hispanic groups compared with those among non-Hispanics while total fat intakes were generally lower. CONCLUSIONS. Since macronutrient intakes differ between Hispanic groups, dietary research, recommendations, and interventions should be targeted to each group individually. Older Puerto Rican and Cuban American adults met population guidelines for reducing chronic disease risk for more macronutrients than any other group. PMID:7733429

  10. Mexican-American and Puerto Rican Breast Cancer Survivors’ Perspectives on Exercise: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Rose A.; Vallejo, Liliana; Hughes, Daniel C.; Gonzalez, Velda; Tirado-Gomez, Maribel; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative data was collected from Mexican-American (MA) and Puerto Rican (PR) breast cancer survivors to gain their perspectives on the relevant issues surrounding breast cancer survivorship and exercise. Six focus groups, a total of 31 participants were convened (three in Puerto Rico and three in Texas). Responses were analyzed and compared between the Mexican-American and Puerto Rican groups. Follow-up sessions were conducted at the sites to review the initial results and to validate a culturally adapted exercise intervention trial. A total of 900 responses were catalogued into 27 codes. Both groups had similar descriptions of exercise and barriers to exercise. Both groups expressed lack of information regarding their exercise capabilities. The groups differed in their responses to perceived safety in their community and how to deliver a culturally adapted exercise intervention in their community. We found important cultural differences and similarities in relevant factors of exercise and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:22610693

  11. Blood lead levels of 4-11-year-old Mexican American, Puerto Rican, and Cuban children.

    PubMed Central

    Carter-Pokras, O; Pirkle, J; Chavez, G; Gunter, E

    1990-01-01

    Data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used to estimate arithmetic mean blood lead and percent with elevated blood lead [25 micrograms per deciliter (micrograms per dl) or greater] for 4-11-year-old Mexican American, Puerto Rican, and Cuban children. The sample size was 1,390 for Mexican American children, 397 for Puerto Rican children, and 114 for Cuban children. Puerto Rican children had the highest mean blood lead levels (11.5 micrograms per dl), followed by Mexican American children (10.4 micrograms per dl) and Cuban children (8.6 micrograms per dl, P less than .05). Puerto Rican children had the highest percent with elevated blood lead (2.7 percent); 1.6 percent of Mexican American children had elevated blood lead; less than 1 percent (0.9 percent) of the Cuban children had elevated blood lead (P less than .05). Mexican American girls had a lower mean blood lead level than did boys: 9.7 micrograms per dl versus 11.0 micrograms per dl (P less than .05). For both Puerto Rican and Mexican American children, younger age indicated a higher risk of having elevated blood lead levels. Mexican American children who lived in poverty had higher mean blood lead levels than did Mexican American children who did not live in poverty--11.6 micrograms per dl versus 9.6 micrograms per dl (P less than .05). Despite advances in primary prevention of lead toxicity in children during the past 10 years, many Hispanic children are at risk of lead toxicity. Approximately 19,000 Mexican American 4-11-year-old children living in the Southwest and approximately 8,000 Puerto Rican children living in the New York City area had elevated blood lead levels (greater than or equal to 25 micrograms per dl) during 1982-84. PMID:2116641

  12. Drug use and HIV risks among African-American, Mexican-American, and Puerto Rican drug injectors.

    PubMed

    Estrada, A L

    1998-01-01

    This article documents the prevalence of injection-related HIV risk behaviors among a sample of 758 Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, and African-American drug injectors derived from the National Institute on Drug Abuse Cooperative Agreement database. The results show that the two Hispanic subgroups had higher injection-related risks than the African-American group. Further, among Hispanics, Puerto Ricans had higher rates of drug injection than Mexican-Americans, but Mexican-Americans had higher rates of sharing injection paraphernalia than Puerto Ricans. The research suggests that more aggressive HIV/AIDS intervention efforts be targeted to minority injection drug users, especially those that are contextualized by the racial/ethnic group targeted.

  13. National trends in smoking behaviors among Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban men and women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Lyzette; Garcia, Robert; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; White, Martha M; Messer, Karen; Pierce, John P; Trinidad, Dennis R

    2014-05-01

    We examined trends in smoking behaviors across 2 periods among Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans in the United States. We analyzed data from the 1992-2007 Tobacco Use Supplements to the Current Population Survey. We constructed 2 data sets (1990s vs 2000s) to compare smoking behaviors between the 2 periods. Significant decreases in ever, current, and heavy smoking were accompanied by increases in light and intermittent smoking across periods for all Latino groups, although current smoking rates among Puerto Rican women did not decline. Adjusted logistic regression models revealed that in the 2000s, younger Mexicans and those interviewed in English were more likely to be light and intermittent smokers. Mexican and Cuban light and intermittent smokers were less likely to be advised by healthcare professionals to quit smoking. Mexicans and Puerto Ricans who were unemployed and Mexicans who worked outdoors were more likely to be heavy smokers. Increases in light and intermittent smoking among Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban Americans suggest that targeted efforts to further reduce smoking among Latinos may benefit by focusing on such smokers.

  14. Puerto Rican Spanish: Opinions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Francisco

    Part of a larger study of Puerto Ricans' language attitudes, an investigation of the attitudes of 104 high school teachers and students in Puerto Rico focused on whether the subjects dissented within or among groups on the published cliches or statements that stereotype Puerto Rican Spanish (PRS) as inferior. All but two subjects placed themselves…

  15. Phonological skills in Puerto Rican and Mexican Spanish-speaking children with phonological disorders.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Brian A

    2007-02-01

    The effects of dialectal differences upon the speech production skills of children with phonological disorders are poorly understood. One might predict that the phonological profile of children using a radical dialect (e.g., Puerto Rican Spanish, which alters consonants in the syllable rhyme) will differ from that of children who use a conservative dialect (e.g., Mexican Spanish, which preserves such consonants). This study evaluated the impact of such dialectal differences by comparing the phonological skills of two groups of Spanish-speaking children with phonological disorders. Six participants used the Mexican dialect; the other six used the Puerto Rican dialect of North American Spanish. All children were matched on number of segmental errors and age, which ranged from 4;4 to 5;6 (M=4;10). A single-word assessment instrument was used to elicit data, and independent and relational analyses were completed for each child. Measures included phonetic inventory complexity, vowel accuracy, consonant accuracy, sound class accuracy, percentage-of-occurrence of phonological patterns, and frequency and types of substitutions. Significant between-group differences were not found for any measures. These findings do not support the hypothesis of significant phonological differences between phonologically disordered speakers of radical and conservative Spanish dialects.

  16. Mexican-American and Puerto Rican breast cancer survivors' perspectives on exercise: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Rose A; Vallejo, Liliana; Hughes, Daniel C; Gonzalez, Velda; Tirado-Gomez, Maribel; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2012-12-01

    Qualitative data was collected from Mexican-American (MA) and Puerto Rican (PR) breast cancer survivors to gain their perspectives on the relevant issues surrounding breast cancer survivorship and exercise. Six focus groups, a total of 31 participants were convened (three in Puerto Rico and three in Texas). Responses were analyzed and compared between the MA and PR groups. Follow-up sessions were conducted at the sites to review the initial results and to validate a culturally adapted exercise intervention trial. A total of 900 responses were catalogued into 27 codes. Both groups had similar descriptions of exercise and barriers to exercise. Both groups expressed lack of information regarding their exercise capabilities. The groups differed in their responses to perceived safety in their community and how to deliver a culturally adapted exercise intervention in their community. We found important cultural differences and similarities in relevant factors of exercise and breast cancer survivorship.

  17. The Silencing of Latino Student "Voice": Puerto Rican and Mexican Narratives in Eighth Grade and High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroz, Pamela Anne

    2001-01-01

    Narratives of Puerto Rican and Mexican American students, written in 8th grade and then 11th grade, describe who they are and illustrate school-sponsored silencing, with student critiques of their educational experience ignored by schools. The narratives help explain the Hispanic student high dropout rate, reasons behind students' academic…

  18. The Silencing of Latino Student "Voice": Puerto Rican and Mexican Narratives in Eighth Grade and High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroz, Pamela Anne

    2001-01-01

    Narratives of Puerto Rican and Mexican American students, written in 8th grade and then 11th grade, describe who they are and illustrate school-sponsored silencing, with student critiques of their educational experience ignored by schools. The narratives help explain the Hispanic student high dropout rate, reasons behind students' academic…

  19. Puerto Rican Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapp, Edward, Ed.

    The contents of this compendium are organized in four parts, as follows. Part one, "From Education," includes the following essays: "A Positive View of Bilingualism," Bejamin Pacheco; "Puerto Rican Children and the New York City Public Schools," Luis Fuentes; "Why Puerto Rican Students Drop Out of School: An Explanatory Analysis," Alexander…

  20. Puerto Rican Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapp, Edward, Ed.

    The contents of this compendium are organized in four parts, as follows. Part one, "From Education," includes the following essays: "A Positive View of Bilingualism," Bejamin Pacheco; "Puerto Rican Children and the New York City Public Schools," Luis Fuentes; "Why Puerto Rican Students Drop Out of School: An Explanatory Analysis," Alexander…

  1. Phonological Skills in Puerto Rican and Mexican Spanish-Speaking Children with Phonological Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Brian A.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of dialectal differences upon the speech production skills of children with phonological disorders are poorly understood. One might predict that the phonological profile of children using a radical dialect (e.g., Puerto Rican Spanish, which alters consonants in the syllable rhyme) will differ from that of children who use a…

  2. Phonological Skills in Puerto Rican and Mexican Spanish-Speaking Children with Phonological Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Brian A.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of dialectal differences upon the speech production skills of children with phonological disorders are poorly understood. One might predict that the phonological profile of children using a radical dialect (e.g., Puerto Rican Spanish, which alters consonants in the syllable rhyme) will differ from that of children who use a…

  3. Prevalence of diabetes in Mexican Americans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1982-1984.

    PubMed

    Flegal, K M; Ezzati, T M; Harris, M I; Haynes, S G; Juarez, R Z; Knowler, W C; Perez-Stable, E J; Stern, M P

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican Americans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans in the United States and compare these estimates to data from prior surveys for U.S. non-Hispanic whites and blacks. Data for this study are from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a multipurpose cross-sectional survey of three U.S. Hispanic populations conducted in 1982-1984. The interviewed sample of people aged 20-74 yr included 3935 Mexican Americans in the southwest, 1134 Cubans in Florida, and 1519 Puerto Ricans in the New York City area. The diabetes component consisted of interview questions on diabetes diagnosis and treatment and an oral glucose tolerance test administered to a subsample. The prevalence of diabetes was two to three times greater for Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans than for non-Hispanic whites surveyed in 1976-1980. In Cubans, the prevalence was similar to that for non-Hispanic whites. In men and women 45-74 yr of age, the prevalence of diabetes was extremely high for both Mexican Americans (23.9%) and Puerto Ricans (26.1%) compared with Cubans (15.8%) or non-Hispanic whites (12%). The total prevalence of diabetes was not significantly different for Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans but was significantly lower for Cubans. The relatively lower prevalence of diabetes among Cubans and the high prevalence in both Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans may be related to socioeconomic, genetic, behavioral, or environmental factors.

  4. Selected Characteristics of Persons and Families of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Other Spanish Origin: March 1972. (Advance Data from March 1972 Sample Survey.) Population Characteristics: Current Population Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD.

    Data on a variety of social and economic characteristics for persons and families in the United States of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Spanish origin and comparative data for the remaining population were selected from the March 1972 Bureau of the Census Current Population Survey (CPS). Revisions in the March 1972 CPS, as compared to…

  5. The Effects of Communication and Socioeconomic Status on the Political Participation of Puerto Ricans, Mexican-Americans, and Cubans in Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subervi-Velez, Federico A.

    An examination was undertaken of the relationship between some socioeconomic variables, particularly communication exposure variables, and the political participation of Puerto Ricans, Mexican-Americans, and Cubans living in Chicago, Illinois. Data for the investigation were taken from an earlier survey of the communication patterns and…

  6. Preferences for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer information among Mexican, Cuban and Puerto Rican women at risk.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; McIntyre, Jessica; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the preferences of at-risk Hispanic women to gain information on hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). This study sought to qualitatively explore preferences for HBOC information among at-risk Mexican, Puerto Rican and Cuban women and to pilot a mock brochure aimed at Hispanic women. Hispanic women aged 18-65 years with a personal or family history of breast or ovarian cancer participated in a semistructured interview. Data were analyzed using a combination of open-coding and content analysis. Fifty-three women participated in the study. For the majority of content areas, there were no major differences between the subethnicities. All women reported discussing cancer with a doctor after a family member had been diagnosed and discussing cancer within their families; however, the content of the discussion varied. Cuban and Puerto Rican women reported using the Internet routinely for health care information while Mexican women said they did not have access to computers and did not use them. All women liked the content and photos in the brochure but Mexican women thought the reading level was too high. Preferences for the spokesperson focused on the need for Spanish-speaking health care providers. While the data show some similarities, such as patterns of cancer discussion and appreciation of the mock brochure, there were differences between the groups on information preferences. In designing HBOC education information for Hispanic audiences, it is important to consider varied channels for dissemination and preferences for specific types of information across subethnicities. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. UNDERSTANDING THE PUERTO RICAN AND HIS FAMILY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THOMAS MARIE, SISTER

    AN UNDERSTANDING OF TRADITIONAL PUERTO RICAN FAMILY CUSTOMS AND BASIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PUERTO RICAN AND OTHER LIFE STYLES SHOULD HELP PROFESSIONAL WORKERS SOLVE THE PROBLEMS CREATED BY MIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES. THE CULTURE OF THE PUERTO RICAN CAN BE DESCRIBED IN RELATION TO THREE CONCEPTS--DIGNIDAD (SELF-ESTEEM OR SELF-WORTH), RESPETO…

  8. Annotated Selected Puerto Rican Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Enrique R., Comp.

    This work represents an effort on the part of The Urban Center to come one step closer to the realization of its goal to further the growth of ethnic studies. After extensive consultation with educationists from within and without the Puerto Rican community, it was decided that an annotated bilingual bibliography should be published to assist and…

  9. Annotated Selected Puerto Rican Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Enrique R., Comp.

    This work represents an effort on the part of The Urban Center to come one step closer to the realization of its goal to further the growth of ethnic studies. After extensive consultation with educationists from within and without the Puerto Rican community, it was decided that an annotated bilingual bibliography should be published to assist and…

  10. Boricuas: The Puerto Ricans. Manual for Inservice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mir, Margarita; Trillas, Elba Pietri

    This document is a teachers' guide to the television series, "Boricuas: The Pureto Ricans." The manual provides additional information to help teachers understand the adjustment problems and special educational needs of Puerto Rican students. The program order is as follows: Puerto Rican studies, island of Borinquen, nineteenth century,…

  11. Boricuas: The Puerto Ricans. Manual for Inservice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mir, Margarita; Trillas, Elba Pietri

    This document is a teachers' guide to the television series, "Boricuas: The Pureto Ricans." The manual provides additional information to help teachers understand the adjustment problems and special educational needs of Puerto Rican students. The program order is as follows: Puerto Rican studies, island of Borinquen, nineteenth century,…

  12. Comparing determinants of physical activity in Puerto Rican, Mexican-American, and non-Hispanic white breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Daniel C; Tirado-Gomez, Maribel; Vallejo, Liliana; Gonzalez, Velda; Treviño-Whitaker, Rose A; Villanueva, Gabriela; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has a myriad of benefits for breast cancer survivors, including a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. Latinas are less physically active than are women in the general population and little is known about Latina breast cancer survivors' levels of PA or their beliefs related to PA. We conducted a survey of 50 Puerto Rican (PR), 50 Mexican-American (MA) and 50 non-Hispanic white (NHW) breast cancer survivors to investigate similarities and differences in PA and social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs associated with PA. We collected information on current PA using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ); comorbidities; anthropometric measures of body mass index [BMI (kg/m(2))] and waist-to-hip (W:H) ratio; and SCT measures, including exercise self-efficacy, exercise barriers self-efficacy, modeling and social support from friends and family. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance of differences between groups and regression models of the predictors of PA were performed. Survivors from the three groups were similar in age (M = 56.8, SD = 11.0), BMI (M = 29.0, SD = 5.7) and co-morbidity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.69). Survivors differed in PA (p < 0.001), self-efficacy (p = 0.05), modeling (p = 0.03) and social support from family (p = 0.05). Social support from family member and exercise barriers self-efficacy were predictors of PA. Consistent with published studies, Hispanic breast cancer survivors self-report that they are less physically active than are non-Hispanic whites. SCT variables associated with PA differ among Hispanic subgroups and non-Hispanic whites. Further research is warranted in order to understand determinants of physical activity for specific ethnic breast cancer survivors.

  13. Examining the influence of family environments on youth violence: a comparison of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, non-Latino Black, and non-Latino White adolescents.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Martínez, Lorena M; Padilla, Mark B; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard; Schulz, Amy Jo

    2011-08-01

    Existing research rarely considers important ethnic subgroup variations in violent behaviors among Latino youth. Thus, their risk for severe violent behaviors is not well understood in light of the immense ethnic and generational diversity of the Latino population in the United States. Grounded in social control theory and cultural analyses of familism, we examine differences in the risk for severe youth violence, as well its associations with family cohesion, parental engagement, adolescent autonomy, household composition, and immigrant generation among Mexican (n = 1,594), Puerto Rican (n = 586), Cuban (n = 488), and non-Latino Black (n = 4,053), and White (n = 9,921) adolescents with data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results indicate a gradient of risk; White youth had the lowest risk for severe violence and Puerto Rican youth had the highest risk compared to all other racial/ethnic subgroups. Within-group analysis indicates that family factors are not universally protective or risk-inducing. While family cohesion decreased the risk of severe violence among all groups, parental engagement was associated with increased risk among Blacks and Whites, and adolescent autonomy was associated with increased risk among Puerto Ricans and Cubans. In addition, Cuban and White adolescents who lived in single parent households or who did not live with their parents, had higher risk for severe violent behaviors than their counterparts who lived in two parent households. Among Latinos, the association of immigrant generation was in opposite directions among Mexicans and Cubans. We conclude that family and immigration factors differentially influence risk for violence among Latino subgroups and highlight the significance of examining subgroup differences and developing intervention strategies that are tailored to the needs of each ethnic subgroup.

  14. Puerto Rican History and Culture: Participant Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This is a manual for use by trainees in the Puerto Rican history and culture training program, which helps to prepare drug abuse workers for dealing with the Puerto Rican community. The manual is designed to help trainees understand the importance of geographical, historical, cultural, and racial factors in the development of the Puerto Rican…

  15. Puerto Rican Women as Workers and Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez, Blanca, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theme issue of the "Centro Bulletin" highlights recent studies by and about employed Puerto Rican and Latina women. "La mujer en el Puerto Rico del siglo XIX" (O. Jimenez de Wagenheim), in Spanish, reviews the contributions of women to Puerto Rican economic, political, and social life during the nineteenth century.…

  16. Puerto Rican Women as Workers and Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez, Blanca, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theme issue of the "Centro Bulletin" highlights recent studies by and about employed Puerto Rican and Latina women. "La mujer en el Puerto Rico del siglo XIX" (O. Jimenez de Wagenheim), in Spanish, reviews the contributions of women to Puerto Rican economic, political, and social life during the nineteenth century.…

  17. Puerto Rican History and Culture: Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This is a resource manual to be used by trainers in the Puerto Rican history and culture training program which helps to prepare drug abuse workers. The manual is designed to help trainers to understand the importance of geographical, historical, cultural, and racial factors in the development of the Puerto Rican nation and their impact on Puerto…

  18. Puerto Rican History and Culture: Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This is a manual for trainers in the Puerto Rican history and culture training program which helps to prepare drug abuse workers for dealing with the Puerto Rican community. A general structural and procedural overview of the training program begins the manual. Various instructional techniques and organizational problems are discussed. The…

  19. Leyendas Puertorriquenas, Adaptaciones (Puerto Rican Legends, Adaptations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Aurea; Puigdollers, Carmen

    The Puerto Rican legends presented here have been adapted for use in a bilingual education setting. They are presented in the framework of a Puerto Rican child's first visit to the island with his family. The four legends are: (1) "Carabali"; (2) "Guanina"; (3) "El Penon de las Palomas"; and (4) "La Garita del Diablo." The book is illistrated with…

  20. Dialect Acquisition among Puerto Rican Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poplack, Shana

    1978-01-01

    Describes an investigation of the nature of English dialect acquisition among bilingual Puerto Ricans. Subjects were in the sixth grade of a school in the Puerto Rican community in North Philadelphia. Results show that subjects can socially classify linguistic variants from two competing systems and use them appropriately. (Author/RM)

  1. Leyendas Puertorriquenas, Adaptaciones (Puerto Rican Legends, Adaptations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Aurea; Puigdollers, Carmen

    The Puerto Rican legends presented here have been adapted for use in a bilingual education setting. They are presented in the framework of a Puerto Rican child's first visit to the island with his family. The four legends are: (1) "Carabali"; (2) "Guanina"; (3) "El Penon de las Palomas"; and (4) "La Garita del Diablo." The book is illistrated with…

  2. Puerto Rican Gangs: A Historical Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Rivera, Edil; Phan, Loan T.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the problem of gangs on the island of Puerto Rico from a historical, economical, and political perspective. Some Puerto Rican historians are convinced that the gang problem in Puerto Rico is due to the political ambiguity and human rights violations of prison inmates (F. Pico, 1998). Some social scientists believe that gangs…

  3. Puerto Rican Gangs: A Historical Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Rivera, Edil; Phan, Loan T.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the problem of gangs on the island of Puerto Rico from a historical, economical, and political perspective. Some Puerto Rican historians are convinced that the gang problem in Puerto Rico is due to the political ambiguity and human rights violations of prison inmates (F. Pico, 1998). Some social scientists believe that gangs…

  4. The Puerto Rican Family: Conflicting Roles for the Puerto Rican College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves, Wilfredo; Valle, Mercedes

    1982-01-01

    Focuses on the Puerto Rican family, the Puerto Rican college student, and the effects that family role and structure have on the student. Defines the family structure and role, provides examples of the college experience, and discusses the counselor's role. (Author)

  5. Transnational Mortality Comparisons Between Archipelago and Mainland Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán; Rodríguez-Ayuso, Idania; Gebrekristos, Hirut T; Roess, Amira; Pérez, Cynthia M; Simonsen, Lone

    2016-06-22

    Puerto Ricans in the US experience higher deaths from diabetes and other causes compared to non-Hispanic Whites and other Hispanic groups. We compared mortality in Puerto Rico to that of Puerto Ricans in the US as a first step to investigate if similar or worse mortality patterns originate from the sending country (Puerto Rico). Age-adjusted death rates were generated using national vital statistics databases in the US and territories for all-cause and the top ten causes of death among Hispanics in 2009. Mortality ratios in the archipelago of Puerto Rico (APR) were compared to mainland US Puerto Ricans (MPR). Rates for other ethnic/racial groups (Mexican Americans, Cubans, and non-Hispanic Whites, Blacks, American Indians, and Asians) were calculated to provide a context. APR had significantly higher all-cause mortality and death rates for diabetes, nephritis, pneumonia/influenza, and homicide/assault compared to MPR (APR/MPR ratio for all-cause: 1.08, diabetes: 2.04, nephritis: 1.84, pneumonia/influenza: 1.33, homicide/assault: 3.15). Death rates for diabetes and homicide/assault (particularly among men) were higher among APR compared to any other racial/ethnic groups in the US. In contrast, deaths from heart disease, cancer, and chronic liver disease were significantly lower for APR compared to MPR (MPR/APR ratio 0.72, 0.91, 0.41, respectively). Among APR women, death rates for these causes were also lower compared to any other group in the US. Substantial mortality variability exists between Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico and those in the US, re-emphasizing the need to study of how socio-environmental determinants of health differ in sending and receiving countries. Explanations for disparate rates include access to and availability of healthcare and unique factors related to the migration experience of this group.

  6. THE LOWER STATUS PUERTO RICAN FAMILY. REVISED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRAM, JOSEPH

    THIS SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS DESCRIBES THE LOWER-STATUS URBAN AND RURAL FAMILIES IN PUERTO RICO. THE "JIBAROS," THE RURAL POOR OF THE HIGHLANDS, ARE LANDLESS AGRICULTURAL WORKERS WHO ARE MORE ISOLATED, LESS LITERATE, AND LESS ACCULTURATED TO URBAN LIFE THAN OTHER PUERTO RICANS. THEY TEND TO BE IDEALIZED AS THE PROTOTYPES OF THE ISLAND FOLK…

  7. Puerto Rican Familism: Considerations for Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayas, Luis H.; Palleja, Josephine

    1988-01-01

    Puerto Rican cultural value of familism, emphasizing obligation and duties of family members to one another, has endured changes in cultural values caused by migrations between United States and Puerto Rico, influences of social and economic trends, and pressures to acculturate to American society. Understanding of familism is useful to family…

  8. Sexual Prejudice among Puerto Rican young adults

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, José A.; Morales, Mercedes M.; Seda, Gretchen; González-Rivera, Milagritos

    2014-01-01

    Sexual prejudice is linked to hate crimes, mental health, risk behaviors, and stigma. Few studies have examined sexual prejudice among Latinos. We surveyed 382 college students in Puerto Rico. A structural model tested whether contact and positive experiences with homosexuals, perceived similarities with peers' attitudes toward homosexuality, and religiosity were predictive of sexual prejudice among Puerto Rican young adults. Sex differences in the structural model were explored. With the exception of peers' attitudes toward homosexuality, all study variables predict sexual prejudice. No sex differences were found. Implications for decreasing sexual prejudice among Puerto Rican youth in a college setting are discussed. PMID:18689195

  9. Puerto Rican Families with and Without Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figler, Clare Spector

    A study utilized a family systems approach, in which two groups of mainland based Puerto Rican families were interviewed, to compare Puerto Rican families whose children have identified handicaps (N=14) and Puerto Rican families whose children do not have handicaps (N=14). Investigated were the quality and quantity of stresses which impinge upon…

  10. Puerto Rican Task Force Report: Project on Ethnicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizio, Emelicia, Ed.

    A model of mental health service delivery to the low-income Puerto Rican population in areas of the mainland United States where Puerto Ricans are concentrated is presented in this report. The model, designed for use by family service agencies and other similar mental health facilities, assumes that Puerto Ricans are at great risk for mental…

  11. Dos Puertorriquenos Visitan Puerto Rico (Two Puerto Ricans Visit Puerto Rico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    These materials for Spanish instruction are based on the meeting and friendship of two Puerto Ricans arriving in Puerto Rico for visits to their hometowns, their discussions of Puerto Rican life, and a sightseeing tour of San Juan. Introductory passages to the visitors' dialogues are in English, and dialogues are in Spanish, with photographs,…

  12. Dos Puertorriquenos Visitan Puerto Rico (Two Puerto Ricans Visit Puerto Rico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    These materials for Spanish instruction are based on the meeting and friendship of two Puerto Ricans arriving in Puerto Rico for visits to their hometowns, their discussions of Puerto Rican life, and a sightseeing tour of San Juan. Introductory passages to the visitors' dialogues are in English, and dialogues are in Spanish, with photographs,…

  13. The Puerto Rican Child in Boston: A Background Study of Puerto Rican History and Culture and the Bilingual Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowntree, Helen W.

    In this manual for volunteers working with Puerto Rican children in Boston, background information is provided about Puerto Rican history and culture. In addition, a detailed description of the Puerto Rican community in Boston is included. There is a short description of the bilingual education program in Massachusetts and a longer description of…

  14. Drug use, AIDS knowledge, and HIV risk behaviors of Cuban-, Mexican-, and Puerto-Rican-born drug injectors who are recent entrants into the United States.

    PubMed

    Freeman, R C; Williams, M L; Saunders, L A

    1999-11-01

    To date, relatively little research attention has been devoted to the HIV-risky behaviors of persons who are newly arrived in the United States and who use drugs. Data gathered from street-recruited injection drug users (IDUs) recruited in 10 United States cities who were born in Mexico, Cuba, and Puerto Rico and who are recent entrants into the United States suggest that, in comparison to US-born IDUs, Mexican-born subjects are at elevated risk for acquiring and transmitting HIV as a result of sharing needles with friends and running partners; sharing drug injection implements such as cookers, cotton, and rinse water; frequent injection in HIV-risky settings; use of unsterilized needles; and relatively frequent trading of sex for drugs or money. Puerto-Rican-born IDUs were found to inject drugs relatively frequently, and to do so relatively often in high-risk settings in which sterile injecting equipment and cleaning materials often are scarce. These data also show generally lower levels of AIDS knowledge among the in-migrant IDUs than among US-born IDUs. Respondents from each nationality group most often cited television as the source of their most useful and reliable AIDS information, but also tended to regard community outreach workers as a significant source of reliable AIDS and needle cleaning information. The high levels of involvement in HIV-risky behaviors, deficits in knowledge concerning the means of HIV transmission, and relative ease of mobility of the at-risk (for HIV) individuals examined here indicate a need for a comprehensive public health prevention initiative to limit the future spread of HIV. At a minimum, such an undertaking would do well to incorporate group-specific, culturally appropriate behavioral interventions as well as an information campaign.

  15. Puerto Rican Migrant Farmworkers: An Untold Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Gloria Bonilla

    1986-01-01

    Details the history and activities in New Jersey of "El Comite de Apoyo a los Trabajadores Agricolos" (CATA) or Farmworkers' Support Committee. The Committee was founded in 1979 to help Puerto Rican migrant workers who suffer from social and political isolation and are denied basic rights. Successes, goals, and problems are noted. (PS)

  16. Monitoring Puerto Rican avifauna using roadside surveys

    Treesearch

    Keith L. Pardieck; Bruce G. Peterjohn

    2005-01-01

    In 1997 we began investigating the use of roadside point counts to monitor the long-term status and trends of Puerto Rican bird populations. If such a methodology proves feasible it may provide the empirical data needed for the development of sound conservation plans for the island’s avifauna in much the same way that North American Breeding Bird Survey data...

  17. Measuring Puerto Ricans' Perceptions of Racial Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginorio, Angela B.; Berry, Paul C.

    To measure how Puerto Ricans classify each other into racial groups by physical appearance, a stimulus set of 60 color slides was prepared. Two hundred and fifty secondary students sorted these portraits into four, three, and finally two groups. Although subjects placed both the pictures and themselves in a color continuum of racial types with…

  18. The Puerto Rican Experience: A Sociological Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordasco, Francesco; Bucchioni, Eugene

    A serious problem has presented itself to students who sought a convenient sourcebook which afforded an overview of the Puerto Rican mainland experience (with some notice of the island backgrounds), essentially compact, but dimensionally comprehensive. This documentary sourcebook is addressed to that need. It is intended as a classroom text (in a…

  19. Bibliography of Puerto Rican History and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Marnesba D., Comp.

    This bibliography is a revised compilation of titles in the Herbert H. Lehman College library collection which have a direct relationship to the area of Puerto Rican Studies. For easy reference, the bibliography is divided into five broad categories: Reference Books; Biography; Education; History and Social Science; and Language, Literature, and…

  20. Puerto Rico and the Puerto Ricans: A Teaching and Resource Unit for Upper Level Spanish Students or Social Studies Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrero, Milagros

    The subject of this teaching and resource unit for Spanish students or social studies classes is Puerto Rico and the Puerto Ricans. The unit has sections dealing with the present conditions of the Puerto Ricans, their culture, and historical perspectives. The appendixes contain: (1) Demands of the Puerto Ricans, (2) Notable Puerto Ricans, (3)…

  1. PUERTO RICO AND THE PUERTO RICANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STERNAU, HERBERT

    PUERTO RICO WAS DISCOVERED BY CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS IN 1493. THE PROCESS OF COLONIZATION BEGAN IN 1508, WITH THE ARRIVAL OF PONCE DE LEON AND HIS SPANISH SOLDIERS. PUERTO RICO WAS GOVERNED BY SPAIN FOR ABOUT 400 YEARS, AND THE GREAT MASS OF PEOPLE REMAINED POVERTY-STRICKEN, UNDERNOURISHED, AND ILLITERATE. THE ISLAND WAS CEDED TO THE UNITED STATES…

  2. PUERTO RICO AND THE PUERTO RICANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STERNAU, HERBERT

    PUERTO RICO WAS DISCOVERED BY CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS IN 1493. THE PROCESS OF COLONIZATION BEGAN IN 1508, WITH THE ARRIVAL OF PONCE DE LEON AND HIS SPANISH SOLDIERS. PUERTO RICO WAS GOVERNED BY SPAIN FOR ABOUT 400 YEARS, AND THE GREAT MASS OF PEOPLE REMAINED POVERTY-STRICKEN, UNDERNOURISHED, AND ILLITERATE. THE ISLAND WAS CEDED TO THE UNITED STATES…

  3. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.10. Prominent Puerto Ricans. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module contains representative examples of native Puerto Rican men and women who have gained distinction in Puerto Rico. Following a pre- and postassessment test and list of learning alternatives are narratives presenting a brief biography of 27 Puerto Ricans. (MJM)

  4. Physiogenomic analysis of the Puerto Rican population

    PubMed Central

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Duconge, Jorge; Windemuth, Andreas; Cadilla, Carmen L; Kocherla, Mohan; Villagra, David; Renta, Jessica; Holford, Theodore; Santiago-Borrero, Pedro J

    2009-01-01

    Aims Admixture in the population of the island of Puerto Rico is of general interest with regards to pharmacogenetics to develop comprehensive strategies for personalized healthcare in Latin Americans. This research was aimed at determining the frequencies of SNPs in key physiological, pharmacological and biochemical genes to infer population structure and ancestry in the Puerto Rican population. Materials & methods A noninterventional, cross-sectional, retrospective study design was implemented following a controlled, stratified-by-region, random sampling protocol. The sample was based on birthrates in each region of the island of Puerto Rico, according to the 2004 National Birth Registry. Genomic DNA samples from 100 newborns were obtained from the Puerto Rico Newborn Screening Program in dried-blood spot cards. Genotyping using a physiogenomic array was performed for 332 SNPs from 196 cardiometabolic and neuroendocrine genes. Population structure was examined using a Bayesian clustering approach as well as by allelic dissimilarity as a measure of allele sharing. Results The Puerto Rican sample was found to be broadly heterogeneous. We observed three main clusters in the population, which we hypothesize to reflect the historical admixture in the Puerto Rican population from Amerindian, African and European ancestors. We present evidence for this interpretation by comparing allele frequencies for the three clusters with those for the same SNPs available from the International HapMap project for Asian, African and European populations. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that population analysis can be performed with a physiogenomic array of cardiometabolic and neuroendocrine genes to facilitate the translation of genome diversity into personalized medicine. PMID:19374515

  5. Anglos Are Weird People For Me. Interviews with Chicanos and Puerto Ricans. Materialien 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Wolfgang

    The book presents the statements of 8 Mexican Americans and 10 Puerto Ricans, aged from 19 to 29, who were interviewed to reveal their degree of acculturation. Questions include attitude, behavior and/or fact-finding items and cover habitat; family background; intactness of family; educational, income, and occupational levels of parents and…

  6. Anglos Are Weird People For Me. Interviews with Chicanos and Puerto Ricans. Materialien 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Wolfgang

    The book presents the statements of 8 Mexican Americans and 10 Puerto Ricans, aged from 19 to 29, who were interviewed to reveal their degree of acculturation. Questions include attitude, behavior and/or fact-finding items and cover habitat; family background; intactness of family; educational, income, and occupational levels of parents and…

  7. Puerto Ricans in the United States: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Diane

    This bibliography of 2,155 items is a resource book intended for educators. It provides up-to-date information on current advances in bilingual education as well as information on the historical, economic, sociological and anthropological aspects of Puerto Ricans, Mexican Americans and other minority groups. Emphasis is on testing, cognitive style…

  8. Puerto Rican Spanish: Linguistic Insecurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Francisco

    The three conditions given in the literature for the pervasiveness of linguistic insecurity (a speaker's attitude toward his or her own speech revealed in face to face interaction through the upward or downward shift of language forms) exist in the case of speakers of the Spanish vernacular of Puerto Rico. The conditions are: the rise of a middle…

  9. The Ecological Effects in Acculturation of Puerto Rican Migrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Ramirez, Norma Iris

    Various studies discuss the influences on and effects of the process of adjustment to a new environment among Puerto Rican migrants to the United States mainland. In confronting cultural differences, Puerto Ricans may experience culture shock and identity problems and suffer disassociation leading to schizophrenia and hysteria, stress,…

  10. Puerto Ricans in Historical and Social Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Clara E.

    This review of the literature on Puerto Ricans in historical and social science research focuses on major English-language books. The review finds that colonialism has been a major factor in, an orienting influence of, and a focus for critical writing about Puerto Ricans. In general, books published before 1970 were reflective, implicitly or…

  11. Puerto Rican Migrants on the Mainland of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Gertrude S.; Gordon, Edmund W.

    1968-01-01

    This bulletin on the Puerto Rican migrant consists primarily of (1) a review of research which examines the social science literature dealing with the island background of the Puerto Rican immigrant as well as his life on "La Vida" which questions whether the family described by Lewis is representative of slum dwellers in urban San Juan…

  12. Puerto Ricans: Breaking Out of the Cycle of Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Jose E., Ed.

    This report contains three background papers for reports presented at the ninth annual conference of the National Puerto Rican Coalition (NPRC) in 1989 and a discussion concerning Puerto Rican Americans and the cycle of poverty originally presented at a conference. The first paper, "Beyond the Census Data: A Portrait of the Community"…

  13. Puerto Rican Early Adolescents' Self-Esteem Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkut, Sumru; Szalacha, Laura A.; Coll, Cynthia Garcia; Alarcon, Odette

    2000-01-01

    Examined self-esteem among Puerto Rican young adolescents. Found that Self-Perception Profile for Children had adequate reliability for use with 13- to 14-year-old Puerto Ricans living on the mainland. Gender differences in different domains were similar to those among Anglo youth. Psychological acculturation played a more protective role for…

  14. Puerto Ricans in the United States: A Changing Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L.; Santiago, Carlos

    This report shows that the face of the Puerto Rican population in the United States has changed dramatically in recent years. The analysis is based largely on data from the 1980 and 1990 Censuses of Population, but it is supplemented by other sources. The number of Puerto Ricans in the United States has increased from close to 2 million in 1980 to…

  15. Puerto Ricans: Breaking Out of the Cycle of Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Jose E., Ed.

    This report contains three background papers for reports presented at the ninth annual conference of the National Puerto Rican Coalition (NPRC) in 1989 and a discussion concerning Puerto Rican Americans and the cycle of poverty originally presented at a conference. The first paper, "Beyond the Census Data: A Portrait of the Community"…

  16. The Puerto Ricans: Their History, Culture, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Adalberto, Ed.

    Articles in this book cover Puerto Rican history from the Spanish colonization to the present day experience of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Political, social, economic, cultural, and historical issues are addresed by the following authors: Edna Acosta-Belen, Frank Bonilla, Juan Manuel Carrion, Diana Christopulos, Sandra Messinger Cypess,…

  17. The Puerto Ricans: Their History, Culture, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Adalberto, Ed.

    Articles in this book cover Puerto Rican history from the Spanish colonization to the present day experience of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Political, social, economic, cultural, and historical issues are addresed by the following authors: Edna Acosta-Belen, Frank Bonilla, Juan Manuel Carrion, Diana Christopulos, Sandra Messinger Cypess,…

  18. Puerto Ricans in Historical and Social Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Clara E.

    This review of the literature on Puerto Ricans in historical and social science research focuses on major English-language books. The review finds that colonialism has been a major factor in, an orienting influence of, and a focus for critical writing about Puerto Ricans. In general, books published before 1970 were reflective, implicitly or…

  19. Cuento Therapy: A Culturally Sensitive Modality for Puerto Rican Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costantino, Giuseppe; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of a modeling therapy designed to be sensitive to Hispanic culture using cuentos (folktales) from Puerto Rican culture to present models of adaptive behavior and folktales tailored to bridge Puerto Ricans' bicultural conflict. Cuento therapy significantly reduced children's trait anxiety relative to traditional…

  20. Genetic admixture and body composition in Puerto Rican adults from the Boston Puerto Rican osteoporosis study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Population admixture plays a role in the risk of chronic conditions that are related to body composition; however, our understanding of these associations in Puerto Ricans, a population characterized by multiple ancestries, is limited. This study investigated the relationship between genetic admixtu...

  1. 27 CFR 19.485 - Marks on containers of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. 19.485 Section 19.485 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... Spirits from Customs Custody Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands Spirits § 19.485 Marks on containers of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) Packages received in bond. (1) When packages of Puerto Rican...

  2. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.05. The Puerto Rican Family. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module provides the participant with an overview of the structure of the Puerto Rican family and the forces which have affected it. It is believed that the learning alternatives in this module will provide the reader with greater insight into the family lives of Puerto Rican children. Upon completion of this module, the participant will be…

  3. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.01. The Puerto Rican in Puerto Rico. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module provides the participant with an overview of life and living conditions in Puerto Rico so that as a teacher he may better understand the lives of Puerto Rican children in mainland schools. Upon completion of this module, the participant will be able to (a) list major cultural forces in the lives of Puerto Ricans on the island and (b)…

  4. Pilot Study of Puerto Rican Junior Colleges. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Kuenzli, Pablo

    Despite an arduous effort to cope with modern Puerto Rico's societal needs, Puerto Rican junior colleges' educational offerings are inadequate and often irrelevant. The complexity and peculiarities of the junior college system in Puerto Rico cannot be fully grasped within the existing models for educational research designed for the educational…

  5. Monitoring Puerto Rican avifauna using roadside surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardieck, K.L.; Peterjohn, B.G.; Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D.

    2005-01-01

    In 1997 we began investigating the use of roadside point counts to monitor the long-term status and trends of Puerto Rican bird populations. If such a methodology proves feasible it may provide the empirical data needed for the development of sound conservation plans for the island's avifauna in much the same way that North American Breeding Bird Survey data are used by the avian conservation prioritization process of Partners in Flight, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Canadian Wildlife Service. By the end of the 2003 field season, we will have the data needed to quantitatively evaluate the utility of the program for tracking the population trends of Puerto Rican avifauna. Here we present data from the 2001 and 2002 field seasons to demonstrate the potential utility of these data for quantifying and portraying avian distributions, abundances, and population trend estimates. In 2001, 27 of the 44 available 5-mile roadside routes (11 stops/route) were sampled between 15 April and 15 May. At each stop a 5-minute point count was conducted. The surveys detected 5,471 individuals representing 70 species. Distribution and abundance maps are depicted for seven endemic species. In 2002, 29 routes were sampled. A total of 6,252 individuals was detected representing 79 species. Significantly fewer species and individuals were detected on wet zone routes as compared to moist and dry zone routes.

  6. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.11. Puerto Ricans and Their Mores. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module provides readers who are not familiar with Puerto Ricans with information regarding certain Puerto Rican mores which seem outstanding to people of Anglo-Saxon background. Pre- and postassessment tests, a bibliography, learning alternative strategies, and a narrative concerning Puerto Ricans and their mores are presented. (MJM)

  7. Successful nesting behavior of Puerto Rican parrots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.A.; Field, R.; Wilson, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed nesting behavior of five pairs of the endangered Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) during eight successful nesting attempts. Each stage of the nesting cycle (egg laying, incubation, early chick rearing, and late chick rearing) was characterized by distinct trends or levels of behavior. During egg laying, female attentiveness to tile nest increased, and male attentiveness decreased. Throughout incubation and the first several days of early chick rearing, females were highly attentive to their nests, whereas males rarely entered the nest cavities. Female attentiveness then began to decline. Male attentiveness to the nest was sporadic until chicks were 10-12 days old. when all males began to enter their nests at least once each day. During late chick rearing, both male and female attentiveness were erratic and highly variable. Biologists may be able to use these results to identify nest problems and the need for management intervention when patterns of nest attentiveness deviate from the limits described in this study..

