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Sample records for mglu receptor activation

  1. mGlu2 metabotropic glutamate receptors restrain inflammatory pain and mediate the analgesic activity of dual mGlu2/mGlu3 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Zammataro, Magda; Chiechio, Santina; Montana, Michael C; Traficante, Anna; Copani, Agata; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Gereau, Robert W

    2011-01-14

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) couple to the inhibitory G-protein Gi. The group II mGluRs include two subtypes, mGlu2 and mGlu3, and their pharmacological activation produces analgesic effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. However, the specific contribution of each one of the two subtypes has not been clarified due to the lack of selective orthosteric ligands that can discriminate between mGlu2 and mGlu3 subtypes.In this study we used mGlu2 or mGlu3 knock-out mice to dissect the specific role for these two receptors in the endogenous control of inflammatory pain and their specific contribution to the analgesic activity of mixed mGlu2/3 receptor agonists.Our results showed that mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice display a significantly greater pain response compared to their wild type littermates. Interestingly the increased pain sensitivity in mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice occurred only in the second phase of the formalin test. No differences were observed in the first phase. In contrast, mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ mice did not significantly differ from their wild type littermates in either phase of the formalin test.When systemically injected, a single administration of the mGlu2/3 agonist, LY379268 (3 mg/kg, ip), showed a significant reduction of both phases in wild-type mice and in mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ but not in mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice. However tolerance to the analgesic effect of LY379268 (3 mg/kg, ip) in mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ mice developed following 5 consecutive days of injection.Taken together, these results demonstrate that: (i) mGlu2 receptors play a predominant role over mGlu3 receptors in the control of inflammatory pain in mice; (ii) the analgesic activity of mixed mGlu2/3 agonists is entirely mediated by the activation of the mGlu2 subtype and (iii) the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of mGlu2/3 agonists develops despite the lack of mGlu3 receptors.

  2. Phasic and Tonic mGlu7 Receptor Activity Modulates the Thalamocortical Network

    PubMed Central

    Tassin, Valériane; Girard, Benoît; Chotte, Apolline; Fontanaud, Pierre; Rigault, Delphine; Kalinichev, Mikhail; Perroy, Julie; Acher, Francine; Fagni, Laurent; Bertaso, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 7 (mGlu7) induces absence-like epileptic seizures, but its precise role in the somatosensory thalamocortical network remains unknown. By combining electrophysiological recordings, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we dissected the contribution of the mGlu7 receptor at mouse thalamic synapses. We found that mGlu7 is functionally expressed at both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses, where it can inhibit neurotransmission and regulate short-term plasticity. These effects depend on the PDZ-ligand of the receptor, as they are lost in mutant mice. Interestingly, the very low affinity of mGlu7 receptors for glutamate raises the question of how it can be activated, namely at GABAergic synapses and in basal conditions. Inactivation of the receptor activity with the mGlu7 negative allosteric modulator (NAM), ADX71743, enhances thalamic synaptic transmission. In vivo administration of the NAM induces a lethargic state with spindle and/or spike-and-wave discharges accompanied by a behavioral arrest typical of absence epileptic seizures. This provides evidence for mGlu7 receptor-mediated tonic modulation of a physiological function in vivo preventing synchronous and potentially pathological oscillations. PMID:27199672

  3. Design and synthesis of systemically active metabotropic glutamate subtype-2 and -3 (mGlu2/3) receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs): pharmacological characterization and assessment in a rat model of cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Dhanya, Raveendra-Panickar; Sheffler, Douglas J; Dahl, Russell; Davis, Melinda; Lee, Pooi San; Yang, Li; Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Cho, Hyekyung P; Smith, Layton H; D'Souza, Manoranjan S; Conn, P Jeffrey; Der-Avakian, Andre; Markou, Athina; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2014-05-22

    As part of our ongoing small-molecule metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) research, we performed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies around a series of group II mGlu PAMs. Initial analogues exhibited weak activity as mGlu2 receptor PAMs and no activity at mGlu3. Compound optimization led to the identification of potent mGlu2/3 selective PAMs with no in vitro activity at mGlu1,4-8 or 45 other CNS receptors. In vitro pharmacological characterization of representative compound 44 indicated agonist-PAM activity toward mGlu2 and PAM activity at mGlu3. The most potent mGlu2/3 PAMs were characterized in assays predictive of ADME/T and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, allowing the discovery of systemically active mGlu2/3 PAMs. On the basis of its overall profile, compound 74 was selected for behavioral studies and was shown to dose-dependently decrease cocaine self-administration in rats after intraperitoneal administration. These mGlu2/3 receptor PAMs have significant potential as small molecule tools for investigating group II mGlu pharmacology.

  4. Design and Synthesis of Systemically Active Metabotropic Glutamate Subtype-2 and -3 (mGlu2/3) Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): Pharmacological Characterization and Assessment in a Rat Model of Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As part of our ongoing small-molecule metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) research, we performed structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies around a series of group II mGlu PAMs. Initial analogues exhibited weak activity as mGlu2 receptor PAMs and no activity at mGlu3. Compound optimization led to the identification of potent mGlu2/3 selective PAMs with no in vitro activity at mGlu1,4–8 or 45 other CNS receptors. In vitro pharmacological characterization of representative compound 44 indicated agonist-PAM activity toward mGlu2 and PAM activity at mGlu3. The most potent mGlu2/3 PAMs were characterized in assays predictive of ADME/T and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, allowing the discovery of systemically active mGlu2/3 PAMs. On the basis of its overall profile, compound 74 was selected for behavioral studies and was shown to dose-dependently decrease cocaine self-administration in rats after intraperitoneal administration. These mGlu2/3 receptor PAMs have significant potential as small molecule tools for investigating group II mGlu pharmacology. PMID:24735492

  5. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor mGlu7 Activates Phospholipase C, Translocates Munc-13-1 Protein, and Potentiates Glutamate Release at Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals*

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Ricardo; Durroux, Thierry; Ciruela, Francisco; Torres, Magdalena; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2010-01-01

    At synaptic boutons, metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGlu7 receptor) serves as an autoreceptor, inhibiting glutamate release. In this response, mGlu7 receptor triggers pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein activation, reducing presynaptic Ca2+ influx and the subsequent depolarization evoked release. Here we report that receptor coupling to signaling pathways that potentiate release can be seen following prolonged exposure of nerve terminals to the agonist l-(+)-phosphonobutyrate, l-AP4. This novel mGlu7 receptor response involves an increase in the release induced by the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin, suggesting a mechanism that is independent of Ca2+ channel activity, but dependent on the downstream exocytotic release machinery. The mGlu7 receptor-mediated potentiation resists exposure to pertussis toxin, but is dependent on phospholipase C, and increased phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate hydrolysis. Furthermore, the potentiation of release does not depend on protein kinase C, although it is blocked by the diacylglycerol-binding site antagonist calphostin C. We also found that activation of mGlu7 receptors translocate the active zone protein essential for synaptic vesicle priming, munc13-1, from soluble to particulate fractions. We propose that the mGlu7 receptor can facilitate or inhibit glutamate release through multiple pathways, thereby exerting homeostatic control of presynaptic function. PMID:20375012

  6. Group I mGlu receptor stimulation inhibits activation-induced cell death of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Miglio, Gianluca; Mesturini, Riccardo; Varsaldi, Federica; Mocellin, Marco; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Dianzani, Chiara; Fantozzi, Roberto; Dianzani, Umberto; Lombardi, Grazia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of L-glutamate on activation-induced cell death (AICD) of human activated (1 μg ml−1 phytohemagglutinin plus 2 U ml−1 interleukin-2; 8 days) T lymphocytes were studied by measuring anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (10 μg ml−1; 18 h)-induced cell apoptosis (Annexin V and propidium iodide staining). L-Glutamate (1 × 10−8–1 × 10−4 M) significantly (P⩽0.01) inhibited AICD in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50=6.3 × 10−8 M; maximum inhibition 54.8±6.3% at 1 × 10−6 M). The L-glutamate inhibitory effect was pharmacologically characterized as mediated by group I mGlu receptors, since mGlu receptor agonists reproduced this effect. The EC50 values were: 3.2 × 10−7 M for (1S,3R)-ACPD; 4.5 × 10−8 M for quisqualate; 1.0 × 10−6 M for (S)-3,5-DHPG; 2.0 × 10−5 M for CHPG. Group I mGlu receptor antagonists inhibited the effects of quisqualate 1.0 × 10−6 M. The IC50 values calculated were: 8.7 × 10−5, 4.3 × 10−6 and 6.3 × 10−7 M for AIDA, LY 367385 and MPEP, respectively. L-Glutamate (1 × 10−6 M; 18 h) significantly (P⩽0.05) inhibited FasL expression (40.8±11.3%) (cytofluorimetric analysis), whereas it did not affect Fas signalling. Expression of both mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor mRNA by T lymphocytes and T-cell lines, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase–PCR analysis, suggests that L-glutamate-mediated inhibition of AICD was exerted on T cells. These data depict a novel role for L-glutamate in the regulation of the immune response through group I mGlu receptor-mediated mechanisms. PMID:16751798

  7. OptoGluNAM4.1, a Photoswitchable Allosteric Antagonist for Real-Time Control of mGlu4 Receptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Xavier; Trapero, Ana; Pittolo, Silvia; Zussy, Charleine; Faucherre, Adèle; Jopling, Chris; Giraldo, Jesús; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Gorostiza, Pau; Goudet, Cyril; Llebaria, Amadeu

    2016-08-18

    OptoGluNAM4.1, a negative allosteric modulator (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4) contains a reactive group that covalently binds to the receptor and a blue-light-activated, fast-relaxing azobenzene group that allows reversible receptor activity photocontrol in vitro and in vivo. OptoGluNAM4.1 induces light-dependent behavior in zebrafish and reverses the activity of the mGlu4 agonist LSP4-2022 in a mice model of chronic pain, defining a photopharmacological tool to better elucidate the physiological roles of the mGlu4 receptor in the nervous system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fenobam: a clinically validated nonbenzodiazepine anxiolytic is a potent, selective, and noncompetitive mGlu5 receptor antagonist with inverse agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Porter, Richard H P; Jaeschke, Georg; Spooren, Will; Ballard, Theresa M; Büttelmann, Bernd; Kolczewski, Sabine; Peters, Jens-Uwe; Prinssen, Eric; Wichmann, Jürgen; Vieira, Eric; Mühlemann, Andreas; Gatti, Silvia; Mutel, Vincent; Malherbe, Pari

    2005-11-01

    Fenobam [N-(3-chlorophenyl)-N'-(4,5-dihydro-1-methyl-4-oxo-1H-imidazole-2-yl)urea] is an atypical anxiolytic agent with unknown molecular target that has previously been demonstrated both in rodents and human to exert anxiolytic activity. Here, we report that fenobam is a selective and potent metabotropic glutamate (mGlu)5 receptor antagonist acting at an allosteric modulatory site shared with 2-methyl-6-phenylethynyl-pyridine (MPEP), the protypical selective mGlu5 receptor antagonist. Fenobam inhibited quisqualate-evoked intracellular calcium response mediated by human mGlu5 receptor with IC(50) = 58 +/- 2 nM. It acted in a noncompetitive manner, similar to MPEP and demonstrated inverse agonist properties, blocking 66% of the mGlu5 receptor basal activity (in an over expressed cell line) with an IC(50) = 84 +/- 13 nM. [(3)H]Fenobam bound to rat and human recombinant receptors with K(d) values of 54 +/- 6 and 31 +/- 4 nM, respectively. MPEP inhibited [(3)H]fenobam binding to human mGlu5 receptors with a K(i) value of 6.7 +/- 0.7 nM, indicating a common binding site shared by both allosteric antagonists. Fenobam exhibits anxiolytic activity in the stress-induced hyperthermia model, Vogel conflict test, Geller-Seifter conflict test, and conditioned emotional response with a minimum effective dose of 10 to 30 mg/kg p.o. Furthermore, fenobam is devoid of GABAergic activity, confirming previous reports that fenobam acts by a mechanism distinct from benzodiazepines. The non-GABAergic activity of fenobam, coupled with its robust anxiolytic activity and reported efficacy in human in a double blind placebo-controlled trial, supports the potential of developing mGlu5 receptor antagonists with an improved therapeutic window over benzodiazepines as novel anxiolytic agents.

  9. Activated nuclear metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 couples to nuclear Gq/11 proteins to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated nuclear Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; O'Malley, Karen L

    2008-05-16

    Recently we have shown that the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor can be expressed on nuclear membranes of heterologous cells or endogenously on striatal neurons where it can mediate nuclear Ca2+ changes. Here, pharmacological, optical, and genetic techniques were used to show that upon activation, nuclear mGlu5 receptors generate nuclear inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in situ. Specifically, expression of an mGlu5 F767S mutant in HEK293 cells that blocks Gq/11 coupling or introduction of a dominant negative Galphaq construct in striatal neurons prevented nuclear Ca2+ changes following receptor activation. These data indicate that nuclear mGlu5 receptors couple to Gq/11 to mobilize nuclear Ca2+. Nuclear mGlu5-mediated Ca2+ responses could also be blocked by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, U73122, the phosphatidylinositol (PI) PLC inhibitor 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (ET-18-OCH3), or by using small interfering RNA targeted against PLCbeta1 demonstrating that PI-PLC is involved. Direct assessment of inositol phosphate production using a PIP2/IP3 "biosensor" revealed for the first time that IP3 can be generated in the nucleus following activation of nuclear mGlu5 receptors. Finally, both IP3 and ryanodine receptor blockers prevented nuclear mGlu5-mediated increases in intranuclear Ca2+. Collectively, this study shows that like plasma membrane receptors, activated nuclear mGlu5 receptors couple to Gq/11 and PLC to generate IP3-mediated release of Ca2+ from Ca2+-release channels in the nucleus. Thus the nucleus can function as an autonomous organelle independent of signals originating in the cytoplasm, and nuclear mGlu5 receptors play a dynamic role in mobilizing Ca2+ in a specific, localized fashion.

  10. The difference in effect of mGlu2/3 and mGlu5 receptor agonists on cognitive impairment induced by MK-801.

    PubMed

    Vales, Karel; Svoboda, Jan; Benkovicova, Kristina; Bubenikova-Valesova, Vera; Stuchlik, Ales

    2010-08-10

    The manipulation of glutamate neurotransmission could represent a potential strategy for the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenic symptoms. Preclinical studies suggest that two subtypes of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors such as mGlu2/3 and mGlu5 receptors have the potential to ameliorate deficits in schizophrenia. In our study we evaluated the role of a non-specific mGlu receptor agonist ((1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid; 1S,3R-ACPD), mGlu5 receptor agonist or positive modulators ((RS)-2-Chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine;CHPG; [(3-Fluoro-phenyl)methylene]hydrazone-3-fluorobenzaldehyde; DFB; 3-Cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide; CDPPB) and a mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (2,2,2-Trifluoro-N-[4-(2-methoxyphenoxy)phenyl]-N-(3-pyrdinylmethyl)ethanesulfonamide hydrochloride; LY-487379) on performance in a cognitive task (Active Allothetic Place Avoidance) after sub-chronic administration of 5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)-cyclo-hepten-5,10-imine; MK-801 . The Active Allothetic Place Avoidance task is suitable for assessing the executive function and attention of animals and was previously validated for testing the effect of anti-psychotics. Application of the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist had no effect on cognitive impairment induced by MK-801. However, the mGlu5 receptor agonists ameliorated cognitive impairment induced by MK-801 without affecting locomotion. In conclusion, the mGlu5 receptor agonists could be effective in the treatment of cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia. However, the pro-cognitive effect of the agonist of mGlu2/3 receptors was not demonstrated in the present study. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. mGlu2/3 agonist-induced hyperthermia: an in vivo assay for detection of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonism and its relation to antidepressant-like efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gleason, S D; Li, X; Smith, I A; Ephlin, J D; Wang, X-S; Heinz, B A; Carter, J H; Baez, M; Yu, J; Bender, D M; Witkin, J M

    2013-08-01

    An assay to detect the on-target effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in vivo would be valuable in guiding dosing regimens for the exploration of biological effects of potential therapeutic import. Multiple approaches involving blockade of mGlu2/3 receptor agoinist-driven behavioral effects in mice and rats were investigated. Most of these methods failed to provide a useful method of detection of antagonists in vivo (e.g., locomotor activity). In contrast, the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 produced dose-dependent increases in body temperature of mice. The hyperthermic effects of LY379268 was abolished in mGlu2 and in mGlu2/3 receptor null mice but not in mGlu3 null mice. Hyperthermia was not produced by an mGlu8 receptor agonist. Agonist-induced hyperthermia was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by structurally-distinct mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists. The blockade was stereo-specific. Moreover, this biological readout was responsive to both orthosteric and to negative allosteric modulators of mGlu2/3 receptors. Antagonism of agonist-induced hyperthermia predicted antidepressant-like efficacy in the mouse forced swim test. As with the hyperthermic response, the antidepressant-like effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists were shown to be due to mGlu2 and not to mGlu3 or mGlu8 receptors through the use of receptor knock-out mice. The ability to rapidly assess on-target activity of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists enables determination of parameters for setting efficacy doses in vivo. In turn, efficacy-related data in the preclinical laboratory can help to set expectations of therapeutic potential and dosing in humans.

  12. Pharmacological characterization of mGlu1 receptors in cerebellar granule cells reveals biased agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Hannah A.; Pshenichkin, Sergey; Grajkowska, Ewa; Gelb, Tara; Emery, Andrew C.; Wolfe, Barry B.; Wroblewski, Jarda T.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of existing research on the function of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor 1 focuses on G protein-mediated outcomes. However, similar to other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), it is becoming apparent that mGlu1 receptor signaling is multi-dimensional and does not always involve G protein activation. Previously, in transfected CHO cells, we showed that mGlu1 receptors activate a G protein-independent, β-arrestin-dependent signal transduction mechanism and that some mGlu1 receptor ligands were incapable of stimulating this response. Here we set out to investigate the physiological relevance of these findings in a native system using primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells. We tested the ability of a panel of compounds to stimulate two mGlu1 receptor-mediated outcomes: (1) protection from decreased cell viability after withdrawal of trophic support and (2) G protein-mediated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis. We report that the commonly used mGlu1 receptor ligands quisqualate, DHPG, and ACPD are completely biased towards PI hydrolysis and do not induce mGlu1 receptor-stimulated neuroprotection. On the other hand, endogenous compounds including glutamate, aspartate, cysteic acid, cysteine sulfinic acid, and homocysteic acid stimulate both responses. These results show that some commonly used mGlu1 receptor ligands are biased agonists, stimulating only a fraction of mGlu1 receptor-mediated responses in neurons. This emphasizes the importance of utilizing multiple agonists and assays when studying GPCR function. PMID:25700650

  13. Perirhinal Cortex mGlu5 Receptor Activation Reduces Relapse to Methamphetamine Seeking by Restoring Novelty Salience

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Jamie; Scofield, Michael D; Ghee, Shannon M; Heinsbroek, Jasper A; Reichel, Carmela M

    2016-01-01

    Rats that have self-administered methamphetamine (meth) under long access, but not short access, conditions do not recognize novel objects. The perirhinal cortex is critical for novelty detection, and perirhinal metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors (mGlu5) are downregulated after long-access meth. The novel positive allosteric modulator (PAM) 1-(4-(2,4-difluorophenyl) piperazin-1-yl)-2-((4-fluorobenzyl)oxy)-ethanone, or DPFE, demonstrates improved solubility compared with other mGlu5 PAMs, thus allowing brain-site-specific pharmacological studies. Infusion of DPFE into perirhinal cortex restored novel object recognition in long-access meth rats. To investigate the impact of these cognitive enhancing effects on relapse, we tested the effects of DPFE infusions into perirhinal cortex on meth-seeking under two different test conditions. In the standard cue relapse test, perirhinal DPFE infusions did not alter meth-seeking in the presence of meth cues. However, in a novel cue relapse test, wherein animals were allowed to allocate responding between a novel cue and meth-conditioned cue, perirhinal DPFE infusions shifted the pattern of responding in long-access rats toward a profile resembling short-access rats, which respond equally for novel and meth cues. Perirhinal mGlu5 are thus a promising pharmacological target for the restoration of cognitive function in meth addicts. Targeting these receptors may also reduce relapse, particularly in situations where novel stimuli compete with conditioned stimuli for control over meth seeking. PMID:26365953

  14. Chronic oral administration of MPEP, an antagonist of mGlu5 receptor, during gestation and lactation alters mGlu5 and A2A receptors in maternal and neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    López-Zapata, Antonio; León-Navarro, David Agustín; Crespo, María; Albasanz, José Luis; Martín, Mairena

    2017-03-06

    Antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs are widely consumed even by pregnant and lactating women. The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) exerts antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions. Given that treatment for anxiety and depression use to be prolonged in time, it is conceivable a possible modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors) after prolonged MPEP exposure, which could also modify adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) since functional cross-talk between them has been reported. Here we report that MPEP crosses placental barrier and reaches neonatal brain through maternal milk using LC-MS/MS methods. Therefore, we analyzed mGlu receptors, mainly mGlu5, and A2AR in both maternal and fetal brain after chronic maternal consumption of MPEP during gestation and/or lactation using radioligand binding, Western-blotting, real-time PCR and phospholipase C (PLC) activity assays. In maternal brain, chronic MPEP consumption caused a significant loss of mGlu, including mGlu5, and A2AR receptors level in plasma membrane. PLC activity assays showed that mGlu5 signaling pathway was desensitized. No variations on mRNA level coding A2AR, A1R and mGlu5 were found after MPEP treatments. In female neonatal brain, maternal consumption of MPEP caused a significant increase in mGlu, including mGlu5, and A2AR receptors level. Neither mGlu receptors nor A2AR were modified in male neonatal brain after maternal MPEP intake. Finally, neither molecular nor behavioral changes (anxiety- and depression-like behavior) were observed in 3-month-old female offspring. In summary, mGlu5 and A2AR are altered in both maternal and female neonatal brain after chronic maternal consumption of MPEP during gestation and/or lactation.

  15. Permissive role for mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in excitotoxic retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Francesca; Bucci, Domenico; Mascio, Giada; Madonna, Michele; Di Pietro, Paola; Beneventano, Martina; Puliti, Alda Maria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Romano, Maria Rosaria

    2017-09-14

    Neuroprotection is an unmet need in eye disorders characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, such as prematurity-induced retinal degeneration, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. In all these disorders excitotoxicity is a prominent component of neuronal damage, but clinical data discourage the development of NMDA receptor antagonists as neuroprotectants. Here, we show that activation of mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors largely contributes to excitotoxic degeneration of RGCs. Mice at postnatal day 9 were challenged with a toxic dose of monosodium glutamate (MSG, 3g/kg), which caused the death of >70% of Brn-3a(+) RGCs. Systemic administration of the mGlu1 receptor negative allosteric modulator (NAM), JNJ16259685 (2.5mg/kg, s.c.), was largely protective against MSG-induced RGC death. This treatment did not cause changes in motor behavior in the pups. We also injected MSG to crv4 mice, which lack mGlu1 receptors because of a recessive mutation of the gene encoding the mGlu1 receptor. MSG did not cause retinal degeneration in crv4 mice, whereas it retained its toxic activity in their wild-type littermates. These findings demonstrate that mGlu1 receptors play a key role in excitotoxic degeneration of RGCs, and encourage the study of mGlu1 receptor NAMs in models of retinal neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SAR studies on mGlu5 receptor positive allosteric modulators (2003- 2013).

    PubMed

    Hao, Junliang; Xiong, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a class C G-protein-coupled receptor which possesses a large extracellular N-terminal domain (ATD) connected to the seven-transmembrane (7-TM) domain. In contrast to the glutamate and its close analogs binding at the orthosteric site on the ATD region, allosteric modulators bind at topographically distinct sites in the 7-TM region. Activation of mGlu5 receptors at either the orthosteric or allosteric sites results in enhancement of NMDA receptor function and represents a promising opportunity for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since the disclosure of the first mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators (PAM) in 2003, there have been intense industry-wide efforts to discover and develop safe and efficacious agents capable of selectively enhancing mGlu5 receptor function at the allosteric sites. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made, and multiple chemical scaffolds have been identified as mGlu5 PAMs, possibly binding to different allosteric sites on the 7-TM domain. These ligands have helped gain novel insights into the biology of mGlu5 receptor allosteric activation. Here we provide a comprehensive review on the structure-activity relationship (SAR) progress on the mGlu5 PAMs reported in the primary literature and include appropriate and complementary examples from the patent literature. Important in vivo studies of select compounds from individual scaffolds are highlighted, and challenges facing the clinical development of mGlu5 receptor PAMs are discussed.

  17. Place field stability requires the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sijie; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are critically involved in enabling the persistency of forms of synaptic plasticity that are believed to underlie hippocampus-dependent memory. These receptors and in particular, mGlu5, are also required for hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. In the hippocampus, synaptic plasticity is one of the mechanisms by which spatial information may be represented. Another mechanism involves increased firing of place cells. Place cells increase their firing activity when an animal is in a specific spatial location. Inhibition of factors that are essential for synaptic plasticity, such as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors or protein synthesis, also impair place cell activity. This raises the question as to whether mGlu receptors, that are so important for synaptic plasticity and spatial memory, are also important for place cell encoding. We examined location-dependent place cell firing i.e. place fields. We observed that antagonism of mGlu5, using 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP) had no effect on place field profiles in a familiar environment. However, in a novel environment mGlu5-antagonism affected long-term place field stability, reduced place cell firing and spatial information. These data strongly suggest a role for mGlu5 in the mechanisms underlying informational content and long-term stability of place fields, and add to evidence supporting the importance of these receptors for hippocampal function. PMID:24910241

  18. mGlu5 Receptor Functional Interactions and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robyn M.; Mustafa, Sanam; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Dodd, Peter R.; Pfleger, Kevin D. G.; Lawrence, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The idea of “receptor mosaics” is that proteins may form complex and dynamic networks with respect to time and composition. These have the potential to markedly expand the diversity and specificity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) signaling, particularly in neural cells, where a few key receptors have been implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including addiction. Metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors (mGlu5) can form complexes with other GPCRs, including adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors. mGlu5-containing complexes have been reported in the striatum, a brain region critical for mediating the rewarding and incentive motivational properties of drugs of abuse. mGlu5-containing complexes and/or downstream interactions between divergent receptors may play roles in addiction–relevant behaviors. Interactions between mGlu5 receptors and other GPCRs can regulate the rewarding and conditioned effects of drugs as well as drug-seeking behaviors. mGlu5 complexes may influence striatal function, including GABAergic output of striatopallidal neurons and glutamatergic input from corticostriatal afferents. Given their discrete localization, mGlu5-[non-mGlu5] receptor interactions and/or mGlu5-containing complexes may minimize off-target effects and thus provide a novel avenue for drug discovery. The therapeutic targeting of receptor–receptor functional interactions and/or receptor mosaics in a tissue specific or temporal manner (for example, a sub-population of receptors in a “pathological state”) might reduce detrimental side effects that may otherwise impair vital brain functions. PMID:22586398

  19. Potential anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of MPEP, a potent, selective and systemically active mGlu5 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Tatarczyńska, E; Klodzińska, A; Chojnacka-Wójcik, E; Palucha, A; Gasparini, F; Kuhn, R; Pilc, A

    2001-04-01

    1. Several lines of evidence suggest a crucial involvement of glutamate in the mechanism of action of anxiolytic and/or antidepressant drugs. The involvement of group I mGlu receptors in anxiety and depression has also been proposed. Given the recent discovery of a selective and brain penetrable mGlu5 receptor antagonists, the effect of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), i.e. the most potent compound described, was evaluated in established models of anxiety and depression. 2. Experiments were performed on male Wistar rats or male Albino Swiss or C57BL/6J mice. The anxiolytic-like effects of MPEP was tested in the conflict drinking test and the elevated plus-maze test in rats as well as in the four-plate test in mice. The antidepressant-like effect was estimated using the tail suspension test in mice and the behavioural despair test in rats. 3. MPEP (1 - 30 mg kg(-1)) induced anxiolytic-like effects in the conflict drinking test and the elevated plus-maze test in rats as well as in the four-plate test in mice. MPEP had no effect on locomotor activity or motor coordination. MPEP (1 - 20 mg kg(-1)) did shorten the immobility time in a tail suspension test in mice, however it was inactive in the behavioural despair test in rats. 4. These data suggest that selective mGlu5 receptor antagonists may play a role in the therapy of anxiety and/or depression, further studies are required to identify the sites and the mechanism of action of MPEP.

  20. mGlu1 receptor canonical signaling pathway contributes to the opening of the orphan GluD2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dadak, Selma; Bouquier, Nathalie; Goyet, Elise; Fagni, Laurent; Levenes, Carole; Perroy, Julie

    2017-03-15

    The orphan Glutamate receptor Delta2 (GluD2) intrinsic ion channel activity is indirectly triggered by glutamate through stimulation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. However, the mechanisms of GluD2 ion channel opening are entirely unknown. In this work, we investigated the signaling pathways underlying the mGlu1-induced GluD2 current, performing whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from mGlu1 and GluD2 transfected HEK293 cells. We show that the activation of GluD2 channels via DHPG-induced mGlu1 stimulation is Gαq-dependent. Moreover, inhibition of the downstream components of the mGlu1 canonical signaling pathway PLC and PKC with U73122 and GF109203X, respectively, strongly reduced the DHPG-induced GluD2 current. These results were further confirmed on endogenous receptors at the Parallel Fiber - Purkinje Cell cerebellar synapse, indicating that the opening of the GluD2 channel by mGlu1 receptor mobilizes the canonical Gq-PLC-PKC pathway. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors, 5 years on'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Potentiation of mGlu5 receptors with the novel enhancer, VU0360172, reduces spontaneous absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats

    PubMed Central

    D’Amore, V.; Santolini, I.; van Rijn, C.M.; Biagioni, F.; Molinaro, G.; Prete, A.; Conn, P.J.; Lindsley, C.W.; Zhou, Y.; Vinson, P.N.; Rodriguez, A.L.; Jones, C.K.; Stauffer, S.R.; Nicoletti, F.; van Luijtelaar, G.; Ngomba, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Absence epilepsy is generated by the cortico-thalamo-cortical network, which undergoes a finely tuned regulation by metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. We have shown previously that potentiation of mGlu1 receptors reduces spontaneous occurring spike and wave discharges (SWDs) in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, whereas activation of mGlu2/3 and mGlu4 receptors produces the opposite effect. Here, we have extended the study to mGlu5 receptors, which are known to be highly expressed within the cortico-thalamo-cortical network. We used presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and aged-matched ACI rats. WAG/Rij rats showed a reduction in the mGlu5 receptor protein levels and in the mGlu5-receptor mediated stimulation of polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis in the ventrobasal thalamus, whereas the expression of mGlu5 receptors was increased in the somatosensory cortex. Interestingly, these changes preceded the onset of the epileptic phenotype, being already visible in pre-symptomatic WAG/Rij rats. SWDs in symptomatic WAG/Rij rats were not influenced by pharmacological blockade of mGlu5 receptors with MTEP (10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.), but were significantly decreased by mGlu5 receptor potentiation with the novel enhancer, VU0360172 (3 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.), without affecting motor behaviour. The effect of VU0360172 was prevented by co-treatment with MTEP. These findings suggest that changes in mGlu5 receptors might lie at the core of the absence-seizure prone phenotype of WAG/Rij rats, and that mGlu5 receptor enhancers are potential candidates to the treatment of absence epilepsy. PMID:22705340

  2. Development of Novel, CNS Penetrant Positive Allosteric Modulators for the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 1 (mGlu1), Based on an N-(3-Chloro-4-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-3-methylfuran-2-carboxamide Scaffold, That Potentiate Wild Type and Mutant mGlu1 Receptors Found in Schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M; Cho, Hyekyung P; Niswender, Colleen M; Byers, Frank W; Locuson, Charles W; Blobaum, Anna L; Xiang, Zixiu; Rook, Jerri M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2015-10-22

    The therapeutic potential of selective mGlu1 activation is vastly unexplored relative to the other group I mGlu receptor, mGlu5; therefore, our lab has focused considerable effort toward developing mGlu1 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) suitable as in vivo proof of concept tool compounds. Optimization of a series of mGlu1 PAMs based on an N-(3-chloro-4-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-3-methylfuran-2-carboxamide scaffold provided 17e, a potent (mGlu1 EC50 = 31.8 nM) and highly CNS penetrant (brain to plasma ratio (Kp) of 1.02) mGlu1 PAM tool compound, that potentiated not only wild-type human mGlu1 but also mutant mGlu1 receptors derived from deleterious GRM1 mutations found in schizophrenic patients. Moreover, both electrophysiological and in vivo studies indicate the mGlu1 ago-PAMs/PAMs do not possess the same epileptiform adverse effect liability as mGlu5 ago-PAMs/PAMs and maintain temporal activity suggesting a broader therapeutic window.

  3. mGlu5, Dopamine D2 and Adenosine A2A Receptors in L-DOPA-induced Dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicolas; Morissette, Marc; Grégoire, Laurent; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) receiving L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA, the gold-standard treatment for this disease) frequently develop abnormal involuntary movements, termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID). Glutamate overactivity is well documented in PD and LID. An approach to manage LID is to add to L-DOPA specific agents to reduce dyskinesias such as metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu receptor) drugs. This article reviews the contribution of mGlu type 5 (mGlu5) receptors in animal models of PD. Several mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators acutely attenuate LID in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) monkeys and 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Chronic administration of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators to MPTP monkeys and 6-OHDA rats also attenuates LID while maintaining the antiparkinsonian effect of L-DOPA. Radioligand autoradiography shows an elevation of striatal mGlu5 receptors of dyskinetic L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys but not in those without LID. The brain molecular correlates of the long-term effect of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators treatments with L-DOPA attenuating development of LID was shown to extend beyond mGlu5 receptors with normalization of glutamate activity in the basal ganglia of L-DOPA-induced changes of NMDA, AMPA, mGlu2/3 receptors and VGlut2 transporter. In the basal ganglia, mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulators also normalize the L-DOPA-induced changes of dopamine D2receptors, their associated signaling proteins (ERK1/2 and Akt/GSK3β) and neuropeptides (preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin) as well as the adenosine A2A receptors expression. These results show in animal models of PD reduction of LID with mGlu5 negative allosteric modulation associated with normalization of glutamate, dopamine and adenosine receptors suggesting a functional link of these receptors in chronic treatment with L-DOPA.

  4. mGlu5, Dopamine D2 and Adenosine A2A Receptors in L-DOPA-induced Dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Nicolas; Morissette, Marc; Grégoire, Laurent; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) receiving L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA, the gold-standard treatment for this disease) frequently develop abnormal involuntary movements, termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID). Glutamate overactivity is well documented in PD and LID. An approach to manage LID is to add to L-DOPA specific agents to reduce dyskinesias such as metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu receptor) drugs. This article reviews the contribution of mGlu type 5 (mGlu5) receptors in animal models of PD. Several mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators acutely attenuate LID in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) monkeys and 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Chronic administration of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators to MPTP monkeys and 6-OHDA rats also attenuates LID while maintaining the anti-parkinsonian effect of L-DOPA. Radioligand autoradiography shows an elevation of striatal mGlu5 receptors of dyskinetic L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys but not in those without LID. The brain molecular correlates of the long-term effect of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators treatments with L-DOPA attenuating development of LID was shown to extend beyond mGlu5 receptors with normalization of glutamate activity in the basal ganglia of L-DOPA-induced changes of NMDA, AMPA, mGlu2/3 receptors and VGlut2 transporter. In the basal ganglia, mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulators also normalize the L-DOPA-induced changes of dopamine D2 receptors, their associated signaling proteins (ERK1/2 and Akt/GSK3β) and neuropeptides (preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin) as well as the adenosine A2A receptors expression. These results show in animal models of PD reduction of LID with mGlu5 negative allosteric modulation associated with normalization of glutamate, dopamine and adenosine receptors suggesting a functional link of these receptors in chronic treatment with L-DOPA. PMID:26639458

  5. The Antidepressant Effects of an mGlu2/3 Receptor Antagonist and Ketamine Require AMPA Receptor Stimulation in the mPFC and Subsequent Activation of the 5-HT Neurons in the DRN

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Kenichi; Iijima, Michihiko; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    We have reported the antidepressant effects of both metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists and ketamine in several animal models, and proposed that serotonergic (5-HTergic) transmission is involved in these actions. Given that the projections from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), where the majority of serotonin (5-HT) neurons exist, are reportedly involved in the antidepressant effects, in this study, we investigated using the forced swimming test (FST) of C57BL/6J male mice, the role of 5-HT neurons in the DRN regulated by the mPFC–DRN projections in the antidepressant effects of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495, and ketamine. Following systemic administration/microinjection into the mPFC, both LY341495 and ketamine were found to exert antidepressant effects in the FST, and the effects were attenuated by depletion of 5-HT by treatment with an inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, PCPA. The antidepressant effects of LY341495 and ketamine were also blocked by systemic administration/microinjection into the mPFC of an AMPA receptor antagonist, NBQX. Moreover, systemic administration/microinjection into the mPFC of LY341495 and ketamine significantly increased the c-Fos expression in the 5-HT neurons in the DRN, and the effect of systemic administration of these drugs on the neuronal c-Fos expression was attenuated by microinjection of NBQX into the mPFC. Our findings suggest that activation of 5-HT neurons in the DRN regulated by stimulation of the AMPA receptor in the mPFC may be involved in the antidepressant effects of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist and ketamine. PMID:26245499

  6. The mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP activates specific stress-related brain regions and lacks neurotoxic effects of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801: significance for the use as anxiolytic/antidepressant drug.

    PubMed

    Inta, Dragos; Filipovic, Dragana; Lima-Ojeda, Juan M; Dormann, Christof; Pfeiffer, Natascha; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gass, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Glutamatergic agents have been conceptualized as powerful, fast-acting alternatives to monoaminergic-based antidepressants. NMDA receptor antagonists such as ketamine or MK-801 are therapeutically effective, but their clinical use is hampered by psychotomimetic effects, accompanied by neurotoxicity in the retrosplenial and cingulate cortex. Antagonists of metabotropic mGlu5 receptors like MPEP elicit both robust antidepressant and anxiolytic effects; however, the underlying mechanisms are yet unknown. mGlu5 receptors closely interact with NMDA receptors, but whether MPEP induces neurotoxicity similar to NMDA receptor antagonists has not been elucidated. We show here using c-Fos brain mapping that MPEP administration results in a restricted activation of distinct stress-related brain areas, including the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), central nucleus of the amygdala, and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVNH), in a pattern similar to that induced by classical antidepressants and anxiolytics. Unlike the NMDA antagonist MK-801, MPEP does not injure the adult retrosplenial cortex, in which it fails to induce heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Moreover, MPEP does not elicit to the same extent as MK-801 apoptosis in cortical areas at perinatal stages, as revealed by caspase 3 expression. These data identify new cellular targets for the anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of MPEP, indicating also in addition that in contrast to MK-801, it lacks the cortical neurotoxicity associated with psychotomimetic side-effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Allosteric signaling through an mGlu2 and 5-HT2A heteromeric receptor complex and its potential contribution to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, José L.; Miranda-Azpiazu, Patricia; García-Bea, Aintzane; Younkin, Jason; Cui, Meng; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Ben-Ezra, Ariel; Voloudakis, Georgios; Fakira, Amanda K.; Baki, Lia; Ge, Yongchao; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Morón, José A.; Milligan, Graeme; López-Giménez, Juan F.; Robakis, Nikolaos K.; Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Meana, J. Javier; González-Maeso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) can form multiprotein complexes (heteromers), which can alter the pharmacology and functions of the constituent receptors. Previous findings demonstrated that the Gq/11-coupled serotonin 5-HT2A receptor and the Gi/o-coupled metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptor—GPCRs that are involved in signaling alterations associated with psychosis—assemble into a heteromeric complex in the mammalian brain. In single-cell experiments with various mutant versions of the mGlu2 receptor, we showed that stimulation of cells expressing mGlu2–5-HT2A heteromers with an mGlu2 agonist led to activation of Gq/11 proteins by the 5-HT2A receptors. For this crosstalk to occur, one of the mGlu2 subunits had to couple to Gi/o proteins, and we determined the relative location of the Gi/o-contacting subunit within the mGlu2 homodimer of the heteromeric complex. Additionally, mGlu2-dependent activation of Gq/11, but not Gi/o, was reduced in the frontal cortex of 5-HT2A knockout mice and was reduced in the frontal cortex of postmortem brains from schizophrenic patients. These findings offer structural insights into this important target in molecular psychiatry. PMID:26758213

  8. Tetrahydronaphthyridine and Dihydronaphthyridinone Ethers As Positive Allosteric Modulators of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGlu5)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Starting from an acetylene-based lead from high throughput screening, an evolved bicyclic dihydronaphthyridinone was identified. We describe further refinements leading to both dihydronaphthyridinone and tetrahydronaphthyridine mGlu5 PAMs containing an alkoxy-based linkage as an acetylene replacement. Exploration of several structural features including western pyridine ring isomers, positional amides, linker connectivity/position, and combinations thereof, reveal that these bicyclic modulators generally exhibit steep SAR and within specific subseries display a propensity for pharmacological mode switching at mGlu5 as well as antagonist activity at mGlu3. Structure–activity relationships within a dihydronaphthyridinone subseries uncovered 12c (VU0405372), a selective mGlu5 PAM with good in vitro potency, low glutamate fold-shift, acceptable DMPK properties, and in vivo efficacy in an amphetamine-based model of psychosis. PMID:24914612

  9. The mGlu5 receptor regulates extinction of cocaine-driven behaviours.

    PubMed

    Bird, Michael K; Lohmann, Peter; West, Billy; Brown, Robyn M; Kirchhoff, Jeppe; Raymond, Clarke R; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    There is extensive evidence implicating the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor in aspects of addiction-related behaviours. Here, we used a well-characterized line of mGlu5-deficient mice to further examine the role of this receptor in cocaine-driven behaviours. We confirmed the previously reported deficit in hippocampal long-term potentiation and associated spatial learning impairment. Despite a spatial learning deficit, mGlu5-deficient mice developed and maintained a conditioned place preference to cocaine, suggesting cocaine reward and Pavlovian conditioning are intact in these animals. Notably, however, mGlu5-deficient mice exhibited a marked deficit in the extinction of a cocaine-conditioned place preference compared to wild type littermates. Moreover, in a fixed ratio operant intravenous self-administration paradigm, both genotypes showed similar responding for cocaine over two different doses, while mGlu5-deficient mice displayed enhanced responding on a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, cue-induced drug-seeking after abstinence was exaggerated in mGlu5-deficient mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that while the mGlu5 receptor may be involved in mediating the rewarding effects of cocaine, it appears necessary for the extinction of cocaine-driven behaviours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Presynaptic Release-Regulating mGlu1 Receptors in Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consists of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor subtypes. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), where they preferentially mediate facilitatory signaling in neurones and glial cells, mainly by favoring phospholipase (PLC) translocation. Based on the literature so far available, group I Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are preferentially expressed at the postsynaptic side of chemical synapsis, where they participate in the progression of the chemical stimulus. Studies, however, have shown the presence of these receptors also at the presynaptic level, where they exert several functions, including the modulation of transmitter exocytosis. Presynaptic Group I mGluRs can be both autoreceptors regulating release of glutamate and heteroreceptors regulating the release of various transmitters, including GABA, dopamine, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. While the existence of presynaptic release-regulating mGlu5 receptors is largely recognized, the possibility that mGlu1 receptors also are present at this level has been a matter of discussion for a long time. A large body of evidence published in the last decade, however, supports this notion. This review aims at revisiting the data from in vitro studies concerning the existence and the role of release-regulating mGlu1 receptors presynaptically located in nerve terminals isolated from selected regions of the CNS. The functional interaction linking mGlu5 and mGlu1 receptor subtypes at nerve terminals and their relative contributions as modulators of central transmission will also be discussed. We apologize in advance for omission in our coverage of the existing literature. PMID:27630571

  11. Glial inhibitors influence the mRNA and protein levels of mGlu2/3, 5 and 7 receptors and potentiate the analgesic effects of their ligands in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Osikowicz, Maria; Skup, Malgorzata; Mika, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2009-12-15

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, which are present on neurons and glial cells, have been shown to play a role in neuropathic pain. The present study sought to investigate how the glial inhibitors minocycline and pentoxifylline alter the effect that chronic constriction injury (CCI) has on the expression of mGlu receptors and on their associated ligands. RT-PCR analysis revealed that seven days after CCI, the mRNA levels of glial markers C1q and GFAP, as well as those of mGlu5 and mGlu3, but not mGlu7, were elevated in the lumbar spinal cord - ipsilateral to the injury. The protein levels of the microglial marker OX42, the astroglial marker GFAP, and mGlu5 receptor protein were increased, whereas the levels of mGlu2/3 and mGlu7 receptor proteins were reduced. Preemptive and repeated intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (16 and 1h before nerve injury and then twice daily for seven days) of minocycline (30mg/kg) and pentoxifylline (20mg/kg) prevented the injury-induced changes in the levels of mGlu3 and mGlu5 receptor mRNAs and the injury-induced changes in the protein levels of all the receptors. Repeated administration of minocycline and pentoxifylline significantly attenuated CCI-induced allodynia (von Frey test) and hyperalgesia (cold plate test) measured on day seven after injury and potentiated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of single i.p. and intrathecal (i.t.) injections of mGlu receptor ligands: MPEP, LY379268 or AMN082. We conclude that attenuation of injury-induced glial activation can reduce glutamatergic activity, thereby contributing to regulation of pain sensation.

  12. Pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors causes a prolonged symptomatic benefit in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a genetic disorder characterized by severe ataxia associated with progressive loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. The mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptor plays a key role in mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum, and its dysfunction is linked to the pathophysiology of motor symptoms associated with SCA1. We used SCA1 heterozygous transgenic mice (Q154/Q2) as a model for testing the hypothesis that drugs that enhance mGlu1 receptor function may be good candidates for the medical treatment of SCA1. Results Symptomatic 30-week old SCA1 mice showed reduced mGlu1 receptor mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum. Interestingly, these mice also showed an intense expression of mGlu5 receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells, which normally lack these receptors. Systemic treatment of SCA1 mice with the mGlu1 receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), Ro0711401 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused a prolonged improvement of motor performance on the rotarod and the paw-print tests. A single injection of Ro0711401 improved motor symptoms for several days, and no tolerance developed to the drug. In contrast, the mGlu5 receptor PAM, VU0360172 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused only a short-lasting improvement of motor symptoms, whereas the mGlu1 receptor antagonist, JNJ16259685 (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), further impaired motor performance in SCA1 mice. The prolonged symptomatic benefit caused by Ro0711401 outlasted the time of drug clearance from the cerebellum, and was associated with neuroadaptive changes in the cerebellum, such as a striking reduction of the ectopically expressed mGlu5 receptors in Purkinje cells, increases in levels of total and Ser880-phosphorylated GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors, and changes in the length of spines in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. Conclusions These data demonstrate that pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 receptors causes a robust and sustained motor improvement in SCA

  13. Changes in mGlu5 receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and coupling to homer proteins in the hippocampus of Ube3A hemizygous mice modeling angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Marco; Piccinin, Sonia; Molinaro, Gemma; Di Menna, Luisa; Riozzi, Barbara; Cannella, Milena; Motolese, Marta; Vetere, Gisella; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Nisticò, Robert; Bruno, Valeria

    2014-03-26

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is caused by the loss of Ube3A, an ubiquitin ligase that commits specific proteins to proteasomal degradation. How this defect causes autism and other pathological phenotypes associated with AS is unknown. Long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synaptic transmission mediated by type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptors was enhanced in hippocampal slices of Ube3A(m-/p+) mice, which model AS. No changes were found in NMDA-dependent LTD induced by low-frequency stimulation. mGlu5 receptor-dependent LTD in AS mice was sensitive to the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, and relied on the same signaling pathways as in wild-type mice, e.g., the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycine pathway, and protein tyrosine phosphatase. Neither the stimulation of MAPK and PI3K nor the increase in Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) levels in response to mGlu5 receptor activation were abnormal in hippocampal slices from AS mice compared with wild-type mice. mGlu5 receptor expression and mGlu1/5 receptor-mediated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis were also unchanged in the hippocampus of AS mice. In contrast, AS mice showed a reduced expression of the short Homer protein isoform Homer 1a, and an increased coupling of mGlu5 receptors to Homer 1b/c proteins in the hippocampus. These findings support the link between Homer proteins and monogenic autism, and lay the groundwork for the use of mGlu5 receptor antagonists in AS.

  14. Dihydrothiazolopyridone Derivatives as a Novel Family of Positive Allosteric Modulators of the Metabotropic Glutamate 5 (mGlu5) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomé-Nebreda, José Manuel; Conde-Ceide, Susana; Delgado, Francisca; Iturrino, Laura; Pastor, Joaquín; Pena, Miguel Ángel; Trabanco, Andrés A.; Tresadern, Gary; Wassvik, Carola M.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Gogi, Kiran; Vinson, Paige N.; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Days, Emily; Weaver, C. David; Lindsley, Craig W.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Jones, Carrie K.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Rombouts, Frederik; Lavreysen, Hilde; Macdonald, Gregor J.; Mackie, Claire; Steckler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Starting from a singleton chromanone high throughput screening (HTS) hit, we describe a focused medicinal chemistry optimization effort leading to the identification of a novel series of phenoxymethyl-dihydrothiazolopyridone derivatives as selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor. These dihydrothiazolopyridones potentiate receptor responses in recombinant systems. In vitro and in vivo drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) evaluation allowed us to select compound 16a for its assessment in a preclinical animal screen of possible antipsychotic activity. 16a was able to reverse amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats in a dose-dependent manner without showing any significant motor impairment or overt neurological side effects at comparable doses. Evolution of our medicinal chemistry program, structure activity, and properties relationships (SAR and SPR) analysis as well as a detailed profile for optimized mGlu5 receptor PAM 16a are described. PMID:23947773

  15. Recent Advances in the Medicinal Chemistry of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 (mGlu1)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This Review summarizes the medicinal chemistry found in publications on both orthosteric and allosteric modulators of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1) from 2005 to the present. The time period covered by the scope of this current review has been particularly rich in mGlu1-related publications with numbers quadrupling when compared to the preceding five year period of 2000−2005. Publications in the field peaked in 2007 with over 35 articles appearing in the peer reviewed literature in the course of that year. Given that glutamate is one of the primary excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), it is unsurprising that it acts upon several receptors that are considered to be of potential therapeutic interest for many indications. Orthosteric and allosteric modulation of the receptor is possible, with a logical extrapolation to the chemotypes used for each strategy. The last five years of publications have yielded many mGlu1 selective antagonist chemotypyes, most of which have shown efficacy in pain in vivo models. However, the primary impact of these compounds has been to highlight the mechanistic safety risks of mGlu1 antagonism, independent of chemotype. As a review in medicinal chemistry, the primary focus of this paper will be on the design and, to a lesser degree, synthetic strategies for the delivery of subtype selective, CNS penetrant, druglike compounds through a “medchem” program, targeting modulators of the mGlu1 receptor. PMID:22860168

  16. Optical control of pain in vivo with a photoactive mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Font, Joan; López-Cano, Marc; Notartomaso, Serena; Scarselli, Pamela; Di Pietro, Paola; Bresolí-Obach, Roger; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Malhaire, Fanny; Rovira, Xavier; Catena, Juanlo; Giraldo, Jesús; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Goudet, Cyril; Nonell, Santi; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Llebaria, Amadeu; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-04-11

    Light-operated drugs constitute a major target in drug discovery, since they may provide spatiotemporal resolution for the treatment of complex diseases (i.e. chronic pain). JF-NP-26 is an inactive photocaged derivative of the metabotropic glutamate type 5 (mGlu5) receptor negative allosteric modulator raseglurant. Violet light illumination of JF-NP-26 induces a photochemical reaction prompting the active-drug's release, which effectively controls mGlu5 receptor activity both in ectopic expressing systems and in striatal primary neurons. Systemic administration in mice followed by local light-emitting diode (LED)-based illumination, either of the thalamus or the peripheral tissues, induced JF-NP-26-mediated light-dependent analgesia both in neuropathic and in acute/tonic inflammatory pain models. These data offer the first example of optical control of analgesia in vivo using a photocaged mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator. This approach shows potential for precisely targeting, in time and space, endogenous receptors, which may allow a better management of difficult-to-treat disorders.

  17. Optical control of pain in vivo with a photoactive mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator

    PubMed Central

    Font, Joan; López-Cano, Marc; Notartomaso, Serena; Scarselli, Pamela; Di Pietro, Paola; Bresolí-Obach, Roger; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Malhaire, Fanny; Rovira, Xavier; Catena, Juanlo; Giraldo, Jesús; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Goudet, Cyril; Nonell, Santi; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Llebaria, Amadeu; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Light-operated drugs constitute a major target in drug discovery, since they may provide spatiotemporal resolution for the treatment of complex diseases (i.e. chronic pain). JF-NP-26 is an inactive photocaged derivative of the metabotropic glutamate type 5 (mGlu5) receptor negative allosteric modulator raseglurant. Violet light illumination of JF-NP-26 induces a photochemical reaction prompting the active-drug’s release, which effectively controls mGlu5 receptor activity both in ectopic expressing systems and in striatal primary neurons. Systemic administration in mice followed by local light-emitting diode (LED)-based illumination, either of the thalamus or the peripheral tissues, induced JF-NP-26-mediated light-dependent analgesia both in neuropathic and in acute/tonic inflammatory pain models. These data offer the first example of optical control of analgesia in vivo using a photocaged mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator. This approach shows potential for precisely targeting, in time and space, endogenous receptors, which may allow a better management of difficult-to-treat disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23545.001 PMID:28395733

  18. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a is required for mGlu receptor dependent long-term depression in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mango, D; Braksator, E; Battaglia, G; Marcelli, S; Mercuri, N B; Feligioni, M; Nicoletti, F; Bashir, Z I; Nisticò, R

    2017-01-27

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), members of the degenerin/epithelial Na(+) channel superfamily, are widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system. ASIC1a is highly permeable to Ca(2+) and are thought to be important in a variety of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. To further understand the role of ASIC1a in synaptic transmission and plasticity, we investigated metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus. We found that ASIC1a channels mediate a component of LTD in P30-40 animals, since the ASIC1a selective blocker psalmotoxin-1 (PcTx1) reduced the magnitude of LTD induced by application of the group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or induced by paired-pulse low frequency stimulation (PP-LFS). Conversely, PcTx1 did not affect LTD in P13-18 animals. We also provide evidence that ASIC1a is involved in group I mGlu receptor-induced increase in action potential firing. However, blockade of ASIC1a did not affect DHPG-induced polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis, suggesting the involvement of some other molecular partners in the functional crosstalk between ASIC1a and group I mGlu receptors. Notably, PcTx1 was able to prevent the increase in GluA1 S845 phosphorylation at the post-synaptic membrane induced by group I mGlu receptor activation. These findings suggest a novel function of ASIC1a channels in the regulation of group I mGlu receptor synaptic plasticity and intrinsic excitability.

  19. Exploration of allosteric agonism structure-activity relationships within an acetylene series of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs): discovery of 5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)-N-(3-methyloxetan-3-yl)picolinamide (ML254).

    PubMed

    Turlington, Mark; Noetzel, Meredith J; Chun, Aspen; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D; Nguyen, Elizabeth D; Gregory, Karen J; Vinson, Paige N; Rook, Jerri M; Gogi, Kiran K; Xiang, Zixiu; Bridges, Thomas M; Daniels, J Scott; Jones, Carrie; Niswender, Colleen M; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W; Stauffer, Shaun R

    2013-10-24

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Both allosteric agonism and high glutamate fold-shift have been implicated in the neurotoxic profile of some mGlu5 PAMs; however, these hypotheses remain to be adequately addressed. To develop tool compounds to probe these hypotheses, the structure-activity relationship of allosteric agonism was examined within an acetylenic series of mGlu5 PAMs exhibiting allosteric agonism in addition to positive allosteric modulation (ago-PAMs). PAM 38t, a low glutamate fold-shift allosteric ligand (maximum fold-shift ~ 3.0), was selected as a potent PAM with no agonism in the in vitro system used for compound characterization and in two native electrophysiological systems using rat hippocampal slices. PAM 38t (ML254) will be useful to probe the relative contribution of cooperativity and allosteric agonism to the adverse effect liability and neurotoxicity associated with this class of mGlu5 PAMs.