  8. Sex Differences in Trajectories of Offending among Puerto Rican Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Wesley G.; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Piquero, Alex R.; Odgers, Candice L.; Bird, Hector; Canino, Glorisa

    2010-01-01

    Although sex is one of the strongest correlates of crime, contentions remain regarding the necessity of sex-specific theories of crime. The current study examines delinquent trajectories across sex among Puerto Rican youth socialized in two different cultural contexts (Bronx, United States; and San Juan, Puerto Rico). Results indicate similar…

  9. POPULATION DECLINES OF THE PUERTO RICAN VIREO IN GUANICA FOREST.

    Treesearch

    JOHN FAABORG; KATE M. DUGGER; WAYNE J. ARENDT; BETHANY L. WOODWORTH; MICHAEL E. BALTZ

    1997-01-01

    Abundance of the Puerto Rican Vireo (Vireo Zutimeri) in Guanica Forest, Puerto Rico, has declined gradually over the period 1973-1996 as determined by constant effort mist netting. Concurrent studies of breeding vireos show low nesting success, primarily due to parasitism by Shiny Cowbirds (Molothrus bonariensis). This decline may reflect the rather recent entry of the...

  10. Sex Differences in Trajectories of Offending among Puerto Rican Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Wesley G.; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Piquero, Alex R.; Odgers, Candice L.; Bird, Hector; Canino, Glorisa

    2010-01-01

    Although sex is one of the strongest correlates of crime, contentions remain regarding the necessity of sex-specific theories of crime. The current study examines delinquent trajectories across sex among Puerto Rican youth socialized in two different cultural contexts (Bronx, United States; and San Juan, Puerto Rico). Results indicate similar…

  11. Assimilation and Educational Determinants for Puerto Rican Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wargacki, Julianne M.

    To understand the problems that urban schools encounter educating Puerto Rican students, teachers must understand the history and culture of Puerto Rico, which has been a melting pot of many different cultures. North American culture became prevalent after the Spanish-American War (1898) and the passage of the Jones Act (1917), which gave U.S.…

  12. Social Support, Family Organizations, and Adolescent Adjustment in Low-Income Puerto Rican Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald D.; Seaton, Elenor; Jacobson, Leanne; Rodriguez, Antoinette U.; Dominguez, Antonio

    Social support from kin has been discussed as an important feature of family life among Puerto Rican families. This study examines the association between kinship support, family organization, and adolescent adjustment in Puerto Rican families. (Author)

  13. Caribbean international circulation: are Puerto Rican women tied-circulators?

    PubMed

    Conway, D; Ellis, M; Shiwdhan, N

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of migration between Puerto Rico and the United States are explored. "This examination of the multiple-movement behaviour of a sample of Puerto Rican women seeks to unravel the relations between their circulation patterns, their family and contextual situations and their declared motives for undertaking international mobility. The leading question asked in this study is whether this international mobility behaviour of Puerto Rican women is autonomous or dependent upon the movement or decision-making of others. Structural theory suggests the latter is most likely, but behavioural divergence occurs in return movement."

  14. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.08. Puerto Rican Spanish. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    Of the multitude of dialects which exemplify the Spanish language, Puerto Rican Spanish has suffered the most severe rejection by language purists and pseudolinguists. The need to take a clear and open look at Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico is preeminent. It is the purpose of this module to clarify some major points of controversy regarding Puerto…

  15. Assessment of Puerto Rican Children in Bilingual Education Programs in the United States: A Critique of Lloyd M. Dunn's Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Joseph O. Prewitt

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Dunn's paper on Hispanic-Anglo differences in IQ scores. Comments on Dunn's translation of Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised into Castilian Spanish, and concludes this version is inappropriate for mainland Puerto Rican and Mexican-American children due to improper translation and validation methods. Contains 27 references.…

  16. The Puerto Rican Involvement in Educational Opportunity Fund Programs for the Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira, Eugene L.

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Puerto Rican response to the opportunities for higher education and to survey the prospects of recruiting more Puerto Ricans in "Educational Opportunity Fund Programs." Camden, New Jersey was chosen as a representative medium-sized city with a Puerto Rican Community. (JW)

  17. Cancer screening participation: comparative willingness of San Juan Puerto Ricans versus New York City Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed Central

    Claudio, Cristina; Katz, Ralph V.; Green, B. Lee; Kressin, Nancy R.; Wang, Min Qi; Russell, Stefanie L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The specific aim of this study was to determine the self-reported likelihood of New York Puerto Ricans (NYPR) and San Juan Puerto Ricans (SJPR) to participate in: 10 site-specific cancer screenings, cancer-screenings conducted by different specific persons/agencies and cancer-screening under specific conditions of what one was asked to do as a part of cancer screening. METHODS: The Cancer Screening Questionnaire (CSQ) was administered via random-digit-dial telephone interviews to 154 adults living in San Juan, PR and 155 in New York, NY. RESULTS: Although the self-reported willingness to participate across the 10 site-specific cancer screening exams was consistently high in both cities, SJPR had higher rates, as compared to NYPR for all 10 site-specific cancer screening exams in the unadjusted analyses. A similar pattern was observed regarding the influence of both "who conducts the cancer-screening exam" and "what one is asked to do in a cancer-screening exam" as factors in the willingness to participate in such exams. Adjusted multivariate analysis showed that the odds of SJPR participating in skin cancer screening as compared to NYPR, were three-fold higher to participate in skin cancer screening and were two-fold higher to participate in a cancer screening where they have to be interviewed about their alcohol habits. These two observed differences might reflect the effect of acculturation in the NYPR. PMID:17534012

  18. Substance use and HIV risk in a sample of severely mentally Ill Puerto Rican women.

    PubMed

    Loue, Sana; Sajatovic, Martha; Mendez, Nancy

    2011-08-01

    Latinos, and Puerto Ricans in particular, have been disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS. Severe mental illness (SMI) is associated with an increase in HIV risk. Relatively little research has focused on the role of SMI among Puerto Rican injection drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs in susceptibility to and transmission of HIV and there are few published reports on HIV risk among Latina SMI. We conducted a longitudinal mixed methods study with 53 Puerto Rican women with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression to examine the cultural context of HIV risk and HIV knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors among a larger study with Puerto Rican and Mexican women with serious mental illness (SMI). There was a high prevalence of past and current substance use and a high prevalence of substance use-associated HIV risk behaviors, such as unprotected sexual relations with an IDU. The violence associated with substance use frequently increased participants' HIV risk. Choice of substance of abuse depended on cost, availability, and use within the individual participant's network. Participants attributed their substance use to the need to relieve symptoms associated with their mental illness, ameliorate unpleasant feelings, and deaden emotional pain. HIV prevention interventions for poorer Puerto Rican women with SMI must target the individuals themselves and others within their networks if the women are to be supported in their efforts to reduce substance use-related risk. The content of any intervention must address past and current trauma and its relationship to substance use and HIV risk, as well as strategies to prevent HIV transmission.

  19. Acculturation and Sociocultural Influences on Dietary Intake and Health Status among Puerto Rican Adults in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Van Rompay, Maria I.; McKeown, Nicola M.; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen; Falcon, Luis M.; Ordovas, José M.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown negative consequences of acculturation on lifestyle factors, health status, and dietary intake of Hispanic immigrants in the US. Despite prevalent type 2 diabetes and low socioeconomic status (SES) among Puerto Rican adults living on the US mainland, little is known about acculturation in this group. Objective We investigated associations among acculturation, lifestyle characteristics, health status, and carbohydrate nutrition in Puerto Rican adults. A secondary objective was to investigate possible confounding and/or effect modification on these associations by SES. Design Cross-sectional data from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study, which included 1219 Puerto Ricans in the Boston area, aged 45–75 years. Statistical analyses Characteristics were compared using ANCOVA, linear trend and Pearson’s chi-square tests across quartiles of acculturation. Tests for interaction by poverty status were conducted. Proportional contributions of foods to intake of total carbohydrate and fiber were assessed using SAS RANK. Results Levels of acculturation were low, despite young age at first arrival to the US mainland (25.4 ± 12.3 y) and long length of stay (34.2 ± 12.2 y). Greater English language use was associated with higher SES, alcohol consumption, physical activity, better perceived health, and less central obesity. Acculturation was associated with lower legume fiber and greater cereal fiber intake. Among those above the poverty threshold, acculturation was associated with lower dietary glycemic index and starch intake, and greater fruit and non-starchy vegetable intake. Conclusions In contrast to studies with Mexican Americans, the association of acculturation with dietary quality in these Puerto Rican adults was mixed, but tended toward better carbohydrate quality. Dietary recommendations should include maintenance of traditional, healthful dietary practices including consumption of legumes, but also reduction in refined

  20. Comparison of Dietary Quality Among Puerto Ricans Living in Massachusetts and Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Cepero, Andrea; Valencia, Alexandra; Jimenez, Julio; Lemon, Stephenie C; Palacios, Cristina; Rosal, Milagros C

    2017-04-01

    Puerto Ricans are burdened by nutrition-related diseases, with greater disease prevalence among Puerto Ricans residing in the continental U.S. compared to those in Puerto Rico (PR). However, little is known about diet quality of these two groups. To compare diet quality of Puerto Ricans in Massachusetts (MA) and PR. Puerto Rican patients from health centers in MA (n = 42) and PR (n = 52) completed a food frequency questionnaire. Diet quality was assessed with the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI). Analysis included Mann-Whitney, Chi square and logistic and quantile regressions. 57.1 % of participants in MA and 19.6 % in PR had a poor diet. Adjusting for age and education, participants in MA were more likely to have a poor diet (OR 3.4; p = 0.02) and lower HEI scores than participants in PR. Diet quality among Puerto Ricans is poor, and is worse among mainland Puerto Ricans compared to islanders.

  1. Elevated asthma morbidity in Puerto Rican children: a review of possible risk and prognostic factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lara, M; Morgenstern, H; Duan, N; Brook, R H

    1999-01-01

    Latino children represent a significant proportion of all US children, and asthma is the most common chronic illness affecting them. Previous research has revealed surprising differences in health among Latino children with asthma of varying countries of family origin. For instance, Puerto Rican children have a higher prevalence of asthma than Mexican American or Cuban American children. In addition, there are important differences in family structure and socioeconomic status among these Latino populations: Cuban Americans have higher levels of education and family income than Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans; mainland Puerto Rican children have the highest proportion of households led by a single mother. Our review of past research documents differences in asthma outcomes among Latino children and identifies the possible genetic, environmental, and health care factors associated with these differences. Based on this review, we propose research studies designed to differentiate between mutable and immutable risk and prognostic factors. We also propose that the sociocultural milieus of Latino subgroups of different ethnic and geographic origin are associated with varying patterns of risk factors that in turn lead to different morbidity patterns. Our analysis provides a blue-print for future research, policy development, and the evaluation of multifactorial interventions involving the collaboration of multiple social sectors, such as health care, public health, education, and public and private agencies. PMID:10063393

  2. Survival and causes of mortality in juvenile Puerto Rican parrots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, G.D.; Arendt, W.J.; Kalina, J.

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen juvenile Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) from wild nests in 1985, 1986 and 1987 were radio monitored an average of 110 +- 15.9 (SE) d (range 4-209 d) post-fledgling. Minimum survival was 67% (n = 3) in 1985, 100% (n = 4) in 1986 and 43% (n = 7) in 1987. Most mortality (three of five deaths) occurred during the first 35 d following fledgling. A major cause of mortality was predation by raptors. This research shows that additional studies are needed to define mortality causes to juvenile and adult free-flying Puerto Rican Parrots and to develop management guidelines to increase survival.

  3. Aging in Puerto Rico: A Comparison of Health Status Among Island Puerto Rican and Mainland U.S. Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Catherine; Ailshire, Jennifer A

    2017-06-01

    To characterize the health status of older island Puerto Ricans, a segment of the U.S. population that has been largely overlooked in aging research. Data from the 2002 Puerto Rican Elderly Health Conditions Project and the 2002 Health and Retirement Study are used to examine differences in disease, disability, and self-rated health among island Puerto Ricans and the mainland U.S.-born older adult population. Differences are further examined by gender. Island Puerto Ricans were less likely to have heart disease, stroke, lung disease, cancer, activities of daily living (ADL) limitations, and poor self-rated health, but more likely to have hypertension and diabetes. Island Puerto Rican women had worse health relative to island Puerto Rican men. Recent challenges in the funding and provision of health care in Puerto Rico are worrisome given the large number of aging island adults, many of whom have hypertension and diabetes, two conditions that require long-term medical care.

  4. Ancestry-environment interactions and asthma risk among Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Shweta; Burchard, Esteban González; Borrell, Luisa N; Tang, Hua; Gomez, Ivan; Naqvi, Mariam; Nazario, Sylvette; Torres, Alphonso; Casal, Jesus; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; Ziv, Elad; Avila, Pedro C; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Risch, Neil J

    2006-11-15

    Puerto Ricans, an admixed population of African, European, and Native American ancestries, have the highest asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality rates of any United States' population. Although socioeconomic status (SES) is negatively correlated with asthma incidence in most populations, no such relationship has been identified among Puerto Ricans. We hypothesized that, in this admixed population, the association between SES and asthma may interact with genetic ancestry. We analyzed 135 Puerto Rican subjects with asthma and 156 control subjects recruited from six different recruitment centers in Puerto Rico. Individual ancestry for each subject was estimated using 44 ancestry informative markers. SES was assigned using the census tracts' median family income. Analyses of SES were based on the SES of the clinic site from which the subjects were recruited and on a subset of individuals on whom home address-based SES was available. In the two (independent) analyses, we found a significant interaction between SES, ancestry, and asthma disease status. At lower SES, European ancestry was associated with increased risk of asthma, whereas African ancestry was associated with decreased risk. The opposite was true for their higher SES counterparts. The observed interaction may help to explain the unique pattern of risk for asthma in Puerto Ricans and the lack of association with SES observed in previous studies when not accounting for varying proportions of ancestry.

  5. Puerto Rican Statehood and the Caribbean Basin Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    21 Cultural Impact of Statehood 22 CHAPTER SIX--STATEHOOD IN PERSPECTIVE -" CHAPTER SEVEN--CONCLUSIONS 27 BIBLIOGRAPHY . . -. - * ?_: - EXECUTIVE...Government; (3) Institute an intensive program to educate the Puerto Ricans on the cultural , economic, and political aspects of statehood; (4) hold a...analysis and evaluation of three objectives. First, the author will evaluate the cultural , political, and economic impact of state- hood on the Puerto

  6. Peer Norms and Sharing of Injection Paraphernalia among Puerto Rican Injection Drug Users in New York and Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andia, Jonny F.; Deren, Sherry; Robles, Rafaela R.; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Colon, Hector M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the influence of peer norms on sharing of injection paraphernalia (e.g., indirect sharing behaviors, including sharing of cookers, cotton, rinse water and back/front loading) among Puerto Rican injection drug users (IDUs) in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, and East Harlem, New York City. Data were collected from 873 Puerto Rican IDUs…

  7. Peer Norms and Sharing of Injection Paraphernalia among Puerto Rican Injection Drug Users in New York and Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andia, Jonny F.; Deren, Sherry; Robles, Rafaela R.; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Colon, Hector M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the influence of peer norms on sharing of injection paraphernalia (e.g., indirect sharing behaviors, including sharing of cookers, cotton, rinse water and back/front loading) among Puerto Rican injection drug users (IDUs) in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, and East Harlem, New York City. Data were collected from 873 Puerto Rican IDUs…

  8. Ladrillo and Tales of Juan Bobo: Puerto Rican Folk Tales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos, Reinaldo; Matos, Ana

    These two illustrated elementary readers contain the Spanish and English versions of the Puerto Rican folk tales, "Ladrillo" and "Cuentos de Juan Bobo." They are part of a series of reading materials for elementary-level migrant children. These materials are intended to help the child relate to his culture, develop interest in…

  9. Acculturation and Depression among Puerto Ricans in the Mainland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Blanca M.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between acculturation and depression in a sample of 1,510 Puerto Ricans residing in the U.S. was examined. Acculturation was measured by assessing subjects' spoken, preferred, read, and written language. Depression was evaluated by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. The scale yielded a three-factor structure…

  10. Cancer Disparities between Mainland and Island Puerto Ricans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cancer incidence is generally lower in Hispanics than non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. These data should be interpreted with caution, as Hispanics are ethnically heterogeneous. This study examined cancer rates in a single Hispanic subgroup – Puerto Ricans – and compared incidence rates among mainla...

  11. Puerto Rican Phenotype: Understanding Its Historical Underpinnings and Psychological Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Irene

    2008-01-01

    The following is a historically informed review of Puerto Rican phenotype. Geared toward educating psychologists, this review discusses how various psychological issues associated with phenotype may have arisen as a result of historical legacies and policies associated with race and racial mixing. It discusses how these policies used various…

  12. Bird Perches Increase Forest Seeds on Puerto Rican Landslides.

    Treesearch

    Aaron B. Shiels; Lawrence R. Walker

    2003-01-01

    Landslides result in the loss of vertical vegetative structure, soil nutrients, and the soil seed bank. These losses impede timely recovery of tropical forest communities. In this study we added bird perches to six Puerto Rican landslides with three types of surfaces (bare, climbing fern, grass) in an effort to facilitate inputs of forest seeds through bird dispersal...

  13. A Model of Fertility Control in a Puerto Rican Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schensul, Stephen L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Studied fertility control among Puerto Rican women in Hartford, Connecticut, utilizing data gathered from structured interviews. Found that sterilization is the overwhelming preference in this community and that number of children--rather than age or availability of accurate information--is usually the factor that precipitates the decision to…

  14. Puerto Rican History, Civilization, and Culture: A Mini-Documentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This publication was compiled from a number of smaller manuscripts dealing with various aspects of Puerto Rican history, civilization, and culture. The book is designed to: (1) provide teachers of middle school and high school students with instructional material which covers all these aspects in a related sequential manner; and (2) provide…

  15. Ladrillo and Tales of Juan Bobo: Puerto Rican Folk Tales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos, Reinaldo; Matos, Ana

    These two illustrated elementary readers contain the Spanish and English versions of the Puerto Rican folk tales, "Ladrillo" and "Cuentos de Juan Bobo." They are part of a series of reading materials for elementary-level migrant children. These materials are intended to help the child relate to his culture, develop interest in…

  16. Social Networks and Depression among Older Puerto Ricans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Puerto Rican population has excess risk of many health problems like diabetes, cognitive impairment, physical frailty, and disability. They also exhibit high rates of depression symptoms. Research suggests that support from social networks may mediate the effects of social and environmental stre...

  17. "Puerto Rican and Proud, Boyee!": Rap, Roots and Amnesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Juan

    1993-01-01

    The recent history of Puerto Ricans as a community can be tracked by their participation in the rise of the hip hop culture, specifically in rap. The present identity of Latino rap is connected with the original placement of Latinos in rap and affirms the multicultural nature of popular culture. (SLD)

  18. Puerto Ricans in Science and Biomedicine: Report of a Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    Twelve divisions and institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) cosponsored this conference to examine the barriers to participation of Puerto Ricans in the United States to careers in science and biomedicine. Areas addressed during the conference included: (1) perspectives from the NIH; (2) historical and modern perspectives of…

  19. Puerto Rican mothers' beliefs and home literacy practices.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Rodriguez, Barbara L; Lawrence, Frank R; Miccio, Adele W

    2007-07-01

    The aims of this investigation were to examine the parenting beliefs and literacy practices of mothers of Puerto Rican descent and to determine if relationships existed between the mothers' beliefs and practices. Eighty-one mothers of bilingual children who attended Head Start programs participated in the project. As part of a larger project, the children were divided into 2 groups depending on the timing of when they were exposed to English. Children who were exposed to Spanish and English from birth were classified as having home English communication (HEC); children who were not expected to communicate in English until age 3 when they entered Head Start were classified as having school English communication (SEC). Trained home visitors used questionnaires to collect information from the mothers on their background, beliefs about parenting and education, and home literacy practices. The results revealed that Puerto Rican mothers held both traditional and progressive beliefs. Additionally, differences between the mothers of children in the HEC and SEC groups were observed on some of the measures of beliefs and practices. Relationships between beliefs and practices were not observed. The findings demonstrated that Puerto Rican mothers integrated aspects of both the Puerto Rican culture and the mainstream culture of the U.S. mainland into their views concering child rearing and education. Implications for practice are discussed.

  20. Acculturation and Teaching Behaviors of Dominican and Puerto Rican Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planos, Ruth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Six maternal teaching behaviors were observed among 101 low-income Puerto Rican and Dominican mothers in New York City as they engaged in a teaching task with their preschool children. Frequencies of specific teaching behaviors were related to ethnicity and acculturation but not to socioeconomic status. Implications for home-school continuity in…

  1. Seeds of Puerto Rican Trees and Shrubs: Second Installment

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis; Alberto Rodríguez

    1993-01-01

    Seed weights and germination information were obtained for 119 native Puerto Rican and naturalized exotic trees and shrubs. Fruit was collected from 34 of these species, and the weights were recorded. The data are presented in tables that list the species alphabetically by scientific names.

  2. Early Childbearing and Educational Attainment among Mainland Puerto Rican Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diez, Virginia; Mistry, Jayanthi

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a study about how early childbearing affected the educational trajectories of nine Puerto Rican teenage mothers living in New England. Raised largely on the mainland, participants chose to carry pregnancies to term and to participate in a parenting program for young mothers. Upon examination of shared meaning-making around…

  3. Dimensions of Career Indecision among Puerto Rican College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkin, Danya; Arbona, Consuelo; Coleman, Nicole; Ramirez, Romilia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to explore the factor structure of a Spanish version of the Career Decision Scale (CDS; Osipow, Carney, Winer, Yanico, & Koschier, 1976) with Puerto Rican college students, (b) to examine the relation of trait anxiety to the identified dimensions of career indecision, and (c) to explore differences in anxiety…

  4. BREEDING AND NATAL DISPERSAL IN THE PUERTO RICAN VIREO

    Treesearch

    BETHANY L. WOODWORTH; JOHN FAABORG; WAYNE J. ARENDT

    1998-01-01

    Information on dispersali s critical for understandingt he population dynamicso f birds. We estimated breeding and natal dispersal in two studies of a population of the Puerto Rican Vireo (Vireo latimeri) that is in danger of local extirpation due to low reproductive success from 7.1-29% of adult males and 12.5 - 25% of adult females changed territories between...

  5. Parenting Practices among Dominican and Puerto Rican Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Dittus, Patricia; Jaccard, James; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida; Acosta, Neifi

    2007-01-01

    This study presents descriptive qualitative data about Latino parenting practices in an urban context. Focus groups were conducted with Dominican and Puerto Rican mother-adolescent pairs in the Bronx borough of New York City. When parenting style typologies are integrated with the Latino cultural components "familismo,"…

  6. Puerto Rican History, Civilization, and Culture: A Mini-Documentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This publication was compiled from a number of smaller manuscripts dealing with various aspects of Puerto Rican history, civilization, and culture. The book is designed to: (1) provide teachers of middle school and high school students with instructional material which covers all these aspects in a related sequential manner; and (2) provide…

  7. Cuentos Folkloricos as a Therapeutic Modality with Puerto Rican Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costantino, Giuseppe; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Therapeutic techniques using Puerto Rican folktales to promote identification with culturally familiar characters and themes were used with 208 children in grades K-3. Cuento therapies significantly increased WISC-R comprehension scores uniformly across grades K-3 and significantly reduced trait anxiety of first graders. (DC)

  8. Appreciating Ethnic Diversity with "When I Was Puerto Rican."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Colleen A.

    2002-01-01

    Notes there are many resources available that will stimulate student thinking about the diverse people in the world. Considers Esmeralda Santiago's "When I Was Puerto Rican," and notes how it provides a great tool for helping high school students explore their understanding and appreciation of the emerging Hispanic culture. (SG)

  9. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.09. Puerto Rican English. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    The dialect of English as spoken by native Puerto Rican Spanish speakers is estensively influenced by interference from the speakers' native language. Since exposure to a language affects one's ability to use it, the speaker's position might affect his access to English and/or his willingness to speak it, and, therefore, his proficiency in it. It…

  10. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.06. Prejudice and the Puerto Rican. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module presents an overview of the kinds of problems Puerto Ricans encounter because of prejudice. Upon completion of this module, participants will be able to (a) list and describe physical characteristics of Puerto Ricans which can make them subject to prejudice and (b) identify results of prejudice in terms of housing, jobs, education,…

  11. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.04. The Puerto Rican in Hartford. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module provides an overview of the life of the Puerto Rican in Hartford, Connecticut, focusing on the issue of employment in order to provide participants with a better understanding of Puerto Rican workers' occupational and economic reality. Upon completion of the module, participants will be able to describe (a) living conditions of Puerto…

  12. The Conflicts in In-School Cultural Behaviors of the Puerto Rican Migrant Children on the Mainland. Working Papers on Issues in Puerto Rican Education, No. 105.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt Diaz, Joseph O.

    Difficulties of Puerto Rican children in adjusting to school in the U.S. mainland can be attributed to their family background and early schooling experience. Unlike the isolated, independent nuclear family unit usually found on the mainland, Puerto Rican families are extended and prize cooperation, socialization, respect for the male patriarch,…

  13. A traditional rice and beans pattern is associated with metabolic syndrome in Puerto Rican older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was approximately 50% for Puerto Rican elders living in Massachusetts. Diet is known to be associated with metabolic syndrome. Little information exists regarding the dietary intakes of Puerto Ricans. We aimed to characterize the dietary patterns of 1167 Puerto...

  14. 27 CFR 19.415 - Marks on containers of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. 19.415 Section 19.415 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) Packages from Puerto Rico. When a proprietor receives... from the Virgin Islands. When a proprietor receives packages of Virgin Islands spirits on bonded...

  15. 27 CFR 19.415 - Marks on containers of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. 19.415 Section 19.415 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) Packages from Puerto Rico. When a proprietor receives... from the Virgin Islands. When a proprietor receives packages of Virgin Islands spirits on bonded...

  16. 27 CFR 19.415 - Marks on containers of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. 19.415 Section 19.415 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) Packages from Puerto Rico. When a proprietor receives... from the Virgin Islands. When a proprietor receives packages of Virgin Islands spirits on bonded...

  17. Puerto Rican Migration: The Return Flow = La Migracion Puertorriquena: El Reflujo a la Isla.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivo, Paquita, Comp.

    This is a guide to materials and research on Puerto Ricans who have returned to Puerto Rico after living in the United States. Part 1 is an annotated bibliography of books, journal articles, printed documents, doctoral dissertations, master's theses, journalistic accounts, and unpublished papers on characteristics of Puerto Rican return migrants;…

  18. "Radical Bilingualism": Language Borders and the Case of Puerto Rican Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Marilisa Jimenez

    2011-01-01

    Puerto Rican children's literature reflects the complex history of Puerto Rico, an island that has been perpetually under colonial rule. Island and US Puerto Ricans represent a cultural identity with indefinite geographical, national and linguistic borders. Although both groups have created distinct communities, both remain loyal to Spanish as a…

  19. Puerto Ricans in Continental United States: A Bibliography, Selected and Annotated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Rene

    This annotated bibliography contains approximately 900 citations of material written about Puerto Ricans residing in the mainland United States. Also included is a section listing published bibliographies that cover literature on Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans. Citations within each section are listed in alphabetical order by author or sponsoring…

  20. 27 CFR 19.415 - Marks on containers of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. 19.415 Section 19.415 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) Packages from Puerto Rico. When a proprietor receives... from the Virgin Islands. When a proprietor receives packages of Virgin Islands spirits on bonded...

  1. Puerto Ricans in Continental United States: A Bibliography, Selected and Annotated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Rene

    This annotated bibliography contains approximately 900 citations of material written about Puerto Ricans residing in the mainland United States. Also included is a section listing published bibliographies that cover literature on Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans. Citations within each section are listed in alphabetical order by author or sponsoring…

  2. Breastfeeding duration and asthma in Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Forno, Erick; Brehm, John M; Han, Yueh-Ying; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Cloutier, Michelle M; Wakefield, Dorothy B; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about breastfeeding and asthma in Puerto Ricans, the ethnic group most affected by this disease in the US. We examined the relation between the currently recommended duration of breastfeeding and asthma in school-aged Puerto Rican children. Case-control study of 1,127 Puerto Rican children aged 6-14 years living in Hartford, Connecticut (n = 449) and San Juan, Puerto Rico (n = 678). Parental recall of breastfeeding was categorized based on duration and according to current guidelines (i.e., none, 0-6 months, and >6 months). Asthma was defined as parental report of physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the previous year. We used logistic regression for the multivariate analysis, which was conducted separately for each study site and for the combined cohort. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, gender, household income, atopy, maternal asthma, body mass index, early-life exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and (for the combined cohort) study site. After adjustment for covariates, children who were breastfed for up to 6 months had 30% lower odds of asthma (95% CI = 0.5-1.0, P = 0.04) than those who were not breastfed. In this analysis, breastfeeding for longer than 6 months was not significantly associated with asthma (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.4, P = 0.06). Our results suggest that breastfeeding for up to 6 months (as assessed by parental recall) is associated with decreased odds of asthma in Puerto Rican children, and that there is no additional beneficial effect of breastfeeding for over 6 months. These results support current recommendations on the duration of breastfeeding in an ethnic group at risk for asthma. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Breastfeeding Duration and Asthma in Puerto Rican Children

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Forno, Erick; Brehm, John M.; Han, Yueh-Ying; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Rationale Little is known about breastfeeding and asthma in Puerto Ricans, the ethnic group most affected by this disease in the US. We examined the relation between the currently recommended duration of breastfeeding and asthma in school-aged Puerto Rican children. Methods Case-control study of 1,127 Puerto Rican children aged 6 to 14 years living in Hartford, Connecticut (n=449) and San Juan, Puerto Rico (n=678). Parental recall of breastfeeding was categorized based on duration and according to current guidelines (i.e., none, 0–6 months, and >6 months). Asthma was defined as parental report of physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the previous year. We used logistic regression for the multivariate analysis, which was conducted separately for each study site and for the combined cohort. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, gender, household income, atopy, maternal asthma, body mass index, early-life exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and (for the combined cohort) study site. Results After adjustment for covariates, children who were breastfed for up to 6 months had 30% lower odds of asthma (95% CI=0.5–1.0, P=0.04) than those who were not breastfed. In this analysis, breastfeeding for longer than 6 months was not significantly associated with asthma (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.0–2.4, P=0.06). Conclusions Our results suggest that breastfeeding for up to 6 months (as assessed by parental recall) is associated with decreased odds of asthma in Puerto Rican children, and that there is no additional beneficial effect of breastfeeding for over 6 months. These results support current recommendations on the duration of breastfeeding in an ethnic group at risk for asthma. PMID:25100626

  4. Parental numeracy and asthma exacerbations in Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Ramratnam, Sima K; Brehm, John M; Han, Yueh-Ying; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Apter, Andrea J; Celedón, Juan C

    2013-07-01

    Puerto Ricans share a disproportionate burden of childhood asthma in the United States. Little is known about the impact of low parental numeracy (a health literacy skill) on asthma morbidity in Puerto Rican children. Our objective was to examine whether low parental numeracy is associated with increased asthma morbidity in Puerto Rican children. This was a cross-sectional study of 351 children with asthma, aged 6 to 14 years, living in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Parents of study participants completed a modified version of the Asthma Numeracy Questionnaire. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was used to examine the relation between low parental numeracy (defined as no correct answers in the modified Asthma Numeracy Questionnaire) and indicators of asthma morbidity (severe asthma exacerbations, core measures of asthma exacerbations, and lung function measures). All multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, household income, reported use of inhaled corticosteroids in the previous 6 months, and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke. Low parental numeracy was associated with increased odds of visits to the ED or urgent care for asthma (adjusted OR [aOR]=1.7, 95% CI=1.03-2.7, P=.04). The association between low parental numeracy and hospitalizations for asthma was significant only among children not using inhaled corticosteroids (aOR=2.8, 95% CI=1.4-5.6, P=.004). There was no association between low parental numeracy and use of systemic steroids or lung function measures. Low parental numeracy is associated with increased asthma morbidity in Puerto Rican children.

  5. Prematurity, atopy, and childhood asthma in Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Ramratnam, Sima K; Brehm, John M; Han, Yueh-Ying; Boutaoui, Nadia; Forno, Erick; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-02-01

    Puerto Rican children share a disproportionate burden of prematurity and asthma in the United States. Little is known about prematurity and childhood asthma in Puerto Rican subjects. We sought to examine whether prematurity is associated with asthma in Puerto Rican children. We performed a case-control study of 678 children aged 6 to 14 years with (n = 351) and without (n = 327) asthma living in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Prematurity was defined by parental report for our primary analysis. In a secondary analysis, we only included children whose parents reported prematurity that required admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the prior year. We used logistic regression for analysis. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, household income, atopy (≥1 positive IgE level to common allergens), maternal history of asthma, and early-life exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. In a multivariate analysis there was a significant interaction between prematurity and atopy on asthma (P = .006). In an analysis stratified by atopy, prematurity was associated with a nearly 5-fold increased odds of asthma in atopic children (adjusted odds ratio, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.5-14.3; P = .007). In contrast, there was no significant association between prematurity and asthma in nonatopic children. Similar results were obtained in our analysis of prematurity requiring admission to the neonatal intensive care unit and asthma. Our results suggest that atopy modifies the estimated effect of prematurity on asthma in Puerto Rican children. Prematurity might explain, in part, the high prevalence of atopic asthma in this ethnic group. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The street/treatment barrier: treatment experiences of Puerto Rican injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Porter, J

    1999-12-01

    This study describes, through ethnographic interviews, the treatment experiences of Puerto Rican long-term heroin users who are at extremely high risk for HIV infection and the barriers they perceive to drug treatment. On the basis of this information we suggest policy recommendations for increasing drug treatment access for Puerto Rican long-term injectors of heroin. It is critical that Puerto Rican populations access drug treatment facilities given their risk factors for HIV infection and the high rate of poverty in Puerto Rican communities that exacerbates drug use.

  7. Behavior of Puerto Rican parrots during failed nesting attempts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.A.; Wilson, M.H.; Field, R.

    1997-01-01

    We compared patterns of nesting behavior of four pairs of Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) that experienced failed nesting attempts to behavior of four pairs of parrots that experienced no substantial nest problems and successfully fledged young without management intervention. Only changes in female parrots' behavior were clearly associated with nest failure. During incubation, decreases in nest attendance, increases in duration of recesses, and increases in frequency of nest entries by female parrots were associated with imminent abandonment of nests. During early chick rearing, similar behavior was associated with the loss of broods. Low nest attendance and long recesses by female parrots during incubation were also associated with successful hatching of eggs followed by death of young several days later. The behavior patterns and changes in Puerto Rican Parrot nesting behavior described in this paper may alert biologists to nest problems that might be mitigated by management intervention.

  8. Discrimination and Puerto Rican children's and adolescents' mental health.

    PubMed

    Szalacha, Laura A; Erkut, Sumru; García Coll, Cynthia; Alarcón, Odette; Fields, Jacqueline P; Ceder, Ineke

    2003-05-01

    Two studies of Puerto Rican youths' development on the U.S. mainland examined the consequences of perceived racial/ethnic discrimination on mental health. In Study I, children were found to have a low likelihood of perceiving discrimination, whereas in Study 2, nearly half of the adolescent sample reported perceiving racial/ethnic discrimination. Although both groups scored high on multiple indicators of mental health, perceiving discrimination and worrying about discrimination were negatively associated with some dimensions of self-esteem and positively associated with depression and stress. Adolescents were aware of negative stereotypes about Puerto Ricans, and nearly half of them related discriminatory instances. Results suggest that both perceiving discrimination and anxiety regarding discrimination can serve as risk factors for the mental health of this population.

  9. The Neuropsychological Performance of Nondemented Puerto Rican Nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Carrión-Baralt, José R.; Meléndez-Cabrero, Josefina; Schnaider Beeri, Michal; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims While the oldest old are the fastest growing segment of the US population, normative neuropsychological data for nondemented oldest old Spanish speakers are nonexistent. This study sought to evaluate the neuropsychological performance of nondemented nonagenarians residing in Puerto Rico and to compare their results with those of a similar English-speaking sample from New York. Methods We studied 81 subjects who had a complete CERAD neuropsychological assessment in Spanish. We used multiple regression analysis to predict performance on the CERAD battery and ANCOVA to compare the Puerto Rico and New York samples. Results In 10 out of the 13 neuropsychological tests administered, education was a significant predictor of performance. There were significant differences between the Puerto Rico and New York groups only in the Trail Making Tests. Conclusions In this Puerto Rican sample, education was the strongest predictor of neuropsychological performance, which is consistent with previous studies. When education level is properly accounted for, the performance of Puerto Rican nonagenarians in the CERAD battery does not differ from the performance of US English-speaking nonagenarians. PMID:19293568

  10. The neuropsychological performance of nondemented Puerto Rican nonagenarians.

    PubMed

    Carrión-Baralt, José R; Meléndez-Cabrero, Josefina; Schnaider Beeri, Michal; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M

    2009-01-01

    While the oldest old are the fastest growing segment of the US population, normative neuropsychological data for nondemented oldest old Spanish speakers are nonexistent. This study sought to evaluate the neuropsychological performance of nondemented nonagenarians residing in Puerto Rico and to compare their results with those of a similar English-speaking sample from New York. We studied 81 subjects who had a complete CERAD neuropsychological assessment in Spanish. We used multiple regression analysis to predict performance on the CERAD battery and ANCOVA to compare the Puerto Rico and New York samples. In 10 out of the 13 neuropsychological tests administered, education was a significant predictor of performance. There were significant differences between the Puerto Rico and New York groups only in the Trail Making Tests. In this Puerto Rican sample, education was the strongest predictor of neuropsychological performance, which is consistent with previous studies. When education level is properly accounted for, the performance of Puerto Rican nonagenarians in the CERAD battery does not differ from the performance of US English-speaking nonagenarians.

  11. Genome empowerment for the Puerto Rican parrot – Amazona vittata

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A unique community-funded project in Puerto Rico has launched whole-genome sequencing of the critically endangered Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata), with interpretation by genome bioinformaticians and students, and deposition into public online databases. This is the first article that focuses on the whole genome of a parrot species, one endemic to the USA and recently threatened with extinction. It provides invaluable conservation tools and a vivid example of hopeful prospects for future genome assessment of so many new species. It also demonstrates inventive ways for smaller institutions to contribute to a field largely considered the domain of large sequencing centers. PMID:23587407

  12. Survival and causes of mortality in juvenile Puerto Rican parrots

    Treesearch

    G.D. Lindsey; W.J. Arendt; J. Kalina

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen juvenile Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) from wild nests in 1985, 1986 and 1987 were radio monitored an average of 110 +_ 15.9 (SE) d (range 4-209 d) post-fiedging.. Minimum survival was 67% (n = 3) in 1985, 100%( n = 4) in 1986 and 43% (n = 7) in 1987. Most mortality (three of five deaths) occurred during the first 35 d following fledging. A major...

  13. African Ancestry and Lung Function in Puerto Rican Children

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, John M.; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Klei, Lambertus; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, Michael; Boutaoui, Nadia; Forno, Erick; Cloutier, Michelle; Datta, Soma; Kelly, Roxanne; Paul, Kathryn; Sylvia, Jody; Calvert, Deanna; Thornton-Thompson, Sherell; Wakefield, Dorothy; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Puerto Ricans and African Americans share a significant proportion of African ancestry. Recent findings suggest that African ancestry influences lung function in African American adults. Objective To examine whether a greater proportion of African ancestry is associated with lower FEV1 and FVC in Puerto Rican children, independently of socioeconomic status (SES), healthcare access or key environmental/lifestyle (EL) factors. Methods Cross-sectional case-control study of 943 Puerto Rican children ages 6 to 14 years with (n=520) and without (n=423) asthma (defined as physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the prior year) living in Hartford (CT, n=383) and San Juan (PR, n=560). We estimated the percentage of African racial ancestry in study participants using genome-wide genotypic data. We tested whether African ancestry is associated with FEV1 and FVC using linear regression. Multivariate models were adjusted for indicators of SES and healthcare, and selected EL exposures. Results After adjustment for household income and other covariates, each 20% increment in African ancestry was significantly associated with lower pre-bronchodilator(BD) FEV1 (−105 ml, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −159 ml to −51 ml, P <0.001) and FVC (−133 ml, 95% CI −197 ml to −69 ml, P <0.001), and post-BD FEV1 (−152 ml, 95% CI=−210 ml to −94 ml, P <0.001) and FVC (−145 ml, 95% CI= −211 to −79 ml, P <0.001) in children with asthma. Similar but weaker associations were found for pre- and post-BD FEV1 (change for each 20% increment in African ancestry= −78 ml, 95% CI= −131 to −25 ml, P=0.004), and for post-BD FVC among children without asthma. Conclusions Genetic and/or EL factors correlated with African ancestry may influence childhood lung function in Puerto Ricans. PMID:22560959

  14. Neighborhood socioeconomic context and change in allostatic load among older Puerto Ricans: The Boston Puerto Rican health study.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Marcia P; Osypuk, Theresa L; Arevalo, Sandra; Tucker, Katherine L; Falcon, Luis M

    2015-05-01

    Neighborhood context may influence health and health disparities. However, most studies have been constrained by cross-sectional designs that limit causal inference due to failing to establish temporal order of exposure and disease. We tested the impact of baseline neighborhood context (neighborhood socioeconomic status factor at the block-group level, and relative income of individuals compared to their neighbors) on allostatic load two years later. We leveraged data from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study, a prospective cohort of aging Puerto Rican adults (aged 45-75 at baseline), with change in AL modeled between baseline and the 2nd wave of follow-up using two-level hierarchical linear regression models. Puerto Rican adults with higher income, relative to their neighbors, exhibited lower AL after two years, after adjusting for NSES, age, gender, individual-level SES, length of residence, and city. After additional control for baseline AL, this association was attenuated to marginal significance. We found no significant association of NSES with AL. Longitudinal designs are an important tool to understand how neighborhood contexts influence health and health disparities.

  15. Family Structure, Transitions and Psychiatric Disorders Among Puerto Rican Children.

    PubMed

    Santesteban-Echarri, Olga; Eisenberg, Ruth E; Bird, Hector R; Canino, Glorisa J; Duarte, Cristiane S

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines whether family structure and its transitions are associated with internalizing and externalizing psychiatric disorders among Puerto Rican-origin children. It uses longitudinal data (three waves) from the Boricua Youth Study, which includes probability samples of children in the South Bronx (New York) and San Juan (Puerto Rico) (n = 2,142). We also examine factors which may explain how family structure and transitions may be related to child psychiatric disorders. Our results show that for both internalizing and externalizing disorders there were no significant differences between children of cohabiting (biological or step) parents or of single parents compared to children of married biological parents. In Puerto Rico only, transitioning once from a two-parent family to a single-parent family was related to child internalizing disorders. Family transitions were not associated with externalizing disorders at either site. Context may be an important factor shaping the risk that family dissolution is followed by an internalizing disorder among children.

  16. Puerto Rican Karst-A Vital Resource

    Treesearch

    Ariel E. Lugo; Leopoldo Miranda Castro; Abel Vale; Tania del Mar López; Enrique Hernández Prieto; Andrés García Martinó; Alberto R. Puente Rolón; Adrianne G. Tossas; Donald A. McFarlane; Tom Miller; Armando Rodríguez; Joyce Lundberg; John Thomlinson; José Colón; Johannes H. Schellekens; Olga Ramos; Eileen Helmer

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The limestone region of Puerto Rico covers about 27.5 percent of the island’s surface and is subdivided into the northern, southern, and dispersed limestone areas. All limestone areas have karst features. The karst belt is that part of the northern limestone with the most spectacular surficial karst landforms. It covers 142,544 ha or 65...

  17. The Puerto Ricans: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivo, Paquita, Ed.

    The initial selection of titles for this bibliography was based on a survey of library catalogs as well as numerous existing lists and partial bibliographies on Puerto Rico. Careful search led to a bibliography that, although selected, is also retrospective, broad, and balanced. It is retrospective in the sense that the first known published works…

  18. Active anting in the Puerto Rican tanager

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, W.B.; Kepler, C.B.