  20. Exploration of Allosteric Agonism Structure-Activity Relationships within an Acetylene Series of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGlu5) Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): discovery of 5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)-N-(3-methyloxetan-3-yl)picolinamide (ML254)

    PubMed Central

    Turlington, Mark; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Chun, Aspen; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Nguyen, Elizabeth D.; Gregory, Karen J.; Vinson, Paige N.; Rook, Jerri M.; Gogi, Kiran K.; Xiang, Zixiu; Bridges, Thomas M.; Daniels, J. Scott; Jones, Carrie; Niswender, Colleen M.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Both allosteric agonism and high glutamate fold-shift have been implicated in the neurotoxic profile of some mGlu5 PAMs; however, these hypotheses remain to be adequately addressed. To develop tool compounds to probe these hypotheses, the structure-activity relationship of allosteric agonism was examined within an acetylenic series of mGlu5 PAMs exhibiting allosteric agonism in addition to positive allosteric modulation (ago-PAMs). PAM 38t, a low glutamate fold-shift allosteric ligand (maximum fold-shift ~3.0), was selected as a potent PAM with no agonism in the in vitro system used for compound characterization and in two native electrophysiological systems using rat hippocampal slices. PAM 38t (ML254) will be useful to probe the relative contribution of cooperativity and allosteric agonism to the adverse effect liability and neurotoxicity associated with this class of mGlu5 PAMs. PMID:24050755

  1. Distinct effects of mGlu4 receptor positive allosteric modulators at corticostriatal vs. striatopallidal synapses may differentially contribute to their antiparkinsonian action.

    PubMed

    Gubellini, Paolo; Melon, Christophe; Dale, Elena; Doller, Dario; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2014-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate 4 (mGlu4) receptor is a promising target for the treatment of motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). This is due in part to its localization at key basal ganglia (BG) synapses that become hyperactive in this pathology, particularly striatopallidal synapses. In this context, mGlu4 receptor activation using either orthosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) improves motor symptoms in rodent PD models in certain conditions. However, literature data show that mGlu4 receptor PAMs have no effect at striatopallidal GABAergic synapses (unless combined with an orthosteric agonist) and on the firing activity of pallidal neurons, and fail to provide significant motor improvement in relevant PD models. This questions the mechanistic hypothesis that mGlu4 receptor PAMs should act at striatopallidal synapses to alleviate PD motor symptoms. To shed light on this issue, we performed brain slice electrophysiology experiments. We show that Lu AF21934, an mGlu4 PAM small-molecule probe-compound, was ineffective at striatopallidal synapses at all concentrations tested, while it significantly inhibited corticostriatal synaptic transmission. Similarly, Lu AF21934 did not affect electrophysiology readouts at striatopallidal synapses in the presence of haloperidol or in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Interestingly, co-application of Lu AF21934 with a glutamate transporter inhibitor revealed a significant inhibitory action at striatopallidal synapses. Possibly, this effect could rely on increased level/permanence of glutamate in the synaptic cleft. Such differential efficacy of mGlu4 receptor PAMs at corticostriatal vs. striatopallidal synapses raises several issues regarding the synaptic target(s) of these drugs in the BG, and challenges the mechanisms by which they alleviate motor deficits in experimental PD models.

  2. Pharmacological enhancement of mGlu5 receptors rescues behavioral deficits in SHANK3 knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicidomini, Cinzia; Ponzoni, Luisa; Lim, Dmitry; Schmeisser, Michael; Reim, Dominik; Morello, Noemi; Orelanna, Daniel; Tozzi, Alessandro; Durante, Valentina; Scalmani, Paolo; Mantegazza, Massimo; Genazzani, Armando A.; Giustetto, Maurizio; Sala, Mariaelvina; Calabresi, Paolo; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Sala, Carlo; Verpelli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    SHANK3 (also called PROSAP2) genetic haploinsufficiency is thought to be the major cause of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS). PMS is a rare genetic disorder that causes a severe form of intellectual disability (ID), expressive language delays and other autistic features. Furthermore, a significant number of SHANK3 mutations have been identified in patients with Autism Spectrum disorders ASD, and SHANK3 truncating mutations are associated with moderate to profound ID. The Shank3 protein is a scaffold protein that is located in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory synapses and is crucial for synapse development and plasticity. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms associated with the ASD-like behaviors observed in Shank3Δ11-/- mice in which exon 11 has been deleted. Our results indicate that Shank3 is essential to mediating mGlu5 receptor signaling by recruiting Homer1b/c to the PSD, specifically in the striatum and cortex. Moreover, augmenting mGlu5 receptor activity by administering 3-Cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB) ameliorated the functional and behavioral defects that were observed in Shank3Δ11-/- mice, suggesting that pharmaceutical treatments that increase mGlu5 activity may represent a new approach for treating patients that are affected by PMS and SHANK3 mutations. PMID:27021819

  3. In the amygdala anxiolytic action of mGlu5 receptors antagonist MPEP involves neuropeptide Y but not GABAA signaling.

    PubMed

    Wierońska, Joanna M; Smiałowska, Maria; Brański, Piotr; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Kłodzińska, Aleksandra; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Pałucha, Agnieszka; Chojnacka-Wójcik, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej

    2004-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that inhibition of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor 5 produces anxiolytic-like effects in rodents. Peptide neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) produces an anxiolytic effect in rats after intraventricular or intra-amygdalar administration. Many classes of anxiolytic drugs exert their effect through the GABA-benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor complex. Therefore, in the present study we have investigated whether the anxiolytic action of MPEP (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridyne), an mGlu5 receptor antagonist, is mediated by a mechanism involving either the GABA-BZD receptor complex or NPY receptor. In the behavioral studies, the anxiolytic activity of MPEP (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was examined using plus-maze test. The BZD antagonist flumazenil (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was given to one group of rats and Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO 3304 (((R)-N-[[4-(aminocarbonylaminomethyl) phenyl] methyl]-N2-(diphenylacetyl)-argininamide trifluoroacetate)3304) (200 pmol/site, intra-amygdala) to the other. It was found that anxiolytic effects of MPEP were not changed by flumazenil, but were abolished by BIBO 3304. Immunohistochemical studies showed a high density of mGlu5 receptor immunoreactivity (IR) in the amygdala. The effect of MPEP on NPY expression in the amygdala was studied using immunohistochemistry (IH) and radioimmunoassay (RIA). Both methods showed a diminution of NPY IR expression, to about 43% (IH) or 81% (RIA) of the control level after multiple administrations, but we observed an increase up to 148% of the control after single MPEP administration. These effects may suggest a release of NPY from nerve terminals after MPEP administration. Our results indicate that the anxiolytic action of MPEP is conveyed through NPY neurons with the involvement of Y1 receptors in the amygdala and that BZD receptors do not significantly contribute to these effects.

  4. The inhibition of release by mGlu7 receptors is independent of the Ca2+ channel type but associated to GABAB and adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Martín, Ricardo; Ladera, Carolina; Bartolomé-Martín, David; Torres, Magdalena; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-09-01

    Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) through signalling pathways that are negatively coupled to Ca2+ channels and adenylyl cyclase. Through Ca2+ imaging and immunocytochemistry, we have recently shown that adenosine A1, GABAB and the metabotropic glutamate type 7 receptors coexist in a subset of cerebrocortical nerve terminals. As these receptors inhibit glutamate release through common intracellular signalling pathways, their co-activation occluded each other responses. Here we have addressed whether the occlusion of receptor responses is restricted to the glutamate release mediated by N-type Ca2+ channels by analysing this process in nerve terminals from mice lacking the alpha1B subunit (Cav 2.2) of these channels. We found that glutamate release from cerebrocortical nerve terminals without these channels, in which release relies exclusively on P/Q type Ca2+ channels, is not modulated by mGlu7 receptors. Furthermore, there is no occlusion of the release inhibition by GABAB and adenosine A1. Hence, in the cerebrocortical preparation, these three receptors only appear to coexist in N-type channel containing nerve terminals. In contrast, in hippocampal nerve terminals lacking this subunit, where mGlu7 receptors modulate glutamate release via P/Q type channels, the occlusion of inhibitory responses by co-stimulation of adenosine A1, GABAB and mGlu7 receptors was observed. Thus, occlusion of the responses by the three GPCRs is independent of the Ca2+ channel type but rather, it is associated to functional mGlu7 receptors.

  5. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like activity of the mGlu5 antagonist MTEP and the mGlu7 agonist AMN082 in the FST in rats.

    PubMed

    Pałucha-Poniewiera, Agnieszka; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Pilc, Andrzej

    2014-07-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressive patients. It has been proposed that these effects are related to changes in synaptogenesis in the mechanism involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Similar mechanisms have been proposed for a group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonist, LY341495. We aimed to investigate whether other mGlu receptor ligands that produce antidepressant-like effects, namely, the mGlu5 antagonist MTEP and the mGlu7 agonist AMN082, induce the activation of mTOR signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in rats. AMN082 administered 60 min before the test increased the levels of pmTOR and pp70S6K, and the mTORC1 antagonist rapamycin reversed AMN082-induced changes in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Furthermore, AMN082 administered 23 h before the decapitation of the rats increased the levels of synapsin I and GluR1, although it did not produce any effect in the FST at the same time point. However, MTEP induced a rapid but unsustained antidepressant-like effect, which was not related to the activation of the mTOR cascade. Finally, the antidepressant-like effects of MTEP or AMN082 were not antagonized by NBQX. In summary, the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP did not depend on the activation of mTOR signaling. However, we observed a unique feature of the mechanism of AMN082. The drug stimulated the mTOR signaling pathway and synaptic protein levels (like ketamine), while it did not induce a sustained antidepressant effect and its action was not directly dependent on AMPA receptor activation (as in classic antidepressants (ADs)).

  6. Lu AF21934, a positive allosteric modulator of mGlu4 receptors, reduces the harmaline-induced hyperactivity but not tremor in rats.

    PubMed

    Ossowska, Krystyna; Wardas, Jadwiga; Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Pilc, Andrzej; Zorn, Stevin H; Doller, Dario

    2014-08-01

    Harmaline induces tremor in animals resembling essential tremor which has been suggested to result from activation of the glutamatergic olivo-cerebellar projection. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of systemic administration of Lu AF21934, a brain-penetrating positive allosteric modulator of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4), on the harmaline-induced tremor and other forms of motor activity in rats using fully automated Force Plate Actimeters. The influence of harmaline on the mGlu4 mRNA expression in the cerebellum and inferior olive was analysed by in situ hybridization. Harmaline at a dose of 15 mg/kg (ip) triggered tremor which was manifested by an increase in the power within 9-15 Hz band and in the tremor index (a difference in power between bands 9-15 Hz and 0-8 Hz). Harmaline induced a biphasic effect on mobility, initially inhibiting the exploratory locomotor activity of rats (0-30 min after administration), followed by an increase in their basic activity. Lu AF21934 (0.5-5 mg/kg sc) did not influence tremor but at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg reversed harmaline-induced hyperactivity. MGlu4 mRNA expression was high in the cerebellar cortex and low in the inferior olive. Repeated harmaline (15 mg/kg ip once a day for 5 days] decreased mGlu4 mRNA in the cerebellum and inferior olive. The present study indicates that the mGlu4 stimulation counteracts hyperactivity induced by harmaline which suggests the involvement of cerebellar glutamatergic transmission in this process. In contrast, neuronal mechanisms involved in tremor seem to be insensitive to the stimulation of mGlu4.

  7. Involvement of GABAB Receptor Signaling in Antipsychotic-like Action of the Novel Orthosteric Agonist of the mGlu4 Receptor, LSP4-2022

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Monika; Acher, Francine; Marciniak, Marcin; Łasoń-Tyburkiewicz, Magdalena; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Considering that ligands of metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors may exert beneficial effects on schizophrenia, we assessed the actions of the first mGlu4-selective orthosteric agonist, LSP4-2022, in several tests reflecting positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Moreover, we investigated the possible involvement of GABAB receptors in LSP4-2022-induced actions. Hyperactivity induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches in mice were used as the models of positive symptoms. The social interaction test, modified forced swim test (FST), and novel object recognition (NOR) test were used as the models of negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. LSP4-2022 inhibited hyperactivity (in a dose-dependent manner, 0.5-2 mg/kg) induced by MK-801 or amphetamine and DOI-induced head twitches. In mGlu4 receptor knockout mice, LSP4-2022 was not effective. However, it reversed MK-801-induced impairment in the social interaction test and the MK-801-induced increase of immobility in the modified FST. In the NOR test, LSP4-2022 was active at a dose of 2 mg/kg. GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP55845 (10 mg/kg), reversed LSP4-2022-induced effects in hyperactivity and head twitch tests. At the same time, the simultaneous administration of subeffective doses of LSP4-2022 (0.1 mg/kg) and a positive allosteric modulator of GABAB receptor PAM, GS39783 (0.1 mg/kg), induced clear antipsychotic-like effects in those two tests. Such an interaction between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors was not observed in the social interaction and NOR tests. Therefore, we suggest that the activation of the mGlu4 receptor is a promising approach facilitating the discovery of novel antipsychotic drugs, and that the interplay between mGlu4 and GABAB receptors may become the basis for a novel therapy for schizophrenic patients with predomination of positive symptoms. PMID:26769224

  8. 5-HT(2A) and mGlu2 receptor binding levels are related to differences in impulsive behavior in the Roman Low- (RLA) and High- (RHA) avoidance rat strains.

    PubMed

    Klein, A B; Ultved, L; Adamsen, D; Santini, M A; Tobeña, A; Fernandez-Teruel, A; Flores, P; Moreno, M; Cardona, D; Knudsen, G M; Aznar, S; Mikkelsen, J D

    2014-03-28

    The Roman Low- and High-Avoidance rat strains (RLA-I vs RHA-I) have been bidirectionally selected and bred according to their performance in the two-way active avoidance response in the shuttle-box test. Numerous studies have reported a pronounced divergence in emotionality between the two rat strains including differences in novelty seeking, anxiety, stress coping, and susceptibility to addictive substances. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms behind these divergent phenotypes are not known. Here, we determined impulsivity using the 5-choice serial reaction time task and levels of serotonin transporter (SERT), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(1A) receptor binding using highly specific radioligands ((3)H-escitalopram, (3)H-MDL100907 and (3)H-WAY100635) and mGlu2/3 receptor binding ((3)H-LY341495) using receptor autoradiography in fronto-cortical sections from RLA-I (n=8) and RHA-I (n=8) male rats. In the more impulsive RHA-I rats, 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(1A) and SERT binding in the frontal cortex was significantly higher compared to RLA-I rats. In contrast, mGlu2/3 receptor binding was decreased by 40% in RHA-I rats compared to RLA-I rats. To differentiate between mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor protein levels, these were further studied using western blotting, which showed non-detectable levels of mGlu2 receptor protein in RHA rats, while no differences were observed for mGlu3 receptor protein levels. Collectively, these data show general congenital differences in the serotonergic system and a pronounced difference in mGlu2 receptor protein levels. We suggest that the differences in the serotonergic system may mediate some of the phenotypic characteristics in this strain such as hyper-impulsivity and susceptibility to drug addiction.

  9. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  10. Presynaptic inhibition upon CB1 or mGlu2/3 receptor activation requires ERK/MAPK phosphorylation of Munc18-1.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Sabine K; King, Cillian; Kortleven, Christian; Huson, Vincent; Kroon, Tim; Kevenaar, Josta T; Schut, Desiree; Saarloos, Ingrid; Hoetjes, Joost P; de Wit, Heidi; Stiedl, Oliver; Spijker, Sabine; Li, Ka Wan; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Cornelisse, Lennart Niels; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2016-06-01

    Presynaptic cannabinoid (CB1R) and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) regulate synaptic strength by inhibiting secretion. Here, we reveal a presynaptic inhibitory pathway activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) that mediates CB1R- and mGluR2/3-induced secretion inhibition. This pathway is triggered by a variety of events, from foot shock-induced stress to intense neuronal activity, and induces phosphorylation of the presynaptic protein Munc18-1. Mimicking constitutive phosphorylation of Munc18-1 results in a drastic decrease in synaptic transmission. ERK-mediated phosphorylation of Munc18-1 ultimately leads to degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Conversely, preventing ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation increases synaptic strength. CB1R- and mGluR2/3-induced synaptic inhibition and depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) are reduced upon ERK/MEK pathway inhibition and further reduced when ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation is blocked. Thus, ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation provides a major negative feedback loop to control synaptic strength upon activation of presynaptic receptors and during intense neuronal activity.

  11. Cellular distribution of AMPA receptor subunits and mGlu5 following acute and repeated administration of morphine or methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Herrold, Amy A; Persons, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2013-08-01

    Ionotropic AMPA receptors (AMPAR) and metabotropic glutamate group I subtype 5 receptors (mGlu5) mediate neuronal and behavioral effects of abused drugs. mGlu5 stimulation increases expression of striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase isoform 61 (STEP61 ) which internalizes AMPARs. We determined the rat brain profile of these proteins using two different classes of abused drugs, opiates, and stimulants. STEP61 levels, and cellular distribution/expression of AMPAR subunits (GluA1, GluA2) and mGlu5, were evaluated via a protein cross-linking assay in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and ventral pallidum (VP) harvested 1 day after acute, or fourteen days after repeated morphine (8 mg/kg) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg) (treatments producing behavioral sensitization). Acute morphine decreased GluA1 and GluA2 surface expression in mPFC and GluA1 in NAc. Fourteen days after repeated morphine or methamphetamine, mGlu5 surface expression increased in VP. In mPFC, mGlu5 were unaltered; however, after methamphetamine, STEP61 levels decreased and GluA2 surface expression increased. Pre-treatment with a mGlu5-selective negative allosteric modulator, blocked methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization and changes in mPFC GluA2 and STEP61 . These data reveal (i) region-specific distinctions in glutamate receptor trafficking between acute and repeated treatments of morphine and methamphetamine, and (ii) that mGlu5 is necessary for methamphetamine-induced alterations in mPFC GluA2 and STEP61 .

  12. Blocking Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 7 (mGlu7) via the Venus Flytrap Domain (VFTD) Inhibits Amygdala Plasticity, Stress, and Anxiety-related Behavior♦

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Christine E.; Peterlik, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Bouhelal, Rochdi; Kaupmann, Klemens; Laue, Grit; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Feuerbach, Dominik; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Ofner, Silvio; Cryan, John F.; van der Putten, Herman; Fendt, Markus; Vranesic, Ivo; Glatthar, Ralf; Flor, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) is an important presynaptic regulator of neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS. mGlu7 function has been linked to autism, drug abuse, anxiety, and depression. Despite this, it has been difficult to develop specific blockers of native mGlu7 signaling in relevant brain areas such as amygdala and limbic cortex. Here, we present the mGlu7-selective antagonist 7-hydroxy-3-(4-iodophenoxy)-4H-chromen-4-one (XAP044), which inhibits lateral amygdala long term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from wild type mice with a half-maximal blockade at 88 nm. There was no effect of XAP044 on LTP of mGlu7-deficient mice, indicating that this pharmacological effect is mGlu7-dependent. Unexpectedly and in contrast to all previous mGlu7-selective drugs, XAP044 does not act via the seven-transmembrane region but rather via a binding pocket localized in mGlu7's extracellular Venus flytrap domain, a region generally known for orthosteric agonist binding. This was shown by chimeric receptor studies in recombinant cell line assays. XAP044 demonstrates good brain exposure and wide spectrum anti-stress and antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like efficacy in rodent behavioral paradigms. XAP044 reduces freezing during acquisition of Pavlovian fear and reduces innate anxiety, which is consistent with the phenotypes of mGlu7-deficient mice, the results of mGlu7 siRNA knockdown studies, and the inhibition of amygdala LTP by XAP044. Thus, we present an mGlu7 antagonist with a novel molecular mode of pharmacological action, providing significant application potential in psychiatry. Modeling the selective interaction between XAP044 and mGlu7's Venus flytrap domain, whose three-dimensional structure is already known, will facilitate future drug development supported by computer-assisted drug design. PMID:24596089

  13. Blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) via the Venus flytrap domain (VFTD) inhibits amygdala plasticity, stress, and anxiety-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine E; Peterlik, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Bouhelal, Rochdi; Kaupmann, Klemens; Laue, Grit; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Feuerbach, Dominik; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Ofner, Silvio; Cryan, John F; van der Putten, Herman; Fendt, Markus; Vranesic, Ivo; Glatthar, Ralf; Flor, Peter J

    2014-04-18

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) is an important presynaptic regulator of neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS. mGlu7 function has been linked to autism, drug abuse, anxiety, and depression. Despite this, it has been difficult to develop specific blockers of native mGlu7 signaling in relevant brain areas such as amygdala and limbic cortex. Here, we present the mGlu7-selective antagonist 7-hydroxy-3-(4-iodophenoxy)-4H-chromen-4-one (XAP044), which inhibits lateral amygdala long term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from wild type mice with a half-maximal blockade at 88 nm. There was no effect of XAP044 on LTP of mGlu7-deficient mice, indicating that this pharmacological effect is mGlu7-dependent. Unexpectedly and in contrast to all previous mGlu7-selective drugs, XAP044 does not act via the seven-transmembrane region but rather via a binding pocket localized in mGlu7's extracellular Venus flytrap domain, a region generally known for orthosteric agonist binding. This was shown by chimeric receptor studies in recombinant cell line assays. XAP044 demonstrates good brain exposure and wide spectrum anti-stress and antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like efficacy in rodent behavioral paradigms. XAP044 reduces freezing during acquisition of Pavlovian fear and reduces innate anxiety, which is consistent with the phenotypes of mGlu7-deficient mice, the results of mGlu7 siRNA knockdown studies, and the inhibition of amygdala LTP by XAP044. Thus, we present an mGlu7 antagonist with a novel molecular mode of pharmacological action, providing significant application potential in psychiatry. Modeling the selective interaction between XAP044 and mGlu7's Venus flytrap domain, whose three-dimensional structure is already known, will facilitate future drug development supported by computer-assisted drug design.

  14. Synthesis and Pharmacological Characterization of C4-(Thiotriazolyl)-substituted-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylates. Identification of (1R,2S,4R,5R,6R)-2-Amino-4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ylsulfanyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic Acid (LY2812223), a Highly Potent, Functionally Selective mGlu2 Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Monn, James A; Prieto, Lourdes; Taboada, Lorena; Hao, Junliang; Reinhard, Matthew R; Henry, Steven S; Beadle, Christopher D; Walton, Lesley; Man, Teresa; Rudyk, Helene; Clark, Barry; Tupper, David; Baker, S Richard; Lamas, Carlos; Montero, Carlos; Marcos, Alicia; Blanco, Jaime; Bures, Mark; Clawson, David K; Atwell, Shane; Lu, Frances; Wang, Jing; Russell, Marijane; Heinz, Beverly A; Wang, Xushan; Carter, Joan H; Getman, Brian G; Catlow, John T; Swanson, Steven; Johnson, Bryan G; Shaw, David B; McKinzie, David L

    2015-09-24

    Identification of orthosteric mGlu(2/3) receptor agonists capable of discriminating between individual mGlu2 and mGlu3 subtypes has been highly challenging owing to the glutamate-site sequence homology between these proteins. Herein we detail the preparation and characterization of a series of molecules related to (1S,2S,5R,6S)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylate 1 (LY354740) bearing C4-thiotriazole substituents. On the basis of second messenger responses in cells expressing other recombinant human mGlu2/3 subtypes, a number of high potency and efficacy mGlu2 receptor agonists exhibiting low potency mGlu3 partial agonist/antagonist activity were identified. From this, (1R,2S,4R,5R,6R)-2-amino-4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ylsulfanyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid 14a (LY2812223) was further characterized. Cocrystallization of 14a with the amino terminal domains of hmGlu2 and hmGlu3 combined with site-directed mutation studies has clarified the underlying molecular basis of this unique pharmacology. Evaluation of 14a in a rat model responsive to mGlu2 receptor activation coupled with a measure of central drug disposition provides evidence that this molecule engages and activates central mGlu2 receptors in vivo.

  15. The effect of the mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator MTEP and NMDA receptor partial agonist D-cycloserine on Pavlovian conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Handford, Charlotte E; Tan, Shawn; Lawrence, Andrew J; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor are critical for processes underlying synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation. mGlu5 signaling increases neuronal excitability and potentiates NMDA receptor currents in the amygdala and the hippocampus. The present study examined the involvement of mGlu5 in the acquisition and consolidation of conditioned fear to a tone and context in mice, and explored the functional relationship between mGlu5 and NMDA receptors in this regard. Experiment 1 showed that systemic administration of the mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP) prior to conditioning significantly attenuated cue-elicited freezing during fear conditioning, which suggests that mGlu5 is necessary for the formation of a tone-shock association. This effect was dose-related (Experiment 2) and not due to any effects of MTEP on shock sensitivity or state-dependency (Experiment 3). Post-conditioning injection of MTEP had no effects (Experiment 4). Although post-conditioning injection of the NMDA receptor partial agonist D-cycloserine (DCS) alone facilitated consolidation of conditioned fear (Experiment 6), it was not able to rescue the acquisition deficit caused by MTEP (Experiment 5). Taken together, these findings indicate a crucial role for mGlu5 signaling in acquisition and NMDA receptor signaling in consolidation of conditioned fear.

  16. The Role of mGlu Receptors in Hippocampal Plasticity Deficits in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders: Implications for Allosteric Modulators as Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Senter, Rebecca K.; Ghoshal, Ayan; Walker, Adam G.; Xiang, Zixiu; Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are two distinct forms of synaptic plasticity that have been extensively characterized at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 (SC-CA1) synapse and the mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapse within the hippocampus, and are postulated to be the molecular underpinning for several cognitive functions. Deficits in LTP and LTD have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Therefore, there has been a large effort focused on developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying these forms of plasticity and novel therapeutic strategies that improve or rescue these plasticity deficits. Among many other targets, the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors show promise as novel therapeutic candidates for the treatment of these disorders. Among the eight distinct mGlu receptor subtypes (mGlu1-8), the mGlu1,2,3,5,7 subtypes are expressed throughout the hippocampus and have been shown to play important roles in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in this brain area. However, development of therapeutic agents that target these mGlu receptors has been hampered by a lack of subtype-selective compounds. Recently, discovery of allosteric modulators of mGlu receptors has provided novel ligands that are highly selective for individual mGlu receptor subtypes. The mGlu receptors modulate the multiple forms of synaptic plasticity at both SC-CA1 and MF synapses and allosteric modulators of mGlu receptors have emerged as potential therapeutic agents that may rescue plasticity deficits and improve cognitive function in patients suffering from multiple neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27296640

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5, mediates enhancements of hippocampal long-term potentiation after environmental enrichment in young and old mice.

    PubMed

    Buschler, Arne; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2017-03-15

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor, mGlu5, is of particular relevance for hippocampal function. It is critically required for the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), regulates neuronal oscillations, maintains the stability of place fields and is required for hippocampus-dependent memory. MGlu5-dysfunctions are associated with profound cognitive deficits in humans, and mGlu5 has been targeted as a putative cognitive enhancer. Cognitive enhancement, by means of environmental enrichment (EE) in rodents, results in improved hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory. Here, we explored whether mGlu5 contributes to these enhancements. MGlu5-antagonism dose-dependently impaired the early phase of LTP (>4 h) in the CA1 region of young(3-4 month old) mice. Late-LTP (>24 h) was also impaired. LTP (>24 h) elicited in old (10-14 month old) mice displayed reduced sensitivity to mGlu5 antagonism. Short-term potentiation (STP, < 2 h) that was elicited by weaker afferent stimulation was unaffected by mGlu5-antagonism in both age-groups. EE significantly amplified STP (<2 h) in old and young animals, but did not increase the duration of synaptic potentiation, or promote induction of LTP. The improvement in STP was prevented by mGlu5-antagonism, in both young and old animals. These results indicate that modifications of the synapse that underlie improvements of LTP by EE require the contribution of mGlu5. Strikingly, although LTP in old mice does not critically depend on mGlu5, improvements in synaptic potentiation resulting from EE are mGlu5-dependent in old mice. Regarded in light of the known role for mGlu5 in hippocampal function and pathophysiology, these data suggest that mGlu5 regulation of synaptic information storage is pivotal to optimal hippocampal function. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors, 5 years on'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and influence of cys407* Grm2 mutation in Hannover-derived Wistar rats: mGlu2 receptor loss links to alcohol intake, risk taking and emotional behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wood, Christian M; Nicolas, Celine S; Choi, Sun-Lim; Roman, Erika; Nylander, Ingrid; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; de Jong, Trynke R; Colombo, Giancarlo; Chastagnier, Denis; Wafford, Keith A; Collingridge, Graham L; Wildt, Sheryl J; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; Robinson, Emma S J; Lodge, David

    2017-03-15

    Modulation of metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptor function has huge potential for treating psychiatric and neurological diseases. Development of drugs acting on mGlu2 receptors depends on the development and use of translatable animal models of disease. We report here a stop codon mutation at cysteine 407 in Grm2 (cys407*) that is common in some Wistar rats. Therefore, researchers in this field need to be aware of strains with this mutation. Our genotypic survey found widespread prevalence of the mutation in commercial Wistar strains, particularly those known as Han Wistar. Such Han Wistar rats are ideal for research into the separate roles of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors in CNS function. Previous investigations, unknowingly using such mGlu2 receptor-lacking rats, provide insights into the role of mGlu2 receptors in behaviour. The Grm2 mutant rats, which dominate some selectively bred lines, display characteristics of altered emotionality, impulsivity and risk-related behaviours and increased voluntary alcohol intake compared with their mGlu2 receptor-competent counterparts. In addition, the data further emphasize the potential therapeutic role of mGlu2 receptors in psychiatric and neurological disease, and indicate novel methods of studying the role of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors, 5 years on'. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Maternal influenza viral infection causes schizophrenia-like alterations of 5-HT2A and mGlu2 receptors in the adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, José L.; Kurita, Mitsumasa; Holloway, Terrell; López, Javier; Cadagan, Richard; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; García-Sastre, Adolfo; González-Maeso, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that maternal influenza viral infection increases the risk for schizophrenia in the adult offspring. The serotonin and glutamate systems are suspected in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The effects of hallucinogens, such as psilocybin and mescaline, require the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor, and induce schizophrenia-like psychosis in humans. In addition, metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu2/3 agonists show promise as a new treatment for schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the level of expression and behavioral function of 5-HT2A and mGlu2 receptors in a mouse model of maternal influenza viral infection. We show that spontaneous locomotor activity is diminished by maternal infection with the mouse-adapted influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. The behavioral responses to hallucinogens and glutamate antipsychotics are both affected by maternal exposure to influenza virus, with increased head-twitch response to hallucinogens and diminished antipsychotic-like effect of the glutamate agonist. In frontal cortex of mice born to influenza virus-infected mothers, the 5-HT2A receptor is up-regulated and the mGlu2 receptor is down-regulated, an alteration that may be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Additionally, we find that the cortical 5-HT2A receptor-dependent signaling pathways are significantly altered in the offspring of infected mothers, showing higher c-fos, egr-1 and egr-2 expression in response to the hallucinogenic drug DOI. Identifying a biochemical alteration that parallels the behavioral changes observed in a mouse model of prenatal viral infection may facilitate targeting therapies for treatment and prevention of schizophrenia. PMID:21289196

  20. Triazolopyridine ethers as potent, orally active mGlu2 positive allosteric modulators for treating schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Mendi A; Marcin, Lawrence R; Christopher Zusi, F; Gentles, Robert; Ding, Min; Pearce, Bradley C; Easton, Amy; Kostich, Walter A; Seager, Matthew A; Bourin, Clotilde; Bristow, Linda J; Johnson, Kim A; Miller, Regina; Hogan, John; Whiterock, Valerie; Gulianello, Michael; Ferrante, Meredith; Huang, Yanling; Hendricson, Adam; Alt, Andrew; Macor, John E; Bronson, Joanne J

    2017-01-15

    Triazolopyridine ethers with mGlu2 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) activity are disclosed. The synthesis, in vitro activity, and metabolic stability data for a series of analogs is provided. The effort resulted in the discovery of a potent, selective, and brain penetrant lead molecule BMT-133218 ((+)-7m). After oral administration at 10mg/kg, BMT-133218 demonstrated full reversal of PCP-stimulated locomotor activity and prevented MK-801-induced working memory deficits in separate mouse models. Also, reversal of impairments in executive function were observed in rat set-shifting studies at 3 and 10mg/kg (p.o.). Extensive plasma protein binding as the result of high lipophilicity likely limited activity at lower doses. Optimized triazolopyridine ethers offer utility as mGlu2 PAMs for the treatment of schizophrenia and merit further preclinical investigation.

  1. Cocaine self-administration, extinction training and drug-induced relapse change metabotropic glutamate mGlu5 receptors expression: Evidence from radioligand binding and immunohistochemistry assays.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamiolo, Lucyna; Miszkiel, Joanna; Frankowska, Malgorzata; Bystrowska, Beata; Filip, Malgorzata

    2017-01-15

    Several behavioral findings highlight the importance of glutamatergic transmission and its metabotropic receptor type 5 (mGlu5) in the controlling of cocaine reward and seeking behaviors. The molecular or neurochemical nature of such interactions is not well recognized, so in the present paper we determine if cocaine self-administration and extinction/reinstatement models with the yoked triad control procedure alter mGlu5 receptor density in rats. [³H]MPEP was used to evaluate mGlu5 receptors density and affinity in selected brain structures, while immunofluorescence analysis was used to detect changes in mGlu5 receptors' brain location. Cocaine self-administration and yoked cocaine delivery evoked a significant elevation in mGlu5 receptors' density in the dorsal striatum, while receptor protein expression was importantly elevated in the substantia nigra and reduced in the nucleus accumbens shell. Cocaine administration followed by 10 extinction training sessions resulted in biphasic mGlu5 receptor density changes in the prefrontal cortex-nucleus accumbens pathway. mGlu5 receptors' up-regulation was noted for cocaine self-administration and extinction training in the hippocampus and in yoked cocaine controls following drug abstinence in the dorsal striatum. A cocaine priming dose (but not a saline priming) resulted in a significant decrease of mGlu5 receptors' density in the nucleus accumbens of rats previously treated with the drug and in the hippocampus of rats previously self-administered cocaine. The latter decrease in mGlu5 receptors' density and protein expression in the hippocampus was parallel to an increase in [³H]MPEP affinity and opposite to a rise observed after single cocaine administration (ip) to drug-naïve yoked saline controls. Additionally, we also observed a significant elevation in the protein expression of the tested receptors in the limbic cortex in both cocaine groups. The present results shown modality dependent and brain-region specific

  2. Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 7 Is Required for Induction of Long-Term Potentiation at SC-CA1 Synapses in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Klar, Rebecca; Walker, Adam G.; Ghose, Dipanwita; Grueter, Brad A.; Engers, Darren W.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Xiang, Zixiu

    2015-01-01

    Of the eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes, only mGlu7 is expressed presynaptically at the Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapse in the hippocampus in adult animals. Coupled with the inhibitory effects of Group III mGlu receptor agonists on transmission at this synapse, mGlu7 is thought to be the predominant autoreceptor responsible for regulating glutamate release at SC terminals. However, the lack of mGlu7-selective pharmacological tools has hampered direct testing of this hypothesis. We used a novel, selective mGlu7-negative allosteric modulator (NAM), ADX71743, and a newly described Group III mGlu receptor agonist, LSP4-2022, to elucidate the role of mGlu7 in modulating transmission in hippocampal area CA1 in adult C57BL/6J male mice. Interestingly, although mGlu7 agonists inhibit SC-CA1 EPSPs, we found no evidence for activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of SC-CA1 afferents. However, LSP4-2022 also reduced evoked monosynaptic IPSCs in CA1 pyramidal cells and, in contrast to its effect on SC-CA1 EPSPs, ADX71743 reversed the ability of high-frequency stimulation of SC afferents to reduce IPSC amplitudes. Furthermore, blockade of mGlu7 prevented induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse and activation of mGlu7 potentiated submaximal LTP. Together, these data suggest that mGlu7 serves as a heteroreceptor at inhibitory synapses in area CA1 and that the predominant effect of activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of glutamatergic afferents is disinhibition, rather than reduced excitatory transmission. Furthermore, this mGlu7-mediated disinhibition is required for induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse, suggesting that mGlu7 could serve as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of cognitive disorders. PMID:25972184

  3. Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 7 Is Required for Induction of Long-Term Potentiation at SC-CA1 Synapses in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Klar, Rebecca; Walker, Adam G; Ghose, Dipanwita; Grueter, Brad A; Engers, Darren W; Hopkins, Corey R; Lindsley, Craig W; Xiang, Zixiu; Conn, P Jeffrey; Niswender, Colleen M

    2015-05-13

    Of the eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes, only mGlu7 is expressed presynaptically at the Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapse in the hippocampus in adult animals. Coupled with the inhibitory effects of Group III mGlu receptor agonists on transmission at this synapse, mGlu7 is thought to be the predominant autoreceptor responsible for regulating glutamate release at SC terminals. However, the lack of mGlu7-selective pharmacological tools has hampered direct testing of this hypothesis. We used a novel, selective mGlu7-negative allosteric modulator (NAM), ADX71743, and a newly described Group III mGlu receptor agonist, LSP4-2022, to elucidate the role of mGlu7 in modulating transmission in hippocampal area CA1 in adult C57BL/6J male mice. Interestingly, although mGlu7 agonists inhibit SC-CA1 EPSPs, we found no evidence for activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of SC-CA1 afferents. However, LSP4-2022 also reduced evoked monosynaptic IPSCs in CA1 pyramidal cells and, in contrast to its effect on SC-CA1 EPSPs, ADX71743 reversed the ability of high-frequency stimulation of SC afferents to reduce IPSC amplitudes. Furthermore, blockade of mGlu7 prevented induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse and activation of mGlu7 potentiated submaximal LTP. Together, these data suggest that mGlu7 serves as a heteroreceptor at inhibitory synapses in area CA1 and that the predominant effect of activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of glutamatergic afferents is disinhibition, rather than reduced excitatory transmission. Furthermore, this mGlu7-mediated disinhibition is required for induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse, suggesting that mGlu7 could serve as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of cognitive disorders.

  4. Effect of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist on depressive behavior induced by withdrawal from chronic treatment with methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Michihiko; Koike, Hiroyuki; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2013-06-01

    Withdrawal from chronic treatment with a psychostimulant precipitates behavioral and physiological conditions similar to the symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD). Accumulated studies have indicated that withdrawal from a psychostimulant in rodents elicits depressive phenotypes including despair and anhedonia. Recently, the modulation of the group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptor has been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach to MDD. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495, on the depressive behavior induced by withdrawal from chronic treatment with a psychostimulant, methamphetamine (MAP) (5.0mg/kg/day×5 days). The rats were then tested for depressive behavior using the forced swimming test. Withdrawal from chronic treatment with MAP increased the immobility time during the forced swimming test, indicating increased depressive behavior. Systemically administered LY341495 counteracted the depressive behavior induced by withdrawal from chronic treatment with MAP. Moreover, we found that the microinjection of LY341495 into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) also counteracted the increase in the immobility time caused by withdrawal from chronic treatment with MAP. Taken together, the present results suggested that the blockade of the mGlu2/3 receptor may prevent the depressive symptoms induced by withdrawal from a psychostimulant and that the blockade of the mGlu2/3 receptor in the NAc may contribute to the antidepressant-like effects of the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist in this test.

  5. Role of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor, mGlu1, in Melanoma Development.

    PubMed

    Wangari-Talbot, Janet; Goydos, James; Chen, Suzie

    2010-08-26

    Melanoma remains one of the cancers for which a decline in morbidity has not been achieved with current scientific and medical advances. Mono-therapies targeting melanoma have been largely ineffective, increasing the need for identification of new drugable targets. Multiple tumor suppressors and oncogenes that impart genetic predisposition to melanoma have been identified and are being studied in an attempt to provide insight on the development of anti-melanoma therapies. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor I (GRM1) has recently been implicated as a novel oncogene involved in melanomagenesis. GRM1 (mGlu1, protein) belongs to the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) super family and is normally functional in the central nervous system. Our group showed in a transgenic mouse model system that ectopic expression of Grm1 in melanocytes is sufficient to induce spontaneous melanoma development in vivo. GPCRs are some of the most important therapeutic drug targets discovered to date and they make up a significant proportion of existing therapies. This super family of transmembrane receptors has wide spread expression and interacts with a diverse array of ligands. Diverse physiological responses can be induced by stimulator(s) or suppressor(s) of GPCRs, which contributes to their attractiveness in existing and emerging therapies. GPCR targeting therapies are employed against a variety of human disorders including those of the central nervous system, cardiovascular, metabolic, urogenital and respiratory systems. In the current review, we will discuss how the identification of the oncogenic properties of GRM1 opens up new strategies for the design of potential novel therapies for the treatment of melanoma.

  6. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor, mGlu5, Is Required for Extinction Learning That Occurs in the Absence of a Context Change

    PubMed Central

    André, Marion Agnes Emma; Güntürkün, Onur; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors and, in particular, mGlu5 are crucially involved in multiple forms of synaptic plasticity that are believed to underlie explicit memory. MGlu5 is also required for information transfer through neuronal oscillations and for spatial memory. Furthermore, mGlu5 is involved in extinction of implicit forms of learning. This places this receptor in a unique position with regard to information encoding. Here, we explored the role of this receptor in context-dependent extinction learning under constant, or changed, contextual conditions. Animals were trained over 3 days to take a left turn under 25% reward probability in a T-maze with a distinct floor pattern (Context A). On Day 4, they experienced either a floor pattern change (Context B) or the same floor pattern (Context A) in the absence of reward. After acquisition of the task, the animals were returned to the maze once more on Day 5 (Context A, no reward). Treatment with the mGlu5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine, before maze exposure on Day 4 completely inhibited extinction learning in the AAA paradigm but had no effect in the ABA paradigm. A subsequent return to the original context (A, on Day 5) revealed successful extinction in the AAA paradigm, but impairment of extinction in the ABA paradigm. These data support that although extinction learning in a new context is unaffected by mGlu5 antagonism, extinction of the consolidated context is impaired. This suggests that mGlu5 is intrinsically involved in enabling learning that once-relevant information is no longer valid. © 2014 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25160592

  7. The metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5, is required for extinction learning that occurs in the absence of a context change.

    PubMed

    André, Marion Agnes Emma; Güntürkün, Onur; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-02-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors and, in particular, mGlu5 are crucially involved in multiple forms of synaptic plasticity that are believed to underlie explicit memory. MGlu5 is also required for information transfer through neuronal oscillations and for spatial memory. Furthermore, mGlu5 is involved in extinction of implicit forms of learning. This places this receptor in a unique position with regard to information encoding. Here, we explored the role of this receptor in context-dependent extinction learning under constant, or changed, contextual conditions. Animals were trained over 3 days to take a left turn under 25% reward probability in a T-maze with a distinct floor pattern (Context A). On Day 4, they experienced either a floor pattern change (Context B) or the same floor pattern (Context A) in the absence of reward. After acquisition of the task, the animals were returned to the maze once more on Day 5 (Context A, no reward). Treatment with the mGlu5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine, before maze exposure on Day 4 completely inhibited extinction learning in the AAA paradigm but had no effect in the ABA paradigm. A subsequent return to the original context (A, on Day 5) revealed successful extinction in the AAA paradigm, but impairment of extinction in the ABA paradigm. These data support that although extinction learning in a new context is unaffected by mGlu5 antagonism, extinction of the consolidated context is impaired. This suggests that mGlu5 is intrinsically involved in enabling learning that once-relevant information is no longer valid.

  8. Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Potentiates Heteromeric Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wetherington, Jonathon; Shaw, Renee; Serrano, Geidy; Swanger, Sharon; Dingledine, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs), a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors, are widely expressed in the central nervous system and are critically involved in synaptic transmission. KAR activation is influenced by metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu) signaling, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. We undertook studies to examine how mGlu modulation affects activation of KARs. Confocal immunohistochemistry of rat hippocampus and cultured rat cortex revealed colocalization of the high-affinity KAR subunits with group I mGlu receptors. In hippocampal and cortical cultures, the calcium signal caused by activation of native KARs was potentiated by activation of group I mGlu receptors. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, activation of group I mGlu receptors potentiated heteromeric but not homomeric KAR-mediated currents, with no change in agonist potency. The potentiation of heteromeric KARs by mGlu1 activation was attenuated by GDPβS, blocked by an inhibitor of phospholipase C or the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), prolonged by the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, but unaffected by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lavendustin A. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition reduced the potentiation by mGlu1 of GluK2/GluK5, and conversely, direct activation of PKC by phorbol 12-myristate,13-acetate potentiated GluK2/GluK5. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified three serines (Ser833, Ser836, and Ser840) within the membrane proximal region of the GluK5 C-terminal domain that, in combination, are required for mGlu1-mediated potentiation of KARs. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of key residues in the C-terminal domain changes the overall charge of this domain, resulting in potentiated agonist responses. PMID:23066089

  9. Insight into the function of Group I and Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors: behavioural characterization and implications for the treatment of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Spooren, W; Ballard, T; Gasparini, F; Amalric, M; Mutel, V; Schreiber, R

    2003-07-01

    Following the molecular cloning in the early 1990s of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1-8), research that focused on the physiology, pharmacology and function of these receptors revealed their potential role in CNS disorders. Numerous psychiatric and neurological dis-orders are indeed linked to changes in excitatory processes, in which glutamate plays a key role. In contrast to ligand-gated ion channels [N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate], which are responsible for fast excitatory transmission, mGlu receptors have a more modulatory role, by contributing to fine-tuning of synaptic efficacy, and control of the accuracy and sharpness of the transmission. Given the fact that the mGlu receptors are G-protein coupled, they obviously constitute new 'drugable' targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. Due to the recent emergence of subtype-specific ligands for Group I and II mGlu receptors, this review will concentrate on the molecular characteristics, brain localization, pharmacology and physiological role of these receptors, in order to provide further insights into their therapeutic potential.

  10. A novel form of low frequency hippocampal mossy fiber plasticity induced by bimodal mGlu1 receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Frausto, Shanti F.; Ito, Koichi; Marszalec, William; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mossy fiber synapses act as the critical mediators of highly dynamic communication between hippocampal granule cells in the dentate gyrus and CA3 pyramidal neurons. Excitatory synaptic strength at mossy fiber to CA3 pyramidal cell synapses is potentiated rapidly and reversibly by brief trains of low frequency stimulation of mossy fiber axons. We show that slight modifications to the pattern of stimulation convert this short-term potentiation into prolonged synaptic strengthening lasting tens of minutes in rodent hippocampal slices. This low-frequency potentiation of mossy fiber EPSCs (mf-LFP) requires postsynaptic mGlu1 receptors for induction but is expressed presynaptically as an increased release probability, and therefore impacts both AMPA and NMDA components of the mossy fiber EPSC. A non-conventional signaling pathway initiated by mGlu1 receptors contributes to induction of plasticity, because EPSC potentiation was prevented by a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and only partially reduced by GDPβS. A slowly reversible state of enhanced synaptic efficacy could serve as a mechanism for altering the integrative properties of this synapse within a relatively broad temporal window. PMID:22114260

  11. Upregulation of mGlu2 receptors via NF-κB p65 acetylation is involved in the Proneurogenic and antidepressant effects of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Cuccurazzu, Bruna; Bortolotto, Valeria; Valente, Maria Maddalena; Ubezio, Federica; Koverech, Aleardo; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Grilli, Mariagrazia

    2013-10-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring molecule with an important role in cellular bioenergetics and as donor of acetyl groups to proteins, including NF-κB p65. In humans, exogenously administered ALC has been shown to be effective in mood disturbances, with a good tolerability profile. No current information is available on the antidepressant effect of ALC in animal models of depression and on the putative mechanism involved in such effect. Here we report that ALC is a proneurogenic molecule, whose effect on neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitors is independent of its neuroprotective activity. The in vitro proneurogenic effects of ALC appear to be mediated by activation of the NF-κB pathway, and in particular by p65 acetylation, and subsequent NF-κB-mediated upregulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGlu2) expression. When tested in vivo, chronic ALC treatment could revert depressive-like behavior caused by unpredictable chronic mild stress, a rodent model of depression with high face validity and predictivity, and its behavioral effect correlated with upregulated expression of mGlu2 receptor in hippocampi of stressed mice. Moreover, chronic, but not acute or subchronic, drug treatment significantly increased adult born neurons in hippocampi of stressed and unstressed mice. We now propose that this mechanism could be potentially involved in the antidepressant effect of ALC in humans. These results are potentially relevant from a clinical perspective, as for its high tolerability profile ALC may be ideally employed in patient subpopulations who are sensitive to the side effects associated with classical antidepressants.

  12. Functional impact of allosteric agonist activity of selective positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 in regulating central nervous system function.

    PubMed

    Noetzel, Meredith J; Rook, Jerri M; Vinson, Paige N; Cho, Hyekyung P; Days, Emily; Zhou, Y; Rodriguez, Alice L; Lavreysen, Hilde; Stauffer, Shaun R; Niswender, Colleen M; Xiang, Zixiu; Daniels, J Scott; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W; Weaver, C David; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu(5)) have emerged as an exciting new approach for the treatment of schizophrenia and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Of interest, some mGlu(5) PAMs act as pure PAMs, only potentiating mGlu(5) responses to glutamate whereas others [allosteric agonists coupled with PAM activity (ago-PAMs)] potentiate responses to glutamate and have intrinsic allosteric agonist activity in mGlu(5)-expressing cell lines. All mGlu(5) PAMs previously shown to have efficacy in animal models act as ago-PAMs in cell lines, raising the possibility that allosteric agonist activity is critical for in vivo efficacy. We have now optimized novel mGlu(5) pure PAMs that are devoid of detectable agonist activity and structurally related mGlu(5) ago-PAMs that activate mGlu(5) alone in cell lines. Studies of mGlu(5) PAMs in cell lines revealed that ago-PAM activity is dependent on levels of mGlu(5) receptor expression in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, whereas PAM potency is relatively unaffected by levels of receptor expression. Furthermore, ago-PAMs have no agonist activity in the native systems tested, including cortical astrocytes and subthalamic nucleus neurons and in measures of long-term depression at the hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse. Finally, studies with pure PAMs and ago-PAMs chemically optimized to provide comparable CNS exposure revealed that both classes of mGlu(5) PAMs have similar efficacy in a rodent model predictive of antipsychotic activity. These data suggest that the level of receptor expression influences the ability of mGlu(5) PAMs to act as allosteric agonists in vitro and that ago-PAM activity observed in cell-based assays may not be important for in vivo efficacy.

  13. Biased mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators provide in vivo efficacy without potentiating mGlu5 modulation of NMDAR currents

    PubMed Central

    Rook, Jerri M.; Xiang, Zixiu; Lv, Xiaohui; Ghoshal, Ayan; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Johnson, Kari A.; Foster, Daniel J.; Gregory, Karen J.; Vinson, Paige N.; Thompson, Analisa D.; Byun, Nellie; Collier, Rebekah L.; Bubser, Michael; Nedelcovych, Michael T.; Gould, Robert W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Daniels, J. Scott; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lavreysen, Hilde; Mackie, Claire; Conde-Ceide, Susana; Alcazar, Jesus; Bartolomé-Nebreda, José M.; Macdonald, Gregor J.; Steckler, Thomas; Jones, Carrie K.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Summary Schizophrenia is associated with disruptions in N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor subtype (NMDAR)-mediated excitatory synaptic signaling. The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) is a closely associated signaling partner with NMDARs and regulates NMDAR function in forebrain regions implicated in the pathology of schizophrenia. Efficacy of mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) in animal models of psychosis and cognition was previously attributed to potentiation of NMDAR function. To directly test this hypothesis, we identified VU0409551 as a novel mGlu5 PAM that exhibits distinct stimulus bias and selectively potentiates mGlu5 coupling to Gαq–mediated signaling but not mGlu5 modulation of NMDAR currents or NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity in the rat hippocampus. Interestingly, VU0409551 produced robust antipsychotic-like and cognition-enhancing activity in animal models. These data provide surprising new mechanistic insights into the actions of mGlu5 PAMs and suggest that modulation of NMDAR currents is not critical for in vivo efficacy. PMID:25937172

  14. mGlu5 Receptors and Relapse to Cocaine-Seeking: The Role of Receptor Trafficking in Postrelapse Extinction Learning Deficits.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, Lori A; Schwendt, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that MTEP, an allosteric antagonist of mGlu5, infused into the nucleus accumbens attenuates relapse after abstinence from cocaine self-administration. MTEP infused into the dorsolateral striatum (dlSTR) does not alter relapse but has long-lasting effects on subsequent extinction learning. Here we tested whether systemic MTEP would prevent relapse after abstinence or alter extinction learning. We also investigated the mechanism of action by which intra-dlSTR MTEP on test day alters extinction on subsequent days. Animals self-administered cocaine for 12 days followed by abstinence for 20-21 days. MTEP (0.5-5 mg/kg IP) was administered prior to placement into the operant chamber for a context-primed relapse test. A separate group of animals received intra-dlSTR MTEP prior to the relapse test and were sacrificed day later. Systemic administration of MTEP attenuated abstinent-relapse without significantly affecting extinction learning. Surface biotinylation analysis of protein expression in the dlSTR revealed that, in cocaine animals, intra-dlSTR MTEP administration decreased mGlu5 surface expression and prevented changes in Arc and GluA1/GluA2 observed in their vehicle counterparts. Thus, blockade of mGlu5 receptors may be utilized in future treatment strategies for relapse prevention in humans, although the effects of chronic blockade on extinction learning should be further evaluated.

  15. Chronic intermittent alcohol disrupts the GluN2B-associated proteome and specifically regulates group I mGlu receptor-dependent long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Wills, Tiffany A; Baucum, Anthony J; Holleran, Katherine M; Chen, Yaoyi; Pasek, Johanna G; Delpire, Eric; Tabb, David L; Colbran, Roger J; Winder, Danny G

    2017-03-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are major targets of both acute and chronic alcohol, as well as regulators of plasticity in a number of brain regions. Aberrant plasticity may contribute to the treatment resistance and high relapse rates observed in alcoholics. Recent work suggests that chronic alcohol treatment preferentially modulates both the expression and subcellular localization of NMDARs containing the GluN2B subunit. Signaling through synaptic and extrasynaptic GluN2B-NMDARs has already been implicated in the pathophysiology of various other neurological disorders. NMDARs interact with a large number of proteins at the glutamate synapse, and a better understanding of how alcohol modulates this proteome is needed. We employed a discovery-based proteomic approach in subcellular fractions of hippocampal tissue from chronic intermittent alcohol (CIE)-exposed C57Bl/6J mice to gain insight into alcohol-induced changes in GluN2B signaling complexes. Protein enrichment analyses revealed changes in the association of post-synaptic proteins, including scaffolding, glutamate receptor and PDZ-domain binding proteins with GluN2B. In particular, GluN2B interaction with metabotropic glutamate (mGlu)1/5 receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD)-associated proteins such as Arc and Homer 1 was increased, while GluA2 was decreased. Accordingly, we found a lack of mGlu1/5 -induced LTD while α1 -adrenergic receptor-induced LTD remained intact in hippocampal CA1 following CIE. These data suggest that CIE specifically disrupts mGlu1/5 -LTD, representing a possible connection between NMDAR and mGlu receptor signaling. These studies not only demonstrate a new way in which alcohol can modulate plasticity in the hippocampus but also emphasize the utility of this discovery-based proteomic approach to generate new hypotheses regarding alcohol-related mechanisms.