    1970-01-01

    Anting, a bird’s intentional exposure of its body surface to chemical substances secreted by ants or other agents, has been recorded in over 20 species of birds of 40 families, mostly within the order Passeriformes. Our observations of anting in the Puerto Rico tanager (Neospingus speculiferus) extend the phenomenon to a new genus and the 14th species of the Thraupidae.

  19. The Puerto Ricans: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivo, Paquita, Ed.

    The initial selection of titles for this bibliography was based on a survey of library catalogs as well as numerous existing lists and partial bibliographies on Puerto Rico. Careful search led to a bibliography that, although selected, is also retrospective, broad, and balanced. It is retrospective in the sense that the first known published works…

  20. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors among older Puerto Rican adults living in Massachusetts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There remains limited research on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Puerto Rican adults. We compared lifestyle and CVD risk factors in Puerto Rican men and women with normal fasting glucose (NFG), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or type 2 diabetes (T2D), and investigated achievement of Am...

  1. Association between BDNF-rs6265 and obesity in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study is to examine a functional variant (rs6265) in the BDNF gene interacting with dietary intake modulate obesity traits in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study population. BDNF rs6265 was genotyped in 1147 Puerto Ricans (aged 45-75 years), and examined for association with o...

  2. Young Puerto Rican Children's Exploration of Racial Discourses within the Figured Worlds of Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castrodad-Rodriguez, Patricia Margarita

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the racial discourses of six and seven year old Puerto Rican children participating in small group literature circles over one academic year. The main research question is "How do Puerto Rican young children in a multiage classroom construct race through dialogue within the figured worlds of literature circles?" This study…

  3. 40 CFR 409.80 - Applicability; description of the Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory. 409.80 Section 409.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Puerto Rican Raw Cane Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.80 Applicability; description of the...

  4. 40 CFR 409.80 - Applicability; description of the Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory. 409.80 Section 409.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Puerto Rican Raw Cane Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.80 Applicability; description of the...

  5. 40 CFR 409.80 - Applicability; description of the Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory. 409.80 Section 409.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Puerto Rican Raw Cane Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.80 Applicability; description of the...

  6. 40 CFR 409.80 - Applicability; description of the Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory. 409.80 Section 409.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Puerto Rican Raw Cane Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.80 Applicability; description of the...

  7. 40 CFR 409.80 - Applicability; description of the Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Puerto Rican raw cane sugar processing subcategory. 409.80 Section 409.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Puerto Rican Raw Cane Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.80 Applicability; description of the...

  8. What about the Teachers and the Classes? Puerto Rican Students in Chicago Share Their Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Erica R.

    This paper explores Puerto Rican high school students' experiences in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS). Data were collected via individual and group interviews with Puerto Rican students, focusing on the relationships, or lack thereof, among participants and their teachers and counselors and the relevance and/or interest, or lack thereof, of…

  9. Home Style Puerto Rican: A Study of Language Maintenance and Use in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urzua, Alfredo; Gomez, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    This study explores Spanish language maintenance in Southbridge, Massachusetts, a suburban town with a vibrant Puerto Rican community. The investigation focuses on the extent to which Southbridge Puerto Ricans use Spanish and English at home, and their attitudes toward Spanish language maintenance. Survey data, especially the impact of factors…

  10. Puerto Rican Students in U.S. Schools. Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Sonia, Ed.

    This collection of papers presents scholarly writings and personal reflections on Puerto Rican students in American schools. Following "Introduction and Overview" (Sonia Nieto), there are 12 chapters in five parts. Part 1, "Historical and Sociopolitical Context," includes: (1) "Puerto Rican Students in U.S. Schools: A Brief History" (Sonia Nieto);…

  11. Dominican and Puerto Rican Women in Partnerships and Their Sexual Risk Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Claudia L.; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2007-01-01

    This study compares demographic characteristics, sexual risk factors for HIV/STI, and cultural predictors of sexual risk among 254 Dominican and 1,012 Puerto Rican women using outpatient health care in New York City. More Dominicans were born outside continental United States and were employed, whereas more Puerto Ricans were single and less…

  12. Young Puerto Rican Children's Exploration of Racial Discourses within the Figured Worlds of Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castrodad-Rodriguez, Patricia Margarita

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the racial discourses of six and seven year old Puerto Rican children participating in small group literature circles over one academic year. The main research question is "How do Puerto Rican young children in a multiage classroom construct race through dialogue within the figured worlds of literature circles?" This study…

  13. Co-Evolution in an Outlying Ethnic Community: The Puerto Ricans of Hartford, Connecticut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backstrand, Jeffrey R.; Schensul, Stephen

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing a model of ethnic community/host community co-evolution, describes interactions between the host environment and the Puerto Rican community of Hartford. Proposes a model for understanding smaller Puerto Rican communities--those outside the large urban centers usually studied. (GC)

  14. Overlapping Influence and Linguistic Assimilation in Second Generation Puerto Rican English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfram, Walt

    The English spoken by second generation Puerto Ricans in Harlem is influenced by black English heard in the surrounding community, standard English used in the school, and the Spanish-influenced English used by the first generation Puerto Rican community. The study of these influences is conducted according to recently developed sociolinguistic…

  15. Education and Imperialism: The Puerto Rican Experience in Higher Education, 1898-1986. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Fraticelli, Carlos

    An integrated historical account of the Puerto Rican experience in higher education is presented by the Higher Education Task Force of the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos of Hunter College, City University of New York. The present situation of Puerto Ricans in higher education on the Island and in the United States reflects the plight Puerto…

  16. Longitudinal Development of Antisocial Behaviors in Young and Early Adolescent Puerto Rican Children at Two Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Davies, Mark; Canino, Glorisa; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Shen, Sa; Loeber, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This report provides descriptive longitudinal findings over three waves of a study designed to assess the development of antisocial behaviors in young and early adolescent Puerto Rican children at two sites. Method: Through the use of standard assessment measures, representative samples of Puerto Rican children of both genders 5 to 13…

  17. Food Insecurity Is Associated with Acculturation and Social Networks in Puerto Rican Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhokarh, Rajanigandha; Himmelgreen, David A.; Peng, Yu-Kuei; Segura-Perez, Sofia; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether acculturation and social networks influence household food insecurity in an inner-city Puerto Rican community. Methods: A survey was administered to 200 low-income female Puerto Rican caregivers with at least 1 child 12-72 months old living in Hartford, CT. Food insecurity was measured with the Radimer/Cornell Hunger…

  18. Food Insecurity Is Associated with Acculturation and Social Networks in Puerto Rican Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhokarh, Rajanigandha; Himmelgreen, David A.; Peng, Yu-Kuei; Segura-Perez, Sofia; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether acculturation and social networks influence household food insecurity in an inner-city Puerto Rican community. Methods: A survey was administered to 200 low-income female Puerto Rican caregivers with at least 1 child 12-72 months old living in Hartford, CT. Food insecurity was measured with the Radimer/Cornell Hunger…

  19. Perspectives of Puerto Rican Adults about Heart Health and a Potential Community Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorova, Irina L. G.; Tejada, Shirley; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Puerto Ricans are the second largest Hispanic group in the United States, and older adults have significant health disparities. Educational programs that address heart disease risk for this population have rarely been developed and implemented. Purpose: To address this gap, the Heart Healthy Initiative for Puerto Rican adults is being…

  20. Association between sleep duration, insomnia symptoms and bone mineral density in older Puerto Rican adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To examine the association between sleep patterns (sleep duration and insomnia symptoms) and total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) among older Boston Puerto Rican adults. Materials/Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study including 750 Puerto Rican adults, aged 47–79 y livi...

  1. Studies of Puerto Rican Children in American Schools; a Preliminary Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordasco, Frank M., Comp.; Covello, Leonard, Comp.

    This unannotated bibliography lists works dealing with Puerto Rican children and their experience in the mainland American schools; however, it makes no attempt to cite comprehensively studies which deal with migration or the overall experience of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Unpublished and published materials are listed separately; s me…

  2. Perceptions of Dominican Spanish and Dominican Self-Perception in the Puerto Rican Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budenbender, Eva-Maria Suarez

    2009-01-01

    The contact between Dominicans and Puerto Ricans is targeted for study as much for its linguistic import as for its social context. Dominican and Puerto Rican Spanish are considered varieties of Caribbean Spanish that differ only by a few phonological and syntactic patterns and a small number of lexical items. Although both varieties are heavily…

  3. Puerto Rican Students in U.S. Schools. Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Sonia, Ed.

    This collection of papers presents scholarly writings and personal reflections on Puerto Rican students in American schools. Following "Introduction and Overview" (Sonia Nieto), there are 12 chapters in five parts. Part 1, "Historical and Sociopolitical Context," includes: (1) "Puerto Rican Students in U.S. Schools: A Brief History" (Sonia Nieto);…

  4. The Ethnic Queue in the U.S.: The Case of the Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Clara

    What effects will racial and ethnic discrimination have on Puerto Ricans? Will Puerto Ricans go the route of previous immigrant groups? Or will they be like blacks? What bearings does all this have on other ethnic groups? On blacks? The examination of the historical context begins with a discussion of the origins of ethnic and racial prejudice in…

  5. Puerto Rican Women and Children: Issues in Health, Growth, and Development. Topics in Social Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamberty, Gontran, Ed.; Coll, Cynthia Garcia, Ed.

    Noting that most socioeconomic and demographic indicators are negative for Puerto Rican mothers and children, this book enhances the current knowledge about the growth and development of Puerto Rican mothers and children, and discusses the likely social origins of their suboptimal experiences. Thirteen papers are presented. The opening chapter…

  6. Home Style Puerto Rican: A Study of Language Maintenance and Use in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urzua, Alfredo; Gomez, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    This study explores Spanish language maintenance in Southbridge, Massachusetts, a suburban town with a vibrant Puerto Rican community. The investigation focuses on the extent to which Southbridge Puerto Ricans use Spanish and English at home, and their attitudes toward Spanish language maintenance. Survey data, especially the impact of factors…

  7. Perceptions of Dominican Spanish and Dominican Self-Perception in the Puerto Rican Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budenbender, Eva-Maria Suarez

    2009-01-01

    The contact between Dominicans and Puerto Ricans is targeted for study as much for its linguistic import as for its social context. Dominican and Puerto Rican Spanish are considered varieties of Caribbean Spanish that differ only by a few phonological and syntactic patterns and a small number of lexical items. Although both varieties are heavily…

  8. Perspectives of Puerto Rican Adults about Heart Health and a Potential Community Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorova, Irina L. G.; Tejada, Shirley; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Puerto Ricans are the second largest Hispanic group in the United States, and older adults have significant health disparities. Educational programs that address heart disease risk for this population have rarely been developed and implemented. Purpose: To address this gap, the Heart Healthy Initiative for Puerto Rican adults is being…

  9. Co-Evolution in an Outlying Ethnic Community: The Puerto Ricans of Hartford, Connecticut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backstrand, Jeffrey R.; Schensul, Stephen

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing a model of ethnic community/host community co-evolution, describes interactions between the host environment and the Puerto Rican community of Hartford. Proposes a model for understanding smaller Puerto Rican communities--those outside the large urban centers usually studied. (GC)

  10. The Puerto Ricans--Two Communities, One Culture. (Los Puertorriquenos--Dos Comunidades, Una Cultura.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivo, Paquita

    1980-01-01

    Puerto Rican roots stem from the ethnic mixture of Indians, Europeans, and Africans. This article describes the advent of each of the groups on the island, the historical and cultural impact each made, and the retention of heritage among Puerto Rican migrants to the U.S. (DS)

  11. CONSTRUCTION OF A GENERAL GROUP TEST FOR PUERTO RICAN STUDENTS IN THE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROCA, PABLO

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO DEVELOP A GROUP TEST OF GENERAL ABILITY WHICH WILL ACCURATELY ASSESS THE INTELLECTUAL CAPACITIES OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY STUDENTS IN THE PUERTO RICAN SCHOOLS. THE OBJECTIVES WERE--(1) TO DETERMINE WHAT COMMON INTELLECTUAL TASKS INDICATE MENTAL ABILITY IN SPANISH-SPEAKING PUERTO RICAN AND OTHER ENGLISH-SPEAKING AMERICAN…

  12. The Puerto Ricans--Two Communities, One Culture. (Los Puertorriquenos--Dos Comunidades, Una Cultura.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivo, Paquita

    1980-01-01

    Puerto Rican roots stem from the ethnic mixture of Indians, Europeans, and Africans. This article describes the advent of each of the groups on the island, the historical and cultural impact each made, and the retention of heritage among Puerto Rican migrants to the U.S. (DS)

  13. The Puerto Rican Community and Natural Support Systems: Implications for the Education of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Melvin

    This report explores how service providers and educators can better understand, support, and work with Puerto Rican natural support systems through a variety of collaborative strategies. A first section presents a definition of Puerto Rican natural support systems and a discussion of how they are operationalized, and describes the following four…

  14. The American Pressure Cooker...The Puerto Rican on the Mainland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soy, Rosa H.; Sanchez, Isabel

    The purpose of this essay is to uncover the factors which have so greatly affected the educational and social aspect of the Puerto Rican's life in the New York metropolitan area. It is concluded that school systems are obviously not going to foster disorder or encourage criticism. The initiative is up to the community. The Puerto Rican community…

  15. IQ's of Puerto Rican Head Start Children on the Vane Kindergarten Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John F.; D'Angelo, Rita

    1971-01-01

    Comparisons between Vane's standardization sample and the Puerto Rican group yielded no significant differences in full scale scores. On the Vocabulary subtest, Puerto Rican subjects earned lower mean scores; on the non-verbal subtests, they scored higher than the normative group. (Author)

  16. Cuento Therapy. Folktales as a Culturally Sensitive Psychotherapy for Puerto Rican Children. Monograph No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, Giuseppe; And Others

    A seven-year project developing and testing cuento therapy, a form of child psychotherapy in which Puerto Rican mothers recount to their children folktales taken from Puerto Rican culture, is described and evaluated in this monograph. Chapter 1 explains how the research presented in later chapters fits into substantially broader patterns of…

  17. Informal Unions among Mainland Puerto Ricans: Cohabitation or an Alternative to Legal Marriage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landale, Nancy S.; Fennelly, Katherine

    1992-01-01

    Examined meaning of informal unions among mainland Puerto Rican women. Compared characteristics of women in informal unions to those of single and married women; assessed whether Puerto Rican women defined their informal unions as nonmarital cohabitation or form of marriage; and examined predictors of women's definitions of informal unions. Found…

  18. Book Reading Interactions between African American and Puerto Rican Head Start Children and Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Nimmo, Diana; Cohen, Risa; Draheim, Heather Clemons; Johnson, Amy Achenbach

    2005-01-01

    In keeping with a sociocultural view of children's literacy development, this study investigated the book reading behaviors of African American and Puerto Rican mothers and their Head Start children. Ten African American and 10 Puerto Rican mothers and their children participated. The communicative behaviors of the mothers and children produced…

  19. African ancestry and lung function in Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Brehm, John M; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Klei, Lambertus; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, Michael M; Boutaoui, Nadia; Forno, Erick; Cloutier, Michelle M; Datta, Soma; Kelly, Roxanne; Paul, Kathryn; Sylvia, Jody; Calvert, Deanna; Thornton-Thompson, Sherell; Wakefield, Dorothy; Litonjua, Augusto A; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2012-06-01

    Puerto Rican and African American subjects share a significant proportion of African ancestry. Recent findings suggest that African ancestry influences lung function in African American adults. We sought to examine whether a greater proportion of African ancestry is associated with lower FEV(1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) in Puerto Rican children independently of socioeconomic status, health care access, or key environmental/lifestyle factors. We performed a cross-sectional case-control study of 943 Puerto Rican children aged 6 to 14 years with (n= 520) and without (n= 423) asthma (defined as physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the prior year) living in Hartford, Connecticut (n= 383), and San Juan, Puerto Rico (n= 560). We estimated the percentage of African racial ancestry in study participants using genome-wide genotypic data. We tested whether African ancestry is associated with FEV(1) and FVC using linear regression. Multivariate models were adjusted for indicators of socioeconomic status and health care and selected environmental/lifestyle exposures. After adjustment for household income and other covariates, each 20% increment in African ancestry was significantly associated with lower prebronchodilator FEV(1) (-105 mL; 95% CI, -159 to -51 mL; P< .001) and FVC (-133 mL; 95% CI, -197 to -69 mL; P< .001) and postbronchodilator FEV(1) (-152 mL; 95% CI, -210 to -94 mL; P< .001) and FVC (-145 mL; 95% CI, -211 to -79 mL; P< .001) in children with asthma. Similar but weaker associations were found for prebronchodilator and postbronchodilator FEV(1) (change for each 20% increment in African ancestry, -78 mL; 95% CI, -131 to -25 mL; P= .004) and for postbronchodilator FVC among children without asthma. Genetic factors, environmental/lifestyle factors, or both correlated with African ancestry might influence childhood lung function in Puerto Rican subjects. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  20. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Acculturation Stress Among Puerto Rican Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Kevin P.; Swendsen, Joel D.; Dierker, Lisa; Canino, Glorisa; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2007-01-01

    Background Although acculturation to the United States has been associated with an increase in substance, mood, and anxiety disorders in Latino populations, few studies have examined this concept relative to comorbidity among these syndromes. Methods This study: (1) compares the prevalence and patterns of psychiatric comorbidity among Puerto Ricans with substance use disorders living in San Juan (Puerto Rico) to those who have migrated to New Haven (Connecticut); and (2) examines the association between acculturation-related stress and the prevalence and patterns of psychiatric comorbidity among those who have migrated to New Haven. Results Lifetime levels of nearly all comorbid psychiatric disorders among respondents with substance use disorders (SUD) was generally similar across sites. However, the risk of any co-occurring psychiatric disorder was higher among SUD cases in New Haven who reported high levels of total acculturation stress and family-specific acculturation stress. These findings were generally accounted for by associations between affective disorders and high scores on these indicators of acculturation stress. Conclusions The overall prevalence and patterns of psychiatric comorbidity are remarkably similar among Puerto Rican substance abusers whether they live in San Juan or have migrated to New Haven, thereby demonstrating robustness to differences in geographic location. Nevertheless, the degree of acculturation-related family stress is positively associated with co-occurring substance and psychiatric disorders, particularly affective disorders. Intervention in family strain related to the acculturation process may diminish the development of comorbid mental disorders and assist in implementing successful treatment of substance abuse. PMID:17543714

  1. Biculturality among Puerto Rican adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cortés, D E; Rogler, L H; Malgady, R G

    1994-10-01

    Identified the concept of acculturation as a cornerstone of immigration research, while questioning assumptions about zero-sum cultural change in acculturation scales and in procedures assessing biculturality. Involvements in the host society culture and the culture of origin should be assessed separately in order to reflect the complexities of the cultural interactions immigrants and their offspring experience. To evaluate this prescription, we convened focus groups of Puerto Rican adults to discuss their cultural experiences in Puerto Rico and in the United States. Discussions were content analyzed to develop acculturation items. Factor analysis of the responses of 403 first- and second-generation adults yielded two general factors, involvement in American culture and involvement in Puerto Rican culture, which demonstrated modest reliability, relative independence, and moderate correlations with traditional acculturation scale validators. Results of the study challenge the assumption of mutual cultural exclusivity in acculturative change; enable the measurement of degree of biculturality; and provide future directions for the assessment of acculturation in domains other than language usage. The concept of acculturation is integrated with recent formulations in community psychology which advocate a deeper and more extensive commitment to studying the implications of cultural phenomena and greater focus on the growing cultural diversity in the United States.

  2. Diet, interleukin-17, and childhood asthma in Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Forno, Erick; Brehm, John M; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Rivera-Soto, Winna; Campos, Hannia; Litonjua, Augusto A; Alcorn, John F; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-10-01

    Dietary patterns might influence the pathogenesis of asthma in Puerto Ricans, the ethnic group most affected by this disease in the United States. To examine the association among diet, T-helper cell type 17 cytokines, and asthma in Puerto Rican children. As part of a case-control study of 678 Puerto Rican children 6 to 14 years old in San Juan, participants completed a 75-item questionnaire on the child's food consumption in the prior week. Foods were aggregated into 7 groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, dairy, fats, and sweets. Logistic regression was used to evaluate consumption frequency of each group, plasma T-helper cell type 17 cytokine levels, and asthma. Based on this analysis, a food score (range -2 [unhealthy diet: high consumption of dairy products and sweets, low consumption of vegetables and grains] to +2 [healthy diet: high consumption of grains and vegetables, low consumption of dairy and sweets]) was created to identify dietary patterns. High consumption of grains was associated with lower odds of asthma (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33-0.82), whereas frequent consumption of dairy products (aOR 1.93, 95% CI 1.32-2.84) or sweets (aOR 1.82, 95% CI 1.08-2.72) was associated with higher odds of asthma. A healthier diet (each 1-point increment in food score) was associated with lower levels of interleukin-17F (β = -1.48 pg/mL, 95% CI -1.78 to -1.20) and with 36% decreased odds of asthma (aOR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77). A healthy diet, with frequent consumption of vegetables and grains and low consumption of dairy products and sweets, was associated with lower levels of interleulin-17F and decreased odds of childhood asthma in Puerto Ricans. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Sex Differences in Trajectories of Offending Among Puerto Rican Youth

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Wesley G.; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Piquero, Alex R.; Odgers, Candice L.; Bird, Hector; Canino, Glorisa

    2011-01-01

    Although sex is one of the strongest correlates of crime, contentions remain regarding the necessity of sex-specific theories of crime. The current study examines delinquent trajectories across sex among Puerto Rican youth socialized in two different cultural contexts (Bronx, United States and San Juan, Puerto Rico). Results indicate: similar substantive offending trajectories across males and females within each cultural context; that males exhibit a higher frequency of offending and higher levels of risk factors for delinquency; and there more similarities than differences in how risk/protective factors relate to patterns of offending across male versus female youth. Study limitations and implications for sex-specific criminological theories are also discussed. PMID:21701603

  4. Perceived Discrimination and Antisocial Behaviors in Puerto Rican Children

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Fernando; López, Irene; Guarnaccia, Peter; Ramirez, Rafael; Canino, Glorisa; Bird, Hector

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether perceived discrimination was related to antisocial behaviors (ASB) in a probability sample of Puerto Rican children living in the South Bronx, New York and the San Juan Metropolitan area of Puerto Rico (N= 1,271). After adjusting for a host of well-known factors associated with ASB, such as sociodemographic variables (i.e., age, gender, household composition), psychosocial stressors (i.e., stressful life events, exposure to violence), and various forms of violence and abuse (i.e., coercive parental discipline, verbal, psychological, physical and sexual abuse), perceived discrimination remained a robust correlate of ASB among both samples. Findings are discussed with reference to the detrimental associations of perceived discrimination. PMID:21113817

  5. Fungal Exposure, Atopy, and Asthma Exacerbations in Puerto Rican Children

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Joshua; Forno, Erick; Brehm, John; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Thorne, Peter S.; Metwali, Nervana; Canino, Glorisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucan is a component of the fungal cell wall that is used as a marker of fungal exposure. Little is known about indoor glucan, atopy, and asthma exacerbations among children living in tropical environments such as Puerto Rico. Our objective was to examine whether glucan exposure is associated with degree of atopy or visits to the emergency department (ED)/urgent care for asthma in Puerto Rican children. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 317 children aged 6 to 14 years with (cases, n = 160) and without (control subjects, n = 157) asthma in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Our primary outcomes were the number of positive skin tests to allergens (range, 0–15) and (in cases only) having had at least one visit to the ED/urgent care for asthma in the prior year. Levels of glucan, endotoxin, peptidoglycan, and five allergens (Der p 1, Bla g 2, Fel d 1, Can f 1, and Mus m 1) were measured in samples of house dust. Linear or logistic regression was used for the multivariate analysis. Measurements and Main Results: In a multivariate analysis adjusting for case-control status, mouse allergen, and other covariates, children exposed to glucan levels in the second and third quartiles had approximately two more positive skin tests than those in the lowest quartile (P < 0.01 in both instances). Among children with asthma, exposure to the highest quartile of glucan was associated with nearly ninefold greater odds of one or more visits to the ED/urgent care for asthma (95% confidence interval for adjusted odds ratio, 2.7–28.4; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our results suggest that indoor fungal exposure leads to an increased degree of atopy and visits to the ED/urgent care for asthma in Puerto Rican children. PMID:24915164

  6. Donde Estan los Estudiantes Puertorriquenos/os Exitosos? [Where Are the Academically Successful Puerto Rican Students?]: Success Factors of High-Achieving Puerto Rican High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene; Velez, William; Garrett, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the 4 success factors that 10 working class Puerto Rican urban high school students attributed to their high academic achievement. These success factors were (a) the acquisition of social capital through religiosity and participation in school and community-based extracurricular activities, (b) having a strong Puerto Rican…

  7. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.12. The Puerto Rican and the Arts. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module provides readers a broad view of the development of music and the plastic arts in Puerto Rico. At the same time, the module includes the names of Puerto Ricans who have found distinction in these fields of endeavor. A preassessment test, learning alternatives, postassessment test, and various narratives concerned with the theme of the…

  8. Migration and HIV Risk Behaviors: Puerto Rican Drug Injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Deren, Sherry; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Colón, Hector M.; Andia, Jonny F.; Robles, Rafaela R.; Oliver-Velez, Denise; Finlinson, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We compared injection-related HIV risk behaviors of Puerto Rican current injection drug users (IDUs) living in New York City and in Puerto Rico who also had injected in the other location with those who had not. Methods. We recruited Puerto Rican IDUs in New York City (n = 561) and in Puerto Rico (n = 312). Of the former, 39% were “newcomers,” having previously injected in Puerto Rico; of the latter, 14% were “returnees,” having previously injected in New York. We compared risk behaviors within each sample between those with and without experience injecting in the other location. Results. Newcomers reported higher levels of risk behaviors than other New York IDUs. Newcomer status (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.62) and homelessness (adjusted OR = 2.52) were significant predictors of “shooting gallery” use; newcomer status also predicted paraphernalia sharing (adjusted OR = 1.67). Returnee status was not related to these variables. Conclusions. Intervention services are needed that target mobile populations who are coming from an environment of high-risk behavior to one of low-risk behavior. PMID:12721149

  9. The Insular Vision: Pedreira's Interpretation of Puerto Rican Culture. Centro Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Juan

    In an attempt to assess and provide an understanding of many aspects of Puerto Rican culture in the United States and in Puerto Rico, this document contains a detailed critical treatment of Antonio S. Pedreira's "Insularismo: Ensayos de interpretacion puertorriquena." Described as being the single most influential study of Puerto Rican…

  10. Interpretations of cigarette advertisement warning labels by Philadelphia Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nancy; Gilpin, Dawn R; Lenos, Melissa; Hobbs, Renee

    2011-09-01

    This study examined Philadelphia Puerto Ricans' interpretations of the Surgeon General's warnings that appear on cigarette packaging and in advertisements. In-home family focus groups in which participants were asked to comment on magazine cigarette advertisements showed a great variety of interpretations of the legally mandated warning labels. These findings (a) corroborate and add to research in public health and communications regarding the possibility of wide variations in message interpretations and (b) support the call for public health messages to be carefully tested for effectiveness among different social groups. The article's focus on Puerto Ricans addresses the problem of misleading conclusions that can arise from aggregating all Latino subpopulations into one group. The use of a naturalistic setting to examine interpretations of messages about smoking departs from the experimental methods typically used for such research and provides new evidence that even a seemingly straightforward message can be interpreted in multiple ways. Understanding and addressing differences in message interpretation can guide public health campaigns aimed at reducing health disparities. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  11. Puerto Rican Families Who Have Children with Disabilities: A Comparison between Families Living in Puerto Rico and Families Living in Florida. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Blanes, Maria E.

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study that compared family needs and sources of support perceived by 55 Puerto Rican mothers of young children (ages birth to 5 years) with disabilities residing in Puerto Rico and 39 of their Puerto Rican counterparts living in Florida. The relationship among perceived family needs, sources of support, and…

  12. Family life among mainland Puerto Ricans in New York City slums.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Rohde, I

    1976-01-01

    Puerto Rican families who migrated to New York City in the 1950s are threatened by a system of impersonal relationships and norms which are at odds with their traditional values. Puerto Rican families have a tendency to have many children. A woman must have a child as soon as possible after marriage to show the community and her husband that she is fertile. They are forbidden by their husbands to use contraceptives, and most Puerto Rican men refuse to use contraceptives because of a machismo complex. Many of the women resort to sterilization. Common-law marriages are found frequently among the lower socioeconomic families. Mainland Puerto Rican families find problems trying to raise girls as virgins and boys with sexual freedom. The daughters want to adopt the dominant pattern of mainland society.

  13. Development of the Inventario de Comportamiento Escolar (IDCE) for Puerto Rican Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The "Inventario de Comportamiento Escolar" is a teacher rating inventory for the assessment of Puerto Rican children, particularly those with a behavior pattern indicative of attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, or academic underachievement. (JHZ)

  14. Development of the Inventario de Comportamiento Escolar (IDCE) for Puerto Rican Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The "Inventario de Comportamiento Escolar" is a teacher rating inventory for the assessment of Puerto Rican children, particularly those with a behavior pattern indicative of attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, or academic underachievement. (JHZ)

  15. Comparison of Bender-Gestalt and WISC Correlations for Puerto Rican, White and Negro Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmorale, Ann M.; Brown, Fred

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated whether a positive relationship between Bender-Gestalt performance and intelligence test scores would be found for Puerto Rican children and, as well, the generalizability of previous results obtained with Negro children. (Author/RK)

  16. Focus groups: examining a community-based group intervention for depressed Puerto Rican women.

    PubMed

    Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R

    2008-07-01

    Puerto Ricans manifest high rates of depression but avoid seeking treatment. The purpose of this pilot was to learn directly from Puerto Rican women how culturally appropriate they would consider a proposed community-based intervention for treating depression. Interactive activities were reviewed by two focus groups of women (N = 16), all working in community-based health programs. All activities (e.g., writing, role playing, and music) except individual drawing were deemed appropriate. Categories that emerged were family/community values, mainland/non-mainland cultural variances, communication style, religion, education/occupational variances, health beliefs, Puerto Rican traditions/customs, emotions, and coping skills. Categories provided guidance for refining a community-based intervention for treating depression in Puerto Rican women.

  17. Performance of Negro and Puerto Rican Head Start Children on the Vane Kindergarten Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John F.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The data of the present study supplement those given by Vane and also provide a context in which to assess the differential abilities of Negro and Puerto Rican Head Start Children on verbal and performance tasks. (Author)

  18. Gratitude and longing: Meanings of health in aging for Puerto Rican adults in the mainland.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Irina L G; Guzzardo, Mariana T; Adams, Wallis E; Falcón, Luis M

    2015-12-01

    Puerto Rican adults in the United States mainland live with socioeconomic and health disparities. To understand their contextual experience of aging, we interviewed participants in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. Through a Thematic Analysis we identify themes and tensions: normalization and acceptance of aging; gratitude; the importance of aging within social networks; longing to return to Puerto Rico at older age. We address the tensions between 'acceptance' and fatalismo as a cultural belief, and a function of structural barriers. The experience of aging is discussed in the context of Puerto Rico's history and continued dependence on the United States.

  19. Voices: Bilingual Youth Constructing and Defending Their Identities across Borders, a Binational Study of Puerto Rican Circular Migrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jesus, Ramon Vega; Sayers, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes an interview-based investigation of Puerto Rican circular migrant students (CMSs) between Puerto Rico and the Northeastern United States. The goals of the study were (1) to identify the perceptions of Puerto Rican CMSs related to the reasons for migration (M) and circular migration (CM), and (2) to identify their…

  20. Masculinity and gender roles among Puerto Rican men: machismo on the U.S. mainland.

    PubMed

    Torres, J B

    1998-01-01

    The literature on masculinity and gender roles in American life has mostly over-looked Latino men, or has stereotyped them by means of a distorted concept of machismo. A reconceptualization of masculinity and machismo among Puerto Rican men is presented, based on a multidimensional view of their historical and current sociocultural reality. Relevant clinical and social services for Puerto Rican men are discussed and directions for future research are suggested.

  1. Bioactive Cycloperoxides Isolated from the Puerto Rican Sponge Plakortis halichondrioides

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Romero, Carlos; Ortiz, Idelisse; Vicente, Jan; Vera, Brunilda; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Nam, Sangkil; Jove, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Two new five-membered ring polyketide endoperoxides, epiplakinic acid F methyl ester (1) and epiplakinidioic acid (3), and a peroxide–lactone, plakortolide J (2), were isolated from the Puerto Rican sponge Plakortis halichondrioides, along with two previously reported cyclic peroxides, 4 and 5. The structures of the new metabolites were determined by spectroscopic and chemical analyses. The absolute stereostructures of 1, 2, and 5 were determined by degradation reactions followed by application of Kishi’s method for the assignment of absolute configuration of alcohols. Biological screening of cycloperoxides 1–5 and semisynthetic analogs 7–12 for cytotoxic activity against various human tumor cell lines revealed that compounds 3, 4 and 11 are very active. Upon assaying for antimalarial and antitubercular activity, some of the compounds tested showed strong activity against the pathogenic microbes Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:20923180

  2. Bioactive Cycloperoxides Isolated from the Puerto Rican Sponge Plakortis halichondrioides.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Romero, Carlos; Ortiz, Idelisse; Vicente, Jan; Vera, Brunilda; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Nam, Sangkil; Jove, Richard

    2010-10-22

    Two new five-membered-ring polyketide endoperoxides, epiplakinic acid F methyl ester (1) and epiplakinidioic acid (3), and a peroxide-lactone, plakortolide J (2), were isolated from the Puerto Rican sponge Plakortis halichondrioides, along with two previously reported cyclic peroxides, 4 and 5. The structures of the new metabolites were determined by spectroscopic and chemical analyses. The absolute stereostructures of 1, 2, and 5 were determined by degradation reactions followed by application of Kishi's method for the assignment of absolute configuration of alcohols. Biological screening of cycloperoxides 1-5 and semisynthetic analogues 7-12 for cytotoxic activity against various human tumor cell lines revealed that compounds 3, 4, and 11 are very active. Upon assaying for antimalarial and antitubercular activity, some of the compounds tested showed strong activity against the pathogenic microbes Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  3. Physical Activity in Puerto Rican Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Gómez, Maribel; Hughes, Daniel C; González-Mercado, Velda; Treviño-Whitaker, Rose A; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer survivors do not engage in appropriate levels of physical activity, despite the known benefits of such activity. This study aims to describe physical-activity levels and the barriers to it in a group of Puerto Rican breast cancer survivors, as well as detailing their preferences for an intervention. Participants who finished their chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for breast cancer at least 4 months prior to the study were included. Demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data were obtained. The Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) and questionnaires on exercise self-efficacy, barriers to self-efficacy, modeling, and social support were filled out by study participants. Data on access to exercise equipment and preferences regarding a physical-activity intervention were collected. Descriptive statistics and correlation analyses were performed. Fifty breast cancer survivors were recruited. Almost all the participants reported that they did not engage in any kind of strenuous physical activity (94%), with more than three fourths (76%) reporting that they did not even participate in any kind of moderate physical activity. The GLTEQ score was associated with barriers to selfefficacy, while the association with exercise self-efficacy approached significance (p = 0.055). Nearly half of the patients (44%) had access to exercise equipment. Preferred methods for the delivery of physical-activity interventions were participating in group settings (72%) and receiving material in the postal mail (44%). The study described herein reports on the low levels of physical activity being practiced by a group of Puerto Rican breast cancer survivors, despite the fact that many of them had access to exercise equipment and facilities. Further studies aimed at understanding breast cancer survivors' barriers to physical activity and at developing culturally competent interventions to increase the levels of such activity are warranted.

  4. Parental psychosocial stress and asthma morbidity in Puerto Rican twins

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Nancy E.; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Silberg, Judy L.; Canino, Glorisa; Rosner, Bernard A.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about paternal psychosocial factors and childhood asthma. Objective To examine the link between maternal and paternal psychosocial stress and asthma outcomes in young children. Methods Parents of 339 pairs of Puerto Rican twins were interviewed individually about their own psychosocial stress and about asthma in their children at age 1 and again about their child’s asthma at age 3. Fathers were asked about symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anti-social behavior. Mothers were asked about depressive symptoms. Outcomes assessed in children included recent asthma symptoms, oral steroid use and hospitalizations for asthma in the prior year, and asthma diagnosis. Generalized estimated equation models were used for the multivariate analysis of parental psychosocial stress and asthma morbidity in childhood. Results After multivariable adjustment, paternal PTSD symptoms, depression, and anti-social behavior were each associated with increased asthma symptoms at age 1 (e.g., OR =1.08 for each 1-point increase in PTSD score, 95% CI=1.03–1.14). Maternal depressive symptoms were associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations at age 1 year. At age 3 years, maternal depressive symptoms were associated with asthma diagnosis and hospitalizations for asthma (OR for each 1-point increase in symptoms=1.16, 95% CI=1.00–1.36]). In an analysis combining 1 and 3 year outcomes, paternal depression was associated with oral steroid use, maternal depressive symptoms were associated with asthma hospitalizations and asthma diagnosis, and parental depression was associated with hospitalizations for asthma. Conclusions Both paternal and maternal psychosocial factors may influence asthma morbidity in young Puerto Rican children. PMID:21194742

  5. Factors associated with Breast Cancer in Puerto Rican women

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Luisa; Alvarez-Garriga, Carolina; Matta, Jaime; Ortiz, Carmen; Vergne, Yeidyly; Vargas, Wanda; Acosta, Heidi; Ramírez, Jonathan; Perez-Mayoral, Julyann; Bayona, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer afflicting Puerto Rican women and accounts for more cancer-related deaths in this population than any other cancer. Methods Demographic, anthropometric, family history, and lifestyle data, as well as DNA repair capacity (DRC), were compared in 465 BC cases and 661 controls. Crude and multiple logistic regression-derived adjusted odds ratios were used as indicators of the associations between BC and the variables under study. Results A low DRC level, aging (> 61 years), family history of BC, and low education level had statistically significant associations with increased BC risk. Endometriosis, full-term pregnancy at an earlier age, higher parity, hysterectomy before age 50, multivitamin and calcium intake, and longer duration of breastfeeding significantly decreased BC risk. Conclusions This study discusses the major risk factors for BC in Puerto Rico (PR). Because many of these findings represent modifiable risk factors, they can translate into public health initiatives to lower BC risk. In addition, the possibility of using DRC as a simple screening tool for BC risk is explored. PMID:24206792

  6. Asthma prevalence among Hispanic adults in Puerto Rico and Hispanic adults of Puerto Rican descent in the United States - results from two national surveys.

    PubMed

    El Burai Félix, Suad; Bailey, Cathy M; Zahran, Hatice S

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess whether asthma prevalence differs between Hispanic adults living in Puerto Rico and Hispanic adults of Puerto Rican descent living in the United States. We used 2008-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, administered in Puerto Rico for Hispanic adults living in Puerto Rico (Hispanics in Puerto Rico), and 2008-2010 National Health Interview Survey data for Hispanic adults of Puerto Rican descent living in the United States (Puerto Rican Americans). We used 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to compare asthma prevalence between corresponding subgroups; non-overlapping CIs indicate statistical significance. Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression were used to assess the association between current asthma status and socio-demographic factors and health risk behaviors within each Puerto Rican population. Current asthma prevalence among Hispanics in Puerto Rico (7.0% [6.4%-7.7%]) was significantly lower than the prevalence among Puerto Rican Americans (15.6% [13.0%-18.1%]). The prevalence among almost all socio-demographic and health risk subgroups of Hispanics in Puerto Rico was significantly lower than the prevalence among the corresponding subgroups of Puerto Rican Americans. Adjusting for potential confounders did not alter the results. Asthma prevalence was significantly associated with obesity among Puerto Rican Americans (adjusted prevalence ratios [aPR]=1.5 [1.1-2.0]), and among Hispanics in Puerto Rico was associated with obesity (aPR=1.6 [1.3-1.9]), smoking (aPR=1.4 [1.1-1.9]) and being female (aPR=1.9 [1.5-2.4]). Asthma was more prevalent among Puerto Rican Americans than Hispanics in Puerto Rico. Although the observed associations did not explain all variations in asthma prevalence between these two populations, they may lay the foundation for future research.

  7. Awareness about factors that affect the management of hypertension in Puerto Rican patients.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Cunegundo; Martin, Autumn M; Wang, Fei; Horowitz, Sheryl

    2004-05-01

    There are few published reports describing the health status of Hispanic populations in the United States with chronic illnesses, such as hypertension. Most studies on hypertension in Hispanics are on Mexican-Americans and little data exist for other Hispanic subgroups, such as Puerto Ricans. Health-related issues specific to a particular Hispanic subgroup may not be generalizable to all Hispanics. Patients' perceptions and awareness of health-related issues specific to a particular medical condition play an important role in the management and outcome. The primary objective of the study is to determine if patients' general perceptions of hypertension, hypertension-related risk factors, complications, and life-style behavior modifications correlated with various patient demographics, such as age, gender, primary language, education level, socioeconomic status, marital status, health insurance category, and employment status. The working hypothesis is that patients who are older, unmarried, less educated, Spanish-speaking only, unemployed, and have low income, are more likely to report lack of awareness to various hypertension-related issues. Hospital-based ambulatory center with major emphasis on providing care to underserved populations of the surrounding community, of which Puerto Ricans comprised the predominant ethnic group. A single, bilingual interviewer administered a series of questions to Hispanic, hypertensive patients. Questions were divided into the following seven categories: patient knowledge and perception of the disease; diet and salt intake; tobacco use; alcohol use; weight control and exercise; and medication and alternative therapy use. Within each category were various questions designed to study the patients' knowledge of hypertension, self-reported compliance with behavior modifications, and patient education on these behaviors. Data from 19 Puerto Rican patients were collected and chi-square tests and pothoc power analyses were performed

  8. Reproductive success of the Puerto Rican vireo in a montane habitat

    Treesearch

    A.G. Tossas

    2008-01-01

    studied the reproductive success of the Puerto Rican Vireo (Vireo latimeri) from 1998 to 2000 in Maricao State Forest, a montane reserve in the southwestern part of Puerto Rico. No parasitism by the Shiny Cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis) was found but 63% of 38 active nests were depredated with an overall daily nest survival of 0.932

  9. SURVIVAL OF CAPTIVE-REARED PUERTO RICAN PARROTS RELEASED IN THE CARIBBEAN NATIONAL FOREST

    Treesearch

    THOMAS H. WHITE; JAIME A. COLLAZO; FRANCISCO J. VILELLA

    2005-01-01

    We report first-year survival for 34 captive-reared Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) released in the Caribbean National Forest, Puerto Rico between 2000 and 2002. The purpose of the releases were to increase population size and the potential number of breeding individuals of the sole extant wild population, and to refine release protocols for eventual...

  10. Sexual Risk Factors for HIV and Violence among Puerto Rican Women in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Claudia L.; Morrill, Allison C.; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined sexual factors for HIV risk in 1,003 women of Puerto Rican heritage who attended a community-based New York City hospital clinic. Participants' ages ranged from 18 to 73 years. Half were born in the continental United States, and half were born in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. All were sexually active within the past 90…

  11. An Exploration of the Effects of Language Policy in Education in a Contemporary Puerto Rican Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado-Valentín, Mirta

    2016-01-01

    During the Spanish regimen, Puerto Rican education was limited and restricted to Spanish language as the medium of instruction. It was not until the U.S. colonization of the island that public education was introduced. As a result, English replaced Spanish as medium of instruction in the new educational system. Immediately after, Puerto Rican…

  12. A Study of Disruptive Behavior Disorders in Puerto Rican Youth: I. Background, Design, and Survey Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Davies, Mark; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Febo, Vivian; Ramirez, Rafael; Hoven, Christina; Wicks, Judith; Musa, George; Loeber, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This is the first of two related articles on a study carried out between 2000 and 2003 designed to assess the prevalence, associated comorbidities, and correlates of disruptive behavior disorders in two populations of Puerto Rican children: one in the Standard Metropolitan Areas of San Juan and Caguas in Puerto Rico, and the other in…

  13. Puerto Rican Sources in Literature: Research and References in an Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Nelly S.

    Because of its complex history, Puerto Rico's legend and myth surpass the literature of other regions and present special characteristics and problems pertaining to its population. Bibliographic control of Puerto Rican publications is often insufficient and there is a need for an organized and extensive bibliography which covers all disciplines…

  14. Trajectories of Delinquency among Puerto Rican Children and Adolescents at Two Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Piquero, Alex R.; Jennings, Wesley G.; Bird, Hector; Canino, Glorisa

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the trajectories of delinquency among Puerto Rican children and adolescents in two cultural contexts. Relying on data from the Boricua Youth Study, a longitudinal study of children and youth from Bronx, New York, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, a group-based trajectory procedure estimated the number of delinquency trajectories,…

  15. National Culture and Migration: Perspectives from the Puerto Rican Working Class. Centro Working Papers No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Ricardo; Flores, Juan

    In this paper Puerto Rico's history as one of colonial oppression and a struggle for national self-definition is described. The divergent conceptions of patriotism, national liberation, and human freedom as voiced by leaders of the national elite and of the Puerto Rican working class are discussed in terms of traditional themes in the culture.…

  16. English Language Training for Puerto Rican Navy Recruits: Evaluation of Pilot Program. Technical Report 155.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. Robert; And Others

    An evaluation of the effectiveness of the English language training for Navy recruits at the English Technical Language School (ETLS) in Puerto Rico is reported. The study covers the period of December 7, 1981, to September 30, 1983. It tracked Puerto Rican Army National Guard (PRANG) personnel from completion of English language training through…

  17. Turn-Allocation in Lessons with North American and Puerto Rican Students: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    The turn-allocation procedure for whole-group lessons is analyzed and compared for third grade classrooms in North America and Puerto Rico. Significant differences in classroom participation and discourse have roots in differing social interaction patterns in the two cultures and have implications for Puerto Rican students in mainland classrooms.…

  18. Inferring Cultural Learning Styles--Puerto Ricans in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Trudy

    People learn differently. One model for instruction does not suit all participants well, especially when those participants are from different cultural backgrounds. Based on research into the speaking patterns of Puerto Ricans in the United States, as well as in Puerto Rico, inferences can be drawn about how those patterns of communication would…

  19. English Language Training for Puerto Rican Navy Recruits: Evaluation of Pilot Program. Technical Report 155.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. Robert; And Others

    An evaluation of the effectiveness of the English language training for Navy recruits at the English Technical Language School (ETLS) in Puerto Rico is reported. The study covers the period of December 7, 1981, to September 30, 1983. It tracked Puerto Rican Army National Guard (PRANG) personnel from completion of English language training through…

  20. Sexual Risk Factors for HIV and Violence among Puerto Rican Women in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Claudia L.; Morrill, Allison C.; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined sexual factors for HIV risk in 1,003 women of Puerto Rican heritage who attended a community-based New York City hospital clinic. Participants' ages ranged from 18 to 73 years. Half were born in the continental United States, and half were born in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. All were sexually active within the past 90…

  1. A Study of the Mental Health Treatment of the Puerto Rican Migrant. Monograph No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Jose; Inclan, Jaimie

    This ethnographic study examines the treatment of first-generation Puerto Rican migrants at a mental health center specializing in services to Hispanic Americans. Information was gathered from observation of staff activities and interviews with staff and residents of the surrounding community. The center, located in a low-income Puerto Rican…

  2. Polymorphism in Osteopontin Gene (SPP1) Is Associated with Asthma and Related Phenotypes in a Puerto Rican Population

    PubMed Central

    Galanter, Josh M.; Choudhry, Shweta; Eng, Celeste; Hu, Donglei; Beckman, Kenneth; Chapela, Rocío; Rodríguez-Santana, José R.; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William; Ford, Jean; Avila, Pedro C.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that osteopontin, a cytokine with suggested immunoregulatory functions, may contribute to pathogenesis of asthma. To determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SPP1, the gene encoding osteopontin, are associated with risk of asthma, we genotyped 6 known SNPs in SPP1 in the well-characterized Genetics of Asthma in Latino Americans population of 294 Mexican and 365 Puerto Rican parent–child asthma trios. The associations between SNPs and asthma or asthma-related phenotypes were examined by transmission disequilibrium tests as implemented in the family-based association test program. Three polymorphisms, 1 in exon 7 (rs1126616C) and 2 in the 3′-untranslated region (rs1126772A and rs9138A) of SPP1, were associated with diagnosis of asthma, severity of asthma, asthma in subjects with elevated immunoglobulin E (IgE) (IgE >100 IU/mL), and postbronchodilator FEV1 in Puerto Ricans (P values=0.00007–0.04). The CC genotype of rs1126616 conferred an odds ratio of 1.7 (95% CI=[1.3, 2.3], P value adjusted for multiple comparisons=0.001) for asthma compared with the CT and TT genotypes. Furthermore, haplotype analysis identified rs1126616C-rs1126772A-rs9138A to be associated with an increased risk for asthma, severity of asthma, and asthma in subjects with elevated IgE (P=0.03). There was no association between the SPP1 SNPs and asthma outcomes in Mexicans. Our findings suggest that the SPP1 gene is a risk factor for asthma and asthma-related phenotypes in Puerto Ricans, and are consistent with previous animal and human studies on the role of osteopontin in pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:22276228

  3. Service utilization among disabled Puerto Rican elders and their caregivers: does acculturation play a role?

    PubMed

    Calderon-Rosado, Vanessa; Morrill, Allison; Chang, Bei-Hung; Tennstedt, Sharon

    2002-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between language acculturation of disabled Puerto Rican elderly and their caregivers, their length of residence in mainland United States, and the utilization of formal services. Language acculturation was measured by language use, understanding, and preferences. The sample of this study consisted of 194 dyads of disabled Puerto Rican elders 60 years and older, and their primary caregivers in an urban center in the northeast. Length of residence in the United States, but not language acculturation, of the disabled Puerto Rican elder and the caregiver was related to elder's use of formal services. Caregivers, whose own children were born in Puerto Rico as opposed to mainland United States, were more likely to use formal services. Language acculturation, although a commonly used measure of acculturation, may be of decreasing importance in explaining service utilization, as bilingual services become increasingly available. Practice implications are discussed.

  4. A spanish version of the barber suggestibility scale for the puerto rican population.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Hosta, Lara; Martínez-Taboas, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Gómez, José

    2007-01-01

    Currently in Puerto Rico, there are no reliable and valid instruments to assess hypnotic responsiveness. The most widely utilized scales have not been scientifically translated and adapted with Puerto Ricans. In the present study, the Barber Suggestibility Scale (BSS) was translated and adapted using back-translation and decentralization. The translated BSS (the ESB) was individually administered to Puerto Rican college students (N = 85). No significant differences were found among the mean scores for the current sample on the ESB and the 1965 sample on the BSS. Both samples had similar score distributions. The internal consistency of the ESB was adequate, and there were significant correlations among scale items and total scores. The authors conclude that the ESB is an adequate instrument to measure hypnotic response within the Puerto Rican population.

  5. Stroke caregiver information needs: comparison of Mainland and Puerto Rican caregivers.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Rittman, Maude R

    2007-01-01

    Research indicates that informal caregivers of stroke survivors often do not have the information necessary to adequately manage the recovery process at home. This article presents findings on the information sources and needs of stroke caregivers both in Puerto Rico and the Mainland United States. Data were collected from 120 caregivers (42 Puerto Rican, 78 Mainland) of veterans who had experienced a stroke. Of all caregivers, 22% to 50% reported the need for information related to stroke recovery. This need was greater for Puerto Rican caregivers compared with Mainland caregivers. Caregivers receive most of their information from their doctors, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and the Internet. This study highlights the need for information dissemination to Puerto Rican and Mainland caregivers within the VHA system. This dissemination is an important and ongoing goal of the Stroke Quality Enhancement Research Initiative and the VHA/ Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  6. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.02. Migration Patterns of the Puerto Rican. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module presents an overview of the background of Puerto Rican migration to the U.S. and an explanation of the migrant's current situation. Upon completion of this module the participant will be able to (a) describe the cultural roots of the migrants, (b) list reasons for the migration after 1898, (c) characterize the migration since 1950, and…

  7. Puerto Ricans and Higher Education Policies. Volume 1: Issues of Scholarship, Fiscal Policies and Admissions. Higher Education Task Force Discussion Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Camille, Ed.; Bosque-Perez, Ramon, Ed.

    This volume explores issues of scholarship, fiscal policies, and admissions in the higher education of Puerto Ricans, with the emphasis on Puerto Ricans on the U.S. mainland and a particular focus on Puerto Rican admissions to the City University of New York. The first paper, "The Centro's Models of Scholarship: Present Challenges to Twenty…

  8. Pride Against Prejudice: Work in the Lives of Older Black and Young Puerto Rican Workers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Dean

    Selected and edited from approximately 100 lengthy open-ended interviews with older black men and women and young Puerto Rican men and women in New York City and Newark, New Jersey, transcripts are presented in which 12 of the older black men and women and six of the young Puerto Ricans describe their work experiences and how they were related to…

  9. Does Americanization Have Adverse Effects on Health? Stress, Health Habits, and Infant Health Outcomes among Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landale, Nancy S.; Oropesa, R. S.; Llanes, Daniel; Gorman, Bridget K.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Puerto Rican Maternal and Infant Health Study found that recent migrants to the U.S. mainland experienced fewer stressful life events and engaged in fewer negative health behaviors during pregnancy than U.S.-born Puerto Rican women. Recent migrants also exhibited better infant health outcomes than childhood migrants or…

  10. Carbohydrate nutrition differs by diabetes status and is associated with dyslipidemia in Boston Puerto Rican adults without diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Puerto Rican adults have a greater prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and lower HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) than the general U.S. population. Carbohydrate nutrition may play a role in this disparity. Cross-sectional analyses included data from 1219 Puerto Ricans aged 45-75 y enrolled in the Boston Puer...

  11. Guide to Puerto Rican Studies in Institutions of Higher Education in the United States, 1985-1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Fraticelli, Carlos, Comp.; Alvarez, Emmo, Comp.

    This guide profiles 36 Puerto Rican Studies programs at colleges, universities, and research centers throughout the United States, which comprise the majority of such programs that are available. Only those courses dealing specifically with Puerto Rican issues, and only faculty and staff members who work full-time, are listed. Each profile…

  12. Proceedings of Conference on Education of Puerto Rican Children on the Mainland (October 18 to 21, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Jose M., Ed.

    These conference proceedings deal with the exploration of the problems faced in educating Puerto Ricans and in seeking solutions for these same problems with a focus on the programs for school age children. Major areas discussed in the conference proceedings are: the cultural background of the Puerto Rican child, testing and placement of Spanish…

  13. Home range and movements of juvenile Puerto Rican parrots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, G.D.; Arendt, W.J.; Kalina, J.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    We studied home range and movements of 15 radio-marked, juvenile Puerto Rican parrots (Amazona vittata) fledging from wild nests during summer and fall, 1985-87. When juvenile parrots remained in the nest valley, home ranges during 1986 (.hivin.x = 32 .+-. 10 [SE] ha, n = 4) were larger (P = 0.0079) than during 1987 (.hivin.x = 13 .+-. 6 ha, n = 5). After radio-marked parrots integrated into adult flocks, home ranges during 1986 (.hivin.x = 1,075 .+-. 135 ha, n = 3) were similar (P = 0.10) to 1987 (.hivin.x = 416 .+-. 62 ha, n = 2). Juvenile parrots restricted their movements to nest valleys an average of 58 .+-. 29 days following fledging. After joining adult flocks, juvenile parrots routinely flew between the east and west slopes of the Luquillo Mountains but did not exhibit a seaonal pattern of movement. We recommend that captive-raised, juvenile parrots used in release programs be .gtoreq. 5 months old to ensure they are mature enough to integrate into wild flocks.

  14. Parenting practices among Dominican and Puerto Rican mothers.

    PubMed

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Dittus, Patricia; Jaccard, James; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida; Acosta, Neifi

    2007-01-01

    This study presents descriptive qualitative data about Latino parenting practices in an urban context. Focus groups were conducted with Dominican and Puerto Rican mother-adolescent pairs in the Bronx borough of NewYork City. When parenting style typologies are integrated with the Latino cultural components familismo, respeto, personalismo, and simpatía, Latino parenting practices and their underlying styles are better understood. Content analysis of parents' focus groups revealed five essential Latino parenting practices: (1) ensuring close monitoring of adolescents; (2) maintaining warm and supportive relationships characterized by high levels of parent-adolescent interaction and sharing; (3) explaining parental decisions and actions; (4) making an effort to build and improve relationships; and (5) differential parenting practices based on adolescents' gender. Mothers reported concerns related to the risks associated with living in an urban area, exposure to different cultural values, and opportunities for engaging in risky behaviors. Adolescents' recommendations for effective parenting strategies were similar to the practices reported by their mothers. The study has important applied implications for culturally competent social work practice with Latino adolescents and their families.

  15. The nightmares of Puerto Ricans: an embodied 'altered states of consciousness' perspective.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, C Jeffrey

    2009-06-01

    This article examines nightmare narratives collected as part of a person-centered ethnographic study of altered states of consciousness (ASCs) and supernaturalism in a mainland Puerto Rican community in the late 1990s. Utilizing a descriptive backdrop informed by cross-cultural studies of ASCs and highlighting the relevance of recent insights from the cognitive sciences of religion and from the anthropology of embodiment or cultural phenomenology, I examine the lived experience and psychocultural elaboration of diverse Puerto Rican nightmare events. Taking the nightmare to be a trauma in its waking-nightmare sense (i.e., through the extreme fright caused by sleep paralysis) as well as an intrusive, traumatic memory in its posttraumatic sense (i.e., a reliving of trauma themes in dreams), I show how the perceptual and interpretive processes evoked by intensely affective ASCs both inform and are informed by Puerto Rican religious and spiritualistic orientations and values.

  16. Puerto Rican cultural beliefs: influence on infant feeding practices in western New York.

    PubMed

    Higgins, B

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cultural beliefs and practices of Puerto Rican families that influence feeding practices and affect the nutritional status of infants and young children. The goal of the study was to outline strategies that would enable nurses to provide culturally congruent care for this population. Culture care theory guided the research, and an ethnonursing methodology was used. From interviews with 10 key and 5 general informants, 11 universal and 2 diverse themes were abstracted. The dimensions of kinship, cultural values, lifeways, and philosophical beliefs were found to influence Puerto Rican infant feeding practices. The cultural belief that big is healthy was found to be integrally related to cultural feeding practices. Strategies are suggested to facilitate provision of culturally congruent care for Puerto Rican infants and children in an ambulatory setting.

  17. What Latino Puerto Ricans and non-Latinos say when they talk about Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Karlawish, Jason; Barg, Frances K; Augsburger, Deborah; Beaver, James; Ferguson, Allison; Nunez, Jessica

    2011-03-01

    To discover whether Latino Puerto Rican and non-Latino communities differ in the words they use to talk about Alzheimer's disease (AD). Four groups of 30 persons per group defined by self-identified ethnicity and caregiver status: Latino Puerto Ricans and non-Latino Whites, who were either caregivers or non-caregivers completed free-listing exercises to identify the words they use when they describe AD causes, symptoms, caregiving, and research risks and benefits. Both Latino Puerto Ricans and non-Latino Whites recognize AD as a disease of memory loss and other cognitive problems. Although both groups used the term "sadness" to describe AD, non-Latino Whites did not feature emotional, behavioral, or psychological problems as among the causes of AD. Although all the groups' descriptions of a person who lives with and cares for a person with AD shared the word "loving," Latino Puerto Ricans focused on a good spouse who exercises intelligence, patience, and attention on behalf of the person with AD and did not use the term "caregiver." In contrast, non-Latino Whites typically used the term "caregiver." Both groups' lists shared words that describe research as presenting harms to an AD patient and requiring a commitment of time. Latino Puerto Ricans' lists suggested an understanding of research benefits akin to clinical care. Notable differences exist in how Latino Puerto Ricans and non-Latino Whites talk about AD and AD research. Clinicians, clinical investigators, and patient educators need to consider these differences when they conduct clinical care and research and design outreach and educational materials. Copyright © 2011 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Allostatic load is associated with chronic conditions in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Josiemer; Demissie, Serkalem; Falcon, Luis M; Ordovas, Jose M

    2010-01-01

    Puerto Ricans living in the United States mainland present multiple disparities in prevalence of chronic diseases, relative to other racial and ethnic groups. Allostatic load (AL), or the cumulative wear and tear of physiological responses to stressors such as major life events, social and environmental burden, has been proposed as a possible mechanism for the inequalities observed in minority groups, but has not been studied in Puerto Ricans. The aim of this study was to determine the association of AL to six chronic diseases (abdominal obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and self-reported cardiovascular disease (CVD), arthritis and cancer) in Puerto Ricans, and to contrast AL to metabolic syndrome (MetS). Participants of the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study (n=1,116, ages 45–75 years) underwent a home-based interview, where questionnaires were completed and biological samples collected. A summary definition of AL was constructed using clinically-defined cutoffs and medication use for 10 physiological parameters in different body systems. Logistic regression models were run to determine associations between AL score and disease status, controlling for age, sex, smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, total fat intake and energy intake. Parallel models were also run with MetS score replacing AL. We found that increasing categories of AL score were significantly associated with abdominal obesity, hypertension, diabetes and self-reported cardiovascular disease (CVD) and arthritis, but not with self-reported cancer. The strength of associations of AL with all conditions, except diabetes and cancer, was similar to or larger than those of MetS score. In conclusion, Puerto Rican older adults experienced physiological dysregulation that was associated with increased odds of chronic conditions. AL was more strongly associated with most conditions, compared to MetS, suggesting that this cumulative measure may be a better predictor of disease. These results have prospective

  19. Exploratory study of the role of family in the treatment of eating disorders among Puerto Ricans

    PubMed Central

    Guadalupe-Rodríguez, Elizabeth; Reyes-Rodríguez, Mae Lynn; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2012-01-01

    In Latino culture, the family is a major source of social support. We explored the needs and the role of the Puerto Rican eating disorders patient’s family in the treatment process by conducting a focus group with five close relatives of youth with eating disorders. Qualitative analyses indicated the need to integrate the family into treatment and to provide management guidelines to assist with the resolution of situations that emerge frequently during recovery. These results underscored the importance of developing and incorporating psychosocial interventions that include family support and guidance for relatives of Puerto Rican youth patients with eating disorders. PMID:24971160

  20. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of asthma in Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi; Brehm, John; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Forno, Erick; Lin, Jerome; Oh, Sam S; Acosta-Perez, Edna; Laurie, Cathy C; Cloutier, Michelle M; Raby, Benjamin A; Stilp, Adrienne M; Sofer, Tamar; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste S; Conomos, Matthew P; Rastogi, Deepa; Rice, Kenneth; Canino, Glorisa; Chen, Wei; Barr, R Graham; Burchard, Esteban G; Celedón, Juan C

    2017-05-01

    Puerto Ricans are disproportionately affected with asthma in the USA. In this study, we aim to identify genetic variants that confer susceptibility to asthma in Puerto Ricans.We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of asthma in Puerto Ricans, including participants from: the Genetics of Asthma in Latino Americans (GALA) I-II, the Hartford-Puerto Rico Study and the Hispanic Community Health Study. Moreover, we examined whether susceptibility loci identified in previous meta-analyses of GWAS are associated with asthma in Puerto Ricans.The only locus to achieve genome-wide significance was chromosome 17q21, as evidenced by our top single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs907092 (OR 0.71, p=1.2×10(-12)) at IKZF3 Similar to results in non-Puerto Ricans, SNPs in genes in the same linkage disequilibrium block as IKZF3 (e.g. ZPBP2, ORMDL3 and GSDMB) were significantly associated with asthma in Puerto Ricans. With regard to results from a meta-analysis in Europeans, we replicated findings for rs2305480 at GSDMB, but not for SNPs in any other genes. On the other hand, we replicated results from a meta-analysis of North American populations for SNPs at IL1RL1, TSLP and GSDMB but not for IL33Our findings suggest that common variants on chromosome 17q21 have the greatest effects on asthma in Puerto Ricans. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  1. Health and Reproductive Assessment of Selected Puerto Rican Parrots ( Amazona vittata ) in Captivity.

    PubMed

    Clubb, Susan; Velez, Jafet; Garner, Michael M; Zaias, Julia; Cray, Carolyn

    2015-12-01

    The Puerto Rican parrot ( Amazona vittata ) has become an iconic and high-profile conservation species. The cornerstone of the recovery plan for this critically endangered species is an active captive breeding program, management of the wild population, and a long-term reintroduction program. In 2002, 40 adult Puerto Rican parrots that had not produced viable offspring were selected for reproductive assessment at 2 aviary populations in Puerto Rico (Iguaca and Río Abajo), which are the only sources of parrots for release. The goal was to enhance reproductive potential and produce productive pairings in an attempt to augment the population growth and provide ample individuals for reintroduction. Seven Hispanolian Amazon parrots ( Amazona ventralis ) that were used as surrogate parents for the Puerto Rican parrots were also included in the study. This assessment included physical examination, endoscopic evaluation, hematologic and plasma biochemical profiles, viral screening, and hormonal assays. Results of general physical examination and hematologic and plasma biochemical testing revealed overall good health and condition of this subset of the population of Puerto Rican parrots; no major infectious diseases were found. Endoscopic examination also revealed overall good health and condition, especially of females. The apparent low fertility of male birds warrants further investigation. The findings helped to define causes of reproductive failure in the selected pairs and individual birds. New pairings resulting from the assessment helped to augment reproduction of this critically endangered species.

  2. Food insecurity and cognitive function in Puerto Rican adults123

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Scott, Tammy; Falcon, Luis M; Wilde, Parke E; Tucker, Katherine L

    2009-01-01

    Background: Food insecurity is associated with nutrient inadequacy and a variety of unfavorable health outcomes. However, little is known about whether food security is associated with lower cognitive function in the elderly. Objective: We investigated the prevalence of food insecurity in a representative sample of 1358 Puerto Ricans aged 45–75 y living in Massachusetts in relation to cognitive function performances. Design: Food security was assessed with the US Household Food Security Scale. Cognitive function was measured to capture general cognition with a battery of 7 tests: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), word list learning (verbal memory), digit span (attention), clock drawing and figure copying (visual-spatial ability), and Stroop and verbal fluency tests (fluency executive functioning). Results: The overall prevalence of food insecurity during the past 12 mo was 12.1%; 6.1% of the subjects reported very low food security. Food insecurity was inversely associated with global cognitive performance, as assessed by the MMSE score. The adjusted difference in the MMSE score was −0.90 (95% CI: −1.6, −0.19; P for trend = 0.003) for a comparison of participants with very low food security with those who were food secure, after adjustment for age, smoking, education, poverty status, income, acculturation, plasma homocysteine, alcohol, diabetes, and hypertension. Food insecurity was significantly associated with lower scores for word-list learning, percentage retention, letter fluency, and digit span backward tests. Conclusions: Very low food security was prevalent among the study subjects and was associated with lower cognitive performance. Further studies, both observational and experimental, are warranted to clarify the direction of causality in this association. PMID:19225117

  3. The Puerto Rican Community and Its Children on the Mainland: A Source Book for Teachers, Social Workers and Other Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordasco, Francesco; Bucchioni, Eugene

    This collection of readings is organized in four parts. Part I, "Aspects of Puerto Rican culture," includes the following articles: "Explicit and implicit culture in Puerto Rico: a case study in educational anthropology," T. Brameld; "Respeto, relajo, and interpersonal relations in Puerto Rico," A. Lauria;…

  4. The Puerto Rican Community and Its Children on the Mainland: A Source Book for Teachers, Social Workers and Other Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordasco, Francesco; Bucchioni, Eugene

    This collection of readings is organized in four parts. Part I, "Aspects of Puerto Rican culture," includes the following articles: "Explicit and implicit culture in Puerto Rico: a case study in educational anthropology," T. Brameld; "Respeto, relajo, and interpersonal relations in Puerto Rico," A. Lauria;…

  5. English Proficiency Required for Puerto Rican Students to Succeed in University Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Iznaga, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Ninety percent of Puerto Rican public school students who graduate from high school lack the basic English skills needed to succeed in university studies. This lack may be the result of Spanish being used as the major language of instruction at all levels in the public school system; when students graduate, they are limited English proficient…

  6. English Proficiency Required for Puerto Rican Students to Succeed in University Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Iznaga, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Ninety percent of Puerto Rican public school students who graduate from high school lack the basic English skills needed to succeed in university studies. This lack may be the result of Spanish being used as the major language of instruction at all levels in the public school system; when students graduate, they are limited English proficient…

  7. "Turning the Sugar": Adult Learning and Cultural Repertoires of Practice in a Puerto Rican Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laura Ruth; Stribling, Colleen; Almburg, Anne; Vitale, Gail

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the processes of knowledge acquisition and transmission among adults within two "communities of practice" in Humboldt Park/"Paseo Boricua," a Puerto Rican community located on Chicago's near-northwest side. In particular, we examine the ways in which two adult women engaged in learning processes and…

  8. Mary Likes Fishes: Reverse Psychological Phenomena in New York Puerto Rican Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvorak, Trisha; Kirschner, Carl

    1982-01-01

    Discusses some syntactic evidence gathered in a recent study which suggests not only that the dialect of Puerto Rican Spanish spoken in the New York area may be undergoing greater change than has previously been documented, but also that English interference cannot adequately account for the nature of that change. (EKN)

  9. Longitudinal Mental Health Service and Medication Use of ADHD among Puerto Rican Youth in Two Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Shen, Sa; Bauermeister, Jose J.; Canino, Glorisa

    2008-01-01

    The study discusses the differences in the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among Puerto Rican children and the influence of risk factors on mental health services, medication and psychostimulant use among them in two different contexts. The conclusion states that prevalence was similar regardless of context and…

  10. Latinx Popular Culture Imaginaries: Examining Puerto Rican Children's Social Discourses in Interpreting Telenovelas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Carmen Liliana; Costa, María del Rocío; Soto, Nayda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a collaboration project within one urban Puerto Rican classroom, focused on constructing a critical literacy inquiry curriculum grounded in the students' out-of-school literacy practices in their communities, including their experiences with media and popular culture. We focused on a critical literacy and media inquiry…

  11. Reinventing Texts and Contexts: Syncretic Literacy Events in Young Puerto Rican Children's Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Dinah; de Acosta, Martha

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes literacy events co-constructed by three bilingual, mainland Puerto Rican kindergarteners and the network of adults and children in their homes who support their developing literacy. Reveals and gives value to some of the many literacies in the children's lives and communicates a respectful approach to the study of literacy in families…

  12. A Brief Culturally Tailored Intervention for Puerto Ricans with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Amico, K. R.; Cruz, Noemi; O'Connell, Ann A.; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Kalichman, Seth C.; Wolf, Scott A.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model of health behavior change informed the design of a brief, culturally tailored diabetes self-care intervention for Puerto Ricans with type 2 diabetes. Participants (n = 118) were recruited from an outpatient, primary care clinic at an urban hospital in the northeast United States. ANCOVA…

  13. Housing Dependence and Intimate Relationships in the Lives of Low-Income Puerto Rican Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sherri Lawson; Burton, Linda M.; Flippen, Chenoa A.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal ethnographic data from the Three-City Study, the authors examined the relationship between 16 low-income Puerto Rican mothers' housing dependencies and their intimate partner relations. This study traced mothers' dependent housing arrangements and entree to marital or cohabiting relationships from their teens through their…

  14. Vida/SIDA: A Grassroots Response to AIDS in Chicago's Puerto Rican Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Chicago's Puerto Rican community in West Town had a unique reaction to the spread of AIDS within its limits. They created their own institutions and tackled the epidemic themselves. In its infancy, Vida/SIDA, which translates as Life/AIDS, was solely an alternative health clinic for people with AIDS. Free of charge, it provided services such as…

  15. Music Education in Puerto Rican Elementary Schools: A Study from the Perspective of Music Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López-León, Ricardo; Lorenzo-Quiles, Oswaldo; Addessi, Anna Rita

    2015-01-01

    This article presents, for the first time, descriptive research on the status of music education in Puerto Rican public elementary schools. General music education at elementary schools on the island has been part of the school offering for more than 50 years. As yet, music education at this level has not been recognized as an essential discipline…

  16. Auditory Discrimination and Reading Achievement of Puerto Rican Spanish-Speaking First-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Judith Ann

    The focus of this study is on the possible effects of phonological interference on the reading achievement of Spanish-speaking Puerto Rican first graders. Specifically, the study explored the relationship between standard English auditory discrimination and first-grade reading achievement. Subjects for the study were 32 female and 20 male students…

  17. The Structure of Inequality and the Status of Puerto Rican Youth in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero Guzman, Hector R.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses and illustrates some of the systemic obstacles that youth, particularly urban African-American and Latino youth, confront, focusing on the dynamics of Puerto Rican families and youth. Information on health and housing; elementary school, secondary school, and higher education; and unemployment and the labor force is presented. (SLD)

  18. Vida/SIDA: A Grassroots Response to AIDS in Chicago's Puerto Rican Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Chicago's Puerto Rican community in West Town had a unique reaction to the spread of AIDS within its limits. They created their own institutions and tackled the epidemic themselves. In its infancy, Vida/SIDA, which translates as Life/AIDS, was solely an alternative health clinic for people with AIDS. Free of charge, it provided services such as…

  19. 27 CFR 19.269 - Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Islands spirits. 19.269 Section 19.269 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... and Virgin Islands Spirits § 19.269 Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) The provisions of 26... Islands with respect to the following: (1) Spirits lost while in TTB bond; (2) Voluntary destruction of...

  20. 27 CFR 19.269 - Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Islands spirits. 19.269 Section 19.269 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... and Virgin Islands Spirits § 19.269 Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) The provisions of 26... Islands with respect to the following: (1) Spirits lost while in TTB bond; (2) Voluntary destruction of...

  1. 27 CFR 19.269 - Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Islands spirits. 19.269 Section 19.269 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... and Virgin Islands Spirits § 19.269 Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) The provisions of 26... Islands with respect to the following: (1) Spirits lost while in TTB bond; (2) Voluntary destruction of...

  2. 27 CFR 19.269 - Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Islands spirits. 19.269 Section 19.269 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... and Virgin Islands Spirits § 19.269 Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits. (a) The provisions of 26... Islands with respect to the following: (1) Spirits lost while in TTB bond; (2) Voluntary destruction of...

  3. Involvement in a Drug Subculture and Abstinence Following Treatment Among Puerto Rican Narcotic Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snarr, Richard W.; Ball, John C.

    The study investigated the life career of a sample of native Puerto Rican narcotic addicts who were treated at the Lexington, Kentucky Public Health Service Hospital. Specifically, it deals with the relationship between the addicts' involvement in a drug subculture and their subsequent drug use and abstinence. The hypothesis presented states that…

  4. Reach Out and Touch Someone: Tactile Communication in Selected Puerto Rican Novels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Joan

    The importance and varieties of human touch have been the subject of much research. Touching varies from culture to culture and is a way of talking in most Latin American countries. Three Puerto Rican novels provide examples of this nonverbal communicative style: "Mambru se fue a la guerra," by Jose Luis Gonzalez; "La vispera del…

  5. Spatial Ecology of Puerto Rican Boas (Epicrates inornatus) in a Hurricane Impacted Forest.

    Treesearch

    Joseph M. Wunderle Jr.; Javier E. Mercado Bernard Parresol Esteban Terranova 2

    2004-01-01

    Spatial ecology of Puerto Rican boas (Epicrates inornatus, Boidae) was studied with radiotelemetry in a subtropical wet forest recovering from a major hurricane (7–9 yr previous) when Hurricane Georges struck. Different boas were studied during three periods relative to Hurricane Georges: before only; before and after; and after only. Mean daily movement per month...

  6. Health Characteristics as Precursors of Substance Abuse in Puerto Rican Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haran, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    In a longitudinal study of precursors of drug usage, data collected in 1968 on health variables was related to substance usage patterns obtained in 1975-76. Some 657 young Puerto Ricans were interviewed for this study, drawn from a pool of about 5,000 questionnaired in 1968. The major findings were that the health factors associated with drug…

  7. The Puerto Rican Prison Experience: A Multicultural Understanding of Values, Beliefs, and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Edil Torres; Wilbur, Michael P.; Roberts-Wilbur, Janice

    1998-01-01

    Counselors are challenged to use a nontraditional, multicultural approach with Puerto Rican inmates, to strive to understand their values, beliefs, experiences, and behaviors; and to question their own underlying assumptions and linear models of therapy. Five specific recommendations are made, and a comparison of beliefs and values is appended.…

  8. The Puerto Rican Child in New York City: Stress and Mental Health. Monograph Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canino, Ian A.; And Others

    The main objective of this study was to review the literature and synthesize data on the mental health of Puerto Rican children in the New York City area to show that they are at higher risk of developing mental health problems than other children. Chapter 1 of this monograph reviews the development of the concept of stress ard its linkage with…

  9. Racial Identity Attitudes and Ego Identity Statuses in Dominican and Puerto Rican College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Delida

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relation between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses in 94 Dominican and Puerto Rican Latino college students in an urban public college setting. Simultaneous regression analyses were conducted to test the relation between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses, and findings indicated that…

  10. Taking a Diasporic Stance: Puerto Rican Mothers Educating Children in a Racially Integrated Neighborhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolon-Dow, Rosalie

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the perspectives of second-generation Puerto Rican mothers as they discuss their experiences educating their children in a working class, lower-middle class, racially diverse neighborhood. The article examines the racialization processes that the women and their families face, despite experiencing geographic and socioeconomic…

  11. Support Networks of Single Puerto Rican Mothers of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Vivian I.; Bonilla, Zobeida E.; Reyes-MacPherson, Maria E.

    2011-01-01

    The social support networks of 25 Puerto Rican single mothers of young children with disabilities were examined and compared with current models of family support for children with disabilities. This study was designed to assess the support systems of Latino single mothers in light of dominant models of family support. The Family Support Scale,…

  12. Development of a pharmacogenetic-guided warfarin dosing algorithm for Puerto Rican patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alga S; Seip, Richard L; Rivera-Miranda, Giselle; Felici-Giovanini, Marcos E; Garcia-Berdecia, Rafael; Alejandro-Cowan, Yirelia; Kocherla, Mohan; Cruz, Iadelisse; Feliu, Juan F; Cadilla, Carmen L; Renta, Jessica Y; Gorowski, Krystyna; Vergara, Cunegundo; Ruaño, Gualberto; Duconge, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study was aimed at developing a pharmacogenetic-driven warfarin-dosing algorithm in 163 admixed Puerto Rican patients on stable warfarin therapy. Patients & methods A multiple linear-regression analysis was performed using log-transformed effective warfarin dose as the dependent variable, and combining CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotyping with other relevant nongenetic clinical and demographic factors as independent predictors. Results The model explained more than two-thirds of the observed variance in the warfarin dose among Puerto Ricans, and also produced significantly better ‘ideal dose’ estimates than two pharmacogenetic models and clinical algorithms published previously, with the greatest benefit seen in patients ultimately requiring <7 mg/day. We also assessed the clinical validity of the model using an independent validation cohort of 55 Puerto Rican patients from Hartford, CT, USA (R2 = 51%). Conclusion Our findings provide the basis for planning prospective pharmacogenetic studies to demonstrate the clinical utility of genotyping warfarin-treated Puerto Rican patients. PMID:23215886

  13. Spatial ecology of Puerto Rican boas (Epicrates inornatus) in a hurricane impacted forest

    Treesearch

    Joseph M. Wunderle; Javier E. Mercado; Bernard Parresol; Esteban Terranova

    2004-01-01

    Spatial ecology of Puerto Rican boas (Epicrates inornatus, Boidae) was studied with radiotelemetry in a subtropical wet forest recovering from a major hurricane (7–9 yr previous) when Hurricane Georges struck. Different boas were studied during three periods relative to Hurricane Georges: before only; before and after; and after only. Mean daily...

  14. Species-specific Seedling Responses to Hurricane Disturbance in a Puerto Rican Rain Forest.

    Treesearch

    Lawrence R. Walker; D. Jean Lodge; Sandra M. Guzman-Grajales; Ned \\t Fetcher

    2003-01-01

    Seedling dynamics were followed in a Puerto Rican forest for 20 months following a severe hurricane to study the interactive effects of hurricane debris, nutrients, and light on seedling diversity, density, growth, and mortality. Three treatments (debris removal, an unaltered control with hurricane debris, and chemical fertilization added to hurricane debris) altered...

  15. Speech and Ways of Speaking in a Bilingual Puerto Rican Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Celia; And Others

    A collection of papers resulting from a research project on the role of language in the life of a Puerto Rican community in New York City focuses on the discourse of English and Spanish speakers, especially conversational interaction, speech events, and narratives. The papers include: "Toward a Social Theory of Language Variability"…

  16. MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS INFLUENCING ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF ELEVENTH GRADE PUERTO RICAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, WILLIAM M.; CHRISTENSEN, EDWARD W.

    THIS STUDY INVOLVED--(1) EXPLORING ACADEMIC MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS IN PUERTO RICAN 11TH-GRADE STUDENTS, (2) CREATING A MEASURE FOR THESE FACTORS WHICH MIGHT BE USABLE IN OTHER LATIN AMERICAN AREAS, AND (3) INVESTIGATING THE CHILD-REARING AND OTHER PSYCHO-SOCIAL FACTORS RELATED TO ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT. THE METHOD INVOLVED THREE STAGES--(1)…

  17. Observations and Recommendations on the Puerto Rican Version of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Roberto E.

    Recommendations and criticisms are made which might result in a more reliable assessment of the Puerto Rican child's intelligence as measured by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC). Many of these recommendations and criticisms involve typographical and grammatical errors, incorrect language usage, difficulty of item sequence and…

  18. Bibliografia General del Nino Puertorriqueno (General Bibliography on the Puerto Rican Child). Cuaderno.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aponte, Eduardo, Comp.; And Others

    This bibliography of literature concerned with Puerto Rican children lists both English-language and Spanish-language titles. (The introductory text is in Spanish.) The bibliography has nine major parts, each dealing with one of the following: demography (population trends and migration); physical and mental health and nutrition; the family;…

  19. Music Education in Puerto Rican Elementary Schools: A Study from the Perspective of Music Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López-León, Ricardo; Lorenzo-Quiles, Oswaldo; Addessi, Anna Rita

    2015-01-01

    This article presents, for the first time, descriptive research on the status of music education in Puerto Rican public elementary schools. General music education at elementary schools on the island has been part of the school offering for more than 50 years. As yet, music education at this level has not been recognized as an essential discipline…

  20. Support Networks of Single Puerto Rican Mothers of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Vivian I.; Bonilla, Zobeida E.; Reyes-MacPherson, Maria E.

    2011-01-01

    The social support networks of 25 Puerto Rican single mothers of young children with disabilities were examined and compared with current models of family support for children with disabilities. This study was designed to assess the support systems of Latino single mothers in light of dominant models of family support. The Family Support Scale,…

  1. Greater variety in fruit and vegetable intake is associated with lower inflammation in Puerto Rican adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Puerto Rican adults have prevalent metabolic abnormalities, but few studies have explored fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in this population. OBJECTIVE: Researchers tested the hypothesis that greater FV intake and variety are associated with a lower...

  2. Communication Apprehension in Puerto Rican and U.S. Mainland Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Arden K.; And Others

    Exploring the relationship of communication apprehension (CA) to culture, age, and gender, a study examined 368 United States mainland children (186 males and 182 females, ages 5-11, in a public elementary school in Bowling Green, Kentucky) and 373 Puerto Rican children (172 males and 201 females from public elementary schools in the Gurabo school…

  3. Health Characteristics as Precursors of Substance Abuse in Puerto Rican Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haran, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    In a longitudinal study of precursors of drug usage, data collected in 1968 on health variables was related to substance usage patterns obtained in 1975-76. Some 657 young Puerto Ricans were interviewed for this study, drawn from a pool of about 5,000 questionnaired in 1968. The major findings were that the health factors associated with drug…

  4. Exposing Prejudice: Puerto Rican Experiences of Language, Race, and Class. Institutional Structures of Feeling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urciuoli, Bonnie

    This book is about language prejudice as experienced by Puerto Ricans in the mainland United States. Prejudice is expressed as social signs that include, but go well beyond, language. When people express linguistic prejudices, they generally start by objectifying the languages in question as though the languages were sharply defined. For Puerto…

  5. A Brief Culturally Tailored Intervention for Puerto Ricans with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Amico, K. R.; Cruz, Noemi; O'Connell, Ann A.; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Kalichman, Seth C.; Wolf, Scott A.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model of health behavior change informed the design of a brief, culturally tailored diabetes self-care intervention for Puerto Ricans with type 2 diabetes. Participants (n = 118) were recruited from an outpatient, primary care clinic at an urban hospital in the northeast United States. ANCOVA…

  6. Latinx Popular Culture Imaginaries: Examining Puerto Rican Children's Social Discourses in Interpreting Telenovelas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Carmen Liliana; Costa, María del Rocío; Soto, Nayda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a collaboration project within one urban Puerto Rican classroom, focused on constructing a critical literacy inquiry curriculum grounded in the students' out-of-school literacy practices in their communities, including their experiences with media and popular culture. We focused on a critical literacy and media inquiry…

  7. Phonological Patterns in Puerto Rican Spanish-Speaking Children with Phonological Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Brian A.; Iglesias, Aquiles

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the speech of 54 young Spanish-speaking (Puerto Rican dialect) children with phonological disorders. It described the mean percentage-of-occurrence and standard deviation of phonological processes and the number and type of nontargeted process errors. Specific patterns characterizing the speech of these children were…

  8. Predicting Child Maltreatment among Puerto Rican Children from Migrant and Non-Migrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sledjeski, Eve M.; Dierker, Lisa C.; Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to (1) describe the prevalence of child maltreatment among migrant and non-migrant Puerto Rican families and (2) identify socio-demographic and cultural (i.e., acculturation pattern, familismo) predictors of maltreatment within these two samples. Method: Representative community samples of…

  9. Auditory Discrimination and Reading Achievement of Puerto Rican Spanish-Speaking First-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Judith Ann

    The focus of this study is on the possible effects of phonological interference on the reading achievement of Spanish-speaking Puerto Rican first graders. Specifically, the study explored the relationship between standard English auditory discrimination and first-grade reading achievement. Subjects for the study were 32 female and 20 male students…

  10. "Turning the Sugar": Adult Learning and Cultural Repertoires of Practice in a Puerto Rican Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laura Ruth; Stribling, Colleen; Almburg, Anne; Vitale, Gail

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the processes of knowledge acquisition and transmission among adults within two "communities of practice" in Humboldt Park/"Paseo Boricua," a Puerto Rican community located on Chicago's near-northwest side. In particular, we examine the ways in which two adult women engaged in learning processes and…

  11. Dominican and Puerto Rican Mother-Adolescent Communication: Maternal Self-Disclosure and Youth Risk Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    A communication framework was developed to examine the influence of maternal use of self-disclosure on adolescent intentions to smoke cigarettes and to engage in sexual intercourse. Data were collected from 516 Dominican and Puerto Rican mother-adolescent dyads. Statistical analyses were conducted in AMOS using structural equation modeling.…

  12. Phylogeography of an island endemic: the Puerto Rican freshwater crab, Epilobocera sinuatifrons

    Treesearch

    Benjamin D. Cook; Catherine M. Pringle; Jane M. Hughes

    2008-01-01

    The endemic Puerto Rican crab, Epilobocera sinuatifrons (Pseudothelphusidae), has a freshwater-dependant life-history strategy, although the species has some capabilities for terrestrial movement as adults. In contrast to all other freshwater decapods on the island (e.g., caridean shrimp), E. sinuatifrons does not undertake amphidromous migration, and is restricted to...