  16. Metabotropic glutamate mGlu2 receptor is necessary for the pharmacological and behavioral effects induced by hallucinogenic 5-HT2A receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Holloway, Terrell; Albizu, Laura; Sealfon, Stuart C; González-Maeso, Javier

    2011-04-15

    Hallucinogenic drugs, including mescaline, psilocybin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), act at serotonin 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs). Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGluR2/3) ligands show efficacy in modulating the responses induced by activation of 5-HT2ARs. The formation of a 5-HT2AR-mGluR2 complex suggests a functional interaction that affects the hallucinogen-regulated cellular signaling pathways. Here, we tested the cellular and behavioral effects of hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists in mGluR2 knockout (mGluR2-KO) mice. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with the hallucinogens DOI (2 mg/kg) and LSD (0.24 mg/kg), or vehicle. Head-twitch behavioral response, expression of c-fos, which is induced by all 5-HT2AR agonists, and expression of egr-2, which is hallucinogen-specific, were determined in wild type and mGluR2-KO mice. [(3)H]Ketanserin binding displacement curves by DOI were performed in mouse frontal cortex membrane preparations. Head twitch behavior was abolished in mGluR2-KO mice. The high-affinity binding site of DOI was undetected in mGluR2-KO mice. The hallucinogen DOI induced c-fos in both wild type and mGluR2-KO mice. However, the induction of egr-2 by DOI was eliminated in mGlu2-KO mice. These findings suggest that the 5-HT2AR-mGluR2 complex is necessary for the neuropsychological responses induced by hallucinogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabotropic glutamate mGlu2 receptor is necessary for the pharmacological and behavioral effects induced by hallucinogenic 5-HT2A receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, José L.; Holloway, Terrell; Albizu, Laura; Sealfon, Stuart C.; González-Maeso, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs, including mescaline, psilocybin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), act at serotonin 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs). Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGluR2/3) ligands show efficacy in modulating the responses induced by activation of 5-HT2ARs. The formation of a 5-HT2AR-mGluR2 complex suggests a functional interaction that affects the hallucinogen-regulated cellular signaling pathways. Here, we tested the cellular and behavioral effects of hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists in mGluR2 knockout (mGluR2-KO) mice. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with the hallucinogens DOI (2 mg/kg) and LSD (0.24 mg/kg), or vehicle. Head-twitch behavioral response, expression of c-fos, which is induced by all 5-HT2AR agonists, and expression of egr-2, which is hallucinogen-specific, were determined in wild type and mGluR2-KO mice. [3H]Ketanserin binding displacement curves by DOI were performed in mouse frontal cortex membrane preparations. Head twitch behavior was abolished in mGluR2-KO mice. The high-affinity binding site of DOI was undetected in mGluR2-KO mice. The hallucinogen DOI induced c-fos in both wild type and mGluR2-KO mice. However, the induction of egr-2 by DOI was eliminated in mGlu2-KO mice. These findings suggest that the 5-HT2AR-mGluR2 complex is necessary for the neuropsychological responses induced by hallucinogens. PMID:21276828

  18. Chronic treatment with MPEP, an mGlu5 receptor antagonist, normalizes basal ganglia glutamate neurotransmission in L-DOPA-treated parkinsonian monkeys.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicolas; Morissette, Marc; Grégoire, Laurent; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2013-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonists reduce L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesias (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of the prototypal mGlu5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on glutamate receptors known to be involved in the development of LID in the de novo chronic treatment of monkeys lesioned with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). MPTP monkeys were treated for one month with L-DOPA and developed dyskinesias while those treated with L-DOPA and MPEP (10 mg/kg) developed significantly less. Normal control and saline-treated MPTP monkeys were also included. All MPTP monkeys were extensively and similarly denervated. The basal ganglia [(3)H]ABP688 specific binding (mGlu5 receptors) was elevated in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys compared to controls but not in those treated with L-DOPA and MPEP; dyskinesia scores of these monkeys correlated positively with their [(3)H]ABP688 specific binding. Striatal density (B(max)) of [(3)H]ABP688 specific binding increased in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys compared to other groups and affinity (Kd) remained unchanged. Striatal mGlu5 receptor mRNA remained unchanged following treatments. Elevated basal ganglia specific binding of [(3)H]Ro 25-6981 (NMDA NR1/NR2B receptors), [(3)H]Ro 48-8587 (AMPA receptors) but not [(3)H]CGP-39653 (NMDA NR1/NR2A receptors) was observed only in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys; dyskinesias scores correlated with binding. By contrast, basal ganglia [(3)H]LY341495 specific binding (mGlu2/3 receptors) decreased in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys compared to controls, saline and L-DOPA + MPEP treated MPTP monkeys; dyskinesias scores correlated negatively with this binding. Hence, chronic MPEP treatment reduces the development of LID and is associated with a normalization of glutamate neurotransmission.

  19. Probing the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGlu5) Positive Allosteric Modulator (PAM) Binding Pocket: Discovery of Point Mutations That Engender a “Molecular Switch” in PAM Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Nguyen, Elizabeth D.; Reiff, Sean D.; Squire, Emma F.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) is a promising novel approach for the treatment of schizophrenia and cognitive disorders. Allosteric binding sites are topographically distinct from the endogenous ligand (orthosteric) binding site, allowing for co-occupation of a single receptor with the endogenous ligand and an allosteric modulator. Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) inhibit and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) enhance the affinity and/or efficacy of the orthosteric agonist. The molecular determinants that govern mGlu5 modulator affinity versus cooperativity are not well understood. Focusing on the modulators based on the acetylene scaffold, we sought to determine the molecular interactions that contribute to PAM versus NAM pharmacology. Generation of a comparative model of the transmembrane-spanning region of mGlu5 served as a tool to predict and interpret the impact of mutations in this region. Application of an operational model of allosterism allowed for determination of PAM and NAM affinity estimates at receptor constructs that possessed no detectable radioligand binding as well as delineation of effects on affinity versus cooperativity. Novel mutations within the transmembrane domain (TM) regions were identified that had differential effects on acetylene PAMs versus 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine, a prototypical NAM. Three conserved amino acids (Y658, T780, and S808) and two nonconserved residues (P654 and A809) were identified as key determinants of PAM activity. Interestingly, we identified two point mutations in TMs 6 and 7 that, when mutated, engender a mode switch in the pharmacology of certain PAMs. PMID:23444015

  20. Partial mGlu5 Negative Allosteric Modulators Attenuate Cocaine-Mediated Behaviors and Lack Psychotomimetic-Like Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Robert W; Amato, Russell J; Bubser, Michael; Joffe, Max E; Nedelcovych, Michael T; Thompson, Analisa D; Nickols, Hilary H; Yuh, Johannes P; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Felts, Andrew S; Rodriguez, Alice L; Morrison, Ryan D; Byers, Frank W; Rook, Jerri M; Daniels, John S; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Emmitte, Kyle A; Lindsley, Craig W; Jones, Carrie K

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse remains a public health concern for which pharmacotherapies are largely ineffective. Comorbidities between cocaine abuse, depression, and anxiety support the development of novel treatments targeting multiple symptom clusters. Selective negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) targeting the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) subtype are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders and have shown promise in preclinical models of substance abuse. However, complete blockade or inverse agonist activity by some full mGlu5 NAM chemotypes demonstrated adverse effects, including psychosis in humans and psychotomimetic-like effects in animals, suggesting a narrow therapeutic window. Development of partial mGlu5 NAMs, characterized by their submaximal but saturable levels of blockade, may represent a novel approach to broaden the therapeutic window. To understand potential therapeutic vs adverse effects in preclinical behavioral assays, we examined the partial mGlu5 NAMs, M-5MPEP and Br-5MPEPy, in comparison with the full mGlu5 NAM MTEP across models of addiction and psychotomimetic-like activity. M-5MPEP, Br-5MPEPy, and MTEP dose-dependently decreased cocaine self-administration and attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. M-5MPEP and Br-5MPEPy also demonstrated antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity. Dose-dependent effects of partial and full mGlu5 NAMs in these assays corresponded with increasing in vivo mGlu5 occupancy, demonstrating an orderly occupancy-to-efficacy relationship. PCP-induced hyperlocomotion was potentiated by MTEP, but not by M-5MPEP and Br-5MPEPy. Further, MTEP, but not M-5MPEP, potentiated the discriminative-stimulus effects of PCP. The present data suggest that partial mGlu5 NAM activity is sufficient to produce therapeutic effects similar to full mGlu5 NAMs, but with a broader therapeutic index. PMID:26315507

  1. Hippocampal long-term depression is facilitated by the acquisition and updating of memory of spatial auditory content and requires mGlu5 activation.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Birte; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2017-03-15

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are key cellular processes that support memory formation. Whereas increases of synaptic strength by means of LTP may support the creation of a spatial memory 'engram', LTD appears to play an important role in refining and optimising experience-dependent encoding. A differentiation in the role of hippocampal subfields is apparent. For example, LTD in the dentate gyrus (DG) is enabled by novel learning about large visuospatial features, whereas in area CA1, it is enabled by learning about discrete aspects of spatial content, whereby, both discrete visuospatial and olfactospatial cues trigger LTD in CA1. Here, we explored to what extent local audiospatial cues facilitate information encoding in the form of LTD in these subfields. Coupling of low frequency afferent stimulation (LFS) with discretely localised, novel auditory tones in the sonic hearing, or ultrasonic range, facilitated short-term depression (STD) into LTD (>24 h) in CA1, but not DG. Re-exposure to the now familiar audiospatial configuration ca. 1 week later failed to enhance STD. Reconfiguration of the same audiospatial cues resulted anew in LTD when ultrasound, but not non-ultrasound cues were used. LTD facilitation that was triggered by novel exposure to spatially arranged tones, or to spatial reconfiguration of the same tones were both prevented by an antagonism of the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5. These data indicate that, if behaviourally salient enough, the hippocampus can use audiospatial cues to facilitate LTD that contributes to the encoding and updating of spatial representations. Effects are subfield-specific, and require mGlu5 activation, as is the case for visuospatial information processing. These data reinforce the likelihood that LTD supports the encoding of spatial features, and that this occurs in a qualitative and subfield-specific manner. They also support that mGlu5 is essential for synaptic encoding of spatial

  2. Evaluation of 5-HT2A and mGlu2/3 receptors in postmortem prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depressive disorder: effect of antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Muguruza, Carolina; Miranda-Azpiazu, Patricia; Díez-Alarcia, Rebeca; Morentin, Benito; González-Maeso, Javier; Callado, Luis F; Meana, J Javier

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated alterations in serotonin 5-HT2A (5-HT2AR) and glutamate metabotropic mGlu2 (mGlu2R) receptors in depression, but never in the same sample population. Recently it has been shown that both receptors form a functional receptor heterocomplex that is altered in schizophrenia. The present study evaluates the gene expression and protein density of 5-HT2AR and mGlu2/3R in the postmortem prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depressive disorder (n = 14) compared with control subjects (n = 14) in a paired design. No significant differences between subjects with depression and controls in the relative mRNA levels of the genes HTR2A, GRM2 and GRM3 were observed. The 5-HT2AR density evaluated by [(3)H]ketanserin binding was significantly lower in antidepressant-treated subjects (Bmax = 313 ± 17 fmol/mg protein; p < 0.05) compared to controls (Bmax = 360 ± 12 fmol/mg protein) but not in antidepressant-free subjects (Bmax = 394 ± 16 fmol/mg protein; p > 0.05). In rats, chronic treatment with citalopram (10 mg/kg/day) and mirtazapine (5 mg/kg/day) decreased mRNA expression and 5-HT2AR density whereas reboxetine (20 mg/kg/day) modified only mRNA expression. The mGlu2/3R density evaluated by [(3)H]LY341495 binding was not significantly different between depression and control subjects. The present results demonstrate no changes in expression and density of both 5-HT2AR and mGlu2/3R in the postmortem prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depressive disorder under basal conditions. However, antidepressant treatment induces a decrease in 5-HT2AR density. This finding suggests that 5-HT2AR down-regulation may be a mechanism for antidepressant effect.

  3. Comparative Effects of LY3020371, a Potent and Selective Metabotropic Glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 Receptor Antagonist, and Ketamine, a Noncompetitive N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist in Rodents: Evidence Supporting the Use of mGlu2/3 Antagonists, for the Treatment of Depression.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Mitchell, S N; Wafford, K A; Carter, G; Gilmour, G; Li, J; Eastwood, B J; Overshiner, C; Li, X; Rorick-Kehn, L; Rasmussen, K; Anderson, W H; Nikolayev, A; Tolstikov, V V; Kuo, M-S; Catlow, J T; Li, R; Smith, S C; Mitch, C H; Ornstein, P L; Swanson, S; Monn, J A

    2017-04-01

    The ability of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine to alleviate symptoms in patients suffering from treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is well documented. In this paper, we directly compare in vivo biologic responses in rodents elicited by a recently discovered metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptor antagonist 2-amino-3-[(3,4-difluorophenyl)sulfanylmethyl]-4-hydroxy-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY3020371) with those produced by ketamine. Both LY3020371 and ketamine increased the number of spontaneously active dopamine cells in the ventral tegmental area of anesthetized rats, increased O2 in the anterior cingulate cortex, promoted wakefulness, enhanced the efflux of biogenic amines in the prefrontal cortex, and produced antidepressant-related behavioral effects in rodent models. The ability of LY3020371 to produce antidepressant-like effects in the forced-swim assay in rats was associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drug levels that matched concentrations required for functional antagonist activity in native rat brain tissue preparations. Metabolomic pathway analyses from analytes recovered from rat CSF and hippocampus demonstrated that both LY3020371 and ketamine activated common pathways involving GRIA2 and ADORA1. A diester analog of LY3020371 [bis(((isopropoxycarbonyl)oxy)-methyl) (1S,2R,3S,4S,5R,6R)-2-amino-3-(((3,4-difluorophenyl)thio)methyl)-4-hydroxy-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylate (LY3027788)] was an effective oral prodrug; when given orally, it recapitulated effects of intravenous doses of LY3020371 in the forced-swim and wake-promotion assays, and augmented the antidepressant-like effects of fluoxetine or citalopram without altering plasma or brain levels of these compounds. The broad overlap of biologic responses produced by LY3020371 and ketamine supports the hypothesis that mGlu2/3 receptor blockade might be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of TRD patients. LY3020371 and LY3027788 represent

  4. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of an 18F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4).

    PubMed

    Kil, Kun-Eek; Poutiainen, Pekka; Zhang, Zhaoda; Zhu, Aijun; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2014-11-13

    Four 4-phthalimide derivatives of N-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-picolinamide were synthesized as potential ligands for the PET imaging of mGlu4 in the brain. Of these compounds, N-(3-chloro-4-(4-fluoro-1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, KALB001) exhibited improved binding affinity (IC50 = 5.1 nM) compared with ML128 (1) and was subsequently labeled with (18)F. When finally formulated in 0.1 M citrate buffer (pH 4) with 10% ethanol, the specific activity of [(18)F]3 at the end of synthesis (EOS) was 233.5 ± 177.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4). The radiochemical yield of [(18)F]3 was 16.4 ± 4.8% (n = 4), and the purity was over 98%. In vivo imaging studies in a monkey showed that the radiotracer quickly penetrated the brain with the highest accumulation in the brain areas known to express mGlu4. Despite some unfavorable radiotracer properties like fast washout in rodent studies, [(18)F]3 is the first (18)F-labeled mGlu4 radioligand, which can be further modified to improve pharmacokinetics and brain penetrability for future human studies.

  5. Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of an 18F-Labeled Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 4 (mGlu4)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Four 4-phthalimide derivatives of N-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-picolinamide were synthesized as potential ligands for the PET imaging of mGlu4 in the brain. Of these compounds, N-(3-chloro-4-(4-fluoro-1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, KALB001) exhibited improved binding affinity (IC50 = 5.1 nM) compared with ML128 (1) and was subsequently labeled with 18F. When finally formulated in 0.1 M citrate buffer (pH 4) with 10% ethanol, the specific activity of [18F]3 at the end of synthesis (EOS) was 233.5 ± 177.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4). The radiochemical yield of [18F]3 was 16.4 ± 4.8% (n = 4), and the purity was over 98%. In vivo imaging studies in a monkey showed that the radiotracer quickly penetrated the brain with the highest accumulation in the brain areas known to express mGlu4. Despite some unfavorable radiotracer properties like fast washout in rodent studies, [18F]3 is the first 18F-labeled mGlu4 radioligand, which can be further modified to improve pharmacokinetics and brain penetrability for future human studies. PMID:25330258

  6. mGlu5 receptors and cellular prion protein mediate amyloid-β-facilitated synaptic long-term depression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Neng-Wei; Nicoll, Andrew J.; Zhang, Dainan; Mably, Alexandra J.; O’Malley, Tiernan; Purro, Silvia A.; Terry, Cassandra; Collinge, John; Walsh, Dominic M.; Rowan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are currently regarded as paramount in the potent and selective disruption of synaptic plasticity by Alzheimer’s disease amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Non-NMDAR mechanisms remain relatively unexplored. Here we describe how Aβ facilitates NMDAR-independent long-term depression of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in vivo. Synthetic Aβ and Aβ in soluble extracts of Alzheimer’s disease brain usurp endogenous acetylcholine muscarinic receptor-dependent long-term depression, to enable long-term depression that required metabotropic glutamate-5 receptors (mGlu5Rs). We also find that mGlu5Rs are essential for Aβ-mediated inhibition of NMDAR-dependent long-term potentiation in vivo. Blocking Aβ binding to cellular prion protein with antibodies prevents the facilitation of long-term depression. Our findings uncover an overarching role for Aβ-PrPC-mGlu5R interplay in mediating both LTD facilitation and LTP inhibition, encompassing NMDAR-mediated processes that were previously considered primary. PMID:24594908

  7. Type-1, but Not Type-5, Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors are Coupled to Polyphosphoinositide Hydrolysis in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria Rosaria; Di Menna, Luisa; Scarselli, Pamela; Mascio, Giada; Madonna, Michele; Notartomaso, Serena; Puliti, Aldamaria; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-04-01

    mGlu1 and mGlu5 metabotropic glutamate receptors are expressed in the vertebrate retina, and are co-localized in some retinal neurons. It is believed that both receptors are coupled to polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in the retina and their function may diverge in some cells because of a differential engagement of downstream signaling molecules. Here, we show that it is only the mGlu1 receptor that is coupled to PI hydrolysis in the retina. We used either bovine retinal slices or intact mouse retinas challenged with the mixed mGlu1/5 receptor agonist, DHPG. In both models, DHPG-stimulated PI hydrolysis was abrogated by the selective mGlu1 receptor antagonist, JNJ16259685, but was insensitive to the mGlu5 receptor antagonist, MPEP. In addition, the PI response to DHPG was unchanged in the retina of mGlu5(-/-) mice but was abolished in the retina of crv4 mice lacking mGlu1 receptors. Stimulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by DHPG in intact mouse retinas were also entirely mediated by mGlu1 receptors. Our data provide the first example of a tissue in which a biochemically detectable PI response is mediated by mGlu1, but not mGlu5, receptors. Hence, bovine retinal slices might be used as a model for the functional screening of mGlu1 receptor ligands. In addition, the mGlu1 receptor caters the potential as a drug target in the experimental treatment of degenerative disorders of the retina.

  8. Identification of Positive Allosteric Modulators VU0155094 (ML397) and VU0422288 (ML396) Reveals New Insights into the Biology of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 7

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGlu7) is a member of the group III mGlu receptors (mGlus), encompassed by mGlu4, mGlu6, mGlu7, and mGlu8. mGlu7 is highly expressed in the presynaptic active zones of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses, and activation of the receptor regulates the release of both glutamate and GABA. mGlu7 is thought to be a relevant therapeutic target for a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and polymorphisms in the GRM7 gene have been linked to autism, depression, ADHD, and schizophrenia. Here we report two new pan-group III mGlu positive allosteric modulators, VU0155094 and VU0422288, which show differential activity at the various group III mGlus. Additionally, both compounds show probe dependence when assessed in the presence of distinct orthosteric agonists. By pairing studies of these nonselective compounds with a synapse in the hippocampus that expresses only mGlu7, we have validated activity of these compounds in a native tissue setting. These studies provide proof-of-concept evidence that mGlu7 activity can be modulated by positive allosteric modulation, paving the way for future therapeutics development. PMID:25225882

  9. Discovery of 4-amino-3-arylsulfoquinolines, a novel non-acetylenic chemotype of metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor negative allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Galambos, János; Bielik, Attila; Wágner, Gábor; Domány, György; Kóti, János; Béni, Zoltán; Szigetvári, Áron; Sánta, Zsuzsanna; Orgován, Zoltán; Bobok, Amrita; Kiss, Béla; Mikó-Bakk, Mónika L; Vastag, Mónika; Sághy, Katalin; Krasavin, Mikhail; Gál, Krisztina; Greiner, István; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Keserű, György M

    2017-06-16

    Negative allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) showed efficacy in a number of animal models of different CNS diseases including anxiety and depression. Virtually all of the compounds which reached the clinic belong to the same chemotype having an acetylenic linker that connects (hetero)cyclic moieties. Searching for new chemotypes we identified a morpholino-sulfoquinoline derivative (1) by screening our corporate compound deck. The HTS hit showed reasonable affinity and selectivity towards mGlu5 receptors, however, its inferior metabolic stability prevented its testing in vivo. In a chemical program we aimed to improve the affinity, physicochemical properties and metabolic stability exploring three regions of the hit. Systematic variation of different amines at position 4 (region I) led to the identification of 4-methyl-piperidinyl analogues. Substituents of the quinoline core (region II) and the phenylsulfonyl moiety (region III) were mapped by parallel synthesis. Evaluation of both morpholino- and 4-methyl-piperidinyl-sulfoquinoline libraries of about 270 derivatives revealed beneficial substituent combinations in regions II and III. Blood levels of optimized 4-methyl-piperidinyl-sulfoquinolines, however, were still insufficient for robust in vivo efficacy. Finally, introducing 4-hydoxymethyl-piperidinyl substituent to region I resulted in new sulfoquinolines with greatly improved solubility and reasonable affinity coupled with affordable metabolic stability. The most promising analogues (24 and 25) showed high blood levels and demonstrated significant efficacy in the experimental model of anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Paige N.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Treatment options for schizophrenia that address all symptom categories (positive, negative, and cognitive) are lacking in current therapies for this disorder. Compounds targeting the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors hold promise as a more comprehensive therapeutic alternative to typical and atypical antipsychotics and may avoid the occurrence of extrapyramidal side effects that accompany these treatments. Activation of the group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2 and mGlu3) and the group I mGlu5 are hypothesized to normalize the disruption of thalamocortical glutamatergic circuitry that results in abnormal glutamaterigic signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Agonists of mGlu2 and mGlu3 have demonstrated efficacy for the positive symptom group in both animal models and clinical trials with mGlu2 being the subtype most likely responsible for the therapeutic effect. Limitations in the chemical space tolerated by the orthosteric site of the mGlu receptors has led to the pursuit of compounds that potentiate the receptor’s response to glutamate by acting at less highly conserved allosteric sites. Several series of selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) for mGlu2 and mGlu5 have demonstrated efficacy in animal models used for the evaluation of antipsychotic agents. In addition, evidence from animal studies indicates that mGlu5 PAMs hold promise for the treatment of cognitive deficits that occur in schizophrenia. Hopefully, further optimization of allosteric modulators of mGlu receptors will yield clinical candidates that will allow full evaluation of the potential efficacy of these compounds in the treatment of multiple symptom domains in schizophrenia patients in the near future. PMID:21620876

  11. Radiosynthesis of N-(4-chloro-3-[(11)C]methoxyphenyl)-2-picolinamide ([(11)C]ML128) as a PET radiotracer for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4).

    PubMed

    Kil, Kun-Eek; Zhang, Zhaoda; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Gong, Chunyu; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Kura, Sreekanth; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2013-10-01

    N-(Chloro-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, ML128, VU0361737) is an mGlu4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), which is potent and centrally penetrating. 3 is also the first mGlu4 PAM to show efficacy in a preclinical Parkinson disease model upon systemic dosing. As a noninvasive medical imaging technique and a powerful tool in neurological research, positron emission tomography (PET) offers a possibility to investigate mGlu4 expression in vivo under physiologic and pathological conditions. We synthesized a carbon-11 labeled ML128 ([(11)C]3) as a PET radiotracer for mGlu4, and characterized its biological properties in Sprague Dawley rats. [(11)C]3 was synthesized from N-(4-chloro-3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-picolinamide (2) using [(11)C]CH3I. Total synthesis time was 38±2.2min (n=7) from the end of bombardment to the formulation. The radioligand [(11)C]3 was obtained in 27.7±5.3% (n=5) decay corrected radiochemical yield based on the radioactivity of [(11)C]CO2. The radiochemical purity of [(11)C]3 was >99%. Specific activity was 188.7±88.8GBq/mol (n=4) at the end of synthesis (EOS). PET images were conducted in 20 normal male Sprague Dawley rats including 11 control studies, 6 studies blocking with an mGlu4 modulator (4) to investigate specificity and 3 studies blocking with an mGlu5 modulator (MTEP) to investigate selectivity. These studies showed fast accumulation of [(11)C]3 (peak activity between 1-3min) in several brain areas including striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb following with fast washout. Blocking studies with the mGlu4 modulator 4 showed 22-28% decrease of [(11)C]3 accumulation while studies of selectivity showed only minor decrease supporting good selectivity over mGlu5. Biodistribution studies and blood analyses support fast metabolism. Altogether this is the first PET imaging ligand for mGlu4, in which the labeled ML128 was used for imaging its in vivo distribution and pharmacokinetics in brain. Copyright © 2013

  12. Radiosynthesis of N-(4-chloro-3-[11C]methoxyphenyl)-2-picolinamide ([11C]ML128) as a PET radiotracer for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4)

    PubMed Central

    Kil, Kun-Eek; Zhang, Zhaoda; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Gong, Chunyu; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Kura, Sreekanth; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    N-(Chloro-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, ML128, VU0361737) is an mGlu4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), which is potent and centrally penetrating. 3 is also the first mGlu4 PAM to show efficacy in a preclinical Parkinson disease model upon systemic dosing. As a noninvasive medical imaging technique and a powerful tool in neurological research, positron emission tomography (PET) offers a possibility to investigate mGlu4 expression in vivo under physiologic and pathological conditions. We synthesized a carbon-11 labeled ML128 ([11C]3) as a PET radiotracer for mGlu4, and characterized its biological properties in Sprague Dawley rats. [11C]3 was synthesized from N-(4-chloro-3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-picolinamide (2) using [11C]CH3I. Total synthesis time was 38±2.2 min (n = 7) from the end of bombardment to the formulation. The radioligand [11C]3 was obtained in 27.7±5.3% (n = 5) decay corrected radiochemical yield based on the radioactivity of [11C]CO2. The radiochemical purity of [11C]3 was >99%. Specific activity was 188.7±88.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4) at the end of synthesis (EOS). PET images were conducted in 20 normal male Sprague Dawley rats including 11 control studies, 6 studies blocking with an mGlu4 modulator (4) to investigate specificity and 3 studies blocking with an mGlu5 modulator (MTEP) to investigate selectivity. These studies showed fast accumulation of [11C]3 (peak activity between 1-3 min) in several brain areas including striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb following with fast washout. Blocking studies with the mGlu4 modulator 4 showed 22-28 % decrease of [11C]3 accumulation while studies of selectivity showed only minor decrease supporting good selectivity over mGlu5. Biodistribution studies and blood analyses support fast metabolism. Altogether this is the first PET imaging ligand for mGlu4, in which the labeled ML128 was used for imaging its in vivo distribution and pharmacokinetics in brain. PMID:23978356

  13. Prefrontal Cortex KCa2 Channels Regulate mGlu5-Dependent Plasticity and Extinction of Alcohol-Seeking Behavior.

    PubMed

    Cannady, Reginald; McGonigal, Justin T; Newsom, Ryan J; Woodward, John J; Mulholland, Patrick J; Gass, Justin T

    2017-04-19

    Identifying novel treatments that facilitate extinction learning could enhance cue-exposure therapy and reduce high relapse rates in alcoholics. Activation of mGlu5 receptors in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL-PFC) facilitates learning during extinction of cue-conditioned alcohol-seeking behavior. Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (KCa2) channels have also been implicated in extinction learning of fear memories, and mGlu5 receptor activation can reduce KCa2 channel function. Using a combination of electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral approaches, this study examined KCa2 channels as a novel target to facilitate extinction of alcohol-seeking behavior in rats. This study also explored related neuronal and synaptic mechanisms within the IL-PFC that underlie mGlu5-dependent enhancement of extinction learning. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology, activation of mGlu5 in ex vivo slices significantly reduced KCa2 channel currents in layer V IL-PFC pyramidal neurons, confirming functional downregulation of KCa2 channel activity by mGlu5 receptors. Additionally, positive modulation of KCa2 channels prevented mGlu5 receptor-dependent facilitation of long-term potentiation in the IL-PFC. Systemic and intra-IL-PFC treatment with apamin (KCa2 channel allosteric inhibitor) significantly enhanced extinction of alcohol-seeking behavior across multiple extinction sessions, an effect that persisted for 3 weeks, but was not observed after apamin microinfusions into the prelimbic PFC. Positive modulation of IL-PFC KCa2 channels significantly attenuated mGlu5-dependent facilitation of alcohol cue-conditioned extinction learning. These data suggest that mGlu5-dependent facilitation of extinction learning and synaptic plasticity in the IL-PFC involves functional inhibition of KCa2 channels. Moreover, these findings demonstrate that KCa2 channels are a novel target to facilitate long-lasting extinction of alcohol-seeking behavior

  14. Allosteric control of an asymmetric transduction in a G protein-coupled receptor heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junke; Zhang, Zongyong; Moreno-Delgado, David; Dalton, James Ar; Rovira, Xavier; Trapero, Ana; Goudet, Cyril; Llebaria, Amadeu; Giraldo, Jesús; Yuan, Qilin; Rondard, Philippe; Huang, Siluo; Liu, Jianfeng; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-10

    GPCRs play critical roles in cell communication. Although GPCRs can form heteromers, their role in signaling remains elusive. Here we used rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors as prototypical dimers to study the functional interaction between each subunit. mGluRs can form both constitutive homo- and heterodimers. Whereas both mGlu2 and mGlu4 couple to G proteins, G protein activation is mediated by mGlu4 heptahelical domain (HD) exclusively in mGlu2-4 heterodimers. Such asymmetric transduction results from the action of both the dimeric extracellular domain, and an allosteric activation by the partially-activated non-functional mGlu2 HD. G proteins activation by mGlu2 HD occurs if either the mGlu2 HD is occupied by a positive allosteric modulator or if mGlu4 HD is inhibited by a negative modulator. These data revealed an oriented asymmetry in mGlu heterodimers that can be controlled with allosteric modulators. They provide new insight on the allosteric interaction between subunits in a GPCR dimer.

  15. Type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1) trigger the gating of GluD2 delta glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ady, Visou; Perroy, Julie; Tricoire, Ludovic; Piochon, Claire; Dadak, Selma; Chen, Xiaoru; Dusart, Isabelle; Fagni, Laurent; Lambolez, Bertrand; Levenes, Carole

    2014-01-01

    The orphan GluD2 receptor belongs to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family but does not bind glutamate. Ligand-gated GluD2 currents have never been evidenced, and whether GluD2 operates as an ion channel has been a long-standing question. Here, we show that GluD2 gating is triggered by type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, both in a heterologous expression system and in Purkinje cells. Thus, GluD2 is not only an adhesion molecule at synapses but also works as a channel. This gating mechanism reveals new properties of glutamate receptors that emerge from their interaction and opens unexpected perspectives regarding synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:24357660

  16. Long-term treatment with l-DOPA and an mGlu5 receptor antagonist prevents changes in brain basal ganglia dopamine receptors, their associated signaling proteins and neuropeptides in parkinsonian monkeys.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicolas; Jourdain, Vincent A; Morissette, Marc; Grégoire, Laurent; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2014-04-01

    Brain glutamate overactivity is well documented in Parkinson's disease (PD) and antiglutamatergic drugs decrease L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA)-induced dyskinesias (LID); the implication of dopamine neurotransmission is not documented in this anti-LID activity. Therefore, we evaluated changes of dopamine receptors, their associated signaling proteins and neuropeptides mRNA, in normal control monkeys, in saline-treated 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys and in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys, without or with an adjunct treatment to reduce the development of LID: 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), the prototypal metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonist. All de novo treatments were administered for 1 month and the animals were sacrificed thereafter. MPTP monkeys treated with l-DOPA + MPEP developed significantly less LID than MPTP monkeys treated with l-DOPA alone. [(3)H]SCH-23390 specific binding to D1 receptors of all MPTP monkeys was decreased as compared to controls in the basal ganglia and no difference was observed between all MPTP groups, while striatal D1 receptor mRNA levels remained unchanged. [(3)H]raclopride specific binding to striatal D2 receptors and mRNA levels of D2 receptors were increased in MPTP monkeys compared to controls; l-DOPA treatment reduced this binding in MPTP monkeys while it remained elevated with the l-DOPA + MPEP treatment. Striatal [(3)H]raclopride specific binding correlated positively with D2 receptor mRNA levels of all MPTP-lesioned monkeys. Striatal preproenkephalin/preprodynorphin mRNA levels and phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Akt/GSK3β levels increased only in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys as compared to controls, saline treated-MPTP and l-DOPA + MPEP treated MPTP monkeys. Hence, reduction of development of LID with MPEP was associated with changes in D2 receptors, their associated signaling proteins and neuropeptides.

  17. Differential changes in mGlu2 and mGlu3 gene expression following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: A comparative real-time PCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ermolinsky, Boris; Pacheco Otalora, Luis F.; Arshadmansab, Massoud F.; Zarei, Masoud; Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R.

    2008-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu II) receptors subtype 2 and 3 (mGlu2 and mGlu3) are subtle regulators of neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. In recent years, researchers have investigated the potential neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects of compounds acting on mGlu II receptors. However, abnormal expression and function of mGlu2 and mGlu3 have been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy, a phenomena that may limit the therapeutic effectiveness of these potentially new antiepileptic drugs. Here, we investigated seizure-induced changes in mGlu2 and mGlu3 mRNA following pilocarpine-inducted status epilepticus (SE) and subsequent epileptogenesis. Relative changes in gene expression were assessed by comparative analysis of quantitative real-time PCR (qrtPCR) by the delta-delta CT method. Pilocarpine-treated and control rats were sacrificed at different periods (24h, 10 days, one month and more than two months) following SE. Total RNA was isolated from microdissected dentate gyrus and processed for RT-PCR and qrtPCR using glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as an endogenous control gene. Analysis of relative quantification (RQ) ratios of mGlu2 and mGlu3 mRNA expression revealed a significant down-regulation of both targets at 24h after SE. Gene expression partially recovered at 10 days following SE reaching control levels at one month after SE. Two month after SE, mGlu2 mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated to ~41% of control expression whereas mGlu3 mRNA was comparable to control levels. Our data indicate that mGlu2 and mGlu3 expression is dynamically down-regulated or selectively enhanced during critical periods of epileptogenesis. Seizure-induced differential dysregulation of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors may affect the availability of these molecular targets for therapeutic compounds in epilepsy. PMID:18585369

  18. MGluR5 mediates the interaction between late-LTP, network activity, and learning.

    PubMed

    Bikbaev, Arthur; Neyman, Sergey; Ngomba, Richard Teke; Conn, P Jeffrey; Conn, Jeffrey; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2008-05-14

    Hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning are strongly regulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and particularly by mGluR5. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying mGluR5-modulation of these phenomena. Prolonged pharmacological blockade of mGluR5 with MPEP produced a profound impairment of spatial memory. Effects were associated with 1) a reduction of mGluR1a-expression in the dentate gyrus; 2) impaired dentate gyrus LTP; 3) enhanced CA1-LTP and 4) suppressed theta (5-10 Hz) and gamma (30-100 Hz) oscillations in the dentate gyrus. Allosteric potentiation of mGluR1 after mGluR5 blockade significantly ameliorated dentate gyrus LTP, as well as suppression of gamma oscillatory activity. CA3-lesioning prevented MPEP effects on CA1-LTP, suggesting that plasticity levels in CA1 are driven by mGluR5-dependent synaptic and network activity in the dentate gyrus. These data support the hypothesis that prolonged mGluR5-inactivation causes altered hippocampal LTP levels and network activity, which is mediated in part by impaired mGluR1-expression in the dentate gyrus. The consequence is impairment of long-term learning.

  19. The effect of ((-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), an mGlu2/3 receptor agonist, on EEG power spectra and coherence in ketamine model of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fujáková, Michaela; Páleníček, Tomáš; Brunovský, Martin; Gorman, Ingmar; Tylš, Filip; Kubešová, Anna; Řípová, Daniela; Krajča, Vladimír; Horáček, Jiří

    2014-07-01

    In the present study we investigated the potential antipsychotic effects of the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268 on changes in EEG power spectra and coherence in the ketamine model of psychosis. In order to use behaviorally active drug doses, experiments detecting changes in locomotor activity and sensorimotor gating were also conducted. In EEG experiments, adult male Wistar rats were injected with ketamine 30 mg/kg i.p. and LY379268 3 mg/kg i.p. Cortical EEG was recorded from twelve (2 × 6) electrodes placed homolaterally on each hemisphere. To avoid interference with the behavioral hyperactivity of ketamine challenge, the behavioral activity of animals was simultaneously registered at the time of recording. Subsequent power spectral and coherence analyses were assessed in epochs corresponding to behavioral inactivity. Analysis of segments with behavioral activity compared to inactivity was also performed. The effects of LY379268 3 mg/kg i.p. on the deficits in sensorimotor processing and on hyperlocomotion induced by ketamine were evaluated in the test of prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle reaction (PPI ASR) and in the open field. LY379268 reversed the ketamine-induced hyperlocomotion but had no effect on ketamine-induced PPI deficits. In EEG epochs corresponding to behavioral inactivity ketamine decreased the power in the delta band, induced a power increase in the high frequency bands and globally decreased EEG coherence. Pretreatment with the LY379268 completely reversed the ketamine-induced power increase in high frequency bands and had a partial effect on EEG coherence. LY379268 alone induced a decrease of beta, high beta and low-gamma power, and an increase in coherence in high frequency bands. Additional analysis revealed that behavioral activity increases power as well as coherence in most frequency bands. In conclusion, agonism of mGlu2/3 receptors was effective in reversing most of the changes induced by ketamine, however due to the lack of effectiveness

  20. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Inhibits the Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Alcohol via Selective Activity Within the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Cannady, Reginald; Grondin, Julie JM; Fisher, Kristen R; Hodge, Clyde W; Besheer, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes (mGlu2/3) regulate a variety of alcohol-associated behaviors, including alcohol reinforcement, and relapse-like behavior. To date, the role of mGlu2/3 receptors in modulating the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol has not been examined. Given that the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs are determinants of abuse liability and can influence drug seeking, we examined the contributions of mGlu2/3 receptors in modulating the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol. In male Long-Evans rats trained to discriminate between alcohol (1 g/kg, IG) and water, the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268 (0.3–10 mg/kg) did not produce alcohol-like stimulus effects. However, pretreatment with LY379268 (1 and 3 mg/kg; in combination with alcohol) inhibited the stimulus effects of alcohol (1 g/kg). Systemic LY379268 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was associated with increases in neuronal activity within the amygdala, but not the nucleus accumbens, as assessed by c-Fos immunoreactivity. Intra-amygdala activation of mGlu2/3 receptors by LY379268 (6 μg) inhibited the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol, without altering response rate. In contrast, intra-accumbens LY379268 (3 μg) profoundly reduced response rate; however, at lower LY379268 doses (0.3, 1 μg), the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol and response rate were not altered. These data suggest that amygdala mGlu2/3 receptors have a functional role in modulating the discriminative stimulus properties of alcohol and demonstrate differential motor sensitivity to activation of mGlu2/3 receptors in the amygdala and the accumbens. Understanding the neuronal mechanisms that underlie the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol may prove to be important for future development of pharmacotherapies for treating alcoholism. PMID:21734651

  1. Preclinical predictors that the orthosteric mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY3020371 will not engender ketamine-associated neurotoxic, motor, cognitive, subjective, or abuse-liability-related effects.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Monn, J A; Li, J; Johnson, B; McKinzie, D L; Wang, X-S; Heinz, B A; Li, R; Ornstein, P L; Smith, S C; Mitch, C H; Calligaro, D O; Swanson, S; Allen, D; Phillips, K; Gilmour, G

    2017-03-08

    The novel mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY3020371 has been shown to produce antidepressant-like effects comparable to that of the clinically-effective antidepressant ketamine. In the present study, we investigated whether LY3020371 would be predicted to be free of the side-effects and safety pharmacology issues associated with ketamine. In contrast to ketamine, LY3020371 produced small increases in locomotion and did not impair motor performance on an inverted. Ketamine, but not LY3020371, increased dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens of rats. Ketamine also produced cognitively-impairing effects in rats in a T-maze and in a psychomotor vigilance task and altered theta synchrony between the hippocampus and mPFC, whereas LY3020371 had either no significant impact or lesser effects in these assays. In mice, ketamine, but not LY3020371, negatively affected spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze. Rats were trained to discriminate LY3020371 from vehicle where 30mg/kg produced 100% drug-appropriate responding and the ED50 for LY3020371 was 9.4mg/kg, i.p. In rats discriminating LY3020371, neither d-amphetamine nor phencyclidine fully substituted for LY3020371 (35-45%) and the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY354740 partially attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of LY3020371. These are the first data to demonstrate the discriminative stimulus effects of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist. Some alterations were suggested to occur in the density of mGlu2/3 receptor binding sites in the drug discrimination rats relative to their age-matched non-drug-exposed controls. In preclinical toxicology studies of 14day dosing of doses up to 1000mg/kg, i.v. in rats and up to 500m/kg, i.v. in Cynomologous monkeys, LY3020371 produced uM plasma exposures without producing critical toxicological findings. It is concluded that LY3020371 does not recapitulate the motor, cognitive, subjective, neurochemical, electrophysiological, or toxicological findings reported with ketamine. Thus, LY

  2. mGlu5 acts as a switch for opposing forms of synaptic plasticity at mossy fiber-CA3 and commissural associational-CA3 synapses.

    PubMed

    Hagena, Hardy; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-03-25

    Within the hippocampus, different kinds of spatial experience determine the direction of change of synaptic weights. Synaptic plasticity resulting from such experience may enable memory encoding. The CA3 region is very striking in this regard: due to the distinct molecular properties of the mossy fiber (MF) and associational-commissural (AC) synapses, it is believed that they enable working memory and pattern completion. The question arises, however, as to how information reaching these synapses results in differentiated encoding. Given its crucial role in enabling persistent synaptic plasticity in other hippocampal subfields, we speculated that the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 may regulate information encoding at MF and AC synapses. Here, we show that antagonism of mGlu5 inhibits LTP, but not LTD at MF synapses of freely behaving adult rats. Conversely, mGlu5 antagonism prevents LTD but not LTP at AC-CA3 synapses. This suggests that, under conditions in which mGlu5 is activated, LTP may be preferentially induced at MF synapses, whereas LTD is favored at AC synapses. To assess this possibility, we applied 50 Hz stimulation that should generate postsynaptic activity that corresponds to θm, the activation threshold that lies between LTP and LTD. MGlu5 activation had no effect on AC responses but potentiated MF synapses. These data suggest that mGlu5 serves as a switch that alters signal-to-noise ratios during information encoding in the CA3 region. This mechanism supports highly tuned and differentiated information storage in CA3 synapses.

  3. Selective Disruption of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5-Homer Interactions Mimics Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weirui; Molinaro, Gemma; Collins, Katie A.; Hays, Seth A.; Paylor, Richard; Worley, Paul F.; Szumlinski, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    Altered function of the Gq-coupled, Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, specifically mGlu5, is implicated in multiple mouse models of autism and intellectual disability. mGlu5 dysfunction has been most well characterized in the fragile X syndrome mouse model, the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mouse, where pharmacological and genetic reduction of mGlu5 reverses many phenotypes. mGlu5 is less associated with its scaffolding protein Homer in Fmr1 KO mice, and restoration of mGlu5-Homer interactions by genetic deletion of a short, dominant negative of Homer, H1a, rescues many phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggested that disruption of mGlu5-Homer leads to phenotypes of FXS. To test this idea, we examined mice with a knockin mutation of mGlu5 (F1128R; mGlu5R/R) that abrogates binding to Homer. Although FMRP levels were normal, mGlu5R/R mice mimicked multiple phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice, including reduced mGlu5 association with the postsynaptic density, enhanced constitutive mGlu5 signaling to protein synthesis, deficits in agonist-induced translational control, protein synthesis-independent LTD, neocortical hyperexcitability, audiogenic seizures, and altered behaviors, including anxiety and sensorimotor gating. These results reveal new roles for the Homer scaffolds in regulation of mGlu5 function and implicate a specific molecular mechanism in a complex brain disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Abnormal function of the metabotropic, or Gq-coupled, glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including a genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism called fragile X syndrome. In brains of a mouse model of fragile X, mGlu5 is less associated with its binding partner Homer, a scaffolding protein that regulates mGlu5 localization to synapses and its ability to activate biochemical signaling pathways. Here we show that a mouse expressing a mutant mGlu5 that cannot bind to Homer is sufficient to mimic many of the biochemical

  4. Structural, signalling and regulatory properties of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: prototypic family C G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, E; Challiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 a new type of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was cloned, the type 1a metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor, which, despite possessing the defining seven-transmembrane topology of the GPCR superfamily, bore little resemblance to the growing number of other cloned GPCRs. Subsequent studies have shown that there are eight mammalian mGlu receptors that, together with the calcium-sensing receptor, the GABA(B) receptor (where GABA is gamma-aminobutyric acid) and a subset of pheromone, olfactory and taste receptors, make up GPCR family C. Currently available data suggest that family C GPCRs share a number of structural, biochemical and regulatory characteristics, which differ markedly from those of the other GPCR families, most notably the rhodopsin/family A GPCRs that have been most widely studied to date. This review will focus on the group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5). This subgroup of receptors is widely and differentially expressed in neuronal and glial cells within the brain, and receptor activation has been implicated in the control of an array of key signalling events, including roles in the adaptative changes needed for long-term depression or potentiation of neuronal synaptic connectivity. In addition to playing critical physiological roles within the brain, the mGlu receptors are also currently the focus of considerable attention because of their potential as drug targets for the treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:11672421

  5. Analysis of positive and negative allosteric modulation in metabotropic glutamate receptors 4 and 5 with a dual ligand.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James A R; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Giraldo, Jesús

    2017-07-10

    As class C GPCRs and regulators of synaptic activity, human metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4 and 5 are prime targets for allosteric modulation, with mGlu5 inhibition or mGlu4 stimulation potentially treating conditions like chronic pain and Parkinson's disease. As an allosteric modulator that can bind both receptors, 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) is able to negatively modulate mGlu5 or positively modulate mGlu4. At a structural level, how it elicits these responses and how mGluRs undergo activation is unclear. Here, we employ homology modelling and 30 µs of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe allosteric conformational change in mGlu4 and mGlu5, with and without docked MPEP. Our results identify several structural differences between mGlu4 and mGlu5, as well as key differences responsible for MPEP-mediated positive and negative allosteric modulation, respectively. A novel mechanism of mGlu4 activation is revealed, which may apply to all mGluRs in general. This involves conformational changes in TM3, TM4 and TM5, separation of intracellular loop 2 (ICL2) from ICL1/ICL3, and destabilization of the ionic-lock. On the other hand, mGlu5 experiences little disturbance when MPEP binds, maintaining its inactive state with reduced conformational fluctuation. In addition, when MPEP is absent, a lipid molecule can enter the mGlu5 allosteric pocket.

  6. Translational Pharmacology of the Metabotropic Glutamate 2 Receptor-Preferring Agonist LY2812223 in the Animal and Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Felder, Christian C; Schober, Douglas A; Tu, Yuan; Quets, Anne; Xiao, Hongling; Watt, Marla; Siuda, Ed; Nisenbaum, Eric; Xiang, Chuanxi; Heinz, Beverly; Prieto, Lourdes; McKinzie, David L; Monn, James A

    2017-04-01

    LY2812223 [(1R,2S,4R,5R,6R)-2-amino-4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ylsulfanyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid] was identified via structure-activity studies arising from the potent metabotropic glutamate mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY354740 [(+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0] hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid] as an mGlu2-preferring agonist. This pharmacology was determined using stably transfected cells containing either the human mGlu2 or mGlu3 receptor. We extended the pharmacological evaluation of LY2812223 to native brain tissues derived from relevant species used for preclinical drug development as well as human postmortem brain tissue. This analysis was conducted to ensure pharmacological translation from animals to human subjects in subsequent clinical studies. A guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate (GTPγS) functional binding assay, a method for measuring Gi-coupled signaling that is inherent to the group 2 mGlu receptors, was used to evaluate LY2812223 pharmacology of native mGlu receptors in mouse, rat, nonhuman primate, and human cortical brain tissue samples. In native tissue membranes, LY2812223 unexpectedly acted as a partial agonist across all species tested. Activity of LY2812223 was lost in cortical membranes collected from mGlu2 knockout mice, but not those from mGlu3 knockout mice, providing additional support for mGlu2-preferring activity. Other signal transduction assays were used for comparison with the GTP binding assay (cAMP, calcium mobilization, and dynamic mass redistribution). In ectopic cell line-based assays, LY2812223 displayed near maximal agonist responses at the mGlu2 receptor across all assay formats, while it showed no functional agonist activity at the mGlu3 receptor except in the cAMP assay. In native brain slices or membranes that express both mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors, LY2812223 displayed unexpected partial agonist activity, which may suggest a functional interplay between these receptor subtypes in the brain. Copyright © 2017 by

  7. Differences in 5-HT2A and mGlu2 Receptor Expression Levels and Repressive Epigenetic Modifications at the 5-HT2A Promoter Region in the Roman Low- (RLA-I) and High- (RHA-I) Avoidance Rat Strains.

    PubMed

    Fomsgaard, Luna; Moreno, Jose L; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Brudek, Tomasz; Adamsen, Dea; Rio-Alamos, Cristobal; Saunders, Justin; Klein, Anders Bue; Oliveras, Ignasi; Cañete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernandez-Teruel, Albert; Gonzalez-Maeso, Javier; Aznar, Susana

    2017-03-06

    The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) and metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptors regulate each other and are associated with schizophrenia. The Roman high- (RHA-I) and the Roman low- (RLA-I) avoidance rat strains present well-differentiated behavioral profiles, with the RHA-I strain emerging as a putative genetic rat model of schizophrenia-related features. The RHA-I strain shows increased 5-HT2A and decreased mGlu2 receptor binding levels in prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here, we looked for differences in gene expression and transcriptional regulation of these receptors. The striatum (STR) was included in the analysis. 5-HT2A, 5-HT1A, and mGlu2 mRNA and [(3)H]ketanserin binding levels were measured in brain homogenates. As expected, 5-HT2A binding was significantly increased in PFC in the RHA-I rats, while no difference in binding was observed in STR. Surprisingly, 5-HT2A gene expression was unchanged in PFC but significantly decreased in STR. mGlu2 receptor gene expression was significantly decreased in both PFC and STR. No differences were observed for the 5-HT1A receptor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed increased trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) at the promoter region of the HTR2A gene in the STR. We further looked at the Akt/GSK3 signaling pathway, a downstream point of convergence of the serotonin and glutamate system, and found increased phosphorylation levels of GSK3β at tyrosine 216 and increased β-catenin levels in the PFC of the RHA-I rats. These results reveal region-specific regulation of the 5-HT2A receptor in the RHA-I rats probably due to absence of mGlu2 receptor that may result in differential regulation of downstream pathways.

  8. Levels of the Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) are altered in the prenatal restrain stress mouse model of schizophrenia and are differentially regulated by the mGlu2/3 receptor agonists, LY379268 and LY354740.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Rosamaria; Borro, Marina; Motolese, Marta; Molinaro, Gemma; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; di Nuzzo, Luigi; Caraci, Filippo; Matrisciano, Francesco; Pittaluga, Anna; Mairesse, Jerome; Simmaco, Maurizio; Nisticò, Robert; Monn, James A; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2014-11-01

    LY379268 and LY354740, two agonists of mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors, display different potencies in mouse models of schizophrenia. This differential effect of the two drugs remains unexplained. We performed a proteomic analysis in cultured cortical neurons challenged with either LY379268 or LY354740. Among the few proteins that were differentially influenced by the two drugs, Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor-β (Rab GDIβ) was down-regulated by LY379268 and showed a trend to an up-regulation in response to LY354740. In cultured hippocampal neurons, LY379268 selectively down-regulated the α isoform of Rab GDI. Rab GDI inhibits the activity of the synaptic vesicle-associated protein, Rab3A, and is reduced in the brain of schizophrenic patients. We examined the expression of Rab GDI in mice exposed to prenatal stress ("PRS mice"), which have been described as a putative model of schizophrenia. Rab GDIα protein levels were increased in the hippocampus of PRS mice at postnatal days (PND)1 and 21, but not at PND60. At PND21, PRS mice also showed a reduced depolarization-evoked [(3)H]d-aspartate release in hippocampal synaptosomes. The increase in Rab GDIα levels in the hippocampus of PRS mice was reversed by a 7-days treatment with LY379268 (1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), but not by treatment with equal doses of LY354740. These data strengthen the validity of PRS mice as a model of schizophrenia, and show for the first time a pharmacodynamic difference between LY379268 and LY354740 which might be taken into account in an attempt to explain the differential effect of the two drugs across mouse models.

  9. An allosteric modulator to control endogenous G protein-coupled receptors with light.

    PubMed

    Pittolo, Silvia; Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Eckelt, Kay; Rovira, Xavier; Dalton, James; Goudet, Cyril; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Llobet, Artur; Giraldo, Jesús; Llebaria, Amadeu; Gorostiza, Pau

    2014-10-01

    Controlling drug activity with light offers the possibility of enhancing pharmacological selectivity with spatial and temporal regulation, thus enabling highly localized therapeutic effects and precise dosing patterns. Here we report on the development and characterization of what is to our knowledge the first photoswitchable allosteric modulator of a G protein-coupled receptor. Alloswitch-1 is selective for the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 and enables the optical control of endogenous mGlu5 receptors.

  10. A slow excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by a novel metabotropic glutamate receptor in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Nengyin; Yang, Jing; Silm, Katlin; Edwards, Robert H; Nicoll, Roger A

    2017-03-15

    Slow excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors) have been reported in several neuronal subtypes, but their presence in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains elusive. Here we find that in CA1 pyramidal neurons a slow EPSC is induced by repetitive stimulation while ionotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate-uptake are blocked whereas it is absent in the VGLUT1 knockout mouse in which presynaptic glutamate is lost, suggesting the slow EPSC is mediated by glutamate activating mGlu receptors. However, it is not inhibited by known mGlu receptor antagonists. These findings suggest that this slow EPSC is mediated by a novel mGlu receptor, and that it may be involved in neurological diseases associated with abnormal high-concentration of extracellular glutamate. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors, 5 years on'.

  11. Substituted 1-Phenyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)urea Negative Allosteric Modulators of mGlu5: Discovery of a New Tool Compound VU0463841 with Activity in Rat Models of Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine is a powerful and highly addictive stimulant that disrupts the normal reward circuitry in the central nervous system (CNS), producing euphoric effects. Cocaine use can lead to acute and life threatening emergencies, and abuse is associated with increased risk for contracting infectious diseases. Though certain types of behavioral therapy have proven effective for treatment of cocaine addiction, relapse remains high, and there are currently no approved medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse. Evidence has continued to accumulate that indicates a critical role for the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) in the modulation of neural circuitry associated with the addictive properties of cocaine. While the small molecule mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator (NAM) field is relatively advanced, investigation into the potential of small molecule mGlu5 NAMs for the treatment of cocaine addiction remains an area of high interest. Herein we describe the discovery and characterization of a potent and selective compound 29 (VU0463841) with good CNS exposure in rats. The utility of 29 (VU0463841) was demonstrated by its ability to attenuate drug seeking behaviors in relevant rat models of cocaine addiction. PMID:23682684

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling in neuroglia

    PubMed Central

    Loane, David J.; Stoica, Bogdan A.; Faden, Alan I.