  13. Housing Dependence and Intimate Relationships in the Lives of Low-Income Puerto Rican Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sherri Lawson; Burton, Linda M.; Flippen, Chenoa A.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal ethnographic data from the Three-City Study, the authors examined the relationship between 16 low-income Puerto Rican mothers' housing dependencies and their intimate partner relations. This study traced mothers' dependent housing arrangements and entree to marital or cohabiting relationships from their teens through their…

  14. Longitudinal Mental Health Service and Medication Use of ADHD among Puerto Rican Youth in Two Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Shen, Sa; Bauermeister, Jose J.; Canino, Glorisa

    2008-01-01

    The study discusses the differences in the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among Puerto Rican children and the influence of risk factors on mental health services, medication and psychostimulant use among them in two different contexts. The conclusion states that prevalence was similar regardless of context and…

  15. Code Switching and Interactions Among Puerto Rican Children, Working Papers in Sociolinguistics, No. 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zentella, Ana Celia

    This study of code switching among Puerto Rican children attending a New York City public school focuses primarily upon the correlation between interaction rules, as perceived by the participants, and code switching. Code switching strategies of a seven-year-old boy, an eight-year-old girl, and a 10-year-old girl in the bilingual third grade class…

  16. Pre- and Post-Hurricane Fruit Availability: Implications for Puerto Rican Parrots in the Luquillo Mountains.

    Treesearch

    JR WUNDERLE

    1999-01-01

    Fruit availability on 25 plant species, consumed or potentially consumed by the Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata), was studied to document the seasonal and annual variation in fruit production in the Luquillo Mountains. In the 33 months before Hurricane Hugo, an annual cycle in the number of species with ripe fruit was evident, with a peak in October-February and a...

  17. Acculturation and sociocultural influences on dietary intake and health status among Puerto Rican adults in Massachusetts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies have shown negative consequences of acculturation on lifestyle factors, health status, and dietary intake of Hispanic immigrants in the US. Despite prevalent type 2 diabetes and low socioeconomic status (SES) among Puerto Rican adults living on the US mainland, little is known about...

  18. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and cognitive function in Puerto Rican adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA oxidative stress has been suggested as an important pathogenic mechanism in cognitive impairment and dementia. We, therefore, examined whether urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a biomarker of global DNA oxidation, was associated with cognitive function in a sample of Puerto Rican adul...

  19. The Puerto Ricans: Culture Change and Language Deviance. Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology, Number 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Ruby Rohrlich

    This anthropological study examines whether sociocultural factors are basic to the etiology of stuttering through (1) an investigation of the incidence of stuttering in a single ethnic group, Puerto Rican rural migrants living in two different cultural milieus (San Juan and New York City), and (2) a comparison of the sociocultural variables in the…

  20. Anatomy of a bottleneck: diagnosing factors limiting population growth in the Puerto Rican Parrot

    Treesearch

    S.R. Beissinger; Jr Wunderle; J.M. Meyers; B.E. Saether; S. Engen

    2008-01-01

    The relative importance of genetic, demographic, environmental, and catastrophic processes that maintain population bottlenecks has received little consideration. We evaluate the role of these factors in maintaining the Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) in a prolonged bottleneck from 1973 through 2000 despite intensive conservation efforts. We first conduct a risk...

  1. Maternal mental health and childhood asthma among Puerto Rican youth: the role of prenatal smoking.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Renee D; Canino, Glorisa; Ortega, Alexander N; Bird, Hector R

    2009-09-01

    Childhood asthma is a major public health problem, with mainland and island Puerto Rican children having the highest asthma rates of any ethnic group in the United States. To examine the relationship between maternal mental health problems, prenatal smoking, and risk of asthma among children in Puerto Rico and the Bronx, New York. A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted in the South Bronx in New York City and the San Juan Standard Metropolitan Area in Puerto Rico. Participants were Puerto Rican children 5 to 13 years of age and their adult caretakers with probability samples of children 5 to 13 years of age and their caregivers drawn at two sites: the South Bronx in New York City (n = 1,135) and San Juan and Caguas, Puerto Rico (n = 1,351). Self-reported maternal mental health, prenatal smoking, and rates of childhood asthma. Results. Maternal mental health problems were associated with significantly higher levels of prenatal smoking, compared with that among women without mental health problems (p < 0.0001). Both maternal mental health problems and prenatal smoking appear to make a contribution to increased odds of asthma among youth. After adjusting for prenatal smoking, the relationship between maternal mental health problems and childhood asthma was no longer statistically significant. Previous research suggests children of Puerto Rican descent are especially vulnerable to asthma. Our results suggest that maternal mental health problems and prenatal smoking are both associated with increased odds of asthma among Puerto Rican youth and that prenatal smoking may partly explain the observed relationship between maternal psychopathology and childhood asthma. Future longitudinal and geographically diverse epidemiological studies may help to identify the role of both maternal mental health problems and prenatal smoking in the health disparities in childhood asthma.

  2. 27 CFR 19.778 - Removal on or after January 1, 1987 of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits, and rum imported...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... January 1, 1987 of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits, and rum imported from all other areas. 19.778... on or after January 1, 1987 of Puerto Rican and Virgin Islands spirits, and rum imported from all... Rican spirits having an alcoholic content of at least 92 percent rum, of Virgin Islands spirits having...

  3. Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquendo-Rodriguez, Aida L.

    Professions and careers related to science and mathematics lack representation of minorities. Within these underrepresented minority populations there is no other group more affected than Latina women and girls. Women in general, are still underrepresented in many areas of our society. While women's roles are changing in today's society, most changes encourage the participation of more White/Anglo women in traditionally male roles. Latina women are still more disadvantaged than White women. There is no doubt that education is significant in increasing the participation of minorities in the fields of science and mathematics, especially for minority girls (Oakes, 1990; Rodriguez, 1993). This study explored the interests, life experiences, characteristics and motivations of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses. The study identifies factors that can influence the interest of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin in science and mathematics career choices. This research is significant and relevant to educators and policy makers, especially to science and mathematics educators. The research is primarily descriptive and exploratory. It explores the social characteristics of Latina girls and professional women who have been successful in science and mathematics high school courses. The research offers the reader a visit to the participants' homes with descriptions and the opportunity to explore the thoughts and life experiences of Latina girls, their mothers and young Latina professionals of Puerto Rican origin. This research reveals the common characteristics of successful students found in the Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who where interviewed. Creating a portrait of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses in one of the school districts of western Massachusetts. The research findings reveal that teacher relationships, family expectations

  4. Sexual risk factors for HIV and violence among Puerto Rican women in New York City.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Claudia L; Morrill, Allison C; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2011-05-01

    The authors examined sexual factors for HIV risk in 1,003 women of Puerto Rican heritage who attended a community-based NewYork City hospital clinic. Participants' ages ranged from 18 to 73 years. Half were born in the continental United States, and half were born in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. All were sexually active within the past 90 days with a male partner.The authors compared sociodemographic characteristics, experience of intimate partner violence (IPV), and HIV sexual risk factors (number of partners, history of sexually transmitted infections [STIs],condom use, and so on).Multiple regression analyses considering sociodemographic characteristics were a predictor for IPV and sexual risk behaviors. The authors found differences in sexual risk behaviors by place of birth (continental United States versus Commonwealth of Puerto Rico) and language chosen for the interview (Spanish or English).Puerto Rican women reported fewer sexual partners and STIs. Mainland-born and English-preference women reported more IPV, risky partners, and condom use. Birth in the continental United States and preference for English appear to be indicators of greater risk for IPV, risky sexual practices, and risky partners. HIV prevention intervention strategies for Puerto Rican women must address differences in heterosexual risk according to language and place of birth.

  5. The circular migration of Puerto Rican women: towards a gendered explanation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M; Conway, D; Bailey, A J

    1996-01-01

    "The purpose of this paper has been to outline a theoretical framework for the explanation of the circulation of Puerto Rican women that brings gender relations to the fore, but frames the island-mainland pattern of mobility in the context of core-periphery capitalist relations. We have argued that gender relations in the home and workplace are vitally important for understanding women's moves to the [United States] and return trips to Puerto Rico. Specifically, we posited that most Puerto Rican women move as tied-migrants or because of their obligation or desire to meet gender responsibilities. In addition, we also viewed migration as an action with the potential to modify gender relations and alter future migration decision-making, as women gain experience in the labour market and exposure to new social and cultural environments." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA)

  6. Time since migration and HIV risk behaviors among Puerto Ricans who inject drugs in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Gelpí-Acosta, C; Pouget, ER; Reilly, KH; Hagan, H; Neaigus, A; Wendel, T; Marshall, D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the U.S., those who initiated drug injection in Puerto Rico (immigrant Puerto Rican PWID) engage in more injection and sexual risk behaviors, and have higher HIV incidence than non-Hispanic whites. OBJECTIVE Understand the persistence of HIV risk behaviors. METHODS In a cross-sectional study conducted in New York City (NYC) in 2012 (National HIV Behavioral Surveillance), PWID aged ≥ 18 years were recruited using Respondent-Driven Sampling, interviewed, and tested for HIV. Participants were categorized into 5 different groups: (1) US-born non-Hispanic PWID, (2) US-born Puerto Rican PWID, (3) recent immigrant Puerto Rican PWID (≤ 3 years in NYC), (4) medium-term immigrant Puerto Rican PWID (> 3 and ≤ 10 years in NYC), and (5) long-term immigrant Puerto Rican PWID (> 10 years in NYC). We examined the relationship between time since migrating on sexual and injection risk behaviors among immigrant Puerto Rican PWID, compared with U.S.-born Puerto Rican PWID and US-born non-Hispanic PWID. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS A total of 481 PWID were recruited. In adjusted analyses using US-born non-Hispanic PWID as the comparison group, syringe sharing was significantly more likely among medium-term immigrants; and unprotected sex with casual partners was more likely among recent and long-term immigrants. CONCLUSIONS The risk-acculturation process for immigrant Puerto Rican PWID may be non-linear and may not necessarily lead to risk reduction over time. Research is needed to better understand this process. PMID:27100322

  7. The social psychological adjustment of migrant and non-migrant Puerto Rican adolescents.

    PubMed

    Prewitt Diaz, J O; Seilhamer, E S

    1987-01-01

    The great migration of Puerto Ricans to the US occurred during the 1950s, when there was promise of employment in the US. Migration decreased in the 1960s when the promise of employment decreased. Many Puerto Ricans returned to the island during the 1960s and 1970s because they could not find work on the mainland; return migration has continued for the last 12 years. The migrant student population in Puerto Rico is composed of migrants, return migrants, and circulatory migrants. The circulatory migrants are those children of Puerto Rican parents who have traveled to and from the island to the mainland several times; these migrants are not served by either educational system. A program that serves the circulatory migrant students is the Puerto Rico Migrant Education Program. 3 factors influence return migration: 1) the shorter the distance of emigration, the higher the incidence of return migration; 2) the longer the emigrants stay away, the less chance they will return; and 3) changes in the economic balance between the place of origin and the place of destination directly affect the volume of return migration. A source of conflict in the adjustment of Puerto Rican return migrants is the difference in cultural values of the 2 settings in which the return migrant student has to live. This study of 273 students shows that there were differences between nonmigrants and circulatory migrants in reading achievement. There were a large number of young people with serious reading problems in their primary school language (English) and the 2nd language (Spanish). A negative relationship between physical adjustment and reading achievement suggests that achievement in reading will increase as soon as the physical adjustment takes place.

  8. Association of Types of Life Events with Depressive Symptoms among Puerto Rican Youth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the association between four types of adverse life events (family environment, separation, social adversity, and death) and the development of depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth. This was a secondary analysis using three waves (2000–2004) of interview data from the Boricua Youth Study of 10–13 year old Puerto Rican youth residing in New York and Puerto Rico with no depressive symptoms at baseline (n = 977). Depressive symptoms increased with an increase in social adversity, separation, death, and death events. Youth support from parents was a significant protective factor for all adverse events and parent coping was a protective factor in social adversity events. Relying on standard diagnostic tools is ideal to identify youth meeting the criteria for a diagnosis of depression but not useful to detect youth who present with subclinical levels of depression. Youth with sub-clinical levels of depression will not get treated and are at increased risk of developing depression later in life. Adverse life events are potentially relevant to use in conjunction with other screening tools to identify Puerto Rican youth who have subclinical depression and are at risk of developing depression in later adolescence. PMID:27788173

  9. Association of Types of Life Events with Depressive Symptoms among Puerto Rican Youth.

    PubMed

    Jaschek, Graciela; Carter-Pokras, Olivia D; He, Xin; Lee, Sunmin; Canino, Glorisa

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the association between four types of adverse life events (family environment, separation, social adversity, and death) and the development of depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth. This was a secondary analysis using three waves (2000-2004) of interview data from the Boricua Youth Study of 10-13 year old Puerto Rican youth residing in New York and Puerto Rico with no depressive symptoms at baseline (n = 977). Depressive symptoms increased with an increase in social adversity, separation, death, and death events. Youth support from parents was a significant protective factor for all adverse events and parent coping was a protective factor in social adversity events. Relying on standard diagnostic tools is ideal to identify youth meeting the criteria for a diagnosis of depression but not useful to detect youth who present with subclinical levels of depression. Youth with sub-clinical levels of depression will not get treated and are at increased risk of developing depression later in life. Adverse life events are potentially relevant to use in conjunction with other screening tools to identify Puerto Rican youth who have subclinical depression and are at risk of developing depression in later adolescence.

  10. Recruitment, asthma characteristics, and medication behaviors in Midwestern Puerto Rican youth: data from Project CURA.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Olson, Daniel; Mosnaim, Giselle; Ortega, Dorian; Rothschild, Steven K

    2012-08-01

    Puerto Rican children have the highest prevalence of asthma, but detailed descriptions of this population have been limited to the island of Puerto Rico and the northeastern United States. To describe the asthma characteristics of this urban Midwest cohort of Puerto Rican youth, focusing on medication behaviors, and to test whether their asthma outcomes are associated with their demographic and psychosocial variables. Data are from the baseline cohorts of a randomized controlled trial designed to improve medication adherence in Puerto Rican youth. Recruitment used a community-based participatory research approach. Data were collected in the home. Medications and medication technique were visually assessed, and adherence was determined using electronic medication monitors or counters. Data on asthma symptoms and morbidity, demographics, and psychosocial factors were collected. The recruitment of 101 participants (51 in elementary school and 50 in high school) was completed in 14 months. Despite overall high asthma severity and poor asthma control, 20% of participants had no reliever medicine in their home. Self-report of controller use was higher than actual controller medications visualized in the home. For those who had an inhaled corticosteroid medicine (only 45% of elementary school participants and 12% of high school participants), median adherence was 1.0 doses per day. Rates of depression and stress were very high among both caregivers and children. Puerto Rican youth in the Midwest bear a significant asthma burden in addition to other stressors, including depression. Visual inspection of medications and monitoring of adherence are critical for understanding asthma morbidity in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biogeography of Puerto Rican ants: a non-equilibrium case?

    Treesearch

    J.A. Torres; R.R. Snelling

    1997-01-01

    Ants were studied on Puerto Rico and 44 islands surrounding Puerto Rico. Habitat diversity was the best predictor of the number of species per island and the distributions of species followed a nested subset pattern. The number of extinctions per island was low, approximately 1 to 2 extinctions per island in a period of 18 years, and the rates of colonization seem to...

  12. Anthropology in a postcolonial colony: Helen I. Safa's contribution to Puerto Rican ethnography.

    PubMed

    Duany, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    This article assesses Helen I. Safa's legacy to anthropological thought in Puerto Rico. The first part of the article locates Safa's research on the Island within a long tradition of fieldwork by U.S. scholars since the early twentieth century. More recent research, conducted mostly by Puerto Rican women anthropologists and other social scientists, has expanded upon Safa's insights on gender and work. The second part of the essay analyzes Safa's major empirical work, The Urban Poor of Puerto Rico: A Study in Development and Inequality. Above all, this book helped overcome the theoretical impasse over the culture of poverty that characterized much of urban anthropology during the 1960s and 1970s. The article concludes with an appraisal of the relevance of Safa's work for the ethnography of contemporary Puerto Rico.

  13. Predicting child maltreatment among Puerto Rican children from migrant and non-migrant families

    PubMed Central

    Sledjeski, Eve M.; Dierker, Lisa C.; Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objectives of the present study were to 1) describe the prevalence of child maltreatment among migrant and non-migrant Puerto Rican families and 2) identify socio-demographic and cultural (i.e. acculturation pattern, familismo) predictors of maltreatment within these two samples. Method Representative community samples of Puerto Rican children (ages 5-13 at baseline) and their adult caretakers were interviewed at two sites: the South Bronx in New York City (n=631 families) and the Standard Metropolitan Areas of San Juan and Caguas in Puerto Rico (n=859 families). Participants were re-interviewed one and two years following the baseline assessment. Results While prevalence rates of maltreatment (physical abuse, 10%; sexual abuse 1 %; neglect, 10%; and multi-type, 6%) did not differ between the two sites at baseline assessment, site differences emerged over time. Rates of physical abuse at follow-up were significantly higher in the Bronx compared to Puerto Rico. Further, for families living in the Bronx, living in poverty predicted chronic maltreatment, whereas living above the poverty line predicted new cases of maltreatment at follow-up. For families living in Puerto Rico, those who experienced physical abuse or multi-type maltreatment at baseline were more likely to report chronic maltreatment at follow-up regardless of poverty level. Cultural factors were not related to baseline or follow-up maltreatment at either site. Conclusion Findings suggest that while rates of child maltreatment may be similar in migrant and non-migrant Puerto Rican families and when compared to prevalence rates in the US, predictors of maltreatment may differ. Practice Implications Since predictors of maltreatment may vary across population subgroups, studying homogenous samples will lead to more effective and targeted interventions. PMID:19457554

  14. Dialect Density in Bilingual Puerto Rican Spanish-English Speaking Children

    PubMed Central

    Fabiano-Smith, Leah; Shuriff, Rebecca; Barlow, Jessica A.; Goldstein, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how the two phonological systems of bilingual children interact. In this exploratory study, we examine children's use of dialect features to determine how their speech sound systems interact. Six monolingual Puerto Rican Spanish-speaking children and 6 bilingual Puerto Rican Spanish-English speaking children, ages 5-7 years, were included in the current study. Children's single word productions were analyzed for (1) dialect density and (2) frequency of occurrence of dialect features (after Oetting & McDonald, 2002). Nonparametric statistical analyses were used to examine differences within and across language groups. Results indicated that monolinguals and bilinguals exhibited similar dialect density, but differed on the types of dialect features used. Findings are discussed within the theoretical framework of the Dual Systems Model (Paradis, 2001) of language acquisition in bilingual children. PMID:25009677

  15. The Emerging Role of Admixture in the Pharmacogenetics of Puerto Rican Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Duconge, Jorge; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2011-01-01

    Admixture is of great relevance to the clinical application of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine. Preliminary findings in Puerto Ricans further substantiate the argument for admixture as a critical covariate in a customized DNA-guided warfarin dosing algorithm. To this purpose, a genome-wide approach that incorporates admixture as an independent predictor of dose variability in DNA-guided algorithms has been postulated. Admixture is expected to be able to reveal some relevant associations in the genetic epidemiology of Hispanics and will be indispensable to assure that pharmacogenomic research can be pursued in such mixed populations. Consequently, the clinical utility of knowing an individual’s genotype before initiating drug treatment in Puerto Ricans, and Hispanics in general, will finally be untangled by developing a “Genetic Prescription Model” that takes admixture into consideration. This approach will help lead physicians and patients to their desired treatment goal, resulting in more effective healthcare in admixed people. PMID:23227441

  16. Home asthma triggers: barriers to asthma control in Chicago Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Thomas, Ann Marie; Mosnaim, Giselle; Greve, Matthew; Swider, Susan M; Rothschild, Steven K

    2013-05-01

    We sought objectively to measure, summarize, and contextualize the asthma triggers found in the homes of urban high-risk Puerto Rican children and adolescents with asthma in Chicago. Data were from the baseline home assessments of Project CURA. Research assistants interviewed caregivers, conducted a home visual inspection, and collected saliva samples for cotinine analysis. A trigger behavior summary score was created. The housing inspected was old with multiple units and obvious structural deficiencies. Many allergic and irritant triggers were observed. Having a controller medicine or private insurance was associated with lower trigger behavior summary scores; caregiver depression, caregiver perceived stress, and child negative life events were associated with high trigger scores. The final multivariate model retained had a controller medicine, private insurance, and caregiver perceived stress. The data from this high-risk cohort identified modifiable areas where environmental interventions could reduce morbidity in Puerto Rican children and adolescents.

  17. Comparison of Bender-Gestalt and WISC correlations for Puerto Rican, White and Negro children.

    PubMed

    Marmorale, A M; Brown, F

    1975-07-01

    Correlations between Bender-Gestalt scores and WISC IQs were obtained for three ethnic groups of 123 Puerto Rican, 82 white, and 61 Negro children in the first grade. The Bender-Gestalt test did not show any significant relationship with the WISC scores of the Puerto Rican children. Significant correlations (p less than .01) between the Bender and all the WISC scores were found for the Negro group. For the white Ss, the WISC-Bender relationship was significant (p less than .01) only for the Performance and Full Scale scores. The absence of a significant correlation between the Bender and the WISC Verbal IQ in these children was attributed to the relative superiority of their Verbal scores.

  18. Stress and the Social Determinants of Maternal Health among Puerto Rican Women: A CBPR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Damio, Grace; Cruz, Joan; D’Angelo, Karen; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative research project explores how poverty, the built environment, education, working conditions, health care access, food insecurity and perceived discrimination are experienced by Puerto Rican Latinas through the course of their lives. Five focus groups were conducted with the primary objective of documenting community experiences and perspectives regarding: 1) stress, including perceived discrimination based on race/ethnicity (racism); 2) the impact of stress on Puerto Rican women of reproductive age, their families, and/or their community; and 3) stressors that affect maternal health. Focus groups were conducted in English and Spanish in the two cities with the highest rates of premature birth and low infant birthweight in the state of Connecticut. Focus group findings indicate that participants perceived poverty, food insecurity, lack of access to quality education, and unsafe environments as significant life stressors affecting maternal and child health. PMID:22080712

  19. Surveys of Puerto Rican screech-owl populations in large-tract and fragmented forest habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardieck, K.L.; Meyers, J.M.; Pagan, M.

    1996-01-01

    We conducted road surveys of Puerto Rican Screech-Owls (Otus nudipes) by playing conspecific vocalizations in secondary wet forest and fragmented secondary moist forest in rural areas of eastern Puerto Rico. Six paired surveys were conducted bi-weekly beginning in April. We recorded number of owl responses, cloud cover, wind speed, moon phase, and number of passing cars during 5-min stops at 60 locations. Owls responded in similar numbers (P > 0.05) in both habitat types. Also, we detected no association with cloud cover, wind speed, moon phase, or passing cars.

  20. My Cousin Talks Bad like You: Relationships between Language and Identity in a Rural Puerto Rican Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazak, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic case study uses participant observation and interviewing to explore the multiple, complex relationships between language and identities in a particular Puerto Rican community. Participants included students and teachers from a K-9 school-turned-community center in a rural municipality in Puerto Rico. Participants did not think…

  1. Pintando Tambien se Aprende. Aspectos de la Cultura Puertorriquena (One Can Also Learn From Coloring. Aspects of Puerto Rican Culture).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadilla de Ruibal, Carmen Alicia

    This workbook-style text is intended to introduce the Puerto Rican child and Spanish speaking children generally to the history, geography, customs and traditions of Puerto Rico. The introduction in the form of a teacher's guide provides objectives, suggested procedures, and additional activities. The student portion of the text is divided into…

  2. Pintando Tambien se Aprende. Aspectos de la Cultura Puertorriquena (One Can Also Learn From Coloring. Aspects of Puerto Rican Culture).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadilla de Ruibal, Carmen Alicia

    This workbook-style text is intended to introduce the Puerto Rican child and Spanish speaking children generally to the history, geography, customs and traditions of Puerto Rico. The introduction in the form of a teacher's guide provides objectives, suggested procedures, and additional activities. The student portion of the text is divided into…

  3. My Cousin Talks Bad like You: Relationships between Language and Identity in a Rural Puerto Rican Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazak, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic case study uses participant observation and interviewing to explore the multiple, complex relationships between language and identities in a particular Puerto Rican community. Participants included students and teachers from a K-9 school-turned-community center in a rural municipality in Puerto Rico. Participants did not think…

  4. Knowledge and Use of Ethnomedical Treatments for Asthma Among Puerto Ricans in an Urban Community

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Luis E.; Wisniewski, Angela M.; Cadzow, Renee B.; Tumiel-Berhalter, Laurene M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Puerto Ricans have higher lifetime and current asthma prevalence than other racial and ethnic groups in the United States. A great many Hispanics use ethnomedical therapies for asthma. This study elicited participant knowledge of ethnomedical therapies, developed a typology of the therapies, and considered whether some types are used or deemed efficacious based, in part, on information source. METHODS Eligible participants were randomly selected from the medical records of an inner-city primary care clinic serving a predominantly Hispanic community in Buffalo, New York. Thirty adult Puerto Ricans who had asthma or were care-givers of children with asthma were interviewed in person using a semistructured instrument. Qualitative data analysis followed a content-driven immersion-crystallization approach. Outcome measures were ethnomedical treatments for asthma known to participants, whether these treatments were used or perceived effective, and the participant’s information source about the treatment. RESULTS Participants identified 75 ethnomedical treatments for asthma. Behavioral strategies were significantly more likely to be used or perceived effective compared with ingested and topical remedies (P <.001). Among information sources for ingested and topical remedies, those recommended by community members were significantly less likely to be used or perceived effective (P <.001) compared with other sources. CONCLUSIONS This sample of Puerto Ricans with a regular source of medical care was significantly more likely to use or perceive as effective behavioral strategies compared with ingested and topical remedies. Allopathic clinicians should ask Puerto Rican patients about their use of ethnomedical therapies for asthma to better understand their health beliefs and to integrate ethnomedical therapies with allopathic medicine. PMID:21242561

  5. Influential Factors of Puerto Rican Mother-Child Communication About Sexual Health Topics.

    PubMed

    Torres, Maria Idalí; Granberry, Phillip; Person, Sharina; Allison, Jeroan; Rosal, Milagros; Rustan, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Introduction Latina mothers play a central role in raising and socializing their children; however, few studies have examined the cultural, socio-cognitive and neighborhood-related variables influencing the level of communication between Puerto Rican mothers and their children about sexuality and sexual health. This cross-sectional study sought to examine these influences. Methods Puerto Rican mothers with children aged 10-19 years (n = 193) were selected randomly for an ethnographic interview as part of a community participatory action research project in a U.S. urban northeastern community. Results Bivariate analyses found statistically significant associations between the child's age (p = 0.002), the mother's past communication about traditional gender role norms of women (marianismo) (p < 0.001), her positive outcome expectations for communications with her child (p < 0.025), and her perceptions of the physical condition (p < 0.001) and sexual health problems (p = 0.047) in the neighborhood. In a multivariate model, all of these variables remained significant except sexual health problems, and mother's attitudes toward the obligations of children to parents (familismo) emerged as a factor associated with a decrease in the number of sexual health topics that mothers raised with their children. No significant effects were found for mother's spiritual and religious experience (religiosidad). Discussion Our study highlights the importance of marianismo as a framework within which Puerto Rican mothers communicate sexual health information as well as the need to improve mothers' confidence discussing sexual health issues with their children. Future public health interventions to promote communication about sexuality and sexual health among Puerto Rican mothers should consider addressing this issue as a part of comprehensive neighborhood improvement projects.

  6. Marine geodetic control for geoidal profile mapping across the Puerto Rican Trench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fubara, D. M.; Mourad, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    A marine geodetic control was established for the northern end of the geoidal profile mapping experiment across the Puerto Rican Trench by determining the three-dimensional geodetic coordinates of the four ocean-bottom mounted acoustic transponders. The data reduction techniques employed and analytical processes involved are described. Before applying the analytical techniques to the field data, they were tested with simulated data and proven to be effective in theory as well as in practice.

  7. Incentive-based Intervention to Maintain Breastfeeding Among Low-income Puerto Rican Mothers.

    PubMed

    Washio, Yukiko; Humphreys, Mara; Colchado, Elisa; Sierra-Ortiz, Maria; Zhang, Zugui; Collins, Bradley N; Kilby, Linda M; Chapman, Donna J; Higgins, Stephan T; Kirby, Kimberly C

    2017-03-01

    Despite maternal and child health benefits, breastfeeding rates are relatively low among low-income Puerto Rican mothers. This study examined the hypothesis that monthly financial incentives would significantly increase the proportion of breastfeeding mothers at 6 months postpartum compared with Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) services only among Puerto Rican mothers. A randomized, 2-arm parallel-group design, from February 2015 through February 2016. Half of the randomized participants received monthly financial incentives contingent on observed breastfeeding for 6 months (Incentive), and the other half received usual WIC services only (Control). Thirty-six self-identified Puerto Rican women who initiated breastfeeding were enrolled. Monthly cash incentives were contingent on observed breastfeeding increasing the amount given at each month from $20 to $70 for a total possible of $270. The intent-to-treat analysis showed significantly higher percentages of breastfeeding mothers in the incentive group at each time point compared with those in the control group (89% vs 44%, P = .01 at 1 month; 89% vs 17%, P < .001 at 3 months; 72% vs 0%, P < .001 at 6 months). No significant differences were detected at any time point between study groups for self-reported exclusive breastfeeding rate and infant outcomes (ie, weight, emergency department visits). Contingent cash incentives significantly increased breastfeeding through 6-month postpartum among WIC-enrolled Puerto Rican mothers; however, no significant differences between the study groups were observed on exclusive breastfeeding rate and infant outcomes. Larger-scale studies are warranted to examine efficacy, implementation potential, and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. In Search of a Better Life: The Education and Housing Problems of Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Harrisburg.

    In early 1972, the Pennsylvania State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights turned its attention to the growing Puerto Rican population in Philadelphia, a population estimated to be anywhere from 30,000 to 125,000. A two-day open meeting or informal hearing was held on June 6 and 7, 1972, to look at two major problem areas for…

  9. Acculturation and Intention to Breastfeed Among a Population of Predominantly Puerto Rican Women

    PubMed Central

    Barcelona de Mendoza, Veronica; Harville, Emily; Theall, Katherine; Buekens, Pierre; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Latinas have high overall breastfeeding initiation rates, yet Puerto Ricans have among the lowest exclusive breastfeeding rates. This study sought to determine if acculturation was associated with intent to breastfeed in a predominantly Puerto Rican population. Methods A cohort of Latina women were enrolled in Proyecto Buena Salud, and provided information on infant feeding intent (N=1323). Acculturation was assessed via the Psychological Acculturation Scale (PAS), language preference and generation in the US. Results Increasing acculturation as measured by English language preference (aOR 0.61, 95% CI 0.42-0.88) and second/third generation in the US (aOR 0.70, 95% 0.52-0.95) was inversely associated with odds of intending to exclusively breastfeed. Similarly, women with higher levels of acculturation as measured by the PAS (aOR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45-0.99), English language preference (aOR 0.48, 95% CI 0.33-0.70) and second or third generation in the US (aOR 0.42, 95% CI 0.31-0.58) were less likely to report intent to combination feed as compared to women with lower acculturation. Conclusions Acculturation was inversely associated with intent to exclusively breastfeed as well as intent to combination feed in this predominantly Puerto Rican sample. PMID:26554873

  10. Application of DNA fingerprinting to the recovery program of the endangered Puerto Rican parrot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Puerto Rican parrot was reduced to 13 animals in 1975 and as a conservation measure, a captive population was established from a few founders taken from the wild between 1973 and 1983. The number of successful breeding pairs in captivity has been !ow, and the captive breeding program has not been as productive as that of the closely related Hispaniolan parrot. Therefore, a genetic study was initiated to examine the relative levels of relatedness of the captive founders using levels of bandsharing in DNA fingerprints. Unrelated captive founder Puerto Rican parrots had the same average level of bandsharing (0.41) as second-degree relatives of the Hispaniolan parrot (0.38, P > 0,05), with an inbreeding coefficient of 0.04. High levels of bandsharing (>40%) between pairs of males and females correlated with reproductive failure, suggesting that inbreeding depression is partly responsible for the !ow number of' breeding pairs. Consequently, DNA profiling can be used to guide the captive breeding program for the Puerto Rican parrot, and other endangered species, by identifying pairs of males and females with low levels of bandsharing.

  11. Acculturation and Intention to Breastfeed among a Population of Predominantly Puerto Rican Women.

    PubMed

    Barcelona de Mendoza, Veronica; Harville, Emily; Theall, Katherine; Buekens, Pierre; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Latinas have high overall breastfeeding initiation rates, yet Puerto Ricans have among the lowest exclusive breastfeeding rates. This study sought to determine if acculturation was associated with intent to breastfeed in a predominantly Puerto Rican population. A cohort of Latina women were enrolled in Proyecto Buena Salud, and provided information on infant feeding intent (n = 1,323). Acculturation was assessed via the Psychological Acculturation Scale (PAS), language preference, and generation in the United States. Increasing acculturation as measured by English language preference (aOR 0.61 [95% CI 0.42-0.88]) and second or third generation in the United States (aOR 0.70 [95% CI 0.52-0.95)] was inversely associated with odds of intending to exclusively breastfeed. Similarly, women with higher levels of acculturation as measured by the PAS (aOR 0.67 [95% CI 0.45-0.99]), English language preference (aOR 0.48 [95% CI 0.33-0.70]) and second or third generation in the United States (aOR 0.42 [95% CI 0.31-0.58]) were less likely to report intent to combination feed as compared with women with lower acculturation. Acculturation was inversely associated with intent to exclusively breastfeed and intent to combination feed in this predominantly Puerto Rican sample. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Toward a Puerto Rican popular nosology: nervios and ataque de nervios.

    PubMed

    Guarnaccia, Peter J; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Marano, Melissa Rivera

    2003-09-01

    This paper is about naming illnesses--about who determines what categories are used and the implications of these determinations. The central concerns of medical/psychiatric anthropology have been to understand popular categories of and systems for classification of illness, to examine the relationship of illness categories to cultural understandings of the body, and to interpret the role of categories of illness in mediating between the personal and social spheres. At the same time, the paper also discusses the interplay of popular categories and psychiatric diagnoses. This paper examines the multiple experiences of nervios among Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico and New York City. Our contention is that nervios is more than a diffuse idiom of distress, and that there are different categories and experiences of nervios which provide insights into how distress is experienced and expressed by Puerto Ricans and point to different social sources of suffering. The data in this paper come from the responses to a series of open-ended questions which tapped into people's general conceptions of nervios and ataques de nervios. These questions were incorporated into follow-up interviews to an epidemiological study of the mental health of adults in Puerto Rico. The results suggest ways to incorporate these different categories of nervios into future research and clinical work with different Latino groups in the United States and in their home countries.

  13. Puerto Rican Vocational Students' Experiences Regarding Standardized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segui, Nomara I.

    2016-01-01

    Vocational high school students are not passing state tests and are not meeting adequate yearly progress (AYP) requirements in Puerto Rico. Limited qualitative research has been conducted to examine the experiences of vocational high school students regarding mandated standardized tests. Using a qualitative case study, the experiences of Puerto…

  14. Asi Son los Puertorriquenos (These Are the Puerto Ricans).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Joan K.

    "Asi Son los Puertorriquenos" immerses the student of Spanish in the language and culture of Puerto Rico. The program is designed to simultaneously improve language skills and develop understanding and appreciation of the culture. The reading selections are challenging for the intermediate level, and provide valuable insight into many…

  15. Writing Puerto Rican History: The Challenge of Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarano, Francisco A.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the research and development of a history textbook on Puerto Rico. Discusses the issues of historical synthesis and the special problems associated with writing a book about an island that is neither an independent nation nor a colonial possession. (CFR)

  16. Puerto Rican Vocational Students' Experiences Regarding Standardized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segui, Nomara I.

    2016-01-01

    Vocational high school students are not passing state tests and are not meeting adequate yearly progress (AYP) requirements in Puerto Rico. Limited qualitative research has been conducted to examine the experiences of vocational high school students regarding mandated standardized tests. Using a qualitative case study, the experiences of Puerto…

  17. Asi Son los Puertorriquenos (These Are the Puerto Ricans).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Joan K.

    "Asi Son los Puertorriquenos" immerses the student of Spanish in the language and culture of Puerto Rico. The program is designed to simultaneously improve language skills and develop understanding and appreciation of the culture. The reading selections are challenging for the intermediate level, and provide valuable insight into many…

  18. Puerto Rican Children's Informal Education at Home. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Evelyn

    Observations of children's daily activities and interviews with the children's caretakers provided information on preschool children's informal home education in Utuado, Puerto Rico. Three kinds of skills were examined: literacy, chores, and rule-bound games. The unit of analysis was the "Potential Learning Activity" (PLA), a…

  19. Merchantable Volume and Weights of Mahoe in Puerto Rican Plantations

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis

    1989-01-01

    Mahoe (Hibiscus elatus Sw.), a fast-growing tree whose wood is considered valuable, is planted and managed primarily in the West Indies. Until now, volume and weight tables have not been available for the species. Data used in this paper were collected from 50 felled trees in a range of sizes from plantations across Puerto Rico. Using linear...

  20. The Puerto Ricans: A Brief Look At Their History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montalvo, David; And Others

    Beginning with an overview of the Spanish conquest and resulting rule, this handbook chronicles the history of Puerto Rico with specific attention devoted to the social and economic influences of contact with both Spain and the United States. Topics of particular relevance include a geographical overview of the land and its influence on the Puerto…

  1. Occurrence and correlates of overweight and obesity among island Puerto Rican youth.

    PubMed

    Garza, Jeremiah R; Pérez, Edna Acosta; Prelip, Michael; McCarthy, William J; Feldman, Jonathan M; Canino, Glorisa; Ortega, Alexander N

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: This article provides 2005-2008 population-based prevalence data on obesity and overweight among youth residing in Puerto Rico. Data for this report are from the Asthma, Depression, and Anxiety in Puerto Rican Youth (ADA) study. Measures included height and weight level data on youth in Puerto Rico aged 10 to 19 years with and without asthma as well as body mass index data on their caregivers. A total of 436 youth-caregiver dyads were selected and weighted to represent the general population of youth in Puerto Rico using 2008 US Census data. Household surveys demonstrated that 40% of youth aged 10 to 19 were overweight or obese. Twenty-five percent met moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity guidelines, however, physical activity was not associated with overweight or obesity in this sample. In multivariate analyses, females were 50% less likely than males to be overweight or obese. Older youth were 73% less likely to be overweight or obese than younger youth. Youth whose parents were obese were more than two times more likely to be overweight or obese than those whose parents were at a desirable weight. Youth in Puerto Rico have higher rates of overweight and obesity and lower compliance to moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity guidelines than rates reported for youth on the mainland. More population-based research is needed to understand the epidemiology of obesity and overweight among island Puerto Rican youth and the contribution of physical activity to the phenomenon.

  2. Differences in Learning Styles of Dominican and Puerto Rican Students: We Are Latinos from the Caribbean; Our First Language Is Spanish, However; Our Learning Preferences Are Different

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado-Torres, Sonia E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Dominican and Puerto Rican students' learning style. Findings of the study demonstrated differences between the learning preferences of Dominican and Puerto Rican students in the elements of Motivation (t = 2.846, p = 0.005), Several Ways of Learning (t = 2.351, p = 0.020), and…

  3. Puerto Rican Bilingual Professionals Parents: Their Expectations, Motivations, and Practices in Support of Their Children's Education and Their Perceptions of Their Children's School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinones, Norma Victoria Cordova Escalera de

    2010-01-01

    This research was designed as a qualitative study as it sought to address Puerto Rican bilingual professional parents' perceptions of their children's school experiences based in North Carolina. In this study, 6 Puerto Rican bilingual professional parents who live in the North Carolina Research Triangle Park (RTP) area were interviewed about their…

  4. Puerto Rican Bilingual Professionals Parents: Their Expectations, Motivations, and Practices in Support of Their Children's Education and Their Perceptions of Their Children's School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinones, Norma Victoria Cordova Escalera de

    2010-01-01

    This research was designed as a qualitative study as it sought to address Puerto Rican bilingual professional parents' perceptions of their children's school experiences based in North Carolina. In this study, 6 Puerto Rican bilingual professional parents who live in the North Carolina Research Triangle Park (RTP) area were interviewed about their…

  5. A Profile of Puerto Rican Health in the United States: Data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1982-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Eric; And Others

    The health conditions and health status of Hispanic Americans will assume increased importance as their population increases. The goal of this book of charts is to present data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) on Puerto Ricans. The Puerto Rican HHANES sampling procedure is a multi-stage probability sample of…

  6. Intersections between nativity, ethnic density, and neighborhood SES: using an ethnic enclave framework to explore variation in Puerto Ricans' physical health.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amanda Leigh; Hughes, Diane; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2013-06-01

    Although past research has demonstrated a "health disadvantage" for Puerto Rican adults, very little is known about correlates of health among this group. Given Puerto Ricans' unique experiences of migration and settlement, an ethnic enclave framework that integrates nativity, ethnic density, and neighborhood SES may offer insight into factors influencing Puerto Ricans' health. This study uses a sample of 449 adult mainland- and island-born Puerto Ricans living in New York City and Chicago. The data, collected as a part of the MIDUS Survey of Minority Groups, are stratified by neighborhood ethnic density and neighborhood SES, allowing for the examination of the individual and joint influences of neighborhood characteristics on physical health. Results revealed that ethnic density and neighborhood SES were not independently or interactively related to physical health for mainland-born Puerto Ricans. However, the interaction between ethnic density and neighborhood SES was related to self-reported health, functional limitations, and health symptoms for island-born Puerto Ricans. Island-born Puerto Ricans living in ethnically dense, low SES neighborhoods reported worse health than island-born Puerto Ricans living in other types of neighborhoods. This may be a result of isolation from resources both within and outside the neighborhood.

  7. Association of child maltreatment and depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth.

    PubMed

    Jaschek, Graciela; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; He, Xin; Lee, Sunmin; Canino, Glorisa

    2016-08-01

    This article compares multiple types of child maltreatment among Puerto Rican youth. We seek to expand the limited knowledge of the effects of multiple types of maltreatment on depressive symptoms in a specific Latino population as emerging studies indicate that children who are exposed to one type of maltreatment are often exposed to other types. This study examines the predictive strength of different and multiple types of lifetime child maltreatment (i.e., physical, sexual, and emotional abuse; and neglect), and the effect of youth support from parents, youth coping, youth self-esteem, and place of residence on depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth. Secondary data analyses were performed using three annual waves (2000-2004) of data from the Boricua Youth Study. The analytic sample consists of 1041 10-13 year old Puerto Rican youth living in New York and Puerto Rico. Results indicate that: (1) youth who experienced 'sexual abuse only', 'multiple maltreatment' (2 or more types of maltreatment), 'physical abuse only' have a significant increase in depressive symptoms (75.1%, 61.6%, and 40.5% respectively) compared to those without maltreatment; and (2) place of residence, exposure to violence, and mental disorders were significant risk factors. When developing psychosocial interventions, professionals should particularly focus on youth who report past lifetime experience with child maltreatment. Particular attention should be given to children living in the Bronx, New York and similar urban low-income areas who report past lifetime experience with multiple types of child maltreatment and who present symptoms or a diagnosis of co-occurring mental health problems.