    2011-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors, which include eight subtypes that have been classified into three groups (I–III) based upon sequence homology, signal transduction mechanism and pharmacological profile. Although most studied with regard to neuronal function and modulation, mGlu receptors are also expressed by neuroglia-including astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Activation of mGlu receptors on neuroglia under both physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions mediates numerous actions that are essential for intrinsic glial cell function, as well as for glial–neuronal interactions. Astrocyte mGlu receptors play important physiological roles in regulating neurotransmission and maintaining neuronal homeostasis. However, mGlu receptors on astrocytes and microglia also serve to modulate cell death and neurological function in a variety of pathophysiological conditions such as acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. The latter effects are complex and bi-directional, depending on which mGlu receptor sub-types are activated. PMID:22662309

  13. Recent Advances in the Design and Development of Novel Negative Allosteric Modulators of mGlu5

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) have remained attractive to researchers as potential therapies for a number of central nervous system related diseases, including anxiety, pain, gastresophageal reflux disease (GERD), addiction, Parkinson’s disease (PD), and fragile X syndrome (FXS). In addition to the many publications with supportive preclinical data with key tool molecules, recent positive reports from the clinic have bolstered the confidence in this approach. During the 2 year time span from 2009 through 2010, a number of new mGlu5 NAM chemotypes have been disclosed and discussed in the primary and patent literature. A summary of several efforts representing many diverse chemotypes are presented here, along with a discussion of representative structure–activity relationships (SAR) and synthetic approaches to the templates where possible. PMID:21927649

  14. Characterization of [3H]-(2S,2′R,3′R)-2-(2′,3′-dicarboxy- cyclopropyl)glycine ([3H]-DCG IV) binding to metabotropic mGlu2 receptor-transfected cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cartmell, Jayne; Adam, Geo; Chaboz, Sylvie; Henningsen, Robert; Kemp, John A; Klingelschmidt, Agnes; Metzler, Veit; Monsma, Frederick; Schaffhauser, Hervé; Wichmann, Jürgen; Mutel, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    The binding of the new selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor radioligand, [3H]-(2S,2′R,3′R)-2-(2′,3′-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine ([3H]-DCG IV), was characterized in rat mGlu2 receptor-transfected CHO cell membranes. [3H]-DCG IV binding was pH-dependent, but was not sensitive to temperature. Saturation analysis showed the presence of a single binding site, with a Kd value of 160 nM and a Bmax value of 10 pmol mg−1 protein. Binding was not sensitive to Na+-dependent glutamate uptake blockers or Cl−-dependent glutamate binding inhibitors. Furthermore, up to concentrations of 1 mM, the glutamate ionotropic receptor agonists, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), (S)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate, did not affect [3H]-DCG IV binding. Of the compounds observed to inhibit [3H]-DCG IV binding, the most potent were the recently described selective group II agonist, (+)-2-aminobicyclo-[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylate (LY 354740; Ki value 16 nM) and antagonist, 2-amino-2-(2-carboxycyclopropan-1-yl)-3-(dibenzopyran-4-yl) propanoic acid (LY 341495; Ki value 19 nM). As expected, for a G-protein-coupled receptor, guanosine-5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) inhibited [3H]-DCG IV binding in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 12 nM. A highly significant correlation was observed between the potencies of compounds able to inhibit [3H]-DCG IV binding and potencies obtained for agonist activity in a GTPγ35S binding functional assay. In addition, these studies identified a number of compounds with previously unknown activity at mGlu2 receptors, including L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (L-AP3), L(+)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (L-AP5), 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (R-CPP), N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamic acid (NAAG) and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP). PMID:9504391

  15. Discovery of dual positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the metabotropic glutamate 2 receptor and CysLT1 antagonists for treating migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Maria-Jesus; Benesh, Dana R; Knobelsdorf, James A; Khilevich, Albert; Cortez, Guillermo S; Mokube, Fese; Aicher, Thomas D; Groendyke, Todd M; Marmsater, Fredrik P; Tang, Tony P; Johnson, Kirk W; Clemens-Smith, Amy; Muhlhauser, Mark A; Swanson, Steven; Catlow, John; Emkey, Renee; Johnson, Michael P; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-15

    Pyridylmethylsulfonamide series were the first reported example of positive allosteric modulators (PAM) of the mGlu2 receptor. The hydroxyacetophenone scaffold is a second series of mGlu2 PAMs we have identified. This series of molecules are potent mGlu2 potentiators and possess significant CysLT1 (cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1) antagonist activity, showing in vivo efficacy in a dural plasma protein extravasation (PPE) model of migraine. In this paper, we describe the dual SAR, pharmacokinetics and preclinical in vivo efficacy data for a tetrazole containing hydroxyacetophenone scaffold.

  16. Positional isomers of bispyridine benzene derivatives induce efficacy changes on mGlu5 negative allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Dalton, James A R; Rovira, Xavier; Pin, Jean Philippe; Goudet, Cyril; Gorostiza, Pau; Giraldo, Jesús; Llebaria, Amadeu

    2017-02-15

    Modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) with partial allosteric antagonists has received increased interest due to their favourable in vivo activity profiles compared to the unfavourable side-effects of full inverse agonists. Here we report on a series of bispyridine benzene derivatives with a functional molecular switch affecting antagonistic efficacy, shifting from inverse agonism to partial antagonism with only a single change in the substitution pattern of the benzene ring. These efficacy changes are explained through computational docking, revealing two different receptor conformations of different energetic stability and different positional isomer binding preferences.

  17. Blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 activation inhibits mechanical hypersensitivity following abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Sharron; Nolan, Andrea Mary

    2007-08-01

    This study used the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor subtype-selective antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) to characterise the contribution of mGlu5 receptor activity to pain and hypersensitivity in an animal model of post-surgical pain. Adult female Wistar rats (200-250g) were anaesthetised with isoflurane (2%) and underwent a midline laparotomy with gentle manipulation of the viscera, and the effects of pre- (30min) or post- (5h) operative treatment with MPEP (1, 3 or 10mgkg(-1); i.p.) or drug-vehicle on hindpaw withdrawal latency (in seconds) to thermal stimulation (Hargreave's Test) and response threshold (in grams) to mechanical stimulation (using a dynamic plantar aesthesiometer) were measured. Animals that underwent surgery displayed significant hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the hindpaws. Hypersensitivity was maximum at 6h post-surgery (44.5+/-2.4% decrease; p<0.01 vs. anaesthesia only controls) and persisted for 48h. Surgery had no effect on thermal withdrawal latency. Both pre-operative and post-operative administration of 10mgkg(-1)MPEP blocked mechanical hypersensitivity induced by surgery (p<0.01 vs. vehicle treatment). MPEP had no effect on acute nociceptive thresholds in naïve animals. These data suggest that activity at mGlu5 receptors contributes to development of pain and hypersensitivity following surgery.

  18. Insights into the interaction of negative allosteric modulators with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5: discovery and computational modeling of a new series of ligands with nanomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Anighoro, Andrew; Graziani, Davide; Bettinelli, Ilaria; Cilia, Antonio; De Toma, Carlo; Longhi, Matteo; Mangiarotti, Fabio; Menegon, Sergio; Pirona, Lorenza; Poggesi, Elena; Riva, Carlo; Rastelli, Giulio

    2015-07-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a biological target implicated in major neurological and psychiatric disorders. In the present study, we have investigated structural determinants of the interaction of negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) with the seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain of mGlu5. A homology model of the 7TM receptor domain built on the crystal structure of the mGlu1 template was obtained, and the binding modes of known NAMs, namely MPEP and fenobam, were investigated by docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results were validated by comparison with mutagenesis data available in the literature for these two ligands, and subsequently corroborated by the recently described mGlu5 crystal structure. Moreover, a new series of NAMs was synthesized and tested, providing compounds with nanomolar affinity. Several structural modifications were sequentially introduced with the aim of identifying structural features important for receptor binding. The synthesized NAMs were docked in the validated homology model and binding modes were used to interpret and discuss structure-activity relationships within this new series of compounds. Finally, the models of the interaction of NAMs with mGlu5 were extended to include important non-aryl alkyne mGlu5 NAMs taken from the literature. Overall, the results provide useful insights into the molecular interaction of negative allosteric modulators with mGlu5 and may facilitate the design of new modulators for this class of receptors.

  19. N-Acetyl-cysteine causes analgesia by reinforcing the endogenous activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmacological activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2 receptors) causes analgesia in experimental models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Presynaptic mGlu2 receptors are activated by the glutamate released from astrocytes by means of the cystine/glutamate antiporter (System xc- or Sxc-). We examined the analgesic activity of the Sxc- activator, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), in mice developing inflammatory or neuropathic pain. Results A single injection of NAC (100 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced nocifensive behavior in the second phase of the formalin test. NAC-induced analgesia was abrogated by the Sxc- inhibitor, sulphasalazine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) or by the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.). NAC still caused analgesia in mGlu3−/− mice, but was inactive in mGlu2−/− mice. In wild-type mice, NAC retained the analgesic activity in the formalin test when injected daily for 7 days, indicating the lack of tolerance. Both single and repeated injections of NAC also caused analgesia in the complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) model of chronic inflammatory pain, and, again, analgesia was abolished by LY341495. Data obtained in mice developing neuropathic pain in response to chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve were divergent. In this model, a single injection of NAC caused analgesia that was reversed by LY341495, whereas repeated injections of NAC were ineffective. Thus, tolerance to NAC-induced analgesia developed in the CCI model, but not in models of inflammatory pain. The CFA and CCI models differed with respect to the expression levels of xCT (the catalytic subunit of Sxc-) and activator of G-protein signaling type-3 (AGS3) in the dorsal portion of the lumbar spinal cord. CFA-treated mice showed no change in either protein, whereas CCI mice showed an ipislateral reduction in xCT levels and a bilateral increase in AGS3 levels in the spinal cord. Conclusions These data demonstrate that pharmacological

  20. Protective role for type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors against ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Moyanova, Slavianka G; Mastroiacovo, Federica; Kortenska, Lidia V; Mitreva, Rumiana G; Fardone, Erminia; Santolini, Ines; Sobrado, Mónica; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Ngomba, Richard T

    2011-04-01

    We examined the influence of type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors on ischemic brain damage using the permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in mice and the endothelin-1 (Et-1) model of transient focal ischemia in rats. Mice lacking mGlu4 receptors showed a 25% to 30% increase in infarct volume after MCAO as compared with wild-type littermates. In normal mice, systemic injection of the selective mGlu4 receptor enhancer, N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-caboxamide (PHCCC; 10  mg/kg, subcutaneous, administered once 30  minutes before MCAO), reduced the extent of ischemic brain damage by 35% to 45%. The drug was inactive in mGlu4 receptor knockout mice. In the Et-1 model, PHCCC administered only once 20  minutes after ischemia reduced the infarct volume to a larger extent in the caudate/putamen than in the cerebral cortex. Ischemic rats treated with PHCCC showed a faster recovery of neuronal function, as shown by electrocorticographic recording and by a battery of specific tests, which assess sensorimotor deficits. These data indicate that activation of mGlu4 receptors limit the development of brain damage after permanent or transient focal ischemia. These findings are promising because selective mGlu4 receptor enhancers are under clinical development for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

  1. Neurophysiologic and antipsychotic profiles of TASP0433864, a novel positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Tetsuaki; Marumo, Toshiyuki; Hikichi, Hirohiko; Tomishima, Yasumitsu; Urabe, Hiroki; Tamita, Tomoko; Iida, Izumi; Yasuhara, Akito; Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2014-12-01

    Excess glutamatergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and the activation of metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptor may exert antipsychotic effects by normalizing glutamate transmission. In the present study, we investigated the neurophysiologic and antipsychotic profiles of TASP0433864 [(2S)-2-[(4-tert-butylphenoxy)methyl]-5-methyl-2,3-dihydroimidazo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazole-6-carboxamide], a newly synthesized positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of mGlu2 receptor. TASP0433864 exhibited PAM activity at human and rat mGlu2 receptors with EC50 values of 199 and 206 nM, respectively, without exerting agonist activity at rat mGlu2 receptor. TASP0433864 produced a leftward and upward shift in the concentration-response curve of glutamate-increased guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding to mGlu2 receptor. In contrast, TASP0433864 had negligible activities for other mGlu receptors, including mGlu3 receptor, and did not have any affinity for other receptors or transporters. In hippocampal slices, TASP0433864 potentiated an inhibitory effect of DCG-IV [(2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxylcyclopropyl)glycine], a mGlu2/3 receptor agonist, on the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the dentate gyrus, indicating that TASP0433864 potentiates the mGlu2 receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. Moreover, TASP0433864 inhibited both MK-801 [(5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate]- and ketamine-increased cortical γ band oscillation in the rat cortical electroencephalogram, which have been considered to reflect the excess activation of cortical pyramidal neurons. The inhibitory effect of TASP0433864 on cortical activation was also observed in the mouse 2-deoxy-glucose uptake study. In a behavioral study, TASP0433864 significantly inhibited both ketamine- and methamphetamine-increased locomotor activities in mice and rats, respectively. Collectively, these

  2. Control of neuronal excitability by Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Correa, Ana Maria Bernal; Guimarães, Jennifer Diniz Soares; Dos Santos E Alhadas, Everton; Kushmerick, Christopher

    2017-08-23

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors couple through G proteins to regulate a large number of cell functions. Eight mGlu receptor isoforms have been cloned and classified into three Groups based on sequence, signal transduction mechanisms and pharmacology. This review will focus on Group I mGlu receptors, comprising the isoforms mGlu1 and mGlu5. Activation of these receptors initiates both G protein-dependent and -independent signal transduction pathways. The G-protein-dependent pathway involves mainly Gαq, which can activate PLCβ, leading initially to the formation of IP3 and diacylglycerol. IP3 can release Ca(2+) from cellular stores resulting in activation of Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels. Intracellular Ca(2+), together with diacylglycerol, activates PKC, which has many protein targets, including ion channels. Thus, activation of the G-protein-dependent pathway affects cellular excitability though several different effectors. In parallel, G protein-independent pathways lead to activation of non-selective cationic currents and metabotropic synaptic currents and potentials. Here, we provide a survey of the membrane transport proteins responsible for these electrical effects of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  3. Activation of Adenosine1 Receptors Induces Antidepressant-Like, Anti-Impulsive Effects on Differential Reinforcement of Low-Rate 72-s Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Stress and psychiatric illness have been associated with a dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Recently, positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptor have been found to exert antidepressant-like activity in rats performing under a differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) 72-s schedule. An autoreceptor role at glutamatergic synapses is the most salient physiological role played by the mGlu2 receptor. Adenosine A1 receptors play a heteroreceptor role at many of the same forebrain synapses where mGlu2 autoreceptors are found. Agonists and/or PAMs of mGlu2 receptors act similarly to adenosine A1 receptor agonists with respect to a wide range of electrophysiological, biochemical, and behavioral responses mediated by limbic circuitry thought to play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disease and to mediate therapeutic drug effects. Therefore, the role of adenosine A1 receptor activation on rat DRL 72-s behavior was explored to provide preclinical evidence consistent or inconsistent with potential antidepressant effects. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) increased the reinforcement rate, decreased the response rate, and induced a rightward shift in inter-response time distributions in a dose-dependent fashion similar to most known antidepressant drugs. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) blocked these antidepressant-like effects. These novel observations with CHA and DPCPX suggest that activation of adenosine A1 receptors could contribute to antidepressant effects, in addition to previous preclinical reports of anxiolytic and antipsychotic effects. By implication, targeting a dysregulated glutamatergic system may be an important principle in discovering novel antidepressant agents that may also possess anti-impulsive activity. PMID:22323824

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: From the workbench to the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, F.; Bockaert, J.; Collingridge, G.L.; Conn, P.J.; Ferraguti, F.; Schoepp, D.D.; Wroblewski, J.T.; Pin, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were discovered in the mid 1980s and originally described as glutamate receptors coupled to polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis. Almost 6500 articles have been published since then, and subtype-selective mGlu receptor ligands are now under clinical development for the treatment of a variety of disorders such as Fragile-X syndrome, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, generalized anxiety disorder, chronic pain, and gastroesophageal reflux disorder. Prof. Erminio Costa was linked to the early times of the mGlu receptor history, when a few research groups challenged the general belief that glutamate could only activate ionotropic receptors and all metabolic responses to glutamate were secondary to calcium entry. This review moves from those nostalgic times to the most recent advances in the physiology and pharmacology of mGlu receptors, and highlights the role of individual mGlu receptor subtypes in the pathophysiology of human disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Trends in Neuropharmacology: In Memory of Erminio Costa’. PMID:21036182

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of [11C]MMPIP as a potential radioligand for imaging of metabotropic glutamate 7 receptor in the brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabotropic glutamate 7 (mGlu7) receptor is a crucial target protein for the development of pharmaceuticals against central nervous system disorders. In the present study, we synthesized [11C]MMPIP, a putative radioligand for mGlu7 (binding constant KB = 30 nM), and evaluated its potential for imaging of mGlu7 via in vitro and in vivo techniques. Methods [11C]MMPIP was synthesized by the reaction of phenol precursor 3 with [11C]CH3I. In vitro autoradiography using [11C]MMPIP was performed on rat brain sections. To determine in vitro specific binding of [11C]MMPIP with mGlu7, a blocking study was conducted by co-incubation with excess AMN082, a selective antagonist for mGlu7, or unlabeled MMPIP. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies and ex vivo metabolite analysis were carried out on rat brains. Results [11C]MMPIP was obtained with two specific activity (SA) levels of average 58 (conventional) and 3,800 (high SA) GBq/μmol, respectively. High radioactive signals derived from conventional [11C]MMPIP in the in vitro autoradiography were seen in the thalamus, medulla oblongata, and striatum, corresponding with comprehensive brain distributions of mGlu7. Co-incubation with ANM082 or unlabeled MMPIP reduced the radioactive signals in the brain sections, respectively. In the PET studies with [11C]MMPIP, no specific uptake relative to mGlu7 was found in the examined brain regions. Conclusion Despite in vitro specific binding of [11C]MMPIP with mGlu7, visualization of mGlu7 in the living brain using PET was not successful. Development of new ligand candidates with higher affinity for mGlu7 is necessary. PMID:23870677

  6. Discovery of VU0409551/JNJ-46778212: An mGlu5 Positive Allosteric Modulator Clinical Candidate Targeting Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the structure–activity relationship of a novel series of (2(phenoxymethyl)-6,7-dihydrooxazolo[5,4-c]pyridine-5(4H)-yl(aryl)methanones as potent, selective, and orally bioavailable metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). On the basis of its robust in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy in multiple preclinical models of multiple domains of schizophrenia, coupled with a good DMPK profile and an acceptable therapeutic window, 17a (VU0409551/JNJ-46778212) was selected as a candidate for further development. PMID:26157544

  7. Ligand Bias at Metabotropic Glutamate 1a Receptors: Molecular Determinants That Distinguish β-Arrestin-Mediated from G Protein-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Andrew C.; DiRaddo, John O.; Miller, Eric; Hathaway, Hannah A.; Pshenichkin, Sergey; Takoudjou, Guy Rodrigue; Grajkowska, Ewa; Yasuda, Robert P.; Wolfe, Barry B.

    2012-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate 1a (mGlu1a) receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor linked with phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and with β-arrestin-1-mediated sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cytoprotective signaling. Previously, we reported the existence of ligand bias at this receptor, inasmuch as glutamate induced both effects, whereas quisqualate induced only PI hydrolysis. In the current study, we showed that mGlu1 receptor agonists such as glutamate, aspartate, and l-cysteate were unbiased and activated both signaling pathways, whereas quisqualate and (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine stimulated only PI hydrolysis. Competitive antagonists inhibited only PI hydrolysis and not the β-arrestin-dependent pathway, whereas a noncompetitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist blocked both pathways. Mutational analysis of the ligand binding domain of the mGlu1a receptor revealed that Thr188 residues were essential for PI hydrolysis but not for protective signaling, whereas Arg323 and Lys409 residues were required for β-arrestin-1-mediated sustained ERK phosphorylation and cytoprotective signaling but not for PI hydrolysis. Therefore, the mechanism of ligand bias appears to involve different modes of agonist interactions with the receptor ligand binding domain. Although some mGlu1a receptor agonists are biased toward PI hydrolysis, we identified two endogenous compounds, glutaric acid and succinic acid, as new mGlu1 receptor agonists that are fully biased toward β-arrestin-mediated protective signaling. Pharmacological studies indicated that, in producing the two effects, glutamate interacted in two distinct ways with mGlu1 receptors, inasmuch as competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists that blocked PI hydrolysis did not inhibit cytoprotective signaling. Quisqualate, which is biased toward PI hydrolysis, failed to inhibit glutamate-induced protection, and glutaric acid, which is biased toward protection, did not interfere with glutamate

  8. Re-exploring the N-phenylpicolinamide derivatives to develop mGlu4 ligands with improved affinity and in vitro microsomal stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoda; Kil, Kun-Eek; Poutiainen, Pekka; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Kang, Hye-Jin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2015-09-15

    In recent years, mGlu4 has received great attention and research effort because of the potential benefits of mGlu4 activation in treating numerous brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Many positive allosteric modulators of mGlu4 have been developed. To better understand the role of mGlu4 in healthy and disease conditions, we are interested in developing an mGlu4 selective radioligand for in vivo studies. Thus, we had synthesized and studied [(11)C]2 as a PET tracer for mGlu4, which demonstrated some promising features as a PET radioligand as well as the limitation need to be improved. In order to develop an mGlu4 ligand with enhanced affinity and improved metabolic stability, we have modified, synthesized and evaluated a series of new N-phenylpicolinamide derivatives. The SAR study has discovered a number of compounds with low nM affinity to mGlu4. The dideuteriumfluoromethoxy modified compound 24 is identified as a very promising mGlu4 ligand, which has demonstrated enhanced affinity, improved in vitro microsomal stability, good selectivity and good permeability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peripheral Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation leads to muscle mechanical hyperalgesia through TRPV1 phosphorylation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Lee, Jongseok; Joseph, John; Saloman, Jami; Ro, Jin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated glutamate levels within injured muscle play important roles in muscle pain and hyperalgesia. In this study, we hypothesized that PKC-dependent TRPV1 phosphorylation contributes to the muscle mechanical hyperalgesia following activation of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1/5). Mechanical hyperalgesia induced by dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), an mGlu1/5 agonist, in the masseter muscle was attenuated by AMG9810, a specific TRPV1 antagonist. AMG9810 also suppressed mechanical hyperalgesia evoked by pharmacological activation of PKC. DHPG-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was suppressed by pretreatment with a decoy peptide that disrupted interactions between TRPV1 and A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP), which facilitates phosphorylation of TRPV1. In dissociated trigeminal ganglia (TG), DHPG upregulated serine phosphorylation of TRPV1 (S800) during which DHPG-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was prominent. The TRPV1 phosphorylation at S800 was suppressed by a PKC inhibitor. Electrophysiological measurements in TG neurons demonstrated that TRPV1 sensitivity was enhanced by pretreatment with DHPG, and this was prevented by a PKC, but not by a PKA, inhibitor. These results suggest that mGlu1/5 activation in masseter afferents invoke phosphorylation of TRPV1 serine residues including S800, and that phosphorylation-induced sensitization of TRPV1 is involved in masseter mechanical hyperalgesia. These data support a role of TRPV1 as an integrator of glutamate receptor signaling in muscle nociceptors. PERSPECTIVE This article demonstrates that activation of mGlu1/5 leads to phosphorylation of a specific TRPV1 residue via PKC and AKAP150 in trigeminal sensory neurons, and that functional interactions between glutamate receptors and TRPV1 mediate mechanical hyperalgesia in the muscle tissue. PMID:25451626

  10. Discovery of 8-Trifluoromethyl-3-cyclopropylmethyl-7-[(4-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1-piperazinyl)methyl]-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine (JNJ-46356479), a Selective and Orally Bioavailable mGlu2 Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulator (PAM).

    PubMed

    Cid, Jose María; Tresadern, Gary; Vega, Juan Antonio; de Lucas, Ana Isabel; Del Cerro, Alcira; Matesanz, Encarnación; Linares, María Lourdes; García, Aránzazu; Iturrino, Laura; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Macdonald, Gregor J; Oehlrich, Daniel; Lavreysen, Hilde; Peeters, Luc; Ceusters, Marc; Ahnaou, Abdellah; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Mackie, Claire; Somers, Marijke; Trabanco, Andrés A

    2016-09-22

    Positive allosteric modulators of the metabotropic glutamate 2 receptor have generated great interest in the past decade. There is mounting evidence of their potential as therapeutic agents in the treatment of multiple central nervous system disorders. We have previously reported substantial efforts leading to potent and selective mGlu2 PAMs. However, finding compounds with the optimal combination of in vitro potency and good druglike properties has remained elusive, in part because of the hydrophobic nature of the allosteric binding site. Herein, we report on the lead optimization process to overcome the poor solubility inherent to the advanced lead 6. Initial prototypes already showed significant improvements in solubility while retaining good functional activity but displayed new liabilities associated with metabolism and hERG inhibition. Subsequent subtle modifications efficiently addressed those issues leading to the identification of compound 27 (JNJ-46356479). This new lead represents a more balanced profile that offers a significant improvement on the druglike attributes compared to previously reported leads.

  11. HTS-compatible FRET-based conformational sensors clarify membrane receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Scholler, Pauline; Moreno-Delgado, David; Lecat-Guillet, Nathalie; Doumazane, Etienne; Monnier, Carine; Charrier-Savournin, Fabienne; Fabre, Ludovic; Chouvet, Cédric; Soldevila, Stéphanie; Lamarque, Laurent; Donsimoni, Geoffrey; Roux, Thomas; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Trinquet, Eric; Rondard, Philippe; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-30

    Cell surface receptors represent a vast majority of drug targets. Efforts have been conducted to develop biosensors reporting their conformational changes in live cells for pharmacological and functional studies. Although Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) appears to be an ideal approach, its use is limited by the low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we report a toolbox composed of a combination of labeling technologies, specific fluorophores compatible with time-resolved FRET and a novel method to quantify signals. This approach enables the development of receptor biosensors with a large signal-to-noise ratio. We illustrate the usefulness of this toolbox through the development of biosensors for various G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. These receptors include mGlu, GABAB, LH, PTH, EGF and insulin receptors among others. These biosensors can be used for high-throughput studies and also revealed new information on the activation process of these receptors in their cellular environment.

  12. Shining Light on an mGlu5 Photoswitchable NAM: A Theoretical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, James A.R.; Lans, Isaias; Rovira, Xavier; Malhaire, Fanny; Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Pittolo, Silvia; Gorostiza, Pau; Llebaria, Amadeu; Goudet, Cyril; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Giraldo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are important drug targets because of their involvement in several neurological diseases. Among mGluRs, mGlu5 is a particularly high-profile target because its positive or negative allosteric modulation can potentially treat schizophrenia or anxiety and chronic pain, respectively. Here, we computationally and experimentally probe the functional binding of a novel photoswitchable mGlu5 NAM, termed alloswitch-1, which loses its NAM functionality under violet light. We show alloswitch-1 binds deep in the allosteric pocket in a similar fashion to mavoglurant, the co-crystallized NAM in the mGlu5 transmembrane domain crystal structure. Alloswitch-1, like NAM 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), is significantly affected by P655M mutation deep in the allosteric pocket, eradicating its functionality. In MD simulations, we show alloswitch-1 and MPEP stabilize the co-crystallized water molecule located at the bottom of the allosteric site that is seemingly characteristic of the inactive receptor state. Furthermore, both NAMs form H-bonds with S809 on helix 7, which may constitute an important stabilizing interaction for NAM-induced mGlu5 inactivation. Alloswitch-1, through isomerization of its amide group from trans to cis is able to form an additional interaction with N747 on helix 5. This may be an important interaction for amide-containing mGlu5 NAMs, helping to stabilize their binding in a potentially unusual cis-amide state. Simulated conformational switching of alloswitch-1 in silico suggests photoisomerization of its azo group from trans to cis may be possible within the allosteric pocket. However, photoexcited alloswitch-1 binds in an unstable fashion, breaking H-bonds with the protein and destabilizing the co-crystallized water molecule. This suggests photoswitching may have destabilizing effects on mGlu5 binding and functionality. PMID:26391742

  13. Shining Light on an mGlu5 Photoswitchable NAM: A Theoretical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James A R; Lans, Isaias; Rovira, Xavier; Malhaire, Fanny; Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Pittolo, Silvia; Gorostiza, Pau; Llebaria, Amadeu; Goudet, Cyril; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Giraldo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are important drug targets because of their involvement in several neurological diseases. Among mGluRs, mGlu5 is a particularly high-profile target because its positive or negative allosteric modulation can potentially treat schizophrenia or anxiety and chronic pain, respectively. Here, we computationally and experimentally probe the functional binding of a novel photoswitchable mGlu5 NAM, termed alloswitch-1, which loses its NAM functionality under violet light. We show alloswitch-1 binds deep in the allosteric pocket in a similar fashion to mavoglurant, the co-crystallized NAM in the mGlu5 transmembrane domain crystal structure. Alloswitch-1, like NAM 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), is significantly affected by P655M mutation deep in the allosteric pocket, eradicating its functionality. In MD simulations, we show alloswitch-1 and MPEP stabilize the co-crystallized water molecule located at the bottom of the allosteric site that is seemingly characteristic of the inactive receptor state. Furthermore, both NAMs form H-bonds with S809 on helix 7, which may constitute an important stabilizing interaction for NAM-induced mGlu5 inactivation. Alloswitch-1, through isomerization of its amide group from trans to cis is able to form an additional interaction with N747 on helix 5. This may be an important interaction for amide-containing mGlu5 NAMs, helping to stabilize their binding in a potentially unusual cis-amide state. Simulated conformational switching of alloswitch-1 in silico suggests photoisomerization of its azo group from trans to cis may be possible within the allosteric pocket. However, photoexcited alloswitch-1 binds in an unstable fashion, breaking H-bonds with the protein and destabilizing the co-crystallized water molecule. This suggests photoswitching may have destabilizing effects on mGlu5 binding and functionality.

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5: a target for migraine therapy.

    PubMed

    Waung, Maggie W; Akerman, Simon; Wakefield, Mark; Keywood, Charlotte; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Many patients suffering from migraine gain little relief from existing treatments partly because many existing acute and preventive therapies used in migraine have been adopted from other neurologic conditions such as depression or epilepsy. Here, we present data supporting a new migraine-specific target, the mGlu5 receptor. We studied the effect of mGlu5 blockade using ADX10059, on neuronal firing in the trigeminocervical complex (TCC) and durovascular effects of nociceptive trigeminovascular activation in the anesthetized rat. The clinical potential of the mGlu5 mechanism was tested with ADX10059 orally in a double-blind placebo-controlled, parallel group, clinical trial. The negative allosteric mGlu5 modulator ADX10059 attenuated dural vasodilator responses to meningeal stimulation in a dose-dependent manner, comparable to naratriptan, while the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blocker MK-801 had no effect. ADX10059 reduced responses of trigeminocervical neurons to dural stimulation, most strikingly affecting their spontaneous firing rate. Immunostaining identified mGlu5 and not mGlu1a receptors in the TCC. The primary efficacy endpoint for the clinical trial, 2 h pain free, demonstrated a significant effect of ADX10059 375 mg, 17%, versus placebo, 5%. No serious adverse events were reported at the primary dose, with transient dizziness being the most common treatment-emergent event at 48%. Our findings provide preclinical and clinical proof of concept establishing mGlu5 as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of migraine. Although ADX10059 is unsuitable as a therapeutic candidate, because of hepatoxicity detected in a subsequent study, the data open a new direction for migraine research and therapy.

  15. Requirement of AMPA receptor stimulation for the sustained antidepressant activity of ketamine and LY341495 during the forced swim test in rats.

    PubMed

    Koike, Hiroyuki; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists produce antidepressant effects in animal models of depression, which last for at least 24h, through the transient increase in glutamate release, leading to activation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic (AMPA) receptor. Both ketamine and an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist reportedly increase the expression of GluR1, an AMPA receptor subunit, within 24h, which may account for the sustained enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission following ketamine administration. However, whether the sustained increase in AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission is associated with the antidepressant effects of ketamine and mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists has not yet been investigated. In the present study, to address this question, we tested whether AMPA receptor stimulation at 24h after a single injection of ketamine or an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, (2S)-2-amino-2-[(1S,2S)-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495) was necessary for the antidepressant effect of these compounds using a forced swim test in rats. A single injection of ketamine or LY341495 at 24h before the test significantly decreased the immobility time. An AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), administered 30min prior to the test significantly and dose-dependently reversed the antidepressant effects of ketamine and LY341495, while NBQX itself had no effect on the immobility time. Our findings suggest that AMPA receptor stimulation at 24h after a single injection of ketamine or LY341495 is required to produce the anti-immobility effects of these compounds. Moreover, the present results provide additional evidence that an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist may share some of neural mechanisms with ketamine to exert antidepressant effects.

  16. Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats causes a selective reduction in the expression of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Panaccione, Isabella; Iacovelli, Luisa; di Nuzzo, Luigi; Nardecchia, Francesca; Mauro, Gianluca; Janiri, Delfina; De Blasi, Antonio; Sani, Gabriele; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Orlando, Rosamaria

    2017-03-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats is considered as an experimental animal model of mania endowed with face, construct, and pharmacological validity. We induced paradoxical sleep deprivation by placing rats onto a small platform surrounded by water. This procedure caused the animal to fall in the water at the onset of REM phase of sleep. Control rats were either placed onto a larger platform (which allowed them to sleep) or maintained in their home cage. Sleep deprived rats showed a substantial reduction in type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex or corpus striatum, as compared to both groups of control rats. No changes in the expression of mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels or mGlu1α and mGlu5 receptor protein levels were found with exception of an increase in mGlureceptor levels in the striatum of SD rats. Moving from these findings we treated SD and control rats with the selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, BINA (30mg/kg, i.p.). SD rats were also treated with sodium valproate (300mg/kg, i.p.) as an active comparator. Both BINA and sodium valproate were effective in reversing the manic-like phenotype evaluated in an open field arena in SD rats. BINA treatment had no effect on motor activity in control rats, suggesting that our findings were not biased by a non-specific motor-lowering activity of BINA. These findings suggest that changes in the expression of mGlu2 receptors may be associated with the enhanced motor activity observed with mania.

  17. Cinnabarinic acid and xanthurenic acid: Two kynurenine metabolites that interact with metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Copeland, Caroline S; Neale, Stuart A; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Salt, Thomas E; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2017-01-01

    Cinnabarinic and xanthurenic acids are kynurenine metabolites generated by oxidative dimerization of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that both compounds can affect brain function and neurotransmission and interact with metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. Cinnabarinic acid behaves as an orthosteric agonist of mGlu4 receptors, whereas some of the in vitro and in vivo effects produced by xanthurenic acid appear to be mediated by the activation of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors. Cinnabarinic acid could play an important role in mechanisms of neuroinflammation acting as a linking bridge between the immune system and the CNS. Xanthurenic acid has potential implications in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and is a promising candidate as a peripheral biomarker of the disorder. The action of cinnabarinic acid and xanthurenic acid may extend beyond the regulation of mGlu receptors and may involve several diverse molecular targets, such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor for cinnabarinic acid and vesicular glutamate transporters for xanthurenic acid. The growing interest on these two metabolites of the kynurenine pathway may unravel new aspects in the complex interaction between tryptophan metabolism and brain function, and lead to the discovery of new potential targets for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of the mGlu5R antagonist MPEP towards quinolinic acid-induced striatal toxicity: involvement of pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms and lack of direct NMDA blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Pintor, Annita; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Frank, Claudio; Pepponi, Rita; Nazzicone, Valeria; Grieco, Rosa; Pèzzola, Antonella; Reggio, Rosaria; Minghetti, Luisa; De Berardinis, Maria Anna; Martire, Alberto; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Massotti, Marino

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5R) antagonist 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) towards quinolinic acid (QA)-induced striatal excitoxicity. Intrastriatal MPEP (5 nmol/0.5 micro L) significantly attenuated the body weight loss, the electroencephalographic alterations, the impairment in spatial memory and the striatal damage induced by bilateral striatal injection of QA (210 nmol/0.7 micro L). In a second set of experiments, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of MPEP. In microdialysis studies in naive rats MPEP (80-250 micro m through the dialysis probe) significantly reduced the increase in glutamate levels induced by 5 mm QA. In primary cultures of striatal neurons MPEP (50 micro m) reduced the toxicity induced by direct application of glutamate [measured as release of lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]). Finally, we found that 50 micro m MPEP was unable to directly block NMDA-induced effects (namely field potential reduction in corticostriatal slices, as well as LDH release and intracellular calcium increase in striatal neurons). We conclude that: (i) MPEP has neuroprotective effects towards QA-induced striatal excitotoxicity; (ii) both pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms are involved; (iii) the neuroprotective effects of MPEP do not appear to involve a direct blockade of NMDA receptors.

  19. Molecular Switches of Allosteric Modulation of the Metabotropic Glutamate 2 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Benito, Laura; Doornbos, Maarten L J; Cordomí, Arnau; Peeters, Luc; Lavreysen, Hilde; Pardo, Leonardo; Tresadern, Gary

    2017-07-05

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) crucial for CNS function and important drug discovery targets. Glutamate triggers receptor activation from an extracellular domain binding site while allosteric modulators bind in the seven-transmembrane domain. Little is known about how allosteric modulators produce their functional effects at the molecular level. Here we address this topic with combined experimental and computational approaches and reveal that mGlu receptor allosteric modulators interact with the homologous "trigger switch" and "transmission switch" amino acids as seen in class A GPCRs, in short, the characteristic hallmarks of class A agonist activation translate to the mGlu allosteric modulator. The proposed "trigger switch" for the mGlu2 involves the side chains of F643(3.36a.40c), N735(5.47a.47c), and W773(6.48a.50c), whereas the "transmission switch" involves the Y647(3.40a.44c), L738(5.50a.50c), and T769(6.44a.46c) amino acids. The work has wide impact on understanding mGlu GPCR function and for future allosteric modulator drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulation of mGlu2 Receptors, but Not PDE10A Inhibition Normalizes Pharmacologically-Induced Deviance in Auditory Evoked Potentials and Oscillations in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahnaou, Abdallah; Biermans, Ria; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H.

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of cognitive impairments represents a high medical need in the development of new antipsychotics. Aberrant EEG gamma oscillations and reductions in the P1/N1 complex peak amplitude of the auditory evoked potential (AEP) are neurophysiological biomarkers for schizophrenia that indicate disruption in sensory information processing. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase (i.e. PDE10A) and activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2) signaling are believed to provide antipsychotic efficacy in schizophrenia, but it is unclear whether this occurs with cognition-enhancing potential. The present study used the auditory paired click paradigm in passive awake Sprague Dawley rats to 1) model disruption of AEP waveforms and oscillations as observed in schizophrenia by peripheral administration of amphetamine and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist phencyclidine (PCP); 2) confirm the potential of the antipsychotics risperidone and olanzapine to attenuate these disruptions; 3) evaluate the potential of mGluR2 agonist LY404039 and PDE10 inhibitor PQ-10 to improve AEP deficits in both the amphetamine and PCP models. PCP and amphetamine disrupted auditory information processing to the first click, associated with suppression of the P1/N1 complex peak amplitude, and increased cortical gamma oscillations. Risperidone and olanzapine normalized PCP and amphetamine-induced abnormalities in AEP waveforms and aberrant gamma/alpha oscillations, respectively. LY404039 increased P1/N1 complex peak amplitudes and potently attenuated the disruptive effects of both PCP and amphetamine on AEPs amplitudes and oscillations. However, PQ-10 failed to show such effect in either models. These outcomes indicate that modulation of the mGluR2 results in effective restoration of abnormalities in AEP components in two widely used animal models of psychosis, whereas PDE10A inhibition does not. PMID:26808689

  1. Biotransformation of a novel positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 contributes to seizure-like adverse events in rats involving a receptor agonism-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Thomas M; Rook, Jerri M; Noetzel, Meredith J; Morrison, Ryan D; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D; Vinson, Paige N; Xiang, Zixiu; Jones, Carrie K; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Stauffer, Shaun R; Conn, P Jeffrey; Daniels, J Scott

    2013-09-01

    Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) represents a novel strategy for therapeutic intervention into multiple central nervous system disorders, including schizophrenia. Recently, a number of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of mGlu5 were discovered to exhibit in vivo efficacy in rodent models of psychosis, including PAMs possessing varying degrees of agonist activity (ago-PAMs), as well as PAMs devoid of agonist activity. However, previous studies revealed that ago-PAMs can induce seizure activity and behavioral convulsions, whereas pure mGlu5 PAMs do not induce these adverse effects. We recently identified a potent and selective mGlu5 PAM, VU0403602, that was efficacious in reversing amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats. The compound also induced time-dependent seizure activity that was blocked by coadministration of the mGlu5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine. Consistent with potential adverse effects induced by ago-PAMs, we found that VU0403602 had significant allosteric agonist activity. Interestingly, inhibition of VU0403602 metabolism in vivo by a pan cytochrome P450 (P450) inactivator completely protected rats from induction of seizures. P450-mediated biotransformation of VU0403602 was discovered to produce another potent ago-PAM metabolite-ligand (M1) of mGlu5. Electrophysiological studies in rat hippocampal slices confirmed agonist activity of both M1 and VU0403602 and revealed that M1 can induce epileptiform activity in a manner consistent with its proconvulsant behavioral effects. Furthermore, unbound brain exposure of M1 was similar to that of the parent compound, VU0403602. These findings indicate that biotransformation of mGlu5 PAMs to active metabolite-ligands may contribute to the epileptogenesis observed after in vivo administration of this class of allosteric receptor modulators.

  2. Biotransformation of a Novel Positive Allosteric Modulator of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Contributes to Seizure-Like Adverse Events in Rats Involving a Receptor Agonism-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Thomas M.; Rook, Jerri M.; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Vinson, Paige N.; Xiang, Zixiu; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) represents a novel strategy for therapeutic intervention into multiple central nervous system disorders, including schizophrenia. Recently, a number of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of mGlu5 were discovered to exhibit in vivo efficacy in rodent models of psychosis, including PAMs possessing varying degrees of agonist activity (ago-PAMs), as well as PAMs devoid of agonist activity. However, previous studies revealed that ago-PAMs can induce seizure activity and behavioral convulsions, whereas pure mGlu5 PAMs do not induce these adverse effects. We recently identified a potent and selective mGlu5 PAM, VU0403602, that was efficacious in reversing amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats. The compound also induced time-dependent seizure activity that was blocked by coadministration of the mGlu5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine. Consistent with potential adverse effects induced by ago-PAMs, we found that VU0403602 had significant allosteric agonist activity. Interestingly, inhibition of VU0403602 metabolism in vivo by a pan cytochrome P450 (P450) inactivator completely protected rats from induction of seizures. P450-mediated biotransformation of VU0403602 was discovered to produce another potent ago-PAM metabolite-ligand (M1) of mGlu5. Electrophysiological studies in rat hippocampal slices confirmed agonist activity of both M1 and VU0403602 and revealed that M1 can induce epileptiform activity in a manner consistent with its proconvulsant behavioral effects. Furthermore, unbound brain exposure of M1 was similar to that of the parent compound, VU0403602. These findings indicate that biotransformation of mGlu5 PAMs to active metabolite-ligands may contribute to the epileptogenesis observed after in vivo administration of this class of allosteric receptor modulators. PMID:23821185

  3. Rapid and Sustained Antidepressant Action of the mGlu2/3 Receptor Antagonist MGS0039 in the Social Defeat Stress Model: Comparison with Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chao; Zhang, Ji-chun; Yao, Wei; Ren, Qian; Ma, Min; Yang, Chun; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Similar to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine, the metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor antagonist, MGS0039, shows antidepressant effects. However, there are no reports comparing these 2 compounds in the social defeat stress model of depression. Methods: We examined the effects of MGS0039 (1 mg/kg) and ketamine (10 mg/kg) on depression-like behavior in susceptible mice after repeated social defeat stress. Protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, TrkB, phospho-TrkB, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (GluA1), postsynaptic density protein 95, and dendritic spine density in selected brain regions were measured. Results: In the tail suspension and forced swimming tests, both MGS0039 and ketamine significantly attenuated the increased immobility time observed in susceptible mice, compared with vehicle-treated animals, 1 or 2 days after a single dose of drug. In the sucrose preference test, both compounds significantly improved the reduced preference typically seen in susceptible mice at 3 to 7 days after a single dose of drug. Western-blot analyses showed that similar to ketamine, MGS0039 significantly attenuated the reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phospho-TrkB/TrkB ratio, GluA1 and postsynaptic density protein 95 seen in the prefrontal cortex, dentate gyrus, and CA3 of the hippocampus from susceptible mice, 8 days after a single dose. Again, in a similar manner to ketamine, MGS0039 significantly attenuated the reduction of spine density in the prelimbic regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, dentate gyrus, and CA3 of the hippocampus, but not infralimbic regions of the medial prefrontal cortex and CA1, in susceptible mice 8 days after a single dose. In contrast, neither drug elicited an effect on altered brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TrkB signaling, GluA1, and postsynaptic density protein 95 levels and did not increase spine density observed in the nucleus accumbens of

  4. Withdrawal from cocaine self-administration and yoked cocaine delivery dysregulates glutamatergic mGlu5 and NMDA receptors in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamiolo, Lucyna; Miszkiel, Joanna; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Pomierny, Bartosz; Niedzielska, Ewa; Smaga, Irena; Fumagalli, Fabio; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-04-01

    In human addicts and in animal models, chronic cocaine use leads to numerous alterations in glutamatergic transmission, including its receptors. The present study focused on metabotropic glutamatergic receptors type 5 (mGluR(5)) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits (NMDAR: GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B) proteins during cocaine self-administration and after 10-day of extinction training in rats. To discriminate the contingent from the non-contingent cocaine delivery, we employed the "yoked"-triad control procedure. Protein expression in rat prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, and dorsal striatum was determined. We also examined the Homer1b/c protein, a member of the postsynaptic density protein family that links NMDAR to mGluR(5). Our results revealed that cocaine self-administration selectively increased GluN1 and GluN2A subunit in the rat hippocampus and dorsal striatum, respectively, while mGluR(5) protein expression was similarly increased in the dorsal striatum of both experimental groups. Withdrawal from both contingent and non-contingent cocaine delivery induced parallel increases in prefrontal cortical GluN2A protein expression, hippocampal mGluR(5), and GluN1 protein expression as well as in accumbal GluN1 subunit expression, while the mGluR(5) expression was reduced in the prefrontal cortex. Extinction training in animals with a history of cocaine self-administration resulted in an elevation of the hippocampal GluN2A/GluN2B subunits and accumbal mGluR(5), and in a 50 % decrease of mGluR(5) protein expression in the dorsal striatum. The latter reduction was associated with Homer1b/1c protein level decrease. Our results showed that both contingent and non-contingent cocaine administration produces numerous, brain region specific, alterations in the mGluR(5), NMDA, and Homer1b/1c protein expression which are dependent on the modality of cocaine administration.

  5. Lead optimization of the VU0486321 series of mGlu1 PAMs. Part 1: SAR of modifications to the central aryl core.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M; Cho, Hyekyung P; Blobaum, Anna L; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2015-11-15

    This Letter describes the lead optimization of the VU0486321 series of mGlu1 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). While first generation PAMs from Roche were reported in the late 1990s, little effort has focused on the development of mGlu1 PAMs since. New genetic data linking loss-of-function mutant mGlu1 receptors to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other neuropsychiatric disorders has rekindled interest in the target, but the ideal in vivo probe, for example, with good PK, brain penetration and low plasma protein binding, for robust target validation has been lacking. Here we describe the first modifications to the central aryl core of the VU0486321 series, where robust SAR was noted. Moreover, structural variants were identified that imparted selectivity (up to >793-fold) versus mGlu4.

  6. In vitro binding of a radio-labeled positive allosteric modulator for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Zysk, John R; Spear, Nathan; Fieles, William; Stein, Mark M; Sygowski, Linda S; King, Megan M; Hoesch, Valerie; Hastings, Richard; Brockel, Becky; Do, Mylinh; Ström, Peter; Gadient, Reto; Chhajlani, Vijay; Elmore, Charles S; Maier, Donna L

    2013-03-01

    The positive allosteric modulator (PAM) binding site for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu(5)) lacks a readily available radio-labeled tracer fordetailed structure-activity studies. This communication describes a selective mGlu(5) compound, 7-methyl-2-(4-(pyridin-2-yloxy)benzyl)-5-(pyridin-3-yl)isoindolin-1-one (PBPyl) that binds with high affinity to human mGlu(5) and exhibits functional PAM activity. Analysis of PBPyl by FLIPR revealed an EC(50) of 87 nM with an 89% effect in transfected HEK293 cells and an EC(50) of 81 nM with a 42% effect in rat primary neurons. PBPyl exhibited 5-fold higher functional selectivity for mGlu(5) in a full mGlu receptor panel. Unlabeled PBPyl was tested for specific binding using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)-based filtration binding assay and exhibited 40% specific binding in recombinant membranes, a value higher than any candidate compound tested. In competition binding studies with [(3)H]MPEP, the mGlu(5) receptor negative allosteric modulator (NAM), PBPyl exhibited a k(i) value of 34 nM. PBPyl also displaced [(3)H]ABP688, a mGluR(5) receptor NAM, in tissue sections from mouse and rat brain using autoradiography. Areas of specific binding included the frontal cortex, striatum and nucleus accumbens. PBPyl was radiolabeled to a specific activity of 15 Ci/mmol and tested for specific binding in a filter plate format. In recombinant mGlu(5b) membranes, [(3)H] PBPyl exhibited saturable binding with a K(d) value of 18.6 nM. In competition binding experiments, [(3)H] PBPyl was displaced by high affinity mGlu(5) positive and negative modulators. Further tests showed that PBPyl displays less than optimal characteristics as an in vivo tool, including a high volume of distribution and ClogP, making it more suitable as an in vitro compound. However, as a first report of direct binding of an mGlu(5) receptor PAM, this study offers value toward the development of novel PET imaging agents for this important

  7. Blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 relieves maladaptive chronic stress consequences.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, Daniel; Stangl, Christina; Bauer, Amelie; Bludau, Anna; Keller, Jana; Grabski, Dominik; Killian, Tobias; Schmidt, Dominic; Zajicek, Franziska; Jaeschke, Georg; Lindemann, Lothar; Reber, Stefan O; Flor, Peter J; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Etiology and pharmacotherapy of stress-related psychiatric conditions and somatoform disorders are areas of high unmet medical need. Stressors holding chronic plus psychosocial components thereby bear the highest health risk. Although the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) is well studied in the context of acute stress-induced behaviors and physiology, virtually nothing is known about its potential involvement in chronic psychosocial stress. Using the mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator CTEP (2-chloro-4-[2-[2,5-dimethyl-1-[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]imidazol-4yl]ethynyl]pyridine), a close analogue of the clinically active drug basimglurant - but optimized for rodent studies, as well as mGlu5-deficient mice in combination with a mouse model of male subordination (termed CSC, chronic subordinate colony housing), we demonstrate that mGlu5 mediates multiple physiological, immunological, and behavioral consequences of chronic psychosocial stressor exposure. For instance, CTEP dose-dependently relieved hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunctions, colonic inflammation as well as the CSC-induced increase in innate anxiety; genetic ablation of mGlu5 in mice largely reproduced the stress-protective effects of CTEP and additionally ameliorated CSC-induced physiological anxiety. Interestingly, CSC also induced an upregulation of mGlu5 in the hippocampus, a stress-regulating brain area. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that mGlu5 is an important mediator for a wide range of chronic psychosocial stress-induced alterations and a potentially valuable drug target for the treatment of chronic stress-related pathologies in man.

  8. Periaqueductal grey CB1 cannabinoid and metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors modulate changes in rostral ventromedial medulla neuronal activities induced by subcutaneous formalin in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Novellis, V; Mariani, L; Palazzo, E; Vita, D; Marabese, I; Scafuro, M; Rossi, F; Maione, S

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the involvement of periaqueductal gray (PAG) cannabinoid or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the formalin-induced changes on the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) ON- and OFF-cells activities. S.c. injection of formalin into the hind paw produced a transient decrease (4-6 min) followed by a longer increase (25-35 min) in tail flick latencies. Formalin also increased basal activity in RVM ON-cells (42+/-7%) and decreased it in OFF-cells (35+/-4%). Intra-PAG microinjection of (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl) pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate (WIN 55,212-2) (2 nmol/rat), a cannabinoid receptor agonist, prevented the formalin-induced changes in RVM cell activities. Higher dosages of WIN 55,212-2 (4-8 nmol/rat) increased the tail flick latencies, delayed the tail flick-related onset to ON-cell burst, and decreased the duration of OFF-cell pause. Furthermore, WIN 55,212-2 at a dosage of 8 nmol/rat decreased RVM ON-cell (57+/-7%) and increased OFF-cell ongoing activities (26+/-4%). These effects were prevented by N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazolecarboxamide SR141716A, (1 pmol/rat), a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, or by 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP 20 nmol/rat), a selective mGlu5 glutamate receptor antagonist. T7-(hydroxyimino) cyclopropa[b]chromen-1alpha-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCOOE/50 nmol/rat) and (S)-(+)-alpha-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid (LY367385, 20 nmol/rat), selective mGlu1 glutamate receptor antagonists, were ineffective in preventing the WIN-induced effects. This study suggests that s.c. injection of formalin modifies RVM neuronal activities and this effect is prevented by PAG cannabinoid receptor stimulation. Moreover, the physiological stimulation of PAG mGlu5, but not mGlu1 glutamate receptors, seems to be required for the cannabinoid-mediated effect.

  9. MGlu5 antagonism impairs exploration and memory of spatial and non-spatial stimuli in rats.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Simonyi, Agnes; Schachtman, Todd R; Clausen, Bettina; Clement, David; Bjerre, Vicky K; Mark, Louise T; Reinholdt, Mette; Schmith-Rasmussen, Kati; Zink, Lena V B

    2008-08-22

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) has been implicated in memory processing in some but not all learning tasks. The reason why this receptor is involved in some tasks but not in others remains to be determined. The present experiments using rats examined effects of the mGlu5-antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP)--applied systemically i.p. (1-10mg/kg) or bilaterally into the prelimbic cortex (1-10 microg)---on the ability of rats to explore and remember new stimuli. A cross-maze, open field, and object recognition task were used to evaluate exploration and memory and it was found that: (1) locomotion during exploration of spatial environments and exploration time at novel objects were reduced by i.p. but not by prelimbic administration of MPEP, (2) spatial short-term memory was impaired in cross-maze and object discrimination was reduced after both types of administration, (3) long-term retention of spatial conditioning in the cross-maze was inhibited after i.p. applications which (4) also inhibited spontaneous alternation performance during maze-exploration. Reduced exploratory locomotion and exploration time after i.p. injections may have contributed to the observed retention impairments. However, the fact that prelimbic administration of MPEP inhibited retention without reducing exploration shows that memory formation was also impacted directly by prelimbic mGlu5 in both spatial and non-spatial learning.

  10. The metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor is necessary for extinction of cocaine‐associated cues

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christina J; Reed, Felicia; Zbukvic, Isabel C; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is currently no medication approved specifically to treat cocaine addiction. Behavioural interventions such as cue exposure therapy (CET) rely heavily on new learning. Antagonism of the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor has emerged as a potential treatment, by reducing the reinforcing properties of cocaine. However, mGlu5 receptor activity is necessary for learning; therefore, such agents could interfere with behavioural treatments. We used a novel rodent model of CET to test the effects of mGlu5 negative and positive allosteric modulators (NAM and PAM) on behavioural therapy. Experimental Approach Rats were trained to press a lever for cocaine in the presence of a discrete cue [conditioned stimulus (CS)] and then extinguished in the absence of the CS. Following lever extinction, half the rats received CS extinction in the same chambers but with the levers withdrawn; the remaining rats received no CS extinction. Before this session, rats received a systemic administration of either vehicle or a mGlu5 NAM (MTEP, experiment 1) or PAM (CDPPB, experiment 2). Cue‐induced reinstatement was tested in a drug‐free session the following day. Key Results At reinstatement, rats that had received CS extinction showed reduced responding. This effect was attenuated by MTEP treatment before CS extinction. In contrast, administration of CDPPB (PAM) led to decreased reinstatement the following day, regardless of extinction condition. Conclusion and Implications These results suggest that mGlu5 receptor activity is both necessary and sufficient for efficient extinction of a cocaine‐associated CS. Therefore, mGlu5 PAMs could enhance the efficacy of CET. PMID:26784278

  11. The metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor is necessary for extinction of cocaine-associated cues.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christina J; Reed, Felicia; Zbukvic, Isabel C; Kim, Jee Hyun; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    There is currently no medication approved specifically to treat cocaine addiction. Behavioural interventions such as cue exposure therapy (CET) rely heavily on new learning. Antagonism of the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5 ) receptor has emerged as a potential treatment, by reducing the reinforcing properties of cocaine. However, mGlu5 receptor activity is necessary for learning; therefore, such agents could interfere with behavioural treatments. We used a novel rodent model of CET to test the effects of mGlu5 negative and positive allosteric modulators (NAM and PAM) on behavioural therapy. Rats were trained to press a lever for cocaine in the presence of a discrete cue [conditioned stimulus (CS)] and then extinguished in the absence of the CS. Following lever extinction, half the rats received CS extinction in the same chambers but with the levers withdrawn; the remaining rats received no CS extinction. Before this session, rats received a systemic administration of either vehicle or a mGlu5 NAM (MTEP, experiment 1) or PAM (CDPPB, experiment 2). Cue-induced reinstatement was tested in a drug-free session the following day. At reinstatement, rats that had received CS extinction showed reduced responding. This effect was attenuated by MTEP treatment before CS extinction. In contrast, administration of CDPPB (PAM) led to decreased reinstatement the following day, regardless of extinction condition. These results suggest that mGlu5 receptor activity is both necessary and sufficient for efficient extinction of a cocaine-associated CS. Therefore, mGlu5 PAMs could enhance the efficacy of CET. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Discovery of molecular switches within the ADX-47273 mGlu5 PAM scaffold that modulate modes of pharmacology to afford potent mGlu5 NAMs, PAMs and partial antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jeffrey P; Engers, Darren W; Niswender, Colleen M; Rodriguez, Alice L; Venable, Daryl F; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-05-01

    This Letter describes a chemical lead optimization campaign directed at a weak mGlu(5) NAM discovered while developing SAR for the mGlu(5) PAM, ADX-47273. An iterative parallel synthesis effort discovered multiple, subtle molecular switches that afford potent mGlu(5) NAMs, mGlu(5) PAMs as well as mGlu(5) partial antagonists.