  8. Addressing the HIV/AIDS Epidemic Among Puerto Rican People Who Inject Drugs: The Need for a Multiregion Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Albizu-García, Carmen E.; González, Ángel; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Santiago-Negrón, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    High levels of HIV risk behaviors and prevalence have been reported among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs (PRPWID) since early in the HIV epidemic. Advances in HIV prevention and treatment have reduced HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the United States. We examined HIV-related data for PRPWID in Puerto Rico and the US Northeast to assess whether disparities continue. Injection drug use as a risk for HIV is still overrepresented among Puerto Ricans. Lower availability of syringe exchanges, drug abuse treatment, and antiretroviral treatment for PWID in Puerto Rico contribute to higher HIV risk and incidence. These disparities should be addressed by the development of a federally supported Northeast–Puerto Rico collaboration to facilitate and coordinate efforts throughout both regions. PMID:25211722

  9. Addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs: the need for a multiregion approach.

    PubMed

    Deren, Sherry; Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Albizu-García, Carmen E; González, Ángel; Des Jarlais, Don C; Santiago-Negrón, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    High levels of HIV risk behaviors and prevalence have been reported among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs (PRPWID) since early in the HIV epidemic. Advances in HIV prevention and treatment have reduced HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the United States. We examined HIV-related data for PRPWID in Puerto Rico and the US Northeast to assess whether disparities continue. Injection drug use as a risk for HIV is still overrepresented among Puerto Ricans. Lower availability of syringe exchanges, drug abuse treatment, and antiretroviral treatment for PWID in Puerto Rico contribute to higher HIV risk and incidence. These disparities should be addressed by the development of a federally supported Northeast-Puerto Rico collaboration to facilitate and coordinate efforts throughout both regions.

  10. Contextual Risk and Promotive Processes in Puerto Rican Youths’ Internalizing Trajectories in Puerto Rico and New York

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Olazagasti, María A.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Canino, Glorisa J.; Bird, Héctor R.

    2012-01-01

    Research on ethnic-minority youths’ mental health has rarely examined developmental trajectories for the same ethnic group in contexts where they are a minority vs. where they are the majority, or mechanisms accounting for differences in trajectories across such contexts. This study examines Puerto Rican youth residing in two contexts -- one in which they are in their home culture of Puerto Rico, and one in which they are a minority group, in New York. We explore the relationship between social context, minority status, risk, resilience, and trajectories of internalizing symptoms after adjusting for factors related to migration. We found that youths’ reports of internalizing symptoms declined over time. Youth in New York had higher levels of internalizing symptoms than youth in Puerto Rico, but similar trajectories. Differences in internalizing symptoms across the two social contexts were accounted for by experiences of discrimination and exposure to violence. Parental monitoring was associated with fewer internalizing symptoms across the two sites, although this effect diminished over time. Contrary to what was expected, family religiosity was associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms. This association was stronger in the New York than in the Puerto Rico site. PMID:23880390

  11. Predicting Heroin and Alcohol Usage Among Young Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Ronald L.; Nuttall, Ena Vazquez

    Using 1968 data collected from junior and senior high school students in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, substance usage patterns for heroin and alcohol were predicted for 1975-6. A sample of 1,000 of the initial 5,000 students were selected for re-interview; half were selected to be at high risk of substance abuse and half were selected randomly. Some 657…

  12. Abundance and distribution of Legionellaceae in Puerto Rican waters.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Roque, C M; Hazen, T C

    1987-01-01

    Waters in marine and freshwater areas of Puerto Rico were analyzed for the presence of Legionella spp. by direct fluorescent antibody assay with guinea pig confirmation. Several species, including L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. longbeachae, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila, were widely distributed among all sites. Legionellaceae, including L. pneumophila, were found in high densities in water collected in the rain forest from epiphytes in trees 30 ft. (about 9.25 m) above the ground. Both interspecific and intersite variations were significant. L. pneumophila was the most abundant species at all sites, with average densities of 10(4) cells ml-1, very close to the range which is potentially pathogenic for humans. Densities of L. pneumophila were highest in sewage-contaminated coastal waters. These are the highest densities of Legionella spp. ever reported for marine habitats. Densities of L. pneumophila were positively correlated with concentrations of sulfates, phosphates, and pH. A survey of 88 fatal atypical pneumonia cases at a Puerto Rico hospital showed that 15% of the patients had L. pneumophila infections. This study establishes L. pneumophila as a relatively common cause of atypical pneumonia in Puerto Rico and suggests natural aquatic habitats as possible sources or reservoirs of pathogenic Legionella spp. in the tropics. Images PMID:3314710

  13. Exploring the role of ethnic identity on the attitudes towards HPV vaccine advertising among Puerto Ricans: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Calo, William A; Fernández, Maria E; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Colón-López, Vivian

    2015-02-01

    Despite the existence of guidelines recommending vaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV) and widespread availability of the vaccine through the Vaccines for Children program, HPV vaccination rates among island Puerto Ricans are suboptimal. Advertising plays a central role in promoting HPV vaccination by increasing awareness of and knowledge about the vaccine; however, little is known about the influence of cultural factors on the impact of HPV messages delivered through the media. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the role of ethnic identity on the attitudes towards HPV vaccine advertising among island Puerto Ricans. Five focus groups (n = 23) were conducted with parents and non-vaccinated females. Our analysis found several themes that may influence attitudes towards HPV vaccine advertising among this population: physical ethnic similarity, relevance of information, and sociocultural congruence. Findings may assist in developing culturally appropriate health promotion programs and media to promote HPV vaccination among Puerto Ricans.

  14. Exploring the role of ethnic identity on the attitudes towards HPV vaccine advertising among Puerto Ricans: A qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calo, William A.; Fernández, Maria E.; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Colón-López, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of guidelines recommending vaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV) and widespread availability of the vaccine through the Vaccines for Children program, HPV vaccination rates among island Puerto Ricans are suboptimal. Advertising plays a central role in promoting HPV vaccination by increasing awareness of and knowledge about the vaccine; however, little is known about the influence of cultural factors on the impact of HPV messages delivered through the media. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the role of ethnic identity on the attitudes towards HPV vaccine advertising among island Puerto Ricans. Five focus groups (n=23) were conducted with parents and non-vaccinated females. Our analysis found several themes that may influence attitudes towards HPV vaccine advertising among this population: physical ethnic similarity, relevance of information, and sociocultural congruence. Findings may assist in developing culturally appropriate health promotion programs and media to promote HPV vaccination among Puerto Ricans. PMID:24052477

  15. Development of a treatment protocol for Puerto Rican adolescents with suicidal behaviors.

    PubMed

    Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Torres-Dávila, Paloma; Spirito, Anthony; Polanco, Norka; Bernal, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents in Puerto Rico are at an increased risk for suicide attempts, though evidence-based treatments specifically for this group have not been tested. The current study was designed to develop and pilot test a culturally sensitive, manualized outpatient treatment for Puerto Rican adolescents who have experienced a suicidal crisis. The study was divided into phases. Phase 1 consisted of developing a socio-cognitive behavioral treatment for suicidal behavior. Phase 2 tested the treatment protocol in an open trial with 11 (6 male and 5 female) Puerto Rican adolescents. Active treatment had an approximate duration of 3-6 months. An initial assessment, process measures, and posttreatment assessment were completed with each participant to measure treatment feasibility as well as suicidality, symptoms, and risk factors. Participants were very satisfied with treatment and reported relevant clinical benefits. The retention rate was 73% (8 out of 11). For those who completed the treatment protocol, the goal of reducing further suicide risk was achieved; 2 showed reliable clinical changes in suicidal ideation, while 6 maintained low levels during treatment. All treatment completers had either a partial or total remission of their pretreatment diagnosis and half had reliable improvements in at least 1 risk factor. A theory-driven treatment protocol was developed according to patient's needs, but further research is needed to continue its development and to explore its efficacy.

  16. Seroprevalence of Schistosoma mansoni in Puerto Ricans with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, E A; Acosta, H; Cruz, M; Weinstock, J; Hillyer, G V

    2001-09-01

    The etiology of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is unknown. These diseases have a higher incidence in industrialized countries and their pathogenesis involves an over-reaction of the immune system. A genetic factor is believed to predispose to the development of chronic inflammation in response to an unidentified stimulus. Exposure to infections in childhood may modulate future immune responses. Parasitosis, particularly Schistosomiasis, stimulate Th2 immune responses. It has been hypothesized that the absence of these parasitic infections, as seen in economically developed countries, favors a Th1 response that may result in the clinical appearance of Crohn's disease later in life. To determine the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni antibodies in Puerto Ricans with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and controls. Serum from 92 Puerto Ricans with IBD and 106 controls was screened for S. mansoni adult microsomal antigens (MAMA) using the FAST:ELISA assay. Those positive were confirmed with an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot test. Seven serum samples (3 UC and 4 controls) were positive for S. mansoni antibodies. There was no significant difference between groups in gender, municipality of origin or seroprevalence of Schistosomiasis. The control group was slightly older than the IBD group. Our study did not demonstrate an inverse relation between Schistosomiasis and IBD. However, the decreasing prevalence of Schistosomiasis in the general population of Puerto Rico may account for this result.

  17. Assessing Colorectal Cancer Knowledge Among Puerto Rican Hispanics: Implications for Cancer Prevention and Control.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amill, Reinaldo; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Vázquez-Santos, Carla; Corzo-Pedrosa, Mónica; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2017-05-25

    In Puerto Rico, colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Moreover, adherence rates to CRC screening (52.2%) are still below the goals (70.5%) established by Healthy People 2020. Lack of knowledge is described as a significant barrier to adherence to CRC screening. The aim of this study was to assess CRC knowledge and screening rates among Puerto Rican Hispanics. Participants aged 40-85 years were recruited from the internal medicine outpatient clinics at the University of Puerto Rico. Demographic characteristics and knowledge about CRC, including risk factors and CRC screening tests, were obtained through face-to-face interviews. A mean CRC knowledge score was calculated based on correct responses to 13 validated questions. Mean knowledge scores were evaluated according to demographic characteristics using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. A total of 101 participants were recruited with mean age of 63 (±10.6) years. Fifty-eight (58%) of participants were females, 59% reported ≥12 years of education, and 71% reported ever screening for CRC. The mean CRC knowledge score was significantly lower (p < 0.05) among participants with lower annual family income, those who had never received a recommendation for CRC screening by a healthcare provider, and those who had no history of CRC screening. Knowledge about CRC must be improved in Puerto Rico. Efforts must be made to promote and develop culturally appropriate CRC educational strategies. Future studies should focus on identifying other barriers and factors that may limit CRC screening in the Puerto Rican Hispanic population.

  18. Acculturation and Adverse Birth Outcomes in a Predominantly Puerto Rican Population

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Veronica Barcelona; Harville, Emily; Theall, Katherine; Buekens, Pierre; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Latinas in the United States on average have poorer birth outcomes than Whites, yet considerable heterogeneity exists within Latinas. Puerto Ricans have some of the highest rates of adverse outcomes and are understudied. The goal of this study was to determine if acculturation was associated with adverse birth outcomes in a predominantly Puerto Rican population. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study conducted from 2006 to 2011. A convenience sample of pregnant Latina women were recruited from a tertiary care hospital in Massachusetts. Acculturation was measured in early pregnancy; directly via the Psychological Acculturation Scale, and via proxies of language preference and generation in the United States. Birth outcomes (gestational age and birthweight) were abstracted from medical records (n = 1362). Results After adjustment, psychological acculturation, language preference, and generation was not associated with odds of preterm birth. However, every unit increase in psychological acculturation score was associated with an increase in gestational age of 0.22 weeks (SE = 0.1, p = 0.04) among all births. Women who preferred to speak Spanish (β = −0.39, SE = 0.2, p = 0.02) and who were first generation in the US (β = −0.33, SE = 0.1, p = 0.02) had significantly lower gestational ages than women who preferred English or who were later generation, respectively. Similarly, women who were first generation had babies who weighed 76.11 g less (SE = 35.2, p = 0.03) than women who were later generation. Discussion We observed a small, but statistically significant adverse impact of low acculturation on gestational age and birthweight in this predominantly Puerto Rican population. PMID:26694041

  19. Depression During Pregnancy and Adverse Birth Outcomes Among Predominantly Puerto Rican Women.

    PubMed

    Szegda, Kathleen; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R; Pekow, Penelope; Powers, Sally; Markenson, Glenn; Dole, Nancy; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    Objectives To examine associations between depression and preterm birth and small-for gestational age (SGA) among women of predominantly Puerto Rican descent, a population who experiences disparities in adverse birth outcomes and one of the highest infant mortality rates in the United States. Methods Proyecto Buena Salud (PBS) was a prospective cohort study conducted from 2006 to 2011 at a large tertiary care center in Western Massachusetts. Caribbean Islander (i.e., Puerto Rican and Dominican Republic) women were interviewed in early, mid and late pregnancy. Among 1262 participants, associations between depression, assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, and risk of preterm birth and small-for-gestational age (SGA) were evaluated. Results Women with at least probable minor depression [odds ratio (OR) = 1.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02, 3.07)] or probable major depression [OR = 1.82 (95% CI = 1.01, 3.25)] in mid-pregnancy had an increased risk of SGA compared to non-depressed women in adjusted analyses. Borderline significant associations were observed between increasing levels of depressive symptom scores in early and mid-pregnancy [OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.11) and OR = 1.04 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.09), respectively] and each additional trimester of exposure to probable major depression across mid- to late pregnancy [OR = 1.66 (95% CI = 1.00, 2.74)] and SGA. Late pregnancy depression was not associated with SGA; depression during pregnancy was not associated with preterm birth. Conclusions for Practice In this population of predominantly Puerto Rican women, mid-pregnancy depression increased risk for SGA. Findings can inform culturally appropriate, targeted interventions to identify and treat pregnant women with depression.

  20. CCR5 chemokine receptor genotype frequencies among Puerto Rican HIV-1-seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, S; Tirado, G; Revuelta, G; Yamamura, Y; Lu, Y; Nerurkar, V R; Yanagihara, R

    1998-01-01

    Some individuals remain uninfected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), despite multiple sexual contacts with subjects with confirmed HIV-1 infection. Several studies have confirmed that individuals who are homozygous for a 32 base pair (bp) deletion mutation in the chemokine receptor gene CCR5, designated as delta 32/ delta 32, are protected against HIV-1 infection. Heterozygotes of the same chemokine receptor deletion mutation are, however, not protected from acquiring HIV-1 infection but seemingly have slower progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndromes (AIDS). Genotype frequencies of the delta 32 CCR5 mutation vary markedly among different ethnic groups; heterozygosity is found in approximately 15% of Caucasians, about 5-7% of Hispanics and African Americans and 1% or less of Asians. The ethnic background of Puerto Ricans is highly complex and usually includes admixture of Caucasian, Caribbean Indian and African traits to a varying extent. This study was conducted to examine the frequencies of the delta 32 CCR5 mutation among Puerto Ricans who are infected with HIV-1. Samples were received from different geographical regions of the island. Of 377 samples tested, 94.2% were wild type (non-deletion mutant) homozygotes, 5.8% were delta 32 CCR5 heterozygotes, and none were delta 32 CCR5 homozygotes. The incidence of CCR5 delta 32/w heterozygous mutation among Puerto Ricans seems to be somewhat lower than what was reported with US Hispanics. Some age and gender associated bias of the mutation frequency were observed with the study population, the reason for which is unclear at present.

  1. Infant mortality, season of birth and the health of older Puerto Rican adults.

    PubMed

    McEniry, Mary

    2011-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of heart disease and diabetes among aging populations in low and middle income countries leads to questions regarding the degree to which endogenous early life exposures (exposures in utero) are important determinants of these health conditions. We devised a test using infant mortality (IMR) to verify if season of birth is a good indicator of early life (in utero) conditions that precipitate adult onset of disease. We linked annual IMR at the municipality (municipio) level from the late 1920s to early 1940s with individual birth year and place using a representative sample of older Puerto Rican adults (n = 1447) from the Puerto Rican Elderly: Health Conditions (PREHCO) study. We estimated the effects of season of birth on adult heart disease and diabetes for all respondents and then for respondents according to whether they were born when IMR was lower or higher, controlling for age, gender, obesity, respondent's educational level, adult behavior (smoking and exercise) and other early life exposures (childhood health, knee height and childhood socioeconomic status (SES)). The pattern of effects suggests that season of birth reflects endogenous causes: (1) odds of heart disease and diabetes were strong and significant for those born during the lean season in years when IMR was lower; (2) effects remained consistent even after controlling for other childhood conditions and adult behavior; but (3) no seasonality effects on adult health for adults born when IMR was higher. We conclude that in this population of older Puerto Rican adults there is continued support that the timing of adverse endogenous (in utero) conditions such as poor nutrition and infectious diseases is associated with adult heart disease and diabetes. It will be important to test the validity of these findings in other similar populations in the developing world.

  2. Acculturation and Adverse Birth Outcomes in a Predominantly Puerto Rican Population.

    PubMed

    Barcelona de Mendoza, Veronica; Harville, Emily; Theall, Katherine; Buekens, Pierre; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Latinas in the United States on average have poorer birth outcomes than Whites, yet considerable heterogeneity exists within Latinas. Puerto Ricans have some of the highest rates of adverse outcomes and are understudied. The goal of this study was to determine if acculturation was associated with adverse birth outcomes in a predominantly Puerto Rican population. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study conducted from 2006 to 2011. A convenience sample of pregnant Latina women were recruited from a tertiary care hospital in Massachusetts. Acculturation was measured in early pregnancy; directly via the Psychological Acculturation Scale, and via proxies of language preference and generation in the United States. Birth outcomes (gestational age and birthweight) were abstracted from medical records (n = 1362). Results After adjustment, psychological acculturation, language preference, and generation was not associated with odds of preterm birth. However, every unit increase in psychological acculturation score was associated with an increase in gestational age of 0.22 weeks (SE = 0.1, p = 0.04) among all births. Women who preferred to speak Spanish (β = -0.39, SE = 0.2, p = 0.02) and who were first generation in the US (β = -0.33, SE = 0.1, p = 0.02) had significantly lower gestational ages than women who preferred English or who were later generation, respectively. Similarly, women who were first generation had babies who weighed 76.11 g less (SE = 35.2, p = 0.03) than women who were later generation. Discussion We observed a small, but statistically significant adverse impact of low acculturation on gestational age and birthweight in this predominantly Puerto Rican population.

  3. Results of an osteoporosis educational intervention randomized trial in a sample of Puerto-Rican women.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Vázquez, Miriam; Tejeda, Manuel J; Colin, Jessie; Matos, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an osteoporosis educational intervention on knowledge, health beliefs, and self-efficacy in college-age Puerto Rican women. The Health Belief Model and Purnell Model formed the theoretical framework for the study. Three hypotheses were tested with a convenience, randomized sample of 51 experimental and 54 control subjects, ages 18-25. The findings support the hypotheses that educational intervention improved osteoporosis knowledge, health beliefs, but had no effect on self-efficacy. Results and directions for future research are discussed.

  4. Individual and group CBT and IPT for Puerto Rican adolescents with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, Jeannette; Bernal, Guillermo; Rivera-Medina, Carmen

    2008-07-01

    This study compared individual (I) to group (G) formats of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for the treatment of depression in adolescents. One hundred and 12 Puerto Rican adolescents were randomized to four conditions (CBT-I, CBT-G, IPT-I, IPT-G). Participants were assessed at pretreatment and posttreatment with structured interviews to establish diagnosis and with self-report measures to assess treatment outcome. The results suggest that CBT and IPT are robust treatments in both group and individual formats. However, CBT produced significantly greater decreases in depressive symptoms and improved self-concept than IPT. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Social and economic factors associated with recent and lifetime incarceration among Puerto Rican drug users.

    PubMed

    de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Lundgren, Lena M; Chassler, Deborah; Horowitz, Amanda C; Adorno, Elpidio; Purington, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 280 Puerto Rican drug users with a history of incarceration residing in Massachusetts, we explore whether a significant association exists between social and economic factors (maintaining social network contacts, receiving public assistance) and lifetime incarceration. Analysis of survey data using regression methods shows that respondents who live in their own home, receive public assistance, and have recent familial contact are significantly less likely to have been incarcerated in the past 6 months. Among study participants, men and those who initiated heroin use at younger ages are more likely to have greater lifetime incarceration totals. Practice implications are discussed.

  6. Habitat Association, Size, Stomach Contents, and Reproductive Condition of Puerto Rican Boas (Epicrates inornatus)

    Treesearch

    JAMES W. WILEY

    2003-01-01

    The Puerto Rican boa occurs in a variety of habitats, including wet montane forest, lowland wet forest, mangrove forest, wet limestone karst, and offshore cays, and from sea level to 480 m. Mean SVL of 49 encountered boas (live and road-killed) was 136.9 ± 35.1 (range = 38.8–205 cm), with a mean mass of 952.1 ± 349.0 g (n = 47; range = 140–1662 g). Prey in digestive...

  7. Puerto Rican elders' knowledge and use of community-based long-term care services.

    PubMed

    Guzzardo, Mariana T; Sheehan, Nancy W

    2013-01-01

    We conducted 3 focus groups with 28 Spanish-speaking Puerto Rican elders to explore their knowledge and use of community-based long-term care services, including an exploration of whether their residential setting influences access to services. Analysis revealed themes relating to participants' difficulties and frustrations with formal services. A major theme was a reliance on formal services, given a lack of reliable familial help. Elders living in Latino senior housing reported the greatest access to services, with availability of Spanish-speaking housing staff and informal support from neighbors serving as critical components of their social networks. Practice and policy recommendations are provided.

  8. [CHALLENGES IN THE INTERVENTION OF PUERTO RICAN ADOLESCENTS THAT SHOW SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR].

    PubMed

    Vélez, Yovanska Duarté; Dávila, Paloma Torres; Hernández, Samariz Laboy

    2015-01-01

    This article is a case study of a Puerto Rican adolescent with suicidal behavior. The adolescent began a Socio-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Suicidal Behavior (SCBT), an ambulatory treatment, after being hospitalized for a suicide attempt. The SCBT incorporates an ecological and developmental perspective to CBT. She initially presented low self-esteem, and significant depressive and anxiety symptoms. At the end of treatment, the adolescent revealed a significant change in symptoms, and a better use of her coping skills. No suicidal ideation was presented during previous months, neither during follow up. Case analysis allowed treatment protocol modifications, particularly family sessions and communication skills, thus contributing to its further feasibility.

  9. The impact of war on Puerto Rican families: challenges and strengthened family relationships.

    PubMed

    Magaly Freytes, I; Hannold, Elizabeth M; Resende, Rosana; Wing, Kristen; Uphold, Constance R

    2013-08-01

    We describe the impact of war on Puerto Rican Veterans and family members. We used qualitative research methods to collect and analyze data. We interviewed 8 Veterans and 8 family members. We used the constant comparison method to review data to identify prominent themes. Two categories emerged: (1) Challenges associated with post-deployment family reintegration, and (2) A positive aftermath of war on the family. Overall, findings indicate that OEF/OIF Veterans and family members were not prepared for the changes they encounter post-deployment. Despite these challenges, some Veterans and family members strengthened their relationships and renewed their appreciation for one another.

  10. Granular cell tumor in an endangered Puerto Rican Amazon parrot (Amazon vittata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, C.F.; Latimer, K.S.; Goldade, S.L.; Rivera, A.; Dein, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    A 3 cm diameter mass from the metacarpus of a Puerto Rican Amazon parrot was diagnosed as a granular cell tumour based on light microscopy. The cytoplasmic granules were periodic-acid Schiff positive and diastase resistant. Ultrastructural characteristics of the cells included convoluted nuclei and the presence of numerous cytoplasmic tertiary lysosomes. This is only the second granular cell tumour reported in a bird. We speculate that most granular cell tumours are derived from cells that are engaged in some type of cellular degradative process, creating a similar morphologic appearance, but lacking a uniform histogenesis.

  11. Trematodes associated with mangrove habitat in Puerto Rican salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, K.D.; Hechinger, R.F.; Lorda, J.; Soler, L.

    2005-01-01

    Batillaria minima is a common snail in the coastal estuaries of Puerto Rico. This snail is host to a variety of trematodes, the most common being Cercaria caribbea XXXI, a microphallid species that uses crabs as second intermediate hosts. The prevalence of infection was higher (7.1%) near mangroves than on mudflats away from man-groves (1.4%). Similarly, there was a significant positive association between the proportion of a site covered with mangroves and the prevalence of the microphallid. The association between mangroves and higher trematode prevalence is most likely because birds use mangroves as perch sites and this results in local transmission to snails. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2005.

  12. [Anthropometric and physiologic profile of Puerto Rican athletes: female softball].

    PubMed

    Rivera, M A; Ramírez-Marrero, F A; Rivas, C A; Rivera-Brown, A M

    1994-12-01

    This study was conducted to describe and compare various anthropometric, body composition, cardiorespiratory, metabolic and neuromuscular characteristics of 12 female athletes, members of the Puerto Rico national softball team. The subjects were divided into three categories according to their game specific requirements (game position): infielders (n = 5), outfielders (n = 4), and pitchers (n = 3). The mean and standard deviations of all the variables in each group was calculated. These athletes demonstrated high levels of body fat and below optimal levels of flexibility, cardiorespiratory endurance, and muscular strength and endurance. The results revealed deficiencies in the health related fitness components and in the physical preparation for sports competition. These results also suggest that the subjects are at risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases, sport injuries, and poor sport performance.

  13. Proceedings of the Conference on Ecological and Cultural Factors Related to Emotional Disturbances in Puerto Rican Children and Youth, Barranquitas, Puerto Rico, December 8-10, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Roberto E., Ed.

    The Conference on Ecological and Cultural Factors Related to Emotional Disturbance in Puerto Rican Children and Youth was the primary attempt to bring together a group of behavioral scientists, medical doctors, and educators, so that the scientific findings of the former--behavioral and medical scientists--may be used by the latter--educators--in…

  14. [Bulimic and depressive symptomatology in Puerto Rican adolescents].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Nelson D; Rosselló, Jeannette

    2003-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa and depression have been identified as frequent mental health problems among adolescents. Bulimia nervosa, an eating disorder has been associated with depression especially among female population. The literature has established a high comorbidity between these disorders. Although depression was initially conceptualized as an adult disorder, recent research evidenced this disorder among adolescents. For this study, it was hypothesized that participants who presented bulimic symptomatology were going to present a higher depressive symptomatology than those who had no bulimic symptoms. The Bulimia Test (Bulit) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) were administered to 309 students from a private high school in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Correlation analyses and group comparisons were performed to investigate the relationship between bulimia nervosa and depression among participants. As hypothesized, a significant correlation (p < .01) was found between depression and bulimia nervosa symptomatology. Females showed a higher average of bulimic symptomatology than males. Early identification for treatments with bulimia and depression would be helpful in preventing future problems in later adulthood. Implications of this study are discussed.

  15. The Toa Baja Drilling Project and current studies in Puerto Rican geology: Introduction and summary

    SciTech Connect

    Larue, D.K. )

    1991-03-01

    This volume concerns information learned by drilling the Toa Baja well on the north coast of Puerto Rico, and current studies of Puerto Rican geology and tectonics. The Toa Baja Drillsite is located in the North Coast basin of Puerto Rico about 10 km west of San Juan. The hole was spudded on August 23, 1989, and plugged and abandoned on November 7, 1989 at a total depth of 2,704m. Two lithologies were encountered during drilling: an upper series consisting of Oligocene-Miocene shallow-water limestone and sandstone facies, and a lower series consisting of Eocene deep-water volcaniclastic strata, including some lava flows or shallow intrusions, pelagic marls, and altered igneous rocks or coarse-grained sandstones. Principal findings made during drilling include: (1) the important unconformity separating the upper and lower series at about 579 m; (2) 8 faults defined clearly by dipmeter log; (3) changes in rock type probably associated with reflection events in seismic reflection profiles crossing the drillsite; (4) confirmation of overall low geothermal gradients and heat flow, but presence of a thermal anomaly near 2683 m; (5) documentation of high paleogeothermal gradients using petrographic, isotopic, X-Ray diffraction and electron microprobe studies; (6) presence of fractures indicating a current extensional tectonic setting. Current studies in the Puerto Rico region include: (1) paleomagnetic evidence for late Miocene counterclockwise rotation; (2) geochemical evolution of Cretaceous and Eocene igneous rocks; (3) evidence of transtension in the northeast Caribbean plate boundary zone; (4) results of studies of ancient fault zones on Puerto Rico; and (5) stratigraphic studies of the Tertiary of Puerto Rico.

  16. Puerto Rican-Born Women in the United States: Contextual Approach to Immigration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Bekteshi, Venera; Van Hook, Mary; Matthew, Lenore

    2015-11-01

    This study focused on how acculturative stress and psychological distress affect Puerto Rican-born women residing in the United States. Mediation path analysis was used to estimate relationships between contextual factors, acculturative stress, and psychological distress. The fit of the data to the final model was adequate as estimated using chi-square analysis, comparative fit index, Tucker-Lewis Index, and root-mean-square error of approximation. Racial discrimination (b = 0.38, p = .01), difficulties visiting family abroad (b = 0.26, p = .03), and age at immigration (b = 0.19, p = .03) were positively associated with acculturative stress. The factor English skills (b = -0.31, p = .02) was negatively associated with acculturative stress. Racial discrimination had the strongest effect on acculturative stress, followed by English skills, difficulties visiting family abroad, and age at immigration. Racial discrimination (b = 0.39, p = .01) and financial constraints (b = 0.30, p = .01) were positively associated with psychological distress. Racial discrimination affected the women's psychological distress the most, followed by economic contexts (financial constraints). This study informs practitioners in considering the significant contextual factors relevant to the psychological distress of Puerto Rican-born women.

  17. Brave new world: mental health experiences of Puerto Ricans, immigrant Latinos, and Brazilians in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mónica; Cardemil, Esteban; Adams, Sara Trillo; Calista, Joanne L; Connell, Joy; Depalo, Alexandra; Ferreira, Juliana; Gould, Diane; Handler, Jeffrey S; Kaminow, Paula; Melo, Tatiana; Parks, Allison; Rice, Eric; Rivera, Ismael

    2014-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are of the most commonly occurring mental health disorders in the United States. Despite a variety of efficacious interventions for depression and anxiety, it is clear that ethnic minorities experience mental health care disparities in their access to mental health services and the quality of treatment they receive. Research indicates that Latino heterogeneity impacts access to depression and anxiety treatment. In addition, Brazilians are becoming an increasingly visible minority within the United States and are often depicted as Latinos. The current study sought to understand the role of acculturation and stigma in mental health symptom endorsement and treatment seeking among Puerto Ricans, immigrant Latinos, and Brazilians. A total of 250 self-identified Latinos and Brazilians were interviewed about their mental health symptom and treatment experience, acculturation, and stigma toward mental illness. Results indicated considerable variability across the three groups, with Puerto Ricans endorsing higher rates of depression and anxiety, as well as higher rates of treatment seeking, than either the immigrant Latinos or the Brazilians. Acculturation played a differential role in the endorsement of anxiety treatment seeking for Brazilians. Finally, although the three groups differed in the extent to which they experienced stigma about mental health issues, stigma did not predict symptom endorsement or treatment-seeking behavior for any of the three groups. These findings underscore the importance of attending to both between-groups and within-group differences in the mental health and mental health treatment experiences of different ethnic groups.

  18. Puerto Rican Latina Youth Coming Out to Talk About Sexuality and Identity.

    PubMed

    Fiddian-Green, Alice; Gubrium, Aline C; Peterson, Jeffery C

    2017-09-01

    Public health efforts focused on Latina youth sexuality are most commonly framed by the syndemic of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, a narrow and often heteronormative focus that perpetuates silences that contribute to health inequities and overlooks the growing need for increased education, awareness, and support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. This article presents findings from the project Let's Talk About Sex: Digital Storytelling for Puerto Rican Latina Youth, which used a culturally centered, narrative-based approach for analyzing participants' own specifications of sexual values and practices. The strength of digital storytelling lies in its utility as an innovative tool for community-based and culturally situated research, as well as in its capacity to open up new spaces for health communication. Here we present two "coming out" case studies to illustrate the value of digital storytelling in supporting the development of meaningful and culturally relevant health promotion efforts for LGBTQ-identified Puerto Rican Latina youth across the life span.

  19. A Study of Disruptive Behavior Disorders in Puerto Rican Youth: II. Baseline Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Correlates in Two Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Davies, Mark; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Shen, Sa; Loeber, Rolf; Canino, Glorisa J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This is the second of two associated articles. The prevalence, correlates, and comorbidities of disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) in two populations are reported. Method: Probability community samples of Puerto Rican boys and girls ages 5-13 years in San Juan, and the south Bronx in New York City are included (n = 2,491). The…

  20. The Teaching and the Enjoyment and Being Together...: Sibling Teaching in the Family of a Puerto Rican Kindergartner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Dinah

    Based on direct observations of the family, this paper analyzes the teaching strategies used by a Puerto Rican kindergartner's older siblings and extended family members to teach school-related knowledge and skills. As the family's instruction was conducted in Spanish only, these teaching strategies are analyzed in relation to those used by the…

  1. "The teaching and the enjoyment and being together...": Sibling Teaching in the Family of a Puerto Rican Kindergartner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Dinah

    1999-01-01

    Analyzed strategies used by older siblings to teach school-related knowledge and skills to a kindergartner in a Puerto Rican home, comparing these strategies to those used by the child's bilingual kindergarten teacher. Found that siblings taught within a context of learning and togetherness established by the parents and grounded in Latino…

  2. Sociocultural Differences in Eating Disordered Behaviors and Body Image Perception: A Comparison between Puerto Rican and American College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Encarnacion-Garcia, Haydee

    This study investigated whether differences attributable to sociocultural factors existed in the eating-disorder behaviors and body image perception of Puerto Rican and U.S. college women. Participants (n=440) completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 and provided demographic information. Results indicated significant differences between the…

  3. Puerto Rican Adolescents' Disclosure and Lying to Parents about Peer and Risky Activities: Associations with Teens' Perceptions of Latino Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalobos, Myriam; Smetana, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure and lying to mothers and fathers about different activities, as defined within social domain theory, were examined as a function of Latino family values in 109 Puerto Rican lower socioeconomic status middle adolescents (M = 15.58 years, SD = 1.18) living in the United States. Questionnaires revealed that teens sometimes disclosed to…

  4. Effects of Model Choice and Forest Structure on Inventory-Based Estimations of Puerto Rican Forest Biomass.

    Treesearch

    THOMAS J. BRANDEIS; MARIA DEL ROCIO SUAREZ ROZO

    2005-01-01

    Total aboveground live tree biomass in Puerto Rican lower montane wet, subtropical wet, subtropical moist and subtropical dry forests was estimated using data from two forest inventories and published regression equations. Multiple potentially-applicable published biomass models existed for some forested life zones, and their estimates tended to diverge with increasing...

  5. Effects of model choice and forest structure on inventory-based estimations of Puerto Rican forest biomass

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Brandeis; Maria Del Rocio; Suarez Rozo

    2005-01-01

    Total aboveground live tree biomass in Puerto Rican lower montane wet, subtropical wet, subtropical moist and subtropical dry forests was estimated using data from two forest inventories and published regression equations. Multiple potentially-applicable published biomass models existed for some forested life zones, and their estimates tended to diverge with increasing...

  6. Changes in Language Usage of Puerto Rican Mothers and Their Children: Do Gender and Timing of Exposure to English Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Lawrence, Frank; Rodriguez, Barbara; Davison, Megan Dunn; Miccio, Adele W.

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated changes in reported language usage between Puerto Rican mothers and their preschoolers over a 4-year period. It also examined whether differences in language usage occurred depending on the timing of children's exposure to English and children's gender. Seventy-six mothers reported the languages they and their…

  7. Culture and Psychiatric Symptoms in Puerto Rican Children: Longitudinal Results from One Ethnic Group in Two Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Cristiane S.; Bird, Hector R.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Wu, Ping; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Shen, Sa; Canino, Glorisa

    2008-01-01

    Background: The development of youth psychopathology may be associated with direct and continuous contact with a different culture (acculturation) and to distress related to this process (cultural stress). We examine cultural experiences of Puerto Rican families in relation to youth psychiatric symptoms in two different contexts: one in which…

  8. Voices of Our Past: Using Oral History To Explore Funds of Knowledge within a Puerto Rican Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Irma M.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an educational rationale for using oral history to teach students that there are multiple sources of information and multiple ways to seek it. The case study of an extended Puerto Rican family is used to explore the funds of knowledge available in this way as well as to challenge some stereotypes about Latinas. (SLD)

  9. Culture and Psychiatric Symptoms in Puerto Rican Children: Longitudinal Results from One Ethnic Group in Two Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Cristiane S.; Bird, Hector R.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Wu, Ping; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Shen, Sa; Canino, Glorisa

    2008-01-01

    Background: The development of youth psychopathology may be associated with direct and continuous contact with a different culture (acculturation) and to distress related to this process (cultural stress). We examine cultural experiences of Puerto Rican families in relation to youth psychiatric symptoms in two different contexts: one in which…

  10. RETARDATION IN INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT OF LOWER-CLASS PUERTO RICAN CHILDREN IN NEW YORK CITY. INTERIM FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THOMAS, ALEXANDER

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO DETERMINE THE ENVIRONMENTAL PATTERNS (CHILD CARE PRACTICES, PARENTAL ATTITUDES, AND OTHER INTRAFAMILY AND EXTRAFAMILY INFLUENCES) WHICH ARE DETRIMENTAL OR BENEFICIAL TO THE OPTIMAL LEARNING AND INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT OF LOWER CLASS PUERTO RICAN CHILDREN. A SAMPLE POPULATION CONSISTED OF 95 CHILDREN WHOSE BEHAVIOR HAD BEEN…

  11. Puerto Rican Adolescents' Disclosure and Lying to Parents about Peer and Risky Activities: Associations with Teens' Perceptions of Latino Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalobos, Myriam; Smetana, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure and lying to mothers and fathers about different activities, as defined within social domain theory, were examined as a function of Latino family values in 109 Puerto Rican lower socioeconomic status middle adolescents (M = 15.58 years, SD = 1.18) living in the United States. Questionnaires revealed that teens sometimes disclosed to…

  12. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) with Puerto Rican elderly.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, José R; Dávila-Martínez, Mariel G; Collazo-Rodríguez, Luis C

    2006-06-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; (1) is one of the most useful measures for depressive symptomatology in many countries (2). The psychometric properties of this inventory, however, have not been reported with Puerto Rican elderly. This paper reports, exploratory psychometric results with a sample of 410 elderly Puerto Rican (65 years and older; men=94, women=316). The assessment of the construct validity of the BDI-II yielded four factors accounting for 52% of total variance and an internal reliability coefficient (alpha Cronbach) of .89. A factor analysis with the 21 items of the BDI-II was performed using principal component analysis as the extraction method and Varimax rotation. This analysis revealed that the BDI-II was a good measure of the dimensions of depressive symptomatology in the present sample, which resembled prior findings reported with the general Puerto Rican Population (3). This study also reports further data supporting the reliability, validity, and practical utility of the BDI-II for the Puerto Rican population including elders. Implications for potential research with minorities and clinical uses of the BDI-II are also discussed.

  13. Puerto Ricans on the United States Mainland: A Bibliography of Reports, Texts, Critical Studies and Related Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordasco, Francesco; And Others

    The contents of this annotated bibliography are divided into six parts, prefaced by a general description of the conditions and problems of the Puerto Ricans on the United States mainland. Part I comprises a list of general bibliographies. Part II concerns "The island experience," and first lists general works and then specific works.…

  14. Theory-Based Predictors of Intention to Engage in Precautionary Sexual Behavior among Puerto Rican High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collazo, Andres A.

    2004-01-01

    Predictors of intention to abstain from sexual intercourse or use condoms consistently with both main and other partners were investigated in 431 Puerto Rican high school students. The basis for this study was the theories of reasoned action (TRA) and planned behavior (TPB), and two predictors from the theory of interpersonal behavior (TIB). As…

  15. Problem Solving and Reasoning Skills Cognitive Development Model for Severely Disadvantaged Puerto Rican College Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ana G. Mendez Educational Foundation, Rio Piedras, PR.

    Through the Problem Solving and Reasoning Skills Cognitive Development Model for Severely Disadvantaged Puerto Rican College Students, the Ana G. Mendez Educational Foundation developed a model for cognitive skills development for disadvantaged, low-achieving Hispanics. The program incorporates cognitive skills into existing remedial courses in…

  16. Cultural Persistence, Political Resistance, and Hope in the Community and School-Based Art of a Puerto Rican Diaspora Neighborhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Raymond, Eli; Rosario-Ramos, Enid M.; Rosario, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe themes of cultural persistence, political resistance, and hope in the art of one Puerto Rican neighborhood in the Midwestern United States. The themes are described across three contexts: community mural art, poetry from students in an alternative high school, and poetry from seventh grade students in a neighborhood middle…

  17. Applicability of the Spanish Translation of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale in a general Puerto Rican population.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Karen G; Guiot, Humberto M; Casas-Dolz, Ingrid; González-Tejera, Gloria; Colón de Martí, Luz N

    2003-06-01

    Voluntary screening has shown to be an effective way to identify depressive symptoms and to provide adequate treatment. If a screening tool was to be used in a general Puerto Rican population, it should be validated in Spanish and be consistent with the particular response style of this group. The main objective of this research study is to assess if the Spanish translation of the Zung SDS is adequate to screen for depression in Puerto Ricans, and if the translation considers the sociocultural peculiarities of this group. Although the Zung SDS is presented as a self-report scale and was found to be reliable by Alpha coefficient and manageable by both the questioner and the participant, the Spanish version used in this activity presented interpretation difficulties. It is recommendable that a Spanish translation of this scale should be developed taking into consideration the particularities of the Puerto Rican population. The use of other screening tools that have already been validated as being culturally sensitive to Puerto Ricans could also be considered.

  18. A Study of Disruptive Behavior Disorders in Puerto Rican Youth: II. Baseline Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Correlates in Two Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Davies, Mark; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Shen, Sa; Loeber, Rolf; Canino, Glorisa J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This is the second of two associated articles. The prevalence, correlates, and comorbidities of disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) in two populations are reported. Method: Probability community samples of Puerto Rican boys and girls ages 5-13 years in San Juan, and the south Bronx in New York City are included (n = 2,491). The…

  19. Theory-Based Predictors of Intention to Engage in Precautionary Sexual Behavior among Puerto Rican High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collazo, Andres A.

    2004-01-01

    Predictors of intention to abstain from sexual intercourse or use condoms consistently with both main and other partners were investigated in 431 Puerto Rican high school students. The basis for this study was the theories of reasoned action (TRA) and planned behavior (TPB), and two predictors from the theory of interpersonal behavior (TIB). As…

  20. Phonological Patterns in Normally Developing Spanish-Speaking 3-and 4-Year Olds of Puerto Rican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Brian A.; Iglesias, Aquiles

    1996-01-01

    This study used quantitative and qualitative methodology to examine the phonological patterns of 24 3-year-old and 30 4-year-old Spanish-speaking preschoolers of Puerto Rican descent. The children acquired the sounds of their language at an early age and did not exhibit high percentages of occurrence on targeted phonological processes. (DB)

  1. The Conflicts in In-School Cultural Behaviors of the Puerto Rican Migrant Children on the Mainland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt-Diaz, Joseph O.

    In this paper, culturally acceptable home behaviors of Puerto Rican children are contrasted with those behaviors that are demanded in classrooms of mainland United States schools. Sources of conflicts between home and classroom behaviors discussed include: (1) instability resulting from the migration process; (2) language problems; (3)…

  2. A Study of the Predictive Validity of the Children's Depression Inventory for Major Depression Disorder in Puerto Rican Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Medina, Carmen L.; Bernal, Guillermo; Rossello, Jeannette; Cumba-Aviles, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the predictive validity of the Children's Depression Inventory items for major depression disorder (MDD) in an outpatient clinic sample of Puerto Rican adolescents. The sample consisted of 130 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old. The five most frequent symptoms of the Children's Depression Inventory that best predict the…

  3. Reaching Joseph: How a Spanish-Speaking Anglo Teacher Helped a Monolingual English-Speaking Puerto Rican Child Learn Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariza, Eileen N.

    1999-01-01

    Describes steps taken to lower the defense mechanism that acted as a barrier to second language learning for a 5-year-old English-speaking Puerto Rican child. Utilized three key principles: (1) getting to know the student as an individual; (2) changing oneself to adapt to the student; and (3) giving the student a chance to experience comfort and…

  4. Role Reversal: The Problems of a Spanish-Speaking Anglo Teaching Spanish to english Dominant Puerto Rican Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariza, Eileen N.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the unique situation of an Anglo Spanish-speaking teacher who is assigned to teach Spanish to a group of non-Spanish-speaking youngsters of Puerto Rican descent. Successful strategies for overcoming the socio- and psycholinguistic barriers of working in this situation are listed as the teacher describes how she created a non-threatening…

  5. Awakening Minorities: American Indians, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, John R.; And Others

    As noted in the Preface, social scientists are entering a period of shared realization that the United States is in a crucial period of transition. "Trans-action" magazine, a pioneer in social programs for changing the society, has dedicated itself for 7 years to the task of reporting the strains and conflicts within the American system and has…

  6. Multifrequency radiometer detection of submarine freshwater sources along the Puerto Rican coastline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H.-J. C.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The surface area above submarine springs of fresh water exhibit temperatures and salinities lower than the surrounding sea waters. A multifrequency radiometer system which earlier demonstrated an accuracy of 1 degree C and 1 part per thousand in remotely detecting the surface temperature and salinities, respectively, was used to detect submarine freshwater springs. The first mission on February 4, 1978, consisted of overflight measurements over three fourths of the coastal areas around the Island of Puerto Rico. During the second mission on February 6, 1978, special attention was directed to the northwest portion of Puerto Rico where several submarine springs had been reported. The previously reported spring locations correlated well with the locations detected by the radiometers. After separating the surface runoffs such as rivers, lagoons, marshes, and bays, 44 submarine freshwater springs were identified which indicates that the submarine freshwater outflow locations are more numerous around the island than had earlier been estimated. The majority of the submarine springs are located at the northwest and southeast portion of the Puerto Rican coastline. The success of detecting the same submarine springs during both missions at the northwest portion of the island was 39%.

  7. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a native Puerto Rican patient.

    PubMed

    Del Pilar-Morales, Esteban A; Cali, Ignazio; Chapas, Javier; Bertrán-Pasarell, Jorge; Puoti, Gianfranco; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Nobo, Ulises

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is often a challenge for most physicians given its extremely low incidence and different clinico-pathological presentations. We report the case of a 56-year old patient native to Puerto Rico suspected of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCD). The symptoms at onset were notorious for bilateral cortical blindness followed by rapidly progressive cognitive decline, visual deficit, increased levels of CSF 14-3-3 and tau along with positive brain MRI and EEG, are highly indicative of CJD. The definite diagnosis was confirmed by the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center (NPDPSC), in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Lack of genetic mutations in the prion protein (PrP) gene, widespread histopathological changes and the accumulation of scrapie PrP (PrPSc) in the brain confirmed the diagnosis of sCJD. The patient, admitted to our institution in 2011, represents the first detailed report of sCJD in a native Puerto Rican patient living in Puerto Rico.

  8. Identification of phthalate esters in the serum of young Puerto Rican girls with premature breast development.

    PubMed Central

    Colón, I; Caro, D; Bourdony, C J; Rosario, O

    2000-01-01

    Premature breast development (thelarche) is the growth of mammary tissue in girls younger than 8 years of age without other manifestations of puberty. Puerto Rico has the highest known incidence of premature thelarche ever reported. In the last two decades since this serious public health anomaly has been observed, no explanation for this phenomenon has been found. Some organic pollutants, including pesticides and some plasticizers, can disrupt normal sexual development in wildlife, and many of these have been widely used in Puerto Rico. This investigation was designed to identify pollutants in the serum of Puerto Rican girls with premature thelarche. A method for blood serum analysis was optimized and validated using pesticides and phthalate esters as model compounds of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Recovery was > 80% for all compounds. We performed final detection by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We analyzed 41 serum samples from thelarche patients and 35 control samples. No pesticides or their metabolite residues were detected in the serum of the study or control subjects. Significantly high levels of phthalates [dimethyl, diethyl, dibutyl, and di-(2-ethylhexyl)] and its major metabolite mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate were identified in 28 (68%) samples from thelarche patients. Of the control samples analyzed, only one showed significant levels of di-isooctyl phthalate. The phthalates that we identified have been classified as endocrine disruptors. This study suggests a possible association between plasticizers with known estrogenic and antiandrogenic activity and the cause of premature breast development in a human female population. PMID:11017896

  9. A Healthy Lifestyle Score Is Associated with Cardiometabolic and Neuroendocrine Risk Factors among Puerto Rican Adults.

    PubMed

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Falcón, Luis M; Gao, Xiang; Tucker, Katherine L; Mattei, Josiemer

    2015-07-01

    Although individual healthy lifestyle behaviors may reduce cardiovascular disease risk, few studies have analyzed the combined effect of multiple lifestyle components as one all-inclusive measure on such outcomes, much less in minority populations. We aimed to develop a Healthy Lifestyle Score (HLS) that included several lifestyle recommendations and to test its association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and allostatic load (AL) and their cardiometabolic and neuroendocrine factors in Puerto Ricans. In a cross-sectional study in 787 Puerto Ricans living in Boston (aged 45-75 y), we developed an HLS that ranged from 0 to 190 (higher score indicative of healthier lifestyle) and included 5 components (diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviors, smoking, social support and network, and sleep). Multivariable-adjusted models were used to test associations between the HLS and biomarkers of dysregulation and odds of MetS and high AL (≥4 out of 10 components). The HLS showed adequate internal consistency (ρ = 0.31-0.69) and was inversely associated with urinary cortisol (β ± SE = -0.22 ± 0.11; P = 0.042), epinephrine (-0.20 ± 0.09; P = 0.017), and norepinephrine (-0.26 ± 0.11; P = 0.016); waist circumference (-0.014 ± 0.004; P = 0.003); and serum insulin (-0.30 ± 0.13; P = 0.028) and positively associated with plasma HDL cholesterol (0.007 ± 0.003; P = 0.021) after adjustment for potential confounders. For each 20-unit increase in HLS, participants had 19% (95% CI: 2%, 33%) and 25% (11%, 36%) lower odds of MetS or AL, respectively. Healthier scores for social support and network and smoking components were associated with lower odds of high AL (P < 0.005). No significant associations were observed for other individual lifestyle components. Following an overall healthy lifestyle that comprises a combination of multiple behaviors may provide stronger protection against MetS and AL in Puerto Rican adults than individual components. The HLS may be a useful tool

  10. Perspectives of Colorectal Cancer Risk and Screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: Stigma and Misperceptions

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Roberta E.; Diaz, Joseph A.; Kim, Ivone

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were “bad food,” digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening. PMID:19776255

  11. Housing Dependence and Intimate Relationships in the Lives of Low-Income Puerto Rican Mothers.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sherri Lawson; Burton, Linda M; Flippen, Chenoa A

    2011-03-01

    Using longitudinal ethnographic data from the Three-City Study, we examined the relationship between sixteen low-income Puerto Rican mothers' housing dependencies and their intimate partner relations. We traced mothers' dependent housing arrangements and entrée to marital or cohabiting relationships from their teens through their procurement of independent housing while entering and maintaining intimate partner unions as adults. Findings indicated that various trigger factors led women out of their natal homes and into expedited cohabitation with romantic partners which frequently resulted in unstable unions in which mothers had little power and autonomy. As mothers became eligible for housing subsidies they obtained housing independent from their male partners, potentially increasing the propensity for greater relationship power. Housing independence, however, was not without problems. Spillover effects, such as shadowing partners, threatened housing stability and mothers' independence. The relevance of these findings for future research is discussed.

  12. Housing Dependence and Intimate Relationships in the Lives of Low-Income Puerto Rican Mothers*

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Sherri Lawson; Burton, Linda M.; Flippen, Chenoa A.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal ethnographic data from the Three-City Study, we examined the relationship between sixteen low-income Puerto Rican mothers’ housing dependencies and their intimate partner relations. We traced mothers’ dependent housing arrangements and entrée to marital or cohabiting relationships from their teens through their procurement of independent housing while entering and maintaining intimate partner unions as adults. Findings indicated that various trigger factors led women out of their natal homes and into expedited cohabitation with romantic partners which frequently resulted in unstable unions in which mothers had little power and autonomy. As mothers became eligible for housing subsidies they obtained housing independent from their male partners, potentially increasing the propensity for greater relationship power. Housing independence, however, was not without problems. Spillover effects, such as shadowing partners, threatened housing stability and mothers’ independence. The relevance of these findings for future research is discussed. PMID:21785522

  13. Factor structure and construct validity of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index among island Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Cintrón, Jennifer A; Carter, Michele M; Suchday, Sonia; Sbrocco, Tracy; Gray, James

    2005-01-01

    The factor structure and convergent and discriminant validity of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) were examined among a sample of 275 island Puerto Ricans. Results from a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) comparing our data to factor solutions commonly reported as representative of European American and Spanish populations indicated a poor fit. A subsequent exploratory factor analysis (EFA) indicated that a two-factor solution (Factor 1, Anxiety Sensitivity; Factor 2, Emotional Concerns) provided the best fit. Correlations between the ASI and anxiety measures were moderately high providing evidence of convergent validity, while correlations between the ASI and BDI were significantly lower providing evidence of discriminant validity. Scores on all measures were positively correlated with acculturation, suggesting that those who ascribe to more traditional Hispanic culture report elevated anxiety.

  14. Intimate partner violence victimization and perpetration by Puerto Rican women with severe mental illnesses.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Loue, Sana; Goldman Heaphy, Emily L; Mendez, Nancy

    2011-04-01

    Previous research indicates a higher prevalence of victimization among severely mentally ill women. Few studies have either compared these levels across diagnostic categories or evaluated perpetration by the women. We report qualitative and quantitative findings regarding intimate partner violence perpetrated both against and by a sample of 53 Puerto Rican women diagnosed with major depression, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Interviewers shadowed participants for a period of 2 years. Two-thirds of the women with serious mental illness had histories of victimization. However, 23% of the women also reported histories of violence towards their significant others. This was attributed to various reasons, such as anger, revenge, control, and self-defense. Participants described their personal conceptualization of the violence they received and perpetrated. This has implications for programs designed to prevent family violence, for health care professionals in general, and for psychiatrists, who may be called upon to address future risk of victimization or commission of violence.

  15. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  16. Nest guarding from observation blinds: strategy for improving Puerto Rican parrot nest success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of 17 yr of nestguarding from observation blinds for increasing reproductive success of the endangered Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) is described. As personnel and time allowed, active nests were guarded part-time during the nest site exploration and selection s stage of the breeding cycle, and part-time to full-time when a nest contained eggs or chicks. Biologists identified nine categories of threat to the success of parrot nests. Since 1973, a minimum of 20 nests, which otherwise would have failed, successfully produced fledglings as a direct result of nest guarding and intervention. Nest success averaged 66% with nest guarding compared to an estimated 38% without guarding. Nest guarding from blinds can help maintain a wild population of a critically endangered species while other management techniques are being developed to stimulate population growth.

  17. New mutation in periaxin gene causing Charcot Marie Tooth disease in a Puerto Rican young male.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Elizabeth; Ramos, Edwardo

    2013-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in more than 30 different genes. One of the genes encodes for periaxin (PRX) protein, which is required for the maintenance of peripheral nerve myelin. Individuals with PRX gene mutations have been described to present early-onset, autosomal recessive, demyelinating CMT disease or CMT4F subtype. Only 23 mutations involving the PRX gene have been reported in patients throughout the world. We describe a case of a Puerto Rican adolescent with history, neurologic examination, electromyographic data, and laboratory tests consistent with CMT4F. Genetic analysis of this individual showed a heterozygous transversion resulting in amino acid change from arginine to glycine in the PRX gene, suggesting CMT4F. We report this novel PRX mutation to expand the clinical spectrum of CMT disease.

  18. Evaluations of Conflicts Between Latino Values and Autonomy Desires Among Puerto Rican Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Villalobos Solís, Myriam; Smetana, Judith G; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina

    2017-09-01

    Puerto Rican adolescents (N = 105; Mage  = 15.97 years, SD = 1.40) evaluated hypothetical situations describing conflicts between Latino values (family obligations and respeto) and autonomy desires regarding personal, friendship, and dating activities. Adolescents judged that peers should prioritize Latino values over autonomy, which led to greater feelings of pride than happiness. However, they believed that teens would prioritize autonomy over Latino values, which led to greater feelings of happiness than pride. Adolescents reasoned about autonomy desires as personal issues, whereas reasoning about Latino values was multifaceted, including references to conventions and concerns for others. Furthermore, judgments and reasoning depended on the type of autonomy desire and Latino value and sometimes, by participants' age and sex. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. Ataques de nervios in relation to anxiety sensitivity among island Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Cintrón, Jennifer A; Carter, Michele M; Sbrocco, Tracy

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated the symptom profile of ataques de nervios (ADN) among Puerto Rican volunteers from the community who self-identified as having experienced at least one ataque. As expected, the most commonly reported ataques-specific symptoms were crying, anger, nervousness, and becoming hysterical. Comparing the responses of those with ADN to those with no history of ADN but who reported elevated anxiety sensitivity (AS) indicated that both groups were comparable on measures of depression, state and trait anxiety, and associated panic symptoms. As expected, both groups scored significantly higher on all measures than did participants with no history of ADN and low AS with the exception of the measure of state anxiety. It is unclear, however, whether the overlap in symptom severity between those with ADN and those with elevated anxiety sensitivity indicates that ADN and AS are the same or distinct conditions.

  20. Habitat association, size, stomach contents, and reproductive condition of Puerto Rican boas (Epicrates inornatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    The Puerto Rican boa occurs in a variety of habitats, including wet montane forest, lowland wet forest, mangrove forest, wet limestone karst, and offshore cays, and from sea level to 480 m. Mean SVL of 49 encountered boas (live and road-killed) was 136.9 ?? 35.1 (range = 38.8-205 cm), with a mean mass of 952.1 ?? 349.0 g (n = 47; range = 140-1662 g). Prey in digestive tracts (n = 29) included remains of black rats, house mice, three species of anoles, bats, common ground-doves, domestic fowl chicks, and invertebrates. Females were in reproductive condition in late April through mid-August and had an average brood size of 21.8 ?? 6.0 (n = 9, range = 13-30 ).

  1. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Josiemer; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Garcia-Bailo, Bibiana; Adiconis, Xian; Shen, Jian; Arnett, Donna; Demissie, Serkalem; Tucker, Katherine L; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection pressures. Such genetic information is limited in Puerto Ricans, the second largest Hispanic ethnic group in the US, and a group with high prevalence of chronic disease. We determined allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 30 genes involved in major metabolic and disease-relevant pathways in Puerto Ricans (n = 969, ages 45–75 years) and compared them to similarly aged non-Hispanic whites (NHW) (n = 597). Results Minor allele frequency (MAF) distributions for 45.5% of the SNPs assessed in Puerto Ricans were significantly different from those of NHW. Puerto Ricans carried risk alleles in higher frequency and protective alleles in lower frequency than NHW. Patterns of population differentiation showed that Puerto Ricans had SNPs with exceptional FST values in intronic, non-synonymous and promoter regions. NHW had exceptional FST values in intronic and promoter region SNPs only. Conclusion These observations may serve to explain and broaden studies on the impact of gene polymorphisms on chronic diseases affecting Puerto Ricans. PMID:19682384

  2. Parental warmth and psychiatric disorders among Puerto Rican children in two different socio-cultural contexts.

    PubMed

    Santesteban-Echarri, Olga; Ramos-Olazagasti, María A; Eisenberg, Ruth E; Wei, Chiaying; Bird, Héctor R; Canino, Glorisa; Duarte, Cristiane S

    2017-04-01

    Parental warmth (PW) has a strong influence on child development and may precede the onset of psychiatric disorders in children. PW is interconnected with other family processes (e.g., coercive discipline) that may also influence the development of psychiatric disorders in children. We prospectively examined the association between PW and child psychiatric disorders (anxiety, major depression disorder, ADHD, disruptive behavior disorders) over the course of three years among Puerto Rican youth, above and beyond the influence of other family factors. Boricua Youth Study participants, Puerto Rican children 5 to 13 years of age at Wave 1 living in the South Bronx (New York) (SB) and San Juan and Canguas (PR) (n = 2,491), were followed for three consecutive years. Youth psychiatric disorders were measured by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV (DISC-IV). Generalized Linear Mixed models tested the association between PW (Wave 1) and psychiatric disorders in the next two years adjusting for demographic characteristics and family processes. Higher levels of PW were related to lower odds of child anxiety and major depressive disorder over time (OR = 0.69[0.60; 0.79]; 0.49[0.41; 0.58], respectively). The strength of the association between PW and ADHD and disruptive behavior disorder declined over time, although it was still significant in the last assessment (OR = 0.44[0.37; 0.52]; 0.46[0.39; 0.54], respectively). PW had a unique influence on psychiatric disorders beyond the influence of other parenting and family processes. Stronger associations were observed among girls for depression and ADHD. Incorporating PW behaviors such as acceptance, support, and comforting into interventions focused on parenting skills may help prevent child psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Food Insecurity Is Associated with Subsequent Cognitive Decline in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janice C; Scott, Tammy; Wilde, Parke; Li, Yin-Ge; Tucker, Katherine L; Gao, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Living with hunger and fear of not having enough food is a growing worldwide concern. In our previous cross-sectional study, we found that food insecurity was associated with poor cognitive function, but the direction of this relation remains unclear. We investigated whether food insecurity is associated with subsequent cognitive decline. This was a longitudinal study of 597 participants aged 40-75 y from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study cohort, with a Mini-Mental State Examination score of ≥24 at baseline. Food security was assessed at baseline with the US Household Food Security Scale. Participants completed cognitive batteries, which included 7 cognitive tests, twice-at baseline and again at a 2-y follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in global cognitive function over 2 y. Multiple linear regression was used to obtain adjusted mean differences and 95% CIs in cognitive decline across baseline food security status. Food insecurity at baseline was associated with a 2-y decline in global cognitive function (P-trend = 0.03) after adjusting for relevant potential confounders, including age, sex, baseline cognitive score, body mass index, education, poverty, acculturation score, depression score, smoking status, use of alcohol, physical activity score, presence of diabetes and hypertension, apolipoprotein E status, plasma homocysteine, healthy eating index, and time between baseline and follow-up measures. Compared with the food-secure group, the decline in the very low food security group was greater [mean difference: -0.26 (95% CI: -0.41, -0.10)]. Baseline food insecurity was significantly associated with a faster decline in executive function (P-trend = 0.02) but not memory function (P-trend = 0.66). Food insecurity was associated with faster cognitive decline in this cohort of Puerto Rican adults. Our study emphasizes the importance of developing interventions for food insecurity that take into account the impact of food insecurity on cognition.

  4. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, p<0.01). In multivariate analyses, DM patients had 2.47 (95 % CI 1.05, 5.84) the odds of having bursitis/tendonitis as compared to non-diabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain’s tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p<0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24522480

  5. Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) reproductive behavior: a guideline for management of active nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    One explanation for the failure of intensively monitored Puerto Rican Parrot nests is that observers may lack the information needed to evaluate pair behavior and to recognize behaviors indicative of nest problems. I examined the behavior of Puerto Rican Parrots during eight non-problematic and six problematic nesting attempts to 1) describe behavior of pairs that experienced no notable nest problems and 2) to identify and describe behaviors associated with nest problems. I examined nest attendance, duration of attentive periods, and frequency of nest visits for both males and females, and duration of periods away from the nest for females only. Adult behavior during incubation and early chick rearing at non-problematic nests was well-defined. Females spent an average of 93.2 to 97.3% of the observation period in their nests during incubation and generally left their nests for average periods of 5 to 12 min. Female nest attendance generally declined and recesses became longer as chick rearing progressed. Males rarely entered their nests during incubation, but they generally established a regular pattern of nest visits within seven to 10 days of hatching of their young. In some cases, incidents of human disturbance to nest pairs during incubation and early chick rearing were associated with sudden changes in behavior. The key indicator of nest problems (abandonment during incubation or loss of young) was unexpected declines in female nest attendance. Declines were often accompanied by unexpected increases in female recesses or frequency of female nest visits, and sometimes by increases in male nest visits. Abandonment of nests during incubation was associated with repeated incidents of potentially disturbing activities (e.g., nest inspections). Deaths of embryos and young were associated with behaviors that allowed increased cooling of embryos.

  6. Food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Puerto Rican caretakers living in Hartford, Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Damio, Grace; González, Anir; Segura-Pérez, Sofia

    2004-03-01

    Household food safety education is needed to minimize the risk of exposure to foodborne pathogens. The Latino population in the United States is growing at a fast rate and has become the largest minority group in this country. However, little research has been done to identify the food safety behavioral risks faced by Puerto Ricans. Ten in-depth household observations and a quantitative survey on food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors (n = 100) were conducted to understand food-handling techniques among Puerto Rican caretakers of young children. This was followed by two focus groups (n = 12) to further characterize food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and the proper media channels for the delivery of food safety education. Even though 97% of survey participants reported washing their hands with soap and water before preparing foods, only 1 of the 10 participants in the household observations actually did it. About 60% of the household participants washed the cutting boards with soap and water compared with 89% of survey participants who claimed to do it. In the survey, 5% reported to know the meaning of cross-contamination, and 71% (n = 80) to use the same cutting board for meats and vegetables. Overall, 96% of survey participants did not use a thermometer to check if meats were cooked properly and only 10% defrosted their meats in the refrigerator. Statistically significant relationships (P < 0.05) were found between speaking English and knowing the meaning of cross-contamination and how to use a meat thermometer. Employed individuals and those with higher education were also more likely to be familiar with the term pasteurization. These results fully justify the delivery of culturally appropriate food safety education in this community.

  7. Gun Violence, African Ancestry, and Asthma: A Case-Control Study in Puerto Rican Children.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Han, Yueh-Ying; Brehm, John M; Forno, Erick; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Cloutier, Michelle M; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to gun violence and African ancestry have been separately associated with increased risk of asthma in Puerto Rican children. The objective of this study was to examine whether African ancestry and gun violence interact on asthma and total IgE in school-aged Puerto Rican children. This is a case-control study of 747 Puerto Rican children aged 9 to 14 years living in San Juan, Puerto Rico (n = 472), and Hartford, Connecticut (n = 275). Exposure to gun violence was defined as the child's report of hearing gunshots more than once, and the percentage of African ancestry was estimated using genome-wide genotypic data. Asthma was defined as parental report of physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the previous year. Serum total IgE (IU/mL) was measured in study participants. Multivariate logistic and linear regressions were used for the analysis of asthma and total IgE, respectively. In multivariate analyses, there was a significant interaction between exposure to gun violence and African ancestry on asthma (P = .001) and serum total IgE (P = .04). Among children exposed to gun violence, each quartile increase in the percentage of African ancestry was associated with approximately 45% higher odds of asthma (95% CI, 1.15-1.84; P = .002) and an approximately 19% increment in total IgE (95% , 0.60-40.65, P = .04). In contrast, there was no significant association between African ancestry and asthma or total IgE in children not exposed to gun violence. Our results suggest that exposure to gun violence modifies the estimated effect of African ancestry on asthma and atopy in Puerto Rican children. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of sensory modulation disorder among Puerto Rican preschoolers: an analysis focused on socioeconomic status variables.

    PubMed

    Román-Oyola, Rosa; Reynolds, Stacey

    2013-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of sensory modulation disorder (SMD) in a sample of Puerto Rican preschoolers and to examine differences in the prevalence of SMD based on socioeconomic status (SES) variables. Caregivers of children from Head Start programs and private preschools were recruited from three regions in Puerto Rico (PR) to participate in the study. Each caregiver completed a Short Sensory Profile (SSP) and a demographic data sheet. Total scores on the SSP were used to establish diagnosis of SMD. The total sample included 141 participants (response rate of 64%). Prevalence of SMD among the total PR sample (19.9%) was higher than previously reported estimates on the US mainland (5-16%). Statistical results indicated no difference in the overall prevalence of SMD based on SES. However, significant differences in scores based on caregivers' educational degree were found on the SSP sub-domain of Movement sensitivity and Under-responsive/seeks sensation; differences in scores based on caregiver household income were also found for the SSP sub-domain of Under-responsive/seeks. Although SMD appears to be prevalent in preschoolers in PR, variables associated with SES do not appear to contribute to an overall SMD diagnosis. However, additional research linking specific sub-domains of SMD to SES variables may be warranted. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Survival of captive-reared Puerto Rican Parrots released in the Caribbean National Forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, T.H.; Collazo, J.A.; Vilella, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    We report first-year survival for 34 captive-reared Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) released in the Caribbean National Forest, Puerto Rico between 2000 and 2002. The purpose of the releases were to increase population size and the potential number of breeding individuals of the sole extant wild population, and to refine release protocols for eventual reintroduction of a second wild population elsewhere on the island. After extensive prerelease training, we released 10 parrots in 2000, 16 parrots in 2001, and eight parrots in 2002 ranging in age from 1-4 years old. All birds were equipped with radio-transmitters to monitor survival. The overall first-year survival estimate for the 34 parrots was 41% (CI = 22%-61%). Only one parrot died within the first week postrelease, with most (94%) surviving for at least eight weeks after release. Most (54%) documented mortalities were due to raptor predation, which claimed 21% of all released parrots. A captive-reared bird (male, age one), released in 2001, paired with a wild female and fledged two young in 2004. We also calculated survival based on 0% and 50% of observed predation losses and found hypothetical survival rates of 72% and 54%, respectively. Rigorous prerelease training and acclimation was believed to have improved initial postrelease parrot survival, and releasing mixed age-class groups suggests the potential for shortening the time to recruitment. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2005.

  10. Diversity of form in the amphibian papilla of Puerto Rican frogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. R.; Hecht, E. I.; Narins, P. M.

    1992-01-01

    In modern frogs, the amphibian papilla exhibits a caudal extension whose shape, relative length, and proportion of hair cells vary markedly from species to species. Tuning in the caudal extension is organized tonotopically and evidently involves the tectorium. In terms of the proportion of amphibian-papillar hair cells in the caudal extension, we report more diversity among 8 species of a single genus (Eleutherodactylus) on a single island (Puerto Rico) than has been found so far among all of the (more than 50) other modern anurans examined for this feature from around the world. These 8 Puerto Rican species have overlapping habitat and conspicuous diversity in the male advertisement call. For 7 of the 8 species, we report that the call has transient spectral components in the frequency range of the amphibian papilla, and that the proportion of caudal extension hair cells and the frequency distribution of those components are correlated. Thus one might conclude that the selective pressures that led to diversity of calls among the 8 species also led to diversity in form of the amphibian papilla.

  11. Evidence for 800 years of North Atlantic multi-decadal variability from a Puerto Rican speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Amos; Miller, Thomas; Kushnir, Yochanan; Sinha, Ashish; Timmermann, Axel; Jury, Mark R.; Gallup, Christina; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    The long-term behavior of the tropical Atlantic ocean/atmospheric system prior to the 20th century is not well characterized due to a lack of high-resolution proxy records to extend the short instrumental record. Here we present the first reconstruction of rainfall variability for the western tropical Atlantic that spans the past 8 centuries and is derived from the δ 18O of speleothem calcite. The δ 18O of speleothem calcite at this Puerto Rican location varies primarily in response to changes in the amount of summer-time precipitation. The speleothem documents multi-decadal to centennial length oscillations in δ 18O that point to large variations in rainfall that have not been manifest in the short instrumental period. Since AD 1850, variations in δ 18O have tracked shifts in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). We tentatively suggest that the speleothem δ 18O-based rainfall record from Puerto Rico extends the history of the AMO to the 12th century.

  12. Communication about sex and HPV among Puerto Rican mothers and daughters.

    PubMed

    Colón-López, Vivian; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Vélez, Camille; Gonzalez, Velda J; Diaz-Toro, Elba C; Calo, William A; Savas, Lara S; Pattatucci, Angela; Fernández, María E

    2017-08-01

    Although opportunities to vaccinate against human papillomavirus (HPV) are available, vaccination rates in Puerto Rico remain low. Communication between parents and adolescents about sexual topics may influence decisions about HPV vaccination uptake, particularly among young women; yet, few studies have addressed this issue. This qualitative study explored Puerto Rican mothers' and daughters' communication on sex-related topics, and HPV, including the HPV vaccine. Thirty participants, including 9 mothers and 21 daughters, participated in seven focus groups. Participants were divided into groups of mothers and daughters, and further stratified by vaccination status. Transcripts were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach to identify emergent themes. Focus group data revealed four main themes: (1) limited parent-daughter communication about sex-related topics; (2) daughters' discomfort discussing sex-related topics with their parents; (3) parental focus on abstinence; and, (4) limited parent-daughter communication about HPV and the HPV vaccine. Although daughters in this study struggled with feelings of embarrassment, invasion of privacy, encouragement of abstinence, and the fear of parents' reaction to them being sexually active prior to marriage, they also recognized the need to increase the parent-daughter communication about sex-related topics including HPV and the HPV vaccine. Educational efforts should target both daughters and parents to increase communication skills and self-efficacy and to enable them to discuss sexual health in open and nonjudgmental conversations.

  13. Clinical Manifestations Associated with Overweight/Obesity in Puerto Ricans with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M.; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Mayor, Ángel M.; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the clinical manifestations associated with overweight/obesity in Hispanics from Puerto Rico with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed in 144 patients with FMS (per American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria). Sociodemographic features, FMS-related symptoms, tender points (per ACR criteria), comorbidities, and FMS treatment were examined. BMI was calculated and patients were grouped into two categories: BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 (nonoverweight/obese) and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (overweight/obese). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate differences between the study groups. Results. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of patients was 50.2 (9.9) years; 95.1% were females and 75.7% were overweight/obese. In the bivariate analysis, overweight/obese patients were more likely to have self-reported memory impairment, anxiety, shortness of breath, and urinary frequency than nonoverweight/obese patients. In addition, the tender point count was higher in the overweight/obese group. In the logistic regression analyses, self-reported memory impairment and urinary frequency differences remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusion. In this population of Puerto Ricans with FMS, overweight/obese patients experienced more FMS-related manifestations than nonoverweight/obese individuals. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and to elucidate if weight reduction interventions could favorably impact the severity of FMS. PMID:26885384

  14. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH TENDER POINT COUNT IN PUERTO RICANS WITH FIBROMYALGIA SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Grissel; Estrada, Marcos; Mayor, Angel M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the factors associated with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) tender point count (TPC) in a group of Hispanic patients from Puerto Rico. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in 144 FMS patients as determined using American College of Rheumatology [ACR] classification). Socio-demographic features, clinical manifestations, comorbidities, and pharmacologic agents were determined during the study visit. Tender points were assessed as described in the ACR classification for FMS. A t-test and one-way ANOVA test were used to examine the relationships between continuous, dichotomous, and nominal variables. Results The mean (standard deviation, [SD]) age of the FMS patients in this study was 50.2 (9.9) years; 95.1% were females. The mean (SD) TPC was 15.0 (4.7). Dysmenorrhea, the sicca syndrome, subjective swelling, increased urinary frequency, shortness of breath, headache, constipation, paresthesia, cognitive dysfunction, arthralgia, tiredness, morning stiffness, depression, and anxiety were associated with higher TPC. No associations were seen between socio-demographic features and FMS pharmacologic therapies. Conclusion In this group of Puerto Ricans with FMS, TPC was associated with several FMS symptoms and comorbidities. This study suggests that TPC may be a simple and effective tool for assessing disease severity in FMS patients. PMID:25244879

  15. The Puerto Rican parrot reintroduction program: sustainable management of the aviary population.

    PubMed

    Earnhardt, Joanne; Vélez-Valentín, Jafet; Valentin, Ricardo; Long, Sarah; Lynch, Colleen; Schowe, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The cornerstone of the recovery plan for the critically endangered Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vitatta) is an actively managed, long-term reintroduction program. One captive population distributed across two aviaries in Puerto Rico is the sole source for release but its ability to persist as a managed resource has not been evaluated since 1989. We conducted an assessment for sustainable management of the aviary population while harvesting for release. To assess demographic rates such as population growth, vital rates, and age/sex structure, we compiled a studbook database on all living, dead, and released individuals in the aviary population. Using an individual-based risk assessment model we applied population specific data based on the management period from 1993 to 2012 to simulate future aviary population dynamics and evaluate future potential production. We modeled four potential management strategies to harvest parrots for proposed releases; these scenarios vary the number of parrots and the life stage. Our simulations revealed that the aviary population can be simultaneously managed for sustainability and harvesting of parrots for release. However, without cautious management, overharvesting can jeopardize sustainability of the aviary population. Our analysis of the aviary breeding program provides a rare opportunity to review progress relative to conservation program objectives after four decades of active management. The successful growth of the aviary population and its ability to serve as a sustainable source for reintroductions supports the 1973 decision to build a breeding program from a small population of 13 parrots.

  16. Description of a domestic violence measure for Puerto Rican gay males.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Madera, Sheilla; Toro-Alfonso, Jose

    2005-01-01

    A sample of 302 Puerto Rican gay males living in Puerto Rico and New York participated in this study with the objective of assessing the prevalence of domestic violence. A self-administered questionnaire was developed addressing issues of intergenerational violence, addictive behaviors, and domestic violence in three dimensions: emotional, physical, and sexual violence. The results concluded that close to half of the participants had experienced some sort of violence in their intimate relationships, have a history of being witness to domestic violence in their family of origin, and had identified in themselves and their families, addictive behaviors. Other variables measured are HIV and sexual coercion, drug and alcohol abuse, and levels of acculturation among participants living in the United States. The main objective of this work is to describe the development of the instrument used in the study. Based on the results of this study we describe the psychometric characteristics and content of the final questionnaire. Final recommendations are made for other researchers interested in doing domestic violence studies with Latino gay men and men who have sex with men.

  17. Feasibility of an Exercise Program for Puerto Rican Women who are Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Portela, Ana L. Mulero; Santaella, Carmen L. Colón; Gómez, Cynthia Cruz; Burch, Annlee

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this pilot study was to explore the feasibility of implementing two exercise programs for female patients who are breast cancer survivors and residents of the metropolitan area of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Potential benefits and complications of participating in a gym-exercise program or a home-exercise program, as opposed to standard care, were identified. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: a gym-exercise group, a home-exercise group, or a non-exercise group. Interventions consisted of exercise programs with both aerobic and strengthening components, offered for a 26-week period. Outcome measures consisted of functional evaluation, shoulder range of motion, 12-minute walk test, handgrip strength, body mass index, and quality of life. The results of this study showed that it is feasible for Puerto Rican women to participate in a moderate intensity exercise program without developing complications. Participation in the exercise programs studied here minimized the side effects after cancer treatment, such as reduced physical functional ability and restricted shoulder mobility. Improvements were found in the measures of shoulder range of motion, upper extremity related physical function, and distance walked. PMID:20664723

  18. Diversity of form in the amphibian papilla of Puerto Rican frogs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E R; Hecht, E I; Narins, P M

    1992-11-01

    In modern frogs, the amphibian papilla exhibits a caudal extension whose shape, relative length, and proportion of hair cells vary markedly from species to species. Tuning in the caudal extension is organized tonotopically and evidently involves the tectorium. In terms of the proportion of amphibian-papillar hair cells in the caudal extension, we report more diversity among 8 species of a single genus (Eleutherodactylus) on a single island (Puerto Rico) than has been found so far among all of the (more than 50) other modern anurans examined for this feature from around the world. These 8 Puerto Rican species have overlapping habitat and conspicuous diversity in the male advertisement call. For 7 of the 8 species, we report that the call has transient spectral components in the frequency range of the amphibian papilla, and that the proportion of caudal extension hair cells and the frequency distribution of those components are correlated. Thus one might conclude that the selective pressures that led to diversity of calls among the 8 species also led to diversity in form of the amphibian papilla.

  19. The Impact of Resistance Exercise Training on the Mental Health of Older Puerto Rican Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Alisa K.; Shepherd, Amy; Johnson, Peggy L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of a 16 week high-intensity progressive resistance exercise training (PRT) program on the mental health of older Puerto Rican adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Fifty-eight Puerto Rican adults were randomly assigned to supervised PRT (n = 29) or a control group (n = 29). A secondary analyses were conducted, and 2 mental health outcomes, the Geriatric Depression Scale and the SF-36 mental component summary score, were used to assess the impact of PRT on mental health status. At baseline, no differences were found on measures of self-reported mental health status. Results. PRT participants had significantly improved mental health status at follow-up (16 weeks). Discussion. The incorporation of exercise into treatment planning for older adults may have important benefits on their mental health status. More work is needed to understand the mechanisms by which this occurred as well as the applicability of these findings to sustainable community programs. PMID:21571703

  20. Domestic violence in Puerto Rican gay male couples: perceived prevalence, intergenerational violence, addictive behaviors, and conflict resolution skills.

    PubMed

    Toro-Alfonso, José; Rodríguez-Madera, Sheilla

    2004-06-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is a pattern of behaviors in the context of an intimate relationship, which can be manifested in emotional, physical, or sexual abuse. DV currently represents a social and a public health issue. This study is an effort to foster a better understanding of DV among same-sex couples. In it, the authors included the participation of 199 Puerto Rican gay males to identify prevalence of DV, violence in their family of origin, participants' addictive behaviors and exposure to violence at childhood, and their conflict resolution skills. Participants were relatively young, highly educated Puerto Rican gay men who reported a high level of domestic violence in their relationships. This violence was identified as emotional violence by 48% of the participants. This sample reported high levels of violence among their families of origin and low conflict resolution skills.

  1. Female employment and the social reproduction of the Puerto Rican working class.

    PubMed

    Safa, H I

    1984-01-01

    The rapid industrialization, migration and urbanization processes in Puerto Rico since 1940 have been responsible for the increase in the rate of female employment from 22.1% in 1960 to 27.8% in 1980, while the rate of male employment has fallen. This rise in female employment is significant in an era of growing unemployment and economic crises. There is a tendency for management to prefer young, single women workers over the older, married or formerly married women. The former tend to be better educated, work harder, complain less and are likely to be burdened with household or childcare responsibilities, which can lead to fatigue or even absenteism on the job. Their strong background in patriarchal rural traditions makes it easier for them to accept the authority of thier employers without question. With a knowledge that they can find other, similar work, the younger women are not troubled by plant problems such as production cutbacks, and layoffs. Their primary concern is not job stability, but money, which is used for future plans which include marriage, children and a new home. In contrast, older women view job security as more important. Their years of being in the labor force and the sense of self worth they have acquired as a result of it, tend to make them critical of authority. The contribution of working women to the household economy in Puerto Rican working class families varies with age and marital status. Older, married and formerly married women carry a heavier financial burden, assume a larger share of household responsibilities, and are often the sole supporters of their families. Younger women usually share their responsibilities with a relatively large number of siblings. Export-led industrialization has contributed to male outmigration from Puerto Rico, but as women lose their factory jobs due the factories being relocaged elsewhere as part of Operation Bootstrap, women too may join the migration flows.

  2. The prevalence of refractive conditions in Puerto Rican adults attending an eye clinic system

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Neisha M.; Romero, Angel. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of refractive conditions in the adult population that visited primary care optometry clinics in Puerto Rico. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study of patients examined at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Eye Institute Clinics between 2004 and 2010. Subjects considered had best corrected visual acuity by standardized subjective refraction of 20/40 or better. The refractive errors were classified by the spherical equivalent (SE): sphere+½ cylinder. Myopia was classified as a SE>−0.50 D, hyperopia as a SE>+0.50  D, and emmetropia as a SE between −0.50 and +0.50, both included. Astigmatism equal or higher than 0.25 D in minus cylinder form was used. Patients with documented history of cataract extraction (pseudophakia or aphakia), amblyopia, refractive surgery or other corneal/ocular surgery were excluded from the study. Results A total of 784 randomly selected subjects older than 40 years of age were selected. The estimated prevalence (95%, confidence interval) among all subjects was hyperopia 51.5% (48.0–55.0), emmetropia 33.8% (30.5–37.2), myopia 14.7% (12.1–17.2) and astigmatism 69.6% (68.8–73.3). Hyperopia was more common in females than males although the difference was not statistically significant. The mean spherical equivalent values was hyperopic until 70 y/o and decreased slightly as the population ages. Conclusion Hyperopia is the most common refractive error and its prevalence and seems to increase among the aging population who visited the clinics. Further programs and studies must be developed to address the refractive errors needs of the adult Puerto Rican population. PMID:25000872

  3. The prevalence of refractive conditions in Puerto Rican adults attending an eye clinic system.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Neisha M; Romero, Angel F

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of refractive conditions in the adult population that visited primary care optometry clinics in Puerto Rico. A retrospective cross-sectional study of patients examined at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Eye Institute Clinics between 2004 and 2010. Subjects considered had best corrected visual acuity by standardized subjective refraction of 20/40 or better. The refractive errors were classified by the spherical equivalent (SE): sphere+½ cylinder. Myopia was classified as a SE>-0.50D, hyperopia as a SE>+0.50 D, and emmetropia as a SE between -0.50 and +0.50, both included. Astigmatism equal or higher than 0.25 D in minus cylinder form was used. Patients with documented history of cataract extraction (pseudophakia or aphakia), amblyopia, refractive surgery or other corneal/ocular surgery were excluded from the study. A total of 784 randomly selected subjects older than 40 years of age were selected. The estimated prevalence (95%, confidence interval) among all subjects was hyperopia 51.5% (48.0-55.0), emmetropia 33.8% (30.5-37.2), myopia 14.7% (12.1-17.2) and astigmatism 69.6% (68.8-73.3). Hyperopia was more common in females than males although the difference was not statistically significant. The mean spherical equivalent values was hyperopic until 70 y/o and decreased slightly as the population ages. Hyperopia is the most common refractive error and its prevalence and seems to increase among the aging population who visited the clinics. Further programs and studies must be developed to address the refractive errors needs of the adult Puerto Rican population. Copyright © 2012 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Puerto Rican primary physicians' knowledge about folic acid supplementation for the prevention of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Ana; Dávila Torres, René R; Gorrín Peralta, José J; Montes de Longo, Idalina

    2003-12-01

    We conducted a study of a group of primary physicians in Puerto Rico to evaluate their knowledge about folic acid supplementation to prevent neural tube defects. The study design was transverse-correlational. A total of 66 primary physicians in two hospitals (public and private) participated in the study. The sample was nonrandom and opportunistic, and only those physicians present in the hospitals at the moment of distribution of the questionnaires participated. A self-administered and anonymous questionnaire was used. Descriptive statistics and cross-tabular analysis were used to describe the results of this study. Inferential statistics were also used, including Chi square and t-tests to establish the associations/differences between physician knowledge and the independent variables. Of the participants, 87.9% demonstrated an inadequate knowledge about folic acid supplementation for the prevention of neural tube defects as part of preconception care and only 12.1% demonstrated adequate knowledge. Older physicians had greater knowledge about folic acid. Also, women demonstrated greater knowledge about folic acid than did men. Most of the physicians who always recommend supplementation to their patients demonstrated a greater knowledge about folic acid, and all participants with adequate knowledge came from the public hospital. Despite a concerted effort by the Health Department of Puerto Rico to provide education in the importance of folic acid supplementation to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects, primary physicians in two Puerto Rican hospitals generally have not availed themselves of this training and showed a lack of knowledge on this important clinical issue. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Trajectories of Sensation Seeking Among Puerto-Rican Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Silvia S.; Wall, Melanie M.; Eisenberg, Ruth; Blanco, Carlos; Santaella, Julian; Ramos-Olazagasti, Maria; Canino, Glorisa; Bird, Hector R.; Brown, Qiana; Duarte, Cristiane S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To document the natural course of sensation seeking from childhood to adolescence, characterize distinct sensation-seeking trajectories, and examine how these trajectories vary according to selected predictors. Method Data were obtained from the Boricua Youth Study, a longitudinal study of 2,491 children and adolescents of Puerto Rican background (three assessments from 2000 to 2004). First, age-specific sensation-seeking levels were characterized. Then, age-adjusted residuals were analyzed using growth mixture models (GMM). Results On average, sensation seeking was stable in childhood (ages 5–10) and increased during adolescence (ages 11–17). Mean scores of sensation seeking were higher in the South Bronx vs. Puerto Rico and among males vs. females. Four classes of sensation-seeking trajectories were observed: most study participants had age-expected sensation-seeking trajectories following the average for their age (“normative,” 43.8%); others (37.2%) remained consistently lower than the expected average for their age (“low” sensation seeking); some (12.0%) had an “accelerated” sensation-seeking trajectory, increasing at a faster rate than expected, while a minority (7.0%) had a decreasing sensation-seeking trajectory that started high but decreased, reaching scores slightly higher than the age-average sensation-seeking scores (“stabilizers”). Site (South Bronx vs. Puerto Rico) and gender were predictors of membership in a specific class of sensation-seeking trajectory. Conclusion It is important to take a developmental approach when examining sensation seeking and to consider gender and the social environment when trying to understand how sensation seeking evolves during childhood and adolescence. PMID:26598479

  6. Impact of nest predators, competitors, and ectoparasites on Pearly-eyed Thrashers, with comments on the potential implications for Puerto Rican Parrot recovery

    Treesearch

    Wayne J. Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Over the past 17 years, research on a rain forest population of the Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus), with additional observations on nesting Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) within the Sierra de Luquillo, Puerto Rico, has shown that reproductive success of thrashers and parrots is often greatly reduced as a result of the additive effects of a diverse...

  7. A Study of the Spanish Translation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised with Puerto Rican Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Maria D.; And Others

    Two studies were performed with Puerto Rican children and adolescents in Puerto Rico and Connecticut to determine the reliability and predictive validity of the Spanish translation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, the Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Ninos-Revisada (EIWN-R). Results suggest that the EIWN-R is a reliable…

  8. Wet canopy evaporation from a Puerto Rican lower montane rain forest: the importance of realistically estimated aerodynamic conductance

    Treesearch

    F. Holwerda; L.A. Bruijnzeel; F.N. Scatena; H.F. Vugts; A.G.C.A. Meesters

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall interception (I) was measured in 20 m tall Puerto Rican tropical forest with complex topography for a 1-year period using totalizing throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) gauges that were measured every 2–3 days. Measured values were then compared to evaporation under saturated canopy conditions (E) determined with the Penman–Monteith (P–M) equation, using (i)...

  9. Carbohydrate Nutrition Differs by Diabetes Status and Is Associated with Dyslipidemia in Boston Puerto Rican Adults without Diabetes12

    PubMed Central

    Van Rompay, Maria I.; McKeown, Nicola M.; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen; Ordovás, José M.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    Puerto Rican adults have a greater prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and lower HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) than the general U.S. population. Carbohydrate nutrition may play a role in this disparity. Cross-sectional analyses included data from 1219 Puerto Ricans aged 45–75 y enrolled in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. Using the Pearson chi-square test and ANCOVA, lifestyle characteristics and dietary intake, as assessed by semiquantitative FFQ, were compared by T2D status based on fasting plasma glucose concentration and medication use. Food source rankings for carbohydrate, dietary glycemic load (GL), and fiber were obtained using the SAS procedure PROC RANK. Geometric mean plasma HDL-C and TG concentrations were compared across quintiles of dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), GL, and fiber by using ANCOVA and tests for linear trend. In multivariable analyses, individuals with T2D (39.5%) had lower dietary carbohydrate, GL, and total sugar intake from lower intake of sugar, fruit drinks, and soda compared with those without T2D. In individuals without T2D, dietary carbohydrate and GL were inversely associated with HDL-C (P < 0.0001). Associations between dietary fiber and HDL-C were confounded by carbohydrate intake, apparently from concurrent consumption of legumes with white rice, a refined carbohydrate food. No associations were observed between carbohydrate, dietary GI, GL, or fiber and TG. In conclusion, individuals with T2D showed evidence of dietary modification. Among those without diabetes, a high intake of refined carbohydrates was associated with decreased HDL-C. Longitudinal research on carbohydrate nutrition in relation to diabetes risk factors and blood lipids in Puerto Ricans is warranted. PMID:23269655

  10. Prediction of Warfarin Dose Reductions in Puerto Rican Patients, Based on Combinatorial CYP2C9 and VKORC1 Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Isa Ivette; Vazquez, Joan; Rivera-Miranda, Giselle; Seip, Richard L; Velez, Meredith; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Cruz-Gonzalez, Iadelisse; Cadilla, Carmen L; Renta, Jessica Y; Felliu, Juan F; Ramos, Alga S; Alejandro-Cowan, Yirelia; Gorowski, Krystyna; Ruaño, Gualberto; Duconge, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 polymorphisms on warfarin dose has been investigated in white, Asian, and African American populations but not in Puerto Rican Hispanic patients. OBJECTIVE To test the associations between genotypes, international normalized ratio (INR) measurements, and warfarin dosing and gauge the impact of these polymorphisms on warfarin dose, using a published algorithm. METHODS A retrospective warfarin pharmacogenetic association study in 106 Puerto Rican patients was performed. DNA samples from patients were assayed for 12 variants in both CYP2C9 and VKORC1 loci by HILOmet PhyzioType assay. Demographic and clinical nongenetic data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Allele and genotype frequencies were determined and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested. RESULTS Sixty-nine percent of patients were carriers of at least one polymorphism in either the CYP2C9 or the VKORC1 gene. Double, triple, and quadruple carriers accounted for 22%, 5%, and 1%, respectively. No significant departure from HWE was found. Among patients with a given CYP2C9 genotype, warfarin dose requirements declined from GG to AA haplotypes; whereas, within each VKORC1 haplotype, the dose decreased as the number of CYP2C9 variants increased. The presence of these loss-of-function alleles was associated with more out-of-range INR measurements (OR = 1.38) but not with significant INR >4 during the initiation phase. Analyses based on a published pharmacogenetic algorithm predicted dose reductions of up to 4.9 mg/day in carriers and provided better dose prediction in an extreme subgroup of highly sensitive patients, but also suggested the need to improve predictability by developing a customized model for use in Puerto Rican patients. CONCLUSIONS This study laid important groundwork for supporting a prospective pharmacogenetic trial in Puerto Ricans to detect the benefits of incorporating relevant genomic information into a customized DNA

  11. Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Among Puerto Rican Women Living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Courtney L.; Vasquez, Elsa; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about barriers to Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) genetic counseling among Puerto Rican women. Objective This study reviews existing literature to identify individual, interpersonal, and systems level factors that may impact the use of HBOC genetic services among Puerto Rican women living in the United States. Methods A systematic search of articles published between the years 1995–2014 was performed in PubMed and ISI Web of Science. Additionally, the bibliography of relevant articles was reviewed for additional potential articles. Results Individual level barriers most frequently identified included: a lack of knowledge or awareness about HBOC or genetic counseling and testing, and facilitators included high levels of interest in genetic counseling/genetic testing. Interpersonal level barriers included worry about knowing a family member’s risk, and conversely, a facilitator was the ability to help family members. Systems level barriers included concerns about the cost, having competing life demands, whereas facilitators included holding private insurance. Conclusion Puerto Rican women are a unique ethnic minority group with specific perceptions, beliefs and levels of education about genetic counseling and testing for HBOC. Addressing individual, interpersonal and systems level factors unique to this group may improve knowledge and awareness. Policy and structural changes may be needed to improve system level barriers. PMID:25626062

  12. Preliminary genetic analysis supports cave populations as targets for conservation in the endemic endangered Puerto Rican boa (Boidae: Epicrates inornatus).

    PubMed

    Puente-Rolón, Alberto R; Reynolds, R Graham; Revell, Liam J

    2013-01-01

    The endemic Puerto Rican boa (Epicrates inornatus) has spent 42 years on the Endangered Species List with little evidence for recovery. One significant impediment to effective conservation planning has been a lack of knowledge of the distribution of genetic variability in the species. It has previously been suggested that boas might best be protected around caves that harbor large populations of bats. Prior study has found Puerto Rican boas at relatively high densities in and around bat caves, which they use both to feed and seek shelter. However, it is unknown whether these behaviorally distinctive populations represent a distinct evolutionary lineage, or (conversely) whether caves harbor representative genetic diversity for the species across the island. We provide the first genetic study of the Puerto Rican boa, and we examine and compare genetic diversity and divergence among two cave populations and two surface populations of boas. We find three haplogroups and an apparent lack of phylogeographic structure across the island. In addition, we find that the two cave populations appear no less diverse than the two surface populations, and harbor multiple mtDNA lineages. We discuss the conservation implications of these findings, including a call for the immediate protection of the remaining cave-associated populations of boas.

  13. Preliminary Genetic Analysis Supports Cave Populations as Targets for Conservation in the Endemic Endangered Puerto Rican Boa (Boidae: Epicrates inornatus)

    PubMed Central

    Revell, Liam J.

    2013-01-01

    The endemic Puerto Rican boa (Epicrates inornatus) has spent 42 years on the Endangered Species List with little evidence for recovery. One significant impediment to effective conservation planning has been a lack of knowledge of the distribution of genetic variability in the species. It has previously been suggested that boas might best be protected around caves that harbor large populations of bats. Prior study has found Puerto Rican boas at relatively high densities in and around bat caves, which they use both to feed and seek shelter. However, it is unknown whether these behaviorally distinctive populations represent a distinct evolutionary lineage, or (conversely) whether caves harbor representative genetic diversity for the species across the island. We provide the first genetic study of the Puerto Rican boa, and we examine and compare genetic diversity and divergence among two cave populations and two surface populations of boas. We find three haplogroups and an apparent lack of phylogeographic structure across the island. In addition, we find that the two cave populations appear no less diverse than the two surface populations, and harbor multiple mtDNA lineages. We discuss the conservation implications of these findings, including a call for the immediate protection of the remaining cave-associated populations of boas. PMID:23691110

  14. [Menarche, menstrual and sociodemographic characteristics of Puerto Rican female athletes in the XV and XVI Central American and Caribbean Games].

    PubMed

    Rivera, M A; Mendez Zamora, I; Matos, R M; Rivera, A

    1993-09-01

    This investigation described maturation, menstrual and socio-demographic characteristics of 65 Puerto Rican women athletes that were interviewed during the XVI Central American and Caribbean Games (CACG), Mexico City in 1990. The results were compared with those of Puerto Rican women athletes (n = 52) at the XV CACG, Santiago Dominican Republic, 1986. The quantitative variables (age, age at initiation of training, years of training, age at menarche, birth order, and family size) were not statistically different (t-independent, p > or = 0.05). The observed frequencies for the qualitative variables (menstrual characteristics, degree of certainty in the recall of age of menarche, use of oral contraceptives, and marital status) were very similar. the women at the XVI CAC in Mexico demonstrated similar maturational, menstrual and socio-demographic characteristics to the those athletes evaluated four years earlier in Santiago and based on their long history of training, both samples were representative of athletically mature athletes. The findings were very similar to those reported for olympic athletes and such data expands the available information on Puerto Rican women athletes.

  15. Predicting the Invasion Potential of a Puerto Rican Frog in Hawaii using MODIS Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, S. A.; White, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    The Puerto Rican coqui frog (Eleutherodactylus coqui, hereafter coqui), which was introduced into Hawaii accidentally via commercial nurseries, is an aggressive invasive species in Hawaii. The coqui threatens Hawaii's unique ecological communities because it predates upon endemic invertebrates, which comprise the large majority of Hawaii's endemic fauna. Coqui frogs also affect real estate valuations because of their loud mating calls. Despite this widespread problem, the potential coqui range in Hawaii is currently unknown, making control and management efforts difficult. We fitted linear discriminant analysis (LDA), logistic regression (LR) via generalized linear models (GLMs), generalized additive models (GAMs), classification trees (CTs), random forests (RF), and support vector machine (SVM) to model the species distribution and map their invasion potential. We used five MODIS satellite imagery-derived biophysical variables as explanatory variables: leaf area index (LAI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and land surface temperature (LST) from three MODIS products: MOD11 (LST), MOD13 (LAI and FPAR), and MOD15 (Vegetation Index) (collection 4). We used 2000-2005 MODIS data from Aqua and Terra satellites to generate monthly climatologies for each biophysical variable. We collected presence/absence data from Puerto Rico and Hawaii using a 1 km grid overlaid over the entire islands of Puerto Rico and the Island of Hawaii by sampling every other pixel of the grid intersecting with the road network. We then used the dataset from Puerto Rico to train the six models while the Hawaii dataset was used as a test set. All six models predicted the invasion potential of coqui frogs in Hawaii with a moderate success with mean Kappa value of 0.31, mean area under the curve of receiver operating characteristics (AUC) of 0.75 and mean classification

  16. Pyrethroid resistance alters the blood-feeding behavior in Puerto Rican Aedes aegypti mosquitoes exposed to treated fabric.

    PubMed

    Agramonte, Natasha M; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Bernier, Ulrich R

    2017-09-01

    Emerging insecticide resistance is a major issue for vector control. It decreases the effectiveness of insecticides, thereby requiring greater quantities for comparable control with a net increase in risk of disease resurgence, product cost, and damage risk to the ecosystem. Pyrethroid resistance has been documented in Puerto Rican populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquitoes. In this study, topical toxicity of five insecticides (permethrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, DDT, transfluthrin) was determined for susceptible (Orlando-ORL) and resistant (Puerto Rico-PR) strains of Ae. aegypti. Resistance ratios were calculated using LD50 values, and high resistance ratios for permethrin (112) and etofenprox (228) were observed for the Puerto Rico strain. Behavioral differences in blood-feeding activity for pyrethroid-resistant and pyrethroid-susceptible strains of Ae. aegypti when exposed to pyrethroid-treated cloth were also explored. Strains were exposed for 15 min to a range of concentrations of pyrethroid-treated uniform fabric in a cage that contained 60 female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. Interestingly, the resistance ratios for blood-feeding were similar for permethrin (61) and etofenprox (70), but were lower than their respective resistance ratios for topical toxicity, suggesting that knockdown resistance was the primary mechanism of resistance in the blood feeding assays. Results showed a rightward shift in the dose-response curves for blood-feeding that indicated higher concentrations of pyrethroids were necessary to deter blood-feeding behavior in the pyrethroid-resistant Puerto Rican strain of Ae. aegypti.

  17. The longitudinal relationship between parental reports of asthma and anxiety and depression symptoms among two groups of Puerto Rican youth

    PubMed Central

    Olazagasti, Maria A. Ramos; Shrout, Patrick E.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between parental reports of child asthma and levels and slopes of anxiety and depression symptoms among two contrasting groups of Puerto Rican youth, and to determine whether asthma is a special risk above and beyond parents’ reports of other youths’ medical conditions. Methods Two probability samples of youth in San Juan and Caguas, Puerto Rico (n=673) and in the south Bronx, New York (n=598), and their caretakers were interviewed in three yearly assessments. Parental reports of their children's asthma during each assessment were used to indicate whether youth had intermittent (PR=34%, NY=23%) or persistent (PR=7%, NY=16%) asthma. Youths’ depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed using self reports to the DISC-IV. Information on youths’ medical comorbidity was gathered through parental reports. Results Multilevel analyses adjusting for comorbid medical conditions indicated that parental reports of youths’ intermittent and persistent asthma were related to higher levels, but similar slopes, of anxiety and depression among youth in New York. In Puerto Rico, youth with persistent asthma experienced less improvement in anxiety over time than youth without asthma, but no other associations were found. Conclusion Having asthma, based on parental reports, represents a risk factor for Puerto Rican youths’ internalizing symptoms, even after adjusting for comorbid medical conditions. This risk is more pronounced among youth living in New York, which highlights the importance of considering the social context in which youth develop and minority status when examining associations between physical health risk factors and mental health. PMID:22980534

  18. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Font, Yvonne M; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Angel M; Vilá, Luis M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, p < 0.01). In multivariate analyses, DM patients had 2.47 (95 % CI 1.05, 5.84) the odds of having bursitis/tendonitis as compared to non-diabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain's tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p < 0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease.

  19. Association between a Healthy Lifestyle Score and inflammatory markers among Puerto Rican adults.

    PubMed

    Sotos-Prieto, M; Bhupathiraju, S N; Falcon, L M; Gao, X; Tucker, K L; Mattei, J

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between multiple lifestyle components analyzed in combination and inflammation remains understudied. We aimed to assess the association between a Healthy Lifestyle Score (HLS) that includes adherence to five behavioral components (diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviors, smoking, social support and network, and sleep) and inflammatory markers, as well as the role of the HLS in inflammation among individuals with cardiometabolic conditions, in Puerto Rican adults. In a cross-sectional study of 842 Puerto Ricans adults (aged 45-75 y) living in Boston, MA, the HLS (range = 0-190; maximum indicative of healthiest adherence) was analyzed for association with three inflammatory markers: interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP). In multivariable-adjusted models, the HLS was inversely associated with IL-6 (β ± SE = -0.55 ± 0.13; P < 0.001) and TNF-α (-0.39 ± 0.13; P = 0.004). The dietary and smoking components were associated with both inflammatory markers independently of the other HLS components. Significant inverse associations were observed for each 20-unit increase in HLS and IL-6 and TNF-α for participants with hypertension (n = 600; β ± SE = -0.58 ± 0.16; -0.46 ± 0.16, respectively) and with overweight/obesity (n = 743; β ± SE = -0.59 ± 0.13; -0.50 ± 0.14, respectively), but not for those with diabetes (n = 187) or heart disease (n = 192). The HLS was not associated with CRP, after adjustment for potential confounders. Higher adherence to multiple lifestyle behaviors was associated with lower concentrations of inflammatory markers. Because low-grade inflammation may precede chronic diseases, following an overall healthy lifestyle may help lower risk of these diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II

  20. Reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire to estimate calcium intake in Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Cristina; Segarra, Adelaida; Trak, MaríaAngélica; Colón, Ixian

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the reproducibility and validity of a short semiquantitative calcium specific FFQ in a convenience Puerto Rican sample.Reproducibility was tested by the difference between calcium intakes from the FFQ completed twice, with a one month difference; validity was assessed against 6-day diet records (DR) in a sample of students, employees and faculty of the Medical Sciences Campus of the University of Puerto Rico. The statistical analyses performed were Pearson correlations, paired t-test, Bland-Altman plots, cross-classification analysis, Willett's surrogate categories, specificity, sensitivity and predictive value. A total of 93 subjects were included in the study (mean age 28.8 +/- 10.1 years, BMI 25.7 +/- 6.1 kg/m2). Mean estimated calcium intakes were 846.4 +/- 356.9 mg/day for the first FFQ, 801.1 +/- 423.7 mg/day for the repeated FFQ and 845.4 +/- 377.5 mg/day for 6-day DR. No statistical difference was observed between the means by paired t-test (p > 0.05), with significant correlations between means (p < 0.05). The FFQ was found to have a specificity of 65.2%, a sensitivity of 73.5%, a positive predictive value of 86.2% and a negative predictive value of 45.5%. In conclusion, the short FFQ is a valid tool that could be used in the future to assess calcium intake in epidemiological surveys in this group.

  1. Folate Deficiency, Atopy, and Severe Asthma Exacerbations in Puerto Rican Children

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Joshua; Brehm, John M.; Sordillo, Joanne; Forno, Erick; Boutaoui, Nadia; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Weiss, Scott T.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Canino, Glorisa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about folate and atopy or severe asthma exacerbations. We examined whether folate deficiency is associated with number of positive skin tests to allergens or severe asthma exacerbations in a high-risk population and further assessed whether such association is explained or modified by vitamin D status. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 582 children aged 6 to 14 years with (n = 304) and without (n = 278) asthma in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Folate deficiency was defined as plasma folate less than or equal to 20 ng/ml. Our outcomes were the number of positive skin tests to allergens (range, 0–15) in all children and (in children with asthma) one or more severe exacerbations in the previous year. Logistic and negative binomial regression models were used for the multivariate analysis. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, household income, residential proximity to a major road, and (for atopy) case/control status; those for severe exacerbations were also adjusted for use of inhaled corticosteroids and vitamin D insufficiency (a plasma 25[OH]D < 30 ng/ml). Measurements and Main Results: In a multivariate analysis, folate deficiency was significantly associated with an increased degree of atopy and 2.2 times increased odds of at least one severe asthma exacerbation (95% confidence interval for odds ratio, 1.1–4.6). Compared with children who had normal levels of both folate and vitamin D, those with both folate deficiency and vitamin D insufficiency had nearly eightfold increased odds of one or more severe asthma exacerbation (95% confidence interval for adjusted odds ratio, 2.7–21.6). Conclusions: Folate deficiency is associated with increased degree of atopy and severe asthma exacerbations in school-aged Puerto Ricans. Vitamin D insufficiency may further increase detrimental effects of folate deficiency on severe asthma exacerbations. PMID:26561879

  2. Reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire to estimate calcium intake in Puerto Ricans

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Cristina; Segarra, Adelaida; Trak, Maria Angélica; Colón, Ixian

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY The objective of the study was to assess the reproducibility and validity of a short semi-quantitative calcium specific FFQ in a convenience Puerto Rican sample. Reproducibility was tested by the difference between calcium intakes from the FFQ completed twice, with a one month difference: validity was assessed against 6-day diet records (DR) in a sample of students, employees and faculty of the Medical Sciences Campus of the University of Puerto Rico. The statistical analyses performed were Pearson correlations, paired t-test. Bland-Altman plots, cross-classification analysis. Willett’s surrogate categories, specificity, sensitivity and predictive value. A total of 93 subjects were included in the study (mean age 28.8±10.1 years, BMI 25.7±6.1 kg/m2). Mean estimated calcium intakes were 846.4±356.9 mg/day for the first FFQ, 801.1±423.7 mg/day for the repeated FFQ and 845.4±377.5 mg/day for 6-day DR. No statistical difference was observed between the means by paired t-test (p>0.05), with significant correlations between means (p<0.05). The FFQ was found to have a specificity of 65.2%, a sensitivity of 73.5%, a positive predictive value of 86.2% and a negative predictive value of 45.5%. In conclusion, the short FFQ is a valid tool that could be used in the future to assess calcium intake in epidemiological surveys in this group. PMID:24617021

  3. Folate Deficiency, Atopy, and Severe Asthma Exacerbations in Puerto Rican Children.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Joshua; Brehm, John M; Sordillo, Joanne; Forno, Erick; Boutaoui, Nadia; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Weiss, Scott T; Litonjua, Augusto A; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about folate and atopy or severe asthma exacerbations. We examined whether folate deficiency is associated with number of positive skin tests to allergens or severe asthma exacerbations in a high-risk population and further assessed whether such association is explained or modified by vitamin D status. Cross-sectional study of 582 children aged 6 to 14 years with (n = 304) and without (n = 278) asthma in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Folate deficiency was defined as plasma folate less than or equal to 20 ng/ml. Our outcomes were the number of positive skin tests to allergens (range, 0-15) in all children and (in children with asthma) one or more severe exacerbations in the previous year. Logistic and negative binomial regression models were used for the multivariate analysis. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, household income, residential proximity to a major road, and (for atopy) case/control status; those for severe exacerbations were also adjusted for use of inhaled corticosteroids and vitamin D insufficiency (a plasma 25[OH]D < 30 ng/ml). In a multivariate analysis, folate deficiency was significantly associated with an increased degree of atopy and 2.2 times increased odds of at least one severe asthma exacerbation (95% confidence interval for odds ratio, 1.1-4.6). Compared with children who had normal levels of both folate and vitamin D, those with both folate deficiency and vitamin D insufficiency had nearly eightfold increased odds of one or more severe asthma exacerbation (95% confidence interval for adjusted odds ratio, 2.7-21.6). Folate deficiency is associated with increased degree of atopy and severe asthma exacerbations in school-aged Puerto Ricans. Vitamin D insufficiency may further increase detrimental effects of folate deficiency on severe asthma exacerbations.

  4. Dental and periodontal health and treatment needs in a mother/child rural Puerto Rican population.

    PubMed

    López Del Valle, Lydia M

    2010-03-01

    Oral research directed toward the maternal and child dyads is important because mothers are a source of dental caries pathogens and are the health behavior managers and trainers of children. The objectives of this study were: 1) to evaluate the oral health status of the mothers in a sample of 100 children aged 12 to 60 months from a rural community in Puerto Rico, and 2) to compare the children with their mothers' oral health status. A sample of 71 women and 100 of their children, (Mean Age = 28.8 years +/- 9.0, and 36.41 mos +/- 18.2, respectively) were evaluated for DMFT/S and periodontal health or deft/s. A NIDCR calibrated dentist performed all dental evaluations of children and mothers utilizing NIDCR criteria. Descriptive statistics were produced. Mothers' bleeding point prevalence in at least one site was 63%; prevalence of at least one site with pocket depth of 4 to 6 mm was 37 %. Calculus prevalence was, no calculus 25%, supragingival calculus 56.7%, subgingival calculus 2.2%, supra and sub gingival calculus 16.3%. Mean Dental Indices for mothers were DMFS (16.51 -/+ 0.02), DMFT (12.20 +/- 6.76), Caries (2.93 +/- 2.86), Filling (7.07 +/- 8.76), Missing (2.93 +/- 4.53). Children's Mean Dental Indices were defs (4.32 +/- 9.7), deft (2.30 +/- 4.0), decalcifications lesions (1.36 +/-1.9), caries (1.96 +/- 3.2) and surfaces caries (3.81 +/- 8.68), fillings (0.22 +/- 0.83) and extracted teeth (0.043 +/- 0.45). Significant levels of treated and untreated caries and gingival disease were observed in this sample. The importance for primary and secondary prevention, as well as treatment for periodontal and dental disease, in rural Puerto Rican communities is evident from this investigation.

  5. Culture and Psychiatric Symptoms in Puerto Rican Children: Longitudinal Results from one Ethnic Group in Two Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Cristiane S.; Bird, Hector R.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Wu, Ping; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Shen, Sa; Canino, Glorisa

    2008-01-01

    (a) Background The development of youth psychopathology may be associated with direct and continuous contact with a different culture (acculturation) and to distress related to this process (cultural stress). We examine cultural experiences of Puerto Rican families in relation to youth psychiatric symptoms in two different contexts: one in which migrant Puerto Ricans reside on the mainland as an ethnic minority and another in which they reside in their place of origin. (b) Methods Sample Probability samples of 10 to 13 year old youth of Puerto Rican background living in the South Bronx, New York City (SB) and in the San Juan Metropolitan area in Puerto Rico (PR) (N=1,271) were followed over time. Measures Three assessments of internalizing psychiatric symptoms (elicited through the DISC-IV) and of antisocial behaviors (ASB) quantified through a six-point index were carried out. Independent variables included scales of adult and child acculturation and cultural stress, and other putative correlates. Data Analysis Within each study site, multilevel linear regression models were examined. (c) Results Parental acculturation was associated with ASB in youth at both sites, but youth acculturation itself was not related to psychiatric symptoms. At both contexts, cultural stress was a more consistent correlate of youth psychiatric symptoms than acculturation after controlling for nativity, maternal education, child gender, stressful life events and parental psychopathology. However, the strength of the youth cultural stress association decreased over time. (d) Conclusion The association between cultural factors and child psychiatric symptoms is not restricted to contexts where an ethnic group is a minority. PMID:18400061

  6. Dimensional assessment of anxiety in Puerto Rican patients: evaluating applicability of psychological questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    González-Barrios, Polaris; Morales-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Merced-Morales, Kritzianel; Lampón, Anabelle; González, Rafael; Martínez, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Objective A dimensional assessment model as a supplement to the diagnosis process could overcome the current pitfalls in classifying psychopathology in ethnic minorities. The aim of the study described herein was to examine a sample of Puerto Rican patients diagnosed with anxiety disorder in order to evaluate the psychometric properties of the specific scales that assess the following 3 domains: clinical symptoms, personality/trait, and affective style. Methods 80 subjects were recruited and interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV to identify the presence of anxiety disorders. Following this, various questionnaires assessing each proposed domain were administered to the participants. Reliability and validity of these questionnaires were examined using Cronbach’s alpha and exploratory factor analysis. The effect of the individual items of the questionnaires on the overall reliability and validity was assessed using factor scores component matrix. Results Analyses revealed moderate to high reliability and validity scores within all 3 domains. The sample obtained moderate to high scores on the scales comprising clinical and personality/trait domains. Conclusion The use of self-report scales in accordance with the proposed dimensional framework may be an effective way to supplement categorical diagnoses within the Hispanic population represented by this sample. PMID:27623138

  7. Gender Differences In Social And Developmental Factors Affecting Puerto Rican Adolescents During The Early Stage

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Cosme, Wanda I.; Miranda, Christine; Fernandez, Diana M.; Maysonet, Johanna; Ramon, Raul O.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescence is associated with risky behaviors related with social and developmental factors. Objectives were to describe social and developmental factors affecting Puerto Rican early adolescent by gender and type of school at study entry. Methods Cross-sectional study design. The study group was composed by 168 seventh grade adolescents from private and public schools. Descriptive and non-parametric comparisons were performed. Results Significance differences among proportions for gender by type of school were found in the following variables: self-esteem and HIV/AIDS attitudes in public school and peer pressure and sensation seeking in private school Discussion Our study revealed that public school adolescents are characterized by males with higher self-esteem and less attitude for HIV/AIDS, while in private school the males has more peer pressure and seeking sensation than females. Future studies could analyze factors related with changes in developmental factors, this step is important to evaluate the effectiveness of ASUMA interventions. PMID:23875519

  8. Cultural mechanisms in the exchange of social support among Puerto Ricans after a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Fernando I

    2012-06-01

    In this study, I uncovered the dynamics involved in the exchange (or lack) of social support among a group of Puerto Ricans who experienced a natural disaster. I coded and analyzed 12 semistructured qualitative interviews. My analysis of the interviews revealed that a reported high degree of need was not associated with any type of help seeking from the respondents' social support networks. Relevant issues that arose in explaining the lack of social support exchanges were level of comfort in help seeking and cultural issues. My findings point to the importance of culture in shaping patterns of help-seeking behavior in the aftermath of a disaster. Two of the most salient cultural explanations as to why disaster victims were reluctant to ask for help from family and friends were the issues of confianza (trust) and pena (embarrassment). I discuss the results with reference to how they might help in planning and establishing programs to maximize help seeking among Latinos/as in an emergency situation.

  9. A Brief Culturally Tailored Intervention for Puerto Ricans with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Amico, K. Rivet; Cruz, Noemi; O’Connell, Ann A.; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Kalichman, Seth C.; Wolf, Scott A.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    The Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model of health behavior change informed the design of a brief, culturally-tailored diabetes self-care intervention for Puerto Ricans with Type 2 diabetes. Participants (n = 118) were recruited from an outpatient, primary care clinic at an urban hospital in the northeast U.S. ANCOVA models evaluated intervention effects on food label reading, diet adherence, physical activity, and glycemic control (HbA1c). At follow-up, the intervention group was reading food labels and adhering to diet recommendations significantly more than the control group. While the mean HbA1c values decreased in both groups (Intervention: 0.48% vs. Control: 0.27% absolute decrease), only the intervention group showed a significant improvement from baseline to follow-up (p < .008) corroborating improvements in self-care behaviors. Findings support the use of the IMB model to culturally tailor diabetes interventions and to enhance patients’ knowledge, motivation, and behavior skills needed for self-care. PMID:21076128

  10. Urinary 8-Hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and Cognitive Function in Puerto Rican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Scott, Tammy; Shen, Jian; Cai, Tianxi; Ordovas, Jose M.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2010-01-01

    DNA oxidative stress has been suggested as an important pathogenic mechanism in cognitive impairment and dementia. With baseline data collected from 2004 to 2008, the authors examined whether urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a biomarker of global DNA oxidation, was associated with cognitive function in a sample of 1,003 Puerto Rican adults, aged 45–75 years, living in Boston, Massachusetts, and the surrounding area. Cognitive function was measured by using a battery of 7 tests: the Mini-Mental State Examination, word list learning, digit span, clock drawing and figure copying, Stroop, and verbal fluency tests. The primary outcome was a global cognitive score, averaging standardized scores across all cognitive tests. A higher 8-OHdG concentration was significantly associated with lower global cognitive scores, after adjustment for age, education, status of the gene for apolipoprotein E (APOE), and other covariates (Ptrend = 0.01). The difference in the global score, comparing participants in the 2 extreme 8-OHdG quartiles, was −0.11 (95% confidence interval: −0.20, −0.02), which was equivalent to accelerating cognitive aging by about 4 years, as observed in this population. Prospective studies are needed to elucidate whether elevated urinary 8-OHdG concentrations can predict the rate of cognitive decline and incident dementia. PMID:20621990

  11. Cultural Mechanisms in the Exchange of Social Support Among Puerto Ricans After a Natural Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Fernando I.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, I uncovered the dynamics involved in the exchange (or lack) of social support among a group of Puerto Ricans who experienced a natural disaster. I coded and analyzed 12 semistructured qualitative interviews. My analysis of the interviews revealed that a reported high degree of need was not associated with any type of help seeking from the respondents' social support networks. Relevant issues that arose in explaining the lack of social support exchanges were level of comfort in help seeking and cultural issues. My findings point to the importance of culture in shaping patterns of help-seeking behavior in the aftermath of a disaster. Two of the most salient cultural explanations as to why disaster victims were reluctant to ask for help from family and friends were the issues of confianza (trust) and pena (embarrassment). I discuss the results with reference to how they might help in planning and establishing programs to maximize help seeking among Latinos/as in an emergency situation. PMID:22232298

  12. Factors Associated with Perceived Patient-Provider Communication Quality among Puerto Ricans

    PubMed Central

    Calo, William A.; Ortiz, Ana P.; Colon, Vivian; Krasny, Sarah; Tortolero-Luna, Guillemo

    2014-01-01

    Patient-provider communication is an important factor influencing patients' health outcomes. This study examined the relationship between patient-provider communication quality and sociodemographic, health care access, trusted information sources, and health status variables. Data were from a representative sample of 450 Puerto Rican adults who participated in the Health Information National Trends Survey. A composite score rating perceived patient-provider communication quality was created from five items (Cronbach's alpha=0.87). A multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted. Patient-provider communication ratings were lower among the unemployed (p=0.049), those who do not trust a lot in the information provided by their providers (p=0.003), and respondents with higher depressive symptoms scores (p=0.036). Perceived patient-provider communication quality, however, was higher among respondents who visited their providers five or more times in the last year (p=0.023). Understanding patient perceptions of provider communication may serve to develop system-level interventions aimed at eliminating communication disparities and improving patients' health outcomes. PMID:24858864

  13. [STIGMA AND HIV / AIDS AMONG PUERTO RICAN PARENTS / MOTHERS AND ADOLESCENTS].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Grace Rosado; Reyes, Glendalys Rivera; Villanueva, Victoria Larrieux; Torres, Gilliam J Torres; Díaz, Elba Betancourt; Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Villaruel, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Communication between parents and adolescents about sexuality is important for the healthy development of young people. Stigmatizing attitudes towards HIV/AIDS may adversely impact this communication. The aim of this study was to identify stigmatizing attitudes towards HIV/AIDS among Puerto Rican parents and adolescents. This effort is part of the Cuídalos Project which aimed to test a web-based intervention to increase communication about sexuality and health among parents and adolescents through an experimental design with 458 parent/adolescent (13-17 years of age) dyads. For the purposes of this article we report descriptive statistics on HIV/AIDS stigma attitudes gathered as part of our baseline measurement. Both parents and adolescents manifested stigmatizing attitudes towards HIV/AIDS. In light of these results it is necessary to continue developing interventions to reduce stigma among this population. Parents can be an invaluable asset to reduce stigma among adolescents and to help prevent sexual risk behaviors and new infection.

  14. A brief culturally tailored intervention for Puerto Ricans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Amico, K R; Cruz, Noemi; O'Connell, Ann A; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Kalichman, Seth C; Wolf, Scott A; Fisher, Jeffrey D

    2010-12-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model of health behavior change informed the design of a brief, culturally tailored diabetes self-care intervention for Puerto Ricans with type 2 diabetes. Participants (n = 118) were recruited from an outpatient, primary care clinic at an urban hospital in the northeast United States. ANCOVA models evaluated intervention effects on food label reading, diet adherence, physical activity, and glycemic control (HbA1c). At follow-up, the intervention group was reading food labels and adhering to diet recommendations significantly more than the control group. Although the mean HbA1c values decreased in both groups ( 0.48% vs. 0.27% absolute decrease), only the intervention group showed a significant improvement from baseline to follow-up (p < .008), corroborating improvements in diabetes self-care behaviors. Findings support the use of the IMB model to culturally tailor diabetes interventions and to enhance patients' knowledge, motivation, and behavior skills needed for self-care.

  15. African-American and Puerto Rican drug use: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Brook, J S; Whiteman, M; Balka, E B; Win, P T; Gursen, M D

    1997-09-01

    To examine the interrelationship of acculturation, family, personality, ecology, and peer domains measured in adolescence as they impact drug use 5 years later and to assess the role of family variables as buffers against personality risks. Youths completed questionnaires in classrooms at T1 and were individually interviewed at T2 (mean age = 20 years). Data were analyzed separately for African-Americans and Puerto Ricans using correlations, hierarchical multiple regressions, and two-way interactions. Most results were similar for both ethnic groups. Eighty percent of the T1 variables significantly related to T2 stage of drug use. A mediational model of the path to drug use was supported. Acculturative influences were associated with family relations, which in turn were related to personality attributes. A reciprocal relationship emerged between the personality and peer domains in their impact on drug use. Family variables primarily enhanced the effect of protective personality traits on drug use. Stability of drug use alone cannot explain the relationship between the earlier domains and later drug use. Specific adolescent risks have long-lasting effects. The personality domain has a direct effect on later drug use despite a benign picture in the acculturation, family, and peer domains.

  16. Neural adaptations for processing the two-note call of the Puerto Rican treefrog, Eleutherodactylus coqui.

    PubMed

    Narins, P M; Capranica, R R

    1980-01-01

    Male Puerto Rican treefrogs, Eleutherodactylus coqui, produce a two-note call: a 100-msec constant frequency 'Co' note, followed by a longer, upward sweeping 'Qui' note. Previous behavioral studies have shown that males respond selectively to natural and synthetic call notes of 100 msec duration, whereas preliminary results suggest that females respond preferentially to the second note in the male's call. In the present study, we first show that the basilar papilla in the inner ear is tuned differentially in males and females. Comparisons were next made between cells in the eighth nerve and midbrain torus semicircularis of firing rate vs. duration functions in order to help determine the underlying neural mechanisms responsible for the behavioral selectivity to notes of 100 msec duration. A model for detection of vocalizations of specific durations is postulated and discussed in the light of the observed calling behavior of the male as well as the response properties of a class of cells found in the torus semicircularis.

  17. Severe Drought Constrains Seedling and Sapling Growth in a Puerto Rican Tropical Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Rodríguez, A. M.; Reed, S.; Cavaleri, M. A.; Uriarte, M.; Carter, K.; Bachelot, B.; Wood, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    Global climate change is expected to cause a significant increase in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events such as droughts and floods. Nevertheless, the potential impacts of these events are poorly understood for tropical forest ecosystems. For Puerto Rico, 2015 was the 6th driest year on record with below average precipitation from April through September, with peak drought conditions occurring in July. Associated reductions in soil moisture persisted for several months after rain resumed. Given that water availability is known to be an important factor regulating the success of tropical seedlings, we evaluated the effects of this drought on the mortality, growth and species composition of woody understory vegetation in a wet tropical forest in Puerto Rico. Seedlings and saplings were monitored within six 12m2 plots, which are part of a field warming experiment (Tropical Responses to Altered Climate Experiment [TRACE]) designed to warm understory plants and soils by 4°C above ambient temperatures. For this study, all plots were considered replicates since measurements were made during the pre-treatment phase of the experiment. The first census was conducted during the drought (May-June 2015), and the individuals were reassessed in November 2015 and June 2016. Comparisons between the two time periods, drought (Jun2015-Nov2015) and post-drought (Nov2015-Jun2016), revealed significant differences for overall growth rates, which were lower during the drought period, but no differences in mortality, abundance, diversity or species composition. Further analyses were conducted for the most dominant species to elucidate their particular responses to drought and if these responses were related to functional traits. Our results suggest that tropical forest seedlings and saplings may limit their growth during drought conditions, and then quickly recover when conditions return to normal. This relatively rapid recovery suggests that Puerto Rican rainforest

  18. [Degree of trait anxiety in a sample of athletes of the Puerto Rican delegation to the XII Pan American Games held in Winnipeg '99].

    PubMed

    Hechavarría Gómez, Rosa M; Pabón Villafañe, Angel L; Morales Figueroa, Ilia N

    2002-03-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to determine the degree of anxiety generated by athletes of the Puerto Rican delegation to the XII Pan American Games held in Winnipeng'99 to develop support programs that contribute to the enhancement of the athletes' mental skills and the development of sports, psychology, in particular. The sample consisted of 55 athletes that participated in the abovementioned Pan American Games. The athletes represented 16 sorts and made up 40% of the Puerto Rican athletes officially registered to participate. The Sport Competition Anxiety Test-Form A was used to detect trait anxiety during competition. An analysis of the variables was conducted utilizing t-tests to determine whether there were significant (p < or = 0.05) between the quantitative variables under study. The results indicated that the athletes of the Puerto Rican delegation that participated in the XII Pan American Games have a degree of trait anxiety that needs professional attention.

  19. Development and Validation of a Culturally Appropriate HIV/AIDS Stigma Scale for Puerto Rican Health Professionals in Training

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Nelson Varas; Neilands, Torsten B.

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma continues to be an obstacle for primary and secondary HIV prevention. Its consequences for the lives of people living with the disease have been well documented and continue to be of great concern for health care providers and researchers in the field. These consequences are worsened when such stigma emanates from health professionals, as this can limit access to services. One of the main obstacles for HIV/AIDS Stigma research in Puerto Rico is the absence of quantitative measures to assess HIV/AIDS stigma manifestations among health professionals. In light of this gap in the scientific literature, the main objective of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a culturally appropriate HIV/AIDS stigma scale for Puerto Rican health care providers and to develop a reduced form of the scale suitable for use in time-limited clinical settings. The developed measure was based on previous qualitative evidence gathered from Puerto Rican health professionals (Varas-Díaz, Serrano-García & Toro-Alfonso, 2005) and administered to a sample of 421 health professionals in training. The scale addresses 12 HIV/AIDS stigma dimensions. In quantitative analyses 11 of these dimensions demonstrated satisfactory validity and reliability. These dimensions in turn were subcomponents of a higher-order general stigma factor. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed. PMID:20024702

  20. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs About Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Among Puerto Rican Mothers and Daughters, 2010: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yen-Chi L.; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Calo, William A.; Savas, Lara S.; Vélez, Camille; Aragon, Angela Pattatucci; Colón-López, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer can be reduced by increasing vaccination for HPV. Yet vaccination uptake and completion of the 3-dose series remain low among Puerto Rican females. This study explored psychosocial factors associated with HPV vaccination uptake decisions among Puerto Rican mothers and daughters. Methods We conducted 7 focus groups with young women aged 16 to 24 (n = 21) and their mothers (n = 9) to assess knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs related to cervical cancer, HPV, and HPV vaccination. We analyzed the focus group transcripts and identified themes by using a constant comparison method of qualitative data analysis and interpretation, guided by a grounded theory approach. Results The analysis identified several emergent themes related to vaccine uptake: 1) low knowledge about cervical cancer, HPV, and the HPV vaccine; 2) inconsistent beliefs about susceptibility to HPV infection and cervical cancer; 3) vaccine effectiveness; 4) vaccine safety and side effects; 5) concerns that the vaccine promotes sexual disinhibition; and 6) availability of insurance coverage and overall cost of the vaccine. Conclusion Our study found that adolescent girls and young women in Puerto Rico have low levels of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer, low perceived susceptibility to HPV, and concerns about the safety and efficacy of the vaccine, and these factors may influence uptake and completion of HPV vaccination. Interventions are needed for both mothers and daughters that address these psychosocial factors and increase access to vaccination. PMID:25474384