  13. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Structural Insights and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a novel approach to the development of probes and therapeutics that is expected to enable subtype-specific regulation of central nervous system target receptors. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are class C GPCRs that play important neuromodulatory roles throughout the brain, as such they are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention for a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders including anxiety, depression, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Over the last fifteen years, selective allosteric modulators have been identified for many members of the mGlu family. The vast majority of these allosteric modulators are thought to bind within the transmembrane-spanning domains of the receptors to enhance or inhibit functional responses. A combination of mutagenesis-based studies and pharmacological approaches are beginning to provide a better understanding of mGlu allosteric sites. Collectively, when mapped onto a homology model of the different mGlu subtypes based on the β2-adrenergic receptor, the previous mutagenesis studies suggest commonalities in the location of allosteric sites across different members of the mGlu family. In addition, there is evidence for multiple allosteric binding pockets within the transmembrane region that can interact to modulate one another. In the absence of a class C GPCR crystal structure, this approach has shown promise with respect to the interpretation of mutagenesis data and understanding structure-activity relationships of allosteric modulator pharmacophores. PMID:20637216

  14. An interchangeable role for kainate and metabotropic glutamate receptors in the induction of rat hippocampal mossy fiber long-term potentiation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, James L; Irvine, Mark W; Jane, David E; Lodge, David; Collingridge, Graham L; Bortolotto, Zuner A

    2015-01-01

    The roles of both kainate receptors (KARs) and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in mossy fiber long-term potentiation (MF-LTP) have been extensively studied in hippocampal brain slices, but the findings are controversial. In this study, we have addressed the roles of both mGluRs and KARs in MF-LTP in anesthetized rats. We found that MF-LTP could be induced in the presence of either GluK1-selective KAR antagonists or group I mGluR antagonists. However, LTP was inhibited when the group I mGluRs and the GluK1-KARs were simultaneously inhibited. Either mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptor activation is sufficient to induce this form of LTP as selective inhibition of either subtype alone, together with the inhibition of KARs, did not inhibit MF-LTP. These data suggest that mGlu1 receptors, mGlu5 receptors, and GluK1-KARs are all engaged during high-frequency stimulation, and that the activation of any one of these receptors alone is sufficient for the induction of MF-LTP in vivo. © 2015 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25821051

  15. Chronic treatment with the mGlu5R antagonist MPEP reduces the functional effects of the mGlu5R agonist CHPG in the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats: possible relevance to the effects of mGlu5R blockade in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Martire, Alberto; Coccurello, Roberto; Pèzzola, Antonella; Reggio, Rosaria; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Popoli, Patrizia

    2005-06-01

    This study was designed to test whether chronic treatment with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5R) antagonist MPEP showed antiparkinsonian effects in rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (a "classic" model of Parkinson's disease, PD), and to evaluate whether chronic MPEP influenced the functional properties and/or the expression of striatal mGlu5Rs. Wistar rats were lesioned with 6-OHDA and then treated with MPEP (3 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or its vehicle over 2 weeks. Chronic MPEP did not induce measurable antiparkinsonian effects, since no differences were found between MPEP- and vehicle-treated animals in the pattern of L-DOPA-induced contralateral rotations. In corticostriatal slices taken from animals chronically treated with MPEP, the functional effects of the mGlu5R agonist CHPG were significantly reduced in the lesioned vs. the intact side, while no changes were found in slices taken from vehicle-treated rats. The binding of [3H]MPEP to striatal membranes showed that neither the maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) nor the dissociation constant (Kd) were changed by the lesion and/or by chronic MPEP. While chronic MPEP did not potentiate L-DOPA-induced turning in a classical model of PD, its ability to reduce mGlu5R-associated signal could help to explain the neuroprotective/antiparkinsonian effects observed in other models of PD.

  16. Investigating Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Allosteric Modulator Cooperativity, Affinity, and Agonism: Enriching Structure-Function Studies and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Rook, Jerri M.; Vinson, Paige N.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Zhou, Ya; Chun, Aspen C.; Felts, Andrew S.; Chauder, Brian A.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Niswender, Colleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Drug discovery programs increasingly are focusing on allosteric modulators as a means to modify the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) targets. Allosteric binding sites are topographically distinct from the endogenous ligand (orthosteric) binding site, which allows for co-occupation of a single receptor with the endogenous ligand and an allosteric modulator that can alter receptor pharmacological characteristics. Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) inhibit and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) enhance the affinity and/or efficacy of orthosteric agonists. Established approaches for estimation of affinity and efficacy values for orthosteric ligands are not appropriate for allosteric modulators, and this presents challenges for fully understanding the actions of novel modulators of GPCRs. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a family C GPCR for which a large array of allosteric modulators have been identified. We took advantage of the many tools for probing allosteric sites on mGlu5 to validate an operational model of allosterism that allows quantitative estimation of modulator affinity and cooperativity values. Affinity estimates derived from functional assays fit well with affinities measured in radioligand binding experiments for both PAMs and NAMs with diverse chemical scaffolds and varying degrees of cooperativity. We observed modulation bias for PAMs when we compared mGlu5-mediated Ca2+ mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation data. Furthermore, we used this model to quantify the effects of mutations that reduce binding or potentiation by PAMs. This model can be applied to PAM and NAM potency curves in combination with maximal fold-shift data to derive reliable estimates of modulator affinities. PMID:22863693

  17. Pharmacological and molecular characterization of the positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Lundström, L; Bissantz, C; Beck, J; Dellenbach, M; Woltering, T J; Wichmann, J; Gatti, S

    2016-12-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGlu2) plays an important role in the presynaptic control of glutamate release and several mGlu2 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been under assessment for their potential as antipsychotics. The binding mode of mGlu2 PAMs is better characterized in functional terms while few data are available on the relationship between allosteric and orthosteric binding sites. Pharmacological studies characterizing binding and effects of two different chemical series of mGlu2 PAMs are therefore carried out here using the radiolabeled mGlu2 agonist (3)[H]-LY354740 and mGlu2 PAM (3)[H]-2,2,2-TEMPS. A multidimensional approach to the PAM mechanism of action shows that mGlu2 PAMs increase the affinity of (3)[H]-LY354740 for the orthosteric site of mGlu2 as well as the number of (3)[H]-LY354740 binding sites. (3)[H]-2,2,2-TEMPS binding is also enhanced by the presence of LY354740. New residues in the allosteric rat mGlu2 binding pocket are identified to be crucial for the PAMs ligand binding, among these Tyr(3.40) and Asn(5.46). Also of remark, in the described experimental conditions S731A (Ser(5.42)) residue is important only for the mGlu2 PAM LY487379 and not for the compound PAM-1: an example of the structural differences among these mGlu2 PAMs. This study provides a summary of the information generated in the past decade on mGlu2 PAMs adding a detailed molecular investigation of PAM binding mode. Differences among mGlu2 PAM compounds are discussed as well as the mGlu2 regions interacting with mGlu2 PAM and NAM agents and residues driving mGlu2 PAM selectivity.

  18. Pharmacological and molecular characterization of the positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Lundström, L; Bissantz, C; Beck, J; Dellenbach, M; Woltering, T J; Wichmann, J; Gatti, S

    2017-02-16

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGlu2) plays an important role in the presynaptic control of glutamate release and several mGlu2 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been under assessment for their potential as antipsychotics. The binding mode of mGlu2 PAMs is better characterized in functional terms while few data are available on the relationship between allosteric and orthosteric binding sites. Pharmacological studies characterizing binding and effects of two different chemical series of mGlu2 PAMs are therefore carried out here using the radiolabeled mGlu2 agonist (3)[H]-LY354740 and mGlu2 PAM (3)[H]-2,2,2-TEMPS. A multidimensional approach to the PAM mechanism of action shows that mGlu2 PAMs increase the affinity of (3)[H]-LY354740 for the orthosteric site of mGlu2 as well as the number of (3)[H]-LY354740 binding sites. (3)[H]-2,2,2-TEMPS binding is also enhanced by the presence of LY354740. New residues in the allosteric rat mGlu2 binding pocket are identified to be crucial for the PAMs ligand binding, among these Tyr(3.40) and Asn(5.46). Also of remark, in the described experimental conditions S731A (Ser(5.42)) residue is important only for the mGlu2 PAM LY487379 and not for the compound PAM-1: an example of the structural differences among these mGlu2 PAMs. This study provides a summary of the information generated in the past decade on mGlu2 PAMs adding a detailed molecular investigation of PAM binding mode. Differences among mGlu2 PAM compounds are discussed as well as the mGlu2 regions interacting with mGlu2 PAM and NAM agents and residues driving mGlu2 PAM selectivity.

  19. Antagonism at metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors inhibits nicotine- and cocaine-taking behaviours and prevents nicotine-triggered relapse to nicotine-seeking.

    PubMed

    Tessari, Michela; Pilla, Maria; Andreoli, Michela; Hutcheson, Daniel M; Heidbreder, Christian A

    2004-09-19

    Previous studies in metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGlu5 receptor) deficient mice have indicated the importance of this receptor in the self-administration of cocaine and locomotor sensitisation to this stimulant. Both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors have been implicated in drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviours, but the specific role of each subtype of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors) is still unknown. In the present series of experiments we further investigated the role of mGlu5 receptors on nicotine, cocaine- and food-taking behaviour. We also investigated the effects of the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine) on the acute locomotor activating effects of nicotine, the expression of sensitisation to its repeated, intermittent administration, and nicotine-triggered relapse to nicotine-seeking behaviour. The results indicate that MPEP treatment reduced nicotine-induced drug-seeking behaviour in a model of nicotine-triggered relapse to nicotine seeking. Furthermore, MPEP decreased both nicotine and cocaine self-administration without affecting food self-administration under similar schedules of reinforcement. Finally, MPEP reduced both the acute locomotor stimulant effects of nicotine as well as the expression of behavioural sensitisation to its repeated administration. Although the intravenous administration of MPEP at 1 and 10 mg/kg transiently reduced spontaneous locomotor activity during the first 25 min post-administration, we also demonstrated that performance on the accelerating rotarod was not affected when MPEP was given 5 and 30 min prior to the test. Altogether, the present findings strengthen the hypothesis that selective antagonism at mGlu5 receptors may be a new potential pharmacotherapeutic approach for the treatment of drug dependence and addiction.

  20. The metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 counteracted ketamine-and apomorphine-induced performance deficits in the object recognition task, but not object location task, in rats.

    PubMed

    Pitsikas, Nikolaos; Markou, Athina

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the non competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine and the mixed dopamine (DA) D1/D2 receptor agonist apomorphine induce schizophrenia-like symptoms in rodents, including cognitive deficits. Activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptors reduces the excessive glutamate release that is hypothesized to be associated with psychiatric disorders. Thus, mGlu2/3 receptor agonists may reverse deficits induced by excessive glutamate or DA release induced by administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and DA receptor agonists, respectively, and potentially those seen in schizophrenia. LY379268 is a selective mGlu2/3 receptor agonist that has shown to be effective in several animal models of stroke, epilepsy, and drug abuse. The present study investigated whether LY379268 antagonizes non-spatial and spatial recognition memory deficits induced by ketamine and apomorphine administration in rats. To assess the effects of the compounds on non-spatial and spatial recognition memory, the object recognition task and object location task were used. Post-training administration of LY379268 (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) counteracted ketamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced performance deficits in the object recognition task. In contrast, LY379268 (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) did not attenuate spatial recognition memory deficits produced by ketamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in the object location task. The present data show that the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 reversed non-spatial, but not spatial, recognition memory deficits induced by NMDA receptor blockade or DA receptor agonism in rodents. Thus, such mGlu2/3 receptor agonists may be efficacious in reversing some memory deficits seen in schizophrenia patients.

  1. N-Aryl Piperazine Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Positive Allosteric Modulators Possess Efficacy in Preclinical Models of NMDA Hypofunction and Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, K.J.; Herman, E.J.; Ramsey, A.J.; Hammond, A.S.; Byun, N.E.; Stauffer, S.R.; Manka, J.T.; Jadhav, S.; Bridges, T.M.; Weaver, C.D.; Niswender, C.M.; Steckler, T.; Drinkenburg, W.H.; Ahnaou, A.; Lavreysen, H.; Macdonald, G.J.; Bartolomé, J.M.; Mackie, C.; Hrupka, B.J.; Caron, M.G.; Daigle, T.L.; Lindsley, C.W.; Conn, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired transmission through glutamatergic circuits has been postulated to play a role in the underlying pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Furthermore, inhibition of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDAR) induces a syndrome that recapitulates many of the symptoms observed in patients with schizophrenia. Selective activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) may provide a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of symptoms associated with schizophrenia through facilitation of transmission through central glutamatergic circuits. Here, we describe the characterization of two novel N-aryl piperazine mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs): 2-(4-(2-(benzyloxy)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl)benzonitrile (VU0364289) and 1-(4-(2,4-difluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-((4-fluorobenzyl)oxy)ethanone (DPFE). VU0364289 and DPFE induced robust leftward shifts in the glutamate concentration-response curves for Ca2+ mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 phosphorylation. Both PAMs displayed micromolar affinity for the common mGlu5 allosteric binding site and high selectivity for mGlu5. VU0364289 and DPFE possessed suitable pharmacokinetic properties for dosing in vivo and produced robust dose-related effects in reversing amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, a preclinical model predictive of antipsychotic-like activity. In addition, DPFE enhanced acquisition of contextual fear conditioning in rats and reversed behavioral deficits in a mouse model of NMDAR hypofunction. In contrast, DPFE had no effect on reversing apomorphine-induced disruptions of prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex. These mGlu5 PAMs also increased monoamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, enhanced performance in a hippocampal-mediated memory task, and elicited changes in electroencephalogram dynamics commensurate with procognitive effects. Collectively, these data support and extend the role for the development of novel

  2. Activation of metabotropic glutamate 5 and NMDA receptors underlies the induction of persistent bursting and associated long-lasting changes in CA3 recurrent connections.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ron; Conquet, François; Zuber, Benoit; Voronin, Leon L; Pralong, Etienne

    2003-07-02

    The aim of this study was to describe the induction and expression mechanisms of a persistent bursting activity in a horizontal slice preparation of the rat limbic system that includes the ventral part of the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex. Disinhibition of this preparation by bicuculline led to interictal-like bursts in the CA3 region that triggered synchronous activity in the entorhinal cortex. Washout of bicuculline after a 1 hr application resulted in a maintained production of hippocampal bursts that continued to spread to the entorhinal cortex. Separation of CA3 from the entorhinal cortex caused the activity in the latter to become asynchronous with CA3 activity in the presence of bicuculline and disappear after washout; however, in CA3, neither the induction of bursting nor its persistence were affected. Associated with the CA3 persistent bursting, a strengthening of recurrent collateral excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal cells and a decreased input to CA3 interneurons was found. Both the induction of the persistent bursting and the changes in synaptic strength were prevented by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) or NMDA receptors or protein synthesis inhibitors and did not occur in slices from mGlu5 receptor knock-out mice. The above findings suggest potential synaptic mechanisms by which the hippocampus switches to a persistent interictal bursting mode that may support a spread of interictal-like bursting to surrounding temporal lobe regions.

  3. Differential Modulation of Thresholds for Intracranial Self-Stimulation by mGlu5 Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulators: Implications for Effects on Drug Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Cleva, Richard M.; Watterson, Lucas R.; Johnson, Meagan A.; Olive, M. Foster

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptor alters various addiction related behaviors such as drug self-administration and the extinction and reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. However, the effects of pharmacological modulation of mGlu5 receptors on brain reward function have not been widely investigated. We examined the effects of acute administration of positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) on brain reward function by assessing thresholds for intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In addition, when acute effects were observed, we examined changes in ICSS thresholds following repeated administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bipolar electrodes into the medial forebrain bundle and trained to respond for ICSS, followed by assessment of effects of mGlu5 ligands on ICSS thresholds using a discrete trials current–intensity threshold determination procedure. Acute administration of the selective mGlu5 NAMs MTEP (0, 0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg) and fenobam (0, 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased ICSS thresholds (∼70% at the highest dose tested), suggesting a deficit in brain reward function. Acute administration of the mGlu5 PAMs CDPPB (0, 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) or ADX47273 (0, 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) was without effect at any dose tested. When administered once daily for five consecutive days, the development of tolerance to the ability of threshold-elevating doses of MTEP and fenobam to increase ICSS thresholds was observed. We conclude that mGlu5 PAMs and NAMs differentially affect brain reward function, and that tolerance to the ability of mGlu5 NAMs to reduce brain reward function develops with repeated administration. These brain reward deficits should be taken into consideration when interpreting acute effects of mGlu5 NAMs on drug self-administration, and repeated administration of these ligands may be an effective method to reduce these deficits. PMID

  4. mGlu5 positive allosteric modulation normalizes synaptic plasticity defects and motor phenotypes in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gogliotti, Rocco G; Senter, Rebecca K; Rook, Jerri M; Ghoshal, Ayan; Zamorano, Rocio; Malosh, Chrysa; Stauffer, Shaun R; Bridges, Thomas M; Bartolome, Jose M; Daniels, J Scott; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Niswender, Colleen M

    2016-05-15

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that shares many symptomatic and pathological commonalities with idiopathic autism. Alterations in protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity (PSDSP) are a hallmark of a number of syndromic forms of autism; in the present work, we explore the consequences of disruption and rescue of PSDSP in a mouse model of RS. We report that expression of a key regulator of synaptic protein synthesis, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) protein, is significantly reduced in both the brains of RS model mice and in the motor cortex of human RS autopsy samples. Furthermore, we demonstrate that reduced mGlu5 expression correlates with attenuated DHPG-induced long-term depression in the hippocampus of RS model mice, and that administration of a novel mGlu5 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), termed VU0462807, can rescue synaptic plasticity defects. Additionally, treatment of Mecp2-deficient mice with VU0462807 improves motor performance (open-field behavior and gait dynamics), corrects repetitive clasping behavior, as well as normalizes cued fear-conditioning defects. Importantly, due to the rationale drug discovery approach used in its development, our novel mGlu5 PAM improves RS phenotypes and synaptic plasticity defects without evoking the overt adverse effects commonly associated with potentiation of mGlu5 signaling (i.e. seizures), or affecting cardiorespiratory defects in RS model mice. These findings provide strong support for the continued development of mGlu5 PAMs as potential therapeutic agents for use in RS, and, more broadly, for utility in idiopathic autism.

  5. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4-Positive Allosteric Modulator VU0364770 Produces Efficacy Alone and in Combination with l-DOPA or an Adenosine 2A Antagonist in Preclinical Rodent Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carrie K.; Bubser, Michael; Thompson, Analisa D.; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Turle-Lorenzo, Nathalie; Amalric, Marianne; Blobaum, Anna L.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Engers, Darren W.; Italiano, Kimberly; Bode, Jacob; Daniels, J. Scott; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder associated with severe motor impairments caused by the loss of dopaminergic innervation of the striatum. Previous studies have demonstrated that positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4), including N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide, can produce antiparkinsonian-like effects in preclinical models of PD. However, these early mGlu4 PAMs exhibited unsuitable physiochemical properties for systemic dosing, requiring intracerebroventricular administration and limiting their broader utility as in vivo tools to further understand the role of mGlu4 in the modulation of basal ganglia function relevant to PD. In the present study, we describe the pharmacologic characterization of a systemically active mGlu4 PAM, N-(3-chlorophenyl)picolinamide (VU0364770), in several rodent PD models. VU0364770 showed efficacy alone or when administered in combination with l-DOPA or an adenosine 2A (A2A) receptor antagonist currently in clinical development (preladenant). When administered alone, VU0364770 exhibited efficacy in reversing haloperidol-induced catalepsy, forelimb asymmetry-induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the median forebrain bundle, and attentional deficits induced by bilateral 6-OHDA nigrostriatal lesions in rats. In addition, VU0364770 enhanced the efficacy of preladenant to reverse haloperidol-induced catalepsy when given in combination. The effects of VU0364770 to reverse forelimb asymmetry were also potentiated when the compound was coadministered with an inactive dose of l-DOPA, suggesting that mGlu4 PAMs may provide l-DOPA-sparing activity. The present findings provide exciting support for the potential role of selective mGlu4 PAMs as a novel approach for the symptomatic treatment of PD and a possible augmentation strategy with either l-DOPA or A2A antagonists. PMID:22088953

  6. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Douglas J.; Gregory, Karen J.; Rook, Jerri M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The development of receptor subtype-selective ligands by targeting allosteric sites of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has proven highly successful in recent years. One GPCR family that has greatly benefited from this approach is the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus). These family C GPCRs participate in the neuromodulatory actions of glutamate throughout the CNS, where they play a number of key roles in regulating synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. A large number of mGlu subtype-selective allosteric modulators have been identified, the majority of which are thought to bind within the transmembrane regions of the receptor. These modulators can either enhance or inhibit mGlu functional responses and, together with mGlu knockout mice, have furthered the establishment of the physiologic roles of many mGlu subtypes. Numerous pharmacological and receptor mutagenesis studies have been aimed at providing a greater mechanistic understanding of the interaction of mGlu allosteric modulators with the receptor, which have revealed evidence for common allosteric binding sites across multiple mGlu subtypes and the presence for multiple allosteric sites within a single mGlu subtype. Recent data have also revealed that mGlu allosteric modulators can display functional selectivity toward particular signal transduction cascades downstream of an individual mGlu subtype. Studies continue to validate the therapeutic utility of mGlu allosteric modulators as a potential therapeutic approach for a number of disorders including anxiety, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, and Fragile X syndrome. PMID:21907906

  7. Fragment and Structure-Based Drug Discovery for a Class C GPCR: Discovery of the mGlu5 Negative Allosteric Modulator HTL14242 (3-Chloro-5-[6-(5-fluoropyridin-2-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]benzonitrile).

    PubMed

    Christopher, John A; Aves, Sarah J; Bennett, Kirstie A; Doré, Andrew S; Errey, James C; Jazayeri, Ali; Marshall, Fiona H; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Serrano-Vega, Maria J; Tehan, Benjamin G; Wiggin, Giselle R; Congreve, Miles

    2015-08-27

    Fragment screening of a thermostabilized mGlu5 receptor using a high-concentration radioligand binding assay enabled the identification of moderate affinity, high ligand efficiency (LE) pyrimidine hit 5. Subsequent optimization using structure-based drug discovery methods led to the selection of 25, HTL14242, as an advanced lead compound for further development. Structures of the stabilized mGlu5 receptor complexed with 25 and another molecule in the series, 14, were determined at resolutions of 2.6 and 3.1 Å, respectively.

  8. The metabotropic glutamate receptor 8 agonist (S)-3,4-DCPG reverses motor deficits in prolonged but not acute models of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kari A.; Jones, Carrie K.; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Bubser, Michael; Marvanova, Marketa; Ansari, M. Sib; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Niswender, Colleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are 7 Transmembrane Spanning Receptors (7TMs) that are differentially expressed throughout the brain and modulate synaptic transmission at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Recently, mGlus have been implicated as therapeutic targets for many disorders of the central nervous system, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that nonselective agonists of group III mGlus have antiparkinsonian effects in several animal models of PD, suggesting that these receptors represent promising targets for treating the motor symptoms of PD. However, the relative contributions of different group III mGlu subtypes to these effects have not been fully elucidated. Here we report that intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the mGlu8-selective agonist (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine (DCPG [2.5, 10, or 30 nmol]) does not alleviate motor deficits caused by acute (two hour) treatment with haloperidol or reserpine. However, following prolonged pretreatment with haloperidol (three doses evenly spaced over 18–20 hours) or reserpine (18–20 hours), DCPG robustly reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy and reserpine-induced akinesia. Furthermore, DCPG (10 nmol, icv) reverses the long-lasting catalepsy induced by 20 hour pretreatment with the decanoate salt of haloperidol. Finally, icv administration of DCPG ameliorates forelimb use asymmetry caused by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of substantia nigra dopamine neurons. These findings suggest that mGlu8 may partially mediate the antiparkinsonian effects of group III mGlu agonists in animal models of PD in which dopamine depletion or blockade of D2-like dopamine receptors is prolonged and indicate that selective activation of mGlu8 may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for alleviating the motor symptoms of PD. PMID:22546615

  9. Interactions between adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat hippocampal slice

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Ali; Stone, Trevor W

    2003-01-01

    We have examined excitatory postsynaptic potentials and paired-pulse interactions in rat hippocampal slices to obtain more information about the site and mechanism of interactions between metabotropic glutamate receptors and adenosine receptors. The results show that the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is explained by a selectively reduced responsiveness to A1 receptor stimulation, and does not involve any facilitation of A2A adenosine receptors, since it can be obtained in the absence of endogenous adenosine and is not prevented by the A2A receptor blocker ZM241385. The glutamate receptors involved are of the group I class since the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is produced by ACPD and the group I selective compound DHPG. Furthermore, the effects of DHPG could be prevented by LY367385, a selective antagonist at the mGlu1a subtype of group I receptors. The selective antagonist at mGlu5 receptors, SIB1893, did not prevent the suppression of adenosine sensitivity by DHPG. Blockade of the DHPG/adenosine interaction was also obtained by superfusion with the protein kinasae C inhibitor chelerythrine. Since the suppression of adenosine responses by metabotropic receptor agonists was seen in the paired-pulse paradigm, we conclude that the observed interactions occur at the level of the presynaptic terminals. The interaction with adenosine receptors is not specific, but applies also to a suppression of responses mediated by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen. We conclude that activation of the mGlu1a subtype of receptor can suppress responses mediated via adenosine A1 receptors, probably by activating protein kinase C. Since the changes induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists last for at least 60 min, the data also imply that these interactions could play an important role in changes of synaptic function long after even transient increases of glutamate release in the CNS. PMID:12684261

  10. Non-competitive metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor antagonists block activity of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptor units in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, P M B; Mavulati, S C

    2009-10-20

    Previous studies suggested that Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors play a role in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors. Using an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation we tested a range of compounds. Surprisingly, only non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists produced profound and long-lasting depression of mechanically evoked firing. 6-Amino-N-cyclohexyl-N,3-dimethylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (YM-298198) had an IC(50) of 8.7 muM (95% CI 5.7 to 13.2 microM), representing the most potent known blocker of type I mechanoreceptors. The derivative 6-amino-N-cyclohexyl-3-methylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (desmethyl YM-298198) had a comparable potency. Another compound 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) had a similar depressant effect, although it was less potent with an approximate IC(50) of 100 microM. Between three and seven times the concentration of CPCCOEt and YM-298198 respectively was required to produce similar depressions in slowly adapting type II units. No depression, and some weak excitatory effects, were observed using the following ligands: the competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist alpha-amino-5-carboxy-3-methyl-2-thiopheneacetic acid (3-MATIDA) (300 microM), the phosphoserine phosphatase inhibitor dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (dl-AP3) (2 mM), non-competitive mGlu5 receptor antagonists 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine; (S)-3,5-DHPG, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (MTEP) (10 microM) and 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) (100 microM), the mGlu1 receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine ((S)-3,5-DHPG) (500 microM), and the mGlu5 receptor agonist (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) (1 mM). The results suggest that the non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists are not acting at conventional mGlu1 receptors but at other binding sites, possibly

  11. In the grey zone between epilepsy and schizophrenia: alterations in group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Boets, Stephanie; Janssens, Pieter; Lavreysen, Hilde; Steckler, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. The glutamate system plays an important role in the formation of synapses during brain development and synaptic plasticity. Dysfunctions in glutamate regulation may lead to hyperexcitatory neuronal networks and neurotoxicity. Glutamate excess is possibly of great importance in the pathophysiology of several neurological and psychiatric disorders such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Interestingly, cross talk between these disorders has been well documented: psychiatric comorbidities are frequent in epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the highest risk factors for developing psychosis. Therefore, dysfunctions in glutamatergic neurotransmission might constitute a common pathological mechanism. A major negative feedback system is regulated by the presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors including mGlu2/3 receptors. These receptors are predominantly localised extrasynaptically in basal ganglia and limbic structures. Hence, mGlu2/3 receptors are an interesting target for the treatment of disorders like epilepsy and schizophrenia. A dysfunction in the glutamate system may be associated with alterations in mGlu2/3 receptor expression. In this review, we describe the localization of mGlu2/3 receptors in the healthy brain of mice, rats and humans. Secondly, changes in mGlu2/3 receptor density of the brain regions affected in epilepsy and schizophrenia are summarised. Increased mGlu2/3 receptor density might represent a compensatory mechanism of the brain to regulate elevated glutamate levels, while reduced mGlu2/3 receptor density in some brain regions may further contribute to the aberrant hyperexcitability. Further research considering the mGlu2/3 receptor can contribute significantly to the understanding of the etiological and therapeutic role of group II mGlu receptor in epilepsy, epilepsy with psychosis and schizophrenia.

  12. Environmental Enrichment Ameliorates Behavioral Impairments Modeling Schizophrenia in Mice Lacking Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Emma L; McOmish, Caitlin E; Buret, Laetitia S; Van den Buuse, Maarten; Hannan, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia arises from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Abnormalities in glutamatergic signaling have been proposed to underlie the emergence of symptoms, in light of various lines of evidence, including the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has also been implicated in the disorder, and has been shown to physically interact with NMDA receptors. To clarify the role of mGlu5-dependent behavioral expression by environmental factors, we assessed mGlu5 knockout (KO) mice after exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) or reared under standard conditions. The mGlu5 KO mice showed reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI), long-term memory deficits, and spontaneous locomotor hyperactivity, which were all attenuated by EE. Examining the cellular impact of genetic and environmental manipulation, we show that EE significantly increased pyramidal cell dendritic branching and BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus of wild-type mice; however, mGlu5 KO mice were resistant to these alterations, suggesting that mGlu5 is critical to these responses. A selective effect of EE on the behavioral response to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 in mGlu5 KO mice was seen. MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion was further potentiated in enriched mGlu5 KO mice and treatment with MK-801 reinstated PPI disruption in EE mGlu5 KO mice only, a response that is absent under standard housing conditions. Together, these results demonstrate an important role for mGlu5 in environmental modulation of schizophrenia-related behavioral impairments. Furthermore, this role of the mGlu5 receptor is mediated by interaction with NMDA receptor function, which may inform development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25666312

  13. Dynamic modulation of inflammatory pain-related affective and sensory symptoms by optical control of amygdala metabotropic glutamate receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Zussy, C; Gómez-Santacana, X; Rovira, X; De Bundel, D; Ferrazzo, S; Bosch, D; Asede, D; Malhaire, F; Acher, F; Giraldo, J; Valjent, E; Ehrlich, I; Ferraguti, F; Pin, J-P; Llebaria, A; Goudet, C

    2016-12-20

    Contrary to acute pain, chronic pain does not serve as a warning signal and must be considered as a disease per se. This pathology presents a sensory and psychological dimension at the origin of affective and cognitive disorders. Being largely refractory to current pharmacotherapies, identification of endogenous systems involved in persistent and chronic pain is crucial. The amygdala is a key brain region linking pain sensation with negative emotions. Here, we show that activation of a specific intrinsic neuromodulatory system within the amygdala associated with type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu4) abolishes sensory and affective symptoms of persistent pain such as hypersensitivity to pain, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, and fear extinction impairment. Interestingly, neuroanatomical and synaptic analysis of the amygdala circuitry suggests that the effects of mGlu4 activation occur outside the central nucleus via modulation of multisensory thalamic inputs to lateral amygdala principal neurons and dorso-medial intercalated cells. Furthermore, we developed optogluram, a small diffusible photoswitchable positive allosteric modulator of mGlu4. This ligand allows the control of endogenous mGlu4 activity with light. Using this photopharmacological approach, we rapidly and reversibly inhibited behavioral symptoms associated with persistent pain through optical control of optogluram in the amygdala of freely behaving animals. Altogether, our data identify amygdala mGlu4 signaling as a mechanism that bypasses central sensitization processes to dynamically modulate persistent pain symptoms. Our findings help to define novel and more precise therapeutic interventions for chronic pain, and exemplify the potential of optopharmacology to study the dynamic activity of endogenous neuromodulatory mechanisms in vivo.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 20 December 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.223.

  14. Cognitive effects of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands in the context of drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. Foster

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate plays a pivotal role in regulating drug self-administration and drug-seeking behavior, and the past decade has witnessed a substantial surge of interest in the role of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptors) in mediating these behaviors. As will be reviewed here, Group I mGlu receptors are involved in normal and drug-induced synaptic plasticity, drug reward, reinforcement and relapse-like behaviors, and addiction-related cognitive processes such as maladaptive learning and memory, behavioral inflexibility, and extinction learning. Animal models of addiction have revealed that antagonists of Group I mGlu receptors, particularly the mGlu5 receptor, reduce self-administration of virtually all drugs of abuse. Since inhibitors of mGlu5 receptor function have now entered clinical trials for other medical conditions and appear to be well-tolerated, a key question that remains unanswered is - what changes in cognition are produced by these compounds that result in reduced drug intake and drug-seeking behavior? Finally, in contrast to mGlu5 receptor antagonists, recent studies have indicated that positive allosteric modulation of mGlu5 receptors actually enhances synaptic plasticity and improves various aspects of cognition, including spatial learning, behavioral flexibility, and extinction of drug-seeking behavior. Thus, while inhibition of Group I mGlu receptor function may reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-related behaviors, positive allosteric modulation of the mGlu5 receptor subtype may actually enhance cognition and potentially reverse some of the cognitive deficits associated with chronic drug use. PMID:20371237

  15. UV activation of receptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Coffer, P J; Burgering, B M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Bos, J L; Kruijer, W

    1995-08-03

    The exposure of mammalian cells to ultraviolet radiation (UV) may lead to DNA damage resulting in mutation and thus possibly cancer, while irradiation can further act as a potent tumor promoter. In addition UV induces p21ras-mediated signalling leading to activation of transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappa B, as well as activation of the Src tyrosine kinase. This 'UV-response' has been well studied in mammalian cells and furthermore is conserved in yeast, however the most upstream components of this signal transduction pathway have remained elusive. Here we show that UV rapidly activates both the EGF receptor and insulin receptor, as shown by tyrosine phosphorylation of these receptors. We demonstrate that this activation is due to autophosphorylation as it only occurs in cells containing receptors with a functional kinase domain. We have further analysed the propagation of the UV-induced signal to downstream events such as, IRS-1 and Shc tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and gene induction all of which are activated by UV irradiation. Importantly, we demonstrate that in cells expressing a 'kinase-dead' receptor mutant the UV-response is inhibited, blocking leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and transcriptional induction. Furthermore, prior-stimulation of cells with UV appears to reduce further responsiveness to addition of growth factor suggesting a common signaling pathway. These data demonstrate a critical role for receptor-mediated events in regulating the response mammalian cells to UV exposure.

  16. The Role of 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and mGlu2 Receptors in the Behavioral Effects of Tryptamine Hallucinogens N,N-Dimethyltryptamine and N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carbonaro, Theresa M.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Forster, Michael J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Gatch, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors are thought to be the primary pharmacological mechanisms for serotonin-mediated hallucinogenic drugs, but recently there has been interest in metabotropic glutamate (mGluR2) receptors as contributors to the mechanism of hallucinogens. Objective: The present study assesses the role of these 5-HT and glutamate receptors as molecular targets for two tryptamine hallucinogens, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (DiPT). Methods: Drug discrimination, head twitch and radioligand binding assays were used. A 5-HT2AR inverse agonist (MDL100907), 5-HT2CR antagonist (SB242084) and mGluR2/3 agonist (LY379268) were tested for their ability to attenuate the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT and DiPT; an mGluR2/3 antagonist (LY341495) was tested for potentiation. MDL100907 was used to attenuate head twitches induced by DMT and DiPT. Radioligand binding studies and inosital-1-phosphate (IP-1) accumulation were performed at the 5-HT2CR for DiPT. Results: MDL100907 fully blocked the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT, but only partially blocked DiPT. SB242084 partially attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of DiPT, but produced minimal attenuation of DMT’s effects. LY379268 produced potent, but only partial blockade of the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT. LY341495 facilitated DMT- and DiPT-like effects. Both compounds elicited head twitches (DiPT>DMT) which were blocked by MDL1000907. DiPT was a low potency full agonist at 5-HT2CR in vitro. Conclusions: The 5-HT2AR likely plays a major role in mediating the effects of both compounds. 5-HT2C and mGluR2 receptors likely modulate the discriminative stimulus effects of both compounds to some degree. PMID:24985890

  17. The role of 5-HT2A, 5-HT 2C and mGlu2 receptors in the behavioral effects of tryptamine hallucinogens N,N-dimethyltryptamine and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Theresa M; Eshleman, Amy J; Forster, Michael J; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Gatch, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors are thought to be the primary pharmacological mechanisms for serotonin-mediated hallucinogenic drugs, but recently there has been interest in metabotropic glutamate (mGluR2) receptors as contributors to the mechanism of hallucinogens. The present study assesses the role of these 5-HT and glutamate receptors as molecular targets for two tryptamine hallucinogens, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (DiPT). Drug discrimination, head twitch, and radioligand binding assays were used. A 5-HT2AR inverse agonist (MDL100907), 5-HT2CR antagonist (SB242084), and mGluR2/3 agonist (LY379268) were tested for their ability to attenuate the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT and DiPT; an mGluR2/3 antagonist (LY341495) was tested for potentiation. MDL100907 was used to attenuate head twitches induced by DMT and DiPT. Radioligand binding studies and inosital-1-phosphate (IP-1) accumulation were performed at the 5-HT2CR for DiPT. MDL100907 fully blocked the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT, but only partially blocked DiPT. SB242084 partially attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of DiPT, but produced minimal attenuation of DMT's effects. LY379268 produced potent, but only partial blockade of the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT. LY341495 facilitated DMT- and DiPT-like effects. Both compounds elicited head twitches (DiPT>DMT) which were blocked by MDL1000907. DiPT was a low-potency full agonist at 5-HT2CR in vitro. The 5-HT2AR likely plays a major role in mediating the effects of both compounds. 5-HT2C and mGluR2 receptors likely modulate the discriminative stimulus effects of both compounds to some degree.

  18. Discovery of a Selective and CNS Penetrant Negative Allosteric Modulator of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 3 with Antidepressant and Anxiolytic Activity in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Engers, Julie L.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Konkol, Leah C.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Thompson, Analisa D.; Byers, Frank W.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Chang, Sichen; Venable, Daryl F.; Loch, Matthew T.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Daniels, J. Scott; Jones, Carrie K.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Emmitte, Kyle A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous preclinical work has demonstrated the therapeutic potential of antagonists of the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus). Still, compounds that are selective for the individual group II mGlus (mGlu2 and mGlu3) have been scarce. There remains a need for such compounds with the balance of properties suitable for convenient use in a wide array of rodent behavioral studies. We describe here the discovery of a selective mGlu3 NAM 106 (VU0650786) suitable for in vivo work. Compound 106 is a member of a series of 5-aryl-6,7-dihydropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrazine-4(5H)-one compounds originally identified as a mGlu5 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) chemotype. Its suitability for use in rodent behavioral models has been established by extensive in vivo PK studies, and the behavioral experiments presented here with compound 106 represent the first examples in which an mGlu3 NAM has demonstrated efficacy in models where prior efficacy had previously been noted with nonselective group II antagonists. PMID:26335039

  19. Targeting glutamate receptors to tackle the pathogenesis, clinical symptoms and levodopa-induced dyskinesia associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Duty, Susan

    2012-12-01

    The appearance of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) and ongoing degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are two key features of Parkinson's disease (PD) that current treatments fail to address. Increased glutamate transmission contributes to the motor symptoms in PD, to the striatal plasticity that underpins LID and to the progression of neurodegeneration through excitotoxic mechanisms. Glutamate receptors have therefore long been considered as potential targets for pharmacological intervention in PD, with emphasis on either blocking activation of 2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo-1,2-oxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or excitatory metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 5 receptors or promoting the activation of group II/III mGlu receptors. Following a brief summary of the role of glutamate in PD and LID, this article explores the current status of pharmacological studies in pre-clinical rodent and primate models through to clinical trials, where applicable, that support the potential of glutamate-based therapeutic interventions. To date, AMPA antagonists have shown good efficacy against LID in rat and primate models, but the failure of perampanel to lessen LID in clinical trials casts doubt on the translational potential of this approach. In contrast, antagonists selective for NR2B-containing NMDA receptors were effective against LID in animal models and in small-scale clinical trials, though observed adverse cognitive effects need addressing. So far, mGlu5 antagonists or negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) look set to become the first introduced for tackling LID, with AFQ-056 reported to exhibit good efficacy in phase II clinical trials. NR2B antagonists and mGlu5 NAMs may subsequently prove to also be effective disease-modifying agents if their protective effects in rat and primate models of PD, respectively, are replicated in the next stages of investigation. Finally, group III mGlu4 agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs

  20. Neuroprotective effects of the allosteric agonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 AMN082 on oxygen-glucose deprivation- and kainate-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Domin, Helena; Jantas, Danuta; Śmiałowska, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Although numerous studies demonstrated a neuroprotective potency of unspecific group III mGluR agonists in in vitro and in vivo models of excitotoxicity, little is known about the protective role of group III mGlu receptor activation against neuronal cell injury evoked by ischemic conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess neuroprotective potential of the allosteric agonist of mGlu7 receptor, N,N'-Bis(diphenylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine dihydrochloride (AMN082) against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)- and kainate (KA)-evoked neuronal cell damage in primary neuronal cultures, with special focus on its efficacy after delayed application. We demonstrated that in cortical neuronal cultures exposed to a 180 min OGD, AMN082 (0.01-1 µM) in a concentration- and time-dependent way attenuated the OGD-induced changes in the LDH release and MTT reduction assays. AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) produced also neuroprotective effects against KA-evoked neurotoxicity both in cortical and hippocampal cultures. Of particular importance was the finding that AMN082 attenuated excitotoxic neuronal injury after delayed application (30 min after OGD, or 30 min-1 h after KA). In both models of neurotoxicity, namely OGD- and KA-induced injury, the neuroprotective effects of AMN082 (1 µM) were reversed by the selective mGlu7 antagonist, 6-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-(4-pyridinyl)-isoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one hydrochloride (MMPIP, 1 µM), suggesting the mGlu7-dependent mechanism of neuroprotective effects of AMN082. Next, we showed that AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) attenuated the OGD-induced increase in the number of necrotic nuclei as well inhibited the OGD-evoked calpain activation, suggesting the participation of these processes in the mechanism of AMN082-mediated protection. Additionally, we showed that protection evoked by AMN082 (1 µM) in KA model was connected with the inhibition of toxin-induced caspase-3 activity, and this effect was abolished by the mGlu7

  1. Impaired expression and function of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R; Otalora, Luis F Pacheco; Arshadmansab, Massoud F; Herrera, Berenice; Francisco, Sebastian; Ermolinsky, Boris S

    2008-11-13

    Group II metabotropic (mGlu II) receptor subtypes mGlu2 and mGlu3 are important modulators of synaptic plasticity and glutamate release in the brain. Accordingly, several pharmacological ligands have been designed to target these receptors for the treatment of neurological disorders characterized by anomalous glutamate regulation including epilepsy. In this study, we examine whether the expression level and function of mGlu2 and mGlu3 are altered in experimental epilepsy by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and extracellular recordings. A down-regulation of mGlu2/3 protein expression at the mossy fiber pathway was associated with a significant reduction in mGlu2/3 protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats. Moreover, a reduction in mGlu2 and mGlu3 transcripts levels was noticed as early as 24 h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and persisted during subsequent "latent" and chronic periods. In addition, a significant impairment of mGlu II-mediated depression of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses was detected in chronically epileptic rats. Application of mGlu II agonists (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) induced a significant reduction of the fEPSP amplitude in control rats, but not in chronic epileptic rats. These data indicate a long-lasting impairment of mGlu2/3 expression that may contribute to abnormal presynaptic plasticity, exaggerate glutamate release and hyperexcitability in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  2. Impaired expression and function of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R.; Otalora, Luis F. Pacheco; Arshadmansab, Massoud F.; Herrera, Berenice; Francisco, Sebastian; Ermolinsky, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Group II metabotropic (mGlu II) receptor subtypes mGlu2 and mGlu3 are important modulators of synaptic plasticity and glutamate release in the brain. Accordingly, several pharmacological ligands have been designed to target these receptors for the treatment of neurological disorders characterized by anomalous glutamate regulation including epilepsy. In this study, we examine whether the expression level and function of mGlu2 and mGlu3 are altered in experimental epilepsy by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and extracellular recordings. A down-regulation of mGlu2/3 protein expression at the mossy fiber pathway was associated with a significant reduction in mGlu2/3 protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats. Moreover, a reduction in mGlu2 and mGlu3 transcripts levels was noticed as early as 24h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and persisted during subsequent “latent” and chronic periods. In addition, a significant impairment of mGlu II-mediated depression of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses was detected in chronically epileptic rats. Application of mGlu II agonists (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) induced a significant reduction of the fEPSP amplitude in control rats, but not in chronic epileptic rats. These data indicate a long-lasting impairment of mGlu2/3 expression that may contribute to abnormal presynaptic plasticity, exaggerate glutamate release and hyperexcitability in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:18804094

  3. Selective remediation of reversal learning deficits in the neurodevelopmental MAM model of schizophrenia by a novel mGlu5 positive allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Gastambide, Francois; Cotel, Marie-Caroline; Gilmour, Gary; O'Neill, Michael J; Robbins, Trevor W; Tricklebank, Mark D

    2012-03-01

    Based on the glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia we assessed the effects of a novel mGlu5 positive allosteric modulator, LSN2463359 [N-(1-methylethyl)-5-(pyridin-4-ylethynyl)pyridine-2-carboxamide] on deficits in cognitive flexibility in two distinct rodent models of schizophrenia, the neurodevelopmental MAM E17 model and the acute PCP model. Cognitive flexibility was measured with the intra-dimensional and extra-dimensional set-shifting and reversal learning digging paradigm. Regional effects of MAM on the expression of parvalbumin-positive cells (PV) and mGlu5 receptors were also examined, to further characterize the model. Results showed that LSN2463359 selectively attenuated reversal learning deficits in the MAM but not acute PCP model. Whilst both models led to deficits in reversal learning and extra-dimensional set-shifting, the reversal impairments were qualitatively distinct, with MAM increasing perseverative responding, whereas the PCP deficit was mainly due to the inability of rats to maintain reinforced choice behavior. Reduction of PV and mGlu5 expression was found in the MAM model in several regions of importance in schizophrenia, such as the orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex, which also mediate reversal learning and extra-dimensional set-shifting. The present findings confirm that the positive modulation of mGlu5 receptors may have beneficial effects in the treatment of certain aspects of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia. This study also illustrates the importance of studying putative cognitive enhancing drug effects in a number of models which may have implications for the future development of the compound.

  4. Selective Remediation of Reversal Learning Deficits in the Neurodevelopmental MAM Model of Schizophrenia by a Novel mGlu5 Positive Allosteric Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Gastambide, Francois; Cotel, Marie-Caroline; Gilmour, Gary; O'Neill, Michael J; Robbins, Trevor W; Tricklebank, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    Based on the glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia we assessed the effects of a novel mGlu5 positive allosteric modulator, LSN2463359 [N-(1-methylethyl)-5-(pyridin-4-ylethynyl)pyridine-2-carboxamide] on deficits in cognitive flexibility in two distinct rodent models of schizophrenia, the neurodevelopmental MAM E17 model and the acute PCP model. Cognitive flexibility was measured with the intra-dimensional and extra-dimensional set-shifting and reversal learning digging paradigm. Regional effects of MAM on the expression of parvalbumin-positive cells (PV) and mGlu5 receptors were also examined, to further characterize the model. Results showed that LSN2463359 selectively attenuated reversal learning deficits in the MAM but not acute PCP model. Whilst both models led to deficits in reversal learning and extra-dimensional set-shifting, the reversal impairments were qualitatively distinct, with MAM increasing perseverative responding, whereas the PCP deficit was mainly due to the inability of rats to maintain reinforced choice behavior. Reduction of PV and mGlu5 expression was found in the MAM model in several regions of importance in schizophrenia, such as the orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex, which also mediate reversal learning and extra-dimensional set-shifting. The present findings confirm that the positive modulation of mGlu5 receptors may have beneficial effects in the treatment of certain aspects of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia. This study also illustrates the importance of studying putative cognitive enhancing drug effects in a number of models which may have implications for the future development of the compound. PMID:22129780

  5. Three-dimensional model of the extracellular domain of the type 4a metabotropic glutamate receptor: new insights into the activation process.

    PubMed Central

    Bessis, A. S.; Bertrand, H. O.; Galvez, T.; De Colle, C.; Pin, J. P.; Acher, F.

    2000-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to the family 3 of G-protein-coupled receptors. On these proteins, agonist binding on the extracellular domain leads to conformational changes in the 7-transmembrane domains required for G-protein activation. To elucidate the structural features that might be responsible for such an activation mechanism, we have generated models of the amino terminal domain (ATD) of type 4 mGluR (mGlu4R). The fold recognition search allowed the identification of three hits with a low sequence identity, but with high secondary structure conservation: leucine isoleucine valine-binding protein (LIVBP) and leucine-binding protein (LBP) as already known, and acetamide-binding protein (AmiC). These proteins are characterized by a bilobate structure in an open state for LIVBP/LBP and a closed state for AmiC, with ligand binding in the cleft. Models for both open and closed forms of mGlu4R ATD have been generated. ACPT-I (1-aminocyclopentane 1,3,4-tricarboxylic acid), a selective agonist, has been docked in the two models. In the open form, ACPT-I is only bound to lobe I through interactions with Lys74, Arg78, Ser159, and Thr182. In the closed form, ACPT-I is trapped between both lobes with additional binding to Tyr230, Asp312, Ser313, and Lys317 from lobe II. These results support the hypothesis that mGluR agonists bind a closed form of the ATDs, suggesting that such a conformation of the binding domain corresponds to the active conformation. PMID:11152130

  6. Ameliorative effect of a hippocampal metabotropic glutamate- receptor agonist on histamine H1 receptor antagonist-induced memory deficit in rats.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Mikami, Azusa; Kamei, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the ameliorative effects of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu)-receptor agonists on histamine H(1) receptor antagonist-induced spatial memory deficit and the decrease in hippocampal theta activity in rats. Intraperitoneal injection of pyrilamine (35 mg/kg) resulted in impaired reference and working memory in the radial maze task and decreased hippocampal theta amplitude and power. The working memory deficit and decreased hippocampal theta power induced by pyrilamine were ameliorated by intrahippocampal injection of (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (1 and 10 microg/side), a group I mGlu-receptor agonist; however, intrahippocampal injection of (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC), a group II mGlu-receptor agonist, and L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4), a group III mGlu-receptor agonist, showed no significant effect on the pyrilamine-induced memory deficit and decreased hippocampal theta activity. These results indicate that the activation of hippocampal group I mGlu receptors, but not group II and III mGlu receptors, improve the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist-induced working memory deficit and decreased hippocampal theta activity.

  7. Morphine in combination with metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on schedule-controlled responding and thermal nociception.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Bradford D; Zimmerman, Eric I; Picker, Mitchell J; Dykstra, Linda A

    2008-02-01

    The present study examined the interactive effects of morphine in combination with metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonists on schedule-controlled responding and thermal nociception. Drug interaction data were examined with isobolographic and dose-addition analysis. Morphine, the mGlu1 receptor antagonist JNJ16259685 [(3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano-[2,3-b]quinolin-7-yl)-(cis-4-methoxycyclohexyl)-methanone], the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride], and the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY341495 [(2S)-2-amino-2-[(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl) propanoic acid] all decreased rates of schedule-controlled responding. JNJ16259685/morphine, MPEP/morphine, and LY341495/morphine mixtures produced additive effects on this endpoint. Morphine also produced dose-dependent antinociception in the assay of thermal nociception, whereas JNJ16259685, MPEP, and LY341495 failed to produce an effect. In this assay, JNJ16259685 and LY341495 potentiated the antinociceptive effects of morphine, whereas MPEP/morphine mixtures produced additive effects. These results suggest that an mGlu1 and an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, but not an mGlu5 receptor antagonist, selectively enhance the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In addition, these data confirm that the behavioral effects of drug mixtures depend on the endpoint under study.

  8. Relief from detrimental consequences of chronic psychosocial stress in mice deficient for the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, Daniel; Stangl, Christina; Bludau, Anna; Grabski, Dominik; Strasser, Robert; Schmidt, Dominic; Flor, Peter J; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole

    2016-05-14

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric conditions and comorbid somatic pathologies are an enormous public health concern in modern society. The etiology of these disorders is complex, with stressors holding a chronic and psychosocial component representing the most acknowledged risk factor. During the last decades, research on the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu) system advanced dramatically and much attention was given to the role of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) in acute stress-related behavior and physiology. However, virtually nothing is known about the potential involvement of mGlu7 in chronic psychosocial stress-related conditions. Using the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) in male mice, we addressed whether central mGlu7 is altered upon chronic psychosocial stressor exposure and whether genetic ablation of mGlu7 interferes with the multitude of chronic stress-induced alterations. CSC exposure resulted in a downregulation of mGlu7 mRNA transcript levels in the prefrontal cortex, a brain region relevant for stress-related behaviors and physiology. Interestingly, mGlu7 deficiency relieved multiple chronic stress-induced alterations including the CSC-induced anxiety-prone phenotype; mGlu7 ablation also ameliorated CSC-induced physiological and immunological consequences such as hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunctions and colonic inflammation, respectively. Together, our findings provide first evidence for the involvement of mGlu7 in a wide range of behavioral and physiological alterations in response to chronic psychosocial stressor exposure. Moreover, the stress-protective phenotype of genetic mGlu7 ablation suggests mGlu7 pharmacological blockade to be a relevant option for the treatment of chronic stress-related emotional and somatic dysfunctions.

  9. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  10. Presynaptic D1 heteroreceptors and mGlu autoreceptors act at individual cortical release sites to modify glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Takuya; Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Arbuthnott, Gordon William

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this work was to study release of glutamic acid (GLU) from one-axon terminal or bouton at-a-time using cortical neurons grown in vitro to study the effect of presynaptic auto- and heteroreceptor stimulation. Neurons were infected with release reporters SypHx2 or iGluSnFR at 7 or 3 days-in-vitro (DIV) respectively. At 13-15 DIV single synaptic boutons were identified from images obtained from a confocal scanning microscope before and after field electrical stimulation. We further stimulated release by raising intracellular levels of cAMP with forskolin (10µM). Forskolin-mediated effects were dependent on protein kinase A (PKA) and did not result from an increase in endocytosis, but rather from an increase in the size of the vesicle readily releasable pool. Once iGluSnFR was confirmed as more sensitive than SypHx2, it was used to study the participation of presynaptic auto- and heteroreceptors on GLU release. Although most receptor agonizts (carbamylcholine, nicotine, dopamine D2, BDNF) did not affect electrically stimulated GLU release, a significant increase was observed in the presence of metabotropic D1/D5 heteroreceptor agonist (SKF38393 10µM) that was reversed by PKA inhibitors. Interestingly, stimulation of group II metabotropic mGLU2/3 autoreceptors (LY379268 50nM) induced a decrease in GLU release that was reversed by the specific mGLU2/3 receptor antagonist (LY341495 1µM) and also by PKA inhibitors (KT5720 200nM and PKI14-22 400nM). These changes in release probability at individual release sites suggest another level of control of the distribution of transmitter substances in cortical tissue.

  11. Numb deficiency in cerebellar Purkinje cells impairs synaptic expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor and motor coordination

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Yang, Dong; Wang, De-Juan; Xie, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Jia-Huan; Zhou, Lin; Huang, Hao; Han, Shuo; Shao, Chong-Yu; Li, Hua-Shun; Zhu, J. Julius; Qiu, Meng-Sheng; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Shen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Protein Numb, first identified as a cell-fate determinant in Drosophila, has been shown to promote the development of neurites in mammals and to be cotransported with endocytic receptors in clathrin-coated vesicles in vitro. Nevertheless, its function in mature neurons has not yet been elucidated. Here we show that cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) express high levels of Numb during adulthood and that conditional deletion of Numb in PCs is sufficient to impair motor coordination despite maintenance of a normal cerebellar cyto-architecture. Numb proved to be critical for internalization and recycling of metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor (mGlu1) in PCs. A significant decrease of mGlu1 and an inhibition of long-term depression at the parallel fiber–PC synapse were observed in conditional Numb knockout mice. Indeed, the trafficking of mGlu1 induced by agonists was inhibited significantly in these mutants, but the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and of mGlu1-associated proteins was not affected by the loss of Numb. Moreover, transient and persistent forms of mGlu1 plasticity were robustly induced in mutant PCs, suggesting that they do not require mGlu1 trafficking. Together, our data demonstrate that Numb is a regulator for constitutive expression and dynamic transport of mGlu1. PMID:26621723

  12. Effects of Positive Allosteric Modulators on Single-Cell Oscillatory Ca2+ Signaling Initiated by the Type 5 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sophie J.; Watson, Jeannette M.

    2009-01-01

    Agonist stimulation of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptor initiates robust oscillatory changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single cells by rapid, repeated cycles of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the mGlu5 receptor, involving protein kinase C and as-yet-unspecified protein phosphatase activities. An emergent property of this type of Ca2+ oscillation-generating mechanism (termed “dynamic uncoupling”) is that once a threshold concentration has been reached to initiate the Ca2+ oscillation, its frequency is largely insensitive to further increases in orthosteric agonist concentration. Here, we report the effects of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) on the patterns of single-cell Ca2+ signaling in recombinant and native mGlu5 receptor-expressing systems. In a Chinese hamster ovary cell-line (CHO-lac-mGlu5a), none of the mGlu5 receptor PAMs studied [3,3′-difluorobenzaldazine (DFB), N-{4-chloro-2-[(1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2H-isoindol-2-yl) methyl]phenyl}-2-hydroxy-benzamide (CPPHA), 3-cyano-N-(1, 3-diphenyl-1H-prazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB), S-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-{3-[3-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-5-yl]-piperidinl-1-yl}-methanone (ADX47273)], stimulated a Ca2+ response when applied alone, but each PAM concentration-dependently increased the frequency, without affecting the amplitude, of Ca2+ oscillations induced by glutamate or quisqualate. Therefore, PAMs can cause graded increases (and negative allosteric modulator-graded decreases) in the Ca2+ oscillation frequency stimulated by orthosteric agonist. Initial data in rat cerebrocortical astrocytes demonstrated that similar effects of PAMs could be observed in a native cell background, although at high orthosteric agonist concentrations, PAM addition could much more often be seen to drive rapid Ca2+ oscillations into peak-plateau responses. These data demonstrate that allosteric modulators can “tune” the Ca2+ oscillation frequency initiated by mGlu5 receptor

  13. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  14. Adenosine A2A receptors enable the synaptic effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the rodent striatum.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Martire, Alberto; Chiodi, Valentina; Pepponi, Rita; Ferrante, Antonella; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Frank, Claudio; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Ledent, Catherine; Popoli, Patrizia

    2009-09-01

    Adenosine A(2A), cannabinoid CB(1) and metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu(5)) receptors are all highly expressed in the striatum. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether, and by which mechanisms, the above receptors interact in the regulation of striatal synaptic transmission. By extracellular field potentials (FPs) recordings in corticostriatal slices, we demonstrated that the ability of the selective type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB(1)R) agonist WIN55,212-2 to depress synaptic transmission was prevented by the pharmacological blockade or the genetic inactivation of A(2A)Rs. Such a permissive effect of A(2A)Rs towards CB(1)Rs does not seem to occur pre-synaptically as the ability of WIN55,212-2 to increase the R2/R1 ratio under a protocol of paired-pulse stimulation was not modified by ZM241385. Furthermore, the effects of WIN55,212-2 were reduced in slices from mice lacking post-synaptic striatal A(2A)Rs. The selective mGlu(5)R agonist (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) potentiated the synaptic effects of WIN55,212-2, and such a potentiation was abolished by A(2A)R blockade. Unlike the synaptic effects, the ability of WIN55,212-2 to prevent NMDA-induced toxicity was not influenced by ZM241385. Altogether, these results show that the state of activation of A(2A)Rs regulates the synaptic effects of CB(1)Rs and that A(2A)Rs may control CB(1) effects also indirectly, namely through mGlu(5)Rs.

  15. Automated cGMP-compliant radiosynthesis of [(18) F]-(E)-PSS232 for brain PET imaging of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Young; Son, Jeongmin; Yun, Mijin; Ametamey, Simon M; Chun, Joong-Hyun

    2017-09-25

    (E)-3-(Pyridin-2-yl ethynyl)cyclohex-2-enone O-(3-(2-[(18) F]-fluoroethoxy)propyl) oxime ([(18) F]-(E)-PSS232, [(18) F]2a) is a recently developed radiotracer that can be used to visualize metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5 ) in vivo. The mGlu5 has become an attractive therapeutic and diagnostic target owing to its role in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Several carbon-11- and fluorine-18-labelled radiotracers have been developed to measure mGlu5 receptor occupancy in the human brain. The radiotracer [(18) F]2a, which is used as an analogue for [(11) C]ABP688 ([(11) C]1) and has a longer physical half-life, is a selective radiotracer that exhibits high binding affinity for mGlu5 . Herein, we report the fully automated radiosynthesis of [(18) F]2a using a commercial GE TRACERlab(TM) FX-FN synthesizer for routine production and distribution to nearby satellite clinics. Nucleophilic substitution of the corresponding mesylate precursor with cyclotron-produced [(18) F]fluoride ion at 100 °C in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification and formulation, readily provided [(18) F]2a with a radiochemical yield of 40 ± 2% (decay corrected, n = 5) at the end of synthesis. Radiochemical purity for the [(18) F]-(E)-conformer was greater than 95%. Molar activity was determined to be 63.6 ± 9.6 GBq/μmol (n = 5), and the overall synthesis time was 70 min. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Presynaptic G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Gatekeepers of Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kari A.; Lovinger, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Drug abuse and addiction cause widespread social and public health problems, and the neurobiology underlying drug actions and drug use and abuse is an area of intensive research. Drugs of abuse alter synaptic transmission, and these actions contribute to acute intoxication as well as the chronic effects of abused substances. Transmission at most mammalian synapses involves neurotransmitter activation of two receptor subtypes, ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic responses and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have slower neuromodulatory actions. The GPCRs represent a large proportion of neurotransmitter receptors involved in almost all facets of nervous system function. In addition, these receptors are targets for many pharmacotherapeutic agents. Drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neuromodulation mediated by GPCRs, with important consequences for intoxication, drug taking and responses to prolonged drug exposure, withdrawal and addiction. Among the GPCRs are several subtypes involved in presynaptic inhibition, most of which are coupled to the Gi/o class of G protein. There is increasing evidence that these presynaptic Gi/o-coupled GPCRs have important roles in the actions of drugs of abuse, as well as behaviors related to these drugs. This topic will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on receptors for three neurotransmitters, Dopamine (DA; D1- and D2-like receptors), Endocannabinoids (eCBs; CB1 receptors) and glutamate (group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors). The focus is on recent evidence from laboratory animal models (and some evidence in humans) implicating these receptors in the acute and chronic effects of numerous abused drugs, as well as in the control of drug seeking and taking. The ability of drugs targeting these receptors to modify drug seeking behavior has raised the possibility of using compounds targeting these receptors for addiction pharmacotherapy. This topic is also discussed, with emphasis on

  17. Distinct subsynaptic localization of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in the rodent cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mahnaz; Kasugai, Yu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Bertaso, Federica; Raynaud, Fabrice; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Kaufmann, Walter A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Ferraguti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1) receptors play a pivotal role in different forms of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar cortex, e.g. long-term depression at glutamatergic synapses and rebound potentiation at GABAergic synapses. These various forms of plasticity might depend on the subsynaptic arrangement of the receptor in Purkinje cells that can be regulated by protein-protein interactions. This study investigated, by means of the freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling method, the subcellular localization of mGlu1 receptors in the rodent cerebellum and whether Homer proteins regulate their subsynaptic distribution. We observed a widespread extrasynaptic localization of mGlu1 receptors and confirmed their peri-synaptic enrichment at glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, we detected mGlu1 receptors within the main body of GABAergic synapses onto Purkinje cell dendrites. Although Homer proteins are known to interact with the mGlu1 receptor C-terminus, we could not detect Homer3, the most abundant Homer protein in the cerebellar cortex, at GABAergic synapses by pre-embedding and post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. We then hypothesized a critical role for Homer proteins in the peri-junctional localization of mGlu1 receptors at glutamatergic synapses. To disrupt Homer-associated protein complexes, mice were tail-vein injected with the membrane-permeable dominant-negative TAT-Homer1a. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling analysis showed no significant alteration in the mGlu1 receptor distribution pattern at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses, suggesting that other scaffolding proteins are involved in the peri-synaptic confinement. The identification of interactors that regulate the subsynaptic localization of the mGlu1 receptor at neurochemically distinct synapses may offer new insight into its trafficking and intracellular signalling.

  18. Protein kinase activity of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gammeltoft, S; Van Obberghen, E

    1986-01-01

    The insulin receptor is an integral membrane glycoprotein (Mr approximately 300,000) composed of two alpha-subunits (Mr approximately 130,000) and two beta-subunits (Mr approximately 95,000) linked by disulphide bonds. This oligomeric structure divides the receptor into two functional domains such that alpha-subunits bind insulin and beta-subunits possess tyrosine kinase activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the single polypeptide chain precursor of human placental insulin receptor revealed that alpha- and beta-subunits consist of 735 and 620 residues, respectively. The alpha-subunit is hydrophilic, disulphide-bonded, glycosylated and probably extracellular. The beta-subunit consists of a short extracellular region which links the alpha-subunit through disulphide bridges, a hydrophobic transmembrane region and a longer cytoplasmic region which is structurally homologous with other tyrosine kinases like the src oncogene product and EGF receptor kinases. The cellular function of insulin receptors is dual: transmembrane signalling and endocytosis of hormone. The binding of insulin to its receptor on the cell membrane induces transfer of signal from extracellular to cytoplasmic receptor domains leading to activation of cell metabolism and growth. In addition, hormone-receptor complexes are internalized leading to intracellular proteolysis of insulin, whereas receptors are recycled to the membrane. These phenomena are kinetically well-characterized, but their molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Insulin receptor in different tissues and animal species are homologous in their structure and function, but show also significant differences regarding size of alpha-subunits, binding kinetics, insulin specificity and receptor-mediated degradation. We suggest that this heterogeneity of receptors may be linked to the diversity in insulin effects on metabolism and growth in various cell types. The purified insulin receptor phosphorylates its own beta-subunit and

  19. High-throughput Analysis of Mammalian Olfactory Receptors: Measurement of Receptor Activation via Luciferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, Casey; Snyder, Lindsey L.; Mainland, Joel D.

    2014-01-01

    Odorants create unique and overlapping patterns of olfactory receptor activation, allowing a family of approximately 1,000 murine and 400 human receptors to recognize thousands of odorants. Odorant ligands have been published for fewer than 6% of human receptors1-11. This lack of data is due in part to difficulties functionally expressing these receptors in heterologous systems. Here, we describe a method for expressing the majority of the olfactory receptor family in Hana3A cells, followed by high-throughput assessment of olfactory receptor activation using a luciferase reporter assay. This assay can be used to (1) screen panels of odorants against panels of olfactory receptors; (2) confirm odorant/receptor interaction via dose response curves; and (3) compare receptor activation levels among receptor variants. In our sample data, 328 olfactory receptors were screened against 26 odorants. Odorant/receptor pairs with varying response scores were selected and tested in dose response. These data indicate that a screen is an effective method to enrich for odorant/receptor pairs that will pass a dose response experiment, i.e. receptors that have a bona fide response to an odorant. Therefore, this high-throughput luciferase assay is an effective method to characterize olfactory receptors—an essential step toward a model of odor coding in the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:24961834

  20. The Emerging Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Chronic Stress-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Peterlik, Daniel; Flor, Peter J.; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, depression, and alcohol abuse are an enormous public health concern. The etiology of these pathologies is complex, with psychosocial stressors being among the most frequently discussed risk factors. The brain glutamatergic neurotransmitter system has often been found involved in behaviors and pathophysiologies resulting from acute stress and fear. Despite this, relatively little is known about the role of glutamatergic system components in chronic psychosocial stress, neither in rodents nor in humans. Recently, drug discovery efforts at the metabotropic receptor subtypes of the glutamatergic system (mGlu1-8 receptors) led to the identification of pharmacological tools with emerging potential in psychiatric conditions. But again, the contribution of individual mGlu subtypes to the manifestation of physiological, molecular, and behavioral consequences of chronic psychosocial stress remains still largely unaddressed. The current review will describe animal models typically used to analyze acute and particularly chronic stress conditions, including models of psychosocial stress, and there we will discuss the emerging roles for mGlu receptor subtypes. Indeed, accumulating evidence indicates relevance and potential therapeutic usefulness of mGlu2/3 ligands and mGlu5 receptor antagonists in chronic stress-related disorders. In addition, a role for further mechanisms, e.g. mGlu7-selective compounds, is beginning to emerge. These mechanisms are important to be analyzed in chronic psychosocial stress paradigms, e.g. in the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) model. We summarize the early results and discuss necessary future investigations, especially for mGlu5 and mGlu7 receptor blockers, which might serve to suggest improved therapeutic strategies to treat stress-related disorders. PMID:27296643

  1. Pharmacological evidence for a metabotropic glutamate receptor heterodimer in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Moreno Delgado, David; Møller, Thor C; Ster, Jeanne; Giraldo, Jesús; Maurel, Damien; Rovira, Xavier; Scholler, Pauline; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Perroy, Julie; Durroux, Thierry; Trinquet, Eric; Prezeau, Laurent; Rondard, Philippe; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-06-29

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are mandatory dimers playing important roles in regulating CNS function. Although assumed to form exclusive homodimers, 16 possible heterodimeric mGluRs have been proposed but their existence in native cells remains elusive. Here, we set up two assays to specifically identify the pharmacological properties of rat mGlu heterodimers composed of mGlu2 and 4 subunits. We used either a heterodimer-specific conformational LRET-based biosensor or a system that guarantees the cell surface targeting of the heterodimer only. We identified mGlu2-4 specific pharmacological fingerprints that were also observed in a neuronal cell line and in lateral perforant path terminals naturally expressing mGlu2 and mGlu4. These results bring strong evidence for the existence of mGlu2-4 heterodimers in native cells. In addition to reporting a general approach to characterize heterodimeric mGluRs, our study opens new avenues to understanding the pathophysiological roles of mGlu heterodimers.

  2. Pharmacological evidence for a metabotropic glutamate receptor heterodimer in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Delgado, David; Møller, Thor C; Ster, Jeanne; Giraldo, Jesús; Maurel, Damien; Rovira, Xavier; Scholler, Pauline; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Perroy, Julie; Durroux, Thierry; Trinquet, Eric; Prezeau, Laurent; Rondard, Philippe; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are mandatory dimers playing important roles in regulating CNS function. Although assumed to form exclusive homodimers, 16 possible heterodimeric mGluRs have been proposed but their existence in native cells remains elusive. Here, we set up two assays to specifically identify the pharmacological properties of rat mGlu heterodimers composed of mGlu2 and 4 subunits. We used either a heterodimer-specific conformational LRET-based biosensor or a system that guarantees the cell surface targeting of the heterodimer only. We identified mGlu2-4 specific pharmacological fingerprints that were also observed in a neuronal cell line and in lateral perforant path terminals naturally expressing mGlu2 and mGlu4. These results bring strong evidence for the existence of mGlu2-4 heterodimers in native cells. In addition to reporting a general approach to characterize heterodimeric mGluRs, our study opens new avenues to understanding the pathophysiological roles of mGlu heterodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25233.001 PMID:28661401

  3. Maternal influenza viral infection causes schizophrenia-like alterations of 5-HT₂A and mGlu₂ receptors in the adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Kurita, Mitsumasa; Holloway, Terrell; López, Javier; Cadagan, Richard; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; García-Sastre, Adolfo; González-Maeso, Javier

    2011-02-02

    Epidemiological studies indicate that maternal influenza viral infection increases the risk for schizophrenia in the adult offspring. The serotonin and glutamate systems are suspected in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The effects of hallucinogens, such as psilocybin and mescaline, require the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor, and induce schizophrenia-like psychosis in humans. In addition, metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu(2/3) agonists show promise as a new treatment for schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the level of expression and behavioral function of 5-HT(2A) and mGlu(2) receptors in a mouse model of maternal influenza viral infection. We show that spontaneous locomotor activity is diminished by maternal infection with the mouse-adapted influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. The behavioral responses to hallucinogens and glutamate antipsychotics are both affected by maternal exposure to influenza virus, with increased head-twitch response to hallucinogens and diminished antipsychotic-like effect of the glutamate agonist. In frontal cortex of mice born to influenza virus-infected mothers, the 5-HT(2A) receptor is upregulated and the mGlu(2) receptor is downregulated, an alteration that may be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Additionally, we find that the cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent signaling pathways are significantly altered in the offspring of infected mothers, showing higher c-fos, egr-1, and egr-2 expression in response to the hallucinogenic drug DOI. Identifying a biochemical alteration that parallels the behavioral changes observed in a mouse model of prenatal viral infection may facilitate targeting therapies for treatment and prevention of schizophrenia.

  4. Fear extinction in 17 day old rats is dependent on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ganella, Despina E; Thangaraju, Pushbalela; Lawrence, Andrew J; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We used pharmacological modulation of the mGlu5 receptor to investigate its role in the extinction of conditioned fear throughout development. In postnatal day (P) 17 rats, the positive allosteric modulator CDPPB facilitated, while the negative allosteric modulator MTEP impaired extinction. These drugs had no such effects on P24 or adult rats. These results establish a changing importance of mGlu5 in extinction of conditioned fear at distinct stages of development.

  5. Metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 Receptors and Epigenetic Modifications in Psychotic Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Matrisciano, Francesco; Panaccione, Isabella; Grayson, Danis R.; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder are chronic psychiatric disorders, both considered as “major psychosis”; they are thought to share some pathogenetic factors involving a dysfunctional gene x environment interaction. Alterations in the glutamatergic transmission have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of psychosis. Our group developed an epigenetic model of schizophrenia originated by Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS) paradigm in mice. PRS mice developed some behavioral alterations observed in schizophrenic patients and classic animal models of schizophrenia, i.e. deficits in social interaction, locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition. They also showed specific changes in promoter DNA methylation activity of genes related to schizophrenia such as reelin, BDNF and GAD67, and altered expression and function of mGlu2/3 receptors in the frontal cortex. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular alterations were reversed by treatment with mGlu2/3 agonists. Based on these findings, we speculate that pharmacological modulation of these receptors could have a great impact on early phase treatment of psychosis together with the possibility to modulate specific epigenetic key protein involved in the development of psychosis. In this review, we will discuss in more details the specific features of the PRS mice as a suitable epigenetic model for major psychosis. We will then focus on key proteins of chromatin remodeling machinery as potential target for new pharmacological treatment through the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:26813121

  6. Metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 Receptors and Epigenetic Modifications in Psychotic Disorders: A Review.

    PubMed

    Matrisciano, Francesco; Panaccione, Isabella; Grayson, Danis R; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder are chronic psychiatric disorders, both considered as "major psychosis"; they are thought to share some pathogenetic factors involving a dysfunctional gene x environment interaction. Alterations in the glutamatergic transmission have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of psychosis. Our group developed an epigenetic model of schizophrenia originated by Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS) paradigm in mice. PRS mice developed some behavioral alterations observed in schizophrenic patients and classic animal models of schizophrenia, i.e. deficits in social interaction, locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition. They also showed specific changes in promoter DNA methylation activity of genes related to schizophrenia such as reelin, BDNF and GAD67, and altered expression and function of mGlu2/3 receptors in the frontal cortex. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular alterations were reversed by treatment with mGlu2/3 agonists. Based on these findings, we speculate that pharmacological modulation of these receptors could have a great impact on early phase treatment of psychosis together with the possibility to modulate specific epigenetic key protein involved in the development of psychosis. In this review, we will discuss in more details the specific features of the PRS mice as a suitable epigenetic model for major psychosis. We will then focus on key proteins of chromatin remodeling machinery as potential target for new pharmacological treatment through the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  7. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  8. Characterization of a plant glutamate receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Teardo, Enrico; Segalla, Anna; Formentin, Elide; Zanetti, Manuela; Marin, Oriano; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatic approaches have allowed the identification of twenty genes, grouped into three subfamilies, encoding for homologues of animal ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLRs) in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. Indirect evidence suggests that plant iGLRs function as non-selective cation channels. In the present work we provide biochemical and electrophysiological evidences for the chloroplast localization of glutamate receptor(s) of family 3 (iGLR3) in spinach. A specific antibody, recognizing putative receptors of family 3 locates iGLR3 to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. In planar lipid bilayer experiments, purified inner envelope vesicles from spinach display a cation-selective electrophysiological activity which is inhibited by DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), considered to act as an inhibitor on both animal and plant iGLRs. These results identify for the first time the intracellular localization of plant glutamate receptor(s) and a DNQX-sensitive, glutamate-gated activity at single channel level in native membrane with properties compatible with those predicted for plant glutamate receptors. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. New GABA amides activating GABAA-receptors.

    PubMed

    Raster, Peter; Späth, Andreas; Bultakova, Svetlana; Gorostiza, Pau; König, Burkhard; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    We have prepared a series of new and some literature-reported GABA-amides and determined their effect on the activation of GABAA-receptors expressed in CHO cells. Special attention was paid to the purification of the target compounds to remove even traces of GABA contaminations, which may arise from deprotection steps in the synthesis. GABA-amides were previously reported to be partial, full or superagonists. In our hands these compounds were not able to activate GABAA-receptor channels in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. New GABA-amides, however, gave moderate activation responses with a clear structure-activity relationship suggesting some of these compounds as promising molecular tools for the functional analysis of GABAA-receptors.

  10. New GABA amides activating GABAA-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Raster, Peter; Späth, Andreas; Bultakova, Svetlana; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-01-01

    Summary We have prepared a series of new and some literature-reported GABA-amides and determined their effect on the activation of GABAA-receptors expressed in CHO cells. Special attention was paid to the purification of the target compounds to remove even traces of GABA contaminations, which may arise from deprotection steps in the synthesis. GABA-amides were previously reported to be partial, full or superagonists. In our hands these compounds were not able to activate GABAA-receptor channels in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. New GABA-amides, however, gave moderate activation responses with a clear structure–activity relationship suggesting some of these compounds as promising molecular tools for the functional analysis of GABAA-receptors. PMID:23503884

  11. Coffee contains potent opiate receptor binding activity.

    PubMed

    Boublik, J H; Quinn, M J; Clements, J A; Herington, A C; Wynne, K N; Funder, J W

    1983-01-20

    Opiate receptor-active peptide fragments (exorphins) have been identified recently in casein and gluten hydrolysates, and morphine has been found in bovine and human milk. To determine whether similar peptides or alkaloids occur in other foodstuffs, we have screened potential sources using a rat brain homogenate assay to detect opiate receptor activity. We report here that instant coffee powders from a variety of manufacturers compete with tritiated naloxone for binding to opiate receptors in the rat brain membrane preparations, with no significant difference between normal and decaffeinated coffee. The receptor binding activity resembles that seen with opiate antagonists, in that there was no change in the half-maximal effective dose (ED50) in the presence of 100 mM Na+; on bioassay, the activity was similarly shown to be antagonistic and specific for opiate-induced inhibition of twitch. Preliminary characterization of the activity reveals that it has a molecular weight (MW) in the range 1,000-3,500, is heat-stable, ether-extractable, not modified by enzymatic digestion with papain, and clearly separable from caffeine and morphine on TLC. As its concentration in an average cup of coffee is five times the ED50, these data suggest that drinking coffee may be followed by effects mediated via opiate receptors, as well as effects of caffeine.

  12. The antidepressant-like action of metabotropic glutamate 7 receptor agonist N,N'-bis(diphenylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine (AMN082) is serotonin-dependent.

    PubMed

    Pałucha-Poniewiera, Agnieszka; Brański, Piotr; Lenda, Tomasz; Pilc, Andrzej

    2010-09-01

    Behavioral studies show that modulation of the glutamatergic system might be an efficient way to achieve antidepressant activity. Among the group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, the mGlu7 receptor subtype seems to be the most promising target for potential antidepressants. It has been shown that a selective, allosteric mGlu7 receptor agonist, N,N'-bis (diphenylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine (AMN082), induced antidepressant-like action in behavioral tests in mice, although the mechanisms responsible for this action remained unknown. Here, we decided to investigate the possible role of the serotonergic system in the antidepressant-like activity of AMN082 in both the forced swim test (FST) in rats and the tail suspension test (TST) in mice. We found that AMN082 (1-10 mg/kg i.p.) induced a dose-dependent reduction in the immobility of rats and an increase in their swimming behavior, whereas there were not any changes in climbing behavior in the FST in rats. In the TST in mice we found that AMN082 (3 mg/kg i.p.) did not induce an antidepressant-like effect after depletion of serotonin (5-HT) with para-chlorophenylalanine. Moreover, we revealed that citalopram, but not reboxetine, when combined with AMN082 (all compounds used at low subeffective doses), induced a significant antidepressant-like effect in the TST. We also discovered that the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist N-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl}-N-(2-pyridynyl) cyclohexane-carboxamide (WAY100635) (0.1 mg/kg s.c.), but not the 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist ritanserin (0.5 mg/kg i.p.), blocked the antidepressant-like action of AMN082. Altogether, the results of our studies show that the antidepressant-like action of the mGlu7 receptor-positive modulator AMN082 depends on the activation of the serotonergic system.

  13. Lymphocyte activation and capping of hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, L Y; Jy, W; Majercik, M H; Bourguignon, G J

    1988-06-01

    In this study both a ligand-dependent treatment [concanavalin A (Con A)] and a ligand-independent treatment [high-voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation (HVPGS)] have been used to initiate lymphocyte activation via a transmembrane signaling process. Our results show that both treatments cause the exposure of two different hormone [insulin and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] receptors within the first 5 min of stimulation. When either insulin or IL-2 is present in the culture medium, the stimulated lymphocytes undergo the following responses: (1) increased free intracellular Ca2+ activity; (2) aggregation of insulin or IL-2 receptors into patch/cap structures; (3) tyrosine-kinase-specific phosphorylation of a 32-kd membrane protein; and finally (4) induction of DNA synthesis. Further analysis indicates that hormone receptor capping is inhibited by (1) cytochalasin D, suggesting the involvement of microfilaments; (2) sodium azide, indicating a requirement for ATP production; and (3) W-5, W-7, and W-12 drugs, implying a need for Ca2+/calmodulin activity. Treatment with these metabolic or cytoskeletal inhibitors also prevents both the tyrosine-kinase-specific protein phosphorylation and DNA synthesis which normally follow hormone receptor capping. Double immunofluorescence staining shows that actomyosin, Ca2+/calmodulin, and myosin light-chain kinase are all closely associated with the insulin and IL-2 receptor cap structures. These findings strongly suggest that an actomyosin-mediated contractile system (regulated by Ca2+, calmodulin, and myosin light-chain kinase in an energy-dependent manner) is required not only for the collection of insulin and IL-2 receptors into patch and cap structures but also for the subsequent activation of tyrosine kinase and the initiation of DNA synthesis. We, therefore, propose that the exposure and subsequent patching/capping of at least one hormone receptor are required for the activation of mouse splenic T-lymphocytes.

  14. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  15. Effect of chronic glutamate administration to pregnant rats during gestation on metabotropic glutamate receptors from mothers and full-term fetuses brain.

    PubMed

    León Navarro, D; Albasanz, J L; Iglesias, I; Ruiz, M A; Martín, M

    2005-03-01

    Chronic glutamate treatment during gestational period caused a significant decrease in total metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) number. Similar results were observed on the steady-state level of mGlu(1) receptor detected by immunoblotting assays, suggesting that this is the main receptor subtype modulated by agonist exposure. Furthermore, no variations on mRNA coding mGlu(1) receptor were found, suggesting post-transcriptional modulation as a possible mechanism of the lost of receptor detected at the membrane surface. On the other hand, western-blotting to determine level of G(q/11) protein and phospholipase C beta(1) revealed a significant decrease of both proteins in mothers brain. This decrease was associated with significant variation in glutamate and DHPG-stimulated phospholipase C activity. No significant differences on mGluR transduction pathway components were observed in fetuses brain. These results suggest that glutamate intake during pregnancy causes a down-regulation of different proteins involved in glutamate response mediated by mGluR only in mothers brain without significantly affecting fetuses brain.

  16. The Metabotropic Glutamate 5 Receptor Modulates Extinction and Reinstatement of Methamphetamine-Seeking in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chesworth, Rose; Brown, Robyn M.; Kim, Jee Hyun; Lawrence, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant with no therapeutics registered to assist addicts in discontinuing use. Glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in the development and maintenance of addiction. We sought to assess the involvement of the metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGlu5) in behaviours relevant to METH addiction because this receptor has been implicated in the actions of other drugs of abuse, including alcohol, cocaine and opiates. mGlu5 knockout (KO) mice were tested in intravenous self-administration, conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. Self-administration of sucrose was used to assess the response of KO mice to a natural reward. Acquisition and maintenance of self-administration, as well as the motivation to self-administer METH was intact in mGlu5 KO mice. Importantly, mGlu5 KO mice required more extinction sessions to extinguish the operant response for METH, and exhibited an enhanced propensity to reinstate operant responding following exposure to drug-associated cues. This phenotype was not present when KO mice were tested in an equivalent paradigm assessing operant responding for sucrose. Development of conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization were intact in KO mice; however, conditioned hyperactivity to the context previously paired with drug was elevated in KO mice. These data demonstrate a role for mGlu5 in the extinction and reinstatement of METH-seeking, and suggests a role for mGlu5 in regulating contextual salience. PMID:23861896

  17. The metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor modulates extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking in mice.

    PubMed

    Chesworth, Rose; Brown, Robyn M; Kim, Jee Hyun; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant with no therapeutics registered to assist addicts in discontinuing use. Glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in the development and maintenance of addiction. We sought to assess the involvement of the metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGlu5) in behaviours relevant to METH addiction because this receptor has been implicated in the actions of other drugs of abuse, including alcohol, cocaine and opiates. mGlu5 knockout (KO) mice were tested in intravenous self-administration, conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. Self-administration of sucrose was used to assess the response of KO mice to a natural reward. Acquisition and maintenance of self-administration, as well as the motivation to self-administer METH was intact in mGlu5 KO mice. Importantly, mGlu5 KO mice required more extinction sessions to extinguish the operant response for METH, and exhibited an enhanced propensity to reinstate operant responding following exposure to drug-associated cues. This phenotype was not present when KO mice were tested in an equivalent paradigm assessing operant responding for sucrose. Development of conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization were intact in KO mice; however, conditioned hyperactivity to the context previously paired with drug was elevated in KO mice. These data demonstrate a role for mGlu5 in the extinction and reinstatement of METH-seeking, and suggests a role for mGlu5 in regulating contextual salience.

  18. Lead optimization of the VU0486321 series of mGlu(1) PAMs. Part 2: SAR of alternative 3-methyl heterocycles and progress towards an in vivo tool.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M; Cho, Hyekyung P; Metts, Adam M; Blobaum, Anna L; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2016-02-01

    This Letter describes the further lead optimization of the VU0486321 series of mGlu1 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), driven by recent genetic data linking loss of function GRM1 to schizophrenia. Steep and caveat-laden SAR plagues the series, but ultimately potent mGlu1 PAMs (EC50s ∼5 nM) have resulted with good DMPK properties (low intrinsic clearance, clean CYP profile, modest Fu) and CNS penetration (Kps 0.25-0.97), along with up to >450-fold selectivity versus mGlu4 and mGlu5.

  19. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  20. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  1. Constitutive Activation of the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Yi; Puga, Alvaro

    1998-01-01

    The ligand-activated aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) dimerizes with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) to form a functional complex that transactivates expression of the cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 gene and other genes in the dioxin-inducible [Ah] gene battery. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the activity of the CYP1A1 enzyme negatively regulates this process. To study the relationship between CYP1A1 activity and Ah receptor activation we used CYP1A1-deficient mouse hepatoma c37 cells and CYP1A1- and AHR-deficient African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Using gel mobility shift and luciferase reporter gene expression assays, we found that c37 cells that had not been exposed to exogenous Ah receptor ligands already contained transcriptionally active AHR-ARNT complexes, a finding that we also observed in wild-type Hepa-1 cells treated with Ellipticine, a CYP1A1 inhibitor. In CV-1 cells, transient expression of AHR and ARNT leads to high levels of AHR–ARNT-dependent luciferase gene expression even in the absence of an agonist. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged AHR, we showed that elevated reporter gene expression correlates with constitutive nuclear localization of the AHR. Transcriptional activation of the luciferase reporter gene observed in CV-1 cells is significantly decreased by (i) expression of a functional CYP1A1 enzyme, (ii) competition with chimeric or truncated AHR proteins containing the AHR ligand-binding domain, and (iii) treatment with the AHR antagonist α-naphthoflavone. These results suggest that a CYP1A1 substrate, which accumulates in cells lacking CYP1A1 enzymatic activity, is an AHR ligand responsible for endogenous activation of the Ah receptor. PMID:9418899

  2. Receptor Dissociation and B-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is one of the most abundant receptors on the surface of B cells with roughly 100,000-200,000 copies per cell. Signaling through the BCR is crucial for the activation and differentiation of B cells. Unlike other receptors, the BCR can be activated by a large set of structurally different ligands, but the molecular mechanism of BCR activation is still a matter of controversy. Although dominant for a long time, the cross-link model (CLM) of BCR activation is not supported by recent studies of the nanoscale organization of the BCR on the surface of resting B cells. In contrast to the prediction of CLM, the numerous BCR complexes on these cells are not randomly distributed monomers but rather form oligomers which reside within membrane confinements. This finding is more in line with the dissociation activation model (DAM), wherein B-cell activation is accompanied by an opening of the auto-inhibited BCR oligomers instead of a cross-linking of the BCR monomers. In this review, we discuss in detail the new findings and their implications for BCR signaling.

  3. Illuminating Phenylazopyridines To Photoswitch Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: From the Flask to the Animals.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Pittolo, Silvia; Rovira, Xavier; Lopez, Marc; Zussy, Charleine; Dalton, James A R; Faucherre, Adèle; Jopling, Chris; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Ciruela, Francisco; Goudet, Cyril; Giraldo, Jesús; Gorostiza, Pau; Llebaria, Amadeu

    2017-01-25

    Phenylazopyridines are photoisomerizable compounds with high potential to control biological functions with light. We have obtained a series of phenylazopyridines with light dependent activity as negative allosteric modulators (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5). Here we describe the factors needed to achieve an operational molecular photoisomerization and its effective translation into in vitro and in vivo receptor photoswitching, which includes zebrafish larva motility and the regulation of the antinociceptive effects in mice. The combination of light and some specific phenylazopyridine ligands displays atypical pharmacological profiles, including light-dependent receptor overactivation, which can be observed both in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, the localized administration of light and a photoswitchable compound in the peripheral tissues of rodents or in the brain amygdalae results in an illumination-dependent analgesic effect. The results reveal a robust translation of the phenylazopyridine photoisomerization to a precise photoregulation of biological activity.

  4. Illuminating Phenylazopyridines To Photoswitch Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: From the Flask to the Animals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Phenylazopyridines are photoisomerizable compounds with high potential to control biological functions with light. We have obtained a series of phenylazopyridines with light dependent activity as negative allosteric modulators (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5). Here we describe the factors needed to achieve an operational molecular photoisomerization and its effective translation into in vitro and in vivo receptor photoswitching, which includes zebrafish larva motility and the regulation of the antinociceptive effects in mice. The combination of light and some specific phenylazopyridine ligands displays atypical pharmacological profiles, including light-dependent receptor overactivation, which can be observed both in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, the localized administration of light and a photoswitchable compound in the peripheral tissues of rodents or in the brain amygdalae results in an illumination-dependent analgesic effect. The results reveal a robust translation of the phenylazopyridine photoisomerization to a precise photoregulation of biological activity. PMID:28149957

  5. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  6. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. Copyright © 2016 by U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  7. Equivalent Activities of Repulsive Axon Guidance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hong; Yoshikawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Receptors on the growth cone at the leading edge of elongating axons play critical guidance roles by recognizing cues via their extracellular domains and transducing signals via their intracellular domains, resulting in changes in direction of growth. An important concept to have emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a major guidance mechanism. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are likely to be qualitative differences in the signals they transduce. However, the nature of these possible differences is unknown. By creating chimeras using the extracellular and intracellular domains of three different Drosophila repulsive receptors, Unc5, Roundabout (Robo), and Derailed (Drl) and expressing them in defined cells within the embryonic nervous system, we examined the responses elicited by their intracellular domains systematically. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative differences in growth cone response or axon growth, suggesting that, despite their highly diverged sequences, each intracellular domain elicits repulsion via a common pathway. In terms of the signaling pathway(s) used by the repulsive receptors, mutations in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio strongly enhance the repulsive activity of all three intracellular domains, suggesting that repulsion by Unc5, Robo, and Drl, and perhaps repulsion in general, involves Trio activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A prevailing concept that has emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a guidance mechanism for steering axons to their appropriate targets. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are differences in the signals that they transduce. However, this has never been tested directly. We have used the advanced genetics of Drosophila to compare directly the outputs of different repulsive receptors. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative

  8. METABOTROPIC GLUTAMATE TYPE 5, DOPAMINE D2 AND ADENOSINE A2A RECEPTORS FORM HIGHER-ORDER OLIGOMERS IN LIVING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Nuria; Gandía, Jorge; Bertarelli, Daniela C. G.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi; Luján, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are known to form homo- and heteromers at the plasma membrane, but the stoichiometry of these receptor oligomers are relatively unknown. Here, by using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we visualized for the first time the occurrence of heterodimers of metabotropic glutamate mGlu5 receptors (mGlu5R) and dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in living cells. Furthermore, the combination of bimolecular fluorescence complementation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques, as well as the sequential resonance energy transfer (SRET) technique, allowed us to detect the occurrence receptor oligomers containing more than two protomers, mGlu5R, D2R and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Interestingly, by using high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy we could confirm that the three receptors co-distribute within the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of the same dendritic spines of asymmetrical, putative glutamatergic, striatal synapses. Also, co-immunoprecipitation experiments in native tissue demonstrated the existence of an association of mGlu5R, D2R and A2AR in rat striatum homogenates. Overall, these results provide new insights into the molecular composition of G protein-coupled receptor oligomers in general and the mGlu5R/D2R/A2AR oligomer in particular, a receptor oligomer that might constitute an important target for the treatment of some neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19344374

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Soskić, Sanja S; Dobutović, Branislava D; Sudar, Emina M; Obradović, Milan M; Nikolić, Dragana M; Zarić, Bozidarka L; Stojanović, Srdan D; Stokić, Edita J; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Isenović, Esma R

    2011-10-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) represent the family of 3 nuclear receptor isoforms-PPARα, -γ, and -δ/β, which are encoded by different genes. As lipid sensors, they are primarily involved in regulation of lipid metabolism and subsequently in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis considers accumulation of the cells and extracellular matrix in the vessel wall leading to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque, atherothrombosis, and other vascular complications. Besides existence of natural ligands for PPARs, their more potent synthetic ligands are fibrates and thiazolidindiones. Future investigations should now focus on the mechanisms of PPARs activation, which might present new approaches involved in the antiatherosclerotic effects revealed in this review. In addition, in this review we are presenting latest data from recent performed clinical studies which have focus on novel approach to PPARs agonists as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of complex disease such as atherosclerosis.

  10. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  11. Activation of amygdalar metabotropic glutamate receptors modulates anxiety, and risk assessment behaviors in ovariectomized estradiol-treated female rats

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús-Burgos, María; Torres-Llenza, Vanessa; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are more prevalent in females than males. The underlying reasons for this gender difference are unknown. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been linked to anxiety and it has been shown that interaction between estrogen receptors and mGluRs modulate sexual receptivity in rats. We investigated the role of mGluRs in anxiety-related behaviors in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats with (OVX+EB) or without (OVX) estradiol implants. We centrally infused (s)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), a group I mGluR agonist, into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of OVX+EB and OVX rats at 0.1 and 1.0 μM. Male rats that normally have low estradiol levels were used to compare with OVX rats. Generalized anxiety, explorative activity and detection and analysis of threat were analyzed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and risk assessment behaviors (RABs). DHPG (1.0 μM) increased the percentage of time spent in- and entries into- the open arms in OVX+EB, but not in OVX females or male rats. Flat-back approaches and stretch-attend postures, two RABs, were significantly reduced by DHPG (0.1 and 1.0 μM) in OVX+EB female rats only. DHPG did not modulate rearing- and freezing, behaviors related to exploration and fear-like behavior, respectively. However, DHPG (1.0 μM) increased head dipping and decreased grooming behaviors in OVX female rats, suggesting a weak explorative modulation. The effects of DHPG observed in OVX+EB, were blocked by 50 μM of (RS)-1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA), a mGluR1 antagonist. AIDA and/or estradiol did not modulate anxiety and or RABs. Our results show that intra-BLA infusion of DHPG exerts an anxiolytic-like effect in OVX+EB, but not in OVX or male rats. This effect seems to depend upon mGluR1 subtype activation. Our findings led us to suggest that the effects observed in OVX+EB rats might be due to an interaction at the membrane level of estrogen receptors with mGlu1 within the BLA. PMID:22326382

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, F; Straface, G; Pitocco, D; Zaccardi, F; Ghirlanda, G; Flex, A

    2009-12-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a group of three nuclear receptor isoforms, PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta, encoded by different genes, and they form a subfamily of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The clinical interest in PPARs originates with fibrates and thiazolidinediones, which, respectively, act on PPARalpha and PPARgamma and are used to ameliorate hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). PPARs play a central role in these patients due to their ability to regulate the expression of numerous genes involved in glycaemic control, lipid metabolism, vascular tone and inflammation. Abnormal angiogenesis is implicated in several of the long-term complications of diabetes mellitus, characterized by vasculopathy associated with aberrant growth of new blood vessels. This pathological process plays a crucial role in diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, impaired wound healing and impaired coronary collateral vessel development. In recent years, there has been increasing appreciation of the fact that PPARs might be involved in the molecular mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis through the action of growth factors and cytokines that stimulate migration, proliferation and survival of endothelial cells. During the last few years direct comparative analyses have been performed, using selective PPARs agonists, to clarify the angiogenic properties of the different members of the PPAR family. Lately, the findings provide new information to order to understand the biological, clinical and therapeutic effects of PPARs, and the role of these nuclear receptors in angiogenesis, with potentially important implications for the management of subjects affected by T2DM.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Daisuke; Kanda, Tsugiyasu

    2014-08-26

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which is composed of four members encoded by distinct genes (α, β, γ, and δ). The genes undergo transactivation or transrepression under specific mechanisms that lead to the induction or repression of target gene expression. As is the case with other nuclear receptors, all four PPAR isoforms contain five or six structural regions in four functional domains; namely, A/B, C, D, and E/F. PPARs have many functions, particularly functions involving control of vascular tone, inflammation, and energy homeostasis, and are, therefore, important targets for hypertension, obesity, obesity-induced inflammation, and metabolic syndrome in general. Hence, PPARs also represent drug targets, and PPARα and PPARγ agonists are used clinically in the treatment of dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively. Because of their pleiotropic effects, they have been identified as active in a number of diseases and are targets for the development of a broad range of therapies for a variety of diseases. It is likely that the range of PPARγ agonist therapeutic actions will result in novel approaches to lifestyle and other diseases. The combination of PPARs with reagents or with other cardiovascular drugs, such as diuretics and angiotensin II receptor blockers, should be studied. This article provides a review of PPAR isoform characteristics, a discussion of progress in our understanding of the biological actions of PPARs, and a summary of PPAR agonist development for patient management. We also include a summary of the experimental and clinical evidence obtained from animal studies and clinical trials conducted to evaluate the usefulness and effectiveness of PPAR agonists in the treatment of lifestyle-related diseases.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors for hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Usuda, Daisuke; Kanda, Tsugiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which is composed of four members encoded by distinct genes (α, β, γ, and δ). The genes undergo transactivation or transrepression under specific mechanisms that lead to the induction or repression of target gene expression. As is the case with other nuclear receptors, all four PPAR isoforms contain five or six structural regions in four functional domains; namely, A/B, C, D, and E/F. PPARs have many functions, particularly functions involving control of vascular tone, inflammation, and energy homeostasis, and are, therefore, important targets for hypertension, obesity, obesity-induced inflammation, and metabolic syndrome in general. Hence, PPARs also represent drug targets, and PPARα and PPARγ agonists are used clinically in the treatment of dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively. Because of their pleiotropic effects, they have been identified as active in a number of diseases and are targets for the development of a broad range of therapies for a variety of diseases. It is likely that the range of PPARγ agonist therapeutic actions will result in novel approaches to lifestyle and other diseases. The combination of PPARs with reagents or with other cardiovascular drugs, such as diuretics and angiotensin II receptor blockers, should be studied. This article provides a review of PPAR isoform characteristics, a discussion of progress in our understanding of the biological actions of PPARs, and a summary of PPAR agonist development for patient management. We also include a summary of the experimental and clinical evidence obtained from animal studies and clinical trials conducted to evaluate the usefulness and effectiveness of PPAR agonists in the treatment of lifestyle-related diseases. PMID:25228953

  15. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  16. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational models on high-throughput screening data to screen thousands of chemicals against the estrogen receptor.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Mansouri , K., A. Abdelaziz, A. Rybacka, A. Roncaglioni, A. Tropsha, A. Varnek, A. Zakharov, A. Worth, A. Richard , C. Grulke , D. Trisciuzzi, D. Fourches, D. Horvath, E. Benfenati , E. Muratov, E.B. Wedebye, F. Grisoni, G.F. Mangiatordi, G.M. Incisivo, H. Hong, H.W. Ng, I.V. Tetko, I. Balabin, J. Kancherla , J. Shen, J. Burton, M. Nicklaus, M. Cassotti, N.G. Nikolov, O. Nicolotti, P.L. Andersson, Q. Zang, R. Politi, R.D. Beger , R. Todeschini, R. Huang, S. Farag, S.A. Rosenberg, S. Slavov, X. Hu, and R. Judson. (Environmental Health Perspectives) CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 1-49, (2016).

  17. Recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu₁).

    PubMed

    Owen, Dafydd R

    2011-08-17

    This Review summarizes the medicinal chemistry found in publications on both orthosteric and allosteric modulators of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu(1)) from 2005 to the present. The time period covered by the scope of this current review has been particularly rich in mGlu(1)-related publications with numbers quadrupling when compared to the preceding five year period of 2000-2005. Publications in the field peaked in 2007 with over 35 articles appearing in the peer reviewed literature in the course of that year. Given that glutamate is one of the primary excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), it is unsurprising that it acts upon several receptors that are considered to be of potential therapeutic interest for many indications. Orthosteric and allosteric modulation of the receptor is possible, with a logical extrapolation to the chemotypes used for each strategy. The last five years of publications have yielded many mGlu(1) selective antagonist chemotypyes, most of which have shown efficacy in pain in vivo models. However, the primary impact of these compounds has been to highlight the mechanistic safety risks of mGlu(1) antagonism, independent of chemotype. As a review in medicinal chemistry, the primary focus of this paper will be on the design and, to a lesser degree, synthetic strategies for the delivery of subtype selective, CNS penetrant, druglike compounds through a "medchem" program, targeting modulators of the mGlu(1) receptor.

  18. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Humans potentially are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Many of these chemicals never have been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for assessment in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Here, we describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating the efficacy of using predictive computational models on high-throughput screening data to screen thousands of chemicals against the ER. CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration among 17 groups in the United States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1677 compounds provided by EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical and 8 continuous models for binding, agonist, and antagonist ER activity. All predictions were tested using an evaluation set of 7522 chemicals collected from the literature. To overcome the limitations of single models, a consensus was built weighting models using a scoring function (0 to 1) based on their accuracies. Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  20. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Tropsha, Alexander; Varnek, Alexandre; Zakharov, Alexey; Worth, Andrew; Richard, Ann M.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Trisciuzzi, Daniela; Fourches, Denis; Horvath, Dragos; Benfenati, Emilio; Muratov, Eugene; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Grisoni, Francesca; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Incisivo, Giuseppina M.; Hong, Huixiao; Ng, Hui W.; Tetko, Igor V.; Balabin, Ilya; Kancherla, Jayaram; Shen, Jie; Burton, Julien; Nicklaus, Marc; Cassotti, Matteo; Nikolov, Nikolai G.; Nicolotti, Orazio; Andersson, Patrik L.; Zang, Qingda; Politi, Regina; Beger, Richard D.; Todeschini, Roberto; Huang, Ruili; Farag, Sherif; Rosenberg, Sine A.; Slavov, Svetoslav; Hu, Xin; Judson, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Objectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) and demonstrate the efficacy of using predictive computational models trained on high-throughput screening data to evaluate thousands of chemicals for ER-related activity and prioritize them for further testing. Methods: CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration with 17 groups in the United States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure–activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical and 8 continuous models for binding, agonist, and antagonist ER activity. All predictions were evaluated on a set of 7,522 chemicals curated from the literature. To overcome the limitations of single models, a consensus was built by weighting models on scores based on their evaluated accuracies. Results: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. Conclusion: This project demonstrated the possibility to screen large libraries of chemicals using a consensus of different in silico approaches. This concept will be applied in future projects related to other

  1. The role of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in cognition and anxiety: Comparative studies in GRM2−/−, GRM3−/− and GRM2/3−/− knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Lyon, Louisa; Taylor, Amy; Lane, Tracy; Burnet, Philip W.J.; Harrison, Paul J.; Bannerman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2 and mGlu3, encoded by GRM2 and GRM3) have been implicated in both cognitive and emotional processes, although their precise role remains to be established. Studies with knockout (KO) mice provide an important approach for investigating the role of specific receptor genes in behaviour. In the present series of experiments we extended our prior characterisation of GRM2/3−/− double KO mice and, in complementary experiments, investigated the behavioural phenotype of single GRM2−/− and GRM3−/− mice. We found no consistent effect on anxiety in either the double or single KO mice. The lack of an anxiety phenotype in any of the lines contrasts with the clear anxiolytic effects of mGlu2/3 ligands. Motor co-ordination was impaired in GRM2/3−/− mice, but spared in single GRM2−/− and GRM3−/− mice. Spatial working memory (rewarded alternation) testing on the elevated T-maze revealed a deficit in GRM2−/− mice throughout testing, whereas GRM3−/− mice exhibited a biphasic effect (initially impaired, but performing better than controls by the end of training). A biphasic effect on activity levels was seen for the GRM2−/− mice. Overall, the phenotype in both GRM2−/− and GRM3−/− mice was less pronounced – if present at all – compared to GRM2/3−/− mice, across the range of task domains. This is consistent with possible redundancy of function and/or compensation in the single KO lines. Results are discussed with reference to a possible role for group II metabotropic glutamate receptors at the interface between arousal and behavioural performance, according to an inverted U-shaped function. PMID:25158312

  2. How IGF-1 activates its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kavran, Jennifer M; McCabe, Jacqueline M; Byrne, Patrick O; Connacher, Mary Katherine; Wang, Zhihong; Ramek, Alexander; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Hristova, Kalina; Cole, Philip A; Leahy, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) is involved in growth and survival of normal and neoplastic cells. A ligand-dependent conformational change is thought to regulate IGF1R activity, but the nature of this change is unclear. We point out an underappreciated dimer in the crystal structure of the related Insulin Receptor (IR) with Insulin bound that allows direct comparison with unliganded IR and suggests a mechanism by which ligand regulates IR/IGF1R activity. We test this mechanism in a series of biochemical and biophysical assays and find the IGF1R ectodomain maintains an autoinhibited state in which the TMs are held apart. Ligand binding releases this constraint, allowing TM association and unleashing an intrinsic propensity of the intracellular regions to autophosphorylate. Enzymatic studies of full-length and kinase-containing fragments show phosphorylated IGF1R is fully active independent of ligand and the extracellular-TM regions. The key step triggered by ligand binding is thus autophosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03772.001 PMID:25255214

  3. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  4. Gi Proteins Regulate Adenylyl Cyclase Activity Independent of Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Melsom, Caroline Bull; Ørstavik, Øivind; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Skomedal, Tor; Levy, Finn Olav; Krobert, Kurt Allen

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Despite the view that only β2- as opposed to β1-adrenoceptors (βARs) couple to Gi, some data indicate that the β1AR-evoked inotropic response is also influenced by the inhibition of Gi. Therefore, we wanted to determine if Gi exerts tonic receptor-independent inhibition upon basal adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity in cardiomyocytes. Experimental approach We used the Gs-selective (R,R)- and the Gs- and Gi-activating (R,S)-fenoterol to selectively activate β2ARs (β1AR blockade present) in combination with Gi inactivation with pertussis toxin (PTX). We also determined the effect of PTX upon basal and forskolin-mediated responses. Contractility was measured ex vivo in left ventricular strips and cAMP accumulation was measured in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult Wistar rats. Key results PTX amplified both the (R,R)- and (R,S)-fenoterol-evoked maximal inotropic response and concentration-dependent increases in cAMP accumulation. The EC50 values of fenoterol matched published binding affinities. The PTX enhancement of the Gs-selective (R,R)-fenoterol-mediated responses suggests that Gi regulates AC activity independent of receptor coupling to Gi protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, forskolin-evoked cAMP accumulation was increased and inotropic responses to forskolin were potentiated by PTX treatment. In non-PTX-treated tissue, phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and 4 inhibition or removal of either constitutive muscarinic receptor activation of Gi with atropine or removal of constitutive adenosine receptor activation with CGS 15943 had no effect upon contractility. However, in PTX-treated tissue, PDE3 and 4 inhibition alone increased basal levels of cAMP and accordingly evoked a large inotropic response. Conclusions and implications Together, these data indicate that Gi exerts intrinsic receptor-independent inhibitory activity upon AC. We propose that PTX treatment shifts the balance of intrinsic Gi and Gs activity upon AC towards Gs

  5. Gi proteins regulate adenylyl cyclase activity independent of receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Melsom, Caroline Bull; Ørstavik, Øivind; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Skomedal, Tor; Levy, Finn Olav; Krobert, Kurt Allen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the view that only β2- as opposed to β1-adrenoceptors (βARs) couple to G(i), some data indicate that the β1AR-evoked inotropic response is also influenced by the inhibition of Gi. Therefore, we wanted to determine if Gi exerts tonic receptor-independent inhibition upon basal adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity in cardiomyocytes. We used the Gs-selective (R,R)- and the Gs- and G(i)-activating (R,S)-fenoterol to selectively activate β2ARs (β1AR blockade present) in combination with Gi inactivation with pertussis toxin (PTX). We also determined the effect of PTX upon basal and forskolin-mediated responses. Contractility was measured ex vivo in left ventricular strips and cAMP accumulation was measured in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult Wistar rats. PTX amplified both the (R,R)- and (R,S)-fenoterol-evoked maximal inotropic response and concentration-dependent increases in cAMP accumulation. The EC50 values of fenoterol matched published binding affinities. The PTX enhancement of the Gs-selective (R,R)-fenoterol-mediated responses suggests that Gi regulates AC activity independent of receptor coupling to Gi protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, forskolin-evoked cAMP accumulation was increased and inotropic responses to forskolin were potentiated by PTX treatment. In non-PTX-treated tissue, phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and 4 inhibition or removal of either constitutive muscarinic receptor activation of Gi with atropine or removal of constitutive adenosine receptor activation with CGS 15943 had no effect upon contractility. However, in PTX-treated tissue, PDE3 and 4 inhibition alone increased basal levels of cAMP and accordingly evoked a large inotropic response. Together, these data indicate that Gi exerts intrinsic receptor-independent inhibitory activity upon AC. We propose that PTX treatment shifts the balance of intrinsic G(i) and Gs activity upon AC towards Gs, enhancing the effect of all cAMP-mediated inotropic agents.

  6. Octahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole negative allosteric modulators of mGlu1

    PubMed Central

    Manka, Jason T.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Venable, Daryl F.; Cho, Hyekyung P.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Daniels, J. Scott; Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Emmitte, Kyle A.

    2014-01-01

    Development of SAR in an octahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole series of negative allosteric modulators of mGlu1 using a functional cell-based assay is described in this Letter. The octahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole scaffold was chosen as an isosteric replacement for the piperazine ring found in the initial hit compound. Characterization of selected compounds in protein binding assays was used to identify the most promising analogs, which were then profiled in P450 inhibition assays in order to further assess the potential for drug-likeness within this series of compounds. PMID:23932792

  7. Fibrates, glitazones, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lalloyer, Fanny; Staels, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Several decades ago, fibrates were approved for the treatment of dyslipidemia, whereas thiazolidinediones were screened in animal models to improve glucose homeostasis and subsequently developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Relatively recently, these drugs were found to act via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, nuclear receptors which control lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. In this historical perspective, we discuss the history of discovery of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, from the clinical development of their agonists to the subsequent discovery of these receptors and their mechanisms of action, to finally evoke possibilities of targeted pharmacology for future development of selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors modulators. PMID:20393155

  8. Activation of Neurotensin Receptor Type 1 Attenuates Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadnie, Chelsea A.; Hinton, David J.; Choi, Sun; Choi, YuBin; Ruby, Christina L.; Oliveros, Alfredo; Prieto, Miguel L.; Park, Jun Hyun; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neurotensin (NT) suppresses locomotor activity. However, the brain regions that mediate the locomotor depressant effect of NT and receptor subtype-specific mechanisms involved are unclear. Using a brain-penetrating, selective NT receptor type 1 (NTS1) agonist PD149163, we investigated the effect of systemic and brain region-specific NTS1 activation on locomotor activity. Systemic administration of PD149163 attenuated the locomotor activity of C57BL/6J mice both in a novel environment and in their homecage. However, mice developed tolerance to the hypolocomotor effect of PD149163 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Since NTS1 is known to modulate dopaminergic signaling, we examined whether PD149163 blocks dopamine receptor-mediated hyperactivity. Pretreatment with PD149163 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited D2R agonist bromocriptine (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-mediated hyperactivity. D1R agonist SKF81297 (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hyperlocomotion was only inhibited by 0.1 mg/kg of PD149163. Since the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been implicated in the behavioral effects of NT, we examined whether microinjection of PD149163 into these regions reduces locomotion. Microinjection of PD149163 (2 pmol) into the NAc, but not the mPFC suppressed locomotor activity. In summary, our results indicate that systemic and intra-NAc activation of NTS1 is sufficient to reduce locomotion and NTS1 activation inhibits D2R-mediated hyperactivity. Our study will be helpful to identify pharmacological factors and a possible therapeutic window for NTS1-targeted therapies for movement disorders. PMID:24929110

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Sander

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels. PMID:18288277

  10. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  11. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  12. Positive Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate 2 Receptors in Schizophrenia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ellaithy, Amr; Younkin, Jason; Gonzalez-Maeso, Javier; Logothetis, Diomedes E.

    2015-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a rise in the “NMDA receptor hypofunction” hypothesis for schizophrenia, a devastating disorder that affects around 1% of the population worldwide. A variety of presynaptic, postsynaptic and regulatory proteins involved in glutamatergic signaling have thus been proposed as potential therapeutic targets. This Review focuses on positive allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate 2 receptors (mGlu2Rs) and discusses how recent preclinical epigenetic data may provide a molecular explanation for the discrepant results of clinical studies, further stimulating the field to exploit the promise of mGlu2R as a target for schizophrenia treatment. PMID:26148747

  13. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  14. Deficits in the extinction of ethanol-seeking behavior following chronic intermittent ethanol exposure are attenuated with positive allosteric modulation of mGlu5.

    PubMed

    Gass, J T; McGonigal, J T; Chandler, L J

    2017-02-01

    Alcoholism is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by periods of heavy alcohol consumption and unsuccessful attempts at abstinence. Relapse is one of the most problematic aspects in the treatment of alcoholism and is triggered by ethanol-associated cues. Extinction-based cue exposure therapies have proven ineffective in the treatment of alcoholism. However, positive allosteric modulation of mGlu5 with CDPPB enhances the extinction learning of alcohol-seeking behavior. The current study investigated the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on the extinction of ethanol-seeking behavior. Adult Wistar rats were trained to self-administer alcohol with a light/tone stimulus serving as the alcohol cue. After training, one group of rats was exposed to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) daily for a period of 2 weeks to induce ethanol dependence. Control rats were exposed to air for the same period of time. Both groups were then retrained to self-administer ethanol and subsequently tested for changes in extinction learning. CIE exposed rats consumed more ethanol compared to their pre-CIE levels and to control rats. During extinction training, CIE rats responded significantly more on the previously active lever and required more sessions to reach extinction criteria compared to control rats. Treatment with CDPPB facilitated extinction in control rats and attenuated the increased resistance to extinction in CIE-exposed rats. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure not only alters ethanol intake, but also the extinction of ethanol-seeking behaviors. The ability to attenuate deficits through modulation of mGlu5 provides a potential target for pharmacological manipulation that could ultimately reduce relapse in alcoholics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. OXYTOCIN INDUCES SOCIAL COMMUNICATION BY ACTIVATING ARGININEVASOPRESSIN V1A RECEPTORS AND NOT OXYTOCIN RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    SONG, Zhimin; MCCANN, Katharine E.; MCNEILL, John K.; LARKIN, Tony E.; HUHMAN, Kim L.; ALBERS, H. Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) and their receptors are very similar in structure. As a result, at least some of the effects of these peptides may be the result of crosstalk between their canonical receptors. The present study investigated this hypothesis by determining whether the induction of flank marking, a form of social communication in Syrian hamsters, by OT is mediated by the OT receptor or the AVP V1a receptor. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of OT or AVP induced flank marking in a dose-dependent manner although the effects of AVP were approximately 100 times greater than those of OT. Injections of highly selective V1a receptor agonists but not OT receptor agonists induced flank marking, and V1a receptor antagonists but not OT receptor antagonists significantly inhibited the ability of OT to induce flank marking. Lastly, injection of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), a peptide that stimulates OT but not AVP release, significantly increased odor-induced flank marking, and these effects were blocked by a V1a receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that OT induces flank marking by activating AVP V1a and not OT receptors, suggesting that the V1a receptor should be considered to be an OT receptor as well as an AVP receptor. PMID:25173438

  16. RELAXIN ACTIVATES PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR GAMMA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Bennett, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Relaxin is a polypeptide hormone that triggers multiple signaling pathways through its receptor RXFP1. Many of relaxin’s functions, including vascular and antifibrotic effects, are similar to those induced by activation of PPARγ. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that relaxin signaling through RXFP1 would activate PPARγ activity. In cells overexpressing RXFP1 (HEK-RXFP1), relaxin increased transcriptional activity through a PPAR response element (PPRE) in a concentration-dependent manner. In cells lacking RXFP1, relaxin had no effect. Relaxin increased both the baseline activity and the response to the PPARγ agonists rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2, but not to agonists of PPARα or PPARδ. In HEK-RXFP1 cells infected with adenovirus expressing PPARγ, relaxin increased transcriptional activity through PPRE, and this effect was blocked with an adenovirus expressing a dominant-negative PPARγ. Knockdown of PPARγ using siRNA resulted in a decrease in the response to both relaxin and rosiglitazone. Both relaxin and rosiglitazone increased expression of the PPARγ target genes CD36 and LXRα in HEK-RXFP1 and in THP-1 cells naturally expressing RXFP1. Relaxin did not increase PPARγ mRNA or protein levels. Treatment of cells with GW9662, an inhibitor of PPARγ ligand binding, effectively blocked rosiglitazone-induced PPARγ activation, but had no effect on relaxin activation of PPARγ. These results suggest that relaxin activates PPARγ activity, and increases the overall response in the presence PPARγ agonists. This activation is dependent on the presence of RXFP1. Furthermore, relaxin activates PPARγ via a ligand-independent mechanism. These studies represent the first report that relaxin can activate the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. PMID:19712722

  17. Mineralocorticoid receptor activation in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome have become major public health concerns. Nowadays, aldosterone is recognized as an important mediator of cardiovascular and renal damage. In the kidney, aldosterone injures glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes), the final filtration barrier to plasma macromolecules, leading to proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists effectively ameliorate proteinuria in patients or in animal models of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as in patients who experience 'aldosterone breakthrough.' Recently, clinical and experimental studies have shown that plasma aldosterone concentration is associated with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome. We showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)/cp, an experimental model of obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome, are prone to glomerular podocyte injury, proteinuria and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, especially when the animals are fed a high-salt diet. Inappropriate activation of the aldosterone/MR system underlies the renal and cardiac injuries. Adipocyte-derived aldosterone-releasing factors (ARFs), although still unidentified, may account for aldosterone excess and the resultant target organ complication in SHR/cp. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that MR activation triggers target organ disease even in normal or low aldosterone states. We identified a small GTP (guanosine triphosphate)-binding protein, Rac1, as a novel activator of MR, and showed that this ligand-independent MR activation by Rac1 contributes to the nephropathy of several CKD models. We expect that ARFs and Rac1 can be novel therapeutic targets for metabolic syndrome and CKD. Future large-scale clinical trials are awaited to prove the efficacy of MR blockade in patients with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that are related to retinoid, steroid and thyroid hormone receptors. The PPAR subfamily comprises three members: PPAR-alpha, PPAR-beta and PPAR-gamma. PPARs have recently been implicated as regulators of cellular proliferation and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha reduce lung injury associated with inflammation and shock.

  19. Structure–Activity Relationships Comparing N-(6-Methylpyridin-yl)-Substituted Aryl Amides to 2-Methyl-6-(substituted-arylethynyl)pyridines or 2-Methyl-4-(substituted-arylethynyl)thiazoles as Novel Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Antagonists†

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Santosh S.; Zou, Mu-Fa; Cao, Jianjing; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2010-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in anxiety, depression, pain, mental retardation, and addiction. The potent and selective noncompetitive mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP, 1) has been a critically important tool used to further elucidate the role of mGluR5 in these CNS disorders. In an effort to provide novel and structurally diverse selective mGluR5 antagonists, we previously described a set of analogues with moderate activity wherein the alkyne bond was replaced with an amide group. In the present report, extended series of both amide and alkyne-based ligands were synthesized. MGluR5 binding and functional data were obtained that identified (1) several novel alkynes with comparable affinities to 1 at mGluR5 (e.g., 10 and 20–23), but (2) most structural variations to the amide template were not well tolerated, although a few potent amides were discovered (e.g., 55 and 56). Several of these novel analogues show drug-like physical properties (e.g., cLogP range) 2–5) that support their use for in vivo investigation into the role of mGluR5 in CNS disorders. PMID:19445453

  20. Sigma-1 receptors modulate functional activity of rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Whitlock, B B; Pultz, J A; Wolfe, S A

    1995-06-01

    Neuroleptics, opiates, and cocaine are commonly prescribed for or abused by humans. Although primarily used for their actions at other receptors in brain, these compounds also act at sigma receptors. We have previously identified sigma-1 receptors on human peripheral blood leukocytes and rat spleen, and in the present study we demonstrate a correlation between the pharmacology of these receptors and the ability of drugs to suppress concanavalin A-induced splenocyte proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that sigma-1 receptors regulate functional activities of immune cells, and suggest that sigma agonists may cause changes in immune competence in vivo.

  1. Sigma Receptors Suppress Multiple Aspects of Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hall Aaron, A.; Yelenis, Herrera; Ajmo Craig, T.; Javier, Cuevas; Pennypacker Keith, R.

    2009-01-01

    During brain injury, microglia become activated and migrate to areas of degenerating neurons. These microglia release pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species causing additional neuronal death. Microglia express high levels of sigma receptors, however, the function of these receptors in microglia and how they may affect the activation of these cells remain poorly understood. Using primary rat microglial cultures, it was found that sigma receptor activation suppresses the ability of microglia to rearrange their actin cytoskeleton, migrate, and release cytokines in response to the activators adenosine triphosphate (ATP), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Next, the role of sigma receptors in the regulation of calcium signaling during microglial activation was explored. Calcium fluorometry experiments in vitro show that stimulation of sigma receptors suppressed both transient and sustained intracellular calcium elevations associated with the microglial response to these activators. Further experiments showed that sigma receptors suppress microglial activation by interfering with increases in intracellular calcium. In addition, sigma receptor activation also prevented membrane ruffling in a calcium-independent manner, indicating that sigma receptors regulate the function of microglia via multiple mechanisms. PMID:19031439

  2. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2010-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis.

  3. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:19741045

  4. Synthesis and SAR of novel, 4-(phenylsulfamoyl)phenylacetamide mGlu4 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) identified by functional high-throughput screening (HTS).

    PubMed

    Engers, Darren W; Gentry, Patrick R; Williams, Richard; Bolinger, Julie D; Weaver, C David; Menon, Usha N; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W; Niswender, Colleen M; Hopkins, Corey R

    2010-09-01

    Herein we disclose the synthesis and SAR of a series of 4-(phenylsulfamoyl)phenylacetamide compounds as mGlu(4) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that were identified via a functional HTS. An iterative parallel approach to these compounds culminated in the discovery of VU0364439 (11) which represents the most potent (19.8 nM) mGlu(4) PAM reported to date.

  5. Lead optimization of the VU0486321 series of mGlu1 PAMs. Part 3. Engineering plasma stability by discovery and optimization of isoindolinone analogs.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M; Cho, Hyekyung P; Blobaum, Anna L; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2016-04-15

    This Letter describes the further lead optimization of the VU0486321 series of mGlu1 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), focused on addressing the recurrent issue of plasma instability of the phthalimide moiety. Here, we evaluated a number of phthalimide bioisosteres, and ultimately identified isoindolinones as the ideal replacement that effectively address plasma instability, while maintaining acceptable mGlu1 PAM potency, DMPK profile, CNS penetration and mGluR selectivity.

  6. Translational neurophysiological markers for activity of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2) modulator JNJ-40411813: Sleep EEG correlates in rodents and healthy men.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; de Boer, P; Lavreysen, H; Huysmans, H; Sinha, V; Raeymaekers, L; Van De Casteele, T; Cid, J M; Van Nueten, L; Macdonald, G J; Kemp, J A; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2016-04-01

    Alterations in rapid eye movement sleep (REM) have been suggested as valid translational efficacy markers: activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) was shown to increase REM latency and to decrease REM duration. The present paper addresses the effects on vigilance states of the mGluR2 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) JNJ-40411813 at different circadian times in rats and after afternoon dosing in humans. Due to its dual mGluR2 PAM/serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor antagonism in rodents, mGlu2R specificity of effects was studied in wild-type (WT) and mGluR2 (-/-) mice. 5-HT2A receptor occupancy was determined in humans using positron emission tomography (PET). Tolerance development was examined in rats after chronic dosing. EEG oscillations and network connectivity were assessed using multi-channel EEG. In rats, JNJ-40411813 increased deep sleep time and latency of REM onset but reduced REM time when administered 2 h after 'lights on' (CT2): this was sustained after chronic dosing. At CT5 similar effects were elicited, at CT10 only deep sleep was enhanced. Withdrawal resulted in baseline values, while re-administration reinstated drug effects. Parieto-occipital cortical slow theta and gamma oscillations were correlated with low locomotion. The specificity of functional response was confirmed in WT but not mGluR2 (-/-) mice. A double-blind, placebo-controlled polysomnographic study in healthy, elderly subjects showed that 500 mg of JNJ-40411813 consistently increased deep sleep time, but had no effect on REM parameters. This deep sleep effect was not explained by 5-HT2A receptor binding, as in the PET study even 700 mg only marginally displaced the tracer. JNJ-40411813 elicited comparable functional responses in rodents and men if circadian time of dosing was taken into account. These findings underscore the translational potential of sleep mechanisms in evaluating mGluR2 therapeutics when administered at the appropriate circadian time.

  7. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  8. Quantifying agonist activity at G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T

    2011-12-26

    When an agonist activates a population of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it elicits a signaling pathway that culminates in the response of the cell or tissue. This process can be analyzed at the level of a single receptor, a population of receptors, or a downstream response. Here we describe how to analyze the downstream response to obtain an estimate of the agonist affinity constant for the active state of single receptors. Receptors behave as quantal switches that alternate between active and inactive states (Figure 1). The active state interacts with specific G proteins or other signaling partners. In the absence of ligands, the inactive state predominates. The binding of agonist increases the probability that the receptor will switch into the active state because its affinity constant for the active state (K(b)) is much greater than that for the inactive state (K(a)). The summation of the random outputs of all of the receptors in the population yields a constant level of receptor activation in time. The reciprocal of the concentration of agonist eliciting half-maximal receptor activation is equivalent to the observed affinity constant (K(obs)), and the fraction of agonist-receptor complexes in the active state is defined as efficacy (ε) (Figure 2). Methods for analyzing the downstream responses of GPCRs have been developed that enable the estimation of the K(obs) and relative efficacy of an agonist. In this report, we show how to modify this analysis to estimate the agonist K(b) value relative to that of another agonist. For assays that exhibit constitutive activity, we show how to estimate K(b) in absolute units of M(-1). Our method of analyzing agonist concentration-response curves consists of global nonlinear regression using the operational model. We describe a procedure using the software application, Prism (GraphPad Software, Inc., San Diego, CA). The analysis yields an estimate of the product of K(obs) and a parameter proportional to efficacy (

  9. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1. PMID:26887338

  10. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  11. Correlating Structural and Energetic Changes in Glycine Receptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Suzanne; Lynch, Joseph W.; Keramidas, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) mediate fast chemoelectrical transduction in the nervous system. The mechanism by which the energy of ligand binding leads to current-conducting receptors is poorly understood and may vary among family members. We addressed these questions by correlating the structural and energetic mechanisms by which a naturally occurring M1 domain mutation (α1Q−26′E) enhances receptor activation in homo- and heteromeric glycine receptors. We systematically altered the charge of spatially clustered residues at positions 19′ and 24′, in the M2 and M2-M3 linker domains, respectively, which are known to be critical to efficient receptor activation, on a background of α1Q−26′E. Changes in the durations of single receptor activations (clusters) and conductance were used to determine interaction coupling energies, which we correlated with conformational displacements as measured in pLGIC crystal structures. Presence of the α1Q−26′E enhanced cluster durations and reduced channel conductance in homo- and heteromeric receptors. Strong coupling between α1−26′ and α119′ across the subunit interface suggests an important role in receptor activation. A lack of coupling between α1−26′ and α124′ implies that 24′ mutations disrupt activation via other interactions. A similar lack of energetic coupling between α1−26′ and reciprocal mutations in the β subunit suggests that this subunit remains relatively static during receptor activation. However, the channel effects of α1Q−26′E on α1β receptors suggests at least one α1-α1 interface per pentamer. The coupling-energy change between α1−26′ and α119′ correlates with a local structural rearrangement essential for pLGIC activation, implying it comprises a key energetic pathway in activating glycine receptors and other pLGICs. PMID:25572390

  12. Tools and techniques to study ligand-receptor interactions and receptor activation by TNF superfamily members.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Pascal; Willen, Laure; Smulski, Cristian R

    2014-01-01

    Ligands and receptors of the TNF superfamily are therapeutically relevant targets in a wide range of human diseases. This chapter describes assays based on ELISA, immunoprecipitation, FACS, and reporter cell lines to monitor interactions of tagged receptors and ligands in both soluble and membrane-bound forms using unified detection techniques. A reporter cell assay that is sensitive to ligand oligomerization can identify ligands with high probability of being active on endogenous receptors. Several assays are also suitable to measure the activity of agonist or antagonist antibodies, or to detect interactions with proteoglycans. Finally, self-interaction of membrane-bound receptors can be evidenced using a FRET-based assay. This panel of methods provides a large degree of flexibility to address questions related to the specificity, activation, or inhibition of TNF-TNF receptor interactions in independent assay systems, but does not substitute for further tests in physiologically relevant conditions.

  13. Activation and dynamic network of the M2 muscarinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Nichols, Sara E.; Gasper, Paul M.; Metzger, Vincent T.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate cellular responses to various hormones and neurotransmitters and are important targets for treating a wide spectrum of diseases. Although significant advances have been made in structural studies of GPCRs, details of their activation mechanism remain unclear. The X-ray crystal structure of the M2 muscarinic receptor, a key GPCR that regulates human heart rate and contractile forces of cardiomyocytes, was determined recently in an inactive antagonist-bound state. Here, activation of the M2 receptor is directly observed via accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, in contrast to previous microsecond-timescale conventional molecular dynamics simulations in which the receptor remained inactive. Receptor activation is characterized by formation of a Tyr2065.58–Tyr4407.53 hydrogen bond and ∼6-Å outward tilting of the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane α-helix 6, preceded by relocation of Trp4006.48 toward Phe1955.47 and Val1995.51 and flipping of Tyr4307.43 away from the ligand-binding cavity. Network analysis reveals that communication in the intracellular domains is greatly weakened during activation of the receptor. Together with the finding that residue motions in the ligand-binding and G-protein-coupling sites of the apo receptor are correlated, this result highlights a dynamic network for allosteric regulation of the M2 receptor activation. PMID:23781107

  14. Activation of human peroxisome-activated receptor-gamma ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Obesity in children has become an epidemic and recent research suggests a possible contribution from exposure to environmental chemicals. Several chemicals, such as phthalates, brominated flame retardants, and perfluorinated chemicals, are common in house dust on floors where children play and are suspected obesogens. Obesogens can act via a mechanism that involves activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARy). A previous study found that dust collected from children’s homes binds to PPARy. Here, we investigated the ability of house dust to activate PPARy in a transiently transfected cell assay. Dust samples were collected in 2012 from carpeted and hardwood floors in children’s homes using thimbles fitted into a vacuum cleaner hose (“TEO” samples), or from homes in an adult cohort NIEHS study. Dust was extracted with 50:50 hexane:acetone, sonicated, centrifuged, and the organic layer collected. This was repeated 2X. The extracts were filtered to remove particulates, dried with purified nitrogen, and reconstituted in DMS0 at 200 ug/ul. COS-1 cells were transfected for 24 hrs with a human PPARy vector containing a luciferase reporter, and exposed for 24 hrs to negative controls water or DMSO (0.1%), positive controls Troglitazone (3 uM in water) or Rosiglitazone (100 nM in DMSO), or dust extracts serially diluted in DMEM at 50, 100, and 200 ug/ml in 0.1% DMSO. Cells were lysed and luciferase activity was measured. Data were log-tra

  15. P2 receptors activated by uracil nucleotides--an update.

    PubMed

    Brunschweiger, Andreas; Müller, Christa E

    2006-01-01

    Pyrimidine nucleotides, including UTP, UDP and UDP-glucose, are important signaling molecules which activate G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs) of the P2Y family. Four distinct pyrimidine nucleotide-sensitive P2Y receptor subtypes have been cloned, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6 and P2Y14. P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors are activated by UTP (the P2Y2, and the rat but not the human P2Y4 receptor are also activated by ATP), the P2Y6 receptor is activated by UDP, and the P2Y14 receptor by UDP-glucose. Furthermore, non-P2Y GPCRs, the cysteinylleukotriene receptors (CysLT1R and CysLT2R) have been described to be activated by UDP in addition to activation by cysteinylleukotrienes. While P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptor activation results in stimulation of phospholipase C, the P2Y14 receptor is coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. Derivatives and analogs of the physiological nucleotides UTP, UDP and ATP have been synthesized and evaluated in order to obtain enzymatically stable, subtype-selective agonists. The P2Y2 receptor agonists diuridine tetraphosphate (diquafosol) and the uracil-cytosine dinucleotide denufosol are currently undergoing clinical trials for dry eye disease, retinal detachment disease, upper respiratory tract symptoms, and cystic fibrosis, respectively. The first antagonists for P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors that appear to be selective versus other P2Y receptor subtypes have recently been described. Selective antagonists for P2Y4 and P2Y14 receptors are still lacking. Uracil nucleotide-sensitive P2Y receptor subtypes may constitute future targets for the treatment of certain cancer types, vascular diseases, inflammatory diseases, and immunomodulatory intervention. They have also been proposed to play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. This article is an updated version of "P2-Pyrimidinergic Receptors and Their Ligands" by C. E. Müller published in Curr. Pharm. Des. 2002, 8, 2353-2369.

  16. Tissue Factor, Protease Activated Receptors and Pathologic Heart Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor is the primary initiator of coagulation cascade and plays an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. In addition, tissue factor and coagulation proteases contribute to the many cellular responses via activation of protease activated receptors. Heart is the organ demonstrating high levels of constitutive tissue factor expression. This review focuses on the role of tissue factor, coagulation proteases and protease activated receptors in heart hemostasis and the pathological heart remodeling associated with myocardial infarction, viral myocarditis and hypertension. PMID:25104210

  17. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activity].

    PubMed

    Haga, T; Haga, K; Kameyama, K; Nakata, H

    1994-09-01

    Recent progress on the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases is reviewed. beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is activated by G protein beta gamma -subunits, which interact with the carboxyl terminal portion of beta ARK. Muscarinic receptor m2-subtypes are phosphorylated by beta ARK1 in the central part of the third intracellular loop (I3). Phosphorylation of I3-GST fusion protein by beta ARK1 is synergistically stimulated by the beta gamma -subunits and mastoparan or a peptide corresponding to portions adjacent to the transmembrane segments of m2-receptors or by beta gamma -subunits and the agonist-bound I3-deleted m2 variant. These results indicate that agonist-bound receptors serve as both substrates and activators of beta ARK.

  18. Mechanisms of Xenobiotic Receptor Activation: Direct vs. Indirect

    PubMed Central

    Mackowiak, Bryan; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    The so-called xenobiotic receptors (XRs) have functionally evolved into cellular sensors for both endogenous and exogenous stimuli by regulating the transcription of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as those involving energy homeostasis, cell proliferation, and/or immune responses. Unlike prototypical steroid hormone receptors, XRs are activated through both direct ligand-binding and ligand-independent (indirect) mechanisms by a plethora of structurally unrelated chemicals. This review covers research literature that discusses direct vs. indirect activation of XRs. A particular focus is centered on the signaling control of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We expect that this review will shed light on both the common and distinct mechanisms associated with activation of these three XRs. PMID:26877237

  19. Prothymosin Alpha Selectively Enhances Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activity by Interacting with a Repressor of Estrogen Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Paolo G. V.; Delage-Mourroux, Regis; Kraichely, Dennis M.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2000-01-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTα) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTα interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTα, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTα increases the magnitude of ERα transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERβ transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTα or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTα (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTα or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTα, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTα to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain its ability to selectively enhance

  20. Plant cysteine proteases that evoke itch activate protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V.B.; Lerner, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain, ficin and papain are cysteine proteases from plants that produce itch upon injection into skin. Their mechanism of action has not been considered previously. Objectives To determine the mechanism by which these proteases function. Methods The ability of these proteases to activate protease-activated receptors was determined by ratiometric calcium imaging. Results We show here that bromelain, ficin and papain activate protease-activated receptors 2 and 4. Conclusions Bromelain, ficin and papain function as signalling molecules and activate protease-activated receptors. Activation of these receptors is the likely mechanism by which these proteases evoke itch. PMID:20491769

  1. Endomorphins fully activate a cloned human mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Gong, J; Strong, J A; Zhang, S; Yue, X; DeHaven, R N; Daubert, J D; Cassel, J A; Yu, G; Mansson, E; Yu, L

    1998-11-13

    Endomorphins were recently identified as endogenous ligands with high selectivity for mu opioid receptors. We have characterized the ability of endomorphins to bind to and functionally activate the cloned human mu opioid receptor. Both endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 exhibited binding selectivity for the mu opioid receptor over the delta and kappa opioid receptors. Both agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated increase of cAMP in a dose-dependent fashion. When the mu opioid receptor was coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes with G protein-activated K+ channels, application of either endomorphin activated an inward K+ current. This activation was dose-dependent and blocked by naloxone. Both endomorphins acted as full agonists with efficacy similar to that of [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO). These data indicate that endomorphins act as full agonists at the human mu opioid receptor, capable of stimulating the receptor to inhibit the cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway and activate G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels.

  2. The δ Opioid Receptor Agonist SNC80 Selectively Activates Heteromeric μ–δ Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Coexpressed and colocalized μ- and δ-opioid receptors have been established to exist as heteromers in cultured cells and in vivo. However the biological significance of opioid receptor heteromer activation is less clear. To explore this significance, the efficacy of selective activation of opioid receptors by SNC80 was assessed in vitro in cells singly and coexpressing opioid receptors using a chimeric G-protein-mediated calcium fluorescence assay, SNC80 produced a substantially more robust response in cells expressing μ–δ heteromers than in all other cell lines. Intrathecal SNC80 administration in μ- and δ-opioid receptor knockout mice produced diminished antinociceptive activity compared with wild type. The combined in vivo and in vitro results suggest that SNC80 selectively activates μ–δ heteromers to produce maximal antinociception. These data contrast with the current view that SNC80 selectively activates δ-opioid receptor homomers to produce antinociception. Thus, the data suggest that heteromeric μ–δ receptors should be considered as a target when SNC80 is employed as a pharmacological tool in vivo. PMID:22860219

  3. Human Receptor Activation by Aroclor 1260, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Clair, Heather B.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A.; States, J. Christopher; Coslo, Denise M.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  4. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  5. Phenobarbital indirectly activates the constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR) by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mutoh, Shingo; Sobhany, Mack; Moore, Rick; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Phenobarbital is a central nervous system depressant that also indirectly activates nuclear receptor constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR), which promotes drug and energy metabolism, as well as cell growth (and death), in the liver. We found that phenobarbital activated CAR by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Phenobarbital bound to EGFR and potently inhibited the binding of EGF, which prevented the activation of EGFR. This abrogation of EGFR signaling induced the dephosphorylation of receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) at Tyr52, which then promoted the dephosphorylation of CAR at Thr38 by the catalytic core subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. The findings demonstrated that the phenobarbital-induced mechanism of CAR dephosphorylation and activation is mediated through its direct interaction with and inhibition of EGFR. PMID:23652203

  6. Phenobarbital indirectly activates the constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR) by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Shingo; Sobhany, Mack; Moore, Rick; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2013-05-07

    Phenobarbital is a central nervous system depressant that also indirectly activates nuclear receptor constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR), which promotes drug and energy metabolism, as well as cell growth (and death), in the liver. We found that phenobarbital activated CAR by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Phenobarbital bound to EGFR and potently inhibited the binding of EGF, which prevented the activation of EGFR. This abrogation of EGFR signaling induced the dephosphorylation of receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) at Tyr(52), which then promoted the dephosphorylation of CAR at Thr(38) by the catalytic core subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. The findings demonstrated that the phenobarbital-induced mechanism of CAR dephosphorylation and activation is mediated through its direct interaction with and inhibition of EGFR.

  7. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  8. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  9. ITIM receptors: more than just inhibitors of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Coxon, Carmen H.; Geer, Mitchell J.

    2017-01-01

    Since their discovery, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-containing receptors have been shown to inhibit signaling from immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing receptors in almost all hematopoietic cells, including platelets. However, a growing body of evidence has emerged demonstrating that this is an oversimplification, and that ITIM-containing receptors are versatile regulators of platelet signal transduction, with functions beyond inhibiting ITAM-mediated platelet activation. PECAM-1 was the first ITIM-containing receptor identified in platelets and appeared to conform to the established model of ITIM-mediated attenuation of ITAM-driven activation. PECAM-1 was therefore widely accepted as a major negative regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis for many years, but more recent findings suggest a more complex role for this receptor, including the facilitation of αIIbβ3-mediated platelet functions. Since the identification of PECAM-1, several other ITIM-containing platelet receptors have been discovered. These include G6b-B, a critical regulator of platelet reactivity and production, and the noncanonical ITIM-containing receptor TREM-like transcript-1, which is localized to α-granules in resting platelets, binds fibrinogen, and acts as a positive regulator of platelet activation. Despite structural similarities and shared binding partners, including the Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatases Shp1 and Shp2, knockout and transgenic mouse models have revealed distinct phenotypes and nonredundant functions for each ITIM-containing receptor in the context of platelet homeostasis. These roles are likely influenced by receptor density, compartmentalization, and as-yet unknown binding partners. In this review, we discuss the diverse repertoire of ITIM-containing receptors in platelets, highlighting intriguing new functions, controversies, and future areas of investigation. PMID:28465343

  10. Activation of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ALK by zinc.

    PubMed

    Bennasroune, Aline; Mazot, Pierre; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Vigny, Marc

    2010-08-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development of the central and peripheral nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in Vertebrates is still a matter of debate. During synaptic transmission the release of ionic zinc found in vesicles of certain glutamatergic and gabaergic terminals may act as a neuromodulator by binding to pre- or post-synaptic receptors. Recently, zinc has been shown to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, independently of neurotrophins. This activation occurs via increasing the Src family kinase activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the ALK activity could be modulated by extracellular zinc. We first showed that zinc alone rapidly activates ALK. This activation is dependent of ALK tyrosine kinase activity and dimerization of the receptor but is independent of Src family kinase activity. In contrast, addition of sodium pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, led to a further activation of ALK. This stronger activation is dependent of Src family kinase but independent of ALK activity and dimerization. In conclusion, zinc could constitute an endogenous ligand of ALK in vertebrates.

  11. Constitutively Active ALK2 Receptor Mutants Require Type II Receptor Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Bagarova, Jana; Vonner, Ashley J.; Armstrong, Kelli A.; Börgermann, Jan; Lai, Carol S. C.; Deng, Donna Y.; Beppu, Hideyuki; Alfano, Ivan; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Bullock, Alex N.; Knaus, Petra; Mishina, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activating mutations in receptor kinases recruit downstream effector pathways independently of upstream signaling, with consequences ranging from developmental syndromes to cancer. Classic fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a congenital syndrome resulting from highly conserved activating mutations of the glycine-serine-rich (GS) regulatory domain of ACVR1, encoding bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor ALK2, which lead to inappropriate signaling and heterotopic ossification of soft tissues. It is unclear if constitutively active mutant ALK2 receptors (caALK2) can function independently of signaling complexes with type II receptors and ligands. We found that ablation of BmpRII and ActRIIa abrogated BMP ligand-mediated and caALK2-mediated signaling and transcription in cells and disrupted caALK2-induced heterotopic ossification in mice. Signaling via GS domain ALK2 mutants could be restored by the expression of either BMP type II receptor. The contribution of BMP type II receptors was independent of their ligand-binding or kinase function but was dependent upon an intact cytoplasmic domain. These data demonstrate that GS domain ALK2 mutants act independently of upstream signaling but may require a nonenzymatic scaffolding function provided by type II receptors to form functional, apparently ligand-independent signaling complexes. These findings define the minimal requirements for signaling of GS domain ALK2 mutants, with implications for the therapeutic targeting of their activity in disease. PMID:23572558

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and liver X receptors in atherosclerosis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Barish, Grant D

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a primary cause of death in the United States, and the current obesity epidemic threatens to exacerbate its morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite important cardiovascular treatment advances over the past few decades, new approaches are needed to curb dangerous health trends. Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. The discovery of subfamilies known as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and liver X receptors (LXR) as lipid-sensors that regulate lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation offers new targets for nutritional and pharmacologic treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, T; Schrum, L; Rippe, R; Xiong, S; Yee, H F; Motomura, K; Anania, F A; Willson, T M; Tsukamoto, H

    2000-11-17

    The present study examined the roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a pivotal event in liver fibrogenesis. RNase protection assay detected mRNA for PPARgamma1 but not that for the adipocyte-specific gamma2 isoform in HSC isolated from sham-operated rats, whereas the transcripts for neither isoforms were detectable in HSC from cholestatic liver fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction confirmed a 70% reduction in PPARgamma mRNA level in HSC from BDL. Nuclear extracts from BDL cells showed an expected diminution of binding to PPAR-responsive element, whereas NF-kappaB and AP-1 binding were increased. Treatment of cultured-activated HSC with ligands for PPARgamma (10 microm 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15dPGJ(2)); 0.1 approximately 10 microm BRL49653) inhibited DNA and collagen synthesis without affecting the cell viability. Suppression of HSC collagen by 15dPGJ(2) was abrogated 70% by the concomitant treatment with a PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662). HSC DNA and collagen synthesis were inhibited by WY14643 at the concentrations known to activate both PPARalpha and gamma (>100 microm) but not at those that only activate PPARalpha (<10 microm) or by a synthetic PPARalpha-selective agonist (GW9578). 15dPGJ(2) reduced alpha1(I) procollagen, smooth muscle alpha-actin, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 mRNA levels while inducing matrix metalloproteinase-3 and CD36. 15dPGJ(2) and BRL49653 inhibited alpha1(I) procollagen promoter activity. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (10 ng/ml) reduced PPARgamma mRNA, and this effect was prevented by the treatment with 15dPGJ(2). These results demonstrate that HSC activation is associated with the reductions in PPARgamma expression and PPAR-responsive element binding in vivo and is reversed by the treatment with PPARgamma ligands in vitro. These findings implicate diminished PPARgamma signaling in

  14. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Mariarosaria; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2005-10-01

    Vascular system is constituted by a complex and articulate network, e.g. arteries, arterioles, venules and veins, that requires a high degree of coordination between different elemental cell types. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) constitute a recent described family of 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by proteolysis. In recent years several evidence have been accumulated for an involvement of this receptor in the response to endothelial injury in vitro and in vivo experimental settings suggesting a role for PAR2 in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular system. This review will deal with the role of PAR2 receptor in the cardiovascular system analyzing both in vivo and in vitro published data. In particular this review will deal with the role of this receptor in vascular reactivity, ischemia/reperfusion injury, coronary atherosclerotic lesions and angiogenesis.

  15. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Botos, Istvan; White, Courtney F.; Du, Haijuan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. In conclusion, the loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.

  16. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; ...

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecularmore » dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. In conclusion, the loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.« less

  17. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Botos, Istvan; White, Courtney F.; Du, Haijuan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. The loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.

  18. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Botos, Istvan; White, Courtney F.; Du, Haijuan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. The loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist. PMID:27924846

  19. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  20. Multiple switches in G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Shivani; Smith, Steven O

    2009-09-01

    The activation mechanism of G protein-coupled receptors has presented a puzzle that finally may be close to solution. These receptors have a relatively simple architecture consisting of seven transmembrane helices that contain just a handful of highly conserved amino acids, yet they respond to light and a range of chemically diverse ligands. Recent NMR structural studies on the active metarhodopsin II intermediate of the visual receptor rhodopsin, along with the recent crystal structure of the apoprotein opsin, have revealed multiple structural elements or 'switches' that must be simultaneously triggered to achieve full activation. The confluence of several required structural changes is an example of "coincidence counting", which is often used by nature to regulate biological processes. In ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors, the presence of multiple switches may provide an explanation for the differences between full, partial and inverse agonists.

  1. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  2. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G; Beazely, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  3. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  4. Activation of the p75 neurotrophin receptor through conformational rearrangement of disulphide-linked receptor dimers

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Marçal; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Kenchappa, Rajappa S.; Simi, Anastasia; Karaca, Esra; Reversi, Alessandra; Choi, Soyoung; Bothwell, Mark; Mingarro, Ismael; Friedman, Wilma J.; Schiavo, Giampietro; Bastiaens, Philippe I. H.; Verveer, Peter J.; Carter, Bruce D.; Ibáñez, Carlos F.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Ligand-mediated dimerization has emerged as a universal mechanism of growth factor receptor activation. Recent structural studies have shown that neurotrophins interact with dimers of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), but the actual mechanism of receptor activation has remained elusive. Here we show that p75NTR forms disulphide-linked dimers independently of neurotrophin binding through the highly conserved Cys257 in its transmembrane domain. Mutation of Cys257 abolished neurotrophin-dependent receptor activity but did not affect downstream signaling by the p75NTR/NgR/Lingo-1 complex in response to MAG, indicating the existence of distinct, ligand-specific activation mechanisms for p75NTR. FRET experiments revealed a close association of p75NTR intracellular domains that was transiently disrupted by conformational changes induced upon NGF binding. Although mutation of Cys257 did not alter the oligomeric state of p75NTR, the mutant receptor was no longer able to propagate conformational changes to the cytoplasmic domain upon ligand binding. We propose that neurotrophins activate p75NTR by a novel mechanism involving rearrangement of disulphide-linked receptor subunits. PMID:19376068

  5. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation.

  6. Differential trafficking of AMPA receptors following activation of NMDA receptors and mGluRs.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Thomas M; Collingridge, Graham L; Fitzjohn, Stephen M

    2011-07-27

    The removal of AMPA receptors from synapses is a major component of long-term depression (LTD). How this occurs, however, is still only partially understood. To investigate the trafficking of AMPA receptors in real-time we previously tagged the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors with ecliptic pHluorin and studied the effects of NMDA receptor activation. In the present study we have compared the effect of NMDA receptor and group I mGluR activation, using GluA2 tagged with super ecliptic pHluorin (SEP-GluA2) expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Surprisingly, agonists of the two receptors, which are both able to induce chemical forms of LTD, had clearly distinct effects on AMPA receptor trafficking. In agreement with our previous work we found that transient NMDA receptor activation results in an initial decrease in surface GluA2 from extrasynaptic sites followed by a delayed reduction in GluA2 from puncta (putative synapses). In contrast, transient activation of group I mGluRs, using DHPG, led to a pronounced but more delayed decrease in GluA2 from the dendritic shafts. Surprisingly, there was no average change in the fluorescence of the puncta. Examination of fluorescence at individual puncta, however, indicated that alterations did take place, with some puncta showing an increase and others a decrease in fluorescence. The effects of DHPG were, like DHPG-induced LTD, prevented by treatment with a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor. The electrophysiological correlate of the effects of DHPG in the SEP-GluA2 infected cultures was a reduction in mEPSC frequency with no change in amplitude. The implications of these findings for the initial mechanisms of expression of both NMDA receptor- and mGluR-induced LTD are discussed.

  7. Association of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors/retinoic acid receptors with renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Drummen, Gregor P C; Jiang, Zong-Pei; Long, Yao-Bin; Qin, Yuan-Han

    2013-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, and is a nuclear transcription receptor involving in the regulation of several biochemical pathways, such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. The nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are transcriptional transregulators that control the expression of specific subsets of genes in a ligand-dependent manner, and include three subtypes (RARα, RARβ, and RARγ). These control the expression of specific gene subsets subsequent to ligand binding and to strictly control phosphorylation processes. The current status of knowledge indicates that there might be inter- or overlapping actions between PPARγ and RARs, and there might be an association of PPARγ/RARs with renal diseases. Various agonists of both receptor families seem to prevent or retard the progression of renal disease. Herein, we review if causal relationships can be established between PPARγ/RARs and renal diseases and its manifestations.

  8. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  9. Blocking the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR): an overview.

    PubMed

    Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; De Filippis, Barbara; Giampietro, Letizia; Amoroso, Rosa

    2013-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been studied extensively over the last few decades and have been assessed as molecular targets for the development of drugs against metabolic disorders. A rapid increase in understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of these receptors has occurred, together with the identification of novel chemical structures that are able to activate the various PPAR subtypes. More recent evidence suggests that moderate activation of these receptors could be favorable in pathological situations due to a decrease in the side effects brought about by PPAR agonists. PPAR partial agonists and antagonists are interesting tools that are currently used to better elucidate the biological processes modulated by this family of nuclear receptors. Herein we present an overview of the various molecular structures that are able to block each of the PPAR subtypes, with a focus on promising therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor: A family of nuclear receptors role in various diseases.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Sandeep; Gupta, Paras; Saini, Arminder Singh; Kaushal, Chaitnya; Sharma, Saurabh

    2011-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of the following three subtypes: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARβ/δ. Activation of PPAR-α reduces triglyceride level and is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPAR-γ causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPAR-β/δ enhances fatty acids metabolism. Thus, PPAR family of nuclear receptors plays a major regulatory role in energy homeostasis and metabolic function. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in dyslipidemia, diabetes, adipocyte differentiation, inflammation, cancer, lung diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, fertility or reproduction, pain, and obesity.

  11. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor: A family of nuclear receptors role in various diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Sandeep; Gupta, Paras; Saini, Arminder Singh; Kaushal, Chaitnya; Sharma, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of the following three subtypes: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARβ/δ. Activation of PPAR-α reduces triglyceride level and is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPAR-γ causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPAR-β/δ enhances fatty acids metabolism. Thus, PPAR family of nuclear receptors plays a major regulatory role in energy homeostasis and metabolic function. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in dyslipidemia, diabetes, adipocyte differentiation, inflammation, cancer, lung diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, fertility or reproduction, pain, and obesity. PMID:22247890

  12. Chronic treatment with LY341495 decreases 5-HT(2A) receptor binding and hallucinogenic effects of LSD in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Holloway, Terrell; Rayannavar, Vinayak; Sealfon, Stuart C; González-Maeso, Javier

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline and psilocybin, alter perception and cognitive processes. All hallucinogenic drugs have in common a high affinity for the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor. Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor ligands show efficacy in modulating the cellular and behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs. Here, we explored the effect of chronic treatment with the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropan-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)-propionic acid (LY341495) on the hallucinogenic-like effects induced by LSD (0.24mg/kg). Mice were chronically (21 days) treated with LY341495 (1.5mg/kg), or vehicle, and experiments were carried out one day after the last injection. Chronic treatment with LY341495 down-regulated [(3)H]ketanserin binding in somatosensory cortex of wild-type, but not mGlu2 knockout (KO), mice. Head-twitch behavior, and expression of c-fos, egr-1 and egr-2, which are responses induced by hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonists, were found to be significantly decreased by chronic treatment with LY341495. These findings suggest that repeated blockade of the mGlu2 receptor by LY341495 results in reduced 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent hallucinogenic effects of LSD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role. PMID:27635169

  14. Understanding Cytokine and Growth Factor Receptor Activation Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Mariya; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the detailed mechanism of action of cytokine and growth factor receptors – and particularly our quantitative understanding of the link between structure, mechanism and function – lags significantly behind our knowledge of comparable functional protein classes such as enzymes, G protein-coupled receptors, and ion channels. In particular, it remains controversial whether such receptors are activated by a mechanism of ligand-induced oligomerization, versus a mechanism in which the ligand binds to a pre-associated receptor dimer or oligomer that becomes activated through subsequent conformational rearrangement. A major limitation to progress has been the relative paucity of methods for performing quantitative mechanistic experiments on unmodified receptors expressed at endogenous levels on live cells. In this article we review the current state of knowledge on the activation mechanisms of cytokine and growth factor receptors, critically evaluate the evidence for and against the different proposed mechanisms, and highlight other key questions that remain unanswered. New approaches and techniques have led to rapid recent progress in this area, and the field is poised for major advances in the coming years, which promises to revolutionize our understanding of this large and biologically and medically important class of receptors. PMID:23046381

  15. Protease-activated receptors in kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Palygin, Oleg; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are members of a well-known family of transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Four PARs have been identified to date, of which PAR1 and PAR2 are the most abundant receptors, and have been shown to be expressed in the kidney vascular and tubular cells. PAR signaling is mediated by an N-terminus tethered ligand that can be unmasked by serine protease cleavage. The receptors are activated by endogenous serine proteases, such as thrombin (acts on PARs 1, 3, and 4) and trypsin (PAR2). PARs can be involved in glomerular, microvascular, and inflammatory regulation of renal function in both normal and pathological conditions. As an example, it was shown that human glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells express PARs, and these receptors are involved in the pathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis, glomerular fibrin deposition, and macrophage infiltration. Activation of these receptors in the kidney also modulates renal hemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate. Clinical studies further demonstrated that the concentration of urinary thrombin is associated with glomerulonephritis and type 2 diabetic nephropathy; thus, molecular and functional mechanisms of PARs activation can be directly involved in renal disease progression. We briefly discuss here the recent literature related to activation of PAR signaling in glomeruli and the kidney in general and provide some examples of PAR1 signaling in glomeruli podocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Functions of the extracellular histidine residues of receptor activity-modifying proteins vary within adrenomedullin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Kato, Johji

    2008-12-05

    Receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-2 and -3 chaperone calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to the plasma membrane, where together they form heterodimeric adrenomedullin (AM) receptors. We investigated the contributions made by His residues situated in the RAMP extracellular domain to AM receptor trafficking and receptor signaling by co-expressing hCRLR and V5-tagged-hRAMP2 or -3 mutants in which a His residue was substituted with Ala in HEK-293 cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that hRAMP2-H71A mediated normal hCRLR surface delivery, but the resultant heterodimers showed significantly diminished [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-evoked cAMP production. Expression of hRAMP2-H124A and -H127A impaired surface delivery of hCRLR, which impaired or abolishing AM binding and receptor signaling. Although hRAMP3-H97A mediated full surface delivery of hCRLR, the resultant heterodimers showed impaired AM binding and signaling. Other His residues appeared uninvolved in hCRLR-related functions. Thus, the His residues of hRAMP2 and -3 differentially govern AM receptor function.

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 negative allosteric modulators: discovery of 2-chloro-4-[1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-4-ylethynyl]pyridine (basimglurant, RO4917523), a promising novel medicine for psychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Georg; Kolczewski, Sabine; Spooren, Will; Vieira, Eric; Bitter-Stoll, Nadia; Boissin, Patrick; Borroni, Edilio; Büttelmann, Bernd; Ceccarelli, Simona; Clemann, Nicole; David, Beatrice; Funk, Christoph; Guba, Wolfgang; Harrison, Anthony; Hartung, Thomas; Honer, Michael; Huwyler, Jörg; Kuratli, Martin; Niederhauser, Urs; Pähler, Axel; Peters, Jens-Uwe; Petersen, Ann; Prinssen, Eric; Ricci, Antonio; Rueher, Daniel; Rueher, Marianne; Schneider, Manfred; Spurr, Paul; Stoll, Theodor; Tännler, Daniel; Wichmann, Jürgen; Porter, Richard H; Wettstein, Joseph G; Lindemann, Lothar

    2015-02-12

    Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) have potential for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including depression, fragile X syndrome (FXS), anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and levodopa induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease. Herein we report the optimization of a weakly active screening hit 1 to the potent and selective compounds chloro-4-[1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-4-ylethynyl]pyridine (basimglurant, 2) and 2-chloro-4-((2,5-dimethyl-1-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)-1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine (CTEP, 3). Compound 2 is active in a broad range of anxiety tests reaching the same efficacy but at a 10- to 100-fold lower dose compared to diazepam and is characterized by favorable DMPK properties in rat and monkey as well as an excellent preclinical safety profile and is currently in phase II clinical studies for the treatment of depression and fragile X syndrome. Analogue 3 is the first reported mGlu5 NAM with a long half-life in rodents and is therefore an ideal tool compound for chronic studies in mice and rats.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activates Human Macrophage Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Linking Mannose Receptor Recognition to Regulation of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Brooks, Michelle N.; Morris, Jessica D.; Torrelles, Jordi B.; Azad, Abul K.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances its survival in macrophages by suppressing immune responses in part through its complex cell wall structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is a transcriptional factor that regulates inflammation and has high expression in alternatively activated alveolar macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, both cell types relevant to tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this study, we show that virulent M. tuberculosis and its cell wall mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan induce PPARγ expression through a macrophage mannose receptor-dependent pathway. When activated, PPARγ promotes IL-8 and cyclooxygenase 2 expression, a process modulated by a PPARγ agonist or antagonist. Upstream, MAPK-p38 mediates cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation, which is required for PPARγ ligand production. The induced IL-8 response mediated by mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan and the mannose receptor is independent of TLR2 and NF-κB activation. In contrast, the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin induces less PPARγ and preferentially uses the NF-κB–mediated pathway to induce IL-8 production. Finally, PPARγ knockdown in human macrophages enhances TNF production and controls the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis. These data identify a new molecular pathway that links engagement of the mannose receptor, an important pattern recognition receptor for M. tuberculosis, with PPARγ activation, which regulates the macrophage inflammatory response, thereby playing a role in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:20554962

  19. Heterodimeric interaction between retinoid X receptor alpha and orphan nuclear receptor OR1 reveals dimerization-induced activation as a novel mechanism of nuclear receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebel, F F; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    OR1 is a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone nuclear receptor superfamily which has been described to mediate transcriptional responses to retinoids and oxysterols. On a DR4 response element, an OR1 heterodimer with the nuclear receptor retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) has been described to convey transcriptional activation in both the absence and presence of the RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid, the mechanisms of which have remained unclear. Here, we dissect the effects of RXR alpha and OR1 ligand-binding domain interaction on transcriptional regulation and the role of the respective carboxy-terminal activation domains (AF-2s) in the absence and presence of the RXR ligand, employing chimeras of the nuclear receptors containing the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain as well as natural receptors. The results show that the interaction of the RXR and OR1 ligand-binding domains unleashes a transcription activation potential that is mainly dependent on the AF-2 of OR1, indicating that interaction with RXR activates OR1. This defines dimerization-induced activation as a novel function of heterodimeric interaction and mechanism of receptor activation not previously described for nuclear receptors. Moreover, we present evidence that activation of OR1 occurs by a conformational change induced upon heterodimerization with RXR. PMID:9199332

  20. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Rebecca A; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors, both of which are GPCRs, are central to the metastatic melanoma phenotype and may serve as potential targets in novel therapies against melanoma and other cancers.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of N-(methylthiophenyl)picolinamide derivatives as PET radioligands for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4.

    PubMed

    Kil, Kun-Eek; Poutiainen, Pekka; Zhang, Zhaoda; Zhu, Aijun; Kuruppu, Darshini; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Tannous, Bakhos A; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, mGlu4 has received great research attention because of the potential benefits of mGlu4 activation in treating numerous brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). A specific mGlu4 PET radioligand could be an important tool in understanding the role of mGlu4 in both healthy and disease conditions, and also for the development of new drugs. In this study, we synthesized four new N-(methylthiophenyl)picolinamide derivatives 11-14. Of these ligands, 11 and 14 showed high in vitro binding affinity for mGlu4 with IC50 values of 3.4nM and 3.1nM, respectively, and suitable physicochemical parameters. Compound 11 also showed enhanced metabolic stability and good selectivity to other mGluRs. [(11)C]11 and [(11)C]14 were radiolabeled using the [(11)C]methylation of the thiophenol precursors 20a and 20c with [(11)C]CH3I in 19.0% and 34.8% radiochemical yields (RCY), and their specific activities at the end of synthesis (EOS) were 496±138GBq/μmol (n=6) and 463±263GBq/μmol (n=4), respectively. The PET studies showed that [(11)C]11 accumulated fast into the brain and had higher uptake, slower washout and 25% better contrast than [(11)C]2, indicating improved imaging characteristics as PET radiotracer for mGlu4 compared to [(11)C]2. Therefore, [(11)C]11 will be a useful radioligand to investigate mGlu4 in different biological applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Endothelin-converting enzyme 2 differentially regulates opioid receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Fujita, W; Gomes, I; Bobeck, E; Devi, L A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opioid receptor function is modulated by post-activation events such as receptor endocytosis, recycling and/or degradation. While it is generally understood that the peptide ligand gets co-endocytosed with the receptor, relatively few studies have investigated the role of the endocytosed peptide and peptide processing enzymes in regulating receptor function. In this study, we focused on endothelin-converting enzyme 2 (ECE2), a member of the neprilysin family of metallopeptidases that exhibits an acidic pH optimum, localizes to an intracellular compartment and selectively processes neuropeptides including opioid peptides in vitro, and examined its role in modulating μ receptor recycling and resensitization. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effect of ECE2 inhibition on hydrolysis of the endocytosed peptide was examined using thin-layer chromatography and on μ opioid receptor trafficking using either elisa or microscopy. The effect of ECE2 inhibition on receptor signalling was measured using a cAMP assay and, in vivo, on antinociception induced by intrathecally administered opioids by the tail-flick assay. KEY RESULTS The highly selective ECE2 inhibitor, S136492, significantly impaired μ receptor recycling and signalling by only those ligands that are ECE2 substrates and this was seen both in heterologous cells and in cells endogenously co-expressing μ receptors with ECE2. We also found that ECE2 inhibition attenuated antinociception mediated only by opioid peptides that are ECE2 substrates. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that ECE2, by selectively processing endogenous opioid peptides in the endocytic compartment, plays a role in modulating opioid receptor activity. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24990314

  3. Activation and inhibition of erythropoietin receptor function: role of receptor dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Watowich, S S; Hilton, D J; Lodish, H F

    1994-01-01

    Members of the cytokine receptor superfamily have structurally similar extracellular ligand-binding domains yet diverse cytoplasmic regions lacking any obvious catalytic domains. Many of these receptors form ligand-induced oligomers which are likely to participate in transmembrane signaling. A constitutively active (factor-independent) mutant of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R), R129C in the exoplasmic domain, forms disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that the wild-type EPO-R is activated by ligand-induced homodimerization. Here, we have taken two approaches to probe the role EPO-R dimerization plays in signal transduction. First, on the basis of the crystal structure of the ligand-bound, homodimeric growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and sequence alignment between the GH-R and EPO-R, we identified residues of the EPO-R which may be involved in intersubunit contacts in an EPO-R homodimer. Residue 129 of the EPO-R corresponds to a residue localized to the GH-R dimer interface region. Alanine or cysteine substitutions were introduced at four other residues of the EPO-R predicted to be in the dimer interface region. Substitution of residue E-132 or E-133 with cysteine renders the EPO-R constitutively active. Like the arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 129 in the exoplasmic domain (R129C), E132C and E133C form disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that constitutive activity is due to covalent dimerization. In the second approach, we have coexpressed the wild-type EPO-R with inactive mutants of the receptor missing all or part of the cytosolic domain. These truncated receptors have a dominant inhibitory effect on the proliferative action of the wild-type receptor. Taken together, these results strengthen the hypothesis that an initial step in EPO- and EPO-R-mediated signal transduction is ligand-induced receptor dimerization. Images PMID:8196600

  4. Dynamic regulation of Drosophila nuclear receptor activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Palanker, Laura; Necakov, Aleksandar S.; Sampson, Heidi M.; Ni, Ruoyu; Hu, Chun; Thummel, Carl S.; Krause, Henry M.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large family of transcription factors that play major roles in development, metamorphosis, metabolism and disease. To determine how, where and when nuclear receptors are regulated by small chemical ligands and/or protein partners, we have used a ‘ligand sensor’ system to visualize spatial activity patterns for each of the 18 Drosophila nuclear receptors in live developing animals. Transgenic lines were established that express the ligand binding domain of each nuclear receptor fused to the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4. When combined with a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, the fusion proteins show tissue- and stage-specific patterns of activation. We show that these responses accurately reflect the presence of endogenous and exogenously added hormone, and that they can be modulated by nuclear receptor partner proteins. The amnioserosa, yolk, midgut and fat body, which play major roles in lipid storage, metabolism and developmental timing, were identified as frequent sites of nuclear receptor activity. We also see dynamic changes in activation that are indicative of sweeping changes in ligand and/or co-factor production. The screening of a small compound library using this system identified the angular psoralen angelicin and the insect growth regulator fenoxycarb as activators of the Ultraspiracle (USP) ligand-binding domain. These results demonstrate the utility of this system for the functional dissection of nuclear receptor pathways and for the development of new receptor agonists and antagonists that can be used to modulate metabolism and disease and to develop more effective means of insect control. PMID:16914501

  5. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  6. Glutamate mediates platelet activation through the AMPA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Craig N.; Sun, Henry; Ikeda, Masahiro; Beique, Jean-Claude; Swaim, Anne Marie; Mason, Emily; Martin, Tanika V.; Thompson, Laura E.; Gozen, Oguz; Ampagoomian, David; Sprengel, Rolf; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Faraday, Nauder; Huganir, Richard; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the kainate receptor, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR). Each receptor was first characterized and cloned in the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate is also present in the periphery, and glutamate receptors have been identified in nonneuronal tissues, including bone, heart, kidney, pancreas, and platelets. Platelets play a central role in normal thrombosis and hemostasis, as well as contributing greatly to diseases such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Despite the presence of glutamate in platelet granules, the role of glutamate during hemostasis is unknown. We now show that activated platelets release glutamate, that platelets express AMPAR subunits, and that glutamate increases agonist-induced platelet activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glutamate binding to the AMPAR increases intracellular sodium concentration and depolarizes platelets, which are important steps in platelet activation. In contrast, platelets treated with the AMPAR antagonist CNQX or platelets derived from GluR1 knockout mice are resistant to AMPA effects. Importantly, mice lacking GluR1 have a prolonged time to thrombosis in vivo. Our data identify glutamate as a regulator of platelet activation, and suggest that the AMPA receptor is a novel antithrombotic target. PMID:18283118

  7. Transcription coactivators for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Songtao; Reddy, Janardan K

    2007-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, neoplastic conversion, inflammation and wound healing in addition to their critical roles in energy (lipid and carbohydrate) metabolism. Unliganded PPARs heterodimerize with retinoid X receptor alpha and repress transcription when bound to DNA by interacting with corepressor molecules. Upon canonical ligand binding, PPARs manifest conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules to enable a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment (association) of coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins to the liganded receptor. Functional significance for the existence of over 200 nuclear receptor cofactors is not readily evident, but emerging gene knockout mouse models show that some of the coactivators are essential for embryonic growth and survival and for controlling receptor specific target gene expression in a cell specific need based demands. Coactivators contain one or more highly conserved LXXLL amphiphatic alpha-helix motif, called nuclear receptor box, for direct interaction with the activation function 2 (AF-2) regions in nuclear receptors. PPARs interact with large multisubunit coactivator protein complexes, some exhibiting intrinsic histone acetyltransferase or methyltransferase activity, while others functioning as facilitators of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling or as linkers to the basal transcription machinery. While the dynamic and coordinated changes in nuclear receptor expression and differences in the nature of their key target genes are important, it is becoming increasingly evident that perturbations in the expression of coactivators may affect the function of many nuclear receptors including PPARs. Tissue specific differences in coactivator expression add another dimension to the complexity of gene- and cell-specific transcriptional regulation. Identification of PPAR specific

  8. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold.

  9. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor and genetically engineered PAF receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Shimizu, T

    2000-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a biologically active phospholipid mediator. Although PAF was initially recognized for its potential to induce platelet aggregation and secretion, intense investigations have elucidated potent biological actions of PAF in a broad range of cell types and tissues, many of which also produce the molecule. PAF acts by binding to a unique G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. PAF receptor is linked to intracellular signal transduction pathways, including turnover of phosphatidylinositol, elevation in intracellular calcium concentration, and activation of kinases, resulting in versatile bioactions. On the basis of numerous pharmacological reports, PAF is thought to have many pathophysiological and physiological functions. Recently advanced molecular technics enable us not only to clone PAF receptor cDNAs and genes, but also generate PAF receptor mutant animals, i.e., PAF receptor-overexpressing mouse and PAF receptor-deficient mouse. These mutant mice gave us a novel and specific approach for identifying the pathophysiological and physiological functions of PAF. This review also describes the phenotypes of these mutant mice and discusses them by referring to previously reported pharmacological and genetical data.

  10. Immunohistochemical quantitation of oestrogen receptors and proliferative activity in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To evaluate the effect of the duration of formalin fixation and of tumour heterogeneity on quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content (oestrogen receptor index) and proliferative activity (MIB-1 index) in breast cancer. METHODS--Two monoclonal antibodies, MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor, were applied to formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue from 25 prospectively collected oestrogen receptor positive breast carcinomas, using a microwave antigen retrieval method. Tumour tissue was allocated systematically to different periods of fixation to ensure minimal intraspecimen variation. The percentages of MIB-1 positive and oestrogen receptor positive nuclei were estimated in fields of vision sampled systematically from the entire specimen and from the whole tumour area of one "representative" cross-section. RESULTS--No correlation was found between the oestrogen receptor and MIB-1 indices and the duration of formalin fixation. The estimated MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor indices in tissue sampled systematically from the entire tumour were closely correlated with estimates obtained in a "representative" section. The intra- and interobserver correlation of the MIB-1 index was good, although a slight systematical error at the second assessment of the intraobserver study was noted. CONCLUSION--Quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content and proliferative activity are not significantly influenced by the period of fixation in formalin, varying from less than four hours to more than 48 hours. The MIB-1 and the oestrogen receptor indices obtained in a "representative" section do not deviate significantly from average indices determined in tissue samples from the entire tumour. Finally, the estimation of MIB-1 index is reproducible, justifying its routine use. PMID:7629289

  11. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid–Activated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X. Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H. Eric

    2008-01-01

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 Å crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix α10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation. PMID:18798693

  12. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  13. Structure-activity relationships of strychnine analogs at glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Amal M Y; Heller, Eberhard; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Jensen, Anders A; Zlotos, Darius P

    2014-08-01

    Nine strychnine derivatives including neostrychnine, strychnidine, isostrychnine, 21,22-dihydro-21-hydroxy-22-oxo-strychnine, and several hydrogenated analogs were synthesized, and their antagonistic activities at human α1 and α1β glycine receptors were evaluated. Isostrychnine has shown the best pharmacological profile exhibiting an IC50 value of 1.6 μM at α1 glycine receptors and 3.7-fold preference towards the α1 subtype. SAR Analysis indicates that the lactam moiety and the C(21) = C(22) bond in strychnine are essential structural features for its high antagonistic potency at glycine receptors. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  14. Polyphenols in alcoholic beverages activating constitutive androstane receptor CAR.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ruiqing; Yasuoka, Akihito; Kamei, Asuka; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Rogi, Tomohiro; Taieishi, Norifumi; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Kiso, Yoshionobu; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor CAR is a xenosensing nuclear receptor that can be activated by natural polyphenols such as flavonoids and catechins. We examined alcoholic beverage phytochemicals for their ability to activate CAR. HepG2 cells were transfected with CAR expression vector and its reporter gene, and then treated with trans-resveratrol, ellagic acid, β-caryophyllene, myrcene, and xanthohumol. A luciferase assay revealed that ellagic acid and trans-resveratrol activated both human and mouse CAR. Since CAR regulates many genes involved in energy metabolism, the possibility exists that these polyphenols would reduce the risk of certain alcohol-induced metabolic disorders with the help of CAR.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Jihan; Badr, Mostafa

    2011-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, function as transcription factors and modulators of gene expression. These actions allow PPARs to regulate a variety of biological processes and to play a significant role in several diseases and conditions. The current literature describes frequently opposing and paradoxical roles for the three PPAR isotypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ and PPARγ, in cancer. While some studies have implicated PPARs in the promotion and development of cancer, others, in contrast, have presented evidence for a protective role for these receptors against cancer. In some tissues, the expression level of these receptors and/or their activation correlates with a positive outcome against cancer, while, in other tissue types, their expression and activation have the opposite effect. These disparate findings raise the possibility of (i) PPAR receptor-independent effects, including effects on receptors other than PPARs by the utilized ligands; (ii) cancer stage-specific effect; and/or (iii) differences in essential ligand-related pharmacokinetic considerations. In this review, we highlight the latest available studies on the role of the various PPAR isotypes in cancer in several major organs and present challenges as well as promising opportunities in the field. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Modular Activating Receptors in Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Richard; Call, Matthew E

    2017-03-14

    Triggering of cell-mediated immunity is largely dependent on the recognition of foreign or abnormal molecules by a myriad of cell surface-bound receptors. Many activating immune receptors do not possess any intrinsic signaling capacity but instead form noncovalent complexes with one or more dimeric signaling modules that communicate with a common set of kinases to initiate intracellular information-transfer pathways. This modular architecture, where the ligand binding and signaling functions are detached from one another, is a common theme that is widely employed throughout the innate and adaptive arms of immune systems. The evolutionary advantages of this highly adaptable platform for molecular recognition are visible in the variety of ligand-receptor interactions that can be linked to common signaling pathways, the diversification of receptor modules in response to pathogen challenges, and the amplification of cellular responses through incorporation of multiple signaling motifs. Here we provide an overview of the major classes of modular activating immune receptors and outline the current state of knowledge regarding how these receptors assemble, recognize their ligands, and ultimately trigger intracellular signal transduction pathways that activate immune cell effector functions.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and cancer: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Jihan; Badr, Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, function as transcription factors and modulators of gene expression. These actions allow PPARs to regulate a variety of biological processes and to play a significant role in several diseases and conditions. The current literature describes frequently opposing and paradoxical roles for the three PPAR isotypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ and PPARγ, in cancer. While some studies have implicated PPARs in the promotion and development of cancer, others, in contrast, have presented evidence for a protective role for these receptors against cancer. In some tissues, the expression level of these receptors and/or their activation correlates with a positive outcome against cancer, while, in other tissue types, their expression and activation have the opposite effect. These disparate findings raise the possibility of (i) PPAR receptor-independent effects, including effects on receptors other than PPARs by the utilized ligands; (ii) cancer stage-specific effect; and/or (iii) differences in essential ligand-related pharmacokinetic considerations. In this review, we highlight the latest available studies on the role of the various PPAR isotypes in cancer in several major organs and present challenges as well as promising opportunities in the field. PMID:21449912

  18. Active NMDA glutamate receptors are expressed by mammalian osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Leon; Itzstein, Cécile; Cheynel, Hervé; Delmas, Pierre D; Chenu, Chantal

    1999-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system, has recently been identified in bone. In this study, we have investigated whether NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts have an electrophysiological activity. Using the patch clamp technique two agonists of the NMDA receptor, L-glutamate (Glu) and NMDA, were shown to activate whole-cell currents recorded in isolated rabbit osteoclasts. The current-voltage (I-V) relationships of the currents induced by Glu (IGlu) and NMDA (INMDA) were studied using Mg2+-free solutions. The agonist-induced currents had a linear I-V relationship with a reversal potential near 0 mV, as expected for a voltage independent and non-selective cationic current. IGlu and INMDA were sensitive to specific blockers of NMDA subtype glutamate receptors, such as magnesium ions, (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a, d]cyclohepten -5,10-imine (MK-801) and 1-(1,2-diphenylethyl) piperidine (DEP). The block of IGlu and INMDA by these specific antagonists was voltage dependent, strong for negative potentials (inward current) and absent for positive potentials (outward current). These results demonstrate that NMDA receptors are functional in rabbit osteoclasts, and that their electrophysiological and pharmacological properties in these cells are similar to those documented for neuronal cells. Active NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts may represent a new target for regulating bone resorption. PMID:10373688

  19. Pronociceptive response elicited by TRPA1 receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Andrade, E L; Luiz, A P; Ferreira, J; Calixto, J B

    2008-03-18

    Ankyrin-repeat transient receptor potential 1 (TRPA1) is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and it is found in sensory neurons. In the present study, we found that TRPA1 receptor activation with allyl isothiocyanate or cinnamaldehyde caused dose-dependent spontaneous nociception when injected into the mouse hind paw. Very similar results were obtained when stimulating transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors with capsaicin. Pretreatment with the TRP receptor antagonist Ruthenium Red (1 nmol/paw) inhibited capsaicin-(0.1 nmol/paw) and allyl isothiocyanate-(1 nmol/paw) induced nociceptive responses. However, the nonselective TRPV1 receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 nmol/paw) and the selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist SB 366791 (1 nmol/paw) only attenuated capsaicin-induced nociception. In contrast, the intrathecal treatment with TRPA1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (2.5 nmol/site) and the degeneration of the subset of primary afferent fibers sensitive to capsaicin significantly reduced allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception. Consequently to TRPA1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment there was a marked decrease of the expression of TRPA1 receptor in both sciatic nervous and spinal cord segments. Moreover, capsaicin and allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception were not significantly changed by chemical sympathectomy produced by guanethidine. The previous degranulation of mast cells by compound 48/80 and treatment with antagonist H(1) receptor antagonist pyrilamine (400 microg/paw) both significantly inhibited the capsaicin- and allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception. The selective NK(1) receptor antagonist N(2)-[(4R)-4-hydroxy-1-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) carbony-1-L-prolyl]-N-methyl-N-phenylmethyl-3-2-(2-naphtyl)-L-alaninamide (10 nmol/paw) reduced either capsaicin- or allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception. Collectively, the present findings demonstrate that the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate produces a

  20. Motogenic and morphogenic activity of epithelial receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases play essential roles in morphogenesis and differentiation of epithelia. Here we examined various tyrosine kinase receptors, which are preferentially expressed in epithelia (c-met, c- ros, c-neu, and the keratin growth factor [KGF] receptor), for their capacity to induce cell motility and branching morphogenesis of epithelial cells. We exchanged the ligand-binding domain of these receptors by the ectodomain of trkA and could thus control signaling by the new ligand, NGF. We demonstrate here that the tyrosine kinases of c- met, c-ros, c-neu, the KGF receptor, and trkA, but not the insulin receptor, induced scattering and increased motility of kidney epithelial cells in tissue culture. Mutational analysis suggests that SHC binding is essential for scattering and increased cell motility induced by trkA. The induction of motility in epithelial cells is thus an important feature of various receptor tyrosine kinases, which in vivo play a role in embryogenesis and metastasis. In contrast, only the c-met receptor promoted branching morphogenesis of kidney epithelial cells in three-dimensional matrices, which resemble the formation of tubular epithelia in development. Interestingly, the ability of c-met to induce morphogenesis could be transferred to trkA, when in a novel receptor hybrid COOH-terminal sequences of c-met (including Y14 to Y16) were fused to the trkA kinase domain. These data demonstrate that tubulogenesis of epithelia is a restricted activity of tyrosine kinases, as yet only demonstrated for the c-met receptor. We predict the existence of specific substrates that mediate this morphogenesis signal. PMID:8655582

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor activation and inactivation in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R H; Leach, K L; La Forest, A C; O'Toole, T E; Wagner, R; Pratt, W B

    1981-01-10

    Although glucocorticoids are not cytolytic for and do not inhibit the growth of the IM-9 line of cultured human lymphoblasts, these cells have a high steroid-binding capacity. We have used IM-9 cells in order to examine whether unoccupied glucocorticoid receptors are inactivated and activated in intact cells. when IM-9 cells are incubated in glucose-free medium in a nitrogen atmosphere, both their ability to bind triamcinolone acetonide and their ATP levels decline and, when glucose and oxygen are reintroduced, ATP levels and receptor activity return. The specific glucocorticoid-binding activity of cytosol prepared from cells exposed to various degrees of energy limitation is directly correlated with the ATP content. Receptor activation in intact cells is rapid and independent of protein synthesis. Cytosol prepared from inactivated cells cannot be activated by addition of ATP. The inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors that occurs when cytosol from normal IM-9 cells is incubated at 25 degrees C is inhibited by molybdate, vanadate, fluoride, ATP, and several other nucleotides. The experiments with intact human lymphoblasts suggest that assays of specific glucocorticoid-binding capacity do not necessarily reflect the cellular content of receptor protein.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Tim

    2008-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a drug/fatty acid-activated trans cription factor involved in the starvation response, and is thus relevant to the ketogenic diet (KD). This article summarizes research indicating the role of PPARalpha in central and peripheral nervous system function with particular reference to downstream targets relevant to anticonvulsant action.

  3. Novel benzopolycyclic amines with NMDA receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Sureda, Francesc X; Vázquez, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    A new series of benzopolycyclic amines active as NMDA receptor antagonists were synthesized. Most of them exhibited increased activity compared with related analogues previously published. All the tested compounds were more potent than clinically approved amantadine and one of them displayed a lower IC50 value than memantine, an anti-Alzheimer's approved drug.

  4. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  5. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  6. Formation and activation by phosphorylation of activin receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Willis, S A; Zimmerman, C M; Li, L I; Mathews, L S

    1996-04-01

    Activin is a protein growth and differentiation factor that initiates intracellular events through the activation of a complex of transmembrane protein serine kinases. Two subfamilies of receptor serine kinases, type I and type II, have been identified, and both receptor types may be required to generate a transmembrane signal. Investigation of the interaction between various activin receptors (ActRs) revealed that ActRs I and II could exist in a stable complex and that formation of that complex between transiently overexpressed molecules was not regulated by ligand. Analysis of phosphorylation suggested that activin induced phosphorylation of receptor I, probably at residues within a conserved glycine and serine-rich sequence in the juxtamembrane region referred to as the GS domain. Phosphorylation of the GS domain was dependent upon a functional ActRII. Introduction of an activin type I receptor, ALK4, into the mink lung epithelial cell line, L17, conferred activin responsiveness on those cells. Mutation of specific combinations of serines and threonines in the core sequence of the ALK4 GS domain to alanine rendered that receptor incompetent for signaling. Mutation of the same sets of residues to glutamic acid produced molecules that supported activin signaling but that did not display elevated basal signaling anticipated for a constitutively active receptor. However, mutation of a threonine residue in the carboxy-terminal half of the GS domain, T206, to glutamic acid yielded receptors with constitutive activity. Taken together, these results support a role for phosphorylation of type I ActRs in the generation of a biological signal.

  7. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and human Mrgpr family members. This expansion of our understanding by which proteases interact with GPCRs redefines the concept of what constitutes a protease-activated receptor. The findings also implicate proteases as ligands to members of this orphan receptor family while providing new insights into how cysteine proteases contribute to itch. PMID:26216096

  8. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  9. Activation of Xenobiotic Receptors: Driving into the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haishan; Wang, Hongbing

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Xenobiotic receptors (XRs) play pivotal roles in regulating the expression of genes that determine the clearance and detoxification of xenobiotics, such as drugs and environmental chemicals. Recently, it has become increasingly evident that most XRs shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus, and activation of such receptors is directly associated with xenobiotic-induced nuclear import. Areas covered in this review The scope of this review covers research literature that discusses nuclear translocation and activation of XRs, as well as unpublished data generated from this laboratory. Specific emphasis is given to the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the pregnane X receptor, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. What the readers will gain A number of molecular chaperons presumably associated with cellular localization of XRs have been identified. Primary hepatocyte cultures have been established as a unique model retaining inactive CAR in the cytoplasm. Moreover, several splicing variants of human CAR exhibit altered cellular localization and chemical activation. Take home message Nuclear accumulation is an essential step in the activation of XRs. Although great strides have been made, much remains to be understood concerning the mechanisms underlying intracellular localization and trafficking of XRs, which involve both direct ligand-binding and indirect pathways. PMID:20113149

  10. Preclinical pharmacology of bilastine, a new selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist: receptor selectivity and in vitro antihistaminic activity.

    PubMed

    Corcóstegui, Reyes; Labeaga, Luis; Innerárity, Ana; Berisa, Agustin; Orjales, Aurelio

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to establish the receptor selectivity and antihistaminic activity of bilastine, a new selective antihistamine receptor antagonist. In vitro experiments were conducted using a receptor binding screening panel and guinea-pig and rat tissues. Antihistaminic activity was determined using H1 receptor binding studies and in vitro H1 antagonism studies conducted in guinea-pig tissues and human cell lines. Receptor selectivity was established using a receptor binding screening panel and a receptor antagonism screening conducted in guinea-pig, rat and rabbit tissues. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators was determined through the Schultz-Dale reaction in sensitised guinea-pig ileum. Bilastine binds to histamine H1-receptors as indicated by its displacement of [3H]-pyrilamine from H1-receptors expressed in guinea-pig cerebellum and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. The studies conducted on guinea-pig smooth muscle demonstrated the capability of bilastine to antagonise H1-receptors. Bilastine is selective for histamine H1-receptors as shown in receptor-binding screening conducted to determine the binding capacity of bilastine to 30 different receptors. The specificity of its H1-receptor antagonistic activity was also demonstrated in a series of in vitro experiments conducted on guinea-pig and rat tissues. The results of these studies confirmed the lack of significant antagonism against serotonin, bradykinin, leukotriene D4, calcium, muscarinic M3-receptors, alpha1-adrenoceptors, beta2-adrenoceptors, and H2- and H3-receptors. The results of the in vitro Schultz-Dale reaction demonstrated that bilastine also has anti-inflammatory activity. These preclinical studies provide evidence that bilastine has H1- antihistamine activity, with high specificity for H1-receptors, and poor or no affinity for other receptors. Bilastine has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Androgen receptor serine 81 mediates Pin1 interaction and activity

    PubMed Central

    La Montagna, Raffaele; Caligiuri, Isabella; Maranta, Pasquale; Lucchetti, Chiara; Esposito, Luca; Paggi, Marco G.; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio; Giordano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Hormone-dependent tumors are characterized by deregulated activity of specific steroid receptors, allowing aberrant expression of many genes involved in cancer initiation, progression and metastasis. In prostate cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) protein has pivotal functions, and over the years it has been the target of different drugs. AR is a nuclear receptor whose activity is regulated by a phosphorylation mechanism controlled by hormone and growth factors. Following phosphorylation, AR interacts with many cofactors that closely control its function. Among such cofactors, Pin1 is a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that is involved in the control of protein phosphorylation and has a prognostic value in prostate cancer. In the present study, we demonstrate that ARSer81 is involved in the interaction with Pin1, and that this interaction is important for the transcriptional activity of AR. Since Pin1 expression positively correlates with tumor grade, our results suggest that Pin1 can participate in this process by modulating AR function. PMID:22894932

  12. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  13. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  14. Effects of kappa-opioid receptor activation on myocardium.

    PubMed

    Pyle, W G; Lester, J W; Hofmann, P A

    2001-08-01

    Kappa-opioid receptor stimulation of the heart transiently increases twitch amplitude and decreases Ca2+-dependent actomyosin Mg2+-ATPase activity through an undetermined mechanism. One purpose of the present study was to determine if the increase in twitch amplitude is due to changes in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. We also wanted to determine if kappa-opioid receptor activation alters maximum actin-myosin ATPase activity and Ca2+ sensitivity of tension in a way consistent with protein kinase A or protein kinase C (PKC) action. Rat hearts were treated with U50,488H (a kappa-opioid receptor agonist), phenylephrine plus propranolol (alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation), isoproterenol (a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist), or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, receptor independent activator of PKC) or were untreated (control), and myofibrils were isolated. U50,488H, phenylephrine plus propranolol, and PMA all decreased maximum Ca2+-dependent actomyosin Mg2+-ATPase activity, whereas isoproterenol treatment increased maximum Ca2+-dependent actomyosin Mg2+- ATPase activity. Untreated myofibrils exposed to exogenous PKC-epsilon, but not PKC-delta, decreased maximum actomyosin Mg2+-ATPase activity. Langendorff-perfused hearts treated with U50,488H, phenylephrine plus propranolol, or isoproterenol had significantly higher ventricular ATP levels compared with control hearts. PKC inhibitors abolished the effects of U50,488H on Ca2+-dependent actomyosin Mg2+-ATPase activity and myocardial ATP levels. U50,488H and PMA treatment of isolated ventricular myocytes increased Ca2+ sensitivity of isometric tension compared with control myocytes at pH 7.0. The U50,488H-dependent increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of tension was retained at pH 6.6. Together, these findings are consistent with the hypotheses that 1) the positive inotropy associated with kappa-opioid receptor activation may be due in part to a PKC-mediated increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity of tension and 2) the

  15. [Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) and insulin sensitivity: experimental studies].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, M M; Haluzík, M

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which act as transcription factors. PPARs affect expression of many genes, which products are involved in lipid and carbohydrates metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation and numerous other processes. Three different subtypes (isoforms) of PPARs have been identified: PPAR-alpha, PPAR-gamma, PPAR-delta. PPAR-alpha receptors play an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism: they decrease circulating fatty acids and triglyceride levels. Recently, the ability of PPAR-alpha receptors to improve insulin sensitivity in rodent model of insulin resistance have been documented and numerous studies have focused on this topic. One of the possible mechanisms of its action on the insulin sensitivity is lowering of ectopic lipids in liver and muscle tissues with subsequent heightening of insulin signalling cascade. Here we summarize the experimental studies focusing on the role of PPAR-alpha in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and discuss possible mechanisms involved.

  16. Interfering with mineralocorticoid receptor activation: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone is a potent mineralocorticoid produced by the adrenal gland. Aldosterone binds to and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in a plethora of tissues, but the cardiovascular actions of aldosterone are of primary interest clinically. Although MR antagonists were developed as antihypertensive agents, they are now considered to be important therapeutic options for patients with heart failure. Specifically, blocking only the MR has proven to be a difficult task because of its similarity to other steroid receptors, including the androgen and progesterone receptors. This lack of specificity caused the use of the first-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to be fraught with difficulty because of the side effects produced by drug administration. However, in recent years, several advances have been made that could potentially increase the clinical use of agents that inhibit the actions of aldosterone. These will be discussed here along with some examples of the beneficial effects of these new therapeutic agents. PMID:25165560

  17. Neurotransmitter GABA activates muscle but not α7 nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Leonardo; Bergé, Ignacio; Bravo, Matías; Esandi, María Del Carmen; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are neurotransmitter-activated ion channels involved in synaptic and extrasynaptic transmission in the brain and are also present in non-neuronal cells. As GABAA and nicotinic receptors (nAChR) belong to this family, we explored by macroscopic and single-channel recordings whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA has the ability to activate excitatory nAChRs. GABA differentially activates nAChR subtypes. It activates muscle nAChRs, with maximal peak currents of about 10% of those elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) and 15-fold higher EC50 with respect to ACh. At the single-channel level, the weak agonism is revealed by the requirement of 20-fold higher concentration of GABA for detectable channel openings, a major population of brief openings, and absence of clusters of openings when compared with ACh. Mutations at key residues of the principal binding-site face of muscle nAChRs (αY190 and αG153) affect GABA activation similarly as ACh activation, whereas a mutation at the complementary face (εG57) shows a selective effect for GABA. Studies with subunit-lacking receptors show that GABA can activate muscle nAChRs through the α/δ interface. Interestingly, single-channel activity elicited by GABA is similar to that elicited by ACh in gain-of-function nAChR mutants associated to congenital myasthenic syndromes, which could be important in the progression of the disorders due to steady exposure to serum GABA. In contrast, GABA cannot elicit single-channel or macroscopic currents of α7 or the chimeric α7-serotonin-type 3 receptor, a feature important for preserving an adequate excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain as well as for avoiding activation of non-neuronal receptors by serum GABA. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  19. Extracellular loop 2 in the FSH receptor is crucial for ligand mediated receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Dupakuntla, Madhavi; Pathak, Bhakti; Roy, Binita Sur; Mahale, Smita D

    2012-10-15

    The present study aims to determine the role of the specific residues of the extracellular loops (ELs) of the FSH receptor (FSHR) in hormone binding and receptor activation. By substituting the sequences of each of the ELs of human FSHR with those of the luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR), we generated three mutant constructs where the three ELs were individually replaced. A fourth construct had all the three substituted ELs. The receptor expression and hormone binding ability of the mutants were comparable to that of the wild type. Hormone-induced signaling and internalization were lower in the EL2 substitution mutant (EL2M). In this mutant, the EL2 of FSHR was substituted with the corresponding loop of LH/CGR. Interestingly, homology modeling revealed a change in the orientation of EL2 in the mutant receptor. Thus, disruption of EL2 affected overall receptor function, suggesting the role of FSHR specific residues of the loop in ligand mediated signaling.

  20. Modulation of Receptor Phosphorylation Contributes to Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor α by Dehydroepiandrosterone and Other Peroxisome Proliferators

    PubMed Central

    Tamasi, Viola; Miller, Kristy K. Michael; Ripp, Sharon L.; Vila, Ermin; Geoghagen, Thomas E.; Prough, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a C19 human adrenal steroid, activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in vivo but does not ligand-activate PPARα in transient transfection experiments. We demonstrate that DHEA regulates PPARα action by altering both the levels and phosphorylation status of the receptor. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) were transiently transfected with the expression plasmid encoding PPARα and a plasmid containing two copies of fatty acyl coenzyme oxidase (FACO) peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor responsive element consensus oligonucleotide in a luciferase reporter gene. Nafenopin treatment increased reporter gene activity in this system, whereas DHEA treatment did not. Okadaic acid significantly decreased nafenopin-induced reporter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Okadaic acid treatment of primary rat hepatocytes decreased both DHEA- and nafenopin-induced FACO activity in primary rat hepatocytes. DHEA induced both PPARα mRNA and protein levels, as well as PP2A message in primary rat hepatocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the serines at positions 12 and 21 were rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment with DHEA and nafenopin. Results using specific protein phosphatase inhibitors suggested that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is responsible for DHEA action, and protein phosphatase 1 might be involved in nafenopin induction. Mutation of serines at position 6, 12, and 21 to an uncharged alanine residue significantly increased transcriptional activity, whereas mutation to negative charged aspartate residues (mimicking receptor phosphorylation) decreased transcriptional activity. DHEA action involves induction of PPARα mRNA and protein levels as well as increased PPARα transcriptional activity through decreasing receptor phosphorylation at serines in the AF1 region. PMID:18079279

  1. Memory retrieval requires ongoing protein synthesis and NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joëlle; Gamache, Karine; Schneider, Rilla; Nader, Karim

    2015-02-11

    Whereas consolidation and reconsolidation are considered dynamic processes requiring protein synthesis, memory retrieval has long been considered a passive readout of previously established plasticity. However, previous findings suggest that memory retrieval may be more dynamic than previously thought. This study therefore aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying memory retrieval in the rat. Infusion of protein synthesis inhibitors (rapamycin or anisomycin) in the amygdala 10 min before memory retrieval transiently impaired auditory fear memory expression, suggesting ongoing protein synthesis is required to enable memory retrieval. We then investigated the role of protein synthesis in NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking. Coinfusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist (ifenprodil) or infusion of an AMPA receptor endocytosis inhibitor (GluA23Y) before rapamycin prevented this memory impairment. Furthermore, rapamycin transiently decreased GluA1 levels at the postsynaptic density (PSD), but did not affect extrasynaptic sites. This effect at the PSD was prevented by an infusion of GluA23Y before rapamycin. Together, these data show that ongoing protein synthesis is required before memory retrieval is engaged, and suggest that this protein synthesis may be involved in the NMDAR activity-mediated trafficking of AMPA receptors that takes place during memory retrieval.

  2. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  3. Lysophospholipid activation of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tetsuji; Chun, Jerold

    2008-01-01

    One of the major lipid biology discoveries in last decade was the broad range of physiological activities of lysophospholipids that have been attributed to the actions of lysophospholipid receptors. The most well characterized lysophospholipids are lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Documented cellular effects of these lipid mediators include growth-factor-like effects on cells, such as proliferation, survival, migration, adhesion, and differentiation. The mechanisms for these actions are attributed to a growing family of 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Their pathophysiological actions include immune modulation, neuropathic pain modulation, platelet aggregation, wound healing, vasopressor activity, and angiogenesis. Here we provide a brief introduction to receptor-mediated lysophospholipid signaling and physiology, and then discuss potential therapeutic roles in human diseases.

  4. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and shock state.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Meli, Rosaria

    2006-12-28

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that are related to retinoid, steroid, and thyroid hormone receptors. Three isotypes of PPARs have been identified: alpha, beta/delta, and gamma, encoded by different genes and distributed in various tissues. PPARs are implicated in the control of inflammatory responses and in energy homeostasis and, thus, can be defined as metabolic and anti-inflammatory transcription factors. They exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the induction of proinflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, and extracellular matrix proteins, or by stimulating the production of anti-inflammatory molecules. Moreover, PPARs modulate the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of immune cells. This review presents the current state of knowledge regarding the involvement of PPARs in the control of inflammatory response, and their potential therapeutic applications in several types of shock, as well as hemorrhagic, septic, and nonseptic shock.

  6. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  7. In Vivo Imaging of Nuclear Receptor Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dart, D Alwyn; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors drive key processes during development, reproduction, metabolism, and disease. In order to understand and analyze, as well as manipulate, their actions it is imperative that we are able to study them in whole animals and in a spatiotemporal manner. The increasing repertoire of transgenic animals, expressing reporter genes driven by a specific nuclear receptor, enables us to do this. Use of luciferase reporter genes is the method of choice of many researchers as it is well tolerated, relatively easy to use, and robust. Further, luciferase lends itself to the process as it can penetrate tissue and can be manipulated to degrade rapidly thus allowing a dynamic response. However, limited resolution, lack of quantitation, and the largely two-dimensional images acquired make it desirable to support results using ex vivo imaging and enzymatic and/or immunohistochemical analysis of dissected tissue. As well as enabling the visualization of nuclear receptor signaling in wild-type animals, crossing these mouse models with models of disease will provide invaluable information on how such signaling is dysregulated during disease progression, and how we may manipulate nuclear receptor signaling in therapy. The use of in vivo imaging therefore provides the power to determine where and when in development, aging, and disease nuclear receptors are active and how ligands or receptor modulators affect this.

  8. Protease-activated receptors and prostaglandins in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Terence; Henry, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G protein-coupled receptors. Signalling through PARs typically involves the cleavage of an extracellular region of the receptor by endogenous or exogenous proteases, which reveals a tethered ligand sequence capable of auto-activating the receptor. A considerable body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years supporting a prominent role for PARs in a variety of human physiological and pathophysiological processes, and thus substantial attention has been directed towards developing drug-like molecules that activate or block PARs via non-proteolytic pathways. PARs are widely expressed within the respiratory tract, and their activation appears to exert significant modulatory influences on the level of bronchomotor tone, as well as on the inflammatory processes associated with a range of respiratory tract disorders. Nevertheless, there is debate as to whether the principal response to PAR activation is an augmentation or attenuation of airways inflammation. In this context, an important action of PAR activators may be to promote the generation and release of prostanoids, such as prostglandin E2, which have well-established anti-inflammatory effects in the lung. In this review, we primarily focus on the relationship between PARs, prostaglandins and inflammatory processes in the lung, and highlight their potential role in selected respiratory tract disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19845685

  9. Buprenorphine-induced antinociception is mediated by mu-opioid receptors and compromised by concomitant activation of opioid receptor-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Lutfy, Kabirullah; Eitan, Shoshana; Bryant, Camron D; Yang, Yu C; Saliminejad, Nazli; Walwyn, Wendy; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Carroll, F Ivy; Maidment, Nigel T; Evans, Christopher J

    2003-11-12

    Buprenorphine is a mixed opioid receptor agonist-antagonist used clinically for maintenance therapy in opiate addicts and pain management. Dose-response curves for buprenorphine-induced antinociception display ceiling effects or are bell shaped, which have been attributed to the partial agonist activity of buprenorphine at opioid receptors. Recently, buprenorphine has been shown to activate opioid receptor-like (ORL-1) receptors, also known as OP4 receptors. Here we demonstrate that buprenorphine, but not morphine, activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt via ORL-1 receptors. Because the ORL-1 receptor agonist orphanin FQ/nociceptin blocks opioid-induced antinociception, we tested the hypothesis that buprenorphine-induced antinociception might be compromised by concomitant activation of ORL-1 receptors. In support of this hypothesis, the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine, but not morphine, was markedly enhanced in mice lacking ORL-1 receptors using the tail-flick assay. Additional support for a modulatory role for ORL-1 receptors in buprenorphine-induced antinociception was that coadministration of J-113397, an ORL-1 receptor antagonist, enhanced the antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking ORL-1 receptors. The ORL-1 antagonist also eliminated the bell-shaped dose-response curve for buprenorphine-induced antinociception in wild-type mice. Although buprenorphine has been shown to interact with multiple opioid receptors, mice lacking micro-opioid receptors failed to exhibit antinociception after buprenorphine administration. Our results indicate that the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine in mice is micro-opioid receptor-mediated yet severely compromised by concomitant activation of ORL-1 receptors.

  10. GIPC interacts with the beta1-adrenergic receptor and regulates beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liaoyuan A; Chen, Wei; Martin, Negin P; Whalen, Erin J; Premont, Richard T; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2003-07-11

    Beta1-adrenergic receptors, expressed at high levels in the human heart, have a carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif that can directly interact with PDZ domain-containing proteins. Using the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl terminus as bait, we identified the novel beta1-adrenergic receptor-binding partner GIPC in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library. Here we demonstrate that the PDZ domain-containing protein, GIPC, co-immunoprecipitates with the beta1-adrenergic receptor in COS-7 cells. Essential for this interaction is the Ser residue of the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif. Our data also demonstrate that beta1-adrenergic receptor stimulation activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK1/2. beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by pertussis toxin, implicating Gi, and was substantially decreased by the expression of GIPC. Expression of GIPC had no observable effect on beta1-adrenergic receptor sequestration or receptor-mediated cAMP accumulation. This GIPC effect was specific for the beta1-adrenergic receptor and was dependent on an intact PDZ binding motif. These data suggest that GIPC can regulate beta1-adrenergic receptor-stimulated, Gi-mediated, ERK activation while having no effect on receptor internalization or Gs-mediated cAMP signaling.

  11. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Covalent agonists for studying G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Dietmar; Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Hiller, Christine; Zhang, Cheng; Hübner, Harald; Kobilka, Brian K.; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide important insights into the architecture and function of these important drug targets. However, the crystallization of GPCRs in active states is particularly challenging, requiring the formation of stable and conformationally homogeneous ligand-receptor complexes. Native hormones, neurotransmitters, and synthetic agonists that bind with low affinity are ineffective at stabilizing an active state for crystallogenesis. To promote structural studies on the pharmacologically highly relevant class of aminergic GPCRs, we here present the development of covalently binding molecular tools activating Gs-, Gi-, and Gq-coupled receptors. The covalent agonists are derived from the monoamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, and histamine, and they were accessed using a general and versatile synthetic strategy. We demonstrate that the tool compounds presented herein display an efficient covalent binding mode and that the respective covalent ligand-receptor complexes activate G proteins comparable to the natural neurotransmitters. A crystal structure of the β2-adrenoreceptor in complex with a covalent noradrenaline analog and a conformationally selective antibody (nanobody) verified that these agonists can be used to facilitate crystallogenesis. PMID:25006259

  13. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  14. Regulation of Liver Energy Balance by the Nuclear Receptors Farnesoid X Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Moore, David D

    2017-01-01

    The liver undergoes major changes in substrate utilization and metabolic output over the daily feeding and fasting cycle. These changes occur acutely in response to hormones such as insulin and glucagon, with rapid changes in signaling pathways mediated by protein phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. They are also reflected in chronic alterations in gene expression in response to nutrient-sensitive transcription factors. Among these, the nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) provide an intriguing, coordinated response to maintain energy balance in the liver. FXR is activated in the fed state by bile acids returning to the liver, while PPARα is activated in the fasted state in response to the free fatty acids produced by adipocyte lipolysis or possibly other signals. Key Messages: Previous studies indicate that FXR and PPARα have opposing effects on each other's primary targets in key metabolic pathways including gluconeogenesis. Our more recent work shows that these 2 nuclear receptors coordinately regulate autophagy: FXR suppresses this pathway of nutrient and energy recovery, while PPARα activates it. Another recent study indicates that FXR activates the complement and coagulation pathway, while earlier studies identify this as a negative target of PPARα. Since secretion is a very energy- and nutrient-intensive process for hepatocytes, it is possible that FXR licenses it in the nutrient-rich fed state, while PPARα represses it to spare resources in the fasted state. Energy balance is a potential connection linking FXR and PPARα regulation of autophagy and secretion, 2 seemingly unrelated aspects of hepatocyte function. FXR and PPARα act coordinately to promote energy balance and homeostasis in the liver by regulating autophagy and potentially protein secretion. It is quite likely that their impact extends to additional pathways relevant to hepatic energy balance, and

  15. The Search for Endogenous Activators of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh P.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    In its simplest aspect, this review is an attempt to describe the major ligand classes of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). A grander objective is to provide models that may help define the physiological activator or “endogenous ligand” of the AHR. We begin by presenting evidence that supports a developmental function for the AHR. This is followed by proposing mechanisms by which an endogenous ligand and consequent AHR activation might be important during normal physiology and development. With this background, we then present a survey of the known xenobiotic, endogenous, dietary and “un-conventional” activators of the AHR. When possible, this includes information about their induction potency, receptor binding affinity and potential for exposure. Because of the essential function of the AHR in embryonic development, we discuss the candidacy of each of these compounds as physiologically important activators. PMID:18076143

  16. Dietary modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Marion-Letellier, R; Déchelotte, P; Iacucci, M; Ghosh, S

    2009-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor that regulates intestinal inflammation. PPAR gamma is highly expressed in the colon and can be activated by various dietary ligands. A number of fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids or eicosanoids are considered as endogenous PPAR gamma activators. Nevertheless, other nutrients such as glutamine, spicy food or flavonoids are also able to activate PPAR gamma. As PPAR gamma plays a key role in bacterial induced inflammation, anti-inflammatory properties of probiotics may be mediated through PPAR gamma. The aims of the present review are to discuss of the potential roles of dietary compounds in modulating intestinal inflammation through PPAR gamma.

  17. Identification of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 as a receptor activated by OxPAPC.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongsong; Mouillesseaux, Kevin P; Montoya, Dennis; Cruz, Daniel; Gharavi, Navid; Dun, Martin; Koroniak, Lukasz; Berliner, Judith A

    2006-03-17

    Oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (OxPAPC), which has been shown to accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions and other sites of chronic inflammation, activates endothelial cells (EC) to bind monocytes by activation of endothelial beta1 integrin and subsequent deposition of fibronectin on the apical surface. Our previous studies suggest this function of OxPAPC is mediated via a Gs protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). PEIPC (1-palmitoyl-2-epoxyisoprostane E2-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) is the most active lipid in OxPAPC that activates this pathway. We screened a number of candidate GPCRs for their interaction with OxPAPC and PEIPC, using a reporter gene assay; we identified prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 and prostaglandin D2 receptor DP as responsive to OxPAPC. We focused on EP2, which is expressed in ECs, monocytes, and macrophages. OxPAPC component PEIPC, but not POVPC, activated EP2 with an EC50 of 108.6 nmol/L. OxPAPC and PEIPC were also able to compete with PGE2 for binding to EP2 in a ligand-binding assay. The EP2 specific agonist butaprost was shown to mimic the effect of OxPAPC on the activation of beta1 integrin and the stimulation of monocyte binding to endothelial cells. Butaprost also mimicked the effect of OxPAPC on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 in monocyte-derived cells. EP2 antagonist AH6809 blocked the activation of EP2 by OxPAPC in HEK293 cells and blocked the interleukin-10 response to PEIPC in monocytic THP-1 cells. These results suggest that EP2 functions as a receptor for OxPAPC and PEIPC, either as the phospholipid ester or the released fatty acid, in both endothelial cells and macrophages.

  18. Silencing of the constitutive activity of the dopamine D1B receptor. Reciprocal mutations between D1 receptor subtypes delineate residues underlying activation properties.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, S; Jarvie, K R; Severynse, D M; Caron, M G; Tiberi, M

    1996-11-08

    Recently, we have shown that the dopamine D1B/D5 receptor displays binding and coupling properties that are reminiscent of those of the constitutively activated G protein-coupled receptors when compared with the related D1A/D1 receptor subtype (Tiberi, M., and Caron, M. G. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 27925-27931). The carboxyl-terminal region of the third cytoplasmic loop of several G protein-coupled receptors has been demonstrated to be important for the regulation of the equilibrium between inactive and active receptor conformations. In this cytoplasmic region, the primary structure of dopamine D1A and D1B receptors differs by only two residues: Phe264/Arg266 are present in D1A receptor compared with Ile288/Lys290 in the D1B receptor. To investigate whether these structural differences could account for the distinct binding and coupling properties of these dopamine receptor subtypes, we swapped the variant residues located in the carboxyl-terminal region by site-directed mutagenesis. The exchange of the D1A receptor residue Phe264 by the D1B receptor counterpart isoleucine led to a D1A receptor mutant exhibiting D1B-like constitutive properties. In contrast, substitution of D1B receptor Ile288 by the D1A receptor counterpart phenylalanine resulted in a loss of constitutive activation of the D1B receptor with binding and coupling properties similar to the D1A receptor. The Arg/Lys substitution had no effect on the function of either receptor. These results demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal region, and in particular residue Ile288, is a major determinant of the constitutive activity of the dopamine D1B receptor. Moreover, these results establish that not only can agonist-independent activity of a receptor be induced, but when given the appropriate mutation, it can be reversed or silenced.

  19. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  20. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  1. UV activates growth factor receptors via reactive oxygen intermediates

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to UV irradiation induces rapid and transient expression of early growth response-1 gene (Egr-1) encoding a transcription factor that plays a role in cell survival. These signals from the irradiated cell surface are likely to involve more than one pathway, and we show here that an essential pathway involves activation of several growth factor receptors by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). UVC irradiation causes the tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and HC11 mouse mammary cells. EGFR activation by irradiation of cells is abrogated by suramin, by antioxidants, and by the presence of a dominant negative EGFR. UV induces the formation of complexes between activated EGFR and SOS, Grb2, PLC gamma, and SHC that can be precipitated with antibodies to EGFR. The activation of EGFR by UV is mimicked by H2O2, suggesting that ROI may function upstream of EGFR activation. Our observations support the hypothesis that ROI and growth factor receptors operate in the early steps of the UV signal that lead to the enhanced expression and activity of Egr-1. PMID:8601609

  2. A transgenic zebrafish model for monitoring glucocorticoid receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Poshusta, Tanya L.; Skuster, Kimberly J.; Berg, MaKayla R.; Gardner, Samantha L.; Clark, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulation resulting from glucocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid response element interactions is a hallmark feature of stress response signaling. Imbalanced glucocorticoid production and glucocorticoid receptor activity have been linked to socio-economically crippling neuropsychiatric disorders, and accordingly there is a need to develop in vivo models to help understand disease progression and management. Therefore, we developed the transgenic SR4G zebrafish reporter line with six glucocorticoid response elements used to promote expression of a short half-life green fluorescent protein following glucocorticoid receptor activation. Herein, we document the ability of this reporter line to respond to both chronic and acute exogenous glucocorticoid treatment. The green fluorescent protein expression in response to transgene activation was high in a variety of tissues including the brain, and provided single cell resolution in the effected regions. The specificity of these responses is demonstrated using the partial agonist mifepristone and mutation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Importantly, the reporter line also modeled the temporal dynamics of endogenous stress response signaling, including the increased production of the glucocorticoid cortisol following hyperosmotic stress and the fluctuations of basal cortisol concentrations with the circadian rhythm. Taken together, these results characterize our newly developed reporter line for elucidating environmental or genetic modifiers of stress response signaling, which may provide insights to the neuronal mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder. PMID:24679220

  3. Receptor for bombesin with associated tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, D M; Gaudino, G; Naldini, L; Comoglio, P M

    1986-01-01

    The neuropeptide bombesin is known for its potent mitogenic activity on murine 3T3 fibroblasts and other cells. Recently it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of small cell lung carcinoma, in which it acts through an autocrine loop of growth stimulation. Phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) antibodies have been successfully used to recognize the autophosphorylated receptors for known growth factors. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, phosphotyrosine antibodies identified a 115,000-Mr cell surface protein (p115) that became phosphorylated on tyrosine as a specific response to bombesin stimulation of quiescent cells. The extent of phosphorylation was dose dependent and correlated with the mitogenic effect induced by bombesin, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p115 was detectable minutes after the addition of bombesin, and its time course paralleled that described for the binding of bombesin to its receptor. Immunocomplexes of phosphorylated p115 and phosphotyrosine antibodies bound 125I-labeled [Tyr4]bombesin in a specific and saturable manner and displayed an associated tyrosine kinase activity enhanced by bombesin. Furthermore, the 125I-labeled bombesin analog gastrin-releasing peptide, bound to intact live cells, was coprecipitated with p115. These data strongly suggest that p115 participates in the structure and function of the surface receptor for bombesin, a new member of the family of growth factor receptors with associated tyrosine kinase activity. Images PMID:2432404

  4. Structural insights into µ-opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N; Sanborn, Adrian L; Kato, Hideaki E; Livingston, Kathryn E; Thorsen, Thor S; Kling, Ralf C; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M; Traynor, John R; Weis, William I; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O; Kobilka, Brian K

    2015-08-20

    Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To shed light on the structural basis for μOR activation, here we report a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the murine μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and a G protein mimetic camelid antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor. Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three G-protein-coupled receptors.

  5. Liver X receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor as integrators of lipid homeostasis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Kidani, Yoko; Bensinger, Steven J

    2012-09-01

    Lipid metabolism has emerged as an important modulator of innate and adaptive immune cell fate and function. The lipid-activated transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, β/δ, γ and liver X receptor (LXR) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily that have a well-defined role in regulating lipid homeostasis and metabolic diseases. Accumulated evidence over the last decade indicates that PPAR and LXR signaling also influence multiple facets of inflammation and immunity, thereby providing important crosstalk between metabolism and immune system. Herein, we provide a brief introduction to LXR and PPAR biology and review recent discoveries highlighting the importance of PPAR and LXR signaling in the modulation of normal and pathologic states of immunity. We also examine advances in our mechanistic understanding of how nuclear receptors impact immune system function and homeostasis. Finally, we discuss whether LXRs and PPARs could be pharmacologically manipulated to provide novel therapeutic approaches for modulation of the immune system under pathologic inflammation or in the context of allergic and autoimmune disease. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  7. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  8. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and cardiovascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2005-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor and then modulate the function of many target genes. Three PPARs are known: alpha, beta/delta, and gamma. The better known are PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma, which may be activated by different synthetic agonists, although the endogenous ligands are unknown. PPAR-alpha is involved in fatty acid oxidation and expressed in the liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle, whereas PPAR-gamma is involved in fat cell differentiation, lipid storage, and insulin sensitivity. However, both have been shown to be present in variable amounts in cardiovascular tissues, including endothelium, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and the heart. The activators of PPAR-alpha (fibrates) and PPAR-gamma (thiazolidinediones or glitazones) antagonized the actions of angiotensin II in vivo and in vitro and exerted cardiovascular antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. PPAR activators lowered blood pressure, induced favorable effects on the heart, and corrected vascular structure and endothelial dysfunction in several rodent models of hypertension. Activators of PPARs may become therapeutic agents useful in the prevention of cardiovascular disease beyond their effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Some side effects, such as weight gain, as well as documented aggravation of advanced heart failure through fluid retention by glitazones, may, however, limit their therapeutic application in prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  10. CINPA1 is an inhibitor of constitutive androstane receptor that does not activate pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Taosheng

    2015-05-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function.

  11. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  12. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  13. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  14. Biological Signaling: the Role of ``Electrostatic Epicenter'' in ``Protein Quake'' and Receptor Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Kang, Zhouyang; Hendriks, Johnny; Hellingwerf, Klaas

    2013-03-01

    Activation of a receptor protein during biological signaling is often characterized by a two state model: a receptor state (also called ``off state'') for detection of a stimuli, and a signaling state (``on state'') for signal relay. Receptor activation is a process that a receptor protein is structurally transformed from its receptor state to its signaling state through substantial conformational changes that are recognizable by its downstream signal relay partner. What are the structural and energetic origins for receptor activation in biological signaling? We report extensive evidence that further support the role of ``electrostatic epicenter'' in driving ``protein quake'' and receptor activation. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial blue light photoreceptor protein for the negative phototaxis of a salt loving Halorhodospira halophia, is employed as a model system in this study. We will discuss potential applications of this receptor activation mechanism to other receptor proteins, including B-RAF receptor protein that is associated with many cancers.

  15. Tumor therapeutics by design: targeting and activation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    Due to their strong apoptosis-inducing capacity, the death receptor ligands CD95L, TNF and TRAIL have been widely viewed as potential cancer therapeutics. While clinical data with CD95L and TRAIL are not yet available, TNF is a registered drug, albeit only for loco-regional application in a limited number of indications. The TNF experience has told us that specific delivery and restricted action is a major challenge in the development of multifunctional, pleiotropically acting cytokines into effective cancer therapeutics. Thus, gene-therapeutic approaches and new cytokine variants have been designed over the last 10 years with the aim of increasing anti-tumoral activity and reducing systemic side effects. Here, we present our current view of the therapeutic potential of the death receptor ligands TNF, CD95L and TRAIL and of the progress made towards improving their efficacy by tumor targeting, use of gene therapy and genetic engineering. Results generated with newly designed fusion proteins suggest that enhanced tumor-directed activity and prevention of undesirable actions of death receptor ligands is possible, thereby opening up a useful therapeutic window for all of the death receptor ligands, including CD95L.

  16. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules.

  17. 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptor activation inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine1B-like receptor function via arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Maayani, S; Clarke, W P

    1996-10-01

    We previously reported that in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1B-like (CHO/5-HT1B) receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation is inhibited by activation of transfected human 5-HT2C receptors but not 5-HT2A receptors. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism involved in the regulation of receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase as a means to further elucidate differences between the signal transduction cascades of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor subtypes. Activation of 5-HT2C receptors with 5-HT or (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane increased release of arachidonic acid via a phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-dependent mechanism. Incubation with (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (1 microM) abolished 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5 nM)-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, which was blocked by the PLA2 inhibitor mepacrine (100 microM) and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (2 microM). Furthermore, purinergic receptor-mediated PLA2 activation as well as direct activation of PLA2 with melittin reduced CHO/5-HT1B responsiveness. These data indicate that activation of the PLA2/arachidonic acid signaling cascade mediates 5-HT2C receptor regulation of the CHO/5-HT1B receptor pathway. Consistent with our previous report and in contrast to activation of 5-HT2C or purinergic receptors, activation of 5-HT2A receptors had no effect on CHO/5-HT1B receptor function, although 5-HT2A receptor-mediated activation of PLA2 was measured. Interestingly, purinergic receptor-mediated inhibition of CHO/5-HT1B receptor function was blocked when 5-HT2A receptors were activated simultaneously. These data suggest that the lack of 5-HT2A mediated regulation of CHO/5-HT1B receptors may be due to activation of a third pathway (in addition to PLC and PLA2 pathways), which results in the inhibition of the production or the actions of a cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic

  18. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane – subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  19. Different phenolic compounds activate distinct human bitter taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Susana; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Mateus, Nuno; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; De Freitas, Victor

    2013-02-20

    Bitterness is a major sensory attribute of several common foods and beverages rich in polyphenol compounds. These compounds are reported as very important for health as chemopreventive compounds, but they are also known to taste bitter. In this work, the activation of the human bitter taste receptors, TAS2Rs, by six polyphenol compounds was analyzed. The compounds chosen are present in a wide range of plant-derived foods and beverages, namely, red wine, beer, tea, and chocolate. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a hydrolyzable tannin, (-)-epicatechin is a precursor of condensed tannins, procyanidin dimer B3 and trimer C2 belong to the condensed tannins, and malvidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-glucoside are anthocyanins. The results show that the different compounds activate different combinations of the ~25 TAS2Rs. (-)-Epicatechin activated three receptors, TAS2R4, TAS2R5, and TAS2R39, whereas only two receptors, TAS2R5 and TAS2R39, responded to PGG. In contrast, malvidin-3-glucoside and procyanidin trimer stimulated only one receptor, TAS2R7 and TAS2R5, respectively. Notably, tannins are the first natural agonists found for TAS2R5 that display high potency only toward this receptor. The catechol and/or galloyl groups appear to be important structural determinants that mediate the interaction of these polyphenolic compounds with TAS2R5. Overall, the EC(50) values obtained for the different compounds vary 100-fold, with the lowest values for PGG and malvidin-3-glucoside compounds, suggesting that they could be significant polyphenols responsible for the bitterness of fruits, vegetables, and derived products even if they are present in very low concentrations.

  20. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane--subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies--whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection.