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Sample records for mi ghi ch

  1. Measurement of Ratios of <mi>νμ> Charged-Current Cross Sections on C, Fe, and Pb to CH at Neutrino Energies 2–20 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, B. G.; Datta, M.; Mousseau, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Barrios Sazo, M. G.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Brooks, W. K.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M. J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Castromonte, C. M.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Jerkins, M.; Kafka, T.; Kordosky, M.; Kulagin, S. A.; Le, T.; Maggi, G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martin Mari, C.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Savage, D. G.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Snider, F. D.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Valencia, E.; Velásquez, J. P.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of mi>νmi>mi>μ> charged-current cross section ratios on carbon, iron, and lead relative to a scintillator (CH) using the fine-grained MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The measurements utilize events of energies 2<mi>Emi>mi>νmi><20mi>GeVmi>, with (mi>Emi>mi>ν>)=8mi>GeVmi>, which have a reconstructed mi>μmi>- scattering angle less than 17° to extract ratios of inclusive total cross sections as a function of neutrino energy mi>Emi>mi>ν> and flux-integrated differential cross sections with respect to the Bjorken scaling variable mi>x>. These results provide the first high-statistics direct measurements of nuclear effects in neutrino scattering using different targets in the same neutrino beam. Measured cross section ratios exhibit a relative

  2. Demethylmenaquinol is a substrate of Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) and forms a stable semiquinone intermediate at the NarGHI quinol oxidation site.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Julia; Pilet, Eric; Fahs, Zeinab; Seduk, Farida; Sylvi, Léa; Hajj Chehade, Mahmoud; Pierrel, Fabien; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel; Grimaldi, Stephane

    2015-08-01

    Quinones are essential building blocks of respiration, a universal process dedicated to efficient harvesting of environmental energy and its conversion into a transmembrane chemiosmotic potential. Quinones differentiate mostly by their midpoint redox potential. As such, γ-proteobacteria such as Escherichia coli are characterized by the presence of demethylmenaquinone (DMK) with an intermediate redox potential between low-potential (menaquinone) and high-potential (ubiquinone) quinones. In this study, we show that demethylmenaquinol (DMKH2) is a good substrate for nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) in nitrate respiration in E. coli. Kinetic studies performed with quinol analogs on NarGHI show that removal of the methyl group on the naphthoquinol ring impacts modestly the catalytic constant but not the KM. EPR-monitored redox titrations of NarGHI-enriched membrane vesicles reveal that endogeneous demethylmenasemiquinone (DMSK) intermediates are stabilized in the enzyme. The measured midpoint potential of the DMK/DMKH2 redox couple in NarGHI (E'm,7.5 (DMK/DMKH2) ~-70mV) is significantly lower than that previously measured for unbound species. High resolution pulsed EPR experiments demonstrate that DMSK are formed within the NarGHI quinol oxidation site. Overall, our results provide the first characterization of a protein-bound DMSK and allows for comparison for distinct use of three quinones at a single Q-site in NarGHI.

  3. Identification of periods of clear sky irradiance in time series of GHI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-01-18

    In this study, we present a simple algorithm for identifying periods of time with broadband global horizontal irradiance (GHI) similar to that occurring during clear sky conditions from a time series of GHI measurements. Other available methods to identify these periods do so by identifying periods with clear sky conditions using additional measurements, such as direct or diffuse irradiance. Our algorithm compares characteristics of the time series of measured GHI with the output of a clear sky model without requiring additional measurements. We validate our algorithm using data from several locations by comparing our results with those obtained from a clear sky detection algorithm, and with satellite and ground-based sky imagery.

  4. Identification of periods of clear sky irradiance in time series of GHI measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Reno, Matthew J.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-01-18

    In this study, we present a simple algorithm for identifying periods of time with broadband global horizontal irradiance (GHI) similar to that occurring during clear sky conditions from a time series of GHI measurements. Other available methods to identify these periods do so by identifying periods with clear sky conditions using additional measurements, such as direct or diffuse irradiance. Our algorithm compares characteristics of the time series of measured GHI with the output of a clear sky model without requiring additional measurements. We validate our algorithm using data from several locations by comparing our results with those obtained from amore » clear sky detection algorithm, and with satellite and ground-based sky imagery.« less

  5. Genotoxicity-related chemistry of human metabolites of benzo[ghi]perylene (B[ghi]P) investigated using electro-optical arrays and DNA/microsome biocolloid reactors with LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shenmin; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Linlin; Schenkman, John B; Rusling, James F

    2013-08-19

    There is limited and sometimes contradictory information about the genotoxicity of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ghi]perylene (B[ghi]P). Using recently developed metabolic toxicity screening arrays and a biocolloid reactor-LC-MS/MS approach, both featuring films of DNA and human metabolic enzymes, we demonstrated the relatively low reactivity of metabolically activated B[ghi]P toward DNA. Electro-optical toxicity screening arrays showed that B[ghi]P metabolites damage DNA at a 3-fold lower rate than benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), whose metabolites have a strong and well-understood propensity for DNA damage. Metabolic studies using magnetic bead biocolloid reactors coated with microsomal enzymes in 96-well plates showed that cyt P450s 1A1 and 1B1 provide high activity for B[ghi]P and B[a]P conversion. Consistent with published results, the major metabolism of B[ghi]P involved oxidations at 3,4 and 11,12 positions, leading to the formation of B[ghi]P 3,4-oxide and B[ghi]P 3,4,11,12-bisoxide. B[ghi]P 3,4-oxide was synthesized and reacted with deoxyadenosine at N6 and N7 positions and with deoxyguanosine at the N2 position. B[ghi]P 3,4-oxide is hydrolytically unstable and transforms into the 3,4-diol or converts to 3- or 4-hydroxy B[ghi]P. LC-MS/MS of reaction products from the magnetic biocolloid reactor particles coated with DNA and human enzymes revealed for the first time that a major DNA adduct results from the reaction between B[ghi]P 3,4,11,12-bisoxide and deoxyguanosine. Results also demonstrated 5-fold lower formation rates of the major DNA adduct for B[ghi]P metabolites compared to B[a]P. Overall, results from both the electro-optical array and biocolloid reactor-LC-MS/MS consistently suggest a lower human genotoxicity profile of B[ghi]P than B[a]P.

  6. Genotoxicity-Related Chemistry of Human Metabolites of Benzo[ghi]perylene (B[ghi]P) Investigated using Electro-optical Arrays and DNA/Microsome Biocolloid Reactors with LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shenmin; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Linlin; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2013-01-01

    There is limited and sometimes contradictory information about the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ghi]perylene (B[ghi]P). Using recently developed metabolic toxicity screening arrays and a biocolloid reactor-LC-MS/MS approach, both featuring films of DNA and human metabolic enzymes, we demonstrated relatively low reactivity of metabolically activated B[ghi]P towards DNA. Electro-optical toxicity screening arrays showed that B[ghi]P metabolites damage DNA at a 3-fold lower rate than benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), whose metabolites have a strong and well-understood propensity for DNA damage. Metabolic studies using magnetic bead biocolloid reactors coated with microsomal enzymes in 96-well plates showed that cyt P450s 1A1 and 1B1 provide high activity for B[ghi]P and B[a]P conversion. Consistent with published results, the major metabolism of B[ghi]P involved oxidations at 3,4 and 11,12 positions, leading to formation of B[ghi]P 3,4-oxide and B[ghi]P 3,4,11,12-bisoxide. B[ghi]P 3,4-oxide was synthesized and reacted with deoxyadenosine at N6 and N7 positions and with deoxyguanosine at the N2 position. B[ghi]P 3,4-oxide is hydrolytically unstable and transforms into the 3,4-diol or converts to 3- or 4-hydroxy B[ghi]P. LC-MS/MS of reaction products from the magnetic biocolloid reactor particles coated with DNA and human enzymes revealed for the first time that a major DNA adduct results from reaction between B[ghi]P 3,4,11,12-bisoxide and deoxyguanosine. Results also demonstrated 5-fold lower formation rates of the major DNA adduct for B[ghi]P metabolites compared to B[a]P. Overall, results from both ECL array and biocolloid reactor-LC-MS/MS consistently suggest a lower human genotoxicity profile of B[ghi]P than B[a]P. PMID:23879290

  7. DOCKING OF STRUCTURALLY RELATED DIOLEPOXIDES OF BENZO(GHI)FLUORANTHENE WITH DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Docking of structurally-related diolepoxides of benzo{ghi}fluoranthene and benzo{c}phenanthrene with DNA
    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are a class of chemicals found in the environment. Some class members are potent carcinogens while others with similar structures show litt...

  8. Benzo[ghi]perylene activates the AHR pathway to exert biological effects on the NL-20 human bronchial cell line.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza-Ojeda, Montserrat; Eguía-Aguilar, Pilar; Perezpeña-Díazconti, Mario; Arenas-Huertero, Francisco

    2016-08-10

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced by incomplete combustion of organic material. In the Mexico City atmosphere, the most abundant PAH is benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP), a gasoline combustion marker. At present, there are no reports of the effects of BghiP on human bronchial cells, so the aim of the study was to evaluate the effects in vitro of BghiP on the NL-20 cell line. Results showed that BghiP induced the formation of small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm, with absence of nuclear fragmentation. At 48h exposition, damage in cell membrane increased significantly at 1.24μg/mL of BghiP (p<0.05). Immunocytochemistry revealed that BghiP provokes nuclear translocation of AhR receptor, which indicates that this compound can induce transcription of genes via receptor binding (AhR pathway activation). BghiP induced a two-fold increase (p<0.05) in the expression of AhR and CYP4B1 (a lung-specific pathway effector). In the presence of the receptor antagonist CH-223191, the loss of viability, the nuclear translocation and the overexpression of genes decreased, though this did not prevent the formation of vesicles. BghiP induced oxidative stress and in presence of the receptor antagonist this increased significantly. In conclusion, BghiP can activate the overexpression of AhR and CYP4B1, and the effects are abated by the AhR receptor antagonist. This is the first report to prove that BghiP utilizes the AhR pathway to exert its toxic effects on the NL-20 human bronchial cell line .

  9. Multiple-stage structure transformation of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite <mi>CH>3<mi>NH>3<mi>PbI>3

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiong; Liu, Henan; Kim, Hui -Seon; Liu, Yucheng; Yang, Mengjin; Yue, Naili; Ren, Gang; Zhu, Kai; Liu, Shengzhong; Park, Nam -Gyu; Zhang, Yong

    2016-09-15

    In this study, by performing spatially resolved Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy with varying excitation wavelength, density, and data acquisition parameters, we achieve a unified understanding towards the spectroscopy signatures of the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite, transforming from the pristine state (CH3NH3PbI3) to the fully degraded state (i.e., PbI2) for samples with varying crystalline domain size from mesoscopic scale (approximately 100 nm) to macroscopic size (centimeters), synthesized by three different techniques. We show that the hybrid perovskite exhibits multiple stages of structure transformation occurring either spontaneously or under light illumination, with exceptionally high sensitivity to the illumination conditions (e.g., power, illumination time, and interruption pattern). We highlight four transformation stages (stages I-IV, with stage I being the pristine state) along either the spontaneous or photoinduced degradation path exhibiting distinctly different Raman spectroscopy features at each stage, and point out that previously reported Raman spectra in the literature reflect highly degraded structures of either stage III or stage IV. Additional characteristic optical features of partially degraded materials under the joint action of spontaneous and photodegradation are also given. This study offers reliable benchmark results for understanding the intrinsic material properties and structure transformation of this unique category of hybrid materials, and the findings are pertinently important to a wide range of potential applications where the hybrid material is expected to function in greatly different environment and light-matter interaction conditions.

  10. A monocyte/macrophage antigen recognized by the four antibodies GHI/61, Ber-MAC3, Ki-M8 and SM4.

    PubMed Central

    Pulford, K; Micklem, K; McCarthy, S; Cordell, J; Jones, M; Mason, D Y

    1992-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody, GHI/61, which labels the majority of monocytes and tissue macrophages is described. This antibody recognizes an intracellular antigen of 130,000 MW (reduced) and 110,000 MW (unreduced). Using biochemical, flow cytometry and immunocytochemical studies antibody GHI/61 was shown to recognize the same antigen as the previously described antibodies Ber-MAC3, Ki-M8 and SM4. On the basis of the results obtained, antibodies GHI/61, SM4, Ber-MAC3 and Ki-M8 should form a new CD group at the next Leucocyte Typing Workshop. Since the antigen recognized by the antibody GHI/61 is relatively easy to purify, the sequencing and the isolation of the gene encoding this protein should be possible. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:1592433

  11. Interspecies signalling: Pseudomonas putida efflux pump TtgGHI is activated by indole to increase antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Fillet, Sandy; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-05-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug efflux pumps are responsible for the extrusion of chemicals that are deleterious for growth. Some of these efflux pumps are induced by endogenously produced effectors, while abiotic or biotic signals induce the expression of other efflux pumps. In Pseudomonas putida, the TtgABC efflux pump is the main antibiotic extrusion system that respond to exogenous antibiotics through the modulation of the expression of this operon mediated by TtgR. The plasmid-encoded TtgGHI efflux pump in P. putida plays a minor role in antibiotic resistance in the parental strain; however, its role is critical in isogenic backgrounds deficient in TtgABC. Expression of ttgGHI is repressed by the TtgV regulator that recognizes indole as an effector, although P. putida does not produce indole itself. Because indole is not produced by Pseudomonas, the indole-dependent antibiotic resistance seems to be part of an antibiotic resistance programme at the community level. Pseudomonas putida recognizes indole added to the medium or produced by Escherichia coli in mixed microbial communities. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the indole-specific response involves activation of 43 genes and repression of 23 genes. Indole enhances not only the expression of the TtgGHI pump but also a set of genes involved in iron homeostasis, as well as genes for amino acid catabolism. In a ttgABC-deficient P. putida, background ampicillin and other bactericidal compounds lead to cell death. Co-culture of E. coli and P. putida ΔttgABC allowed growth of the P. putida mutant in the presence of ampicillin because of induction of the indole-dependent efflux pump.

  12. Highly Soluble Benzo[ghi]perylenetriimide Derivatives: Stable and Air-Insensitive Electron Acceptors for Artificial Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2015-01-01

    A series of new benzo[ghi]perylenetriimide (BPTI) derivatives has been synthesized and characterized. These remarkably soluble BPTI derivatives show strong optical absorption in the range of λ=300–500 nm and have a high triplet-state energy of 1.67 eV. A cyanophenyl substituent renders BPTI such a strong electron acceptor (Ered=−0.11 V vs. the normal hydrogen electrode) that electron-trapping reactions with O2 and H2O do not occur. The BPTI radical anion on a fluorine-doped tin oxide|TiO2 electrode is persistent up to tens of seconds (t1/2=39 s) in air-saturated buffer solution. As a result of favorable packing, theoretical electron mobilities (10−2∼10−1 cm2 V−1 s−1) are high and similar to the experimental values observed for perylene diimide and C60 derivatives. Our studies show the potential of the cyanophenyl-modified BPTI compounds as electron acceptors in devices for artificial photosynthesis in water splitting that are also very promising nonfullerene electron-transport materials for organic solar cells. PMID:26395847

  13. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD transports a natural phenazine that controls gene expression and biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Sakhtah, Hassan; Koyama, Leslie; Zhang, Yihan; Morales, Diana K.; Fields, Blanche L.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Hogan, Deborah A.; Shepard, Kenneth; Dietrich, Lars E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Redox-cycling compounds, including endogenously produced phenazine antibiotics, induce expression of the efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Previous studies of P. aeruginosa virulence, physiology, and biofilm development have focused on the blue phenazine pyocyanin and the yellow phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In P. aeruginosa phenazine biosynthesis, conversion of PCA to pyocyanin is presumed to proceed through the intermediate 5-methylphenazine-1-carboxylate (5-Me-PCA), a reactive compound that has eluded detection in most laboratory samples. Here, we apply electrochemical methods to directly detect 5-Me-PCA and find that it is transported by MexGHI-OpmD in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 planktonic and biofilm cells. We also show that 5-Me-PCA is sufficient to fully induce MexGHI-OpmD expression and that it is required for wild-type colony biofilm morphogenesis. These physiological effects are consistent with the high redox potential of 5-Me-PCA, which distinguishes it from other well-studied P. aeruginosa phenazines. Our observations highlight the importance of this compound, which was previously overlooked due to the challenges associated with its detection, in the context of P. aeruginosa gene expression and multicellular behavior. This study constitutes a unique demonstration of efflux-based self-resistance, controlled by a simple circuit, in a Gram-negative pathogen. PMID:27274079

  14. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD transports a natural phenazine that controls gene expression and biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Sakhtah, Hassan; Koyama, Leslie; Zhang, Yihan; Morales, Diana K; Fields, Blanche L; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Hogan, Deborah A; Shepard, Kenneth; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2016-06-21

    Redox-cycling compounds, including endogenously produced phenazine antibiotics, induce expression of the efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Previous studies of P. aeruginosa virulence, physiology, and biofilm development have focused on the blue phenazine pyocyanin and the yellow phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In P. aeruginosa phenazine biosynthesis, conversion of PCA to pyocyanin is presumed to proceed through the intermediate 5-methylphenazine-1-carboxylate (5-Me-PCA), a reactive compound that has eluded detection in most laboratory samples. Here, we apply electrochemical methods to directly detect 5-Me-PCA and find that it is transported by MexGHI-OpmD in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 planktonic and biofilm cells. We also show that 5-Me-PCA is sufficient to fully induce MexGHI-OpmD expression and that it is required for wild-type colony biofilm morphogenesis. These physiological effects are consistent with the high redox potential of 5-Me-PCA, which distinguishes it from other well-studied P. aeruginosa phenazines. Our observations highlight the importance of this compound, which was previously overlooked due to the challenges associated with its detection, in the context of P. aeruginosa gene expression and multicellular behavior. This study constitutes a unique demonstration of efflux-based self-resistance, controlled by a simple circuit, in a Gram-negative pathogen.

  15. The MexGHI-OpmD multidrug efflux pump controls growth, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via 4-quinolone-dependent cell-to-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Aendekerk, Séverine; Diggle, Stephen P; Song, Zhijun; Høiby, Niels; Cornelis, Pierre; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2005-04-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the production of multiple virulence factors depends on cell-to-cell communication through the integration of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)- and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS)- dependent signalling. Mutation of genes encoding the efflux protein MexI and the porin OpmD from the MexGHI-OpmD pump resulted in the inability to produce N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-c12-hsl) and pqs and a marked reduction in n-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone levels. Both pump mutants were impaired in growth and exhibited enhanced rather than reduced antibiotic resistance. Provision of exogenous PQS improved growth and restored AHL and virulence factor production as well as antibiotic susceptibility, indicating that the pump mutants retained their capacity to respond to PQS. RT-PCR analysis indicated that expression of the PQS biosynthetic genes, phnA and pqsA, was inhibited when the mutants reached stationary phase, suggesting that the pleiotropic phenotype observed may be due to intracellular accumulation of a toxic PQS precursor. To explore this hypothesis, double mexI phnA (unable to produce anthranilate, the precursor of PQS) and mexI pqsA mutants were constructed; the improved growth of the former suggested that the toxic compound is likely to be anthranilate or a metabolite of it. Mutations in mexI and opmD also resulted in the attenuation of virulence in rat and plant infection models. In plants, addition of PQS restored the virulence of mexI and opmD mutants. Collectively, these results demonstrate an essential function for the MexGHI-OpmD pump in facilitating cell-to-cell communication, antibiotic susceptibility and promoting virulence and growth in P. aeruginosa.

  16. Synthesis, microsome-mediated metabolism, and identification of major metabolites of environmental pollutant naphtho(8,1,2-ghi)chrysene

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Gowdahalli, K.; Gimbor, M.; Amin, S.

    2008-05-15

    Naphtho(8,1,2-ghi)chrysene, commonly known as naphtho(1,2-e)pyrene (N(1,2-e)P) is a widespread environmental pollutant, identified in coal tar extract, air borne particulate matter, marine sediment, cigarette smoke condensate, and vehicle exhaust. Herein, we determined the ability of rat liver microsomes to metabolize N(1,2-e)P and an unequivocal assignment of the metabolites by comparing them with independently,synthesized standards. We developed the synthesis of both the fjord region and the K-region dihydrodiols and various phenolic derivatives for metabolite identification. In summary, N(1,2-e)P trans-11, 12-dihydrodiol was the major metabolite formed along with N(1,2-e)P 4,5-trtins-dihydrodiol and 12-OH-N(1,2-e)P on exposure of rat liver microsomes to N(1,2-e)P. The presence of N(1,2-e)P in the environment and formation of fjord region dihydrodiol 14 as a major metabolite in in vitro metabolism studies strongly suggest the role of N(1,2-e)P as a potential health hazard.

  17. Characterization by electron paramagnetic resonance of the role of the Escherichia coli nitrate reductase (NarGHI) iron-sulfur clusters in electron transfer to nitrate and identification of a semiquinone radical intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Magalon, A; Rothery, R A; Giordano, G; Blasco, F; Weiner, J H

    1997-01-01

    We have used Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane preparations enriched in wild-type and mutant (NarH-C16A and NarH-C263A) nitrate reductase (NarGHI) to study the role of the [Fe-S] clusters of this enzyme in electron transfer from quinol to nitrate. The spectrum of dithionite-reduced membrane bound NarGHI has major features comprising peaks at g = 2.04 and g = 1.98, a peak-trough at g = 1.95, and a trough at g = 1.87. The oxidized spectrum of NarGHI in membranes comprises an axial [3Fe-4S] cluster spectrum with a peak at g = 2.02 (g(z)) and a peak-trough at g = 1.99 (g(xy)). We have shown that in two site-directed mutants of NarGHI which lack the highest potential [4Fe-4S] cluster (B. Guigliarelli, A. Magalon, P. Asso, P. Bertrand, C. Frixon, G. Giordano, and F. Blasco, Biochemistry 35:4828-4836, 1996), NarH-C16A and NarH-C263A, oxidation of the NarH [Fe-S] clusters is inhibited compared to the wild type. During enzyme turnover in the mutant enzymes, a distinct 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide-sensitive semiquinone radical species which may be located between the hemes of NarI and the [Fe-S] clusters of NarH is observed. Overall, these studies indicate (i) the importance of the highest-potential [4Fe-4S] cluster in electron transfer from NarH to the molybdenum cofactor of NarG and (ii) that a semiquinone radical species is an important intermediate in electron transfer from quinol to nitrate. PMID:9260944

  18. Laboratory Spectroscopy of CH(+) and Isotopic CH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    The A1II - X1(Epsilon) electronic band of the CH(+) ion has been used as a probe of the physical and dynamical conditions of the ISM for 65 years. In spite of being one of the first molecular species observed in the ISM and the very large number of subsequent observations with large derived column densities, the pure rotational spectra of CH+ has remained elusive in both the laboratory and in the ISM as well. We report the first laboratory measurement of the pure rotation of the CH(+) ion and discuss the detection of CH-13(+) in the ISM. Also reported are the somewhat unexpected chemical conditions that resulted in laboratory production.

  19. Measurement of the direct <mi>CP> -violating parameter <mi>Ami><mi>CP> in the decay <mi>D>+<mi>Kmi>-<mimi>+<mi>π>+

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We measure the direct mi>Cmi>mi>P>-violating parameter mi>Ami>mi>Cmi>mi>Pmi> for the decay of the charged charm meson, mi>Dmi>+mi>Kmi>-mi>πmi>+mi>πmi>+ (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 mi>fbmi>-1 sample of mi>p>mi>p>¯ collisions at mi>smi>=1.96 mi>TeVmi> collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from mi>B>mi>D

  20. STAT5a promotes the transcription of mature mmu-miR-135a in 3T3-L1 cells by binding to both miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2 promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiajie; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Peng, Yongdong; Zheng, Rong; Chai, Jin; Jiang, Siwen

    2016-08-01

    Despite extensive research on the role of miR-135a in biological processes, very little attention has been paid to the regulation of its transcription. We have previously reported that miR-135a suppresses 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis by directly targeting the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and activating the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, but the regulatory elements that regulate the expression of the two isoforms of miR-135a (miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2) remain poorly understood. Here, by using deletion analysis, we predicted two binding sites (-874/-856 and -2020/-2002) for the transcription factor Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 5a (STAT5a) within the core promoters of miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2 (-1128/-556 and -2264/-1773), and the subsequent site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the two STAT5a binding sites regulated the activity of the miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2 promoters. The binding of STAT5a to the miR-135a-1/2 core promoters in vitro and in cell culture was identified by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Overexpression and RNAi knockdown of STAT5a showed that the transcription factor regulated the endogenous miR-135a expression. Additionally, The expression time frame of STAT5a and APC indicated a potential negative feedback between them. In sum, the overall results from this study indicate that STAT5a regulates miR-135a transcription by binding to both miR-135a-1 and miR135a-2 promoter elements and the findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulatory mechanisms of miR-135a during adipogenesis.

  1. MiR-125a TNF receptor-associated factor 6 to inhibit osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Li-Juan; Liao, Lan; Yang, Li; Li, Yu; Jiang, Tie-Jian

    2014-02-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In the present study, we found that miR-125a was dramatically down-regulated during macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclastogenesis of circulating CD14+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overexpression of miR-125a in CD14+ PBMCs inhibited osteoclastogenesis, while inhibition of miR-125a promoted osteoclastogenesis. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), a transduction factor for RANKL/RANK/NFATc1 signal, was confirmed to be a target of miR-125a. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that NFATc1 bound to the promoter of the miR-125a. Overexpression of NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transcription, and block of NFATc1 expression attenuated RANKL-regulated miR-125a transcription. Here, we reported that miR-125a played a biological function in osteoclastogenesis through a novel TRAF6/ NFATc1/miR-125a regulatory feedback loop. It suggests that regulation of miR-125a expression may be a potential strategy for ameliorating metabolic disease. - Highlights: • MiR-125a was significantly down-regulated in osteoclastogenesis of CD14+ PBMCs. • MiR-125a inhibited osteoclast differentiation by targeting TRAF6. • NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transciption by binding to the promoter of miR-125a. • TRAF6/NFATc1 and miR-125a form a regulatory feedback loop in osteoclastogenesis.

  2. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  3. Conformational analysis of (CH 3) 2CCl(CH 2) xCH(CH 3) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, G. A.; Richardson, Mary Townsend

    Liquid and solid-state i.r. spectra and liquid-state Raman spectra were obtained for three compounds in a family of compounds with the general formula (CH 3) 2CCl(CH 2) xCH(CH 3) 2 with x = 0, 1 and 2. Two carbon—chlorine stretching bands were observed in the liquid-state spectra of each of the three: 2-chloro-2,3-dimethylbutane, 569 and 611 cm -1; 2-chloro-2,4-dimethypentane, 573 and 628 cm -1; 2-chloro-2,5-dimethylhexane, 561 and 626 cm -1. It was determined that two conformers ( TCHH and THHH) exist in the liquid state of 2-chloro-2,3-dimethylbutane and that only the THHH conformer was present in the crystalline solid. For both 2-chloro-2,4-dimethylpentane and 2-chloro-2,5-dimethylhexane, the liquid is composed of the TCHH conformer and at least one of the two possible THHH conformers. The crystalline solid exists as one of the two possible THHH conformers. Normal coordinate calculations were made for all three compounds and a force field was developed for the family. It was not possible to distinguish between the two THHH forms of 2-chloro-2,4-dimethylpentane and 2-chloro-2,5-dimethylhexane.

  4. MI1ANAV

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-03

    MI1ANAV MISR Level 1A Navigation Data: Reformatted Annotated Level 1A Product for the Navigation Data, which contains samples of the Terra Platform position and ... Specification Versioning History:  Engineering, Navigation SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B ...

  5. MI1AENG1

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-03

    MI1AENG1 MISR Level 1A Engineering Data File Type 1: Reformatted Annotated Level 1A product for the camera engineering data, which represents indicators of sampled measurements. ... Status Production Report Read Software Files :  Data Product Specification Versioning ...

  6. miRNA Profiles in Plasma from Patients with Sleep Disorders Reveal Dysregulation of miRNAs in Narcolepsy and Other Central Hypersomnias

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Anja; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Modvig, Signe; Jennum, Poul; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2014-01-01

    pathophysiology of central hypersomnias. Citation: Holm A, Bang-Berthelsen CH, Knudsen S, Kornum BR, Modvig S, Jennum P, Gammeltoft S. miRNA profiles in plasma from patients with sleep disorders reveal dysregulation of miRNAs in narcolepsy and other central hypersomnias. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1525-1533. PMID:25142559

  7. STAT5 induces miR-21 expression in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Lise M.; Fredholm, Simon; Joseph, Claudine; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jønson, Lars; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Gluud, Maria; Blümel, Edda; Petersen, David L.; Sibbesen, Nina; Hu, Tengpeng; Nastasi, Claudia; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Jæhger, Ditte; Persson, Jenny L.; Mongan, Nigel; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Litvinov, Ivan V.; Sasseville, Denis; Koralov, Sergei B.; Bonefeld, Charlotte M.; Geisler, Carsten; Woetmann, Anders; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Iversen, Lars; Odum, Niels

    2016-01-01

    In cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL), miR-21 is aberrantly expressed in skin and peripheral blood and displays anti-apoptotic properties in malignant T cells. It is, however, unclear exactly which cells express miR-21 and what mechanisms regulate miR-21. Here, we demonstrate miR-21 expression in situ in both malignant and reactive lymphocytes as well as stromal cells. qRT-PCR analysis of 47 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary Syndrome (SS) confirmed an increased miR-21 expression that correlated with progressive disease. In cultured malignant T cells miR-21 expression was inhibited by Tofacitinib (CP-690550), a clinical-grade JAK3 inhibitor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed direct binding of STAT5 to the miR-21 promoter. Cytokine starvation ex vivo triggered a decrease in miR-21 expression, whereas IL-2 induced an increased miR-21 expression in primary SS T cells and cultured cytokine-dependent SS cells (SeAx). siRNA-mediated depletion of STAT5 inhibited constitutive- and IL-2-induced miR-21 expression in cytokine-independent and dependent T cell lines, respectively. IL-15 and IL-2 were more potent than IL-21 in inducing miR-21 expression in the cytokine-dependent T cells. In conclusion, we provide first evidence that miR-21 is expressed in situ in CTCL skin lesions, induced by IL-2 and IL-15 cytokines, and is regulated by STAT5 in malignant T cells. Thus, our data provide novel evidence for a pathological role of IL-2Rg cytokines in promoting expression of the oncogenic miR-21 in CTCL. PMID:27329723

  8. Adrenaline inhibits osteogenesis via repressing miR-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Danying; Wang, Zuolin

    2017-01-01

    Sympathetic signaling is involved in bone homeostasis; however, the cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we found that the psychological stress mediator adrenaline inhibited osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stem cells (hMSC) by reducing microRNA-21 (miR-21) expression. Briefly, adrenaline significantly inhibited the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, as observed with both Alizarin red staining and maker gene expression (RUNX2, OSX, OCN, and OPN). During this process, miR-21 was suppressed by adrenaline via inhibition of histone acetylation, as verified by H3K9Ac chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. MiR-21 was confirmed to promote hMSC osteogenic differentiation, and overexpression of miR-21 reversed the impeditive effect of adrenaline on hMSC osteogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-21 is responsible for the adrenaline-mediated inhibition of hMSC osteogenic differentiation. These findings indicate a regulation of bone metabolism by psychological stress and also provide a molecular basis for psychological stress-associated bone diseases.

  9. Reactions of CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2 radicals with O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ozone was photolyzed at 253.7 nm at 25 and -52 degrees in the presence of CH4 and O2 to measure the reactions of O3 with CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2. The O(1D) atoms produced in the primary photochemical act react with CH4 to give CH3 radicals which in turn can react with O2 to give CH3O2 and CH3O radicals. At very high O2 to O3 concentration ratios, the quantum yield of O3 disappearance approached 1.0, indicating that O3 reactions with CH3O2 and CH3O are slow. Upper limits to the rate coefficients at 25 degrees were computed. At lower values of the concentration ratio, chain decomposition of O3 occurred which could be explained by the reaction of O3 with CH3 radicals to produce CH2O, O2, and H atoms all the time. The two routes to these products are considered, and the preferred reaction channel is found.

  10. Estudio del CH interestelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olano, C.; Lemarchand, G.; Sanz, A. J.; Bava, J. A.

    El objetivo principal de este proyecto consiste en el estudio de la distribución y abundancia del CH en nubes interestelares a través de la observación de las líneas hiperfinas del CH en 3,3 GHz. El CH es una molécula de amplia distribución en el espacio interestelar y una de las pocas especies que han sido observadas tanto con técnicas de radio como ópticas. Desde el punto de vista tecnológico se ha desarrollado un cabezal de receptor que permitirá la realización de observaciones polarimétricas en la frecuencia de 3,3 GHz, con una temperatura del sistema de 60 K y un ancho de banda de 140 MHz, y que será instalado en el foco primario de la antena parabólica del IAR. El cabezal del receptor es capaz de detectar señales polarizadas, separando las componentes de polarización circular derecha e izquierda. Para tal fin el cabezal consta de dos ramas receptoras que amplificarán la señal y la trasladarán a una frecuencia más baja (frecuencia intermedia), permitiendo de esa forma un mejor transporte de la señal a la sala de control para su posterior procesamiento. El receptor además de tener características polarimétricas, podrá ser usado en el continuo y en la línea, utilizando las ventajas observacionales y de procesamiento de señal que actualmente posee el IAR.

  11. miR-219-5p inhibits proliferation and clonogenicity in chordoma cells and is associated with tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Qiuhang; Wang, Zhenlin; Yan, Bo; Feng, Yanjun; Li, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumor that is usually localized to the skull base, vertebral column and sacrum. The transcription factor brachyury, which is encoded by the T gene, has a critical role in the development and progression of chordoma, although the mechanisms underlying brachyury regulation remain unclear. The aim of the current study was to identify and characterize microRNAs (miRs) that regulate brachyury expression in chordoma. MicroRNAs that target brachyury were predicted using miRanda and TargetScan. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, miR-219-5p was shown to be significantly downregulated in chordoma tissues and the U-CH2 chordoma cell lines. A dual-luciferase reporter assay was used to validate the inhibitory effect of miR-219-5p on brachyury mRNA expression. The expression level of brachyury was downregulated in U-CH2 cells following transfection with miR-219-5p mimics and upregulated following transfection with the miR-219-5p inhibitor. The effects of miR-219-5p on the proliferation and clonogenicity of chordoma cells were assessed using cell counting kit-8, EdU and clone formation assays. These in vitro results indicated that miR-219-5p may have an important role in regulating the cell proliferation and clonogenicity of human chordoma cells, potentially by targeting brachyury. Furthermore, the associations between the expression levels of miR-219-5p and various clinicopathological factors were analyzed, and miR-219-5p expression was shown to correlate with tumor extent and recurrence. These results suggested that miR-219-5p functions as a tumor suppressor in chordoma and, therefore, that miR-219-50 may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28105164

  12. CH-47F Improved Cargo Helicopter (CH-47F)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-278 CH-47F Improved Cargo Helicopter (CH-47F) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY

  13. CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement Helicopter (CH-53K)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-390 CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement Helicopter (CH-53K) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget...Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY

  14. NF-κB-Regulated miR-99a Modulates Endothelial Cell Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Mei-hua; Li, Jian-Ming; Luo, Huai-qing; Tang, Liang; Lv, Qiao-li; Li, Guang-yi; Zhou, Hong-hao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The present study was performed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of miR-99a on LPS-induced endothelial cell inflammation, as well as the regulation of NF-κB on miR-99a production. Methods and Results. ELISA showed that LPS treatment significantly promoted the secretion of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and MCP-1). LPS treatment also inhibited miR-99a production and promoted mTOR expression and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Overexpression of miR-99a suppressed the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and MCP-1 overproduction, mTOR upregulation, and NF-κB nuclear translocation. The PROMO software analysis indicated NF-κB binding site in the −1643 to −1652 region of miR-99a promoter. Dual luciferase reporter analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), and chromosome immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated that NF-κB promoted the transcription of miR-99a by binding to the −1643 to −1652 region of miR-99a promoter. Further studies on HUVECs verified the regulatory effects of NF-κB on miR-99a production. Conclusion. MiR-99a inhibited the LPS-induced HUVECs inflammation via inhibition of the mTOR/NF-κB signal. NF-κB promoted miR-99a production by binding to the −1643 to −1652 region of miR-99a promoter. Considering the importance of endothelial inflammation on cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, our results may provide a new insight into the pathogenesis and therapy of atherosclerosis. PMID:27403035

  15. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Nie, Quanmin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance.

  16. Computed barrier heights for H + CH2O yields CH3O yields CH2OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1993-01-01

    The barrier heights (including zero-point effects) for H + CH2O yields CH3O and CH3O yields CH2OH have been computed using complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF)/gradient calculations to define the stationary point geometries and harmonic frequencies and internally contracted configuration-interaction (CCI) to refine the energetics. The computed barrier heights are 5.6 kcal/mol and 30.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The former barrier height compares favorably to an experimental activation energy of 5.2 kcal/mol.

  17. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  18. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  19. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-05-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  20. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-11-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  1. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  2. CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-10-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  3. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  4. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-12-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  5. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-06-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-09-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  7. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  8. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-03-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  9. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-12-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  10. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  11. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-02-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  12. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-01-18

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  13. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-10-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  14. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  15. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  16. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-30

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  17. Study of the <mi>Zc>+ channel using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Prelovsek, Sasa; Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Recently experimentalists have discovered several charged charmoniumlike hadrons mi>Zmi>mi>cmi>+ with unconventional quark content mi>c>¯mi>c>mi>d>¯mi>u>. We perform a search for mi>Zmi>mi>cmi>+ with mass below 4.2 GeV in the channel mi>Imi>mi>G>(mi>Jmi>mi>Pmi>mi>C>)=1+(1+-) using lattice QCD. The major challenge is presented by the two-meson states mi>Jmi>/mi>ψmi>π>, mi>ψ>2mi>Smi>mi>π>, mi>ψ>1mi>Dmi>

  18. HOTAIR functions as a competing endogenous RNA to regulate PTEN expression by inhibiting miR-19 in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yanjun; He, Shuai; Ma, Liming; Lin, Hong; Ren, Biyun; Ma, Jing; Zhu, Xinyu; Zhuang, Shifang

    2017-03-18

    Sustained cardiac hypertrophy (CH) is related to a variety of physiological as well as pathological stimuli and eventually increases the risk of heart failure. HOTAIR has been identified as a competing endogenous RNA in multiple human biological processes. Whether lncRNA-HOTAIR is involved in the progress of CH and how it works still remain unknown. Herein, we found that HOTAIR was down-regulated, while miR-19 was up-regulated in both heart tissues from TAC-operated mice in vivo and cultural cardiomyocytes treated with Ang-II in vitro by real-time PCR. Meanwhile, HOTAIR expression was negatively correlated with miR-19 in TAC-operated mice. HOTAIR overexpression reduced cell surface area and the expression of hypertrophic markers ANP, BNP, and β-MHC in response to Ang-II stimulation as well as knockdown of miR-19. The further molecular mechanisms of HOTAIR action in CH demonstrated that HOTAIR may act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) for miR-19, thereby modulating the dis-inhibition of its endogenous target PTEN and playing an important role in inhibiting CH progress. These findings reveal a novel function of LncRNAs, which conduce to an extensive understanding of CH and provide novel research directions and therapeutic options for treating this disease.

  19. MiR-211/STAT5A Signaling Modulates Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Improve its Therapeutic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyang; Chen, Panpan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Kan; Xu, Yinchuan; Chen, Han; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Rongrong; Webster, Keith A; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Jian'an

    2016-07-01

    Our previous study showed that the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation were improved by enhancing migration. MicroRNA-211 (miR-211) can modulate the migratory properties of some cell types by mechanisms that are not fully understood. This study was designed to investigate a possible role for miR-211 in MSC migration, and whether genetic manipulation of miR-211 in MSCs could be used to enhance its beneficial effects of cell transplantation. Transwell assays confirmed that MSCs migration of was significantly impaired by miR-211 knockdown but enhanced by miR-211 overexpression. MiR-211 overexpressing MSCs also exhibited significantly increased cell engraftment in the peri-infarct areas of female rat hearts 2 days after intravenous transplantation of male MSCs as shown by GFP tracking and SYR gene quantification. This conferred a significant decrease in infarct size and improved cardiac performance. By using a loss or gain of gene function approach, we demonstrated that miR-211 targeted STAT5A to modulate MSCs migration, possibly by interacting with MAPK signaling. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of miR-211 overexpression in MSCs were abolished by simultaneous overexpression of STAT5A whereas the negative effects of miR-211 silencing on MSC migration were rescued by simultaneous downregulation of STAT5A. Finally, using ChIP-PCR and luciferase assays, we provide novel evidence that STAT3 can directly bind to promoter elements that activate miR-211 expression. STAT3/miR-211/STAT5A signaling plays a key role in MSCs migration. Intravenous infusion of genetically modified miR-211 overexpressing MSCs conveys enhanced protection from adverse post-MI remodeling compared with unmodified MSCs. Stem Cells 2016;34:1846-1858.

  20. Celastrol Induces Autophagy by Targeting AR/miR-101 in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianquan; Huang, Xuemei; Wang, Hui; Yang, Huanjie

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process responsible for the degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components through autolysosomes. Targeting AR axis is a standard strategy for prostate cancer treatment; however, the role of AR in autophagic processes is still not fully understood. In the present study, we found that AR played a negative role in AR degrader celastrol-induced autophagy. Knockdown of AR in AR-positive prostate cancer cells resulted in enhanced autophagy. Ectopic expression of AR in AR-negative prostate cancer cells, or gain of function of the AR signaling in AR-positive cells, led to suppression of autophagy. Since miR-101 is an inhibitor of autophagy and its expression was decreased along with AR in the process of celastrol-induced autophagy, we hypothesize that AR inhibits autophagy through transactivation of miR-101. AR binding site was defined in the upstream of miR-101 gene by luciferase reporter and ChIP assays. MiR-101 expression correlated with AR status in prostate cancer cell lines. The inhibition of celastrol-induced autophagy by AR was compromised by blocking miR-101; while transfection of miR-101 led to inhibition of celastrol-induced autophagy in spite of AR depletion. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the AR binding site in miR-101 gene led to decreased suppression of autophagy by AR. Finally, autophagy inhibition by miR-101 mimic was found to enhance the cytotoxic effect of celastrol in prostate cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that AR inhibits autophagy via transactivation of miR-101, thus combination of miR-101 mimics with celastrol may represent a promising therapeutic approach for treating prostate cancer. PMID:26473737

  1. Celastrol Induces Autophagy by Targeting AR/miR-101 in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianquan; Huang, Xuemei; Wang, Hui; Yang, Huanjie

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process responsible for the degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components through autolysosomes. Targeting AR axis is a standard strategy for prostate cancer treatment; however, the role of AR in autophagic processes is still not fully understood. In the present study, we found that AR played a negative role in AR degrader celastrol-induced autophagy. Knockdown of AR in AR-positive prostate cancer cells resulted in enhanced autophagy. Ectopic expression of AR in AR-negative prostate cancer cells, or gain of function of the AR signaling in AR-positive cells, led to suppression of autophagy. Since miR-101 is an inhibitor of autophagy and its expression was decreased along with AR in the process of celastrol-induced autophagy, we hypothesize that AR inhibits autophagy through transactivation of miR-101. AR binding site was defined in the upstream of miR-101 gene by luciferase reporter and ChIP assays. MiR-101 expression correlated with AR status in prostate cancer cell lines. The inhibition of celastrol-induced autophagy by AR was compromised by blocking miR-101; while transfection of miR-101 led to inhibition of celastrol-induced autophagy in spite of AR depletion. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the AR binding site in miR-101 gene led to decreased suppression of autophagy by AR. Finally, autophagy inhibition by miR-101 mimic was found to enhance the cytotoxic effect of celastrol in prostate cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that AR inhibits autophagy via transactivation of miR-101, thus combination of miR-101 mimics with celastrol may represent a promising therapeutic approach for treating prostate cancer.

  2. CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement Helicopter (CH-53K)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    BA - Budget Authority/Budget Activity BY - Base Year DAMIR - Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval Dev Est - Development Estimate DoD...APUC None CH-53K December 2013 SAR April 16, 2014 17:02:21 UNCLASSIFIED 7 Schedule Milestones SAR Baseline Dev Est Current APB...2018 FEB 2018 IOT &E (OPEVAL) Complete JUN 2015 SEP 2018 MAR 2019 SEP 2018 IOC SEP 2015 JAN 2019 JUL 2019 JUL 2019 (Ch-1) FRP Decision Review DEC 2015

  3. Nuclear Receptor SHP Activates miR-206 Expression via a Cascade Dual Inhibitory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guisheng; Wang, Li

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs play a critical role in many essential cellular functions in the mammalian species. However, limited information is available regarding the regulation of miRNAs gene transcription. Microarray profiling and real-time PCR analysis revealed a marked down-regulation of miR-206 in nuclear receptor SHP−/− mice. To understand the regulatory function of SHP with regard to miR-206 gene expression, we determined the putative transcriptional initiation site of miR-206 and also its full length primary transcript using a database mining approach and RACE. We identified the transcription factor AP1 binding sites on the miR-206 promoter and further showed that AP1 (c-Jun and c-Fos) induced miR-206 promoter transactivity and expression which was repressed by YY1. ChIP analysis confirmed the physical association of AP1 (c-Jun) and YY1 with the endogenous miR-206 promoter. In addition, we also identified nuclear receptor ERRγ (NR3B3) binding site on the YY1 promoter and showed that YY1 promoter was transactivated by ERRγ, which was inhibited by SHP (NROB2). ChIP analysis confirmed the ERRγ binding to the YY1 promoter. Forced expression of SHP and AP1 induced miR-206 expression while overexpression of ERRγ and YY1 reduced its expression. The effects of AP1, ERRγ, and YY1 on miR-206 expression were reversed by siRNA knockdown of each gene, respectively. Thus, we propose a novel cascade “dual inhibitory” mechanism governing miR-206 gene transcription by SHP: SHP inhibition of ERRγ led to decreased YY1 expression and the de-repression of YY1 on AP1 activity, ultimately leading to the activation of miR-206. This is the first report to elucidate a cascade regulatory mechanism governing miRNAs gene transcription. PMID:19721712

  4. Fluorescence from excitation of CH4, CH3OH and CH3SH by extreme vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Guang; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The photoabsorption and fluorescence cross sections of CH4, CH3OH, and CH3SH were measured in the wavelength regions of 52-106, 48-106, and 48-106 nm, respectively. The fluorescence spectra were dispersed to identify the emitting species. Emissions from the excited species of H(asterisk) and CH(asterisk) are commonly observed for all three molecules. Emission from the excited CH2(asterisk) is observed from CH4, OH(asterisk) from CH3OH and CS(asterisk) from CH3SH. The photoexcitation processes that may produce the observed emission bands are discussed.

  5. miR-222/VGLL4/YAP-TEAD1 regulatory loop promotes proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Yu, Nanrong; Wang, Jia; Xi, Haofeng; Lu, Weiqun; Xu, Houwei; Deng, Min; Zheng, Guopei; Liu, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common malignant tumors and recent data demonstrates the tumor suppressor role of VGLL4 in GC, but the mechanisms for VGLL4 downregulation in GC remain to be elucidated. Here, we confirmed the suppressor role of VGLL4 on proliferation and invasion in GC cells with over-activated YAP-TEAD signal, and indicated the reverse correlation between expression patters of VGLL4 and miR-222. Bioinformatics analysis combined with experimental confirmation revealed VGLL4 is a direct target of miR-222 in GC cells. Functionally, miR-222 inhibitor significantly inhibited GC cells proliferation and invasion and VGLL4 knockdown abolished the effects of miR-222 inhibitor. Moreover, TEAD1 knockdown resulted in decrease of miR-222 expression and increase of VGLL4 expression, and also resulted in reduction of luciferase activity driven by miR-222 promoter in GC cells, suggesting over-activated TEAD1 positively feedback transcriptionally regulates miR-222 expression via physically binding to the miR-222 promoter indicated by ChIP assay. Collectively, our findings implied the important role of miR-222/VGLL4/YAP-TEAD1 regulatory loop maintaining over-activated YAP-TEAD1 signal in GC cells, and enriched the rationale of VGLL4 in GC based on which a promising therapeutic strategy will be developed.

  6. <mi>J/ψ> production at low transverse momentum in <mi>p+p> and <mi>d> + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2016-06-10

    In this paper, we report on the measurement of J/ψ production in the dielectron channel at midrapidity (|y| < 1) in p + p and d + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200 from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The transverse momentum pT spectra in p + p for pT < 4 GeV/c and d + Au collisions for pT < 3 GeV/c are presented. These measurements extend the STAR coverage for J/ψ production in p + p collisions to low pT . The < p$2\\atop{T}$ > from the measured J/ψ invariant cross section in p + p and d + Au collisions are evaluated and compared to similar measurements at other collision energies. The nuclear modification factor for J/ψ is extracted as a function of pT and collision centrality in d + Au and compared to model calculations using the modified nuclear parton distribution function and a final-state J/ψ nuclear absorption cross section.

  7. Repression of Esophageal Neoplasia and Inflammatory Signaling by Anti-miR-31 Delivery In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Taccioli, Cristian; Garofalo, Michela; Chen, Hongping; Jiang, Yubao; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio Malagoli; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Alder, Hansjuerg; Fadda, Paolo; Middleton, Justin; Smalley, Karl J.; Selmi, Tommaso; Naidu, Srivatsava; Farber, John L.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of microRNA-31 (miR-31) is implicated in the pathogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a deadly disease associated with dietary zinc deficiency. Using a rat model that recapitulates features of human ESCC, the mechanism whereby Zn regulates miR-31 expression to promote ESCC is examined. Methods: To inhibit in vivo esophageal miR-31 overexpression in Zn-deficient rats (n = 12–20 per group), locked nucleic acid–modified anti-miR-31 oligonucleotides were administered over five weeks. miR-31 expression was determined by northern blotting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization. Physiological miR-31 targets were identified by microarray analysis and verified by luciferase reporter assay. Cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and expression of inflammation genes were determined by immunoblotting, caspase assays, and immunohistochemistry. The miR-31 promoter in Zn-deficient esophagus was identified by ChIP-seq using an antibody for histone mark H3K4me3. Data were analyzed with t test and analysis of variance. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: In vivo, anti-miR-31 reduced miR-31 overexpression (P = .002) and suppressed the esophageal preneoplasia in Zn-deficient rats. At the same time, the miR-31 target Stk40 was derepressed, thereby inhibiting the STK40-NF-κΒ–controlled inflammatory pathway, with resultant decreased cellular proliferation and activated apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activities, fold change = 10.7, P = .005). This same connection between miR-31 overexpression and STK40/NF-κΒ expression was also documented in human ESCC cell lines. In Zn-deficient esophagus, the miR-31 promoter region and NF-κΒ binding site were activated. Zn replenishment restored the regulation of this genomic region and a normal esophageal phenotype. Conclusions: The data define the in vivo signaling pathway underlying interaction of Zn deficiency and miR-31 overexpression in esophageal neoplasia and

  8. Identification of miR-34 regulatory networks in settings of disease and antimiR-therapy: Implications for treating cardiac pathology and other diseases.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Jenny Y Y; Bernardo, Bianca C; Singla, Saloni; Patterson, Natalie L; Lin, Ruby C Y; McMullen, Julie R

    2016-04-28

    Expression of the miR-34 family (miR-34a, -34b, -34c) is elevated in settings of heart disease, and inhibition with antimiR-34a/antimiR-34 has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy. Under chronic cardiac disease settings, targeting the entire miR-34 family is more effective than targeting miR-34a alone. The identification of transcription factor (TF)-miRNA regulatory networks has added complexity to understanding the therapeutic potential of miRNA-based therapies. Here, we sought to determine whether antimiR-34 targets secondary miRNAs via TFs which could contribute to antimiR-34-mediated protection. Using miRNA-Seq we identified differentially regulated miRNAs in hearts from mice with cardiac pathology due to transverse aortic constriction (TAC), and focused on miRNAs which were also regulated by antimiR-34. Two clusters of stress-responsive miRNAs were classified as "pathological" and "cardioprotective," respectively. Using ChIPBase we identified 45 TF binding sites on the promoters of "pathological" and "cardioprotective" miRNAs, and 5 represented direct targets of miR-34, with the capacity to regulate other miRNAs. Knockdown studies in a cardiomyoblast cell line demonstrated that expression of 2 "pathological" miRNAs (let-7e, miR-31) was regulated by one of the identified TFs. Furthermore, by qPCR we confirmed that expression of let-7e and miR-31 was lower in hearts from antimiR-34 treated TAC mice; this may explain why targeting the entire miR-34 family is more effective than targeting miR-34a alone. Finally, we showed that Acsl4 (a common target of miR-34, let-7e and miR-31) was increased in hearts from TAC antimiR-34 treated mice. In summary, antimiR-34 regulates the expression of other miRNAs and this has implications for drug development.

  9. miRNA Digger: a comprehensive pipeline for genome-wide novel miRNA mining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shao, Chaogang; Ye, Xinghuo; Meng, Yijun; Zhou, Yincong; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. The recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technique have greatly facilitated large-scale detection of the miRNAs. However, thoroughly discovery of novel miRNAs from the available HTS data sets remains a major challenge. In this study, we observed that Dicer-mediated cleavage sites for the processing of the miRNA precursors could be mapped by using degradome sequencing data in both animals and plants. In this regard, a novel tool, miRNA Digger, was developed for systematical discovery of miRNA candidates through genome-wide screening of cleavage signals based on degradome sequencing data. To test its sensitivity and reliability, miRNA Digger was applied to discover miRNAs from four organs of Arabidopsis. The results revealed that a majority of already known mature miRNAs along with their miRNA*s expressed in these four organs were successfully recovered. Notably, a total of 30 novel miRNA-miRNA* pairs that have not been registered in miRBase were discovered by miRNA Digger. After target prediction and degradome sequencing data-based validation, eleven miRNA-target interactions involving six of the novel miRNAs were identified. Taken together, miRNA Digger could be applied for sensitive detection of novel miRNAs and it could be freely downloaded from http://www.bioinfolab.cn/miRNA_Digger/index.html.

  10. Circulating microRNAs, miR-939, miR-595, miR-519d and miR-494, Identify Cirrhotic Patients with HCC

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, Francesca; Ferracin, Manuela; Trerè, Davide; Milazzo, Maddalena; Marinelli, Sara; Galassi, Marzia; Venerandi, Laura; Pollutri, Daniela; Patrizi, Clarissa; Borghi, Alberto; Foschi, Francesco G.; Stefanini, Giuseppe F.; Negrini, Massimo; Bolondi, Luigi; Gramantieri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The performance of circulating biomarkers for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is sub-optimal. In this study we tested circulating microRNAs as biomarkers for HCC in cirrhotic patients by performing a two stage study: a discovery phase conducted by microarray and a validation phase performed by qRT-PCR in an independent series of 118 patients. Beside miRNAs emerged from the discovery phase, miR-21, miR-221, miR-519d were also tested in the validation setting on the basis of literary and tissue findings. Deregulated microRNAs were assayed in HCC-derived cells in the intracellular compartment, cell culture supernatant and exosomal fraction. Serum and tissue microRNA levels were compared in 14 patients surgically treated for HCC. From the discovery study, it emerged that seven circulating microRNAs were differentially expressed in cirrhotic patients with and without HCC. In the validation set, miR-939, miR-595 and miR-519d were shown to differentiate cirrhotic patients with and without HCC. MiR-939 and miR-595 are independent factors for HCC. ROC curves of miR-939, miR-595 and miR-519d displayed that AUC was higher than AFP. An exosomal secretion of miR-519d, miR-21, miR-221 and miR-1228 and a correlation between circulating and tissue levels of miR-519d, miR-494 and miR-21 were found in HCC patients. Therefore, we show that circulating microRNAs deserve attention as non-invasive biomarkers in the diagnostic setting of HCC and that exosomal secretion contributes to discharging a subset of microRNAs into the extracellular compartment. PMID:26509672

  11. Hsa-miR-331-3p inhibits VHL expression by directly targeting its mRNA 3'-UTR in HCC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yiyi; Zhang, Jinnan; Xiong, Dongmei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Ting; Huang, Ailong; Tang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of miRNA is widely involved in human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Array data for miRNAs indicated that miR-331-3p might be one of the disorderly expressed miRNAs in HCC cell lines, but the function of miR-331-3p in HCC remains unclear. In this study, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results indicated that miR-331-3p was up-regulated in HepG2.2.15 cells, Ad-HBV-HepG2 cells and pCH9/3091 transfected SMMC7721 cells compared with their control group, respectively. miRNA target prediction software was used, and VHL was found to be one of the target genes of miR-331-3p. qRT-PCR and western blot analysis indicated VHL expression was decreased when miR-331-3p was over-expressed and increased when miR-331-3p was inhibited in SMMC7721 cells. The luciferase reporter activity was inhibited in SMMC7721 cells when co-transfected with miR-331-3p expression vector and VHL 3'-UTR wild type vector and increased in HepG2.2.15 transfected with miR-331-3p inhibitor compared to its control group respectively. When co-transfected with miR-331-3p expression vector and VHL 3'-UTR mutated type vector in SMMC7721 cells the luciferase reporter activity was recovered. All of these results show that HBV up-regulated miR-331-3p expression in HCC cell lines and miR-331-3p could inhibit VHL expression by directly targeting its 3'-UTR. This provided useful information in exploring the mechanism of HCC induced by HBV infection.

  12. Convergence of miRNA Expression Profiling, α-Synuclein Interacton and GWAS in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Madalena; Rosa, Alexandra; Guedes, Leonor C.; Fonseca, Benedita V.; Gotovac, Kristina; Violante, Sara; Mestre, Tiago; Coelho, Miguel; Rosa, Mário M.; Martin, Eden R.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Wang, Liyong; Borovecki, Fran; Ferreira, Joaquim J.; Oliveira, Sofia A.

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs were recently implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). miRNAs are abundant in the nervous system, essential for efficient brain function and play important roles in neuronal patterning and cell specification. To further investigate their involvement in the etiology of PD, we conducted miRNA expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 19 patients and 13 controls using microarrays. We found 18 miRNAs differentially expressed, and pathway analysis of 662 predicted target genes of 11 of these miRNAs revealed an over-representation in pathways previously linked to PD as well as novel pathways. To narrow down the genes for further investigations, we undertook a parallel approach using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis to uncover genome-wide interactions of α-synuclein, a molecule with a central role in both monogenic and idiopathic PD. Convergence of ChIP-seq and miRNomics data highlighted the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the ubiquitin proteasome system as key players in PD. We then tested the association of target genes belonging to these pathways with PD risk, and identified nine SNPs in USP37 consistently associated with PD susceptibility in three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) datasets (0.46≤OR≤0.63) and highly significant in the meta-dataset (3.36×10−4miRNAs may act as regulators of both known and novel biological processes leading to idiopathic PD. PMID:22003392

  13. Platelet miRNAs and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Alarcón, Marcelo

    2015-07-15

    Activated platelets play a critical role in the acute complications of atherosclerosis that cause life-threatening ischemic events at late stages of the disease. The miRNAs are a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that play a significant role in both inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. The miRNAs are known to be present in platelets and exert important regulatory functions. Here we systematically examine the genes that are regulated by platelet miRNAs (miRNA-223,miRNA-126,miRNA-21, miRNA-24 and miRNA-197) and the association with cardiovascular disease risks. Platelet-secreted miRNAs could be novel biomarkers associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  14. On the unimolecular reactions of CH 3O and CH 2OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, George F.; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Purvis, George D.

    1982-04-01

    Recent experiments suggest that the isomerization reaction CH 3O ⇋ CH 2OH may compete with the hydrogen dissociation reaction CH 3O → CH 2O + H. We report correlated many-body calculations of barrier heights for these reactions and other decompositions of CH 3O and CH 2OH. The barriers for isomerization and dissociation are similar, while the reaction CH 3O → HCO + H 2 has a higher energy barrier.

  15. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, Raoul J P; Rossi, Riccardo L; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-07-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org.

  16. Identification of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated regulatory pathways in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Li, Yang; He, Hua; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-10-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) post-transcriptionally regulate target gene expression to modulate growth and development and biotic and abiotic stress responses. By analyzing small RNA deep sequencing data in combination with the genome sequence, we identified 75 conserved miRNAs and 11 novel miRNAs. Their target genes were also predicted. For most conserved miRNAs, the miRNA-target pairs were conserved across plant species. In addition to these conserved miRNA-target pairs, we also identified some papaya-specific miRNA-target regulatory pathways. Both miR168 and miR530 target the Argonaute 1 gene, indicating a second autoregulatory mechanism for miRNA regulation. A non-conserved miRNA was mapped within an intron of Dicer-like 1 (DCL1), suggesting a conserved homeostatic autoregulatory mechanism for DCL1 expression. A 21-nt miRNA triggers secondary siRNA production from its target genes, nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat protein genes. Certain phased-miRNAs were processed from their conserved miRNA precursors, indicating a putative miRNA evolution mechanism. In addition, we identified a Carica papaya-specific miRNA that targets an ethylene receptor gene, implying its function in the ethylene signaling pathway. This work will also advance our understanding of miRNA functions and evolution in plants.

  17. Thz Spectroscopy of 12CH^+, 13CH^+, and 12CD^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian; Pearson, John; Amano, Takayoshi

    2015-06-01

    In 1937, Dunham detected a couple of unidentified lines in near-UV, and later Douglas and Herzberg identified them based on their laboratory observations to be low-J electronic transitions of CH^+. The electronic spectra, in particular the A^1Π-X^1σ^+ band, have been investigated extensively. On the other hand, the pure rotational transitions have not been studied so extensively. Only the lowest rotational transition, J=1-0, was observed in the laboratory for the normal species, 13CH^+, and CD^+. Based on the laboratory frequency, CH^+ was detected in star forming regions with the Hershel space observatory. Cernicharo et al identified pure rotational transitions from J=2-1 to J=6-5 in the far-infrared region in the ISO spectrum of the planetary nebula NGC 7027. The ISO spectra, however, were of low-resolution, so high-resolution spectroscopic observation is highly desirable. In this presentation, we have extended the measurements to higher-J lines up to 2 THz. For production of CH^+, an extended negative glow discharge in a gas mixture of CH_4 (˜ 0.5 mTorr) diluted in He (˜ 60 mTorr) was used. The optimum discharge current was about 15 mA and the axial magnetic filed to 160 Gauss was applied up. The discharge cell was cooled down to liquid nitrogen temperature. Several frequency multiplier chains, developed at JPL and purchased from Virginia Diodes, were used as THz radiation sources. New THz measurements are not only useful for providing better characterization of spectroscopic properties but also will serve as starting point for astronomical observations. T. Dunham, Publ. Astron. Soc. Pac., 49,~26 (1937) A. E. Douglas and G. Herzberg, Ap. J. 94,~381 (1941) T. Amano, Ap.J.Lett., 716, L1 (2010) T. Amano, J. Chem. Phys., 133, 244305 (2010) J. Cernicharo et al., Ap. J. Lett., 483, L65 (1997)

  18. CH5+: chemistry's chameleon unmasked.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keiran C; Crittenden, Deborah L; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2005-04-06

    The nuclear vibrational wave function and zero-point vibrational energy of CH5(+) are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo techniques on an interpolated potential energy surface constructed from CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pVTZ ab initio data. From this multidimensional wave function, the vibrationally averaged rotational constants and radial distribution functions for atom-atom distances within the molecule are constructed. It is found that the distributions of all 10 H-H distances are bimodal and identical. The radial distribution functions obtained for the five C-H distances are also identical, but unimodal. The three rotational constants were found to be 3.78, 3.80, and 3.83 cm(-1). These values indicate that the ground state of CH5(+) is significantly more symmetric than its global minimum energy structure. We conclude that the zero-point motion of CH5(+) renders all five protons equivalent in the ground state and precludes the assignment of a unique structure to the molecule.

  19. Catalytic, oxidative condensation of CH4 to CH3COOH in one step via CH activation.

    PubMed

    Periana, Roy A; Mironov, Oleg; Taube, Doug; Bhalla, Gaurav; Jones, C J

    2003-08-08

    Acetic acid is an important petrochemical that is currently produced from methane (or coal) in a three-step process based on carbonylation of methanol. We report a direct, selective, oxidative condensation of two methane molecules to acetic acid at 180 degrees C in liquid sulfuric acid. Carbon-13 isotopic labeling studies show that both carbons of acetic acid originate from methane. The reaction is catalyzed by palladium, and the results are consistent with the reaction occurring by tandem catalysis, involving methane C-H activation to generate Pd-CH3 species, followed by efficient oxidative carbonylation with methanol, generated in situ from methane, to produce acetic acid.

  20. CH-47F Improved Cargo Helicopter (CH-47F)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Authority/Budget Activity BY - Base Year DAMIR - Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval Dev Est - Development Estimate DoD - Department of...SEP 1999 LRIP (#1) Contract Award DEC 2002 DEC 2002 JUN 2003 DEC 2002 LRIP (#2) Contract Award DEC 2003 DEC 2003 JUN 2004 DEC 2003 IOT &E Start MAR...NOV 2007 JUL 2007 Change Explanations None Memo CH-47F December 2013 SAR April 16, 2014 16:29:40 UNCLASSIFIED 8 IOT &E is a single effort

  1. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  2. Martian CH(4): sources, flux, and detection.

    PubMed

    Onstott, T C; McGown, D; Kessler, J; Lollar, B Sherwood; Lehmann, K K; Clifford, S M

    2006-04-01

    Recent observations have detected trace amounts of CH(4) heterogeneously distributed in the martian atmosphere, which indicated a subsurface CH(4) flux of ~2 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(9) cm(2) s(1). Four different origins for this CH(4) were considered: (1) volcanogenic; (2) sublimation of hydrate- rich ice; (3) diffusive transport through hydrate-saturated cryosphere; and (4) microbial CH(4) generation above the cryosphere. A diffusive flux model of the martian crust for He, H(2), and CH(4) was developed based upon measurements of deep fracture water samples from South Africa. This model distinguishes between abiogenic and microbial CH(4) sources based upon their isotopic composition, and couples microbial CH(4) production to H(2) generation by H(2)O radiolysis. For a He flux of approximately 10(5) cm(2) s(1) this model yields an abiogenic CH(4) flux and a microbial CH(4) flux of approximately 10(6) and approximately 10(9) cm(2) s(1), respectively. This flux will only reach the martian surface if CH(4) hydrate is saturated in the cryosphere; otherwise it will be captured within the cryosphere. The sublimation of a hydrate-rich cryosphere could generate the observed CH(4) flux, whereas microbial CH(4) production in a hypersaline environment above the hydrate stability zone only seems capable of supplying approximately 10(5) cm(2) s(1) of CH(4). The model predicts that He/H(2)/CH(4)/C(2)H(6) abundances and the C and H isotopic values of CH(4) and the C isotopic composition of C(2)H(6) could reveal the different sources. Cavity ring-down spectrometers represent the instrument type that would be most capable of performing the C and H measurements of CH(4) on near future rover missions and pinpointing the cause and source of the CH(4) emissions.

  3. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  4. Bioinformatics of cardiovascular miRNA biology.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Meik; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Chunguang; Viereck, Janika; Pachel, Christina; Frantz, Stefan; Thum, Thomas; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ~22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs and are highly conserved among species. Moreover, miRNAs regulate gene expression of a large number of genes associated with important biological functions and signaling pathways. Recently, several miRNAs have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Thus, investigating the complex regulatory effect of miRNAs may lead to a better understanding of their functional role in the heart. To achieve this, bioinformatics approaches have to be coupled with validation and screening experiments to understand the complex interactions of miRNAs with the genome. This will boost the subsequent development of diagnostic markers and our understanding of the physiological and therapeutic role of miRNAs in cardiac remodeling. In this review, we focus on and explain different bioinformatics strategies and algorithms for the identification and analysis of miRNAs and their regulatory elements to better understand cardiac miRNA biology. Starting with the biogenesis of miRNAs, we present approaches such as LocARNA and miRBase for combining sequence and structure analysis including phylogenetic comparisons as well as detailed analysis of RNA folding patterns, functional target prediction, signaling pathway as well as functional analysis. We also show how far bioinformatics helps to tackle the unprecedented level of complexity and systemic effects by miRNA, underlining the strong therapeutic potential of miRNA and miRNA target structures in cardiovascular disease. In addition, we discuss drawbacks and limitations of bioinformatics algorithms and the necessity of experimental approaches for miRNA target identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Non-coding RNAs'.

  5. THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, AND TRIPLE BONDS: Al - CH3, Al = CH2, AND Al. = CH

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Douglas J.; Ray, Douglas; Rubesin, Philip C.; Schaefer III, Henry F.

    1980-06-01

    Nonempirical quantum mechanical methods have been used to investigate the A{ell}CH{sub 3}, A{ell}CH{sub 2}, and A{ell}CH molecules, which may be considered to represent the simplest aluminum-carbon single, double, and triple bonds. Equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were determined at the self-consistent-field level of theory using double zeta basis set: A{ell}(11s7p/6s4p), C(9s5p/4s2p), H(4s/2s). The {sup 1}A{sub 1} ground state of A{ell}CH{sub 3} has a reasonably conventional A{ell}-C single bond of length 2.013 {angstrom}, compared to 1.96 {angstrom} in the known molecule A{ell}(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}. The CH equilibrium distance is 1.093 {angstrom} and the A{ell}-C-H angle 111.9{sup o}. The structures of three electron states each of A{ell}CH{sub 2} and A{ell}CH were similarly predicted, The interesting result is that the ground state of A{ell}CH{sub 2} does not contain an A{ell}-C double bond, and the ground state of A{ell}CH is not characterized by an A{ell}{triple_bond}C bond. The multiply-bonded electronic states do exist but they lie 21 kcal (A{ell}CH{sub 2}) and 86 kcal (A{ell}CH) above the respective ground states. The dissociation energies of the three ground electronic states are predicted to be 68 kcal (A{ell}CH{sub 3}), 77 kcal (A{ell}CH{sub 2}), and 88 kcal (A{ell}CH), Vibrational frequencies are also predicted for the three molecules, and their electronic structures are discussed with reference to Mulliken populations and dipole moments.

  6. miRDeep*: an integrated application tool for miRNA identification from RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    An, Jiyuan; Lai, John; Lehman, Melanie L; Nelson, Colleen C

    2013-01-01

    miRDeep and its varieties are widely used to quantify known and novel micro RNA (miRNA) from small RNA sequencing (RNAseq). This article describes miRDeep*, our integrated miRNA identification tool, which is modeled off miRDeep, but the precision of detecting novel miRNAs is improved by introducing new strategies to identify precursor miRNAs. miRDeep* has a user-friendly graphic interface and accepts raw data in FastQ and Sequence Alignment Map (SAM) or the binary equivalent (BAM) format. Known and novel miRNA expression levels, as measured by the number of reads, are displayed in an interface, which shows each RNAseq read relative to the pre-miRNA hairpin. The secondary pre-miRNA structure and read locations for each predicted miRNA are shown and kept in a separate figure file. Moreover, the target genes of known and novel miRNAs are predicted using the TargetScan algorithm, and the targets are ranked according to the confidence score. miRDeep* is an integrated standalone application where sequence alignment, pre-miRNA secondary structure calculation and graphical display are purely Java coded. This application tool can be executed using a normal personal computer with 1.5 GB of memory. Further, we show that miRDeep* outperformed existing miRNA prediction tools using our LNCaP and other small RNAseq datasets. miRDeep* is freely available online at http://www.australianprostatecentre.org/research/software/mirdeep-star.

  7. So, Why Sol-Mi? American Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Peggy D.

    2005-01-01

    Walk into any primary grade music class in the U.S., and you will likely hear teacher and students singing a musical greeting, such as "Good morning boys and girls" (sol-mi-mi-sol-sol-mi) and the response "Good morning Miss Purdy" (sol-mi-mi-sol-mi-mi). Since about the 1970s, teachers have been beginning and ending music class for young children…

  8. miRNA-based drought regulation in wheat.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, Guray; Tufekci, Ebru Derelli; Uranbey, Serkan; Unver, Turgay

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding regulatory RNAs that regulate gene expression by guiding target mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. Drought is a common environmental stress influencing crop growth and development. To date, it has been reported that a number of plant miRNA are involved in drought stress response. In this study, we comparatively investigated drought stress-responsive miRNAs in the root and leaf of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Sivas 111/33) by miRNA microarray screening. miRNA microarray analysis showed that 285 miRNAs (207 upregulated and 78 downregulated) and 244 miRNAs (115 upregulated and 129 downregulated) were differentially expressed in leaf and root tissues, respectively. Among the differentially expressed miRNAs, 23 miRNAs were only expressed in the leaf and 26 miRNAs were only expressed in the root of wheat growth under drought stress. Upon drought treatment, expression of miR159, miR160, miR166, miR169, miR172, miR395, miR396, miR408, miR472, miR477, miR482, miR1858, miR2118, and miR5049 were found to be significantly differentiated in bread wheat. The regulatory network analysis showed that miR395 has connections with a number of target transcripts, and miR159 and miR319 share a number of target genes. Drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive wheat cultivars showed altered expression pattern upon drought stress in terms of investigated miRNA and their target transcript expression level.

  9. Two miRNA clusters, miR-34b/c and miR-449, are essential for normal brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingwen; Bao, Jianqiang; Kim, Minkyung; Yuan, Shuiqiao; Tang, Chong; Zheng, Huili; Mastick, Grant S.; Xu, Chen; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Ablation of a single miRNA gene rarely leads to a discernable developmental phenotype in mice, in some cases because of compensatory effects by other functionally related miRNAs. Here, we report that simultaneous inactivation of two functionally related miRNA clusters (miR-34b/c and miR-449) encoding five miRNAs (miR-34b, miR-34c, miR-449a, miR-449b, and miR-449c) led to sexually dimorphic, partial perinatal lethality, growth retardation, and infertility. These developmental defects correlated with the dysregulation of ∼240 target genes, which are mainly involved in three major cellular functions, including cell-fate control, brain development and microtubule dynamics. Our data demonstrate an essential role of a miRNA family in brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis. PMID:24982181

  10. miRLocator: Machine Learning-Based Prediction of Mature MicroRNAs within Plant Pre-miRNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haibo; Zhai, Jingjing; Ma, Chuang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short, non-coding RNA that play regulatory roles in a wide variety of biological processes, such as plant growth and abiotic stress responses. Although several computational tools have been developed to identify primary miRNAs and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs), very few provide the functionality of locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. This manuscript introduces a novel algorithm for predicting miRNAs named miRLocator, which is based on machine learning techniques and sequence and structural features extracted from miRNA:miRNA* duplexes. To address the class imbalance problem (few real miRNAs and a large number of pseudo miRNAs), the prediction models in miRLocator were optimized by considering critical (and often ignored) factors that can markedly affect the prediction accuracy of mature miRNAs, including the machine learning algorithm and the ratio between training positive and negative samples. Ten-fold cross-validation on 5854 experimentally validated miRNAs from 19 plant species showed that miRLocator performed better than the state-of-art miRNA predictor miRdup in locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. miRLocator will aid researchers interested in discovering miRNAs from model and non-model plant species.

  11. miRLocator: Machine Learning-Based Prediction of Mature MicroRNAs within Plant Pre-miRNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Haibo; Zhai, Jingjing; Ma, Chuang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short, non-coding RNA that play regulatory roles in a wide variety of biological processes, such as plant growth and abiotic stress responses. Although several computational tools have been developed to identify primary miRNAs and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs), very few provide the functionality of locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. This manuscript introduces a novel algorithm for predicting miRNAs named miRLocator, which isbased on machine learning techniques and sequence and structural features extracted from miRNA:miRNA* duplexes. To address the class imbalance problem (few real miRNAs and a large number of pseudo miRNAs), the prediction models in miRLocator were optimized by considering critical (and often ignored) factors that can markedly affect the prediction accuracy of mature miRNAs, including the machine learning algorithm and the ratio between training positive and negative samples. Ten-fold cross-validation on 5854 experimentally validated miRNAs from 19 plant species showed that miRLocator performed better than the state-of-art miRNA predictor miRdup in locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. miRLocator will aid researchers interested in discovering miRNAs from model and non-model plant species. PMID:26558614

  12. Knockout of miR-221 and miR-222 reveals common and specific targets for paralogous miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Geon; Lim, Yeong-Hwan; Kim, Nam Joong; Wee, Gabbine; Kim, Young-Kook

    2017-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of mRNA through sequence-specific binding of the 3' untranslated region (UTR). The seed sequence of miRNAs is the key determinant for target site recognition. Paralogous miRNAs, which share the same seed sequences but differ in their 3' regions, are known to regulate largely overlapping groups of mRNAs. However, no study has analyzed functional differences between paralogous miRNAs with proper experimental methods. In this study, we compared the targets of paralogous miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-222. Using a nuclease-mediated genome engineering technique, we established knockout cell lines for these miRNAs, and precisely analyzed differences in target regulation. We found that miR-221 and miR-222 suppress the previously identified targets, CDKN1B and CDKN1C, differentially. Whereas both miRNAs suppressed CDKN1B, only miR-221 suppressed CDKN1C. From transcriptome analyses, we found that several different target mRNAs were regulated by each of miR-221 and miR-222 independently, although a large number of mRNAs responded commonly to miR-221 and miR-222. This is the first study to compare the mRNA regulations by paralogous miRNAs and illustrate that paralogous miRNAs with the same seed sequence also have difference in target regulation.

  13. <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric slowing down of decoherence

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartlomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh Behari

    2016-10-27

    Here, we investigate <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric quantum systems ultraweakly coupled to an environment. We find that such open systems evolve under <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric, purely dephasing and unital dynamics. The dynamical map describing the evolution is then determined explicitly using a quantum canonical transformation. Furthermore, we provide an explanation of why <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric dephasing-type interactions lead to a critical slowing down of decoherence. This effect is further exemplified with an experimentally relevant system, a <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric qubit easily realizable, e.g., in optical or microcavity experiments.

  14. miRClassify: an advanced web server for miRNA family classification and annotation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Mao, Yaozong; Hu, Lingling; Wu, Yunfeng; Ji, Zhiliang

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) family is a group of miRNAs that derive from the common ancestor. Normally, members from the same miRNA family have similar physiological functions; however, they are not always conserved in primary sequence or secondary structure. Proper family prediction from primary sequence will be helpful for accurate identification and further functional annotation of novel miRNA. Therefore, we introduced a novel machine learning-based web server, the miRClassify, which can rapidly identify miRNA from the primary sequence and classify it into a miRNA family regardless of similarity in sequence and structure. Additionally, the medical implication of the miRNA family is also provided when it is available in PubMed. The web server is accessible at the link http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/software/MIR/home.html.

  15. Transforming Growth Factor β1/Smad4 Signaling Affects Osteoclast Differentiation via Regulation of miR-155 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Haiyu; Liu, Jianwen; Jin, Mengran; Chen, Jinping; Huang, Yazeng

    2017-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1)/Smad4 signaling plays a pivotal role in maintenance of the dynamic balance between bone formation and resorption. The microRNA miR-155 has been reported to exert a significant role in the differentiation of macrophage and dendritic cells. The goal of this study was to determine whether miR-155 regulates osteoclast differentiation through TGFβ1/Smad4 signaling. Here, we present that TGFβ1 elevated miR-155 levels during osteoclast differentiation through the stimulation of M-CSF and RANKL. Additionally, we found that silencing Smad4 attenuated the upregulation of miR-155 induced by TGFβ1. The results of luciferase reporter experiments and ChIP assays demonstrated that TGFβ1 promoted the binding of Smad4 to the miR-155 promoter at a site located in 454 bp from the transcription start site in vivo, further verifying that miR-155 is a transcriptional target of the TGFβ1/Smad4 pathway. Subsequently, TRAP staining and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that silencing Smad4 impaired the TGFβ1-mediated inhibition on osteoclast differentiation. Finally, we found that miR-155 may target SOCS1 and MITF to suppress osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, we provide the first evidence that TGFβ1/Smad4 signaling affects osteoclast differentiation by regulation of miR-155 expression and the use of miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target for osteoclast-related diseases shows great promise. PMID:28359146

  16. miRNAs in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farazi, Thalia A.; Spitzer, Jessica I.; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNA molecules of 20- to 23-nucleotide (nt) length that control gene expression in many cellular processes. These molecules typically reduce the stability of mRNAs, including those of genes that mediate processes in tumorigenesis, such as inflammation, cell cycle regulation, stress response, differentiation, apoptosis, and invasion. miRNA targeting is mostly achieved through specific base-pairing interactions between the 5′ end (“seed” region) of the miRNA and sites within coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs; target sites in the 3′ UTR lead to more effective mRNA destabilization. Since miRNAs frequently target hundreds of mRNAs, miRNA regulatory pathways are complex. To provide a critical overview of miRNA dysregulation in cancer we first discuss the methods currently available for studying the role of miRNAs in cancer and then review miRNA genomic organization, biogenesis, and mechanism of target recognition examining how these processes are altered in tumorigenesis. Given the critical role miRNAs play in tumorigenesis processes and their disease specific expression, they hold potential as therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers. PMID:21125669

  17. Thermal evolution of antiferromagnetic correlations and tetrahedral bond angles in superconducting <mi mathvariant='normal'>FeTemi>1<mi>x mathvariant='normal'>Semi>x>

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijun; Schneeloch, J. A.; Wen, Jinsheng; Božin, E. S.; Granroth, G. E.; Winn, B. L.; Feygenson, M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Gu, Genda; Zaliznyak, I. A.; Tranquada, J. M.; Xu, Guangyong

    2016-03-14

    It has recently been demonstrated that dynamical magnetic correlations measured by neutron scattering in iron chalcogenides can be described with models of short-range correlations characterized by particular choices of four-spin plaquettes, where the appropriate choice changes as the parent material is doped towards superconductivity. Here we apply such models to describe measured maps of magnetic scattering as a function of two-dimensional wave vectors obtained for optimally superconducting crystals of <mi mathvariant='normal'>FeTemi>1<mi>x mathvariant='normal'>Semi>x>. We show that the characteristic antiferromagnetic wave vector evolves from that of the bicollinear structure found in underdoped chalcogenides (at high temperature) to that associated with the stripe structure of antiferromagnetic iron arsenides (at low temperature); these can both be described with the same local plaquette, but with different interplaquette correlations. While the magnitude of the low-energy magnetic spectral weight is substantial at all temperatures, it actually weakens somewhat at low temperature, where the charge carriers become more itinerant. The observed change in spin correlations is correlated with the dramatic drop in the electronic scattering rate and the growth of the bulk nematic response upon cooling. In conclusion, we also present powder neutron diffraction results for lattice parameters in <mi mathvariant='normal'>FeTemi>1<mi>x mathvariant='normal'>Semi>x> indicating that the tetrahedral bond angle tends to increase towards the ideal value upon cooling, in agreement with the increased screening of the crystal field by more itinerant electrons and the correspondingly smaller splitting of the Fe 3d orbitals.

  18. Cholinesterase (ChE) response and related mortality among birds fed ChE inhibitors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludke, J.L.; Hill, E.F.; Dieter, M.P.

    1975-01-01

    Patterns of mortality and inhibition of brain and plasma ChE in birds treated with ChE inhibitors were studied in an attempt to determine the validity of using ChE activity as a monitoring and diagnostic technique. Analysis of brain ChE activity proved to be reliable for diagnosing and monitoring effects of selected ChE inhibitors in birds. Brain ChE inhibition exceeding 20% indicated exposure, and inhibition greater than 50% was sufficient for diagnosing cause of death. Individuals that died from dietary exposure to parathion or carbofuran had brain ChE activities below 55% of normal; although individuals could survive with brain ChE activity lower than 50%. Problems associated with collection, storage, and analysis of tissues for ChE activity are discussed.

  19. Regulation of miRNA Processing and miRNA Mediated Gene Repression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bajan, Sarah; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human protein-coding genes are predicted to be targets of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The widespread influence of miRNAs is illustrated by their essential roles in all biological processes. Regulated miRNA expression is essential for maintaining cellular differentiation; therefore alterations in miRNA expression patterns are associated with several diseases, including various cancers. High-throughput sequencing technologies revealed low level expressing miRNA isoforms, termed isomiRs. IsomiRs may differ in sequence, length, target preference and expression patterns from their parental miRNA and can arise from differences in miRNA biosynthesis, RNA editing, or SNPs inherent to the miRNA gene. The association between isomiR expression and disease progression is largely unknown. Misregulated miRNA expression is thought to contribute to the formation and/or progression of cancer. However, due to the diversity of targeted transcripts, miRNAs can function as both tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes as defined by cellular context. Despite this, miRNA profiling studies concluded that the differential expression of particular miRNAs in diseased tissue could aid the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers. PMID:25069508

  20. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes. PMID:26407127

  1. NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (LR) SUBSTATION (MI98D), POWERHOUSE (MI98C), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (L-R) SUBSTATION (MI-98-D), POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C), AND COOKE DAM POND IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, North Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  2. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes.

  3. The photolysis of CH3ONO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, H. A.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The photolysis of CH3ONO, alone and in the presence of NO, NO-N2 mixtures, and NO-CO mixtures was studied between 25 and 150 C. The major products are CH2O, N2O, and H2O. The quantum yields of N2O were measured. The N2O yield is large at low pressures but approaches a high-pressure limiting value of 0.055 at all temperatures as the excited CH3O produced in the primary step is stabilized by collision. In the presence of excess CO, and N2O yield drops, and CO2 is produced (though not in sufficient amounts to account for the drop in N2O). When pure CH2ONO is photolyzed, CO is produced and NO accumulates in the system. Both products are formed in related processes and result from CH3O attack on CH2O.

  4. Unusual reaction paths of SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4 + H- → CH4 + H- and CH4 + F- → CH3F + H-: Quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyaev, Ruslan M.; Quapp, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Benjamin; Getmanskii, Ilya V.; Koval, Vitaliy V.

    2013-11-01

    Quantum chemical (CCSD(full)/6-311++G(3df,3pd), CCSD(T)(full)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)) and density function theory (B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd)) calculations were performed for the SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4 + H- → CH4 + H- and CH4 + F- → CH3F + H-. The calculated gradient reaction pathways for both reactions have an unusual behavior. An unusual stationary point of index 2 lies on the gradient reaction path. Using Newton trajectories for the reaction path, we can detect VRI point at which the reaction path branches.

  5. Low-dose irradiation promotes Rad51 expression by down-regulating miR-193b-3p in hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eon-Seok; Won, Yeo Jin; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Daeui; Bae, Jin-Han; Park, Seong-Joon; Noh, Sung Jin; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Choi, Si Ho; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Son, Tae Gen

    2016-05-01

    Current evidence indicates that there is a relationship between microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene silencing and low-dose irradiation (LDIR) responses. Here, alterations of miRNA expression in response to LDIR exposure in male BALB/c mice and three different types of hepatocytes were investigated. The miRNome of the LDIR-exposed mouse spleens (0.01 Gy, 6.5 mGy/h) was analyzed, and the expression of miRNA and mRNA was validated by qRT-PCR. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase assays were also performed to evaluate the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes and to gain insight into the regulation of miRNA expression. The expression of miRNA-193b-3p was down-regulated in the mouse spleen and liver and in various hepatocytes (NCTC, Hepa, and HepG2 cell lines) in response to LDIR. The down-regulation of miR-193b-3p expression was caused by histone deacetylation on the miR-193b-3p promoter in the HepG2 cells irradiated with 0.01 Gy. However, the alteration of histone deacetylation and miR-193b-3p and Rad51 expression in response to LDIR was restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-cyctein. In conclusion, we provide evidence that miRNA responses to LDIR include the modulation of cellular stress responses and repair mechanisms.

  6. Strong anisotropy and magnetostriction in the two-dimensional Stoner ferromagnet <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Kent, P. R. C.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2016-04-06

    Computationally characterizing magnetic properies of novel two-dimensional (2D) materials serves as an important first step of exploring possible applications. Using density-functional theory, we show that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 is a potential 2D material with sufficiently low formation energy to be synthesized by mechanical exfoliation from the bulk phase with a van der Waals layered structure. In addition, we calculated the phonon dispersion demonstrating that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2is dynamically stable. Furthermore, we find that similar to the bulk phase, 2D <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 exhibits amagnetic moment that originates from a Stoner instability. In contrast to other 2D materials, we find that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 exhibits a significant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of 920μ eV per Fe atom originating from spin-orbit coupling. In conclusion, we show that applying biaxial tensile strains enhances the anisotropy energy, which reveals strong magnetostriction in single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 with a sizable magneostrictive coefficient. Our results indicate that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 is potentially useful for magnetic storage applications.

  7. MiRNAs and miRNA Polymorphisms Modify Drug Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-Peng; Hu, Yao-Dong; Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Yang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Chun; Tang, Jie; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Differences in expression of drug response-related genes contribute to inter-individual variation in drugs’ biological effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs emerging as new players in epigenetic regulation of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs regulate the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, drug transportation, drug targets and downstream signal molecules directly or indirectly. MiRNA polymorphisms, the genetic variations affecting miRNA expression and/or miRNA-mRNA interaction, provide a new insight into the understanding of inter-individual difference in drug response. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress in miRNAs mediated regulation of biotransformation enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors. We also describe the implications of miRNA polymorphisms in cancer chemotherapy response. PMID:27834829

  8. MiRNAs in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin T; Xiao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which mainly inhibit protein expression by targeting the 3'UTR (untranslated region) of mRNAs, are known to play various roles in the pathogenesis of many different types of diseases. Specifically, in bone diseases, recent emphasis has been placed on the involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation and proliferation of bone and cartilage cells, particularly with regards to how these mechanisms contribute to bone homeostasis. In this review, we summarize miRNAs that are important in the differentiation and proliferation of bone cells, and specific miRNAs associated with bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review also provides the perspective that miRNA studies will identify not only new mechanisms in basic bone research, but also potential novel diagnostic biomarkers and drug targets for bone diseases.

  9. Shortened Engineered Human Antibody CH2 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Zhao, Qi; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain is critical for antibody effector functions. Isolated CH2 domains are promising scaffolds for construction of libraries containing diverse binders that could also confer some effector functions. We have shown previously that an isolated human CH2 domain is relatively unstable to thermally induced unfolding, but its stability can be improved by engineering an additional disulfide bond (Gong, R., Vu, B. K., Feng, Y., Prieto, D. A., Dyba, M. A., Walsh, J. D., Prabakaran, P., Veenstra, T. D., Tarasov, S. G., Ishima, R., and Dimitrov, D. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 14203–14210). We have hypothesized that the stability of this engineered antibody domain could be further increased by removing unstructured residues. To test our hypothesis, we removed the seven N-terminal residues that are in a random coil as suggested by our analysis of the isolated CH2 crystal structure and NMR data. The resulting shortened engineered CH2 (m01s) was highly soluble, monomeric, and remarkably stable, with a melting temperature (Tm) of 82.6 °C, which is about 10 and 30 °C higher than those of the original stabilized CH2 (m01) and CH2, respectively. m01s and m01 were more resistant to protease digestion than CH2. A newly identified anti-CH2 antibody that recognizes a conformational epitope bound to m01s significantly better (>10-fold higher affinity) than to CH2 and slightly better than to m01. m01s bound to a recombinant soluble human neonatal Fc receptor at pH 6.0 more strongly than CH2. These data suggest that shortening the m01 N terminus significantly increases stability without disrupting its conformation and that our approach for increasing stability and decreasing size by removing unstructured regions may also apply to other proteins. PMID:21669873

  10. Demethylation of H3K27 Is Essential for the Induction of Direct Cardiac Reprogramming by miR Combo.

    PubMed

    Dal-Pra, Sophie; Hodgkinson, Conrad P; Mirotsou, Maria; Kirste, Imke; Dzau, Victor J

    2017-02-16

    Rationale: Direct reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts to cardac omyocytes has recently emerged as a novel and promising approach to regenerate the injured myocardium. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of this approach in vitro and in vivo using a combination of four microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that we named miR combo. However, the mechanism of miR combo mediated direct cardiac reprogramming is currently unknown. Objective: Here we investigated the possibility that miR combo initiated direct cardiac reprogramming through an epigenetic mechanism. Methods and Results: Using a qPCR array, we found that histone methyltransferases and demethylases that regulate the tri-methylation of H3K27 (H3K27me3), an epigenetic modification that marks transcriptional repression, were changed in miR combo treated fibroblasts. Accordingly, global H3K27me3 levels were downregulated by miR combo treatment. In particular, the promoter region of cardiac transcription factors showed decreased H3K27me3 as revealed by ChIP-qPCR. Inhibition of H3K27 methyltransferases or of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) by pharmaceutical inhibition or siRNA reduced the levels of H3K27me3 and induced cardiogenic markers at the RNA and protein level, similarly to miR combo treatment. In contrast, knockdown of the H3K27 demethylases Kdm6A and Kdm6B restored the levels of H3K27me3 and blocked the induction of cardiac gene expression in miR combo treated fibroblasts. Conclusions: In summary, we demonstrated that removal of the repressive mark H3K27me3 is essential for the induction of cardiac reprogramming by miR combo. Our data not only highlight the importance of regulating the epigenetic landscape during cell fate conversion but also provide a framework to improve this technique.

  11. The Products of the Thermal Decomposition of CH3CHO

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliou, AnGayle; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Zhang, Xu; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Osborn, David L.; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2011-04-06

    We have used a heated 2 cm x 1 mm SiC microtubular (mu tubular) reactor to decompose acetaldehyde: CH3CHO + DELTA --> products. Thermal decomposition is followed at pressures of 75 - 150 Torr and at temperatures up to 1700 K, conditions that correspond to residence times of roughly 50 - 100 mu sec in the mu tubular reactor. The acetaldehyde decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: VUV photoionization mass spectroscopy (PIMS) and infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy after isolation in a cryogenic matrix. Besides CH3CHO, we have studied three isotopologues, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. We have identified the thermal decomposition products CH3(PIMS), CO (IR, PIMS), H (PIMS), H2 (PIMS), CH2CO (IR, PIMS), CH2=CHOH (IR, PIMS), H2O (IR, PIMS), and HC=CH (IR, PIMS). Plausible evidence has been found to support the idea that there are at least three different thermal decomposition pathways for CH3CHO: Radical decomposition: CH3CHO + DELTA --> CH3 + [HCO] --> CH3 + H + CO Elimination: CH3CHO + DELTA --> H2 + CH2=C=O. Isomerization/elimination: CH3CHO + DELTA --> [CH2=CH-OH] --> HC=CH + H2O. Both PIMS and IR spectroscopy show compelling evidence for the participation of vinylidene, CH2=C:, as an intermediate in the decomposition of vinyl alchohol: CH2=CH-OH + DELTA --> [CH2=C:] + H2O --> HC=CH + H2O.

  12. Chromatin poises miRNA- and protein-coding genes for expression.

    PubMed

    Barski, Artem; Jothi, Raja; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Schones, Dustin E; Zhao, Keji

    2009-10-01

    Chromatin modifications have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression. While association of certain modifications with expressed or silent genes has been established, it remains unclear how changes in chromatin environment relate to changes in gene expression. In this article, we used ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing) to analyze the genome-wide changes in chromatin modifications during activation of total human CD4(+) T cells by T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Surprisingly, we found that the chromatin modification patterns at many induced and silenced genes are relatively stable during the short-term activation of resting T cells. Active chromatin modifications were already in place for a majority of inducible protein-coding genes, even while the genes were silent in resting cells. Similarly, genes that were silenced upon T-cell activation retained positive chromatin modifications even after being silenced. To investigate if these observations are also valid for miRNA-coding genes, we systematically identified promoters for known miRNA genes using epigenetic marks and profiled their expression patterns using deep sequencing. We found that chromatin modifications can poise miRNA-coding genes as well. Our data suggest that miRNA- and protein-coding genes share similar mechanisms of regulation by chromatin modifications, which poise inducible genes for activation in response to environmental stimuli.

  13. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Gennaro, Gianfranco Di; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30–50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs. PMID:27057640

  14. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-05-10

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30-50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs.

  15. Expression profiles of miRNAs in Gossypium raimondii *

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Guo, Teng-long; Wang, Qing-lian; Wang, Kun-bo; Sun, Run-run; Zhang, Bao-hong

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are a class of conserved, small, endogenous, and non-protein-coding RNA molecules with 20–24 nucleotides (nt) in length that function as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Functional studies have demonstrated that plant miRNAs are involved in the regulation of a wide range of plant developmental processes. To date, however, no research has been carried out to study the expression profiles of miRNAs in Gossypium raimondii, a model cotton species. We selected 16 miRNAs to profile their tissue-specific expression patterns in G. raimondii four different tissues, and these miRNAs are reported to play important roles in plant growth and development. Our results showed that the expression levels of these miRNAs varied significantly from one to another in a tissue-dependent manner. Eight miRNAs, including miR-159, miR-162, miR-164, miR-172, miR-390, miR-395, miR-397, and miR-398, exhibited exclusively high expression levels in flower buds, suggesting that these miRNAs may play significant roles in floral development. The expression level of miR-164 was relatively high in shoots beside flower buds, implying that the function of miR-164 is not only limited to floral development but it may also play an important role in shoot development. Certain miRNAs such as miR-166 and miR-160 were extremely highly expressed in all of the four tissues tested compared with other miRNAs investigated, suggesting that they may play regulatory roles at multiple development stages. This study will contribute to future studies on the functional characterization of miRNAs in cotton. PMID:25845363

  16. A novel panel of serum miR-21/miR-155/miR-365 as a potential diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Guang; Jiang, Yong-Dong; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Yang, Yan-Mei; Pang, Da; Song, Yan-Ni

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Insufficient sensitivity and specificity prevent the use of most existing biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer. Recently, it was reported that serum microRNAs (miRNAs) may be potential biomarkers in many cancer diseases. In this study, we investigated whether serum levels of 5 miRNAs including miR-21, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, and miR-365 could discriminate breast cancer patients and healthy controls. Methods Serum levels of miRNAs were measured by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 99 breast cancer patients and 21 healthy controls. The abundance change of serum miRNAs were also evaluated following surgical resection in 20 breast cancer patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers. Results Serum levels of miR-21 and miR-155 was significantly higher, while miR-365 was significantly lower in breast cancer as compared with healthy controls. The serum levels of miR-21 and miR-155 significantly decreased following surgical resection. Additionally, the serum level of miR-155 at stages I and II was significantly higher compared to stage III. The serum miR-145 level was remarkably higher in progesterone receptor (PR)-positive patients than PR-negative. The positivity of miR-21, miR-155, and miR-365 was high compared to CA 153 and CEA in breast cancer. ROC curve analyses of a combination of miR-21, miR-155, and miR-365 yielded much higher area under curve and enhanced sensitivity and specificity in comparison to each miRNA alone. Conclusion The combination of serum miR-21/miR-155/miR-365 may potentially serve as a sensitive and specific biomarker that enables differentiation of breast cancer from healthy controls. PMID:28203552

  17. Infrared measurements of atmospheric CH3CN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinbohl, Armin; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Bhaswar, Sen; Blavier, Jean--Francois; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2005-01-01

    For the first time CH3CN has been measured in the Earth's atmosphere by means of infrared remote sensing. Vertical profiles of volume mixing ratio were retrieved from 12 solar occultation measurements by the balloon-borne JPL MkIV interferometer between 1993 and 2004. Profile retrieval is possible in an altitude range between 12 and 30 km with a precision of _20 ppt in the Arctic and _30 ppt at mid-latitudes. The retrieved CH3CN profiles show mixing ratios of 100-150 ppt a few kilometers above the tropopause that decrease to values below 40 ppt at altitudes between 22 and 30 km. The CH3CN mixing ratios show a reasonably compact correlation with the stratospheric tracers CH3Cl and CH4. The CH3CN altitude profiles and tracer correlations are well reproduced by a 2-dimensional model, suggesting that CH3CN is long-lived in the lower stratosphere and that previously-proposed ion-molecule reactions do not play a major role as loss processes of CH3CN.

  18. Convergent repression of miR156 by sugar and the CDK8 module of Arabidopsis Mediator.

    PubMed

    Buendía-Monreal, Manuel; Gillmor, C Stewart

    2017-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, leaves produced during the juvenile vegetative phase are simple, while adult leaves are morphologically complex. The juvenile to adult transition is regulated by miR156, a microRNA that promotes juvenility by impeding the function of SPL transcription factors, which specify adult leaf traits. Both leaf derived sugars, as well as the Mediator Cyclin Dependent Kinase 8 (CDK8) module genes CENTER CITY (CCT)/MED12 and GRAND CENTRAL (GCT)/MED13, act upstream of miR156 to promote the juvenile to adult transition. However, it is not known whether sugar, CCT and GCT repress miR156 independently, as part of the same pathway, or in a cooperative manner. Here we show that sugar treatment can repress MIR156 expression in the absence of CCT or GCT. Both cct and the photosynthetic mutant chlorina1 (ch1) (which decreases sugar synthesis) exhibit extended juvenile development and increased MIR156A and MIR156C expression. Compared to ch1 and cct single mutants, the ch1 cct double mutant has a stronger effect on juvenile leaf traits, higher MIR156C levels, and a dramatic increase in MIR156A. Our results show that sugar and the CDK8 module are capable of regulating MIR156 independently, but suggest they normally act together in a synergistic manner.

  19. MiR-125b, miR-100 and miR-99a co-regulate vincristine resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Akbari Moqadam, F; Lange-Turenhout, E A M; Ariës, I M; Pieters, R; den Boer, M L

    2013-10-01

    MicroRNA-125b (miR-125b), miR-99a and miR-100 are overexpressed in vincristine-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cellular viability of ETV6-RUNX1-positive Reh cells significantly increased in presence of 9 ng/mL vincristine upon co-expression of miR-125b/miR-99a (91 ± 4%), miR-125b/miR-100 (93 ± 5%) or miR-125b/miR-99a/miR-100 (82 ± 17%) compared with miR-125b-transduced cells (38 ± 13%, P<0.05). Co-expression of these miRNAs resulted in downregulation of DNTT, NUCKS1, MALAT1, SNRPE, PNO1, SET, KIF5B, PRPS2, RPS11, RPL38 and RPL23A (fold-change 1.3-1.9, p<0.05). Similarly, 7 out of these genes are lower expressed in vincristine-resistant ALL cells of children (p<0.05). The concerted function of miR-125b in combination with miR-99a and/or miR-100 illustrates the complexity of vincristine-resistant pediatric ALL.

  20. Probing shock models of CH(+) formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Isabel; Craig, Nahide

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution, high SNR observations of CH and CH(+) toward Zeta Oph, Xi Per, and P Cyg are used to test several predictions of shock models of molecule formation. The predicted differences between the CH and HCH(+) heliocentric velocities of the magnitude produced by the shock theories are not found in any of the three stars. toward Zeta Oph and Xi Per, no difference is found, based on high-quality data, between the observed CH(+) lie profiles and a Gaussian function which would be expected as a result of shock structure. Gaussian line width parameters of CH(+) lines toward Zeta Oph and Xi Per are broad as predicted by shock models are consistent with previous measurements. These observations yield only weak evidence in favor of the predictions of shock models of molecule formation.

  1. MiRTDL: a deep learning approach for miRNA target prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuang; Guo, Maozu; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Xuejian

    2015-12-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate genes that are associated with various diseases. To better understand miRNAs, the miRNA regulatory mechanism needs to be investigated and the real targets identified. Here, we present miRTDL, a new miRNA target prediction algorithm based on convolutional neural network (CNN). The CNN automatically extracts essential information from the input data rather than completely relying on the input dataset generated artificially when the precise miRNA target mechanisms are poorly known. In this work, the constraint relaxing method is first used to construct a balanced training dataset to avoid inaccurate predictions caused by the existing unbalanced dataset. The miRTDL is then applied to 1,606 experimentally validated miRNA target pairs. Finally, the results show that our miRTDL outperforms the existing target prediction algorithms and achieves significantly higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 88.43%, 96.44% and 89.98%, respectively. We also investigate the miRNA target mechanism, and the results show that the complementation features are more important than the others.

  2. miRNA Modulation of Cholesterol Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the roles of the SREBP1 and SREBP2 transcription factors in regulating fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis and uptake have been known for some time, it was recently discovered that two related microRNAs, miR-33a and miR-33b, are embedded in these genes. Studies indicate that miR-33a and miR-33b act with their host genes, Srebp2 and Srebp1, respectively, to reciprocally regulate cholesterol homeostasis and fatty acid metabolism in a negative feedback loop. miR-33 has been shown to post-transcriptionally repress key genes involved in cellular cholesterol export and HDL metabolism (Abca1, Abcg1, Npc1), fatty acid oxidation (Crot, Cpt1a, Hadhb, Ampk), and glucose metabolism (Sirt6, Irs2). Delivery of inhibitors of miR-33 in vitro and in vivo relieves repression of these genes resulting in up-regulation of the associated metabolic pathways. In mouse models, miR-33 antagonism has proven has proven to be an effective strategy for increasing plasma HDL cholesterol and fatty acid oxidation, and protecting from atherosclerosis. These exciting findings have opened up promising new avenues for the development of therapeutics to treat dyslipidemia and other metabolic disorders. PMID:22011750

  3. Time Series miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis reveals critical miRNAs and targets in macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liangqun; McCurdy, Sara; Huang, Sijia; Zhu, Xun; Peplowska, Karolina; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Boisvert, William A.; Garmire, Lana X.

    2016-01-01

    Polarization of macrophages is regulated through complex signaling networks. Correlating miRNA and mRNA expression over time after macrophage polarization has not yet been investigated. We used paired RNA-Seq and miRNA-Seq experiments to measure the mRNA and miRNA expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages over a time-series of 8 hours. Bioinformatics analysis identified 31 differentially expressed miRNAs between M1 and M2 polarized macrophages. The top 4 M1 miRNAs (miR-155-3p, miR-155-5p, miR-147-3p and miR-9-5p) and top 4 M2 miRNAs (miR-27a-5p, let-7c-1-3p, miR-23a-5p and miR-23b-5p) were validated by qPCR. Interestingly, M1 specific miRNAs could be categorized to early- and late-response groups, in which three new miRNAs miR-1931, miR-3473e and miR-5128 were validated as early-response miRNAs. M1 polarization led to the enrichment of genes involved in immune responses and signal transduction, whereas M2 polarization enriched genes involved in cell cycle and metabolic processes. C2H2 zinc-finger family members are key targets of DE miRNAs. The integrative analysis between miRNAs and mRNAs demonstrates the regulations of miRNAs on nearly four thousand differentially expressed genes and most of the biological pathways enriched in macrophage polarization. In summary, this study elucidates the expression profiles of miRNAs and their potential targetomes during macrophage polarization. PMID:27981970

  4. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet <mi>Mn>1+<mi>δSb>

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; May, Andrew F.; Williams, Travis J.; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Cao, Huibo; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2015-06-15

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet <mi>Mn>1+<mi>δSb>. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.

  5. MI high power operation and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing both the beam intensity and power. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the near future plans.

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  7. Restoration of BRG1 inhibits proliferation and metastasis of lung cancer by regulating tumor suppressor miR-148b

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zheng; Su, Yanhe; Fa, Xianen

    2015-01-01

    Background Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) has been implicated in a variety of biological processes, and it has been found to be mutated or silenced in numerous cancers, including lung cancer. Recent reports have proposed BRG1 as a tumor suppressor, but its roles in cell proliferation and metastasis remain unknown. miR-148b functions as a tumor suppressor in non-small-cell lung cancer. However, the mechanism responsible for the downregulation of miR-148b in lung cancer is still elusive. Methods The expression of BRG1 and miR-148b was evaluated in lung cancer tissues and cells using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The effect of BRG1 on proliferation of lung cancer cells was investigated using MTT assay. Transwell and Western blot assays were used to analyze the effect of BRG1 on invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), respectively. The target of miR-148b was ascertained using luciferase reporter assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was performed to analyze the relation of BRG1 and the promoter region of miR-148b. Results Restoration of BRG1 was demonstrated to inhibit cell proliferation, metastasis, and EMT in lung cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we found that miR-148b was positively regulated by BRG1. Additionally, we suggested that miR-148b suppressed cell proliferation, metastasis, and EMT in lung cancer cells by directly binging to 3′-untranslated region of WNT1, blocking the WNT1/β-catenin signaling pathway. ChIP assay showed that BRG1 bound to the promoter of miR-148b in A549 cells. Conclusion BRG1 positively regulated the expression of miR-148b, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation, metastasis, restraint of EMT, and inactivation of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, which highlights potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26664144

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-mediated transcription of miR-301a and miR-454 and their host gene SKA2 regulates endothelin-1 and PAI-1 expression in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Caryn S; Li, Chen; Malik, Punam; Tahara, Stanley M; Kalra, Vijay K

    2015-10-12

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) play important roles in pulmonary hypertension (PH) in sickle cell disease (SCD). Our previous studies show higher levels of placenta growth factor (PlGF) in SCD correlate with increased plasma levels of ET-1, PAI-1, and other physiological markers of PH. PlGF-mediated ET-1 and PAI-1 expression occurs via activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). However, relatively little is understood regarding post-transcriptional regulation of PlGF-mediated expression of ET-1 and PAI-1. Herein, we show PlGF treatment of endothelial cells reduced levels of miR-301a and miR-454 from basal levels. In addition, both miRNAs targeted the 3'-UTRs of ET-1 and PAI-1 mRNAs. These results were corroborated in the mouse model of SCD [Berkeley sickle mice (BK-SS)] and in SCD subjects. Plasma levels of miR-454 in SCD subjects were significantly lower compared with unaffected controls, which correlated with higher plasma levels of both ET-1 and PAI-1. Moreover, lung tissues from BK-SS mice showed significantly reduced levels of pre-miR-301a and concomitantly higher levels of ET-1 and PAI-1. Furthermore, we show that miR-301a/miR-454 located in the spindle and kinetochore-associated protein-2 (SKA2) transcription unit was co-transcriptionally regulated by both HIF-1α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) as demonstrated by SKA2 promoter mutational analysis and ChIP. Finally we show that fenofibrate, a PPAR-α agonist, increased the expression of miR-301a/miR-454 and SKA2 in human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC) cells; the former were responsible for reduced expression of ET-1 and PAI-1. Our studies provide a potential therapeutic approach whereby fenofibrate-induced miR-301a/miR-454 expression can ameliorate PH and lung fibrosis by reduction in ET-1 and PAI-1 levels in SCD.

  9. Two-wavelength single laser CH and CH(4) imaging in a lifted turbulent diffusion flame.

    PubMed

    Namazian, M; Schmitt, R L; Long, M B

    1988-09-01

    A new technique has been developed which allows simultaneous 2-D mapping of CH and CH 4 in a turbulent methane flame. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser using two back mirrors produces output at 431.5 and 444 nm simultaneously. The 431.5-nm line is used to excite the (0, 0) band of the A(2)Delta-X(2)Pi system of CH, and the fluorescence of the (0, 1) transition is observed at 489 nm. Coincidentally, the spontaneous Raman scattering from CH(4) also occurs near 489 nm for a 431.5-nm excitation. To separate the CH(4) and CH contributions, the 444-nm line is used to produce a spontaneous Raman signal from CH(4) that is spectrally separated from the CH fluorescence. Subtraction of the signals generated by the 431.5- and 444-nm wavelength beams yields separate measurements of CH(4) and CH. Raman-scattered light records the instantaneous distribution of the fuel, and simultaneously the CH fluorescence indicates the location of the flame zone. The resulting composite images provide important insight on the interrelationship between fuel-air mixing and subsequent combustion.M. Namazian is with Altex Technologies Corporation, 109 Via De Tesoros, Los Gatos, California 95030; R. L. Schmitt is with Sandia National Laboratories, Combustion Research Facility, Livermore, California 94550; and M. B. Long is with Yale University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Haven, Connecticut 06520.

  10. Inference of gene regulation via miRNAs during ES cell differentiation using MiRaGE method.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Taguchi, Y-H; Yasuda, Jun

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a critical regulator of cell growth, differentiation, and development. To identify important miRNAs in a biological process, many bioinformatical tools have been developed. We have developed MiRaGE (MiRNA Ranking by Gene Expression) method to infer the regulation of gene expression by miRNAs from changes of gene expression profiles. The method does not require precedent array normalization. We applied the method to elucidate possibly important miRNAs during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation to neuronal cells and we infer that certain miRNAs, including miR-200 family, miR-429, miR-302 family, and miR-17-92 cluster members may be important to the maintenance of undifferentiated status in ES cells.

  11. Effect of miR-146a and miR-155 on cardiac xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhicheng; Qi, Feng; Liu, Tong; Fu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of miR-146a and miR-155 in a cardiac xenograft model treated with the immunosuppressant FK506, and to construct lentiviral vectors to further study the roles of miR-146a and miR-155 in cardiac xenotransplantation. Expression levels of miR-146a and miR-155 were examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and protein expression of RelA, which is a member of the nuclear factor-κB family, was examined by western blot analysis. Pre-miR-146a and pre-miR-155 fragments were designed and synthesized according to MiRBase and were cloned into the plasmid pCDH1-MCS1-EF1-copGFP. Recombinant plasmids were identified by enzyme digestion and sequencing. Survival time of cardiac grafts in the FK506 treatment group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). In addition, the histopathological grading results were significantly decreased in the treatment group (P<0.05). A significant decrease in RelA protein expression levels was observed in the treatment group (P<0.05), along with a significant increase in miR-146a expression levels (P<0.05) and a significant decrease in miR-155 expression levels (P<0.05). Digestion and sequencing findings demonstrated that the insertion of miRNA into the plasmid pCDH1-MCS1-EF1-copGFP conformed with the pre-miRNAs, and the lentiviral vectors were concentrated to a titer of 5×107 IFU/ml. These findings demonstrated that FK506 is able to inhibit the rejection effect in a mouse-to-rat cardiac xenotransplantation model. FK506 treatment altered the expression levels of miR-146a and miR-155, indicating that they may have an important role in regulating the immune response to the rejection effect. miR-146a and miR-155 lentiviral vectors were successfully constructed for further experiments both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:28101175

  12. Predictive and Prognostic Roles of Abnormal Expression of Tissue miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxing; Zheng, Jihui; Chen, Liangyu; Diao, Hongyu; Liu, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is the most prevalent primary brain tumors in adults. In addition to the high incidence and mortality rate, the 5-year survival rate of glioma is also extremely low. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as a class of small non-coding RNAs, may play an important role in carcinogenesis. It was also proposed that miRNAs might also be associated with glioma diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we aimed at investigating the predictive and prognostic values of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in glioma and, hopefully, to provide some evidence for novel therapy of glioma. Tissue specimens were obtained from tumor tissue and adjacent non-tumor tissue. RNA was extracted and qRT-PCR was performed with U6 being the internal control. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed, and the area under the ROC curves (AUC) was calculated to evaluate the significance of candidate miRNAs in distinguishing glioma tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Survival curves of Kaplan-Meier method were constructed for both high expression group and low expression group, and the difference between curves was evaluated by log-rank test. All the statistical analyses were performed using Stata version 12.0 software, and graphs were generated by GraphPad Prism 5.0. The significance of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 expression level in distinguishing glioma tumor from adjacent non-tumor tissues was further validated. Combination of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-22 was significantly superior compared to the clinical standard of using these miRNAs alone. A clear demarcation was shown by survival analysis between patients with high miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 expression and patients with poor prognosis. Similarly, panel of these miRNAs could play a better prognostic role in glioma. In this study, we confirmed the significance of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in distinguishing glioma tumor from adjacent non-tumor tissues. Higher expressions of miR-125b and miR-222 have also been proved

  13. miR-15 and miR-16 induce apoptosis by targeting BCL2.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Amelia; Calin, George Adrian; Fabbri, Muller; Iorio, Marilena V; Ferracin, Manuela; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Wojcik, Sylwia E; Aqeilan, Rami I; Zupo, Simona; Dono, Mariella; Rassenti, Laura; Alder, Hansjuerg; Volinia, Stefano; Liu, Chang-Gong; Kipps, Thomas J; Negrini, Massimo; Croce, Carlo M

    2005-09-27

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common human leukemia and is characterized by predominantly nondividing malignant B cells overexpressing the antiapoptotic B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) protein. miR-15a and miR-16-1 are deleted or down-regulated in the majority of CLLs. Here, we demonstrate that miR-15a and miR-16-1 expression is inversely correlated to Bcl2 expression in CLL and that both microRNAs negatively regulate Bcl2 at a posttranscriptional level. BCL2 repression by these microRNAs induces apoptopsis in a leukemic cell line model. Therefore, miR-15 and miR-16 are natural antisense Bcl2 interactors that could be used for therapy of Bcl2-overexpressing tumors.

  14. Evolution of the miR-290–295/miR-371–373 Cluster Family Seed Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Aksoy, Munevver; Shi, Jianting; Houbaviy, Hristo Botev

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the mouse miR-290–295 cluster and its miR-371–373 homolog in human is restricted to early embryos, primordial germ cells, the germ line stem cell compartment of the adult testis and to stem cell lines derived from the early embryonic lineages. Sequencing data suggest considerable seed diversification between the seven homologous pre-miRNAs of miR-290–295 but it is not clear if all of the implied miR-290–295 seeds are also conserved in the human miR-371–373 cluster, which consists of only three homologous pre-miRNAs. By employing miRNA target reporters we show that most, if not all, seeds in miR-290–295 are represented in miR-371–373. In the mouse, pre-miR-290, pre-miR-292 and pre-miR-293 express subsets of the miRNA isoforms processed from the single human pre-miR-371. Comparison of the possible miR-290–295/miR-371–373 seed repertoires in placental mammals suggests a model for the evolution of this miRNA cluster family, which would be otherwise difficult to deduce based solely on pre-miRNA sequence comparisons. The conservation of co-expressed seeds that is characteristic of miR-290–295/miR-371–373 should be taken into account in models of the corresponding miRNA-target interaction networks. PMID:25268927

  15. MiRduplexSVM: A High-Performing MiRNA-Duplex Prediction and Evaluation Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Nestoras; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of predicting the position of a miRNA duplex on a microRNA hairpin via the development and application of a novel SVM-based methodology. Our method combines a unique problem representation and an unbiased optimization protocol to learn from mirBase19.0 an accurate predictive model, termed MiRduplexSVM. This is the first model that provides precise information about all four ends of the miRNA duplex. We show that (a) our method outperforms four state-of-the-art tools, namely MaturePred, MiRPara, MatureBayes, MiRdup as well as a Simple Geometric Locator when applied on the same training datasets employed for each tool and evaluated on a common blind test set. (b) In all comparisons, MiRduplexSVM shows superior performance, achieving up to a 60% increase in prediction accuracy for mammalian hairpins and can generalize very well on plant hairpins, without any special optimization. (c) The tool has a number of important applications such as the ability to accurately predict the miRNA or the miRNA*, given the opposite strand of a duplex. Its performance on this task is superior to the 2nts overhang rule commonly used in computational studies and similar to that of a comparative genomic approach, without the need for prior knowledge or the complexity of performing multiple alignments. Finally, it is able to evaluate novel, potential miRNAs found either computationally or experimentally. In relation with recent confidence evaluation methods used in miRBase, MiRduplexSVM was successful in identifying high confidence potential miRNAs. PMID:25961860

  16. Using miRNA-Analyzer for the Analysis of miRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Tradigo, Giuseppe; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small biological molecules that play an important role during the mechanisms of protein formation. Recent findings have demonstrated that they act as both positive and negative regulators of protein formation. Thus, the investigation of miRNAs, i.e., the determination of their level of expression, has developed a huge interest in the scientific community. One of the leading technologies for extracting miRNA data from biological samples is the miRNA Affymetrix platform. It provides the quantification of the level of expression of the miRNA in a sample, thus enabling the accumulation of data and allowing the determination of relationships among miRNA, genes, and diseases. Unfortunately, there is a lack of a comprehensive platform able to provide all the functions needed for the extraction of information from miRNA data. We here present miRNA-Analyzer, a complete software tool providing primary functionalities for miRNA data analysis. The current version of miRNA-Analyzer wraps the Affymetrix QCTool for the preprocessing of binary data files, and then provides feature selection (the filtering by species and by the associated p-value of preprocessed files). Finally, preprocessed and filtered data are analyzed by the Multiple Experiment Viewer (T-MEV) and Short Time Series Expression Miner (STEM) tools, which are also wrapped into miRNA-Analyzer, thus providing a unique environment for miRNA data analysis. The tool offers a plug-in interface so it is easily extensible by adding other algorithms as plug-ins. Users may download the tool freely for academic use at https://sites.google.com/site/mirnaanalyserproject/d. PMID:27983673

  17. miRsig: a consensus-based network inference methodology to identify pan-cancer miRNA-miRNA interaction signatures

    PubMed Central

    Nalluri, Joseph J.; Barh, Debmalya; Azevedo, Vasco; Ghosh, Preetam

    2017-01-01

    Decoding the patterns of miRNA regulation in diseases are important to properly realize its potential in diagnostic, prog- nostic, and therapeutic applications. Only a handful of studies computationally predict possible miRNA-miRNA interactions; hence, such interactions require a thorough investigation to understand their role in disease progression. In this paper, we design a novel computational pipeline to predict the common signature/core sets of miRNA-miRNA interactions for different diseases using network inference algorithms on the miRNA-disease expression profiles; the individual predictions of these algorithms were then merged using a consensus-based approach to predict miRNA-miRNA associations. We next selected the miRNA-miRNA associations across particular diseases to generate the corresponding disease-specific miRNA-interaction networks. Next, graph intersection analysis was performed on these networks for multiple diseases to identify the common signature/core sets of miRNA interactions. We applied this pipeline to identify the common signature of miRNA-miRNA inter- actions for cancers. The identified signatures when validated using a manual literature search from PubMed Central and the PhenomiR database, show strong relevance with the respective cancers, providing an indirect proof of the high accuracy of our methodology. We developed miRsig, an online tool for analysis and visualization of the disease-specific signature/core miRNA-miRNA interactions, available at: http://bnet.egr.vcu.edu/miRsig. PMID:28045122

  18. ChIA-PET2: a versatile and flexible pipeline for ChIA-PET data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guipeng; Chen, Yang; Snyder, Michael P.; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2017-01-01

    ChIA-PET2 is a versatile and flexible pipeline for analyzing different types of ChIA-PET data from raw sequencing reads to chromatin loops. ChIA-PET2 integrates all steps required for ChIA-PET data analysis, including linker trimming, read alignment, duplicate removal, peak calling and chromatin loop calling. It supports different kinds of ChIA-PET data generated from different ChIA-PET protocols and also provides quality controls for different steps of ChIA-PET analysis. In addition, ChIA-PET2 can use phased genotype data to call allele-specific chromatin interactions. We applied ChIA-PET2 to different ChIA-PET datasets, demonstrating its significantly improved performance as well as its ability to easily process ChIA-PET raw data. ChIA-PET2 is available at https://github.com/GuipengLi/ChIA-PET2. PMID:27625391

  19. Universal MI definition update for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    White, Harvey; Thygesen, Kristian; Alpert, Joseph S; Jaffe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The new third universal definition of myocardial infarction (MI) is based on troponin elevation together with ischemic symptoms, ischemic ECG changes, and imaging evidence. MIs are classified into five types as to whether they are spontaneous, secondary to imbalance between coronary artery blood supply and demand, related to sudden death, or related to revascularization procedures. The definition is based on a rise and/or fall in troponin levels occurring in a clinical setting. There have been modifications over previous definitions with adding intracoronary thrombus as a criterion, adding a new type of MI type 4c, and raising the cutpoint for the diagnosis of MI related to percutaneous coronary intervention to five times the 99(th) percentile upper reference limit and requiring evidence of ischemia or angiographic complications. In clinical practice, trials, and registries, different definitions are used. There is a need for consistency with regard to the definition of MI and the universal definition should be implemented.

  20. 78 FR 15796 - Michigan Disaster #MI-00038.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Michigan Disaster MI-00038. AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Mecosta. Contiguous Counties: Michigan:...

  1. Early anthropogenic CH4 emissions and the variation of CH4 and 13CH4 over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houweling, S.; van der Werf, G. R.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; RöCkmann, T.; Aben, I.

    2008-03-01

    This study presents a new hypothesis to explain the observed variation of CH4 and δ13C-CH4 over the last millennium. It was originally proposed that the observed minimum of δ13C-CH4 prior to the start of industrialization is caused by a large shift in biomass burning emissions between 1400 and 1700 A.D. According to our new hypothesis, however, the δ13C-CH4 minimum is the first sign of the global rise of anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The main idea is that emissions of isotopically depleted CH4, from, for example, rice cultivation, domestic ruminants, and waste treatment started increasing earlier than the isotopically enriched emissions from fossil fuel, which started with the start of industrialization. However, because the observed increase of atmospheric methane only started around 1750 A.D., these preindustrial anthropogenic emissions must have been accompanied by a net reduction of natural CH4 sources during the Little Ice Age (LIA) compensating for the increase of anthropogenic emissions during that period. Results of transient box model simulations for the last millennium show that under the new hypothesis a close agreement can be obtained between model and measurements. Prior to 1400 A.D., low emissions from anthropogenic biomass burning require a sizable contribution of methane emissions from vegetation to explain the observed high level of δ13C-CH4. During the Little Ice Age, a larger than expected reduction of natural sources is needed, which calls for further verification using a more sophisticated modeling approach and additional constraints from ice core measurements.

  2. The NuMI neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Bernstein, R. H.; Biggs, J.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bocean, V.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Bourkland, K.; Cao, S. V.; Castromonte, C. M.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Corwin, L.; Crane, D.; Cravens, J. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Ducar, R. J.; De Jong, J. K.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Fields, T. H.; Ford, R.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Garkusha, V.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Harding, D.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hays, S.; Heller, K.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Ibrahim, A.; Indurthy, D.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Johnstone, J.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Laughton, C.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Loiacono, L.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marchionni, A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Michael, D. G.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, J. L.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Morfín, J.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Murgia, S.; Murtagh, M.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O`Connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Olsen, M.; Orchanian, M.; Osprey, S.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Patzak, T.; Pavlović, Ž.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Prieto, P.; Pushka, D.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Ratchford, J.; Rebel, B.; Reilly, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ruddick, K.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Sauer, L.; Schneps, J.; Schoo, D.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Shanahan, P.; Sharma, R.; Smart, W.; Smith, C.; Sousa, A.; Stefanik, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tassotto, G.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Tinsley, D.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Trostin, I.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Vaziri, K.; Villegas, E.; Viren, B.; Vogel, G.; Webber, R. C.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; Wehmann, A.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong-Squires, M. L.; Yang, T.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Zarucheisky, V.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important design details of individual components are described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  3. The NuMI neutrino beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; ...

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  4. Androgens downregulate miR-21 expression in breast cancer cells underlining the protective role of androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Cesario, Maria Grazia; Donà, Ada; Rizza, Pietro; Aquila, Saveria; Avena, Paola; Lanzino, Marilena; Pellegrino, Michele; Vivacqua, Adele; Tucci, Paola; Morelli, Catia; Andò, Sebastiano; Sisci, Diego

    2016-03-15

    Although the protective role of androgen receptor (AR) in breast cancer (BC) is well established, the mechanisms involved remains largely unexplored. MicroRNAs play fundamental roles in many biological processes, including tumor cell development and metastasis. Herein, we report that androgens reduce BC cells proliferation acting as a negative modulator of the onco-miRNA-21.The synthetic androgen miboleron (Mib) decreases BC cell proliferation induced by miR-21 over-expression and AR knockdown evidenced the requirement of AR in the down-regulation of miR-21 expression. These effects seem to be a general mechanism occurring in BC tissues.Chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis disclosed the binding of AR to a specific ARE sequence in miR-21 proximal promoter and recognizes the recruitment of HDAC3 as component for AR-mediated transcriptional repression. Such event is associated to a significantly reduced PolII binding in Mib treated extracts confirming that activated AR is a transcriptional repressor of miR-21 expression, providing further insight into the protective role of androgens in breast cancer cells.Collectively, our data and the widespread AR expression in primary and metastatic breast tumours, suggest a careful examination of the therapeutic potential of androgens also in potentiating the effectiveness of anti-oestrogen adjuvant therapies.

  5. Androgens downregulate miR-21 expression in breast cancer cells underlining the protective role of androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Donà, Ada; Rizza, Pietro; Aquila, Saveria; Avena, Paola; Lanzino, Marilena; Pellegrino, Michele; Vivacqua, Adele; Tucci, Paola; Morelli, Catia; Andò, Sebastiano; Sisci, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Although the protective role of androgen receptor (AR) in breast cancer (BC) is well established, the mechanisms involved remains largely unexplored. MicroRNAs play fundamental roles in many biological processes, including tumor cell development and metastasis. Herein, we report that androgens reduce BC cells proliferation acting as a negative modulator of the onco-miRNA-21. The synthetic androgen miboleron (Mib) decreases BC cell proliferation induced by miR-21 over-expression and AR knockdown evidenced the requirement of AR in the down-regulation of miR-21 expression. These effects seem to be a general mechanism occurring in BC tissues. Chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis disclosed the binding of AR to a specific ARE sequence in miR-21 proximal promoter and recognizes the recruitment of HDAC3 as component for AR-mediated transcriptional repression. Such event is associated to a significantly reduced PolII binding in Mib treated extracts confirming that activated AR is a transcriptional repressor of miR-21 expression, providing further insight into the protective role of androgens in breast cancer cells. Collectively, our data and the widespread AR expression in primary and metastatic breast tumours, suggest a careful examination of the therapeutic potential of androgens also in potentiating the effectiveness of anti-oestrogen adjuvant therapies. PMID:26862856

  6. Addendum to NuMI shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The original safety assessment and the Safety Envelope for the NuMI beam line corresponds to 400 kW of beam power. The Main Injector is currently capable of and approved for producing 500 kW of beam power2. However, operation of the NuMI beam line at 400 kW of power brings up the possibility of an occasional excursion above 400 kW due to better than usual tuning in one of the machines upstream of the NuMI beam line. An excursion above the DOE approved Safety Envelope will constitute a safety violation. The purpose of this addendum is to evaluate the radiological issues and modifications required to operate the NuMI beam line at 500 kW. This upgrade will allow 400 kW operations with a reasonable safety margin. Configuration of the NuMI beam line, boundaries, safety system and the methodologies used for the calculations are as described in the original NuMI SAD. While most of the calculations presented in the original shielding assessment were based on Monte Carlo simulations, which were based on the design geometries, most of the results presented in this addendum are based on the measurements conducted by the AD ES&H radiation safety group.

  7. miRNAsong: a web-based tool for generation and testing of miRNA sponge constructs in silico

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Tomas; Peskova, Lucie; Hampl, Ales

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA transcripts containing multiple high-affinity binding sites that associate with and sequester specific miRNAs to prevent them from interacting with their target messenger (m)RNAs. Due to the high specificity of miRNA sponges and strong inhibition of target miRNAs, these molecules have become increasingly applied in miRNA loss-of-function studies. However, improperly designed sponge constructs may sequester off-target miRNAs; thus, it has become increasingly important to develop a tool for miRNA sponge construct design and testing. In this study, we introduce microRNA sponge generator and tester (miRNAsong), a freely available web-based tool for generation and in silico testing of miRNA sponges. This tool generates miRNA sponge constructs for specific miRNAs and miRNA families/clusters and tests them for potential binding to miRNAs in selected organisms. Currently, miRNAsong allows for testing of sponge constructs in 219 species covering 35,828 miRNA sequences. Furthermore, we also provide an example, supplemented with experimental data, of how to use this tool. Using miRNAsong, we designed and tested a sponge for miR-145 inhibition, and cloned the sequence into an inducible lentiviral vector. We found that established cell lines expressing miR-145 sponge strongly inhibited miR-145, thus demonstrating the usability of miRNAsong tool for sponge generation. URL: http://www.med.muni.cz/histology/miRNAsong/. PMID:27857164

  8. miRNAsong: a web-based tool for generation and testing of miRNA sponge constructs in silico.

    PubMed

    Barta, Tomas; Peskova, Lucie; Hampl, Ales

    2016-11-18

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA transcripts containing multiple high-affinity binding sites that associate with and sequester specific miRNAs to prevent them from interacting with their target messenger (m)RNAs. Due to the high specificity of miRNA sponges and strong inhibition of target miRNAs, these molecules have become increasingly applied in miRNA loss-of-function studies. However, improperly designed sponge constructs may sequester off-target miRNAs; thus, it has become increasingly important to develop a tool for miRNA sponge construct design and testing. In this study, we introduce microRNA sponge generator and tester (miRNAsong), a freely available web-based tool for generation and in silico testing of miRNA sponges. This tool generates miRNA sponge constructs for specific miRNAs and miRNA families/clusters and tests them for potential binding to miRNAs in selected organisms. Currently, miRNAsong allows for testing of sponge constructs in 219 species covering 35,828 miRNA sequences. Furthermore, we also provide an example, supplemented with experimental data, of how to use this tool. Using miRNAsong, we designed and tested a sponge for miR-145 inhibition, and cloned the sequence into an inducible lentiviral vector. We found that established cell lines expressing miR-145 sponge strongly inhibited miR-145, thus demonstrating the usability of miRNAsong tool for sponge generation. URL: http://www.med.muni.cz/histology/miRNAsong/.

  9. Aberrant miRNA profiles associated with chronic benzene poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Yang, Jing; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    Chronic occupational benzene exposure is associated with an increased risk of hematological malignancies. To gain an insight into the new biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of chronic benzene poisoning, miRNA profiles and mRNA expression pattern from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic benzene poisoning patients and health controls matched age and gender without benzene exposure were performed using the Exiqon miRNA PCR ARRAY and Gene Chip Human Gene 2.0ST Arrays, respectively. Totally, 6 up-regulated miRNAs (miR-34a, miR-205, miR-10b, let-7d, miR-185 and miR-423-5p-2) and 7 down-regulated miRNAs (miR-133a, miR-543, hsa-miR-130a, miR-27b,miR-223, miR-142-5p and miR-320b) were found in chronic benzene poisoning group compared to health controls (P ≤ 0.05). By integrating miRNA and mRNA expression data, these differential miRNAs were mainly involved in regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, axon guidance, regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent, nervous system development, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Further, pathway analysis indicated that SMAD4, PLCB1, NFAT5, GNAI2, PTEN, VEGFA, BCL2, CTNNB1 and CCND1 were key target genes of differential miRNAs which were implicated in Adherens junction, TGF-beta signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, tight junction and Pathways in cancer. In conclusion, the aberrant miRNAs might be a potential biomarker of chronic benzene poisoning.

  10. Telomere Length, TERT, and miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Andrew J.; Wolff, Roger K.; Mullany, Lila E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that miRNAs are involved in the control of telomeres. We test that hypothesis by examining the association between miRNAs and telomere length (TL). Additionally, we evaluate if genetic variation in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is associated with miRNA expression levels. We use data from a population-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), where we have previously shown associations between TL and TERT and CRC, to test associations between TL and miRNA expression and TERT and miRNA expression. To gain insight into functions of miRNAs associated with TERT we tested linear associations between miRNAs and their targeted gene mRNAs. An Agilent platform that contained information on over 2000 miRNAs was used. TL was measured using a multiplexed quantitative PCR (qPCR). RNAseq was used to assess gene expression. Our sample consisted of 1152 individuals with SNP data and miRNA expression data; 363 individuals with both TL and miRNA; and 148 individuals with miRNA and mRNA data. Thirty-three miRNAs were directly associated with TL after adjusting for age and sex (false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05). TERT rs2736118 was associated with differences in miRNA expression between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa for 75 miRNAs (FDR <0.05). Genes regulated by these miRNAs, as indicated by mRNA/miRNA associations, were associated with major signaling pathways beyond their TL-related functions, including PTEN, and PI3K/AKT signaling. Our data support a direct association between miRNAs and TL; differences in miRNA expression levels by TERT genotype were observed. Based on miRNA and targeted mRNA associations our data suggest that TERT is involved in non-TL-related functions by acting through altered miRNA expression. PMID:27627813

  11. miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 Enhance Adipogenic Differentiation from Porcine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Xinglan; Ma, Kuiying; Zhang, Zhiren; Zhao, Tianchuang; Zhang, Xueming; Tang, Bo; Li, Ziyi

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have multilineage differentiation abilities toward adipocytes and osteoblasts. Recently, numerous studies have focused on the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the process of adipogenic differentiation of human and mouse cells. However, the role of miRNAs in adipogenic differentiation process of porcine BMSCs (pBMSCs) remains unclear. In this study, pBMSCs were induced to differentiate into adipocytes using a chemical approach, and the roles of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 in this process were investigated. Our results showed that pBMSCs could be chemically induced to differentiate into adipocytes and that the expression of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 increased during differentiation. Then, overexpression of mimics of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 increased the number of oil red O-positive cells of adipocyte differentiation. The expression levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) mRNA showed increases of 1.8-, 1.5-, and 1.2-fold in the groups expressing mimics of miR-21, miR-17, and miR-143, respectively, at day 20. These results demonstrate that miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 are involved in and promote the adipogenic differentiation of pBMSCs. This study provides an experimental basis for establishing a stable and efficient adipogenic differentiation model for applications in cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  12. miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador

    2015-02-15

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological pathways. As their role in phagocytosis remains poorly understood, we investigated their impact on phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells. Seven miRNAs (miR-24, -30b, -101, 142-3p, -652-3p, -652-5p, and -1275) that were differentially expressed during monocyte to macrophage (Mφ) and monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation were screened for their potential role in phagocytosis. Among these, overexpression of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p in human monocyte-derived Mφ, DC, monocytes, and PBMCs significantly attenuate phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the secretion of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12p40. miRNA-mediated changes in cytokine profiles were observed at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels and importantly exhibit miRNA-specific impact. To examine the underlying mechanism, we monitored the expression of phagocytosis pathway-associated genes and identified several genes that were altered in Mφ and DC transfected with miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p mimics. Some of these genes with altered expression also harbor putative miRNA binding sites. We show that miR-142-3p directly regulates protein kinase Cα (PKCα), a key gene involved in phagocytosis. Interestingly, miR-142-3p and PKCα exhibit antagonistic expression during Mφ and DC differentiation. Short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PKCα in Mφ leads to reduced bacterial uptake, further highlighting the role of the gene in phagocytosis. Overall, these results demonstrate that miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis and associated cytokine production in myeloid inflammatory cells through modulation of various genes involved in the pathway.

  13. miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Rune; Høyheim, Bjørn

    2017-02-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as important post transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In higher vertebrates, a subset of miRNAs has been identified as important regulators of a number of key genes in immune system gene networks, and this paper review recent studies on miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish. Challenge studies conducted in several species have identified differently expressed miRNAs associated with viral or bacterial infection. The results from these studies point out several miRNAs that are likely to have evolutionary conserved functions that are related to immune response in teleost fish. Changed expression levels of mature miRNAs from the five miRNA genes miRNA-462, miRNA-731, miRNA-146, miRNA-181 and miRNA-223 are observed following viral as well as bacterial infection in several teleost fish. Furthermore, significant changes in expression of mature miRNAs from the five genes miRNA-21, miRNA-155, miRNA-1388, miRNA-99 and miRNA-100 are observed in multiple studies of virus infected fish while changes in expression of mature miRNA from the three genes miRNA-122, miRNA-192 and miRNA-451 are observed in several studies of fish with bacterial infections. Interestingly, some of these genes are not present in higher vertebrates. The function of the evolutionary conserved miRNAs responding to infection depends on the target gene(s) they regulate. A few target genes have been identified while a large number of target genes have been predicted by in silico analysis. The results suggest that many of the targets are genes from the host's immune response gene networks. We propose a model with expected temporal changes in miRNA expression if they target immune response activators/effector genes or immune response inhibitors, respectively. The best way to understand the function of a miRNA is to identify its target gene(s), but as the amount of genome resources for teleost fish is limited, with less well characterized genomes

  14. miR-15a and miR-16-1 in cancer: discovery, function and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, R I; Calin, G A; Croce, C M

    2010-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) encoded by the miR-15/16 cluster are known to act as tumor suppressors. Expression of these miRNAs inhibits cell proliferation, promotes apoptosis of cancer cells, and suppresses tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo. miR-15a and miR-16-1 function by targeting multiple oncogenes, including BCL2, MCL1, CCND1, and WNT3A. Down-regulation of these miRNAs has been reported in chronic lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL), pituitary adenomas, and prostate carcinoma. This review summarizes the discovery, functions, and clinical relevance of these miRNAs in cancer, particularly CLL.

  15. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon Photochemistry: CH3 + CH3 Recombination in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory P.; Huestis, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary emissions of the methyl radical CH3 were observed for the first time in 1998 on Saturn and Neptune by the ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) mission satellite. CH3 is produced by VUV photolysis of CH4 and is the key photochemical intermediate leading complex organic molecules on the giant planets and moons. The CH3 emissions from Saturn were unexpectedly weak. A suggested remedy is to increase the rate of the recombination reaction CH3 + CH3 + H2 --> C2H6 + H2 at 140 K to a value at least 10 times that measured at room temperature in rare gases, but within the range of disagreeing theoretical expressions at low temperature. We are performing laboratory experiments at low temperature and very low pressure. The experiments are supported by RRKM theoretical modeling that is calibrated using the extensive combustion literature.

  16. Ion yields of laser aligned CH3I and CH3Br from multiple orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lanhai; Pan, Yun; Yang, Yujun; Luo, Sizuo; Lu, Chunjing; Zhao, Huifang; Li, Dongxu; Song, Lele; Stolte, Steven; Ding, Dajun; Roeterdink, Wim G.

    2016-11-01

    We have measured the alignment influence on ion yields of CH3I and CH3Br molecules in the laser intensity regime from 1013 W/cm2 to 1015 W/cm2. The hexapole state-selection technique combined with laser induced alignment has been employed to obtain aligned ( = 0.7) and anti-aligned ( = - 0.1) CH3I and CH3Br molecules. The ratio of saturation intensities observed for the CH3I and CH3Br molecules with different alignments are simulated using a modified PPT model for molecules considering different orbitals and a good agreement has been achieved, indicating the contribution from multiple orbitals in the ionization.

  17. Photodissociation of CH2. I - Potential energy surfaces of the dissociation into CH and H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearda, Robert A.; Van Hemert, Marc C.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1992-01-01

    The possible photodissociation pathways of the CH2 radical are studied using ab initio multireference configuration-interaction methods, and accurate photodissociation cross sections and branching ratios for the production of CH + H and C + H2 are obtained. Potential energy surfaces were calculated using the Wuppertal-Bonn self-consistent field plus a multireference single and double-excitation configuration interaction package of programs. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces of the ten lowest triplet states correlating with the seven lowest states of CH were calculated as functions of bond angle and one C-H bond distance, keeping the other C-H bond distance fixed at the equilibrium CH2 value.

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent regulation of miR-196a expression controls lung fibroblast apoptosis but not proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Emelia; Zago, Michela; Sarill, Miles; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Although activation of the AhR by xenobiotics such as dioxin inhibits the cell cycle and control apoptosis, paradoxically, AhR expression also promotes cell proliferation and survival independent of exogenous ligands. The microRNA (miRNA) miR-196a has also emerged as a regulator of proliferation and apoptosis but a relationship between the AhR and miR-196a is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that AhR-dependent regulation of endogenous miR-196a expression would promote cell survival and proliferation. Utilizing lung fibroblasts from AhR deficient (AhR{sup −/−}) and wild-type (AhR{sup +/+}) mice, we show that there is ligand-independent regulation of miRNA, including low miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} cells. Validation by qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease in basal expression of miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} compared to AhR{sup +/+} cells. Exposure to AhR agonists benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and FICZ as well as AhR antagonist CH-223191 decreased miR-196a expression in AhR{sup +/+} fibroblasts concomitant with decreased AhR protein levels. There was increased proliferation only in AhR{sup +/+} lung fibroblasts in response to serum, corresponding to a decrease in p27{sup KIP1} protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Increasing the cellular levels of miR-196a had no effect on proliferation or expression of p27{sup KIP1} in AhR{sup −/−} fibroblasts but attenuated cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis. This study provides the first evidence that AhR expression is essential for the physiological regulation of cellular miRNA levels- including miR-196a. Future experiments designed to elucidate the functional relationship between the AhR and miR-196a may delineate additional novel ligand-independent roles for the AhR. - Highlights: • The AhR controls proliferation and apoptosis in lung cells. • The AhR regulates the

  19. Reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Volinia, Stefano; Galasso, Marco; Costinean, Stefan; Tagliavini, Luca; Gamberoni, Giacomo; Drusco, Alessandra; Marchesini, Jlenia; Mascellani, Nicoletta; Sana, Maria Elena; Abu Jarour, Ramzey; Desponts, Caroline; Teitell, Michael; Baffa, Raffaele; Aqeilan, Rami; Iorio, Marilena V; Taccioli, Cristian; Garzon, Ramiro; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Fabbri, Muller; Catozzi, Marco; Previati, Maurizio; Ambs, Stefan; Palumbo, Tiziana; Garofalo, Michela; Veronese, Angelo; Bottoni, Arianna; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Harris, Curtis C; Visone, Rosa; Pekarsky, Yuri; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomston, Mark; Dillhoff, Mary; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Huebner, Kay; Pichiorri, Flavia; Lenze, Dido; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Zanesi, Nicola; Rossi, Simona; Calin, George A; Liu, Chang-Gong; Palatini, Jeff; Negrini, Massimo; Vecchione, Andrea; Rosenberg, Anne; Croce, Carlo M

    2010-05-01

    We studied miRNA profiles in 4419 human samples (3312 neoplastic, 1107 nonmalignant), corresponding to 50 normal tissues and 51 cancer types. The complexity of our database enabled us to perform a detailed analysis of microRNA (miRNA) activities. We inferred genetic networks from miRNA expression in normal tissues and cancer. We also built, for the first time, specialized miRNA networks for solid tumors and leukemias. Nonmalignant tissues and cancer networks displayed a change in hubs, the most connected miRNAs. hsa-miR-103/106 were downgraded in cancer, whereas hsa-miR-30 became most prominent. Cancer networks appeared as built from disjointed subnetworks, as opposed to normal tissues. A comparison of these nets allowed us to identify key miRNA cliques in cancer. We also investigated miRNA copy number alterations in 744 cancer samples, at a resolution of 150 kb. Members of miRNA families should be similarly deleted or amplified, since they repress the same cellular targets and are thus expected to have similar impacts on oncogenesis. We correctly identified hsa-miR-17/92 family as amplified and the hsa-miR-143/145 cluster as deleted. Other miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-30 and hsa-miR-204, were found to be physically altered at the DNA copy number level as well. By combining differential expression, genetic networks, and DNA copy number alterations, we confirmed, or discovered, miRNAs with comprehensive roles in cancer. Finally, we experimentally validated the miRNA network with acute lymphocytic leukemia originated in Mir155 transgenic mice. Most of miRNAs deregulated in these transgenic mice were located close to hsa-miR-155 in the cancer network.

  20. Reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Volinia, Stefano; Galasso, Marco; Costinean, Stefan; Tagliavini, Luca; Gamberoni, Giacomo; Drusco, Alessandra; Marchesini, Jlenia; Mascellani, Nicoletta; Sana, Maria Elena; Abu Jarour, Ramzey; Desponts, Caroline; Teitell, Michael; Baffa, Raffaele; Aqeilan, Rami; Iorio, Marilena V.; Taccioli, Cristian; Garzon, Ramiro; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Fabbri, Muller; Catozzi, Marco; Previati, Maurizio; Ambs, Stefan; Palumbo, Tiziana; Garofalo, Michela; Veronese, Angelo; Bottoni, Arianna; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Harris, Curtis C.; Visone, Rosa; Pekarsky, Yuri; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomston, Mark; Dillhoff, Mary; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Huebner, Kay; Pichiorri, Flavia; Lenze, Dido; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Zanesi, Nicola; Rossi, Simona; Calin, George A.; Liu, Chang-Gong; Palatini, Jeff; Negrini, Massimo; Vecchione, Andrea; Rosenberg, Anne; Croce, Carlo M.

    2010-01-01

    We studied miRNA profiles in 4419 human samples (3312 neoplastic, 1107 nonmalignant), corresponding to 50 normal tissues and 51 cancer types. The complexity of our database enabled us to perform a detailed analysis of microRNA (miRNA) activities. We inferred genetic networks from miRNA expression in normal tissues and cancer. We also built, for the first time, specialized miRNA networks for solid tumors and leukemias. Nonmalignant tissues and cancer networks displayed a change in hubs, the most connected miRNAs. hsa-miR-103/106 were downgraded in cancer, whereas hsa-miR-30 became most prominent. Cancer networks appeared as built from disjointed subnetworks, as opposed to normal tissues. A comparison of these nets allowed us to identify key miRNA cliques in cancer. We also investigated miRNA copy number alterations in 744 cancer samples, at a resolution of 150 kb. Members of miRNA families should be similarly deleted or amplified, since they repress the same cellular targets and are thus expected to have similar impacts on oncogenesis. We correctly identified hsa-miR-17/92 family as amplified and the hsa-miR-143/145 cluster as deleted. Other miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-30 and hsa-miR-204, were found to be physically altered at the DNA copy number level as well. By combining differential expression, genetic networks, and DNA copy number alterations, we confirmed, or discovered, miRNAs with comprehensive roles in cancer. Finally, we experimentally validated the miRNA network with acute lymphocytic leukemia originated in Mir155 transgenic mice. Most of miRNAs deregulated in these transgenic mice were located close to hsa-miR-155 in the cancer network. PMID:20439436

  1. Close correlation between magnetic properties and the soft phonon mode of the structural transition in <mi>BaFe>2<mi>As>2 and <mi>SrFe>2<mi>As>2

    SciTech Connect

    Parshall, D.; Pintschovius, L.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Castellan, J. -P.; Lamago, D.; Mittal, R.; Wolf, Th.; Reznik, Dmitry

    2015-04-27

    Parent compounds of Fe-based superconductors undergo a structural phase transition from a tetragonal to an orthorhombic structure. We investigated the temperature dependence of the frequencies of TA phonons that extrapolate to the shear vibrational mode at the zone center, which corresponds to the orthorhombic deformation of the crystal structure at low temperatures in <mi>BaFe>2<mi>As>2 and <mi>SrFe>2<mi>As>2. We found that acoustic phonons at small wave vectors soften gradually towards the transition from high temperatures, tracking the increase of the size of slowly fluctuating magnetic domains. On cooling below the transition to base temperature the phonons harden, following the square of the magnetic moment (which we find is proportional to the anisotropy gap). Finally, our results provide evidence for close correlation between magnetic and phonon properties in Fe-based superconductors.

  2. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi><mi>N>=200 <mi>GeV>

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-24

    We measured jet production rates in p+p and d+Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi><mi>N>=200 <mi>GeV> recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-kt algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12T<50 GeV/c, within a pseudorapidity acceptance of |η|<0.3. The nuclear-modification factor (RdAu) values for 0%–100% d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. Nonetheless, the centrality-selected RdAu values and central-to-peripheral ratios (RCP) show large, pT-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

  3. miReader: Discovering Novel miRNAs in Species without Sequenced Genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Along with computational approaches, NGS led technologies have caused a major impact upon the discoveries made in the area of miRNA biology, including novel miRNAs identification. However, to this date all microRNA discovery tools compulsorily depend upon the availability of reference or genomic sequences. Here, for the first time a novel approach, miReader, has been introduced which could discover novel miRNAs without any dependence upon genomic/reference sequences. The approach used NGS read data to build highly accurate miRNA models, molded through a Multi-boosting algorithm with Best-First Tree as its base classifier. It was comprehensively tested over large amount of experimental data from wide range of species including human, plants, nematode, zebrafish and fruit fly, performing consistently with >90% accuracy. Using the same tool over Illumina read data for Miscanthus, a plant whose genome is not sequenced; the study reported 21 novel mature miRNA duplex candidates. Considering the fact that miRNA discovery requires handling of high throughput data, the entire approach has been implemented in a standalone parallel architecture. This work is expected to cause a positive impact over the area of miRNA discovery in majority of species, where genomic sequence availability would not be a compulsion any more. PMID:23805282

  4. Small RNA zippers lock miRNA molecules and block miRNA function in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyu; Liu, Cuicui; Lü, Jinhui; Zhao, Qian; Deng, Shengqiong; Wang, Guangxue; Qiao, Jing; Zhang, Chuyi; Zhen, Lixiao; Lu, Ying; Li, Wenshu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Pestell, Richard G.; Fan, Huiming; Chen, Yi-Han; Liu, Zhongmin; Yu, Zuoren

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) loss-of-function phenotypes are mainly induced by chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides. Here we develop an alternative inhibitor for miRNAs, termed ‘small RNA zipper'. It is designed to connect miRNA molecules end to end, forming a DNA–RNA duplex through a complementary interaction with high affinity, high specificity and high stability. Two miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-17, are tested in human breast cancer cell lines, demonstrating the 70∼90% knockdown of miRNA levels by 30–50 nM small RNA zippers. The miR-221 zipper shows capability in rescuing the expression of target genes of miR-221 and reversing the oncogenic function of miR-221 in breast cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the miR-221 zipper attenuates doxorubicin resistance with higher efficiency than anti-miR-221 in human breast cancer cells. Taken together, small RNA zippers are a miRNA inhibitor, which can be used to induce miRNA loss-of-function phenotypes and validate miRNA target genes. PMID:28045030

  5. Comprehensive expression analysis of miRNA in breast cancer at the miRNA and isomiR levels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianjin; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Shaoke; Zhong, Jixin; Yang, Lawei; Xu, Junfa

    2015-02-25

    Breast cancer (BC) is the main factor that leads cause of cancer death in women worldwide. A class of small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), has been widely studied in human cancers as crucial regulatory molecule. Recent studies indicate that a series of isomiRs can be yielded from a miRNA locus, and these physiological miRNA isoforms have versatile roles in miRNA biogenesis. Herein, we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNAs at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC using next-generation sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Abnormally expressed miRNA (miR-21, miR-221, miR-155, miR-30e and miR-25) and isomiR profiles could be obtained at the miRNA and isomiR levels, and similar biological roles could be detected. IsomiR expression profiles should be further concerned, and especially isomiRs are actual regulatory molecules in the miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks. The study provides a comprehensive expression analysis at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC, which indicates biological roles of isomiRs.

  6. Role of miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b in gastric cancer hypoxia-induced chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Katia; Silvestris, Nicola; Simone, Giovanni; Signorile, Michele; Saragoni, Luca; Brunetti, Oronzo; Monti, Manlio; Mazzotta, Annalisa; De Summa, Simona; Mangia, Anita; Tommasi, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the search for new therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer (GC), there is much evidence of progression due to resistance to chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the ability of cancer cells to survive after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. The involvement of miRNAs in the development of MDR has been well described but miRNAs able to modulate the sensitivity to chemotherapy by regulating hypoxia signaling pathways have not yet been fully addressed in GC. Our aim was to analyze miR-20b, miR-27a and miR-181a expression with respect to (epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX)) chemotherapy regimen in a set of GC patients, in order to investigate whether miRNAs deregulation may influence GC MDR also via hypoxia signaling modulation. Cancer biopsy were obtained from 21 untreated HER2 negative advanced GC patients, retrospectively analyzed. All patients received a first-line chemotherapy (EOX) regimen. MirWalk database was used to identify miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b target genes. The expression of miRNAs and of HIPK2, HIF1A and MDR1 genes were detected by real-time PCR. HIPK2 localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Our data showed the down-regulation of miR-20b, miR-27a, miR-181a concomitantly to higher levels of MDR1, HIF1A and HIPK2 genes in GC patients with a progressive disease respect to those with a disease control rate. Moreover, immunohistochemistry assay highlighted a higher cytoplasmic HIPK2 staining, suggesting a different role for it. We showed that aberrant expression of miR-20b, miR27a and miR-181a was associated with chemotherapeutic response in GC through HIF1A, MDR1 and HIPK2 genes modulation, suggesting a possible novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:26793992

  7. Role of miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b in gastric cancer hypoxia-induced chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; Silvestris, Nicola; Simone, Giovanni; Signorile, Michele; Saragoni, Luca; Brunetti, Oronzo; Monti, Manlio; Mazzotta, Annalisa; De Summa, Simona; Mangia, Anita; Tommasi, Stefania

    2016-04-02

    Despite the search for new therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer (GC), there is much evidence of progression due to resistance to chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the ability of cancer cells to survive after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. The involvement of miRNAs in the development of MDR has been well described but miRNAs able to modulate the sensitivity to chemotherapy by regulating hypoxia signaling pathways have not yet been fully addressed in GC. Our aim was to analyze miR-20b, miR-27a and miR-181a expression with respect to (epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX)) chemotherapy regimen in a set of GC patients, in order to investigate whether miRNAs deregulation may influence GC MDR also via hypoxia signaling modulation. Cancer biopsy were obtained from 21 untreated HER2 negative advanced GC patients, retrospectively analyzed. All patients received a first-line chemotherapy (EOX) regimen. MirWalk database was used to identify miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b target genes. The expression of miRNAs and of HIPK2, HIF1A and MDR1 genes were detected by real-time PCR. HIPK2 localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Our data showed the down-regulation of miR-20b, miR-27a, miR-181a concomitantly to higher levels of MDR1, HIF1A and HIPK2 genes in GC patients with a progressive disease respect to those with a disease control rate. Moreover, immunohistochemistry assay highlighted a higher cytoplasmic HIPK2 staining, suggesting a different role for it. We showed that aberrant expression of miR-20b, miR27a and miR-181a was associated with chemotherapeutic response in GC through HIF1A, MDR1 and HIPK2 genes modulation, suggesting a possible novel therapeutic strategy.

  8. NFkappaB activation is essential for miR-21 induction by TGFβ1 in high glucose conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Madhyastha, Radha Madhyastha, HarishKumar; Pengjam, Yutthana; Nakajima, Yuichi; Omura, Sayuri; Maruyama, Masugi

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) induces miR-21 in high glucose conditions. • NFkappaB activation and subsequent ROS generation are necessary for TGFβ1’s effect. • TGFβ1 facilitates binding of NFkB p65 to miR-21 promoter. • SMAD proteins bind to R-SBE sites on primary miR-21, in NFkB dependent manner. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1) is a pleiotropic growth factor with a very broad spectrum of effects on wound healing. Chronic non-healing wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers express reduced levels of TGFβ1. On the other hand, our previous studies have shown that the microRNA miR-21 is differentially regulated in diabetic wounds and that it promotes migration of fibroblast cells. Although interplay between TGFβ1 and miR-21 are studied in relation to cancer, their interaction in the context of chronic wounds has not yet been investigated. In this study, we examined if TGFβ1 could stimulate miR-21 in fibroblasts that are subjected to high glucose environment. MiR-21 was, in fact, induced by TGFβ1 in high glucose conditions. The induction by TGFβ1 was dependent on NFκB activation and subsequent ROS generation. TGFβ1 was instrumental in degrading the NFκB inhibitor IκBα and facilitating the nuclear translocation of NFκB p65 subunit. EMSA studies showed enhanced DNA binding activity of NFκB in the presence of TGFβ1. ChIP assay revealed binding of p65 to miR-21 promoter. NFκB activation was also required for the nuclear translocation of Smad 4 protein and subsequent direct interaction of Smad proteins with primary miR-21 as revealed by RNA-IP studies. Our results show that manipulation of TGFβ1–NFκB–miR-21 pathway could serve as an innovative approach towards therapeutics to heal diabetic ulcers.

  9. Serum profiling identifies novel muscle miRNA and cardiomyopathy-related miRNA biomarkers in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Lameth, Julie; Krimi, Soraya; Buisset, Julien; Amor, Fatima; Le Guiner, Caroline; Barthélémy, Inès; Servais, Laurent; Blot, Stéphane; Voit, Thomas; Israeli, David

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked neuromuscular disease that affects 1 boy in 3500 to 5000 boys. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog is the best clinically relevant DMD animal model. Here, we used a high-thoughput miRNA sequencing screening for identification of candidate serum miRNA biomarkers in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. We confirmed the dysregulation of the previously described muscle miRNAs, miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-378, and identified a new candidate muscle miRNA, miR-95. We identified two other classes of dysregulated serum miRNAs in muscular dystrophy: miRNAs belonging to the largest known miRNA cluster that resides in the imprinting DLK1-DIO3 genomic region and miRNAs associated with cardiac disease, including miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR-499. No simple correlation was identified between serum levels of cardiac miRNAs and cardiac functional parameters in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. Finally, we confirmed a dysregulation of miR-95, miR-208a, miR-208b, miR-499, and miR-539 in a small cohort of DMD patients. Given the interspecies conservation of miRNAs and preliminary data in DMD patients, these newly identified dysregulated miRNAs are strong candidate biomarkers for DMD patients.

  10. Introns of plant pri-miRNAs enhance miRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bielewicz, Dawid; Kalak, Malgorzata; Kalyna, Maria; Windels, David; Barta, Andrea; Vazquez, Franck; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Plant MIR genes are independent transcription units that encode long primary miRNA precursors, which usually contain introns. For two miRNA genes, MIR163 and MIR161, we show that introns are crucial for the accumulation of proper levels of mature miRNA. Removal of the intron in both cases led to a drop-off in the level of mature miRNAs. We demonstrate that the stimulating effects of the intron mostly reside in the 5′ss rather than on a genuine splicing event. Our findings are biologically significant as the presence of functional splice sites in the MIR163 gene appears mandatory for pathogen-triggered accumulation of miR163 and proper regulation of at least one of its targets. PMID:23681439

  11. p53 induces miR199a-3p to suppress SOCS7 for STAT3 activation and renal fibrosis in UUO

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruhao; Xu, Xuan; Li, Huiling; Chen, Jinwen; Xiang, Xudong; Dong, Zheng; Zhang, Dongshan

    2017-01-01

    The role of p53 in renal fibrosis has recently been suggested, however, its function remains controversial and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of p53 attenuated renal interstitial fibrosis, apoptosis, and inflammation in mice with unilateral urethral obstruction (UUO). Interestingly, p53 blockade was associated with the suppression of miR-215-5p, miR-199a-5p&3p, and STAT3. In cultured human kidney tubular epithelial cells (HK-2), TGF-β1 treatment induced fibrotic changes, including collagen I and vimentin expression, being associated with p53 accumulation, p53 Ser15 phosphorylation, and miR-199a-3p expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α blocked STAT3 activation and the expression of miR-199a-3p, collagen I, and vimentin during TGF-β1 treatment. Over-expression of miR-199a-3p increased TGFβ1-induced collagen I and vimentin expression and restored SOCS7 expression. Furthermore, SOCS7 was identified as a target gene of miR-199a-3p, and silencing of SOCS7 promoted STAT3 activation. ChIp analyses indicated the binding of p53 to the promoter region of miR-199a-3p. Consistently, kidney biopsies from patients with IgA nephropathy and diabetic nephropathy exhibited substantial activation of p53 and STAT3, decreased expression of SOCS7, and increase in profibrotic proteins and miR-199a-3p. Together, these results demonstrate the novel p53/miR-199a-3p/SOCS7/STAT3 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. PMID:28240316

  12. Expression profiles of miRNAs and involvement of miR-100 and miR-34 in regulation of cell cycle arrest in Artemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Jin, Feng; Ye, Xiang; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of the cell cycle is complex but critical for proper development, reproduction and stress resistance. To survive unfavourable environmental conditions, the crustacean Artemia produces diapause embryos whose metabolism is maintained at extremely low levels. In the present study, the expression profiles of miRNAs during Artemia diapause entry and termination were characterized using high-throughput sequencing. A total of 13 unclassified miRNAs and 370 miRNAs belonging to 87 families were identified; among them, 107 were differentially expressed during diapause entry and termination. We focused on the roles of two of these miRNAs, miR-100 and miR-34, in regulating cell cycle progression; during the various stages of diapause entry, these miRNAs displayed opposing patterns of expression. A functional analysis revealed that miR-100 and miR-34 regulate the cell cycle during diapause entry by targeting polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), leading to activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (MEK-ERK-RSK2) pathway and cyclin K, leading to suppression of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) activity respectively. The findings presented in the present study provide insights into the functions of miR-100 and miR-34 and suggest that the expression profiles of miRNAs in Artemia can be used to characterize their functions in cell cycle regulation.

  13. Discovery of miRNAs and Their Corresponding miRNA Genes in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): Use of Stable miRNAs as Reference Genes Reveals Subgroups of miRNAs That Are Highly Expressed in Particular Organs

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Rune; Rangnes, Fredrik; Sivertsen, Maria; Chiang, Michelle; Tran, Michelle; Worren, Merete Molton

    2016-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the economically most important species in the northern Atlantic Ocean and a model species for studying development of the immune system in vertebrates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNA molecules that regulate fundamental biological processes at the post-transcriptional level. Detailed knowledge about a species miRNA repertoire is necessary to study how the miRNA transcriptome modulate gene expression. We have therefore discovered and characterized mature miRNAs and their corresponding miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. We have also performed a validation study to identify suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression in Atlantic cod. Finally, we utilized the newly characterized miRNA repertoire and the dedicated RT-qPCR method to reveal miRNAs that are highly expressed in certain organs. Results The discovery analysis revealed 490 mature miRNAs (401 unique sequences) along with precursor sequences and genomic location of the miRNA genes. Twenty six of these were novel miRNA genes. Validation studies ranked gmo-miR-17-1—5p or the two-gene combination gmo-miR25-3p and gmo-miR210-5p as most suitable qPCR reference genes. Analysis by RT-qPCR revealed 45 miRNAs with significantly higher expression in tissues from one or a few organs. Comparisons to other vertebrates indicate that some of these miRNAs may regulate processes like growth, lipid metabolism, immune response to microbial infections and scar damage repair. Three teleost-specific and three novel Atlantic cod miRNAs were among the differentially expressed miRNAs. Conclusions The number of known mature miRNAs was considerably increased by our identification of miRNAs and miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. This will benefit further functional studies of miRNA expression using deep sequencing methods. The validation study showed that stable miRNAs are suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression. Applying RT-qPCR we

  14. miRBase: the microRNA sequence database.

    PubMed

    Griffiths-Jones, Sam

    2006-01-01

    The miRBase Sequence database is the primary repository for published microRNA (miRNA) sequence and annotation data. miRBase provides a user-friendly web interface for miRNA data, allowing the user to search using key words or sequences, trace links to the primary literature referencing the miRNA discoveries, analyze genomic coordinates and context, and mine relationships between miRNA sequences. miRBase also provides a confidential gene-naming service, assigning official miRNA names to novel genes before their publication. The methods outlined in this chapter describe these functions. miRBase is freely available to all at http://microrna.sanger.ac.uk/.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  16. miRandb: a resource of online services for miRNA research.

    PubMed

    Aghaee-Bakhtiari, Seyed Hamid; Arefian, Ehsan; Lau, Pierre

    2017-01-03

    Recent discovery of thousands of small and large noncoding RNAs, in parallel to technical improvements enabling scientists to study the transcriptome in much higher depth, has resulted in massive data generation. This burst of information prompts the development of easily accessible resources for storage, retrieval and analysis of raw and processed data, and hundreds of Web-based tools dedicated to these tasks have been made available. However, the increasing number and diversity of bioinformatics tools, each covering a specific and specialized area, as well as their redundancies, represent potential sources of complication for end users. To overcome these issues, we are introducing an easy-to-follow classification of microRNA (miRNA)-related bioinformatics tools for biologists interested in studying this important class of small noncoding RNAs. We also developed our miRNA database miRNA algorithmic network database (miRandb) that is a meta-database, which presents a survey of > 180 Web-based miRNA databases. These include miRNA sequence, discovery, target prediction, target validation, expression and regulation, functions and their roles in diseases, interactions in cellular pathways and networks and deep sequencing. miRandb recapitulates the diverse possibilities and facilitates that access to the different categories of miRNA resources. Researchers can easily select the category of miRNA information and desired organism, in result eligible databases with their features are presented. This database introducing an easy-to-follow classification of available resources that can facilitate selection of appropriate resources for miRNA-related bioinformatics tools. Finally, we described current shortages and future necessities that assist researchers to use these tools easily. Our database is accessible at http://mirandb.ir.

  17. MI Gap Clearing Kicker Magnet Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The kicker system requirements were originally conceived for the NOvA project. NOvA is a neutrino experiment located in Minnesota. To achieve the desired neutrino flux several upgrades are required to the accelerator complex. The Recycler will be used as a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI). As the Recycler is the same size as the MI, it is possible to do a single turn fill ({approx}11 {micro}sec), minimizing the proton injection time in the MI cycle and maximizing the protons on target. The Recycler can then be filled with beam while the MI is ramping to extract beam to the target. To do this requires two new transfer lines. The existing Recycler injection line was designed for 10{pi} pbar beams, not the 20{pi} proton beams we anticipate from the Booster. The existing Recycler extraction line allows for proton injection through the MI, while we want direct injection from the Booster. These two lines will be decommissioned. The new injection line from the MI8 line into the Recycler will start at 848 and end with injection kickers at RR104. The new extraction line in the RR30 straight section will start with a new extraction kicker at RR232 and end with new MI injection kickers at MI308. Finally, to reduce beam loss activation in the enclosure, a new gap clearing kicker will be used to extract uncaptured beam created during the slip stack injection process down the existing dump line. It was suggested that the MI could benefit from this type of system immediately. This led to the early installation of the gap clearing system in the MI, followed by moving the system to Recycler during NOvA. The specifications also changed during this process. Initially the rise and fall time requirements were 38 ns and the field stability was {+-}1%. The 38 ns is based on having a gap of 2 RF buckets between injections. (There are 84 RF buckets that can be filled from the Booster for each injection, but 82 would be filled with beam. MI and Recycler contain 588 RF buckets

  18. Polysome shift assay for direct measurement of miRNA inhibition by anti-miRNA drugs.

    PubMed

    Androsavich, John R; Sobczynski, Daniel J; Liu, Xueqing; Pandya, Shweta; Kaimal, Vivek; Owen, Tate; Liu, Kai; MacKenna, Deidre A; Chau, B Nelson

    2016-01-29

    Anti-miRNA (anti-miR) oligonucleotide drugs are being developed to inhibit overactive miRNAs linked to disease. To help facilitate the transition from concept to clinic, new research tools are required. Here we report a novel method--miRNA Polysome Shift Assay (miPSA)--for direct measurement of miRNA engagement by anti-miR, which is more robust than conventional pharmacodynamics using downstream target gene derepression. The method takes advantage of size differences between active and inhibited miRNA complexes. Active miRNAs bind target mRNAs in high molecular weight polysome complexes, while inhibited miRNAs are sterically blocked by anti-miRs from forming this interaction. These two states can be assessed by fractionating tissue or cell lysates using differential ultracentrifugation through sucrose gradients. Accordingly, anti-miR treatment causes a specific shift of cognate miRNA from heavy to light density fractions. The magnitude of this shift is dose-responsive and maintains a linear relationship with downstream target gene derepression while providing a substantially higher dynamic window for aiding drug discovery. In contrast, we found that the commonly used 'RT-interference' approach, which assumes that inhibited miRNA is undetectable by RT-qPCR, can yield unreliable results that poorly reflect the binding stoichiometry of anti-miR to miRNA. We also demonstrate that the miPSA has additional utility in assessing anti-miR cross-reactivity with miRNAs sharing similar seed sequences.

  19. miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; García, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Álvarez, Héctor; Ili, Carmen; López, Jaime; Castillo, Jonathan; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The development of miRNA-based therapeutics represents a new strategy in cancer treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differential expression of microRNAs in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and to assess the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in GBC cell behavior. A profile of miRNA expression was determined using DharmaconTM microarray technology. Differential expression of five microRNAs was validated by TaqMan reverse transcription quantitative-PCR in a separate cohort of 8 tumors and 3 non-cancerous samples. Then, we explored the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in tumor cell behavior by ectopic in vitro expression in the GBC NOZ cell line. Several miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed in GBC; most of these showed a significantly decreased expression compared to non-neoplastic tissues (Q value < 0.05). The differential expression of 7 selected miRNAs was confirmed by real time PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the most deregulated miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-143 and miR-145) collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as TGF-β, ErbB3, WNT and VEGF, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. The ectopic expression of miR-1 and miR-145 in NOZ cells significantly inhibited cell viability and colony formation (P < 0.01) and reduced gene expression of VEGF-A and AXL. This study represents the first investigation of the miRNA expression profile in gallbladder cancer, and our findings showed that several miRNAs are deregulated in this neoplasm. In vitro functional assays suggest that miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in GBC. PMID:24966896

  20. miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; García, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Álvarez, Héctor; Ili, Carmen; López, Jaime; Castillo, Jonathan; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The development of miRNA-based therapeutics represents a new strategy in cancer treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differential expression of microRNAs in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and to assess the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in GBC cell behavior. A profile of miRNA expression was determined using DharmaconTM microarray technology. Differential expression of five microRNAs was validated by TaqMan reverse transcription quantitative-PCR in a separate cohort of 8 tumors and 3 non-cancerous samples. Then, we explored the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in tumor cell behavior by ectopic in vitro expression in the GBC NOZ cell line. Several miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed in GBC; most of these showed a significantly decreased expression compared to non-neoplastic tissues (Q value<0.05). The differential expression of 7 selected miRNAs was confirmed by real time PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the most deregulated miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-143 and miR-145) collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as TGF-β, ErbB3, WNT and VEGF, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. The ectopic expression of miR-1 and miR-145 in NOZ cells significantly inhibited cell viability and colony formation (P<0.01) and reduced gene expression of VEGF-A and AXL. This study represents the first investigation of the miRNA expression profile in gallbladder cancer, and our findings showed that several miRNAs are deregulated in this neoplasm. In vitro functional assays suggest that miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in GBC.

  1. miR-10b, miR-26a, miR-146a And miR-153 Expression in Triple Negative Vs Non Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Potential Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Fkih M'hamed, Insaf; Privat, Maud; Trimeche, Mounir; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Kenani, Abderraouf

    2017-01-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs composed of 18-25 nucleotides that can post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and have key regulatory roles in cancer, acting as both oncogenes and tumor suppressors. About 1000 genes in humans encode miRNAs, which account for approximately 3% of the human genome, and up to 30% of human protein coding genes may be regulated by miRNAs. The objective of this article is to evaluate the expression profile of four miRNAs previously implicated in triple negative breast cancer: miR-10b, miR-26a, miR-146a and miR-153, and to determine their possible interaction in triple negative and non triple negative breast cancer based on clinical outcome and the expression of BRCA1. 24 triple-negative and 13 non triple negative breast cancer cases, were studied by q-RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry to determine the expression of the four studied miRNAs and the BRCA1 protein, respectively. We observed that the BRCA1 protein was absent in 62.5% of the triple negative cases. Besides, the miR-146a and miR-26a were over expressed in triple negative breast cancer. These two miRNAs, miR-10b and miR-153 were significantly associated to lymph node metastases occurrence in triple negative breast carcinoma. All the analyzed microRNAs were not associated with the expression of BRCA1 in our conditions. Our work provides evidence that miR-146a, miR-26a, miR-10b and miR-153 could be defined as biomarkers in triple negative breast cancer to predict lymph node metastases (LNM).

  2. The miR-204-3p-targeted IGFBP2 pathway is involved in xanthohumol-induced glioma cell apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Kuei; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Ho, Kuo-Hao; Chen, Ku-Chung

    2016-11-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone extracted from hop plant Humulus lupulus L. (Cannabaceae), has potential for cancer therapy, including gliomas. Micro (mi)RNAs are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression. Several miRNAs have been identified to participate in regulating glioma development. However, no studies have demonstrated whether miRNA is involved in XN cytotoxicity resulting in glioma cell death. This study investigated the effects of XN-mediated miRNA expression in activating apoptotic pathways in glioblastoma U87 MG cells. First, we found that XN significantly reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis via pro-caspase-3/8 cleavage and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) degradation. We also identified that pro-caspase-9 cleavage, Bcl2 family expression changes, mitochondrial dysfunction, and intracellular ROS generation also participated in XN-induced glioma cell death. With a microarray analysis, miR-204-3p was identified as the most upregulated miRNA induced by XN cytotoxicity. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Fos pathway was validated to participate in XN-upregulated miR-204-3p expression. With a promoter assay and ChIP analysis, we found that c-Fos dose-dependently bound to the miR-204-3p gene promoter region. Furthermore, miR-204-3p levels decreased in several glioma cell lines compared to astrocytes. Overexpression of miR-204-3p enhanced glioma cell apoptosis. IGFBP2, an upregulated regulator of glioma proliferation, was validated by a TCGA analysis as a direct target gene of miR-204-3p. XN's inhibition of the IGFBP2/AKT/Bcl2 pathway via miR-204-3p targeting played a critical role in mediating glioma cell death. These results emphasized that the XN-mediated miR-204-3p network may provide novel therapeutic strategies for future glioblastoma therapy and drug development.

  3. The regulation roles of miR-125b, miR-221 and miR-27b in porcine Salmonella infection signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Min; Gao, Weihua; Yang, Jun; Liang, Xiongyan; Luo, Jingbo; Huang, Tinghua

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are non-coding RNA molecules typically 18–22 nucleotides long that can suppress the expression of their target genes. Several laboratories have attempted to identify miRNAs from the pig that are involved in Salmonella infection. These bioinformatics strategies using the newly available genomic sequence are generally successful. Here, we report an in silico identification of miRNAs in pig focusing on the Salmonella infection pathway, and further investigated the differential expression of those miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR during pre- and post-natal stage of Salmonella inoculation from the peripheral blood of commercially breed pigs. We identified 29 miRNAs that have predicted targets in the Salmonella infection pathway and nine of them were not yet described in pig. In addition, the expression of nine selected miRNAs was validated in the peripheral blood by northern blotting. Through expression analyses, differences were found between pre- and post-natal stages of Salmonella inoculation for miR-221, miR-125b and miR-27b—all of them were suppressed 2 days after Salmonella inoculation. The predicted targets of those three miRNAs were validated by luciferase reporter assays. We show that FOS is a direct target of miR-221, miR-125b can suppress MAPK14, and miR-27b can target IFNG. These findings will be helpful in understanding the function and processing of these miRNAs in Salmonella infection. The miRNA differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of commercial breed pigs suggest that it can be used as genetic markers for salmonella infection resistance in pigs. PMID:27474500

  4. The regulation roles of miR-125b, miR-221 and miR-27b in porcine Salmonella infection signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Min; Gao, Weihua; Yang, Jun; Liang, Xiongyan; Luo, Jingbo; Huang, Tinghua

    2016-08-01

    miRNAs are non-coding RNA molecules typically 18-22 nucleotides long that can suppress the expression of their target genes. Several laboratories have attempted to identify miRNAs from the pig that are involved in Salmonella infection. These bioinformatics strategies using the newly available genomic sequence are generally successful. Here, we report an in silico identification of miRNAs in pig focusing on the Salmonella infection pathway, and further investigated the differential expression of those miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR during pre- and post-natal stage of Salmonella inoculation from the peripheral blood of commercially breed pigs. We identified 29 miRNAs that have predicted targets in the Salmonella infection pathway and nine of them were not yet described in pig. In addition, the expression of nine selected miRNAs was validated in the peripheral blood by northern blotting. Through expression analyses, differences were found between pre- and post-natal stages of Salmonella inoculation for miR-221, miR-125b and miR-27b-all of them were suppressed 2 days after Salmonella inoculation. The predicted targets of those three miRNAs were validated by luciferase reporter assays. We show that FOS is a direct target of miR-221, miR-125b can suppress MAPK14, and miR-27b can target IFNG. These findings will be helpful in understanding the function and processing of these miRNAs in Salmonella infection. The miRNA differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of commercial breed pigs suggest that it can be used as genetic markers for salmonella infection resistance in pigs.

  5. Diagnostic Value of Circulating Extracellular miR-134, miR-185, and miR-22 Levels in Lung Adenocarcinoma-Associated Malignant Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon Mi; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lim, Sung-Nam; An, Jin Young; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Lee, Ki Man; Choe, Kang Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The accurate and timely diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion (MPE) in lung cancer patients is important because MPE has a poor prognosis and is classified as stage IV disease. Molecular biomarkers for pleural effusion, such as circulating extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) isolated from pleural fluid, may help in the diagnosis of MPE. The present study examined whether miRNAs that are deregulated in lung cancer (miR-134, miR-185, and miR-22) can serve as diagnostic markers for lung adenocarcinoma-associated MPE (LA-MPE). Materials and Methods Real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the expression of the three miRNAs in samples from 87 patients with pleural effusion comprising 45 LA-MPEs and 42 benign pleural effusions (BPEs). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was then used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of each of the three miRNAs and compare it with that of the common tumor marker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Results The expression of all three miRNAs was significantly lower in LA-MPE than in BPE (p <0.001). The AUCs for miR-134, miR-185, miR-22, and CEA were 0.721, 0.882, 0.832, and 0.898, respectively. Combining CEA with the three miRNAs increased the diagnostic performance, yielding an AUC of 0.942 (95% confidence interval, 0.864 to 0.982), with a sensitivity of 91.9% and a specificity of 92.5%. Conclusion The present study suggests that the expression levels of circulating extracellular miR-134, miR-185, and miR-22 in patients with pleural effusion may have diagnostic value when differentiating between LA-MPE and BPE. PMID:24851110

  6. Association of miR-196a-2 and miR-499 variants with ulcerative colitis and their correlation with expression of respective miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ranjha, Raju; Meena, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Abhiraman; Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in regulating the gene expression of their target genes. SNP miR-196a-2 rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 are reported to have association with the risk and prognosis of multiple-types of inflammatory diseases including IBD. This study was conducted to show if any association of SNP miR-196a-2rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 exists with ulcerative colitis (UC) patients of north Indian population and how these polymorphisms modulate the expression profile of the respective miRNAs. Methods A total of 638 participants including 197 UC patients and 441 controls were included in this study. Polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR-RFLP and the miRNA expression was measured using qRT-PCR. Genotypes and allele frequencies were calculated using SPSS 16 software. Results MiR-196a-2 rs11614913 (C>T) and miR-499 rs3746444 (T>C) were found to be associated with UC. TT genotype of miR-196a-2 rs11614913 (p = 0.03) was negatively associated with UC whereas the heterozygous TC genotype of miR-499 rs3746444 (p = 0.003) was showing positive association with UC. Patients having a combination of both SNPs, developed disease at older age and they suffered from severe disease extent. Genotype that showed association with the disease also showed correlation with the changes in miRNA expression. Conclusion In this study we found miR-196a-2 rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 were associated with UC in north Indian population. We found the genotype that showed association with UC also altered the expression of respective miRNA in the patient harboring the genotype. There was correlation between associated genotype and altered miRNA expression. PMID:28301487

  7. Involvement of miRNAs in equine follicle development.

    PubMed

    Schauer, S N; Sontakke, S D; Watson, E D; Esteves, C L; Donadeu, F X

    2013-09-01

    Previous evidence from in vitro studies suggests specific roles for a subset of miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-23a, miR-145, miR-503, miR-224, miR-383, miR-378, miR-132, and miR-212, in regulating ovarian follicle development. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the levels of these miRNAs in relation to follicle selection, maturation, and ovulation in the monovular equine ovary. In Experiment 1, follicular fluid was aspirated during ovulatory cycles from the dominant (DO) and largest subordinate (S) follicles of an ovulatory wave and the dominant (DA) follicle of a mid-cycle anovulatory wave (n=6 mares). Follicular fluid levels of progesterone and estradiol were lower (P<0.01) in S follicles than in DO follicles, whereas mean levels of IGF1 were lower (P<0.01) in S and DA follicles than in DO follicles. Relative to DO and DA follicles, S follicles had higher (P≤0.01) follicular fluid levels of miR-145 and miR-378. In Experiment 2, follicular fluid and granulosa cells were aspirated from dominant follicles before (DO) and 24 h after (L) administration of an ovulatory dose of hCG (n=5 mares/group). Relative to DO follicles, L follicles had higher follicular fluid levels of progesterone (P=0.05) and lower granulosa cell levels of CYP19A1 and LHCGR (P<0.005). Levels of miR-21, miR-132, miR-212, and miR-224 were increased (P<0.05) in L follicles; this was associated with reduced expression of the putative miRNA targets, PTEN, RASA1, and SMAD4. These novel results may indicate a physiological involvement of miR-21, miR-145, miR-224, miR-378, miR-132, and miR-212 in the regulation of cell survival, steroidogenesis, and differentiation during follicle selection and ovulation in the monovular ovary.

  8. Variation of CH Stretch Frequencies with CH_4 Orientation in the CH_4 - F^- Complex: Multiple Resonances as Vibrational Conical Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapaliya, Bishnu P.; Perry, David S.

    2016-06-01

    In the CH_4 - F^- complex, an adiabatic separation of the CH stretch frequencies from the CH_4 orientational coordinates allows the calculation of the four adiabatic CH stretch surfaces. These ab initio calculations reveal (i) a large variation of CH stretch frequencies (> 100 wn) in the orientational space and (ii) the existence of four symmetrically equivalent sets of vibrational conical intersections (CIs). Two sets of symmetry-allowed CIs are identified in addition to the symmetry-required CIs at the front- and back-side C3v geometries. These results have implications for the evolution of excited CH vibrations in methane during its approach to a potentially reactive surface.

  9. Fluoxetine Increases the Expression of miR-572 and miR-663a in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mundalil Vasu, Mahesh; Anitha, Ayyappan; Takahashi, Taro; Thanseem, Ismail; Iwata, Keiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on the developed neurons in the adult brain. In contrast, the drug may be deleterious to immature or undifferentiated neural cells, although the mechanism is unclear. Recent investigations have suggested that microRNAs (miRNA) may be critical for effectiveness of psychotropic drugs including SSRI. We investigated whether fluoxetine could modulate expressions of neurologically relevant miRNAs in two neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Initial screening results revealed that three (miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) and four (miR-320a, miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) miRNAs were up-regulated in SK-N-SH cells and SH-SY5Y cells, respectively, after 24 hours treatment of fluoxetine (1–25 μM). Cell viability was reduced according to the dose of fluoxetine. The upregulation of miR-572 and miR-663a was consistent in both the SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH cells, confirmed by a larger scale culture condition. Our data is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine could increase the expression of miRNAs in undifferentiated neural cells, and that putative target genes of those miRNAs have been shown to be involved in fundamental neurodevelopmental processes. PMID:27716787

  10. Use of Mature miRNA Strand Selection in miRNAs Families in Cervical Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Granados-López, Angelica Judith; Ruiz-Carrillo, José Luis; Servín-González, Luis Steven; Martínez-Rodríguez, José Luis; Reyes-Estrada, Claudia Araceli; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Rosalinda; López, Jesús Adrián

    2017-02-14

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as a cancer hallmark, nevertheless miRNA function and expression does not always correlate in patients tissues and cell lines studies. In addition to this issue, miRNA strand usage conduces to increased cell signaling pathways modulation diversifying cellular processes regulation. In cervical cancer, 20 miRNA families are involved in carcinogenesis induction and development to this moment. These families have 5p and 3p strands with different nucleotide (nt) chain sizes. In general, mature 5p strands are larger: two miRNAs of 24 nt, 24 miRNAs of 23 nt, 35 miRNAs of 22 nt and three miRNAs of 21 nt. On the other hand, the 3p strands lengths observed are: seven miRNAs of 23 nt, 50 miRNAs of 22 nt, six miRNAs of 21 nt and four miRNAs of 20 nt. Based on the analysis of the 20 miRNA families associated with cervical cancer, 67 3p strands and 65 5p strands are selected suggesting selectivity and specificity mechanisms regulating cell processes like proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, metabolism and Warburg effect. The insight reviewed here could be used in the miRNA based therapy, diagnosis and prognosis approaches.

  11. Use of Mature miRNA Strand Selection in miRNAs Families in Cervical Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Granados-López, Angelica Judith; Ruiz-Carrillo, José Luis; Servín-González, Luis Steven; Martínez-Rodríguez, José Luis; Reyes-Estrada, Claudia Araceli; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Rosalinda; López, Jesús Adrián

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as a cancer hallmark, nevertheless miRNA function and expression does not always correlate in patients tissues and cell lines studies. In addition to this issue, miRNA strand usage conduces to increased cell signaling pathways modulation diversifying cellular processes regulation. In cervical cancer, 20 miRNA families are involved in carcinogenesis induction and development to this moment. These families have 5p and 3p strands with different nucleotide (nt) chain sizes. In general, mature 5p strands are larger: two miRNAs of 24 nt, 24 miRNAs of 23 nt, 35 miRNAs of 22 nt and three miRNAs of 21 nt. On the other hand, the 3p strands lengths observed are: seven miRNAs of 23 nt, 50 miRNAs of 22 nt, six miRNAs of 21 nt and four miRNAs of 20 nt. Based on the analysis of the 20 miRNA families associated with cervical cancer, 67 3p strands and 65 5p strands are selected suggesting selectivity and specificity mechanisms regulating cell processes like proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, metabolism and Warburg effect. The insight reviewed here could be used in the miRNA based therapy, diagnosis and prognosis approaches. PMID:28216603

  12. Identification of miR414 and expression analysis of conserved miRNAs from Stevia rebaudiana.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) usually contain 19-24 nucleotides and have been identified as important eukaryotic gene regulators. Applications of various computational approaches have simplified the task by predicting miRNAs from available sequence data sources. In this study, we identified a conserved miR414 from a computational analysis of EST sequence data available from Stevia rebaudiana. In addition, we also identified six conserved miRNAs namely miR169, miR319, miR414, miR164, miR167 and miR398 using stem-loop RT-PCR analysis. Hence, miR414 was commonly identified using both methods. The expression analysis of these miRNAs documented their roles in growth and development of Stevia. Furthermore, the detected miRNAs were found to target genes involved in plant growth, development, metabolism and signal transduction. This is the first study reporting these conserved miRNAs and their expression in Stevia.

  13. A path-based measurement for human miRNA functional similarities using miRNA-disease associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pingjian; Luo, Jiawei; Xiao, Qiu; Chen, Xiangtao

    2016-09-01

    Compared with the sequence and expression similarity, miRNA functional similarity is so important for biology researches and many applications such as miRNA clustering, miRNA function prediction, miRNA synergism identification and disease miRNA prioritization. However, the existing methods always utilized the predicted miRNA target which has high false positive and false negative to calculate the miRNA functional similarity. Meanwhile, it is difficult to achieve high reliability of miRNA functional similarity with miRNA-disease associations. Therefore, it is increasingly needed to improve the measurement of miRNA functional similarity. In this study, we develop a novel path-based calculation method of miRNA functional similarity based on miRNA-disease associations, called MFSP. Compared with other methods, our method obtains higher average functional similarity of intra-family and intra-cluster selected groups. Meanwhile, the lower average functional similarity of inter-family and inter-cluster miRNA pair is obtained. In addition, the smaller p-value is achieved, while applying Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test to different miRNA groups. The relationship between miRNA functional similarity and other information sources is exhibited. Furthermore, the constructed miRNA functional network based on MFSP is a scale-free and small-world network. Moreover, the higher AUC for miRNA-disease prediction indicates the ability of MFSP uncovering miRNA functional similarity.

  14. A double-negative feedback loop between E2F3b and miR- 200b regulates docetaxel chemosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanping; Chen, Longbang; Song, Haizhu; Chen, Yitian; Wang, Rui; Feng, Bing

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs which negatively regulate gene expressions mainly through 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) binding of target mRNAs. Recent studies have highlighted the feedback loops between miRNAs and their target genes in physiological and pathological processes including chemoresistance of cancers. Our previous study identified miR-200b/E2F3 axis as a chemosensitivity restorer of human lung adenocarcinoma (LAD) cells. Moreover, E2F3b was bioinformatically proved to be a potential transcriptional regulator of pre-miR-200b gene promoter. The existance of this double-negative feedback minicircuitry comprising E2F3b and miR-200b was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, site-specific mutation and luciferase reporter assay. And the underlying regulatory mechanisms of this feedback loop on docetaxel resistance of LAD cells were further investigated by applying in vitro chemosensitivity assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as mice xenograft model. In conclusion, our results suggest that the double-negative feedback loop between E2F3b and miR-200b regulates docetaxel chemosensitivity of human LAD cells mainly through cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis. PMID:27027446

  15. SMAR1 binds to T(C/G) repeat and inhibits tumor progression by regulating miR-371-373 cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Jinumary; Mittal, Smriti P. K.; Alam, Aftab; Ranade, Payal; Mogare, Devraj; Patel, Sonal; Saxena, Smita; Ghorai, Suvankar; Kulkarni, Abhijeet P.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin architecture and dynamics are regulated by various histone and non-histone proteins. The matrix attachment region binding proteins (MARBPs) play a central role in chromatin organization and function through numerous regulatory proteins. In the present study, we demonstrate that nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 orchestrates global gene regulation as determined by massively parallel ChIP-sequencing. The study revealed that SMAR1 binds to T(C/G) repeat and targets genes involved in diverse biological pathways. We observe that SMAR1 binds and targets distinctly different genes based on the availability of p53. Our data suggest that SMAR1 binds and regulates one of the imperative microRNA clusters in cancer and metastasis, miR-371-373. It negatively regulates miR-371-373 transcription as confirmed by SMAR1 overexpression and knockdown studies. Further, deletion studies indicate that a ~200 bp region in the miR-371-373 promoter is necessary for SMAR1 binding and transcriptional repression. Recruitment of HDAC1/mSin3A complex by SMAR1, concomitant with alteration of histone marks results in downregulation of the miRNA cluster. The regulation of miR-371-373 by SMAR1 inhibits breast cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis as determined by in vivo experiments. Overall, our study highlights the binding of SMAR1 to T(C/G) repeat and its role in cancer through miR-371-373. PMID:27671416

  16. Regulation of miR-34 Family in Neuronal Development.

    PubMed

    Jauhari, Abhishek; Singh, Tanisha; Singh, Parul; Parmar, Devendra; Yadav, Sanjay

    2017-01-13

    Differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC's) to mature and functional neurons requires coordinated expression of mRNA, microRNAs (miRNAs) and regulatory proteins. Our earlier unbiased miRNA profiling studies have identified miR-200, miR-34 and miR-221/222 as maximally up-regulated miRNA families in differentiating PC12 cells and demonstrated the capability of miR-200 family in inducing neuronal differentiation (J. Neurochem, 2015, 133, 640-652). In present study, we have investigated role of miR-34 family in neuronal differentiation and identified P53 as mediator of nerve growth factor (NGF) induced miR-34a expression in differentiating PC12 cells. Our studies have shown that NGF induced miR-34a, arrests proliferating PC12 cells to G1 phase, which is pre-requisite for neuronal differentiation. Our studies have also shown that increased expression of miR-34a controls the P53 level in differentiated PC12 cells in feedback inhibition manner, which probably prevents differentiated cells from P53 induced apoptosis. Expression profiling of miR-34 family in different neuronal, non-neuronal and developing cells have identified differentiated and aged brain cells as richest source of miR-34, which also indicates that higher expression of miR-34 family helps in maintaining the mature neurons in non-proliferative stage. In conclusion, our studies have shown that miR-34 is brain enriched miRNA family, which up-regulates with neuronal maturation and brain ageing and co-operative regulation of P53 and miR-34a helps in neuronal differentiation by arresting cells in G1 phase.

  17. The atmospheric oxidation of diethyl ether: chemistry of the C2H5-O-CH(O.)CH3 radical between 218 and 335 K.

    PubMed

    Orlando, John J

    2007-08-21

    The products of the Cl atom initiated oxidation of diethyl ether (DEE) were investigated at atmospheric pressure over a range of temperatures (218-335 K) and O(2) partial pressures (50-700 Torr), both in the presence and absence of NO(x). The major products observed at 298 K and below were ethyl formate and ethyl acetate, which accounted for approximately equal to 60-80% of the reacted diethyl ether. In general, the yield of ethyl formate increased with increasing temperature, with decreasing O(2) partial pressure, and upon addition of NO to the reaction mixtures. The product yield data show that thermal decomposition reaction 3, CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH(O.)CH(3)--> CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH=O + CH(3), and reaction 6 with O(2), CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH(O.)CH(3) + O(2)--> CH(3)CH(2)-O-C(=O)CH(3) + HO(2) are competing fates of the CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH(O )CH(3) radical, with a best estimate of k3/k6 approximately equal to 6.9 x 10(24) exp(-3130/T). Thermal decomposition via C-H or C-O bond cleavage are at most minor contributors to the CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH(O.)CH(3) chemistry. The data also show that the CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH(O.)CH(3) radical is subject to a chemical activation effect. When produced from the exothermic reaction of the CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH(OO.)CH(3) radical with NO, prompt decomposition via both CH(3)- and probably H-elimination occur, with yields of about 40% and < or =15%, respectively. Finally, at temperatures slightly above ambient, evidence for a change in mechanism in the absence of NO(x), possibly due to chemistry involving the peroxy radical CH(3)CH(2)-O-CH(OO.)CH(3), is presented.

  18. miEAA: microRNA enrichment analysis and annotation

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Christina; Khaleeq, Qurratulain T.; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the development of gene set enrichment and gene regulatory network analysis tools over a decade ago, microRNA enrichment tools are currently gaining importance. Building on our experience with the gene set analysis toolkit GeneTrail, we implemented the miRNA Enrichment Analysis and Annotation tool (miEAA). MiEAA is a web-based application that offers a variety of commonly applied statistical tests such as over-representation analysis and miRNA set enrichment analysis, which is similar to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Besides the different statistical tests, miEAA also provides rich functionality in terms of miRNA categories. Altogether, over 14 000 miRNA sets have been added, including pathways, diseases, organs and target genes. Importantly, our tool can be applied for miRNA precursors as well as mature miRNAs. To make the tool as useful as possible we additionally implemented supporting tools such as converters between different miRBase versions and converters from miRNA names to precursor names. We evaluated the performance of miEAA on two sets of miRNAs that are affected in lung adenocarcinomas and have been detected by array analysis. The web-based application is freely accessible at: http://www.ccb.uni-saarland.de/mieaa_tool/. PMID:27131362

  19. miRNA expression during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Cárdenas, Flor de Fátima; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Gutiérrez-Ramos, Ximena; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. They are involved in the control of many developmental processes, including fruit development. The increasing amount of information on miRNAs, on their expression, abundance, and conservation between various species, provides a new opportunity to study the role of miRNAs in non-model plant species. In this work, we used a combination of Northern blot and tissue print hybridization analysis to identify conserved miRNAs expressed during prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) fruit development. Comparative profiling detected the expression of 34 miRNAs, which were clustered in three different groups that were associated with the different phases of fruit development. Variation in the level of miRNA expression was observed. Gradual expression increase of several miRNAs was observed during fruit development, including miR164. miR164 was selected for stem-loop RT-PCR and for a detailed spatial-temporal expression analysis. At early floral stages, miR164 was mainly localized in meristematic tissues, boundaries and fusion zones, while it was more homogenously expressed in fruit tissues. Our results provide the first evidence of miRNA expression in the prickly pear cactus and provide the basis for future research on miRNAs in Opuntia. Moreover, our analyses suggest that miR164 plays different roles during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

  20. miRNA-encoded peptides (miPEPs): A new tool to analyze the roles of miRNAs in plant biology

    PubMed Central

    Couzigou, Jean-Malo; Lauressergues, Dominique; Bécard, Guillaume; Combier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA molecules negatively regulating the expression of many important genes in plants and animals. We have recently shown that plant primary transcripts of miRNAs encode peptides (miPEPs) able to increase specifically the transcription of their associated miRNA.1 We discuss here the possibility of using miPEPs as a new tool for functional analysis of single members of miRNA families in plants, including in non-model plants, that could avoid transgenic transformation and minimize artifactual interpretation. We also raise several fundamental and crucial questions that need to be address for a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlining the regulatory activity of miPEPs. PMID:26400469

  1. miRNA-encoded peptides (miPEPs): A new tool to analyze the roles of miRNAs in plant biology.

    PubMed

    Couzigou, Jean-Malo; Lauressergues, Dominique; Bécard, Guillaume; Combier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA molecules negatively regulating the expression of many important genes in plants and animals. We have recently shown that plant primary transcripts of miRNAs encode peptides (miPEPs) able to increase specifically the transcription of their associated miRNA.(1) We discuss here the possibility of using miPEPs as a new tool for functional analysis of single members of miRNA families in plants, including in non-model plants, that could avoid transgenic transformation and minimize artifactual interpretation. We also raise several fundamental and crucial questions that need to be address for a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlining the regulatory activity of miPEPs.

  2. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mière, Arnaud; Ramage, Karim; Vermeulen, Anne; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters , intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between ICARE, IPSL and OMP data centers and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. ChArMEx data, either produced or used by the project, are documented and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The website offers the usual but user-friendly functionalities: data catalog, user registration procedure, search tool to select and access data... The metadata (data description) are standardized, and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) assignement procedure allows to automatically register the datasets, in order to make them easier to access, cite, reuse and verify. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 120 datasets, including more than 80 in situ datasets (2012, 2013 and 2014 summer campaigns, background monitoring station of Ersa...), 25 model output sets (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios...), a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean... Many in situ datasets

  3. miR-155: A Novel Target in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Li, Junyao; Gao, Peng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs of 18–24 nucleotides in length, function to posttranscriptionally regulate protein expression. miR-155 was one of the first identified and, to date, the most studied miRNA, and has been linked to various cellular processes such as modulation of immune responses and oncogenesis. Previous studies have identified miR-155 as a crucial positive regulator of Th1 immune response in autoimmune diseases, but as a suppressor of Th2 immunity in allergic disorders. However, recent studies have found new evidence that miR-155 plays an indispensible role in allergic asthma. This review summarizes the recent findings with respect to miR-155 in immune responses and the underlying mechanisms responsible for miR-155-related allergic diseases, as well as the similarities between miR-155 and glucocorticoids in immunity. PMID:27783037

  4. Fitness and structure landscapes for pre-miRNA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf; de Meaux, Juliette; Lassig, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The processing from pre-miRNA to mature miRNA in plants involves a mechanism, which depends on an extended stem in the secondary structure of the pre-miRNA. Here, we show how natural selection acts on this secondary structure to produce evolutionary conservation of the processing mechanism together with modularity of the pre-miRNA molecules, making this molecular function independent of others. Our main results are: 1. Selection on miRNA processing can be described by a fitness landscape which depends directly on the secondary structure of the pre-miRNA. 2. This fitness landscape predicts the divergence of the phenotype between orthologous pre-miRNA molecules from different species. 3. Actual pre-miRNA structures are modular: their phenotype is significantly less affected by deleterious mutations in the remainder of the molecule than for random RNA molecules.

  5. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2015-12-26

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets.

  6. 21. Photocopy of drawing (from Sault Ste. Marie, MI city ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of drawing (from Sault Ste. Marie, MI city archives) showing ROADWAY ACROSS SECTION DETAILS - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  7. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  8. Overexpression of miR-484 and miR-744 in Vero cells alters Dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Castrillón-Betancur, Juan Camilo; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dengue is considered one of the world’s most important mosquito-borne diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding single-stranded RNAs that play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Although miRNAs possess antiviral activity against many mammalian-infecting viruses, their involvement in Dengue virus (DENV) replication remains poorly understood. OBJECTIVE To determine the role of miR-484 and miR-744 in DENV infection and to examine whether DENV infection alters the expression of both miRNAs. METHODS We used bioinformatics tools to explore the relationship between DENV and cellular miRNAs. We then overexpressed miR-484 or miR-744 in Vero cells to examine their role in DENV replication using flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and western blotting. FINDINGS We found several cellular miRNAs that target a conserved region within the 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) of the genome of the four DENV serotypes and found that overexpression of miR-484 or miR-744 inhibits infection by DENV-1 to DENV-4. Furthermore, we observed that DENV RNA might be involved in the downregulation of endogenous miR-484 and miR-744. CONCLUSION Our study identifies miR-484 and miR-744 as two possible restriction host factors against DENV infection. However, further studies are needed to directly verify whether miR-484 and miR-744 both have an anti-DENV effect in vivo. PMID:28327787

  9. miR-27a and miR-27a* contribute to metastatic properties of osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Arafeh, Rand; Maximov, Vadim; Galasso, Marco; Khawaled, Saleh; Abou-Sharieha, Samah; Volinia, Stefano; Jones, Kevin B; Croce, Carlo M; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-03-10

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in adolescents and young adults. The essential mechanisms underlying osteosarcomagenesis and progression continue to be obscure. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have far-reaching effects on the cellular biology of development and cancer. We recently reported that unique miRNA signatures associate with the pathogenesis and progression of OS. Of particular interest, we found that higher expression of miR-27a is associated with clinical metastatic disease. We report here that overexpression of miR-27a/miR-27a*, a microRNA pair derived from a single precursor, promotes pulmonary OS metastases formation. By contrast, sequestering miR-27a/miR-27a* by sponge technology suppressed OS cells invasion and metastases formation. miR-27a/miR-27a* directly repressed CBFA2T3 expression among other target genes. We demonstrated that CBFA2T3 is downregulated in majority of OS samples and its over expression significantly attenuated OS metastatic process mediated by miR-27a/miR-27a* underscoring CBFA2T3 functions as a tumor suppressor in OS. These findings establish that miR-27a/miR-27a* pair plays a significant role in OS metastasis and proposes it as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target in managing OS metastases.

  10. miR-27a and miR-27a* contribute to metastatic properties of osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Maximov, Vadim; Galasso, Marco; Khawaled, Saleh; Abou-Sharieha, Samah; Volinia, Stefano; Jones, Kevin B.; Croce, Carlo M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in adolescents and young adults. The essential mechanisms underlying osteosarcomagenesis and progression continue to be obscure. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have far-reaching effects on the cellular biology of development and cancer. We recently reported that unique miRNA signatures associate with the pathogenesis and progression of OS. Of particular interest, we found that higher expression of miR-27a is associated with clinical metastatic disease. We report here that overexpression of miR-27a/miR-27a*, a microRNA pair derived from a single precursor, promotes pulmonary OS metastases formation. By contrast, sequestering miR-27a/miR-27a* by sponge technology suppressed OS cells invasion and metastases formation. miR-27a/miR-27a* directly repressed CBFA2T3 expression among other target genes. We demonstrated that CBFA2T3 is downregulated in majority of OS samples and its over expression significantly attenuated OS metastatic process mediated by miR-27a/miR-27a* underscoring CBFA2T3 functions as a tumor suppressor in OS. These findings establish that miR-27a/miR-27a* pair plays a significant role in OS metastasis and proposes it as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target in managing OS metastases. PMID:25749032

  11. MiRNA expression profiling in human gliomas: upregulated miR-363 increases cell survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Conti, Alfredo; Romeo, Sara G; Cama, Annamaria; La Torre, Domenico; Barresi, Valeria; Pezzino, Gaetana; Tomasello, Chiara; Cardali, Salvatore; Angileri, Filippo F; Polito, Francesca; Ferlazzo, Guido; Di Giorgio, Rosamaria; Germanò, Antonino; Aguennouz, M'hammed

    2016-10-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in glioma biology is increasingly recognized. To investigate the regulatory mechanisms governing the malignant signature of gliomas with different grades of malignancy, we analyzed miRNA expression profiles in human grade I-IV tumor samples and primary glioma cell cultures. Multiplex real-time PCR was used to profile miRNA expression in a set of World Health Organization (WHO) grade I (pilocytic astrocytoma), II (diffuse fibrillary astrocytoma), and IV (glioblastoma multiforme) astrocytic tumors and primary glioma cell cultures. Primary glioma cell cultures were used to evaluate the effect of transfection of specific miRNAs and miRNA inhibitors. miRNA microarray showed that a set of miRNAs was consistently upregulated in all glioma samples. miR-363 was upregulated in all tumor specimens and cell lines, and its expression correlated with tumor grading. The transfection of glioma cells with the specific inhibitor of miR-363 increased the expression level of tumor suppressor growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43). Transfection of miR-363 induced cell survival, while inhibition of miR-363 significantly reduced glioma cell viability. Furthermore, miRNA-363 inhibition induced the downregulation of AKT, cyclin-D1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and Bcl-2 and upregulation of caspase 3. Together, these data suggest that the upregulation of miR-363 may play a role in malignant glioma signature.

  12. Virus-Mediated Alterations in miRNA Factors and Degradation of Viral miRNAs by MCPIP1

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Christine; Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, encodes 25 mature viral miRNAs. MCP-1-induced protein-1 (MCPIP1), a critical regulator of immune homeostasis, has been shown to suppress miRNA biosynthesis via cleavage of precursor miRNAs through its RNase domain. We demonstrate that MCPIP1 can directly cleave KSHV and EBV precursor miRNAs and that MCPIP1 expression is repressed following de novo KSHV infection. In addition, repression with siRNAs to MCPIP1 in KSHV-infected cells increased IL-6 and KSHV miRNA expression, supporting a role for MCPIP1 in IL-6 and KSHV miRNA regulation. We also provide evidence that KSHV miRNAs repress MCPIP1 expression by targeting the 3’UTR of MCPIP1. Conversely, expression of essential miRNA biogenesis components Dicer and TRBP is increased following latent KSHV infection. We propose that KSHV infection inhibits a negative regulator of miRNA biogenesis (MCPIP1) and up-regulates critical miRNA processing components to evade host mechanisms that inhibit expression of viral miRNAs. KSHV-mediated alterations in miRNA biogenesis represent a novel mechanism by which KSHV interacts with its host and a new mechanism for the regulation of viral miRNA expression. PMID:27893764

  13. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kook; Henry, Jon C.; Jiang, Jinmai; Esau, Christine; Gusev, Yuriy; Lerner, Megan R.; Postier, Russell G.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  14. Synthesis and photoelectron spectroscopic studies of N(CH2CH2NMe)3P=E (E = O, S, NH, CH2).

    PubMed

    Kárpáti, Tamás; Veszprémi, Tamás; Thirupathi, Natesan; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhigang; Ellern, Arkady; Nyulászi, László; Verkade, John G

    2006-02-08

    The synthesis and the crystal and molecular structure of N(CH(2)CH(2)NMe)(3)P=CH(2) is reported. The P-N(ax) distance is rather long in N(CH(2)CH(2)NMe)(3)P=CH(2). The ylide N(CH(2)CH(2)NMe)(3)P=CH(2) proved to be a stronger proton acceptor than proazaphosphatrane N(CH(2)CH(2)NMe)(3)P, since it was shown to deprotonate N(CH(2)CH(2)NMe)(3)PH(+). The extremely strong basicity of the ylide is in accordance with its low ionization energy (6.3 eV), which is the lowest in the presently investigated series N(CH(2)CH(2)NMe)(3)P=E (E: CH(2), NH, lone pair, O and S), and to the best of our knowledge it is the smallest value observed for a non-conjugated phosphorus ylide. Computations reveal the existence of two bond strech isomers, and the stabilization of the phosphorus centered cation by electron donation from the equatorial and the axial nitrogens. Similar stabilizing effects operate in the case of protonation of E. A fine balance of these different interactions determines the P-N(ax) distance, which is thus very sensitive to the level of the theory applied. According to the quantum mechanical calculations, methyl substitution at the equatorial nitrogens flattens the pyramidality of this atom, increasing its electron donor capability. As a consequence, the PN(ax) distance in the short-transannular bonded protonated systems and the radical cations is longer by about 0.5 A in the N(eq)(Me) than in the N(eq)(H) systems. Accordingly, isodesmic reaction energies show that a stabilization of about 25 and 10 kcal/mol is attributable to the formation of the transannular bond in case of N(eq)(H) and the experimentally realizable N(eq)(Me) species, respectively.

  15. Exosomes as miRNA Carriers: Formation-Function-Future.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojie; Odenthal, Margarete; Fries, Jochen W U

    2016-12-02

    Exosomes, which are one of the smallest extracellular vesicles released from cells, have been shown to carry different nucleic acids, including microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs significantly regulate cell growth and metabolism by posttranscriptional inhibition of gene expression. The rapidly changing understanding of exosomes' formation and function in delivering miRNAs from cell to cell has prompted us to review current knowledge in exosomal miRNA secretion mechanisms as well as possible therapeutic applications for personalized medicine.

  16. Serum miR-152, miR-148a, miR-148b, and miR-21 as novel biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-shan; Li, Bao-jian; Lu, Hua-wei; Chen, Yu; Lu, Chuan; Zhu, Rui-xia; Liu, Si-hai; Yi, Qing-ting; Li, Jing; Song, Chun-hui

    2015-04-01

    Lung cancer, predominantly by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths over the world. Late diagnosis is one of important reasons for high mortality rate in lung cancer. Current diagnostic approaches have disadvantages such as low accuracy, high cost, invasive procedure, etc. MicroRNAs were previously proposed as promising novel biomarkers in cancer screening. In this study, we evaluated the predictive power of four candidate miRNAs in NSCLC detection. Our study involved 152 NSCLC patients and 300 healthy controls. Blood samples were obtained from the total 452 subjects. After miRNA extraction from serum, the expression of miRNAs in cases and controls were quantified by qRT-PCR and normalized to the level of U6 small RNA. Statistical analyses were performed to compare miRNA levels between cases and controls. Stratified analyses were employed to compare miRNA levels in NSCLC patients with different clinical characteristics. Serum miR-148a, miR-148b, and miR-152 were significantly downregulated in NSCLC patients. However, overexpression of serum miR-21 was observed in NSCLC patients. The combination of four candidate miRNAs exhibited the highest predictive accuracy in NSCLC screening compared with individual miRNAs (AUC = 0.97). Low level of miRNA-148/152 members may associate with advanced stage, large tumor size, malignant cell differentiation, and metastasis. High expression of miR-21 was possibly correlated with large size tumor and advanced cancer stage. Our results showed the dysregulation of miR-148/152 family and miR-21 in NSCLC patients. Hence, the four candidate miRNAs have great potential to serve as promising novel biomarkers in NSCLC screening. Further large-scale studies are needed to validate our results.

  17. Targeting pre-miRNA by Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Avitabile, Concetta; Saviano, Michele; D'Andrea, Luca; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Brognara, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    PNAs conjugated to carrier peptides have been employed for the targeting of miRNA precursor, with the aim to develop molecules able to interfere in the pre-miRNA processing. The capability of the molecules to bind pre-miRNA has been tested in vitro by fluorescence assayes on Thiazole Orange labeled molecules and in vivo, in K562 cells, evaluating the amount of miRNA produced after treatment of cells with two amounts of PNAs. PMID:22699795

  18. Nuclear Hyperfine Structure in the Donor – Acceptor Complexes (CH3)3N-BF3 and (CH)33N-B(CH3)3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The donor-acceptor complexes (CH3)3N-BF3 and (CH3)3N-B(CH3)3 have been reinvestigated at high resolution by rotational spectroscopy in a supersonic jet. Nuclear hyperfine structure resulting from both nitrogen and boron has been resolved and quadrupole coupling constants have bee...

  19. MiSIS: Michigan Student Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Higher Education Management Services.

    The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) is the student flow component, of the Michigan Community College Occupational Education Evaluation System (MCCOEES), a comprehensive state-wide system for evaluating occupational education. It was developed by the Michigan community college system as a systematic and valid method of collecting…

  20. 78 FR 36631 - Michigan Disaster #MI-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Michigan Disaster MI-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Application Deadline Date: 03/12/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  1. Reduced dimensionality quantum dynamics of CH3 + CH4 --> CH4 + CH3: symmetric hydrogen exchange on an Ab initio potential.

    PubMed

    Remmert, Sarah M; Banks, Simon T; Clary, David C

    2009-04-23

    The symmetric title reaction CH(3) + CH(4) --> CH(4) + CH(3) is studied using quantum scattering theory. Quantum dynamics calculations are performed in hyperspherical coordinates with a two-dimensional effective potential energy surface consisting of an analytical 18-parameter double Morse function fit to ab initio data at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Spectator modes are treated adiabatically by inclusion of projected zero-point energy corrections in the effective potential. The close-coupled equations are solved via R-matrix propagation. Energy and J-shifted thermal rate constants are compared to experimental data and highlight the importance of quantum tunneling. Oscillating reactivity and metastable bound state resonances are observed in the cumulative and state-to-state reaction probabilities. State-to-state differential and initial state-selected integral cross sections are presented and discussed. Primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects for two symmetric deuterated variants of the title reaction are also presented.

  2. Design of a miRNA sponge for the miR-17 miRNA family as a therapeutic strategy against vulvar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Melo Maia, Beatriz; Ling, Hui; Monroig, Paloma; Ciccone, Maria; Soares, Fernando A; Calin, George A; Rocha, Rafael M

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs has been studied thoroughly, and has been observed in a variety of tumors including vulvar carcinomas, a rare type of gynecological tumor with increasing incidence. However, very few therapeutic alternatives have reached the clinical setting, and there is an urgent unmet need to develop novel strategies for patients with this tumor type. Thus, a microRNA (miRNA) sponge for the miR-17 miRNA family was designed, synthesized and validated in vitro in order to explore a new therapeutic strategy based on inhibiting this oncogenic miRNA family in vulvar cancer. Members of the miR-17 family were evaluated for expression in a vulvar tumor cell line (SW954) and 20 HPV negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Six in tandem, bulged sequences that were complementary to these miRNAs were designed, synthesized, cloned, and transfected into SW954 cells. A luciferase reporter assay with a psiCheck2 vector was used to test the specificity of the sponge sequences for miR-17 family miRNA binding. Taqman qRT-PCR was used to test how the sponges affected miRNA expression. In FFPE samples, higher expression of miR-20a and miR-106a correlated with deeper tumor invasion (P = 0.0187 and P = 0.0404, respectively). The luciferase reporter assay validated the specificity of the sponge for miR-17 family members. Using qRT-PCR, we confirmed this specificity with decreased expression in 5 (out of six) miRNAs of the miR-17 family in SW954 cells. Although our results are preliminary, these results demonstrate that these miRNA sponges are potent inhibitors of the miR-17 family of miRNAs in SW954. Therefore, this miRNA-specific sponge may be developed into a novel therapeutic treatment for patients with vulvar cancer.

  3. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2013-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and falls within the scope of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The database website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - Forms to document observations or products that will be provided to the database in compliance with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - A search tool to browse the catalogue using thematic, geographic and/or temporal criteria. - Sorted lists of the datasets by thematic keywords, by measured parameters, by instruments or by platform type. - A shopping-cart web interface to order in situ data files. At present datasets from the background monitoring station of Ersa, Cape Corsica and from the 2012 ChArMEx pre-campaign are available. - A user-friendly access to satellite products

  4. miR-217 and CAGE form feedback loop and regulates the response to anti-cancer drugs through EGFR and HER2

    PubMed Central

    Han, Minho; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Yun Sil; Choe, Jongseon; Kim, Young Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA array analysis revealed that miR-217 expression was decreased in anti-cancer drug-resistant Malme3MR cancer cells. CAGE, a cancer/testis antigen, was predicted as a target of miR-217. Luciferase activity and ChIP assays revealed a negative feedback relationship between CAGE and miR-217. miR-217 and CAGE oppositely regulated the response to anti-cancer drugs such as taxol, gefitinib and trastuzumab, an inhibitor of HER2. miR-217 negatively regulated the tumorigenic, metastatic, angiogenic, migration and invasion potential of cancer cells. The xenograft of Malme3MR cells showed an increased expression of pEGFRY845. CAGE and miR-217 inhibitor regulated the expression of pEGFRY845. CAGE showed interactions with EGFR and HER2 and regulated the in vivo sensitivity to trastuzumab. The down-regulation of EGFR or HER2 enhanced the sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs. CAGE showed direct regulation of HER2 and was necessary for the interaction between EGFR and HER2 in Malme3MR cells. miR-217 inhibitor induced interactions of CAGE with EGFR and HER2 in Malme3M cells. The inhibition of EGFR by CAGE-binding GTGKT peptide enhanced the sensitivity to gefitinib and trastuzumab and prevented interactions of EGFR with CAGE and HER2. Our results show that miR-217-CAGE feedback loop serves as a target for overcoming resistance to various anti-cancer drugs, including EGFR and HER2 inhibitors. PMID:26863629

  5. Protocol for miRNA isolation from biofluids.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgeny A; Zaporozhchenko, Ivan A; Morozkin, Evgeny S; Bryzgunova, Olga E; Vlassov, Valentin V; Laktionov, Pavel P

    2016-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as promising biomarkers in cancer and other diseases. Packaging of miRNAs into vesicles and complexes with proteins ensures their stability in biological fluids but also complicates their isolation. Conventional protocols used to isolate cell-free RNA are generally successful in overcoming these difficulties; however, they are costly, labor-intensive, or heavily reliant on the use of hazardous chemicals. Here we describe a protocol that is suitable for isolating miRNAs from biofluids, including blood plasma and urine. The protocol is based on precipitation of proteins, denaturation of miRNA-containing complexes with octanoic acid and guanidine isothiocyanate, and subsequent purification of miRNA on spin columns. The efficacy of miRNA extraction by phenol-chloroform extraction, miRCURY RNA isolation kit--biofluids (Exiqon), and the proposed protocol was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR of miR-16 and miR-126. The proposed protocol was slightly more effective for isolating miRNA from plasma and significantly superior to the other two methods for miRNA isolation from urine. Spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE data suggest that the disparity in performance between miRCURY Biofluids and the proposed protocol can be attributed to differences in precipitation mechanisms, as confirmed by the retention of different proteins in the supernatant.

  6. Ferromagnetism and Nonmetallic Transport of Thin-Film <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 : A Stabilized Metastable Material

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guixin; Singh, D. J.; Zhang, X. -G.; Samolyuk, German; Qiao, Liang; Parish, Chad; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Guo, Hangwen; Tang, Siwei; Wang, Wenbin; Yi, Jieyu; Cantoni, Claudia; Siemons, Wolter; Payzant, E. Andrew; Biegalski, Michael; Ward, T. Z.; Mandrus, David; Stocks, G. M.; Gai, Zheng

    2015-04-07

    The epitaxially stabilized metallic <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 thin films on Si(001) were grown using pulsed laser deposition. While the bulk material of <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 is a high temperature metastable phase and nonmagnetic, the thin film is stabilized at room temperature and shows unusual electronic transport and magnetic properties due to strain modification. The transport renders two different conducting states with a strong crossover at 50 K accompanied by an onset of ferromagnetism as well as a substantial magnetocaloric effect and magnetoresistance. These experimental results are discussed in terms of the unusual electronic structure of <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 obtained within density functional calculations and Boltzmann transport calculations with and without strain. Our findings provide an example of a tailored material with interesting physics properties for practical applications.

  7. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <mi>Tmi>c> superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <mi>d>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <mi>d>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors.

  8. 78 FR 14652 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Gaylord, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Gaylord, MI AGENCY: Federal... Gaylord, MI. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Gaylord, MI, area, creating...

  9. 78 FR 6726 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Ontonagon, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Ontonagon, MI AGENCY... airspace at Ontonagon, MI. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Ontonagon, MI, area, creating...

  10. 77 FR 5170 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Jackson, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... County Airport-Reynolds Field, MI (Lat. 42 15'38'' N., long. 84 27'38'' W.) That airspace extending... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Jackson, MI AGENCY: Federal... Class D airspace within the Jackson, MI, area by changing the name of the airport from Jackson...

  11. 77 FR 5169 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Saginaw, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Saginaw, MI AGENCY: Federal... Class D airspace within the Saginaw, MI, area by changing the name of the airport from Tri-City... airspace at MBS International Airport, Saginaw, MI. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71...

  12. Cortical Morphogenesis during Embryonic Development Is Regulated by miR-34c and miR-204

    PubMed Central

    Venø, Morten T.; Venø, Susanne T.; Rehberg, Kati; van Asperen, Jessy V.; Clausen, Bettina H.; Holm, Ida E.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Finsen, Bente; Kjems, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    The porcine brain closely resembles the human brain in aspects such as development and morphology. Temporal miRNA profiling in the developing embryonic porcine cortex revealed a distinct set of miRNAs, including miR-34c and miR-204, which exhibited a highly specific expression profile across the time of cortical folding. These miRNAs were found to target Doublecortin (DCX), known to be involved in neuron migration during cortical folding of gyrencephalic brains. In vivo modulation of miRNA expression in mouse embryos confirmed that miR-34c and miR-204 can control neuronal migration and cortical morphogenesis, presumably by posttranscriptional regulation of DCX. PMID:28232790

  13. GeneSet2miRNA: finding the signature of cooperative miRNA activities in the gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexey V.; Dietmann, Sabine; Wong, Philip; Lutter, Dominik; Mewes, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    GeneSet2miRNA is the first web-based tool which is able to identify whether or not a gene list has a signature of miRNA-regulatory activity. As input, GeneSet2miRNA accepts a list of genes. As output, a list of miRNA-regulatory models is provided. A miRNA-regulatory model is a group of miRNAs (single, pair, triplet or quadruplet) that is predicted to regulate a significant subset of genes from the submitted list. GeneSet2miRNA provides a user friendly dialog-driven web page submission available for several model organisms. GeneSet2miRNA is freely available at http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/proj/gene2mir/. PMID:19420064

  14. MicroRNAs modulating angiogenesis: miR-129-1 and miR-133 act as angio-miR in HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Soufi-Zomorrod, Mina; Hajifathali, Abbas; Kouhkan, Fatemeh; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Rad, Seyed Mohammad Ali Hosseini; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-07-01

    The sprouting of new blood vessels by angiogenesis is critical in vascular development and homeostasis. Aberrant angiogenesis leads to enormous pathological conditions such as ischemia and cancer. MicroRNAs (also known as miRNAs or miRs) play key roles in regulation of a range of cellular processes by posttranscriptional suppression of their target genes. Recently, new studies have indicated that miRNAs are involved in certain angiogenic settings and signaling pathways use these non-coding RNAs to promote or suppress angiogenic processes. Herein, VEGFR2 and FGFR1 were identified as miR-129-1 and miR-133 targets using bioinformatic algorithms, respectively. Afterwards, using luciferase reporter assay and gene expression analysis at both mRNA and protein levels, VEGFR2 and FGFR1 were validated as miR-129-1 and miR-133 targets. In addition, we showed that miR-129-1 and miR-133 suppress angiogenesis properties such as proliferation rate, cell viability, and migration activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro. We conclude that these miRNAs can suppress key factors of angiogenesis by directly targeting them. These results have important therapeutic implications for a variety of diseases involving deregulation of angiogenesis, including cancer.

  15. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in muon neutrinos interactions on CH at 4.2 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    MINERvA (Main INjector Experiment for v-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in Fermilab's NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam. MINERvA was designed to make precision measurements of neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on a variety of materials including plastic scintillator(CH), C, Fe, Pb, He and water. We present a result of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon (CH) at an average neutrino energy of 4.2 GeV in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions exiting the nucleus . Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from both quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus.

  16. Circulating miR-21, miR-378, and miR-940 increase in response to an acute exhaustive exercise in chronic heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saumya; Wang, Lemin; Jiang, Jinfa; Li, Guanghe; Xu, Jiahong; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Dai, Yue; Xiao, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a major cause of hospitalizations, morbidity, and mortality in Western societies. In addition to optimal medical and device therapy, exercise training is an important adjunct treatment option for CHF patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) participate in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Dynamic regulation of circulating miRNAs during exercise in healthy persons and athletes has recently been documented, however, the response of circulating miRNAs to exercise in CHF patients is undetermined. Twenty-eight CHF patients underwent a symptom-limited incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test on a bicycle ergometer using a standardized exercise protocol of revised Ramp10 programs at Shanghai Tongji Hospital. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after an acute exercise session. RNA was extracted from the serum and selected miRNAs were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reactions. Moreover, inflammatory and muscle damage markers were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. We found that serum miR-21, miR-378 and miR-940 levels were significantly up-regulated immediately following an acute exercise while the rest were not changed. In addition, no robust correlation was identified between changes of these miRNAs and exercise capacity, muscle damage or inflammation. In conclusion, serum miR-21, miR-378, and miR-940 increase in response to an acute exhaustive exercise in CHF patients. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential use of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of exercise adaptation in CHF patients, and if they have any use as prognostic markers of cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26799589

  17. miR319, miR390, and miR393 Are Involved in Aluminum Response in Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zyablitsin, Alexander V.; Rozhmina, Tatiana A.; Speranskaya, Anna S.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.

    2017-01-01

    Acid soils limit agricultural production worldwide. Major reason of crop losses in acid soils is the toxicity of aluminum (Al). In the present work, we investigated expression alterations of microRNAs in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) plants under Al stress. Flax seedlings of resistant (TMP1919 and G1071/4_k) and sensitive (Lira and G1071/4_o) to Al cultivars and lines were exposed to AlCl3 solution for 4 and 24 hours. Twelve small RNA libraries were constructed and sequenced using Illumina platform. In total, 97 microRNAs from 18 conserved families were identified. miR319, miR390, and miR393 revealed expression alterations associated with Al treatment of flax plants. Moreover, for miR390 and miR393, the alterations were distinct in sensitive and resistant to Al genotypes. Expression level changes of miR319 and miR390 were confirmed using qPCR analysis. In flax, potential targets of miR319 are TCPs, miR390–TAS3 and GRF5, and miR393–AFB2-coding transcripts. TCPs, TAS3, GRF5, and AFB2 participate in regulation of plant growth and development. The involvement of miR319, miR390, and miR393 in response to Al stress in flax was shown here for the first time. We speculate that these microRNAs play an important role in Al response via regulation of growth processes in flax plants. PMID:28299328

  18. The expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in gliomas patients and their prognosis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Yi; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhang, Jianning

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the expression of microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 in human glioma cells and tissues. The expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in human glioma cell line U87, U251, A172, LN229 and surgery resected glioma tissues were measured. The survival rate of X-ray (2 Gy) irradiated glioma cells were calculated. 165 cases of glioma patients were recruited successfully; the expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in their resected tissues were measured. The expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in cancer tissues were obviously higher than control tissues (normal brain tissue) and control cell (gastric mucosal epithelial cell, GES) (p < 0.05). The highly malignant glioma tissues expressed significantly higher miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 than low malignant glioma tissues. Patients with highly expressed miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 have shorter survival time. Survival rate of glioma cells was significantly higher than GES cell after irradiation (p < 0.05); miRNA-221 in glioma cells. The expressions of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in irritated glioma cells were positively correlated with the survival rate of glioma cells (r = 0.629, 0.712, both p < 0.01). For the 165 glioma patients, the expressions of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 increased with the increasing of pathological grades (χ (2) = 42.85, p < 0.01); and their survival time decreased when miRNA-221 expression elevated (χ (2) = 57.12, p < 0.01). MiRNA-221 and miRNA-222 express highly in human glioma cells and tissues. Expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 are closely related to pathological grading and prognosis of glioma; they could be used as independent prognostic factor for glioma.

  19. Clinical and biological significance of miR-23b and miR-193a in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Ilaria; Arici, Bruna; Portolani, Nazario; Petro, Giuseppina De; Salvi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common cancer of the liver with a very poor prognosis. The dysregulation of microRNAs (miRs) is indeed implicated in HCC onset and progression. In this study, we have evaluated the expression of miR-23b and miR-193a in a large cohort of 59 and 67 HCC patients, respectively. miR-23b and miR-193a resulted significantly down-regulated in primary HCCs compared to their matched peritumoral counterparts. Furthermore, patients with higher miR-193a expression exhibited longer OS and DFS, suggesting that miR-193a may be a molecular prognostic factor for HCC patients. Since the regulation of miRs by DNA methylation may occur in human cancers, we verified whether the down-modulation of miR-23b and miR-193a in HCC tissues could be related to DNA methylation. An inverse trend between miR-23b expression and DNA methylation was observed, indicating that miR-23b can be epigenetically regulated. By contrast, the down-regulation of miR-193a was not mediated by DNA methylation. To verify the potential role of miR-23b and miR-193a as responsive molecular targets in vitro, we used the inhibitor of DNA methylation 5-aza-dC to restore miR-23b expression level in combination with miR-193a transfection. The combined treatment led to a significant inhibition of cellular proliferation and migration. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that miR-23b and miR-193a may be molecular diagnostic and prognostic factors for HCC; furthermore, miR-23b and miR-193a are responsive molecular targets for limiting HCC cell aggressiveness in combination with the epigenetic drug 5-aza-dC. Moreover, our results provide new advances in the epigenetic regulation of these miRs in HCC. PMID:28036298

  20. Ozone Depletion Potential of CH3Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Scott, Courtney; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    The ozone depletion potential (ODP) of methyl bromide (CH3Br) can be determined by combining the model-calculated bromine efficiency factor (BEF) for CH3Br and its atmospheric lifetime. This paper examines how changes in several key kinetic data affect BEF. The key reactions highlighted in this study include the reaction of BrO + H02, the absorption cross section of HOBr, the absorption cross section and the photolysis products of BrON02, and the heterogeneous conversion of BrON02 to HOBR and HN03 on aerosol particles. By combining the calculated BEF with the latest estimate of 0.7 year for the atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, the likely value of ODP for CH3Br is 0.39. The model-calculated concentration of HBr (approximately 0.3 pptv) in the lower stratosphere is substantially smaller than the reported measured value of about I pptv. Recent publications suggested models can reproduce the measured value if one assumes a yield for HBr from the reaction of BrO + OH or from the reaction of BrO + H02. Although the DeAlore et al. evaluation concluded any substantial yield of HBr from BrO + HO2 is unlikely, for completeness, we calculate the effects of these assumed yields on BEF for CH3Br. Our calculations show that the effects are minimal: practically no impact for an assumed 1.3% yield of HBr from BrO + OH and 10% smaller for an assumed 0.6% yield from BrO + H02.

  1. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in <mi>p><mi>p>¯ collisions using the <mi>lepton>+<mi>jets> channel

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Falkowski, A.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.

    2014-10-01

    We present a measurement of the forward–backward asymmetry in top quark–antiquark production using the full Tevatron Run II data set collected by the D0 experiment at Fermilab. The measurement is performed in lepton+mi>jets> final states using a new kinematic fitting algorithm for events with four or more jets and a new partial reconstruction algorithm for events with only three jets. Corrected for detector acceptance and resolution effects, the asymmetry is evaluated to be mi>Ami>mi>FBmi>=(10.6±3.0)%. Results are consistent with the standard model predictions which range from 5.0% to 8.8%. We also present the dependence of the asymmetry on the invariant mass of the top quark–antiquark system and the difference in rapidities of the top quark and antiquark.

  2. Ab Initio Chemical Kinetics for the CH3 + O((3)P) Reaction and Related Isomerization-Decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH Radicals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z F; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics and mechanism of the CH3 + O reaction and related isomerization-decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH radicals have been studied by ab initio molecular orbital theory based on the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ, CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ, and G2M//B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p) levels of theory. The predicted potential energy surface of the CH3 + O reaction shows that the CHO + H2 products can be directly generated from CH3O by the TS3 → LM1 → TS7 → LM2 → TS4 path, in which both LM1 and LM2 are very loose and TS7 is roaming-like. The result for the CH2O + H reaction shows that there are three low-energy barrier processes including CH2O + H → CHO + H2 via H-abstraction and CH2O + H → CH2OH and CH2O + H → CH3O by addition reactions. The predicted enthalpies of formation of the CH2OH and CH3O radicals at 0 K are in good agreement with available experimental data. Furthermore, the rate constants for the forward and some key reverse reactions have been predicted at 200-3000 K under various pressures. Based on the new reaction pathway for CH3 + O, the rate constants for the CH2O + H and CHO + H2 reactions were predicted with the microcanonical variational transition-state/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (VTST/RRKM) theory. The predicted total and individual product branching ratios (i.e., CO versus CH2O) are in good agreement with experimental data. The rate constant for the hydrogen abstraction reaction of CH2O + H has been calculated by the canonical variational transition-state theory with quantum tunneling and small-curvature corrections to be k(CH2O + H → CHO + H2) = 2.28 × 10(-19) T(2.65) exp(-766.5/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the 200-3000 K temperature range. The rate constants for the addition giving CH3O and CH2OH and the decomposition of the two radicals have been calculated by the microcanonical RRKM theory with the time-dependent master equation solution of the multiple quantum well system in the 200-3000 K temperature range at 1 Torr to

  3. miR-125b and miR-100 Are Predictive Biomarkers of Response to Induction Chemotherapy in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Yoshida, Akihiko; Arai, Yasuhito; Qiao, Zhiwei; Ochiya, Takahiro; Kawai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy in bone. Patients who respond poorly to induction chemotherapy are at higher risk of adverse prognosis. The molecular basis for such poor prognosis remains unclear. We investigated miRNA expression in eight open biopsy samples to identify miRNAs predictive of response to induction chemotherapy and thus maybe used for risk stratification therapy. The samples were obtained from four patients with inferior necrosis (Huvos I/II) and four patients with superior necrosis (Huvos III/IV) following induction chemotherapy. We found six miRNAs, including miR-125b and miR-100, that were differentially expressed > 2-fold (p < 0.05) in patients who respond poorly to treatment. The association between poor prognosis and the abundance of miR-125b and miR-100 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in 20 additional osteosarcoma patients. Accordingly, overexpression of miR-125b and miR-100 in three osteosarcoma cell lines enhanced cell proliferation, invasiveness, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs such as methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. In addition, overexpression of miR-125b blocked the ability of these chemotherapy agents to induce apoptosis. As open biopsy is routinely performed to diagnose osteosarcoma, levels of miR-125b and miR-100 in these samples may be used as basis for risk stratification therapy. PMID:27990096

  4. A Toolbox for Herpesvirus miRNA Research: Construction of a Complete Set of KSHV miRNA Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Lanier, Curtis; Dolce, Alexander; Hu, Jianhong; Brulois, Kevin; Haecker, Irina; Turner, Peter; Renne, Rolf; Krueger, Brian

    2016-02-19

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 viral microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed during latency. Research into KSHV miRNA function has suffered from a lack of genetic systems to study viral miRNA mutations in the context of the viral genome. We used the Escherichia coli Red recombination system together with a new bacmid background, BAC16, to create mutants for all known KSHV miRNAs. The specific miRNA deletions or mutations and the integrity of the bacmids have been strictly quality controlled using PCR, restriction digestion, and sequencing. In addition, stable viral producer cell lines based on iSLK cells have been created for wildtype KSHV, for 12 individual miRNA knock-out mutants (ΔmiR-K12-1 through -12), and for mutants deleted for 10 of 12 (ΔmiR-cluster) or all 12 miRNAs (ΔmiR-all). NGS, in combination with SureSelect technology, was employed to sequence the entire latent genome within all producer cell lines. qPCR assays were used to verify the expression of the remaining viral miRNAs in a subset of mutants. Induction of the lytic cycle leads to efficient production of progeny viruses that have been used to infect endothelial cells. Wt BAC16 and miR mutant iSLK producer cell lines are now available to the research community.

  5. A miRNA-tRNA mix-up: tRNA origin of proposed miRNA.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Heynen, Stephan; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The rapid release of new data from DNA genome sequencing projects has led to a variety of misannotations in public databases. Our results suggest that next generation sequencing approaches are particularly prone to such misannotations. Two related miRNA candidates did recently enter the miRBase database, miR-1274b and miR-1274a, but they share identical 18-nucleotide stretches with tRNA (Lys3) and tRNA (Lys5) , respectively. The possibility that the small RNA fragments that led to the description of these two miRNAs originated from the two tRNAs was examined. The ratio of the miR-1274b:miR-1274a fragments does closely resemble the known tRNA lys3:lys5 ratio in the cell. Furthermore, the proposed miRNA hairpins have a very low prediction score and the proposed miRNA genes are in fact endogenous retroviral elements. We searched for other miRNA-mimics in the human genome and found more examples of tRNA-miRNA mimicry. We propose that the corresponding miRNAs should be validated in more detail, as the small RNA fragments that led to their description are likely derived from tRNA processing.

  6. miR-219 Cooperates with miR-338 in Myelination and Promotes Myelin Repair in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Moyano, Ana Lis; Ma, Zhangyan; Deng, Yaqi; Lin, Yifeng; Zhao, Chuntao; Zhang, Liguo; Jiang, Minqing; He, Xuelian; Ma, Zhixing; Lu, Fanghui; Xin, Mei; Zhou, Wenhao; Yoon, Sung Ok; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Lu, Q Richard

    2017-03-27

    A lack of sufficient oligodendrocyte myelination contributes to remyelination failure in demyelinating disorders. miRNAs have been implicated in oligodendrogenesis; however, their functions in myelin regeneration remained elusive. Through developmentally regulated targeted mutagenesis, we demonstrate that miR-219 alleles are critical for CNS myelination and remyelination after injury. Further deletion of miR-338 exacerbates the miR-219 mutant hypomyelination phenotype. Conversely, miR-219 overexpression promotes precocious oligodendrocyte maturation and regeneration processes in transgenic mice. Integrated transcriptome profiling and biotin-affinity miRNA pull-down approaches reveal stage-specific miR-219 targets in oligodendrocytes and further uncover a novel network for miR-219 targeting of differentiation inhibitors including Lingo1 and Etv5. Inhibition of Lingo1 and Etv5 partially rescues differentiation defects of miR-219-deficient oligodendrocyte precursors. Furthermore, miR-219 mimics enhance myelin restoration following lysolecithin-induced demyelination as well as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, principal animal models of multiple sclerosis. Together, our findings identify context-specific miRNA-regulated checkpoints that control myelinogenesis and a therapeutic role for miR-219 in CNS myelin repair.

  7. miR-375 ameliorates sepsis by downregulating miR-21 level via inhibiting JAK2-STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Bo; Zhao, Lei; Zang, Xuefeng; Zhen, Jie; Chen, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Accumulating evidences have confirmed that miRNAs have important roles in sepsis. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) enhance late sepsis development through immunosuppression in mice. Here, the functions and mechanisms of miR-375 in sepsis were revealed. We found that miR-375 level was downregulated but miR-21 level was upregulated in sepsis patients and that their levels were correlated negatively. Importantly, ectopic expression of miR-375 could decrease the number of sepsis Gr1+CD11b+ MDSCs in mice. Mechanistically, miR-375 could target Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and further impaired signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in sepsis Gr1+CD11b+ MDSC. Gain and loss of function of experiments showed that upregulation or downregulation of miR-375 level could decrease or increase miR-21 level. Moreover, pretreatment of JAK2 overexpressing vector could abolish the effects of miR-375 on miR-21 level and the amount of sepsis Gr1+CD11b+ MDSCs. Therefore, our results demonstrate that miR-375 could block JAK2-STAT3 pathway and thus modulate miR-21 level, which is involved in regulation of late sepsis.

  8. Quantum dynamics of the Walden inversion reaction Cl - +CH3Cl --> ClCH3+Cl -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, David C.; Palma, Juliana

    1997-01-01

    Quantum scattering calculations on the SN2 reaction Cl-+CH3Cl→ClCH3+Cl- are reported. The rotating bond approximation (RBA) has been adapted so that three degrees of freedom including the C-Cl stretching vibration and the CH3 umbrella mode are treated explicitly. The calculations have been done with minor modifications of a potential due to Vande Linde and Hase. It is found that initial excitation of the C-Cl vibration has a large effect on the reaction probabilities, while excitation of the CH3 umbrella vibration is less significant. The reaction is dominated by scattering resonances with lifetimes ranging from 0.1 to 10 ps. It is found that the length of the C-Cl bond at the transition state of the reaction has a particularly pronounced effect on the reaction probabilities. The magnitude of the quantum reaction probabilities compares quite well with those calculated using the quasiclassical trajectory method.

  9. Submillimeter laboratory identification of CH{sup +} and CH{sub 2}D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, T.

    2015-01-22

    Laboratory identification of two basic and important interstellar molecular ions is presented. The J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of {sup 12}CH{sup +} together with those of {sup 13}CH{sup +} and {sup 12}CD{sup +} was observed in the laboratory. The newly obtained frequencies were found to be different from those reported previously. Various experimental evidences firmly support the new measurements. In addition, the Zeeman effect and the spin-rotation hyperfine interaction enforce the laboratory identification with no ambiguity. Rotational lines of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} were observed in the submillimeter-wave region. This laboratory observation is consistent with a recent tentative identification of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} toward Ori IRc2.

  10. The reactions of Si + ions with CH3SiH3, CH3SiD3, C2H6, and CH3CHD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. P.; Lampe, F. W.

    1992-02-01

    The reactions of Si+ with CH3SiH3, CH3SiD3, C2H6, and CH3CHD2 have been studied in a tandem mass spectrometric apparatus over the kinetic energy range of 1-10 eV laboratory-frame-of reference (LAB). In all systems, the major process is the formation of SiCH+3, as well as SiCH2D+ and SiCHD+2 in the case of the reaction with CH3CHD2. It is shown that in the reaction of Si+ with CH3SiH3 and CH3SiD3, the process is best described as a Walden inversion, while in the reaction with C2H6 and CH3CHD2, the process appears to approximate the spectator stripping model or modified spectator stripping (polarization-reflection model). In the reaction with CH3CHD2, the slight preference of Si+ to strip the CH3 radical rather than the CHD2 radical is shown to be in accord with a cross-sectional energy dependence of approximately E-1.

  11. Arsenic-exposed Keratinocytes Exhibit Differential microRNAs Expression Profile; Potential Implication of miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141 in Melanoma Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Horacio; Lema, Carolina; Kirken, Robert A.; Maldonado, Rosa A.; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term exposure to arsenic has been linked to cancer in different organs and tissues, including skin. Here, non-malignant human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were exposed to arsenic and its effects on microRNAs (miRNAs; miR) expression were analyzed via miRCURY LNA array analyses. A total of 30 miRNAs were found differentially expressed in arsenic-treated cells, as compared to untreated controls. Among the up-regulated miRNAs, miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141, are well known to be involved in carcinogenesis. Additional findings confirmed that those three miRNAs were indeed up-regulated in arsenic-stimulated keratinocytes as demonstrated by quantitative PCR assay. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis of both potential cancer-related pathways and targeted genes affected by miR-21, miR-200a and/or miR-141 was performed. Results revealed that miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141 are implicated in skin carcinogenesis related with melanoma development. Conclusively, our results indicate that arsenic-treated keratinocytes exhibited alteration in the miRNAs expression profile and that miR-21, miR-200a and miR-141 could be promising early biomarkers of the epithelial phenotype of cancer cells and they could be potential novel targets for melanoma therapeutic interventions. PMID:27054085

  12. MiR-205 and MiR-373 Are Associated with Aggressive Human Mucinous Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eyking, Annette; Reis, Henning; Frank, Magdalena; Gerken, Guido; Schmid, Kurt W.; Cario, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) represents a distinct histopathological entity of colorectal cancer (CRC), which is associated with disease progression and poor prognosis. Here, we found that expression levels of miR-205 and miR-373 were specifically upregulated only in patients with mucinous colon cancers, but not in CRC that lack mucinous components. To investigate the effects of miR-205 and miR-373 on intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) biology by gain- and loss-of-function experiments in a proof-of-concept approach, we chose previously established in-vitro human Caco-2-based models of differentiated, non-invasive (expressing TLR4 wild-type; termed Caco-2[WT]) versus undifferentiated, invasive (expressing TLR4 mutant D299G; termed Caco-2[D299G]) IEC. Enterocyte-like Caco-2[WT] showed low levels of miR-205 and miR-373 expression, while both miRNAs were significantly upregulated in colorectal carcinoma-like Caco-2[D299G], thus resembling the miRNA expression pattern of paired normal versus tumor samples from MAC patients. Using stable transfection, we generated miR-205- or miR-373-expressing and miR-205- or miR-373-inhibiting subclones of these IEC lines. We found that introduction of miR-205 into Caco-2[WT] led to expansion of mucus-secreting goblet cell-like cells, which was associated with induction of KLF4, MUC2 and TGFβ1 expression. Activation of miR-205 in Caco-2[WT] induced chemoresistance, while inhibition of miR-205 in Caco-2[D299G] promoted chemosensitivity. Caco-2[WT] overexpressing miR-373 showed mitotic abnormalities and underwent morphologic changes (loss of epithelial polarity, cytoskeletal reorganization, and junctional disruption) associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression to inflammation-associated colonic carcinoma, which correlated with induction of phosphorylated STAT3 and N-CADHERIN expression. Functionally, introduction of miR-373 into Caco-2[WT] mediated loss of cell-cell adhesion and increased proliferation and invasion

  13. miRNA Isolation from FFPET Specimen: A Technical Comparison of miRNA and Total RNA Isolation Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia Brigitta; Wichmann, Barnabás; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-07-01

    MiRNA remain stable for detection and PCR-based amplification in FFPE tissue samples. Several miRNA extraction kits are available, however miRNA fraction, as part of total RNA can be isolated using total RNA purification methods, as well. Our primary aim was to compare four different miRNA and total RNA isolation methods from FFPE tissues. Further purposes were to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the yield of the isolated miRNA. MiRNAs were isolated from normal colorectal cancer FFPE specimens from the same patients. Two miRNA isolation kits (High Pure miRNA Isolation Kit, miRCURY™ RNA Isolation Kit) and two total RNA isolation kits were compared (High Pure RNA Paraffin Kit, MagNA Pure 96 Cellular RNA LV Kit). Quantity and quality were determined, expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR using qPCR Human Panel I + II (Exiqon) method detecting 742 human miRNAs in parallel. The yield of total RNA was found to be higher than miRNA purification protocols (in CRC: Ex: 0203 ± 0021 μg; HPm: 1,45 ± 0,8 μg; HPp: 21,36 ± 4,98 μg; MP: 8,6 ± 5,1 μg). MiRNAs were detected in lower relative quantity of total RNA compared to the miRNA kits. Higher number of miRNAs could be detected by the miRNA isolation kits in comparison to the total RNA isolation methods. (Ex: 497 ± 16; HPm: 542 ± 11; HPp: 332 ± 36; MP: 295 ± 74). Colon specific miRNAs (miR-21-5p;-34-5p) give satisfying results by miRNA isolation kits. Although miRNA can be detected also after total RNA isolation methods, for reliable and reproducible miRNA expression profiling the use of miRNA isolation kits are more suitable.

  14. Elevated miR-33a and miR-224 in steatotic chronic hepatitis C liver biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Lendvai, Gabor; Jármay, Katalin; Karácsony, Gizella; Halász, Tünde; Kovalszky, Ilona; Baghy, Kornélia; Wittmann, Tibor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Kiss, András

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the expression of selected microRNAs (miRNA) in hepatitis C, steatotic hepatitis C, noninfected steatotic and normal liver tissues. METHODS: The relative expression levels of miR-21, miR-33a, miR-96, miR-122, miR-125b, miR-221 and miR-224 were determined in 76 RNA samples isolated from 18 non-steatotic and 28 steatotic chronic hepatitis C (CHC and CHC-Steatosis, respectively) cases, 18 non-infected, steatotic liver biopsies of metabolic origin (Steatosis) and 12 normal formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded liver tissues using TaqMan MicroRNA Assays. All CHC biopsy samples were obtained prior to initiating therapy. Patients’ serum biochemical values, which included glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), were obtained and correlated with relative miRNA expression. RESULTS: When compared with control non-infected liver samples, miR-122 and miR-221 levels were reduced in CHC-Steatosis (P < 0.03) and in CHC, CHC-Steatosis and Steatosis (P < 0.01). Alternatively, the expression of miR-33a and miR-224 were elevated in CHC-Steatosis and Steatosis in comparison to control tissue (P < 0.01). The levels of miR-33a and miR-224 in CHC-Steatosis (P < 0.02) and miR-224 in Steatosis (P < 0.001) were increased in comparison to CHC samples. By contrast, the expression of miR-21 did not differ statistically between diseased and normal liver samples. Levels of miR-33a correlated negatively with serum AST and AP levels in Steatosis as well as with necroinflammatory grade in CHC, whereas miR-21 correlated positively with AST in Steatosis and displayed negative correlation with triglyceride level in CHC-Steatosis. In contrast, miRNA levels were not correlated with ALT, GGT, cholesterol levels or fibrosis stage. CONCLUSION: Differences in miRNA expression were observed between CHC and steatotic CHC, CHC and steatotic liver, but not between steatotic CHC

  15. Collisional narrowing in the optically pumped CH3OH and CH3F lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Koepf, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    The gain linewidth of the optically pumped CH3F laser is observed to narrow and rebroaden with the addition of He. In addition, the same effect is observed in the CH3OH laser with the addition of the polyatomic buffer gases SF6 and CS2. These results offer conclusive evidence of the Dicke narrowing phenomena in these inverted pure rotational transitions. The effect is observed using a high harmonic mixing technique in a Schottky barrier diode.

  16. Reaction mechanism and rate constants of the CH+CH4 reaction: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Joao Marcelo; Mebel, Alexander M.

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of CH radical insertion into methane. The results show that the reaction can be viewed to occur via two stages. On the first stage, the CH radical approaches methane without large structural changes to acquire proper positioning for the subsequent stage, where H-migration occurs from CH4 to CH, along with a C-C bond formation. Where the first stage ends and the second begins, a tight transition state was located using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) and MP4(SDQ)/6-311++G(d,p) methods. Using a rigid rotor - harmonic oscillator approach within transition state theory, we show that at the MP5/6-311++G(d,p)//MP4(SDQ)/6-311++G(d,p) level the calculated rate constants are in a reasonably good agreement with experiment in a broad temperature range of 145-581 K. Even at low temperatures, the insertion reaction bottleneck is found about the location of the tight transition state, rather than at long separations between the CH and CH4 reactants. In addition, high level CCSD(T)-F12/CBS calculations of the remainder of the C2H5 potential energy surface predict the CH+CH4 reaction to proceed via the initial insertion step to the ethyl radical which then can emit a hydrogen atom to form highly exothermic C2H4+H products.

  17. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-07-01

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 107 s-1, which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s-1 at 298 K.

  18. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Lester, Marsha I

    2016-07-28

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 10(7) s(-1), which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s(-1) at 298 K.

  19. Tissue Specific Effects of Dietary Carbohydrates and Obesity on ChREBPα and ChREBPβ Expression.

    PubMed

    Stamatikos, Alexis D; da Silva, Robin P; Lewis, Jamie T; Douglas, Donna N; Kneteman, Norman M; Jacobs, René L; Paton, Chad M

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) regulates insulin-independent de novo lipogenesis. Recently, a novel ChREBPβ isoform was identified. The purpose of the current study was to define the effect of dietary carbohydrates (CHO) and obesity on the transcriptional activity of ChREBP isoforms and their respective target genes. Mice were subjected to fasting-refeeding of high-CHO diets. In all three CHO-refeeding groups, mice failed to induce ChREBPα, yet ChREBPβ increased 10- to 20-fold. High-fat fed mice increased hepatic ChREBPβ mRNA expression compared to chow-fed along with increased protein expression. To better assess the independent effect of fructose on ChREBPα/β activity, HepG2 cells were treated with fructose ± a fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase inhibitor to suppress gluconeogenesis. Fructose treatment in the absence of gluconeogenesis resulted in increased ChREBP activity. To confirm the existence of ChREBPβ in human tissue, primary hepatocytes were incubated with high-glucose and the expression of ChREBPα and -β was determined. As with the animal models, glucose induced ChREBPβ expression while ChREBPα was decreased. Taken together, ChREBPβ is more responsive to changes in dietary CHO availability than the -α isoform. Diet-induced obesity increases basal expression of ChREBPβ, which may increase the risk of developing hepatic steatosis, and fructose-induced activation is independent of gluconeogenesis.

  20. Warming Early Mars With CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justh, H. L.; Kasting, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    The nature of the ancient climate of Mars remains one of the fundamental unresolved problems in martian research. While the present environment is hostile to life, images from the Mariner, Viking and Mars Global Surveyor missions, have shown geologic features on the martian surface that seem to indicate an earlier period of hydrologic activity. The fact that ancient valley networks and degraded craters have been seen on the martian surface indicates that the early martian climate may have been more Earth-like, with a warmer surface temperature. The presence of liquid water would require a greenhouse effect much larger than needed at present, as the solar constant, S0, was 25% lower 3.8 billion years ago when the channels are thought to have formed (1,2). Previous calculations have shown that gaseous CO2 and H2O alone could not have warmed the martian surface to the temperature needed to account for the presence of liquid water (3). It has been hypothesized that a CO2-H2O atmosphere could keep early Mars warm if it was filled with CO2 ice clouds in the upper martian troposphere (4). Obtaining mean martian surface temperatures above 273 K would require nearly 100% cloud cover, a condition that is unrealistic for condensation clouds on early Mars. Any reduction in cloud cover makes it difficult to achieve warm martian surface temperatures except at high pressures and CO2 clouds could cool the martian surface if they were low and optically thick (5). CO2 and CH4 have been suggested as important greenhouse gases on the early Earth. Our research focuses on the effects of increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases on the surface temperature of early Mars, with emphasis on the reduced greenhouse gas, CH4. To investigate the possible warming effect of CH4, we modified a one-dimensional, radiative-convective climate model used in previous studies of the early martian climate (5). New cloud-free temperature profiles for various surface pressures and CH4 mixing

  1. miRNA and protein expression profiles of visceral adipose tissue reveal miR-141/YWHAG and miR-520e/RAB11A as two potential miRNA/protein target pairs associated with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Valentina; Nardelli, Carmela; Ferrigno, Maddalena; Iaffaldano, Laura; Pilone, Vincenzo; Forestieri, Pietro; Zambrano, Nicola; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2012-06-01

    Adipose tissues show selective gene expression patterns, to whom microRNAs (miRNAs) may contribute. We evaluated in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from obese and nonobese females, both miRNA and protein expression profiles, to identify miRNA/protein target pairs associated with obesity (metabolic pathways miRNA-deregulated during obesity). Obese and nonobese females [BMI 42.2 ± 1.6 and 23.7 ± 1.2 kg/m(2) (mean ± SEM), respectively] were enrolled in this study. Notably, most miRNAs were down-expressed in obese tissues, whereas most of the proteins from the investigated spots were up-expressed. Bioinformatics integration of miRNA expression and proteomic data highlighted two potential miRNA/protein target pairs: miR-141/YWHAG (tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, gamma polypeptide) and miR-520e/RAB11A (Ras-related protein RAB-11A); the functional interaction between these miRNAs and their target sequences on the corresponding mRNAs was confirmed by luciferase assays. Both RAB11A and YWHAG proteins are involved in glucose homeostasis; YWHAG is also involved in lipid metabolism. Hence, the identified miRNA/protein target pairs are potential players in the obese phenotype.

  2. Exploration of miRNA families for hypotheses generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanu, Timothy K. K.; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Archer, John A. C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2013-10-01

    Technological improvements have resulted in increased discovery of new microRNAs (miRNAs) and refinement and enrichment of existing miRNA families. miRNA families are important because they suggest a common sequence or structure configuration in sets of genes that hint to a shared function. Exploratory tools to enhance investigation of characteristics of miRNA families and the functions of family-specific miRNA genes are lacking. We have developed, miRNAVISA, a user-friendly web-based tool that allows customized interrogation and comparisons of miRNA families for hypotheses generation, and comparison of per-species chromosomal distribution of miRNA genes in different families. This study illustrates hypothesis generation using miRNAVISA in seven species. Our results unveil a subclass of miRNAs that may be regulated by genomic imprinting, and also suggest that some miRNA families may be species-specific, as well as chromosome- and/or strand-specific.

  3. MicroRNAs, macrocontrol: regulation of miRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Durmus, Selvi; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a set of small, non-protein-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Maturation of miRNAs comprises several regulated steps resulting in approximately 22-nucleotide single-stranded mature miRNAs. Regulation of miRNA expression can occur both at the transcriptional level and at the post-transcriptional level during miRNA processing. Recent studies have elucidated specific aspects of the well-regulated nature of miRNA processing involving various regulatory proteins, editing of miRNA transcripts, and cellular location. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA genes can also affect the processing efficiency of primary miRNA transcripts. In this review we present an overview of the currently known regulatory pathways of miRNA processing and provide a basis to understand how aberrant miRNA processing may arise and may be involved in pathophysiological conditions such as cancer.

  4. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  5. Microprocessor activity controls differential miRNA biogenesis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Marsico, Annalisa; Gehre, Maja; Orom, Ulf Andersson

    2014-10-23

    In miRNA biogenesis, pri-miRNA transcripts are converted into pre-miRNA hairpins. The in vivo properties of this process remain enigmatic. Here, we determine in vivo transcriptome-wide pri-miRNA processing using next-generation sequencing of chromatin-associated pri-miRNAs. We identify a distinctive Microprocessor signature in the transcriptome profile from which efficiency of the endogenous processing event can be accurately quantified. This analysis reveals differential susceptibility to Microprocessor cleavage as a key regulatory step in miRNA biogenesis. Processing is highly variable among pri-miRNAs and a better predictor of miRNA abundance than primary transcription itself. Processing is also largely stable across three cell lines, suggesting a major contribution of sequence determinants. On the basis of differential processing efficiencies, we define functionality for short sequence features adjacent to the pre-miRNA hairpin. In conclusion, we identify Microprocessor as the main hub for diversified miRNA output and suggest a role for uncoupling miRNA biogenesis from host gene expression.

  6. miRNA Control of Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Ghatak, Subhadip

    2016-01-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration rely on the function of miRNA, molecular silencers that enact post-transcriptional gene silencing of coding genes. Disruption of miRNA homeostasis is developmentally lethal, indicating that fetal tissue development is tightly controlled by miRNAs. Multiple critical facets of adult tissue repair are subject to control by miRNAs, as well. Sources of cell pool for tissue repair and regeneration are diverse and provided by processes including cellular dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, and reprogramming. Each of these processes is regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, induced pluripotency may be achieved by miRNA-based strategies independent of transcription factor manipulation. The observation that miRNA does not integrate into the genome makes miRNA-based therapeutic strategies translationally valuable. Tools to manipulate cellular and tissue miRNA levels include mimics and inhibitors that may be specifically targeted to cells of interest at the injury site. Here, we discuss the extraordinary importance of miRNAs in tissue repair and regeneration based on emergent reports and rapid advances in miRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:26056933

  7. MiR-222 in Cardiovascular Diseases: Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shengguang; Huang, Haitao; Xu, Yiming; Zhu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs and miRs) are endogenous 19–22 nucleotide, small noncoding RNAs with highly conservative and tissue specific expression. They can negatively modulate target gene expressions through decreasing transcription or posttranscriptional inducing mRNA decay. Increasing evidence suggests that deregulated miRNAs play an important role in the genesis of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, circulating miRNAs can be biomarkers for cardiovascular diseases. MiR-222 has been reported to play important roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes in the heart. Here we reviewed the recent studies about the roles of miR-222 in cardiovascular diseases. MiR-222 may be a potential cardiovascular biomarker and a new therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28127557

  8. Mitochondria: one of the destinations of miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Lakshmi; Tomar, Dhanendra; Singh, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    The cellular processes are controlled by a narrow range of mRNA and proteins levels, where small RNAs (sRNAs) known as miRNAs play a critical role. The spatial and temporal regulation of miRNA processing components and mature miRNA is emerging. The recent studies suggest that mitochondria are one of the destinations of pre as well as mature miRNAs. The role of mitochondria extends beyond energy metabolism to many other cellular processes like metabolism, cell death and inflammation. The new found destination of miRNAs suggest the role of mitochondria in monitoring site specific regulations of proteins as well as the function of mitochondria. The studies in this direction will decipher the novel role of mitochondria-associated miRNAs in different cellular processes. This review is focussed on the recent studies demonstrating the presence of miRNAs in mitochondria and its possible significance in different cellular and physiological conditions.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of miRNAs in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Muller; Calore, Federica; Paone, Alessio; Galli, Roberta; Calin, George A

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs with gene regulatory functions. It has been demonstrated that the genes encoding for miRNAs undergo the same regulatory epigenetic processes of protein coding genes. In turn, a specific subgroup of miRNAs, called epi-miRNAs, is able to directly target key enzymatic effectors of the epigenetic machinery (such as DNA methyltransferases, histone deacetylases, and polycomb genes), therefore indirectly affecting the expression of epigenetically regulated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Also, several of the epigenetic drugs currently approved as anticancer agents affect the expression of miRNAs and this might explain part of their mechanism of action. This chapter focuses on the tight relationship between epigenetics and miRNAs and provides some insights on the translational implications of these findings, leading to the upcoming introduction of epigenetically related miRNAs in the treatment of cancer.

  10. The ChEMBL database in 2017

    PubMed Central

    Gaulton, Anna; Hersey, Anne; Nowotka, Michał; Bento, A. Patrícia; Chambers, Jon; Mendez, David; Mutowo, Prudence; Atkinson, Francis; Bellis, Louisa J.; Cibrián-Uhalte, Elena; Davies, Mark; Dedman, Nathan; Karlsson, Anneli; Magariños, María Paula; Overington, John P.; Papadatos, George; Smit, Ines; Leach, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    ChEMBL is an open large-scale bioactivity database (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl), previously described in the 2012 and 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issues. Since then, alongside the continued extraction of data from the medicinal chemistry literature, new sources of bioactivity data have also been added to the database. These include: deposited data sets from neglected disease screening; crop protection data; drug metabolism and disposition data and bioactivity data from patents. A number of improvements and new features have also been incorporated. These include the annotation of assays and targets using ontologies, the inclusion of targets and indications for clinical candidates, addition of metabolic pathways for drugs and calculation of structural alerts. The ChEMBL data can be accessed via a web-interface, RDF distribution, data downloads and RESTful web-services. PMID:27899562

  11. The ChEMBL database in 2017.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Anna; Hersey, Anne; Nowotka, Michał; Bento, A Patrícia; Chambers, Jon; Mendez, David; Mutowo, Prudence; Atkinson, Francis; Bellis, Louisa J; Cibrián-Uhalte, Elena; Davies, Mark; Dedman, Nathan; Karlsson, Anneli; Magariños, María Paula; Overington, John P; Papadatos, George; Smit, Ines; Leach, Andrew R

    2017-01-04

    ChEMBL is an open large-scale bioactivity database (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl), previously described in the 2012 and 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issues. Since then, alongside the continued extraction of data from the medicinal chemistry literature, new sources of bioactivity data have also been added to the database. These include: deposited data sets from neglected disease screening; crop protection data; drug metabolism and disposition data and bioactivity data from patents. A number of improvements and new features have also been incorporated. These include the annotation of assays and targets using ontologies, the inclusion of targets and indications for clinical candidates, addition of metabolic pathways for drugs and calculation of structural alerts. The ChEMBL data can be accessed via a web-interface, RDF distribution, data downloads and RESTful web-services.

  12. Identification of candidate miRNA biomarkers from miRNA regulatory network with application to prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs approximately 22 nucleotides in length that play a role in a wide range of biological processes. Abnormal miRNA function has been implicated in various human cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). Altered miRNA expression may serve as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, limited data are available on the role of cancer-specific miRNAs. Integrative computational bioinformatics approaches are effective for the detection of potential outlier miRNAs in cancer. Methods The human miRNA-mRNA target network was reconstructed by integrating multiple miRNA-mRNA interaction datasets. Paired miRNA and mRNA expression profiling data in PCa versus benign prostate tissue samples were used as another source of information. These datasets were analyzed with an integrated bioinformatics framework to identify potential PCa miRNA signatures. In vitro q-PCR experiments and further systematic analysis were used to validate these prediction results. Results Using this bioinformatics framework, we identified 39 miRNAs as potential PCa miRNA signatures. Among these miRNAs, 20 had previously been identified as PCa aberrant miRNAs by low-throughput methods, and 16 were shown to be deregulated in other cancers. In vitro q-PCR experiments verified the accuracy of these predictions. miR-648 was identified as a novel candidate PCa miRNA biomarker. Further functional and pathway enrichment analysis confirmed the association of the identified miRNAs with PCa progression. Conclusions Our analysis revealed the scale-free features of the human miRNA-mRNA interaction network and showed the distinctive topological features of existing cancer miRNA biomarkers from previously published studies. A novel cancer miRNA biomarker prediction framework was designed based on these observations and applied to prostate cancer study. This method could be applied for miRNA biomarker prediction in other cancers. PMID

  13. Investigation of key miRNAs and target genes in bladder cancer using miRNA profiling and bioinformatic tools.

    PubMed

    Canturk, Kemal Murat; Ozdemir, Muhsin; Can, Cavit; Öner, Setenay; Emre, Ramazan; Aslan, Huseyin; Cilingir, Oguz; Ciftci, Evrim; Celayir, Fatih Mehmet; Aldemir, Ozgur; Özen, Mustafa; Artan, Sevilhan

    2014-12-01

    Despite the association of several miRNAs with bladder cancer, little is known about the miRNAs' regulatory networks. In this study, we aimed to construct potential networks of bladder-cancer-related miRNAs and their known target genes using miRNA expression profiling and bioinformatics tools and to investigate potential key molecules that might play roles in bladder cancer regulatory networks. Global miRNA expression profiles were obtained using microarray followed by RT-qPCR validation using two randomly selected miRNAs. Known targets of deregulated miRNAs were utilized using DIANA-TarBase database v6.0. The incorporation of deregulated miRNAs and target genes into KEGG pathways were utilized using DIANA-mirPath software. To construct potential miRNA regulatory networks, the overlapping parts of three selected KEGG pathways were visualized by Cytoscape software. We finally gained 19 deregulated miRNAs, including 5 ups- and 14 down regulated in 27 bladder-cancer tissue samples and 8 normal urothelial tissue samples. The enrichment results of deregulated miRNAs and known target genes showed that most pathways were related to cancer or cell signaling pathways. We determined the hub CDK6, BCL2, E2F3, PTEN, MYC, RB, and ERBB3 target genes and hub hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, hsa-miR-141-3p, hsa-miR-26a-5p, hsa-miR-23b-3p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p miRNAs of the constructed networks. These findings provide new insights into the bladder cancer regulatory networks and give us a hypothesis that hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p, along with CDK4 and CDK6 genes might exist in the same bladder cancer pathway. Particularly, hub miRNAs and genes might be potential biomarkers for bladder cancer clinics.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activation inhibits liver growth through miR-122-mediated downregulation of cMyc.

    PubMed

    Yarushkin, Andrei A; Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Kobelev, Vyacheslav S; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2017-02-15

    Although NR1C3 agonists inhibit cell growth, the molecular mechanism of their action has not been thoroughly characterized to date. A recent study demonstrated that NR1C3 can regulate miR-122 by binding to its promoter. Given that miR-122 can indirectly regulate cMyc-mediated promitogenic signaling by targeting E2f1, we hypothesized that NR1C3 activation inhibits hepatocyte proliferation through miR-122-mediated cMyc downregulation. In the present study, we examined if liver hyperplasia induced by a strong chemical mitogen for the liver, 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), which is an agonist of NR1I3, can be repressed by NR1C3 activation through miR-122 upregulation. Acute TCPOBOP treatment caused a significant increase in liver-to-body weight ratio. The liver mass increase was accompanied with miR-122 downregulation. ChIP assays demonstrated that TCPOBOP-activated NR1I3 accumulated on the DR1 site in the pri-miR-122 promoter; and the NR1I3 accumulation is accompanied by a decrease in miR-122 and an increase in E2f1 and its transcription target cMyc. Rosiglitazone (Ros) treatment, which is an agonist of NR1C3, caused an opposite effect on liver-to-body weight ratio. When Ros was given with TCPOBOP, it attenuated the inhibitory effect of TCPOBOP on miR-122. Moreover, Ros treatment inhibited the NR1I3 binding with the DR1 site in the pri-miR-122 promoter. Furthermore, the increase of miR-122 produced by Ros was correlated with the downregulation of its targets, E2f1 and cMyc. Thus, our finding demonstrated that the liver growth inhibitory effect of NR1C3 activation was at least partly related to the decrease of cMyc though the activation of miR-122 and the downregulation of E2f1.

  15. Role of miRNA-9 in Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Balachandar; Alwin Prem Anand, A.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small regulatory RNAs involved in gene regulation. The regulation is effected by either translational inhibition or transcriptional silencing. In vertebrates, the importance of miRNA in development was discovered from mice and zebrafish dicer knockouts. The miRNA-9 (miR-9) is one of the most highly expressed miRNAs in the early and adult vertebrate brain. It has diverse functions within the developing vertebrate brain. In this article, the role of miR-9 in the developing forebrain (telencephalon and diencephalon), midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord of vertebrate species is highlighted. In the forebrain, miR-9 is necessary for the proper development of dorsoventral telencephalon by targeting marker genes expressed in the telencephalon. It regulates proliferation in telencephalon by regulating Foxg1, Pax6, Gsh2, and Meis2 genes. The feedback loop regulation between miR-9 and Nr2e1/Tlx helps in neuronal migration and differentiation. Targeting Foxp1 and Foxp2, and Map1b by miR-9 regulates the radial migration of neurons and axonal development. In the organizers, miR-9 is inversely regulated by hairy1 and Fgf8 to maintain zona limitans interthalamica and midbrain–hindbrain boundary (MHB). It maintains the MHB by inhibiting Fgf signaling genes and is involved in the neurogenesis of the midbrain–hindbrain by regulating Her genes. In the hindbrain, miR-9 modulates progenitor proliferation and differentiation by regulating Her genes and Elav3. In the spinal cord, miR-9 modulates the regulation of Foxp1 and Onecut1 for motor neuron development. In the forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain, miR-9 is necessary for proper neuronal progenitor maintenance, neurogenesis, and differentiation. In vertebrate brain development, miR-9 is involved in regulating several region-specific genes in a spatiotemporal pattern. PMID:27721656

  16. miR-21: a small multi-faceted RNA

    PubMed Central

    Krichevsky, Anna M; Gabriely, Galina

    2009-01-01

    Abstract More than 1000 microRNAs (miRNAs) are expressed in human cells, some tissue or cell type specific, others considered as house-keeping molecules. Functions and direct mRNA targets for some miRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. Every miRNA potentially regulates the expression of numerous protein-coding genes (tens to hundreds), but it has become increasingly clear that not all miRNAs are equally important; diverse high-throughput screenings of various systems have identified a limited number of key functional miRNAs over and over again. Particular miRNAs emerge as principal regulators that control major cell functions in various physiological and pathophysiological settings. Since its identification 3 years ago as the miRNA most commonly and strongly up-regulated in human brain tumour glioblastoma [1], miR-21 has attracted the attention of researchers in various fields, such as development, oncology, stem cell biology and aging, becoming one of the most studied miRNAs, along with let-7, miR-17–92 cluster (‘oncomir-1’), miR-155 and a few others. However, an miR-21 knockout mouse has not yet been generated, and the data about miR-21 functions in normal cells are still very limited. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of miR-21 functions in human disease, with an emphasis on its regulation, oncogenic role, targets in human cancers, potential as a disease biomarker and novel therapeutic target in oncology. PMID:19175699

  17. Research On The CH-47B Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, Kathryn B.; Tucker, George E.; Chen, Robert T. N.; Fry, Emmett B.; Hindson, William S.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes equipment added to, and research capabilities of CH-47B helicopter. Programmable symbol generator provides display formats for variety of missions - those of vertical-takeoff-and-landing aircraft and helicopters. Powerful general-purpose flight computer in operation. Computer programmable in high-level languages and supports research more efficiently. Flight-control software developed to improve capability of helicopter to perform simulations in flight.

  18. Cobalt-catalyzed C-H borylation.

    PubMed

    Obligacion, Jennifer V; Semproni, Scott P; Chirik, Paul J

    2014-03-19

    A family of pincer-ligated cobalt complexes has been synthesized and are active for the catalytic C-H borylation of heterocycles and arenes. The cobalt catalysts operate with high activity and under mild conditions and do not require excess borane reagents. Up to 5000 turnovers for methyl furan-2-carboxylate have been observed at ambient temperature with 0.02 mol % catalyst loadings. A catalytic cycle that relies on a cobalt(I)-(III) redox couple is proposed.

  19. Electron Impact Fragmentation of CH4 Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Oguri, Kazuhiro; Makochekanwa, Casten; Kitajima, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    Absolute electron-molecule impact dissociation cross sections are of interest in many fields of physics and chemistry, plasma etching of microelectronic devices and other industrial applications. However, experimental data on these cross sections is scarce mainly because of the difficulties involved in measuring neutral fragments [1]. Electron impact dissociation of CH4 molecules into the CH3 radicals have been investigated over the energy range 15.0 to 37.0 eV. The experimental procedure involves a dual-electron-beam in a two-stage collision system in conjunction with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). This is similar to the threshold-ionization mass spectrometry method [2]. Significant differences, in magnitude up to four times at 100 eV, exist between the only available absolute measurements by Sugai et al. [2] and Moore et al. [3]. Our data shows very close agreement with the Moore et al. data, which which show reasonable consistency with the available CH4 total dissociation data by Winters [3]. [1] L. S. Polak and D. I. Slovetsky, Int. J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 8, 257 (1976). [2] H. Sugai, H. Toyoda and T. Nakano, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 30, 2912 (1991). [3] H. F. Winters, J. Chem. Phys. 63, 3462 (1975).

  20. CO2 CH4 and N20 fluxes during land conversion in early bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, T.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 CH4 and N20 fluxes during land conversion in early bioenergy systems Terenzio Zenone1-2, Jiquan Chen1-2, Ilya Gelfand3-4, G. Philip Robertson3-4 1 Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH USA 2 Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI USA 3 W.K. Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State University, Hickory Corners, MI USA 4Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI USA Environmental sustainability of bioenergy crop cultivation represents an important challenge and is a topic of intensive scientific and political debate worldwide due to increasing societal needs for renewable energy. Despite the increasing knowledge related to potential bioenergy systems, the effect of land use change (LUC) on GHG fluxes during the conversion remains poorly understood but is likely to be substantial. In order to tackle this issue the Great lake Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has established a field experiment and deployed a cluster of eddy-covariance towers to quantify the magnitude and changes of ecosystem carbon assimilation, loss, and balance during the conversion and establishment years in a permanent prairie and four types of candidate biofuel systems [Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) grassland, switchgrass, mixed-species restored prairie and corn]. Six sites were converted to soybean in 2009 before establishing the bioenergy systems in 2010 while one site was kept grassland as reference. Soil N2O and CH4 fluxes were measured biweekly with static chambers in four replicate locations in each fields, within the footprint of the eddy covariance tower using static chamber GHG flux protocols of the KBS LTER site. Our field observations, made between January 2009 through December 2010, showed that conversion of CRP to soybean induced net C emissions during the conversion year that ranging from 288 g C m-2, to 173 g C m-2 . while

  1. miR-199a and miR-497 Are Associated with Better Overall Survival due to Increased Chemosensitivity in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Troppan, Katharina; Wenzl, Kerstin; Pichler, Martin; Pursche, Beata; Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Feichtinger, Julia; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Beham-Schmid, Christine; Neumeister, Peter; Deutsch, Alexander

    2015-08-05

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding single-stranded RNA molecules regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs are involved in cell development, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation. miRNAs can either function as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in various important pathways. The expression of specific miRNAs has been identified to correlate with tumor prognosis. For miRNA expression analysis real-time PCR on 81 samples was performed, including 63 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, 15 of germinal center B-cell like subtype, 17 non germinal center B-cell, 23 transformed, and eight unclassified) and 18 controls, including nine peripheral B-cells, 5 germinal-center B-cells, four lymphadenitis samples, and 4 lymphoma cell lines (RI-1, SUDHL4, Karpas, U2932). Expression levels of a panel of 11 miRNAs that have been previously involved in other types of cancer (miR-15b_2, miR-16_1*, miR-16_2, miR-16_2*, miR-27a, miR-27a*, miR-98-1, miR-103a, miR-185, miR-199a, and miR-497) were measured and correlated with clinical data. Furthermore, cell lines, lacking miR-199a and miR-497 expression, were electroporated with the two respective miRNAs and treated with standard immunochemotherapy routinely used in patients with DLBCL, followed by functional analyses including cell count and apoptosis assays. Seven miRNAs (miR-16_1*, miR-16_2*, miR-27a, miR-103, miR-185, miR-199, and miR-497) were statistically significantly up-regulated in DLBCL compared to normal germinal cells. However, high expression of miR-497 or miR-199a was associated with better overall survival (p = 0.042 and p = 0.007). Overexpression of miR-199a and miR-497 led to a statistically significant decrease in viable cells in a dose-dependent fashion after exposure to rituximab and various chemotherapeutics relevant in multi-agent lymphoma therapy. Our data indicate that elevated miR-199a and miR-497 levels are associated with improved survival in aggressive lymphoma

  2. miRSponge: a manually curated database for experimentally supported miRNA sponges and ceRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Ning, Shangwei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe miRSponge, a manually curated database, which aims at providing an experimentally supported resource for microRNA (miRNA) sponges. Recent evidence suggests that miRNAs are themselves regulated by competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or ‘miRNA sponges’ that contain miRNA binding sites. These competitive molecules can sequester miRNAs to prevent them interacting with their natural targets to play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes. It has become increasingly important to develop a high quality database to record and store ceRNA data to support future studies. To this end, we have established the experimentally supported miRSponge database that contains data on 599 miRNA-sponge interactions and 463 ceRNA relationships from 11 species following manual curating from nearly 1200 published articles. Database classes include endogenously generated molecules including coding genes, pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs, along with exogenously introduced molecules including viral RNAs and artificial engineered sponges. Approximately 70% of the interactions were identified experimentally in disease states. miRSponge provides a user-friendly interface for convenient browsing, retrieval and downloading of dataset. A submission page is also included to allow researchers to submit newly validated miRNA sponge data. Database URL: http://www.bio-bigdata.net/miRSponge. PMID:26424084

  3. miRSponge: a manually curated database for experimentally supported miRNA sponges and ceRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Ning, Shangwei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe miRSponge, a manually curated database, which aims at providing an experimentally supported resource for microRNA (miRNA) sponges. Recent evidence suggests that miRNAs are themselves regulated by competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or 'miRNA sponges' that contain miRNA binding sites. These competitive molecules can sequester miRNAs to prevent them interacting with their natural targets to play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes. It has become increasingly important to develop a high quality database to record and store ceRNA data to support future studies. To this end, we have established the experimentally supported miRSponge database that contains data on 599 miRNA-sponge interactions and 463 ceRNA relationships from 11 species following manual curating from nearly 1200 published articles. Database classes include endogenously generated molecules including coding genes, pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs, along with exogenously introduced molecules including viral RNAs and artificial engineered sponges. Approximately 70% of the interactions were identified experimentally in disease states. miRSponge provides a user-friendly interface for convenient browsing, retrieval and downloading of dataset. A submission page is also included to allow researchers to submit newly validated miRNA sponge data. Database URL: http://www.bio-bigdata.net/miRSponge.

  4. Theoretical study and rate constant calculation of the CH2O+CH3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-yao; Li, Ze-sheng; Wu, Jia-yan; Wei, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Gang; Sun, Chia-chung

    2003-10-01

    The potential energy surface of the CH2O+CH3 reaction is explored at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p), MP4SDQ/6-311G(d,p), and QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) (single point) levels of theory. Theoretical calculations suggest that the major product channel (R1) is the hydrogen abstraction leading to the product P1 CHO+CH4 (R1), while the addition process leading to P2H+CH3CHO (R2) appears to be negligibly small. The calculated enthalpies and dissociation activation energies for CH3CH2O and CH3OCH2 radicals involved in the reaction are in line with the experimental values. Dual-level dynamics calculation is carried out for the direct hydrogen abstraction channel. The energy profile of (R1) is refined with the interpolated single-point energies (ISPE) method at the QCISD(T)//MP2 level. The rate constants, which are evaluated by canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) including small-curvature tunneling (SCT) correction, are in good agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that tunneling effect plays a significant role in the rate constant calculation; and as a result, the CVT/SCT rate constants exhibit typical non-Arrhenius behavior over a wide temperature range 300-2000 K. The three parameter expression is k=6.35×10-26 T4.4 exp(-2450/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  5. A Biogenesis Step Upstream of Microprocessor Controls miR-17∼92 Expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Wang, Longfei; Sliz, Piotr; Gregory, Richard I

    2015-08-13

    The precise control of miR-17∼92 microRNA (miRNA) is essential for normal development, and overexpression of certain miRNAs from this cluster is oncogenic. Here, we find that the relative expression of the six miRNAs processed from the primary (pri-miR-17∼92) transcript is dynamically regulated during embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation. Pri-miR-17∼92 is processed to a biogenesis intermediate, termed "progenitor-miRNA" (pro-miRNA). Pro-miRNA is an efficient substrate for Microprocessor and is required to selectively license production of pre-miR-17, pre-miR-18a, pre-miR-19a, pre-miR-20a, and pre-miR-19b from this cluster. Two complementary cis-regulatory repression domains within pri-miR-17∼92 are required for the blockade of miRNA processing through the formation of an autoinhibitory RNA conformation. The endonuclease CPSF3 (CPSF73) and the spliceosome-associated ISY1 are responsible for pro-miRNA biogenesis and expression of all miRNAs within the cluster except miR-92. Thus, developmentally regulated pro-miRNA processing is a key step controlling miRNA expression and explains the posttranscriptional control of miR-17∼92 expression in development.

  6. Differential expression of miR-21 and miR-75 in esophageal carcinoma patients and its clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongbo; He, Zhanao; Wang, Hongjiang; Du, Tongxin; Pang, Zuoliang

    2016-01-01

    In Xinjiang, China, esophageal carcinoma has a high incidence in Kazak and Uighur populations. MicroRNA (miR)-21 and miR-375 are related to esophageal carcinoma. This study thus investigated their potencials in early diagnosis and prognosis in Kazak and Uighur populations, to provide evidences for serum markers of esophageal cancer. A total of 126 Kazak or Uighur esophageal cancer patients were enrolled as the disease group, along with 86 local Han patients as disease control cohort, and 80 healthy Kazak or Uighur individuals. MiRNA expression was detected by in situ hybridization in tissues and by qRT-PCR in serum. ROC approach was used to evaluate the diagnostic value of miRNA on esophageal carcinoma. Cox analysis was performed to screen factors governing prognosis. MiR-21 level was significantly elevated in both tissue and serum samples of esophageal cancer patients, while miR-375 was down-regulated. Such difference was more potent in disease group compared to disease control group. MiR expression was correlated with infiltration depth, TNM stage, vascular invasion, and lymph node metastasis. Elevated expression of miR-21 reduced the sensitivity of radio-therapy, and increased recurrence frequency. The diagnostic value of single assay for miR-21 or miR-375 was lower than the combined assay (AUC=0.812 or 0.739 vs. 0.858). They also affected patient prognosis (OR=1.53 or 0.652). MiR-21 and miR-375 presented abnormal expression in Kazak or Uighur esophageal carcinoma patients and were independent factors affecting prognosis. The combined assay of miR-21 and miR-375 may help to make early diagnosis of esophageal cancer. PMID:27508050

  7. Rapid divergence and high diversity of miRNAs and miRNA targets in the Camelineae.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa M; Burbano, Hernán A; Wang, Xi; Fitz, Joffrey; Wang, George; Ural-Blimke, Yonca; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs involved in gene regulation through translational inhibition and transcript cleavage. After processing from imperfect fold-back structures, miRNAs are incorporated into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) before targeting transcripts with varying degrees of complementarity. Some miRNAs are evolutionarily deep-rooted, and sequence complementarity with their targets is maintained through purifying selection. Both Arabidopsis and Capsella belong to the tribe Camelineae in the Brassicaceae, with Capsella rubella serving as an outgroup to the genus Arabidopsis. The genome sequence of C. rubella has recently been released, which allows characterization of its miRNA complement in comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. Through next-generation sequencing, we identify high-confidence miRNA candidates specific to the C. rubella lineage. Only a few lineage-specific miRNAs have been studied for evolutionary constraints, and there have been no systematic studies of miRNA target diversity within or divergence between closely related plant species. Therefore we contrast sequence variation in miRNAs and their targets within A. thaliana, and between A. thaliana, A. lyrata and C. rubella. We document a surprising amount of small-scale variation in miRNA-target pairs, where many miRNAs are predicted to have species-specific targets in addition to ones that are shared between species. Our results emphasize that the transitive nature of many miRNA-target pairs can be observed even on a relatively short evolutionary time-scale, with non-random occurrences of differences in miRNAs and their complements in the miRNA precursors, the miRNA* sequences.

  8. MiRComb: An R Package to Analyse miRNA-mRNA Interactions. Examples across Five Digestive Cancers.

    PubMed

    Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Gironella, Meritxell; Lozano, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate the expression of target mRNAs by specific binding on the mRNA 3'UTR and promoting mRNA degradation in the majority of cases. It is often of interest to know the specific targets of a miRNA in order to study them in a particular disease context. In that sense, some databases have been designed to predict potential miRNA-mRNA interactions based on hybridization sequences. However, one of the main limitations is that these databases have too many false positives and do not take into account disease-specific interactions. We have developed an R package (miRComb) able to combine miRNA and mRNA expression data with hybridization information, in order to find potential miRNA-mRNA targets that are more reliable to occur in a specific physiological or disease context. This article summarizes the pipeline and the main outputs of this package by using as example TCGA data from five gastrointestinal cancers (colon cancer, rectal cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer and esophageal cancer). The obtained results can be used to develop a huge number of testable hypotheses by other authors. Globally, we show that the miRComb package is a useful tool to deal with miRNA and mRNA expression data, that helps to filter the high amount of miRNA-mRNA interactions obtained from the pre-existing miRNA target prediction databases and it presents the results in a standardised way (pdf report). Moreover, an integrative analysis of the miRComb miRNA-mRNA interactions from the five digestive cancers is presented. Therefore, miRComb is a very useful tool to start understanding miRNA gene regulation in a specific context. The package can be downloaded in http://mircomb.sourceforge.net.

  9. MiR-578 and miR-573 as potential players in BRCA-related breast cancer angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Katia; Summa, Simona De; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Merla, Giuseppe; Simone, Gianni; Tommasi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of microRNA (miRNAs), a new class of small RNA molecules, in governing angiogenesis has been well described. Our aim was to investigate miRNA-mediated regulation of angiogenesis in a series of familial breast cancers stratified by BRCA1/2 mutational status in BRCA carriers and BRCA non-carriers (BRCAX). Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays were used to perform miRNA expression analysis on 43 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour tissue familial breast cancers (22 BRCA 1/2-related and 21 BRCAX). Pathway enrichment analysis was carried out with the DIANA miRPath v2.0 web-based computational tool, and the miRWalk database was used to identify target genes of deregulated miRNAs. An independent set of 8 BRCA 1/2-related and 11 BRCAX breast tumors was used for validation by Real-Time PCR. In vitro analysis on HEK293, MCF-7 and SUM149PT cells were performed to best-clarify miR-573 and miR-578 role. A set of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between BRCA 1/2-related and BRCAX breast tumors emerged from the profile analysis. Among these, miR-578 and miR-573 were found to be down-regulated in BRCA 1/2-related breast cancer and associated to the Focal adhesion, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling pathways. Our data highlight the role of miR-578 and miR-573 in controlling BRCA 1/2-related angiogenesis by targeting key regulators of Focal adhesion, VEGF and HIF-1 signaling pathways. PMID:25333258

  10. MiR-578 and miR-573 as potential players in BRCA-related breast cancer angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; De Summa, Simona; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Merla, Giuseppe; Simone, Gianni; Tommasi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of microRNA (miRNAs), a new class of small RNA molecules, in governing angiogenesis has been well described. Our aim was to investigate miRNA-mediated regulation of angiogenesis in a series of familial breast cancers stratified by BRCA1/2 mutational status in BRCA carriers and BRCA non-carriers (BRCAX). Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays were used to perform miRNA expression analysis on 43 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour tissue familial breast cancers (22 BRCA 1/2-related and 21 BRCAX). Pathway enrichment analysis was carried out with the DIANA miRPath v2.0 web-based computational tool, and the miRWalk database was used to identify target genes of deregulated miRNAs. An independent set of 8 BRCA 1/2-related and 11 BRCAX breast tumors was used for validation by Real-Time PCR. In vitro analysis on HEK293, MCF-7 and SUM149PT cells were performed to best-clarify miR-573 and miR-578 role. A set of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between BRCA 1/2-related and BRCAX breast tumors emerged from the profile analysis. Among these, miR-578 and miR-573 were found to be down-regulated in BRCA 1/2-related breast cancer and associated to the Focal adhesion, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling pathways. Our data highlight the role of miR-578 and miR-573 in controlling BRCA 1/2-related angiogenesis by targeting key regulators of Focal adhesion, VEGF and HIF-1 signaling pathways.

  11. MiR-9 and miR-21 as prognostic biomarkers for recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sondermann, Adriana; Andreghetto, Flavia Maziero; Moulatlet, Ana Carolina Bernardini; da Silva Victor, Elivane; de Castro, Marilia Germanos; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; Severino, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Despite low mortality rates, nodal recurrence in papillary thyroid carcinoma occurs in up to 20 % of patients. Emerging evidences indicate that dysregulated microRNAs are implicated in the process of metastasis. In the present study, we investigated whether miR-9, miR-10b, miR-21 and miR-146b levels are predictive of papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence. Using macro-dissection followed by quantitative real-time PCR, we measured miR-9, miR-10b, miR-21 and miR-146b expression levels in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 66 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma categorized into two groups: the recurrent group (n = 19) and the non-recurrent group (n = 47). All patients underwent total thyroidectomy and were followed for at least 120 months after surgery to be considered recurrence-free. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using the Cox proportional hazard model in order to identify associations between multiple clinical variables and microRNA expression levels and papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence. MiR-9 and miR-21 expression levels were found to be significant prognostic factors for recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (HR = 1.48; 95 % CI 1.24-1.77, p < 0.001; and HR = 1.52; 95 % CI 1.18-1.94, p = 0.001; respectively). Multivariate analysis involving the expression level of miR-9 and miR-21 and various clinical parameters identified the expression of these microRNAs as independent prognostic factors for papillary thyroid cancer patients. In conclusion, our results support the potential clinical value of miR-9 and miR-21 as prognostic biomarkers for recurrence in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  12. A positive feedback between p53 and miR-34 miRNAs mediates tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Okada, Nobuhiro; Lin, Chao-Po; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; Biton, Anne; Lai, Gregory; He, Xingyue; Bu, Pengcheng; Vogel, Hannes; Jablons, David M; Keller, Andreas C; Wilkinson, J Erby; He, Biao; Speed, Terry P; He, Lin

    2014-03-01

    As bona fide p53 transcriptional targets, miR-34 microRNAs (miRNAs) exhibit frequent alterations in many human tumor types and elicit multiple p53 downstream effects upon overexpression. Unexpectedly, miR-34 deletion alone fails to impair multiple p53-mediated tumor suppressor effects in mice, possibly due to the considerable redundancy in the p53 pathway. Here, we demonstrate that miR-34a represses HDM4, a potent negative regulator of p53, creating a positive feedback loop acting on p53. In a Kras-induced mouse lung cancer model, miR-34a deficiency alone does not exhibit a strong oncogenic effect. However, miR-34a deficiency strongly promotes tumorigenesis when p53 is haploinsufficient, suggesting that the defective p53-miR-34 feedback loop can enhance oncogenesis in a specific context. The importance of the p53/miR-34/HDM4 feedback loop is further confirmed by an inverse correlation between miR-34 and full-length HDM4 in human lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, human lung adenocarcinomas generate an elevated level of a short HDM4 isoform through alternative polyadenylation. This short HDM4 isoform lacks miR-34-binding sites in the 3' untranslated region (UTR), thereby evading miR-34 regulation to disable the p53-miR-34 positive feedback. Taken together, our results elucidated the intricate cross-talk between p53 and miR-34 miRNAs and revealed an important tumor suppressor effect generated by this positive feedback loop.

  13. MiRComb: An R Package to Analyse miRNA-mRNA Interactions. Examples across Five Digestive Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Casadesús, Maria

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate the expression of target mRNAs by specific binding on the mRNA 3'UTR and promoting mRNA degradation in the majority of cases. It is often of interest to know the specific targets of a miRNA in order to study them in a particular disease context. In that sense, some databases have been designed to predict potential miRNA-mRNA interactions based on hybridization sequences. However, one of the main limitations is that these databases have too many false positives and do not take into account disease-specific interactions. We have developed an R package (miRComb) able to combine miRNA and mRNA expression data with hybridization information, in order to find potential miRNA-mRNA targets that are more reliable to occur in a specific physiological or disease context. This article summarizes the pipeline and the main outputs of this package by using as example TCGA data from five gastrointestinal cancers (colon cancer, rectal cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer and esophageal cancer). The obtained results can be used to develop a huge number of testable hypotheses by other authors. Globally, we show that the miRComb package is a useful tool to deal with miRNA and mRNA expression data, that helps to filter the high amount of miRNA-mRNA interactions obtained from the pre-existing miRNA target prediction databases and it presents the results in a standardised way (pdf report). Moreover, an integrative analysis of the miRComb miRNA-mRNA interactions from the five digestive cancers is presented. Therefore, miRComb is a very useful tool to start understanding miRNA gene regulation in a specific context. The package can be downloaded in http://mircomb.sourceforge.net. PMID:26967326

  14. MiRNA-155 and miRNA-132 as potential diagnostic biomarkers for pulmonary tuberculosis: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meng-Li; Zhou, Nai-Kang; Luo, Cheng-Hua

    2016-11-01

    In our study, we aimed to profile a panel microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and to illuminate the molecular mechanisms in the development of PTB. Firstly, gene expression profile of E-GEOD-49951 was downloaded from ArrayExpress database, and quantile-adjusted conditional maximum likelihood method was utilized to identify statistical difference between miRNAs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-infected individuals and healthy subjects. Furthermore, in order to assess the performance of our methodology, random forest (RF) classification model was utilized to identify the top 10 miRNAs with better Area Under The Curve (AUC) using 10-fold cross-validation method. Additionally, Monte Carlo Cross-Validation was repeated 50 times to explore the best miRNAs. In order to learn more about the differentially-expressed miRNAs, the target genes of differentially-expressed miRNAs were retrieved from TargetScan database and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) was used to screen out biological pathways where target genes were involved. After normalization, a total of 478 miRNAs with higher than 0.25-fold quantile average across all samples were required. Based on the differential expression analysis, 38 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified when the significance was set as false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.01. Among the top 10 differentially expressed miRNAs, miRNA-155 obtained a highest AUC value 0.976, showing a good performance between PTB and control groups. Similarly, miRNA-449a, miRNA-212 and miRNA-132 revealed also a good performance with AUC values 0.947, 0.931 and 0.930, respectively. Moreover, miRNA-155, miRNA-449a, miRNA-29b-1* and miRNA-132 appeared in 50, 49, 49 and 48 bootstraps. Thus, miRNA-155 and miRNA-132 might be important in the progression of PTB and thereby, might present potential signatures for diagnosis of PTB.

  15. miRFam: an effective automatic miRNA classification method based on n-grams and a multiclass SVM

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~22 nt long integral elements responsible for post-transcriptional control of gene expressions. After the identification of thousands of miRNAs, the challenge is now to explore their specific biological functions. To this end, it will be greatly helpful to construct a reasonable organization of these miRNAs according to their homologous relationships. Given an established miRNA family system (e.g. the miRBase family organization), this paper addresses the problem of automatically and accurately classifying newly found miRNAs to their corresponding families by supervised learning techniques. Concretely, we propose an effective method, miRFam, which uses only primary information of pre-miRNAs or mature miRNAs and a multiclass SVM, to automatically classify miRNA genes. Results An existing miRNA family system prepared by miRBase was downloaded online. We first employed n-grams to extract features from known precursor sequences, and then trained a multiclass SVM classifier to classify new miRNAs (i.e. their families are unknown). Comparing with miRBase's sequence alignment and manual modification, our study shows that the application of machine learning techniques to miRNA family classification is a general and more effective approach. When the testing dataset contains more than 300 families (each of which holds no less than 5 members), the classification accuracy is around 98%. Even with the entire miRBase15 (1056 families and more than 650 of them hold less than 5 samples), the accuracy surprisingly reaches 90%. Conclusions Based on experimental results, we argue that miRFam is suitable for application as an automated method of family classification, and it is an important supplementary tool to the existing alignment-based small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) classification methods, since it only requires primary sequence information. Availability The source code of miRFam, written in C++, is freely and publicly available at: http://admis.fudan.edu.cn/projects/mi

  16. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Helene; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2014-05-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 75 datasets, including 50 in situ datasets (2012 and 2013 campaigns, Ersa background monitoring station), 25 model outputs (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios), and a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean. Many in situ datasets have been inserted in a relational database, in order to enable more accurate data selection and download of different datasets in a shared format. The database website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - A data catalogue that complies with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - Metadata forms to document

  17. Chen 10-marker miRNA signature for non-small cell lung cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    A panel of 10 serum miRNAs has been identified that were found to have significantly different expression levels in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) serum samples compared with the control serum samples. This panel of miRNAs was able to distinguish NSCLC cases from controls with high sensitivity and specificity. The ten miRNAs are: miR-20a, miR-24, miR-25, miR-145, miR-152, miR-199a-5p, miR-221, miR-222, miR-223, miR-320.

  18. DNA methylation and not H3K4 trimethylation dictates the expression status of miR-152 gene which inhibits migration of breast cancer cells via DNMT1/CDH1 loop.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Rath, Sandip Kumar; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Parbin, Sabnam; Pradhan, Nibedita; Patra, Samir Kumar

    2016-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNAs which targets most protein-coding transcripts (mRNA) and destroy them. Thus miRNA controls the abundance of those specific proteins and impact on developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Dysregulation of miRNA function thus may lead to various clinicopathological complications, including breast cancer. Silencing of miR-152 gene due to promoter DNA methylation alter the expression pattern of several other genes. E-cadherin (CDH1) forms the core of adherent junctions between surrounding epithelial cells, link with actin cytoskeleton and affects cell signaling. CDH1 gene is down regulated by promoter DNA methylation during cancer progression. In this investigation, we attempt to elucidate the correlation of miR-152 and CDH1 function, as it is well known that the loss of CDH1 function is one of the major reasons for cancer metastasis and aggressiveness of spreading. For the first time we have shown that loss of CDH1 expression is directly proportional to the loss of miR-152 function in breast cancer cells. mRNA and protein expression profile of DNMT1 implicate that miR-152 targets DNMT1 mRNA and inhibits its protein expression. Tracing the molecular marks on DNA and histone 3 for understanding the mechanism of gene regulation by ChIP analyses leads to a paradoxical result that shows DNA methylation adjacent to active histone marking (enrichment of H3K4me3) silence miR-152 gene. Further experiments revealed that DNMT1 plays crucial role for regulation of miR-152 gene. When DNMT1 protein function is blocked miR-152 expression prevails and destroys the mRNA of DNMT1; this molecular regulatory mechanism is creating a cyclic feedback loop, which is now focused as DNMT1/miR-152 switch for on/off of DNMT1 target genes. We discovered modulation of CDH1 gene expression by DNMT1/miR-152 switches. We have demonstrated further that DNMT1 down regulation mediated upregulation of CDH1 (hereafter, DNMT1/CDH1 loop) in

  19. Experimental and Computational Study fo CH, CH*, and OH* in an Axisymmetric Laminar Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, K. T.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we extend the results of previous combined numerical and experimental investigations of an axisymmetric laminar diffusion flame in which difference Raman spectroscopy, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and a multidimensional flame model were used to generate profiles of the temperature and major and minor species. A procedure is outlined by which the number densities of ground-state CH (X(sup 2)II) excited-state CH (A(sup 2)Delta, denoted CH*), and excited-state OH (A(sup 2)Sigma, denoted OH*) are measured and modeled. CH* and OH* number densities are deconvoluted from line-of-sight flame-emission measurements. Ground-state CH is measured using linear LIF. The computations are done with GRI Mech 2.11 as well as an alternate hydrocarbon mechanism. In both cases, additional reactions for the production and consumption of CH* and OH* are added from recent kinetic studies. Collisional quenching and spontaneous emission are responsible for the de-excitation of the excited-state radicals. As with our previous investigations, GRI Mech 2.11 continues to produce very good agreement with the overall flame length observed in the experiments, while significantly under predicting the flame lift-off height. The alternate kinetic scheme is much more accurate in predicting lift-off height but overpredicts the over-all flame length. Ground-state CH profiles predicted with GRI Mech 2.11 are in excellent agreement with the corresponding measurements, regarding both spatial distribution and absolute concentration (measured at 4 ppm) of the CH radical. Calculations of the excited-state species show reasonable agreement with the measurements as far as spatial distribution and overall characteristics are concerned. For OH*, the measured peak mole fraction, 1.3 x 10(exp -8), compared well with computed peaks, while the measured peak level for CH*, 2 x 10(exp -9), was severely underpredicted by both kinetic schemes, indicating that the formation and destruction kinetics

  20. Semirna: searching for plant miRNAs using target sequences.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Perkins, James R; Viguera, Enrique; Thode, Guillermo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2012-04-01

    Many plant genomes are already known, and new ones are being sequenced every year. The next step for researchers is to identify all of the functional elements in these genomes, including the important class of functional elements known as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in posttranscriptional regulatory pathways. However, computational tools for predicting new plant miRNAs are limited, and there is a particular need for tools that can be used easily by laboratory researchers. We present semirna, a new tool for predicting miRNAs in plant genomes, available as a Web server. This tool takes a putative target sequence such as a messenger RNA (mRNA) as input, and allows users to search for miRNAs that target this sequence. It can also be used to determine whether small RNA sequences from massive sequencing analysis represent true miRNAs and to search for miRNAs in new genomes using homology. Semirna has shown a high level of accuracy using various test sets, and gives users the ability to search for miRNAs with several different adjustable parameters. Semirna, a user-friendly and intuitive Web server for predicting miRNA sequences, can be reached at http://www.bioinfocabd.upo.es/semirna/ . It is useful for researchers searching for miRNAs involved in particular pathways, as well as those searching for miRNAs in newly sequenced genomes.

  1. Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoliang; Lu, Lixia; Su, Hailong; Lou, Zhongzi; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yadong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of small regulatory RNAs that are involved in numerous biological processes through small RNA-induced silencing networks. In an attempt to explore the phylogeny of miRNAs across five platyhelminths, we integrated annotated miRNAs and their full genomes. We identified conserved miRNA clusters and, in particular, miR-71/2 was conserved from planarian to parasitic flatworms and was expanded in free-living Schmidtea mediterranea. Analysis of 22 miRNA loci provided compelling evidence that most known miRNAs are conserved across platyhelminths. Meanwhile, we also observed alterations of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNA(s), such as transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation, in around ~ 41% of 22 known miRNA loci. Compared with Echinococcus multilocularis, the majority of these events occurred in evolution-distant Hymenolepis microstoma, Schistosoma japonicum or/and S. mediterranea. These results imply rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

  2. miR-375 and miR-30d in the effect of chromium-containing Chinese medicine moderating glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xiao, Xinhua; Li, Ming; Li, Wenhui; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Huabing; Ping, Fan; Wang, Zhixin; Zheng, Jia; Xiang, HongDing

    2014-01-01

    In China, TianMai Xiaoke tablet (TM) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. However, the exact mechanism of TM is not clear. This study is to investigate the effect of TM on glucose metabolism in diabetic rats and to identify whether TM takes a direct action through microRNAs on islet. Rats were divided into control group, diabetic group, low dose of TM group (TML), and high dose of TM group (TMH). Pancreas samples were analyzed using microRNA array and Q-PCR. Eight-week treatment with TM significantly decreased fasting blood glucose. The blood glucose was significantly reduced in TM-treated groups before and after oral glucose administration. Fasting insulin and HOMA-IR were suppressed in TM-treated groups. miR-448, let-7b, miR-540, miR-296, miR-880, miR-200a, miR-500, miR-10b, miR-336, miR-30d, miR-208, let-7e, miR-142-5p, miR-874, miR-375, miR-879, miR-501, and miR-188 were upregulated, while miR-301b, miR-134, and miR-652 were downregulated in TMH group. Through target gene analysis and real-time PCR verification, we found that these miRNAs, especially miR-375 and miR-30d, can stimulate insulin secretion in islet. Our data suggest that TM can improve blood glucose in diabetic rats which involved increasing the expression of miR-375 and miR-30d to activate insulin synthesis in islet.

  3. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-05

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  4. Fractionation of the methane isotopologues 13CH4, 12CH3D, and 13CH3D during aerobic oxidation of methane by Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David T.; Welander, Paula V.; Ono, Shuhei

    2016-11-01

    Aerobic oxidation of methane plays a major role in reducing the amount of methane emitted to the atmosphere from freshwater and marine settings. We cultured an aerobic methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at 30 and 37 °C, and determined the relative abundance of 12CH4, 13CH4, 12CH3D, and 13CH3D (a doubly-substituted, or ;clumped; isotopologue of methane) to characterize the clumped isotopologue effect associated with aerobic methane oxidation. In batch culture, the residual methane became enriched in 13C and D relative to starting methane, with D/H fractionation a factor of 9.14 (Dε/13ε) larger than that of 13C/12C. As oxidation progressed, the Δ13CH3D value (a measure of the excess in abundance of 13CH3D relative to a random distribution of isotopes among isotopologues) of residual methane decreased. The isotopologue fractionation factor for 13CH3D/12CH4 was found to closely approximate the product of the measured fractionation factors for 13CH4/12CH4 and 12CH3D/12CH4 (i.e., 13C/12C and D/H). The results give insight into enzymatic reversibility in the aerobic methane oxidation pathway. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model was developed to predict isotopologue signatures expected for methane in the environment that has been partially-oxidized by aerobic methanotrophy. Measurement of methane clumped isotopologue abundances can be used to distinguish between aerobic methane oxidation and alternative methane-cycling processes.

  5. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  6. Rapid identification of regulatory microRNAs by miTRAP (miRNA trapping by RNA in vitro affinity purification).

    PubMed

    Braun, Juliane; Misiak, Danny; Busch, Bianca; Krohn, Knut; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. However, the identification of miRNAs regulating the fate of a specific messenger RNA remains limited due to the imperfect complementarity of miRNAs and targeted transcripts. Here, we describe miTRAP (miRNA trapping by RNA in vitro affinity purification), an advanced protocol of previously reported MS2-tethering approaches. MiTRAP allows the rapid identification of miRNAs targeting an in vitro transcribed RNA in cell lysates. Selective co-purification of regulatory miRNAs was confirmed for the MYC- as well as ZEB2-3'UTR, two well-established miRNA targets in vivo. Combined with miRNA-sequencing, miTRAP identified in addition to miRNAs reported to control MYC expression, 18 novel candidates including not in silico predictable miRNAs. The evaluation of 10 novel candidate miRNAs confirmed 3'UTR-dependent regulation of MYC expression as well as putative non-canonical targeting sites for the not in silico predictable candidates. In conclusion, miTRAP provides a rapid, cost-effective and easy-to-handle protocol allowing the identification of regulatory miRNAs for RNAs of choice in a cellular context of interest. Most notably, miTRAP not only identifies in silico predictable but also unpredictable miRNAs regulating the expression of a specific target RNA.

  7. Detection of Differentially Expressed MicroRNAs in Rheumatic Heart Disease: miR-1183 and miR-1299 as Potential Diagnostic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ni; Lian, Jiangfang; Zhao, Sheng; Zheng, Dawei; Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Xinbao; Sun, Lebo; Zhou, Qingyun; Shi, Huoshun; Xu, Guodong; Incoom, Enchill KoJo; Zhou, Jianqing; Shao, Guofeng

    2015-01-01

    This study compared microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles between rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients and healthy controls to investigate their differential expression and help elucidate their mechanisms of action. Microarray analysis was used to measure miRNA expression, and a total of 133 miRNAs were shown to be significantly upregulated in RHD patients compared with controls, including miR-1183 and miR-1299. A total of 137 miRNAs, including miR-4423-3p and miR-218-1-3p, were significantly downregulated in RHD patients. Quantitative real-time-PCR confirmed microarray findings for miR-1183 and miR-1299 in both tissue and plasma. Bioinformatic predictions were also made of differentially expressed miRNAs as biomarkers in RHD by databases and GO/pathway analysis. Furthermore, we investigated miR-1183 and miR-1299 expression in RHD patients with secondary pulmonary hypertension (PAH). Our findings identified an important role for miR-1299 as a direct regulator of RHD, while the observed difference in expression of miR-1183 between RHD-PAH patients with high or low pulmonary artery pressure suggests that miR-1183 overexpression may reflect pulmonary artery remodeling. miR-1183 and miR-1299 appear to play distinct roles in RHD pathogenesis accompanied by secondary PAH and could be used as potential biological markers for disease development. PMID:26539505

  8. Regulation of miR‐200c and miR‐141 by Methylation in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Seodhna M.; O'Neill, Karla M.; McKenna, Michael M.; Walsh, Colum P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In prostate cancer (PCa), abnormal expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs) has been previously reported. Increasing evidence shows that aberrant epigenetic regulation of miRNAs is a contributing factor to their altered expression in cancer. In this study, we investigate whether expression of miR‐200c and miR‐141 in PCa is related to the DNA methylation status of their promoter. METHODS PCR analysis of miR‐200c and miR‐141, and CpG methylation analysis of their common promoter, was performed in PCa cell‐lines and in archived prostate biopsy specimens. The biological significance of miR‐200c and miR‐141 expression in prostate cancer cells was assessed by a series of in vitro bioassays and the effect on proposed targets DNMT3A and TET1/TET3 was investigated. The effect on promoter methylation status in cells treated with demethylating agents was also examined. RESULTS miR‐200c and miR‐141 are both highly elevated in LNCaP, 22RV1, and DU145 cells, but significantly reduced in PC3 cells. This correlates inversely with the methylation status of the miR‐200c/miR‐141 promoter, which is unmethylated in LNCaP, 22RV1, and DU145 cells, but hypermethylated in PC3. In PC3 cells, miR‐200c and miR‐141 expression is subsequently elevated by treatment with the demethylating drug decitabine (5‐aza‐2′deoxycytidine) and by knockdown of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), suggesting their expression is regulated by methylation. Expression of miR‐200c and miR‐141 in prostate biopsy tissue was inversely correlated with methylation in promoter CpG sites closest to the miR‐200c/miR‐141 loci. In vitro, over‐expression of miR‐200c in PC3 cells inhibited growth and clonogenic potential, as well as inducing apoptosis. Expression of the genes DNMT3A and TET1/TET3 were down‐regulated by miR‐200c and miR‐141 respectively. Finally, treatment with the soy isoflavone genistein caused demethylation of the promoter CpG sites closest to the mi

  9. miR-181a and miR-630 regulate cisplatin-induced cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Morselli, Eugenia; Vitale, Ilio; Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Criollo, Alfredo; Servant, Nicolas; Paccard, Caroline; Hupé, Philippe; Robert, Thomas; Ripoche, Hugues; Lazar, Vladimir; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Dessen, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are noncoding RNAs that regulate multiple cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis. We used microarray technology to identify miRNAs that were upregulated by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells in response to cisplatin (CDDP). The corresponding synthetic miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) per se were not lethal when transfected into A549 cells yet affected cell death induction by CDDP, C2-ceramide, cadmium, etoposide, and mitoxantrone in an inducer-specific fashion. Whereas synthetic miRNA inhibitors (anti-miRNAs) targeting miR-181a and miR-630 failed to modulate the response of A549 to CDDP, pre-miR-181a and pre-miR-630 enhanced and reduced CDDP-triggered cell death, respectively. Pre-miR-181a and pre-miR-630 consistently modulated mitochondrial/postmitochondrial steps of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, including Bax oligomerization, mitochondrial transmembrane potential dissipation, and the proteolytic maturation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. In addition, pre-miR-630 blocked early manifestations of the DNA damage response, including the phosphorylation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and of two ATM substrates, histone H2AX and p53. Pharmacologic and genetic inhibition of p53 corroborated the hypothesis that pre-miR-630 (but not pre-miR-181a) blocks the upstream signaling pathways that are ignited by DNA damage and converge on p53 activation. Pre-miR-630 arrested A549 cells in the G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle, correlating with increased levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1) as well as with reduced proliferation rates and resulting in greatly diminished sensitivity of A549 cells to the late S-G2-M cell cycle arrest mediated by CDDP. Altogether, these results identify miR-181a and miR-630 as novel modulators of the CDDP response in NSCLC.

  10. Downregulation of long noncoding RNA HOTAIRM1 promotes monocyte/dendritic cell differentiation through competitively binding to endogenous miR-3960

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Jiaxuan; Li, Jing; Feng, Yue; Wang, Liyang; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Rongcun

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation is controlled by a multilayered regulatory circuitry consisting of various elements, including histone modifications, transcription factors, and posttranscriptional regulators such as miRNAs, long noncoding RNAs, and circular RNAs. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this biological process remains unclear. In this study, through epigenetic profiling analysis using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), we identified an lncRNA, HOTAIRM1, with a critical role in myeloid development. Further ChIP-chip analysis showed obvious H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 histone modification peak changes in the promoter region of HOTAIRM1 during the process of monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation. In line with this observation, HOTAIRM1 RNA expression was downregulated when monocytes differentiated into DCs. Moreover, we found that HOTAIRM1 RNA was regulated by epigenetic factors such as RBBP4 and RBBP7. Mechanistically, we found that the silencing of HOTAIRM1 caused changes in the expression of several monocyte differentiation markers such as CD14 and B7H2. In addition, based on the “competing endogenous RNA” hypothesis, we discovered miR-3960 targeting both HOTAIRM1 and the DC differentiation repression gene, HOXA1, by most possibly constructing a potential competing endogenous RNA network. Increased miR-3960 expression could downregulate both of these two long RNAs and finally lead peripheral blood cells to differentiate into DCs. In summary, our study demonstrates that HOTAIRM1 competitively binds to miR-3960 and finally regulates the process of hematopoiesis, which reveals a novel regulatory mechanism of lncRNA function. PMID:28280365

  11. Measurement of the higher-order anisotropic flow coefficients for identified hadrons in Au + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200<mi mathvariant='bold'>GeVmi>

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2016-05-31

    In this paper, measurements of the anisotropic flow coefficients v22}, v33}, v44}, and v42} for identified particles (π±, K±, and p + ¯p) at midrapidity, obtained relative to the event planes Ψm at forward rapidities in Au + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200<mi mathvariant='bold'>GeVmi>, are presented as a function of collision centrality and particle transverse momenta pT. The vn coefficients show characteristic patterns consistent with hydrodynamical expansion of the matter produced in the collisions. For each harmonic n, a modified valence quark-number Nq scaling [plotting vnm}/(Nq)n/2 versus transverse kinetic energies (KET)/Nq] is observed to yield a single curve for all the measured particle species for a broad range of KET . A simultaneous blast-wave model fit to the observed vnm}(pT) coefficients and published particle spectra identifies radial flow anisotropies ρnm} and spatial eccentricities snm} at freeze-out. Finally, these are generally smaller than the initial-state participant-plane geometric eccentricities εnPPm} as also observed in the final eccentricity from quantum interferometry measurements with respect to the event plane.

  12. MiPS (Mi Prostate Score Urine test) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The MiPS assay is a multiplex analysis of T2-ERG gene fusion, PCA3, and serum PSA (KLK3). It is commercially available through the University of Michigan MLabs. The MiPS assay tests for the presence of two prostate cancer biomarkers: a piece of RNA made from the PCA3 gene, found to be overactive in 95 percent of all prostate cancers, and another RNA marker that is found only when TMPRSS2 and ERG abnormally fuse. TMPRSS2:ERG, or T2-ERG, is a strong indicator of prostate cancer.

  13. Aberrant Expression of Breast Development-Related MicroRNAs, miR-22, miR-132, and miR-212, in Breast Tumor Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Damavandi, Zahra; Torkashvand, Safoora; Vasei, Mohammad; Soltani, Bahram M.; Tavallaei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a major class of small endogenous RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of most genes in the human genome. miRNAs are often located in chromosomal fragile sites, which are suscept-ible to amplification or deletion. Chromosomal deletions are frequent events in breast cancer cells. Deletion and loss of heterozygosity at 17p13.3 have been reported in 49% of breast cancers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential expression alterations of miR-22, miR-132, and miR-212, which are located on the 17p13.3 locus and are required for mammary gland development. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted, which included 36 pairs of tumor and matched nontumor surgical specimens from patients diagnosed with breast invasive ductal carcinoma. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from archival collections at the pathology department of Shariati Hospital were prepared for RNA extraction using the xylene-ethanol method before total RNA was isolated with TRIzol Reagent. Specific primers were designed for cDNA synthesis and miRNA amplification. The expression of miRNAs was then evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results According to our RT-PCR data, the miR-212/miR-132 family was downregulated in breast cancer (0.328-fold, p<0.001), and this reduced expression was the most prominent in high-grade tumors. In contrast, miR-22 exhibited a significant upregulation in breast tumor samples (2.183-fold, p=0.040). Conclusion Consistent with the frequent deletion of the 17p13.3 locus in breast tumor cells, our gene expression data demonstrated a significant downregulation of miR-212 and miR-132 in breast cancer tissues. In contrast, we observed a significant upregulation of miR-22 in breast tumor samples. The latter conflicting result may have been due to the upregulation of miR-22 in stromal/cancer-associated fibroblasts, rather than in the tumor cells. PMID:27382390

  14. Conformational and spectroscopic study of xanthogen ethyl formates, ROC(S)SC(O)OCH2CH3. Isolation of CH3CH2OC(O)SH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncal, Luciana C.; Cozzarín, Melina V.; Romano, Rosana M.

    2015-03-01

    ROC(S)SC(O)OCH2CH3, with R = CH3sbnd , (CH3)2CHsbnd and CH3(CH2)2sbnd , were obtained through the reaction between potassium xanthate salts, ROC(S)SK, and ethyl chloroformate, ClC(O)OCH2CH3. The liquid compounds were identified and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR and mass spectrometry. The conformations adopted by the molecules were studied by DFT methods. 6 conformers were theoretically predicted for R = CH3sbnd and (CH3)2CHsbnd , while the conformational flexibility of the n-propyl substituent increases the total number of feasible rotamers to 21. For the three molecules, the conformers can be associated in 3 groups, being the most stable the AS forms - the Cdbnd S double bond anti (A) with respect to the Csbnd S single bond and the Ssbnd C single bond syn (S) with respect to the Cdbnd O double bond - followed by AA and SS conformers. The vibrational spectra were interpreted in terms of the predicted conformational equilibrium, presenting the ν(Cdbnd O) spectral region signals corresponding to the three groups of conformers. A moderated pre-resonance Raman enhancement of the ν(Cdbnd S) vibrational mode of CH3(CH2)2OC(S)SC(O)OCH2CH3 was detected, when the excitation radiation approaches the energy of a n → π∗ electronic transition associated with the Cdbnd S chromophore. UV-visible spectra in different solvents were measured and interpreted in terms of TD-DFT calculations. The unknown molecule CH3CH2OC(O)SH was isolated by the UV-visible photolysis of CH3OC(S)SC(O)OCH2CH3 isolated in Ar matrix, and also obtained as a side-product of the reaction between potassium xanthate salts, ROC(S)SK, and ethyl chloroformate, ClC(O)OCH2CH3.

  15. Uncovering miRNAs involved in crosstalk between nutrient deficiencies in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Ai, Qin; Yu, Diqiu

    2015-07-02

    Integrating carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and sulfur (S) metabolism is essential for the growth and development of living organisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in regulating nutrient metabolism in plants. However, how plant miRNAs mediate crosstalk between different nutrient metabolic pathways is unclear. In this study, deep sequencing of Arabidopsis thaliana small RNAs was used to reveal miRNAs that were differentially expressed in response to C, N, or S deficiency. Comparative analysis revealed that the targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs are involved in different cellular responses and metabolic processes, including transcriptional regulation, auxin signal transduction, nutrient homeostasis, and regulation of development. C, N, and S deficiency specifically induced miR169b/c, miR826 and miR395, respectively. In contrast, miR167, miR172, miR397, miR398, miR399, miR408, miR775, miR827, miR841, miR857, and miR2111 are commonly suppressed by C, N, and S deficiency. In particular, the miRNAs that are induced specifically by a certain nutrient deficiency are often suppressed by other nutrient deficiencies. Further investigation indicated that the modulation of nutrient-responsive miRNA abundance affects the adaptation of plants to nutrient starvation conditions. This study revealed that miRNAs function as important regulatory nodes of different nutrient metabolic pathways.

  16. Ternary chalcogenides <mi mathvariant='normal'>Cmi> mathvariant='normal'>smi>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Zmi> mathvariant='normal'>nmi>3<mi mathvariant='normal'>Smi> mathvariant='normal'>emi>4 and <mi mathvariant='normal'>Cmi> mathvariant='normal'>smi>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Zmi> mathvariant='normal'>nmi>3<mi mathvariant='normal'>Tmi> mathvariant='normal'>emi>4 : Potential <mi>p> -type transparent conducting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Singh, David J.; Sefat, Athena S.; Du, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-11

    Here we report prediction of two new ternary chalcogenides that can potentially be used as p-type transparent conductors along with experimental synthesis and initial characterization of these previously unknown compounds, Cs2Zn3Ch4 (Ch = Se, Te). In particular, the structures are predicted based on density functional calculations and confirmed by experiments. Phase diagrams, electronic structure, optical properties, and defect properties of Cs2Zn3Se4 and Cs2Zn3Te4 are calculated to assess the viability of these materials as p-type TCMs. Cs2Zn3Se4 and Cs2Zn3Te4, which are stable under ambient air, display large optical band gaps (calculated to be 3.61 and 2.83 eV, respectively) and have small hole effective masses (0.5-0.77 me) that compare favorably with other proposed p-type TCMs. Defect calculations show that undoped Cs2Zn3Se4 and Cs2Zn3Te4 are p-type materials. However, the free hole concentration may be limited by low-energy native donor defects, e.g., Zn interstitials. Lastly, non-equilibrium growth techniques should be useful for suppressing the formation of native donor defects, thereby increasing the hole concentration.

  17. Comparison Between Dust Particle Generation In CH4 or CH4/N2 Mixing RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jeremy; Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre

    2005-10-31

    Dust particles have been spontaneously generated either in pure CH4 or in CH4/N2 r.f. plasmas. The dust particle formation results from homogeneous nucleation in the plasma and is detected by laser light scattering (Ar+, {lambda} = 514.5 nm). The temporal and spatial behaviour of dust particles is studied. In pure methane gas, particles are trapped in well defined clouds at the plasma sheath boundaries. In a CH4/N2 mixture, the nitrogen addition leads to an expansion of the clouds. For nitrogen contents higher than 50%, the space between the electrodes is nearly completely filled with dust particles leading to plasma instabilities and a void appears in the center of the discharge. The particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.8-2 {mu}m. For nitrogen-rich plasmas, the particles growth is improved and leads to a rough shape with an orange-peel-type surface texture.

  18. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3+O2+CH3O+O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, -0.47)) X 10(exp 13) exp(- 15813 +/- 587 K/T)cc/mol s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  19. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, sub -0.47 ) x 10(exp 13) e(-15813 +/- 587 K/T)/cubic cm.mol.s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  20. miR-34/449 miRNAs are required for motile ciliogenesis by repressing cp110

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rui; Walentek, Peter; Sponer, Nicole; Klimke, Alexander; Lee, Joon Sub; Dixon, Gary; Harland, Richard; Wan, Ying; Lishko, Polina; Lize, Muriel; Kessel, Michael; He, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The miR-34/449 family consists of six homologous miRNAs at three genomic loci. Redundancy of miR-34/449 miRNAs and their dominant expression in multiciliated epithelia suggest a functional significance in ciliogenesis. Here, we report that mice deficient for all miR-34/449 miRNAs exhibited postnatal mortality, infertility, and strong respiratory dysfunction caused by defective mucociliary clearance. In both mouse and Xenopus, miR-34/449-deficient multiciliated cells (MCCs) exhibited a significant decrease in cilia length and number, due to defective basal body maturation and apical docking. The effect of miR-34/449 on ciliogenesis was mediated, at least in part, by post-transcriptional repression of Cp110, a centriolar protein suppressing cilia assembly. cp110 knockdown in miR-34/449-deficient MCCs restored ciliogenesis by rescuing basal body maturation and docking. Altogether, our findings elucidate conserved cellular and molecular mechanisms through which miR-34/449 regulate motile ciliogenesis. PMID:24899310

  1. Integrating miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiling Uncovers miRNAs Underlying Fat Deposition in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangxian; Wang, Xiaolong; Yuan, Chao; Kang, Danju; Xu, Xiaochun; Zhou, Jiping; Geng, Rongqing; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Zhaoxia

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological processes including adipogenesis and fat metabolism. Here, we adopted a deep sequencing approach to determine the identity and abundance of miRNAs involved in fat deposition in adipose tissues from fat-tailed (Kazakhstan sheep, KS) and thin-tailed (Tibetan sheep, TS) sheep breeds. By comparing HiSeq data of these two breeds, 539 miRNAs were shared in both breeds, whereas 179 and 97 miRNAs were uniquely expressed in KS and TS, respectively. We also identified 35 miRNAs that are considered to be putative novel miRNAs. The integration of miRNA-mRNA analysis revealed that miRNA-associated targets were mainly involved in the gene ontology (GO) biological processes concerning cellular process and metabolic process, and miRNAs play critical roles in fat deposition through their ability to regulate fundamental pathways. These pathways included the MAPK signaling pathway, FoxO and Wnt signaling pathway, and focal adhesion. Taken together, our results define miRNA expression signatures that may contribute to fat deposition and lipid metabolism in sheep. PMID:28293627

  2. Functions of miR-146a and miR-222 in Tumor-associated Macrophages in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanshuang; Zhao, Lianmei; Shi, Bianhua; Ma, Sisi; Xu, Zhenbiao; Ge, Yehua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play critical roles in promoting tumor progression and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying TAM regulation remain to be further investigated and may make significant contributions to cancer treatment. Mammalian microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified as important regulators of gene expression that function by repressing specific target genes mainly at the post-transcriptional level. However, systematic studies of the functions and mechanisms of miRNAs in TAMs in tumor tissues are rare. In this study, miR-146a and miR-222 were shown to be significantly decreased in TAMs associated with the up-regulated NF-κB p50 subunit. miR-146a promoted the expression of some M2 macrophage phenotype molecules, and miR-146a antagomir transfected RAW264.7 monocyte-macrophage cells inhibited 4T1 tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, overexpression of miR-222 inhibited TAM chemotaxis, and miR-222 in TAMs inhibited 4T1 tumor growth by targeting CXCL12 and inhibiting CXCR4. These data revealed that miRNAs influence breast tumor growth by promoting the M2 type polarization or regulating the recruitment of TAMs. These observations suggest that endogenous miRNAs may exert an important role in controlling the polarization and function of TAMs in breast cancer. PMID:26689540

  3. Integrating miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiling Uncovers miRNAs Underlying Fat Deposition in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangxian; Wang, Xiaolong; Yuan, Chao; Kang, Danju; Xu, Xiaochun; Zhou, Jiping; Geng, Rongqing; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Zhaoxia; Chen, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological processes including adipogenesis and fat metabolism. Here, we adopted a deep sequencing approach to determine the identity and abundance of miRNAs involved in fat deposition in adipose tissues from fat-tailed (Kazakhstan sheep, KS) and thin-tailed (Tibetan sheep, TS) sheep breeds. By comparing HiSeq data of these two breeds, 539 miRNAs were shared in both breeds, whereas 179 and 97 miRNAs were uniquely expressed in KS and TS, respectively. We also identified 35 miRNAs that are considered to be putative novel miRNAs. The integration of miRNA-mRNA analysis revealed that miRNA-associated targets were mainly involved in the gene ontology (GO) biological processes concerning cellular process and metabolic process, and miRNAs play critical roles in fat deposition through their ability to regulate fundamental pathways. These pathways included the MAPK signaling pathway, FoxO and Wnt signaling pathway, and focal adhesion. Taken together, our results define miRNA expression signatures that may contribute to fat deposition and lipid metabolism in sheep.

  4. The sequential action of miR156 and miR172 regulates developmental timing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Park, Mee Yeon; Conway, Susan R.; Wang, Jia-Wei; Weigel, Detlef; Poethig, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The transition from the juvenile to the adult phase of shoot development in plants is accompanied by changes in vegetative morphology and an increase in reproductive potential. Here we describe the regulatory mechanism of this transition. We show that miR156 is necessary and sufficient for the expression of the juvenile phase, and regulates the timing of the juvenile-to-adult transition by coordinating the expression of several pathways that control different aspects of this process. miR156 acts by repressing the expression of functionally distinct SPL transcription factors. miR172 acts downstream of miR156 to promote adult epidermal identity. miR156 regulates the expression of miR172 via SPL9 which, redundantly with SPL10, directly promotes the transcription of miR172b. Thus, like the larval-to-adult transition in Caenorhabditis elegans, the juvenile-to-adult transition in Arabidopsis is mediated by sequentially operating miRNAs. miR156 and miR172 are positively regulated by the transcription factors they target, suggesting that negative feedback loops contribute to the stability of the juvenile and adult phases. PMID:19703400

  5. MicroRNA Detection Using a Double Molecular Beacon Approach: Distinguishing Between miRNA and Pre-miRNA.

    PubMed

    James, Amanda Marie; Baker, Meredith B; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are recognized for their roles both as modulators of disease progression and as biomarkers of disease activity, including neurological diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Commonly, miRNA abundance is assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), however, qRT-PCR for miRNA can be labor intensive, time consuming, and may lack specificity for detection of mature versus precursor forms of miRNA. Here, we describe a novel double molecular beacon approach to miRNA assessment that can distinguish and quantify mature versus precursor forms of miRNA in a single assay, an essential feature for use of miRNAs as biomarkers for disease. Using this approach, we found that molecular beacons with DNA or combined locked nucleic acid (LNA)-DNA backbones can detect mature and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) of low (< 1 nM) abundance in vitro. The double molecular beacon assay was accurate in assessing miRNA abundance in a sample containing a mixed population of mature and precursor miRNAs. In contrast, qRT-PCR and the single molecular beacon assay overestimated miRNA abundance. Additionally, the double molecular beacon assay was less labor intensive than traditional qRT-PCR and had 10-25% increased specificity. Our data suggest that the double molecular beacon-based approach is more precise and specific than previous methods, and has the promise of being the standard for assessing miRNA levels in biological samples.

  6. miR-203 and miR-205 expression patterns identify subgroups of prognosis in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cañueto, J; Cardeñoso-Álvarez, E; García-Hernández, J L; Galindo-Villardón, P; Vicente-Galindo, P; Vicente-Villardón, J L; Alonso-López, D; De Las Rivas, J; Valero, J; Moyano-Sáez, E; Fernández-López, E; Mao, J H; Castellanos-Martín, A; Román-Curto, C; Pérez-Losada, J

    2016-12-11

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is the second most widespread cancer in humans and its incidence is rising. These tumours can evolve as poor-prognosis diseases, and therefore it is important to identify new markers to better predict its clinical evolution. Here, we identified the expression pattern of miRNAs at different stages of skin cancer progression in a panel of murine skin cancer cell lines. We determined that miR-203 and miR-205 are differentially expressed in this panel, and evaluated their potential use as biomarkers of prognosis in human tumours. MiR-205 was expressed in tumours with pathological features recognized as indicators of poor prognosis such as desmoplasia, perineural invasion and infiltrative growth pattern. MiR-205 was mainly expressed in undifferentiated areas and in the invasion front, and was associated with both local recurrence and the development of general clinical events of poor evolution. MiR-205 expression was an independent variable selected to predict events of poor clinical evolution using the multinomial logistic regression model described in this study. In contrast, miR-203 was mainly expressed in tumours exhibiting the characteristics associated with a good prognosis, was mainly present in well-differentiated zones, and rarely expressed in the invasion front. Therefore, the expression and associations of miR-205 and miR-203 were mostly mutually exclusive. Finally, using a logistic biplot we identified three clusters of patients with differential prognosis based on miR-203 and miR-205 expression, and pathological tumour features. This work highlights the utility of miRNA-205 and miRNA-203 as prognostic markers in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. MicroRNA Detection Using a Double Molecular Beacon Approach: Distinguishing Between miRNA and Pre-miRNA

    PubMed Central

    James, Amanda Marie; Baker, Meredith B.; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are recognized for their roles both as modulators of disease progression and as biomarkers of disease activity, including neurological diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Commonly, miRNA abundance is assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), however, qRT-PCR for miRNA can be labor intensive, time consuming, and may lack specificity for detection of mature versus precursor forms of miRNA. Here, we describe a novel double molecular beacon approach to miRNA assessment that can distinguish and quantify mature versus precursor forms of miRNA in a single assay, an essential feature for use of miRNAs as biomarkers for disease. Using this approach, we found that molecular beacons with DNA or combined locked nucleic acid (LNA)-DNA backbones can detect mature and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) of low (< 1 nM) abundance in vitro. The double molecular beacon assay was accurate in assessing miRNA abundance in a sample containing a mixed population of mature and precursor miRNAs. In contrast, qRT-PCR and the single molecular beacon assay overestimated miRNA abundance. Additionally, the double molecular beacon assay was less labor intensive than traditional qRT-PCR and had 10-25% increased specificity. Our data suggest that the double molecular beacon-based approach is more precise and specific than previous methods, and has the promise of being the standard for assessing miRNA levels in biological samples. PMID:28255356

  8. Identification of targets of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Manna; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhao, Jinkun; Liang, Chunyong; Zhang, Huilai

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) regulated by microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 that are associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. The GSE19777 transcription profile was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and includes data from three samples of antisense miRNA-221-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR breast cancer cells, three samples of antisense miRNA-222-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells and three samples of control inhibitor (green fluorescent protein)-treated fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells. The linear models for microarray data package in R/Bioconductor was employed to screen for DEGs in the miRNA-transfected cells, and the pheatmap package in R was used to perform two-way clustering. Pathway enrichment was conducted using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis tool. Furthermore, a miRNA-messenger (m) RNA regulatory network depicting interactions between miRNA-targeted upregulated DEGs was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape. In total, 492 and 404 DEGs were identified for the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells and the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells, respectively. Genes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In addition, components of the Wnt signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, miRNA-222 was demonstrated to target protocadherin 10 (PCDH10). The results of the present study suggested that the PPP and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as CAMs and PCDH10, may be associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. PMID:27895744

  9. Identification of targets of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Manna; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhao, Jinkun; Liang, Chunyong; Zhang, Huilai

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) regulated by microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 that are associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. The GSE19777 transcription profile was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and includes data from three samples of antisense miRNA-221-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR breast cancer cells, three samples of antisense miRNA-222-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells and three samples of control inhibitor (green fluorescent protein)-treated fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells. The linear models for microarray data package in R/Bioconductor was employed to screen for DEGs in the miRNA-transfected cells, and the pheatmap package in R was used to perform two-way clustering. Pathway enrichment was conducted using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis tool. Furthermore, a miRNA-messenger (m) RNA regulatory network depicting interactions between miRNA-targeted upregulated DEGs was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape. In total, 492 and 404 DEGs were identified for the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells and the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells, respectively. Genes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In addition, components of the Wnt signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, miRNA-222 was demonstrated to target protocadherin 10 (PCDH10). The results of the present study suggested that the PPP and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as CAMs and PCDH10, may be associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant.

  10. The emerging role of miR-506 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Ju, Jingfang; Ni, Bing; Wang, Huaizhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. They are involved in almost all biological processes, and many have been identified as potential oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. miR-506 was recently discovered to play pivotal roles in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Dysregulation of miR-506 has been demonstrated in multiple types of cancers; however, whether it functions as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor seems to be context-dependent. Altered miR-506 expression in cancer is caused by promoter methylation and changes in upstream transcription factors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the diverse roles and underlying mechanisms of miR-506 and its involvement in cancer, and suggest the potential therapeutic strategy based on miR-506. PMID:27542202

  11. Genome-wide miRNA seeds prediction in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqin; Xu, Yuming; Lu, Zuhong

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that miRNA genes exist in the archaeal genome, though the functional role of such noncoding RNA remains unclear. Here, we integrated the phylogenetic information of available archaeal genomes to predict miRNA seeds (typically defined as the 2-8 nucleotides of mature miRNAs) on the genomic scale. Finally, we found 2649 candidate seeds with significant conservation signal. Eleven of 29 unique seeds from previous study support our result (P value <0.01), which demonstrates that the pipeline is suitable to predict experimentally detectable miRNA seeds. The statistical significance of the overlap between the detected archaeal seeds and known eukaryotic seeds shows that the miRNA may evolve before the divergence of these two domains of cellular life. In addition, miRNA targets are enriched for genes involved in transcriptional regulation, which is consistent with the situation in eukaryote. Our research will enhance the regulatory network analysis in Archaea.

  12. miRNA Inhibition in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Beavers, Kelsey R.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are noncoding RNA that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has recently motivated expanding efforts toward development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair. PMID:25553957

  13. MiRNA inhibition in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Nelson, Christopher E; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has motivated expanding efforts toward the development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair.

  14. miRNAs in the pathogenesis of oncogenic human viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor viruses are a class of pathogens with well established roles in the development of malignant diseases. Numerous bodies of work have highlighted miRNAs (microRNAs) as critical regulators of tumor pathways and it is clear that the dysregulation of cellular miRNA expression can promote tumor formation. Tumor viruses encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to modulate their host cell environment, thereby facilitating their respective infection cycles. The modulation of these miRNA responsive pathways, however, often influences certain signal transduction cascades in ways that favor tumorigenesis. In this review, we discuss the roles of virally-encoded and virally-regulated cellular miRNAs in the respective viral life-cycles and in virus associated pathogenesis. PMID:20943311

  15. Laboratory Spectra of Mixtures of CH4, C2H6, and CH3OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrapa, Rachel; Berry, Matthew T.; Sandford, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is commonly used as a tool for identifying the composition of objects in the Solar System and beyond. Using laboratory spectra, optical constants can be calculated and used to create model spectra for comparison to spectra obtained from infrared telescopes. In this study, the optical constants of mixtures of simple organics, including CH4, C2H6, and CH3OH were calculated from 15 to 70 K, in the frequency range of 9000-500 cm(sup -1) (1.1-20 micrometers), at a spectral resolution of 1 cm(sup -1).

  16. ChEA: transcription factor regulation inferred from integrating genome-wide ChIP-X experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Alexander; Xu, Huilei; Krishnan, Jayanth; Berger, Seth I.; Mazloom, Amin R.; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Experiments such as ChIP-chip, ChIP-seq, ChIP-PET and DamID (the four methods referred herein as ChIP-X) are used to profile the binding of transcription factors to DNA at a genome-wide scale. Such experiments provide hundreds to thousands of potential binding sites for a given transcription factor in proximity to gene coding regions. Results: In order to integrate data from such studies and utilize it for further biological discovery, we collected interactions from such experiments to construct a mammalian ChIP-X database. The database contains 189 933 interactions, manually extracted from 87 publications, describing the binding of 92 transcription factors to 31 932 target genes. We used the database to analyze mRNA expression data where we perform gene-list enrichment analysis using the ChIP-X database as the prior biological knowledge gene-list library. The system is delivered as a web-based interactive application called ChIP Enrichment Analysis (ChEA). With ChEA, users can input lists of mammalian gene symbols for which the program computes over-representation of transcription factor targets from the ChIP-X database. The ChEA database allowed us to reconstruct an initial network of transcription factors connected based on shared overlapping targets and binding site proximity. To demonstrate the utility of ChEA we present three case studies. We show how by combining the Connectivity Map (CMAP) with ChEA, we can rank pairs of compounds to be used to target specific transcription factor activity in cancer cells. Availability: The ChEA software and ChIP-X database is freely available online at: http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/lib/chea.jsp Contact: avi.maayan@mssm.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20709693

  17. Altered Expressions of miR-1238-3p, miR-494, miR-6069, and miR-139-3p in the Formation of Chronic Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Budak, Ferah; Bal, Salih Haldun; Tezcan, Gulcin; Akalın, Halis; Goral, Guher; Oral, Haluk Barbaros

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that is still endemic in developing countries. Despite early diagnosis and treatment of patients, chronic infections are seen in 10-30% of patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate the immunological factors that play roles in the transition of brucellosis from acute infection into chronic infection. Here, more than 2000 miRNAs were screened in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with acute or chronic brucellosis and healthy controls by using miRNA array, and the results of the miRNA array were validated through qRT-PCR. Findings were evaluated using GeneSpring GX (Agilent) 13.0 software and KEGG pathway analysis. Four miRNAs were expressed in the chronic group but were not expressed in acute and control groups. Among these miRNAs, the expression level of miR-1238-3p was increased while miR-494, miR-6069, and miR-139-3p were decreased (p < 0.05, fold change > 2). These miRNAs have the potential to be markers for chronic cases. The differentially expressed miRNAs and their predicted target genes involved in endocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, MAPK signaling pathway, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and its chemokine signaling pathway indicate their potential roles in chronic brucellosis and its progression. It is the first study of miRNA expression analysis of human PBMC to clarify the mechanism of inveteracy in brucellosis.

  18. Association of miR-146a, miR-149, miR-196a2, and miR-499 Polymorphisms with Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament of the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Joo; Kumar, Hemant; Sohn, Seil; Min, Hyoung Sik; Lee, Jang Bo; Kuh, Sung Uk; Kim, Keung Nyun; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Ok Joon; Ropper, Alexander E.; Kim, Nam Keun; Han, In Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the spine is considered a multifactorial and polygenic disease. We aimed to investigate the association between four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of pre-miRNAs [miR-146aC>G (rs2910164), miR-149T>C (rs2292832), miR-196a2T>C (rs11614913), and miR-499A>G (rs3746444)] and the risk of cervical OPLL in the Korean population. Methods The genotypic frequencies of these four SNPs were analyzed in 207 OPLL patients and 200 controls by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Findings For four SNPs in pre-miRNAs, no significant differences were found between OPLL patients and controls. However, subgroup analysis based on OPLL subgroup (continuous: continuous type plus mixed type, segmental: segmental and localized type) showed that miR-499GG genotype was associated with an increased risk of segmental type OPLL (adjusted odds ratio = 4.314 with 95% confidence interval: 1.109–16.78). In addition, some allele combinations (C-T-T-G, G-T-T-A, and G-T-C-G of miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499) and combined genotypes (miR-149TC/miR-196a2TT) were associated with increased OPLL risk, whereas the G-T-T-G and G-C-C-G allele combinations were associated with decreased OPLL risk. Conclusion The results indicate that GG genotype of miR-499 is associated with significantly higher risks of OPLL in the segmental OPLL group. The miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499 allele combinations may be a genetic risk factor for cervical OPLL in the Korean population. PMID:27454313

  19. miRNA-based heavy metal homeostasis and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Noman, Ali; Aqeel, Muhammad

    2017-02-22

    Plants have been naturally gifted with mechanisms to adjust under very high or low nutrient concentrations. Heavy metal toxicity is considered as a major growth and yield-limiting factor for plants. This stress includes essential as well as non-essential metals. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known for mediating post-transcriptional regulation by cleaving transcripts or translational inhibition. It is commonly agreed that an extensive understanding of plant miRNAs will significantly help in the induction of tolerance against environmental stresses. With the introduction of the latest technology like next generation sequencing (NGS), a growing figure of miRNAs has been productively recognized in several plants for their diverse roles. These miRNAs are well-known modulators of plant responses to heavy metal (HM) stress. Data regarding metal-responsive miRNAs point out the vital role of plant miRNAs in supplementing metal detoxification by means of transcription factors (TF) or gene regulation. Acting as systemic signals, miRNAs also synchronize different physiological processes for plant responses to metal toxicities. In contrast to practicing techniques, using miRNA is a greatly helpful, pragmatic, and feasible approach. The earlier findings point towards miRNAs as a prospective target to engineer heavy metal tolerance in plants. Therefore, there is a need to augment our knowledge about the orchestrated functions of miRNAs during HM stress. We reviewed the deterministic significance of plant miRNAs in heavy metal tolerance and their role in mediating plant responses to HM toxicities. This review also summarized the topical developments by identification and validation of different metal stress-responsive miRNAs.

  20. Altered Expressions of miR-1238-3p, miR-494, miR-6069, and miR-139-3p in the Formation of Chronic Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Budak, Ferah; Bal, Salih Haldun; Tezcan, Gulcin; Akalın, Halis; Goral, Guher

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that is still endemic in developing countries. Despite early diagnosis and treatment of patients, chronic infections are seen in 10–30% of patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate the immunological factors that play roles in the transition of brucellosis from acute infection into chronic infection. Here, more than 2000 miRNAs were screened in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with acute or chronic brucellosis and healthy controls by using miRNA array, and the results of the miRNA array were validated through qRT-PCR. Findings were evaluated using GeneSpring GX (Agilent) 13.0 software and KEGG pathway analysis. Four miRNAs were expressed in the chronic group but were not expressed in acute and control groups. Among these miRNAs, the expression level of miR-1238-3p was increased while miR-494, miR-6069, and miR-139-3p were decreased (p < 0.05, fold change > 2). These miRNAs have the potential to be markers for chronic cases. The differentially expressed miRNAs and their predicted target genes involved in endocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, MAPK signaling pathway, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and its chemokine signaling pathway indicate their potential roles in chronic brucellosis and its progression. It is the first study of miRNA expression analysis of human PBMC to clarify the mechanism of inveteracy in brucellosis. PMID:27722176

  1. Association between single nucleotide polymorphism in miR-499, miR-196a2, miR-146a and miR-149 and prostate cancer risk in a sample of Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Moradi, Nazanin; Ziaee, Seyed Amir Mohsen; Narouie, Behzad; Soltani, Mohammad Hosein; Rezaei, Maryam; Shahkar, Ghazaleh; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and are involved in numerous physiological processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human miRNA genes may affect miRNA biogenesis pathway and influence the susceptibility to several diseases such as cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of miR-499 rs3746444, miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms on prostate cancer (PCa) risk in a sample of Iranian population. This case-control study was done on 169 patients with pathologically confirmed PCa and 182 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The genotyping assays were done using T-ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP methods. The findings indicated that CC genotype of miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.12–2.79, P = 0.019) compared to TT genotype. No statistically significant association was found between miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms and PCa risk. In summary, the findings indicated that miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa in an Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are necessary to verify the findings of the present study. PMID:27222754

  2. Scaling properties of fractional momentum loss of high- <mi>pT> hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions at <mi>smi><mi>NN> from 62.4 GeV to 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J. -L.; Chen, C. -H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, T. W.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deaton, M. B.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimamyi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zou, L.

    2016-02-22

    We present measurements of the fractional momentum loss (Sloss = delta pT / pT) of high-transverse-momentum-identified hadrons in heavy-ion collisions. Using pi0 in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and and charged hadrons in Pb + Pb collisions measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we studied the scaling properties of Sloss as a function of a number of variables: the number of participants, Npart, the number of quark participants, Nqp, the charged-particle density, dNch/dη, and the Bjorken energy density times the equilibration time, epsilonBjτ0. We also find that the pT, where Sloss has its maximum, varies both with centrality and collision energy. Above the maximum, Sloss tends to follow a power-law function with all four scaling variables. Finally, the data at √sNN = 200 GeV and 2.76 TeV, for sufficiently high particle densities, have a common scaling of Sloss with dNch/dη and εBjτ0, lending insight into the physics of parton energy loss.

  3. Abnormal Expression of miR-21 and miR-95 in Cancer Stem-Like Cells is Associated with Radioresistance of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Chailan; Hu, Lin; He, Yin; Shi, Zeya; Tang, Siyuan; Chen, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrated that miR-21 and miR-95 expression were significantly higher in the ALDH1(+)CD133(+)subpopulation than in the ALDH1(-)CD133(-) subpopulation of lung cancer cells. Combined delivery of anti-miR-21 and anti-miR-95 by calcium phosphate nanoparticles significantly inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model and sensitized radiotherapy. The anti-miRNAs significantly reduced miR-21 and miR-95 levels, increased PTEN, SNX1, and SGPP1 protein expression, but reduced Akt Ser(473) and Thr(308) phosphorylation. ALDH1(+)CD133(+) subpopulation of NSCLC tumor cells confers radioresistance due to high expression of miR-21 and miR-95. Targeting inhibition of miR-21 and miR-95 can inhibit tumor growth through elevating PTEN, SNX1, and SGPP1 expression and inhibiting Akt phosphorylation.

  4. Responses of tomato genotypes to avirulent and Mi-virulent Meloidogyne javanica isolates occurring in Israel.

    PubMed

    Iberkleid, Ionit; Ozalvo, Rachel; Feldman, Lidia; Elbaz, Moshe; Patricia, Bucki; Horowitz, Sigal Brown

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of naturally virulent Meloidogyne isolates toward the tomato resistance gene Mi in major tomato-growing areas in Israel was studied for the first time. Virulence of seven selected isolates was confirmed over three successive generations on resistant (Mi-carrying) and susceptible (non-Mi-carrying) tomato cultivars. Diagnostic markers verified the predominance of Meloidogyne javanica among virulent isolates selected on resistant tomato cultivars or rootstocks. To better understand the determinants of nematode selection on Mi-carrying plants, reproduction of Mi-avirulent and virulent isolates Mjav1 and Mjv2, respectively, measured as eggs per gram of root, on non-Mi-carrying, heterozygous (Mi/mi) and homozygous (Mi/Mi) genotypes was evaluated. Although no reproduction of Mjav1 was observed on Mi/Mi genotypes, some reproduction was consistently observed on Mi/mi plants; reproduction of Mjv2 on the homozygous and heterozygous genotypes was similar to that on susceptible cultivars, suggesting a limited quantitative effect of the Mi gene. Histological examination of giant cells induced by Mi-virulent versus avirulent isolates confirmed the high virulence of Mjv2 on Mi/mi and Mi/Mi genotypes, allowing the formation of well-developed giant-cell systems despite the Mi gene. Analysis of the plant defense response in tomato Mi/Mi, Mi/mi, and mi/mi genotypes to both avirulent and virulent isolates was investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Although the jasmonate (JA)-signaling pathway was clearly upregulated by avirulent and virulent isolates on the susceptible (not carrying Mi) and heterozygous (Mi/mi) plants, no change in signaling was observed in the homozygous (Mi/Mi) resistant line following incompatible interaction with the avirulent isolate. Thus, similar to infection promoted by the avirulent isolate on the susceptible genotype, the Mi-virulent isolate induced the JA-dependent pathway, which might promote tomato susceptibility

  5. Exosomal miRs in Lung Cancer: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xiulan; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, primarily non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and worldwide. While early detection significantly improves five-year survival, there are no reliable diagnostic tools for early detection. Several exosomal microRNAs (miRs) are overexpressed in NSCLC, and have been suggested as potential biomarkers for early detection. The present paper develops a mathematical model for early stage of NSCLC with emphasis on the role of the three highest overexpressed miRs, namely miR-21, miR-205 and miR-155. Simulations of the model provide quantitative relationships between the tumor volume and the total mass of each of the above miRs in the tumor. Because of the positive correlation between these miRs in the tumor tissue and in the blood, the results of the paper may be viewed as a first step toward establishing a combination of miRs 21, 205, 155 and possibly other miRs as serum biomarkers for early detection of NSCLC. PMID:28002496

  6. Exosomes as miRNA Carriers: Formation–Function–Future

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojie; Odenthal, Margarete; Fries, Jochen W. U.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, which are one of the smallest extracellular vesicles released from cells, have been shown to carry different nucleic acids, including microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs significantly regulate cell growth and metabolism by posttranscriptional inhibition of gene expression. The rapidly changing understanding of exosomes’ formation and function in delivering miRNAs from cell to cell has prompted us to review current knowledge in exosomal miRNA secretion mechanisms as well as possible therapeutic applications for personalized medicine. PMID:27918449

  7. Principles of miRNA-Target Regulation in Metazoan Models

    PubMed Central

    Doxakis, Epaminondas

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are key post-transcriptional regulators that silence gene expression by direct base pairing to target sites of RNAs. They have a wide variety of tissue expression patterns and are differentially expressed during development and disease. Their activity and abundance is subject to various levels of control ranging from transcription and biogenesis to miR response elements on RNAs, target cellular levels and miR turnover. This review summarizes and discusses current knowledge on the regulation of miR activity and concludes with novel non-canonical functions that have recently emerged. PMID:23965954

  8. Assay Reproducibility in Clinical Studies of Plasma miRNA

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Jonathan; Roberts, Henry; Burton, James; Pan, Jianmin; States, Vanessa; Rai, Shesh N.; Galandiuk, Susan

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing reports of plasma miRNAs as biomarkers of human disease but few standards in methodologic reporting, leading to inconsistent data. We systematically reviewed plasma miRNA studies published between July 2013-June 2014 to assess methodology. Six parameters were investigated: time to plasma extraction, methods of RNA extraction, type of miRNA, quantification, cycle threshold (Ct) setting, and methods of statistical analysis. We compared these data with a proposed standard methodologic technique. Beginning with initial screening for 380 miRNAs using microfluidic array technology and validation in an additional cohort of patients, we compared 11 miRNAs that exhibited differential expression between 16 patients with benign colorectal neoplasms (advanced adenomas) and 16 patients without any neoplasm (controls). Plasma was isolated immediately, 12, 24, 48, or 72 h following phlebotomy. miRNA was extracted using two different techniques (Trizol LS with pre-amplification or modified miRNeasy). We performed Taqman-based RT-PCR assays for the 11 miRNAs with subsequent analyses using a variable Ct setting or a fixed Ct set at 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, or 0.5. Assays were performed in duplicate by two different operators. RNU6 was the internal reference. Systematic review yielded 74 manuscripts meeting inclusion criteria. One manuscript (1.4%) documented all 6 methodological parameters, while < 5% of studies listed Ct setting. In our proposed standard technique, plasma extraction ≤12 h provided consistent ΔCt. miRNeasy extraction yielded higher miRNA concentrations and fewer non-expressed miRNAs compared to Trizol LS (1/704 miRNAs [0.14%] vs 109/704 miRNAs [15%], not expressed, respectively). A fixed Ct bar setting of 0.03 yielded the most reproducible data, provided that <10% miRNA were non-expressed. There was no significant intra-operator variability. There was significant inter-operator variation using Trizol LS extraction, while this was negligible using

  9. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future. PMID:27757114

  10. miRNAs: roles and clinical applications in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Weakley, Sarah M; Zhang, Lidong; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, mainly at the post-transcriptional level, via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA can regulate the expression of multiple target genes. The study of miRNAs is rapidly growing and recent studies have revealed a significant role of miRNAs in vascular biology and disease. Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the vasculature, and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. Several miRNAs have been found to be critical modulators of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, arterial remodeling, angiogenesis, smooth muscle cell regeneration, hypertension, apoptosis, neointimal hyperplasia and signal transduction pathways. Thus, miRNAs may serve as novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for vascular disease. This article summarizes the current studies related to the disease correlations and functional roles of miRNAs in the vascular system and discusses the potential applications of miRNAs in vascular disease.

  11. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy in <mi>UMn>2<mi>Ge>2 and related Mn-based actinide ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, David S.; Ghimire, Nirmal; Singleton, John; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Baumbach, Ryan; Mandrus, David; Li, Ling; Singh, David J.

    2015-05-04

    We present magnetization isotherms in pulsed magnetic fields up to 62 Tesla, supported by first principles calculations, demonstrating a huge uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy - approximately 20 MJ/m3 - in <mi>UMn>2<mi>Ge>2. This large anisotropy results from the extremely strong spin-orbit coupling affecting the uranium 5 f electrons, which in the calculations exhibit a substantial orbital moment exceeding 2 μB. Finally, we also find from theoretical calculations that a number of isostructural Mn-actinide compounds are expected to have similarly large anisotropy.

  12. miRNA Involved in Six1-Induced Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Summay 3. DATES COVERED 15 April 2010 – 14 April 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER miRNA Involved in Six1-Induced Breast Cancer ...the cell cycle inhibitor, p21, and pro-apoptotic factor , Bim. These data suggest that Six1-induced upregulation of these miRNA may mediate the switch...promoting the pro-metastatic functions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Six1, miRNAs , miR106b-25, TGFβ , epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer stem cells

  13. A Comprehensive Prescription for Plant miRNA Identification

    PubMed Central

    Alptekin, Burcu; Akpinar, Bala A.; Budak, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny ribo-regulatory molecules involved in various essential pathways for persistence of cellular life, such as development, environmental adaptation, and stress response. In recent years, miRNAs have become a major focus in molecular biology because of their functional and diagnostic importance. This interest in miRNA research has resulted in the development of many specific software and pipelines for the identification of miRNAs and their specific targets, which is the key for the elucidation of miRNA-modulated gene expression. While the well-recognized importance of miRNAs in clinical research pushed the emergence of many useful computational identification approaches in animals, available software and pipelines are fewer for plants. Additionally, existing approaches suffers from mis-identification and annotation of plant miRNAs since the miRNA mining process for plants is highly prone to false-positives, particularly in cereals which have a highly repetitive genome. Our group developed a homology-based in silico miRNA identification approach for plants, which utilizes two Perl scripts “SUmirFind” and “SUmirFold” and since then, this method helped identify many miRNAs particularly from crop species such as Triticum or Aegliops. Herein, we describe a comprehensive updated guideline by the implementation of two new scripts, “SUmirPredictor” and “SUmirLocator,” and refinements to our previous method in order to identify genuine miRNAs with increased sensitivity in consideration of miRNA identification problems in plants. Recent updates enable our method to provide more reliable and precise results in an automated fashion in addition to solutions for elimination of most false-positive predictions, miRNA naming and miRNA mis-annotation. It also provides a comprehensive view to genome/transcriptome-wide location of miRNA precursors as well as their association with transposable elements. The “SUmirPredictor” and

  14. miRNAs as biomarkers of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gomes da Silva, Ananília Medeiros; Silbiger, Vivian Nogueira

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a highly prevalent arrhythmia with pronounced morbidity and mortality. Genetics analysis has established electrophysiological substrates, which determine individual vulnerability to AF occurrence and maintenance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) found in virtually all organisms function as negative regulators of protein-coding genes. Several studies have suggested a role for miRNAs in the regulation of cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis. This review is based on 18 studies conducted between 2009 and 2013 to investigate the association of miRNAs with AF. miRNAs are discussed here as candidate biomarkers for AF in blood and cardiac tissues and as potential targets for AF therapy.

  15. Methylation of miRNA genes and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loginov, V I; Rykov, S V; Fridman, M V; Braga, E A

    2015-02-01

    Interaction between microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA of target genes at the posttranscriptional level provides fine-tuned dynamic regulation of cell signaling pathways. Each miRNA can be involved in regulating hundreds of protein-coding genes, and, conversely, a number of different miRNAs usually target a structural gene. Epigenetic gene inactivation associated with methylation of promoter CpG-islands is common to both protein-coding genes and miRNA genes. Here, data on functions of miRNAs in development of tumor-cell phenotype are reviewed. Genomic organization of promoter CpG-islands of the miRNA genes located in inter- and intragenic areas is discussed. The literature and our own results on frequency of CpG-island methylation in miRNA genes from tumors are summarized, and data regarding a link between such modification and changed activity of miRNA genes and, consequently, protein-coding target genes are presented. Moreover, the impact of miRNA gene methylation on key oncogenetic processes as well as affected signaling pathways is discussed.

  16. Upgrades to the Fermilab NuMI beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Michael A.; Childress, Sam; Grossman, Nancy; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; McCluskey, Elaine; Moore, Craig Damon; Reilly, Robert; Tariq, Salman; Wehmann, Alan; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The NuMI beamline at Fermilab has been delivering high-intensity muon neutrino beams to the MINOS experiment since the spring of 2005. A total of 3.4 x 10{sup 20} protons has been delivered to the NuMI target and a maximum beam power of 320 kW has been achieved. An upgrade of the NuMI facility increasing the beam power capability to 700 kW is planned as part of the NOvA experiment. The plans for this upgrade are presented and the possibility of upgrading the NuMI beamline to handle 1.2 MW is considered.

  17. MicroRNA miR-125b causes leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Marina; Harris, Marian H; Zhou, Beiyan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-12-14

    MicroRNA miR-125b has been implicated in several kinds of leukemia. The chromosomal translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) found in patients with myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia leads to an overexpression of miR-125b of up to 90-fold normal. Moreover, miR-125b is also up-regulated in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the t(11;14)(q24;q32) translocation. To decipher the presumed oncogenic mechanism of miR-125b, we used transplantation experiments in mice. All mice transplanted with fetal liver cells ectopically expressing miR-125b showed an increase in white blood cell count, in particular in neutrophils and monocytes, associated with a macrocytic anemia. Among these mice, half died of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or a myeloproliferative neoplasm, suggesting an important role for miR-125b in early hematopoiesis. Furthermore, coexpression of miR-125b and the BCR-ABL fusion gene in transplanted cells accelerated the development of leukemia in mice, compared with control mice expressing only BCR-ABL, suggesting that miR-125b confers a proliferative advantage to the leukemic cells. Thus, we show that overexpression of miR-125b is sufficient both to shorten the latency of BCR-ABL-induced leukemia and to independently induce leukemia in a mouse model.

  18. [Correlation between the levels of miR-21, miR-34c, miR-140 and miR-375 in the sperm from in vitro fertilization patients and the embryo quality].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Liu, Nenghui

    2015-08-01

    目的:通过检测不同胚胎质量的体外受精(in vitro fertilization,IVF)患者精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375的表达情况,探讨精子来源的miRNAs与胚胎质量的相关性。方法:选择2012年9月至12月在中南大学湘雅医院生殖医学中心行IVF治疗原发不育的男性患者44例,收集 IVF取卵当日剩余新鲜精液标本,采用实时荧光定量PCR测定精子miRNAs(miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375)的表达水平。观察胚胎情况后分组,第3天胚胎评分的平均值<8分为实验组,≥8分为对照组。比较实验组和对照组患者一般情况及实验室资料,分析精子miRNAs表达水平与胚胎质量的相关性。结果:实验组精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375表达水平低于对照组(P<0.01)。实验组与对照组的获卵数、减数分裂II期(metaphase II,MII)卵子数、双原核(dual pronuclear,2PN)受精数、卵裂数、受精率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);实验组卵裂率低于对照组(P<0.05)。精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375表达水平与第2,3天胚胎碎片率呈负相关,与第3天胚胎卵裂球数呈正相关,与胚胎评分呈正相关。结论:精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375的表达水平上升可能影响卵裂期胚胎质量,对胚胎发育可能起一定的积极作用。.

  19. miR-203 and miR-320 Regulate Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2-Induced Osteoblast Differentiation by Targeting Distal-Less Homeobox 5 (Dlx5)

    PubMed Central

    Laxman, Navya; Mallmin, Hans; Nilsson, Olle; Kindmark, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small, non-coding RNAs (17–24 nucleotides), which regulate gene expression either by the degradation of the target mRNAs or inhibiting the translation of genes. Recent studies have indicated that miRNA plays an important role in regulating osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we identified miR-203 and miR-320b as important miRNAs modulating osteoblast differentiation. We identified Dlx5 as potential common target by prediction algorithms and confirmed this by knock-down and over expression of the miRNAs and assessing Dlx5 at mRNA and protein levels and specificity was verified by luciferase reporter assays. We examined the effect of miR-203 and miR-320b on osteoblast differentiation by transfecting with pre- and anti-miRs. Over-expression of miR-203 and miR-320b inhibited osteoblast differentiation, whereas inhibition of miR-203 and miR-320b stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization. We show that miR-203 and miR-320b negatively regulate BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation by suppressing Dlx5, which in turn suppresses the downstream osteogenic master transcription factor Runx2 and Osx and together they suppress osteoblast differentiation. Taken together, we propose a role for miR-203 and miR-320b in modulating bone metabolism. PMID:28025541

  20. An improved treatment of spectator mode vibrations in reduced dimensional quantum dynamics: application to the hydrogen abstraction reactions mu + CH4, H + CH4, D + CH4, and CH3 + CH4.

    PubMed

    Banks, Simon T; Tautermann, Christofer S; Remmert, Sarah M; Clary, David C

    2009-07-28

    A method for projecting chemical reaction surface coordinates from a Hessian in curvilinear internal coordinates has recently been developed. Here we introduce a modification to this approach which allows for analytical evaluation of the necessary coordinate derivatives, thus reducing the number of ab initio calculations required. We apply this method to the determination of spectator mode frequencies and zero-point energies for the series of hydrogen abstraction reactions X + CH(4) --> XH + CH(3), X = muonium (mu), H, D, CH(3). Comparison of these frequencies with those obtained using rectilinear coordinates allows us to examine how the mass of X affects the coordinate sensitivity of the spectator modes. We carry out two-dimensional quantum reactive scattering calculations for these reactions to highlight instances where the choice of coordinates may have a significant impact on the evaluated thermal rate constants.

  1. [The role of miRNA in endometrial cancer in the context of miRNA 205].

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Miłosz; Danielska, Justyna; Dzieniecka, Monika; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-coding molecules of ribonucleic acids of approximately 22 bp length, which serve as regulators of gene expression and protein translation due to interference with messenger RNA (mRNA). MiRNAs, which take part in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, may be associated with carcinogenesis. Aberrant expression of miRNAs in endometrial cancer might contribute to the endometrial cancer initiation or progression, as well as metastasis formation, and may influence cancer invasiveness. Specific-miRNAs expressed in endometrial cancer tissues may serve as diagnostic markers of the disease, prognostic biomarkers, or play an important part in oncological therapy We aimed to describe the role of miRNAs in endometrial cancer with special consideration of miRNA 205.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic studies and DFT calculations on NaCH3CO2(aq) and CH3COOH(aq).

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Wolfram W; Fischer, Dieter; Irmer, Gert

    2014-02-28

    Aqueous solutions of sodium acetate, NaCH3CO2, and acetic acid, CH3COOH, were studied using Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The spectra were recorded over a large concentration range, in the terahertz region and up to 4000 cm(-1). In the isotropic Raman spectrum in R-format, a polarized band at 189 cm(-1) was assigned to the ν1Na-O stretch of the hydrated Na(+)-ion and a shoulder at 245 cm(-1) to the restricted translation band, νsO-H···O* of the hydrated acetate ion, CH3CO2(-)(aq). The CH3CO2(-)(aq) and the hydrated acetic acid, CH3COOH(aq), possess pseudo Cs symmetry. Geometrical parameters for the species in the gas phase and for CH3CO2(-)(aq) and CH3COOH(aq) are reported. Characteristic bands for CH3CO2(-)(aq) and CH3COOH(aq) were assigned under the guidance of the DFT vibrational frequency calculations and discussed in detail. In aqueous NaCH3CO2 solutions, at high concentrations, no contact ion pairs could be detected, but instead solvent separated ion pairs were found. In LiCH3CO2(aq), however, contact ion pairs are formed which is indicated by the appearance of a shoulder at 939 cm(-1) and the shift of the symmetric stretching mode of the -CO2(-) group to higher wavenumbers.

  3. Ab initio characterization of (CH3IO3) isomers and the CH3O2 + IO reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Drougas, Evangelos; Kosmas, Agnie M

    2007-05-03

    The geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, relative energetics, and enthalpies of formation of (CH(3)IO(3)) isomers and the reaction CH(3)O(2) + IO have been investigated using quantum mechanical methods. Optimization has been performed at the MP2 level of theory, using all electron and effective core potential, ECP, computational techniques. The relative energetics has been studied by single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level. Methyl iodate, CH(3)OIO(2), is found to be the lowest-energy isomer showing particular stabilization. The two nascent association minima, CH(3)OOOI and CH(3)OOIO, show similar stabilities, and they are considerably higher located than CH(3)OIO(2). Interisomerization barriers have been determined, along with the transition states involved in various pathways of the reaction CH(3)O(2) + IO.

  4. Electronic structure, stability, and formation dynamics of hypervalent molecular clusters: CH 3NH 3(CH 3NH 2) n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Takahata, Akihiro; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2004-03-01

    The formation and decay processes of CH 3NH 3(CH 3NH 2) n produced by the photolysis of (CH 3NH 2) n are studied by a pump-probe technique with femtosecond laser. The dissociation time of CH 3NH 2 in clusters is estimated to be less than 500 fs, while the formation time of CH 3NH 3(CH 3NH 2) n is less than 2 ps in the photolysis at 200 nm. The lifetime of free CH 3NH 3 is determined to be 30 ps and is elongated by 10 5 times in clusters. The ionization potentials and the binding energies of these clusters are determined by photoionization threshold measurements. On the basis of these results, the formation and decay processes for these clusters are discussed.

  5. Targeting oncomiRNAs and mimicking tumor suppressor miRNAs: New trends in the development of miRNA therapeutic strategies in oncology (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GAMBARI, ROBERTO; BROGNARA, ELEONORA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; FABBRI, ENRICA

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA or miR) therapeutics in cancer are based on targeting or mimicking miRNAs involved in cancer onset, progression, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. Several studies conclusively have demonstrated that miRNAs are deeply involved in tumor onset and progression, either behaving as tumor-promoting miRNAs (oncomiRNAs and metastamiRNAs) or as tumor suppressor miRNAs. This review focuses on the most promising examples potentially leading to the development of anticancer, miRNA-based therapeutic protocols. The inhibition of miRNA activity can be readily achieved by the use of miRNA inhibitors and oligomers, including RNA, DNA and DNA analogues (miRNA antisense therapy), small molecule inhibitors, miRNA sponges or through miRNA masking. On the contrary, the enhancement of miRNA function (miRNA replacement therapy) can be achieved by the use of modified miRNA mimetics, such as plasmid or lentiviral vectors carrying miRNA sequences. Combination strategies have been recently developed based on the observation that i) the combined administration of different antagomiR molecules induces greater antitumor effects and ii) some anti-miR molecules can sensitize drug-resistant tumor cell lines to therapeutic drugs. In this review, we discuss two additional issues: i) the combination of miRNA replacement therapy with drug administration and ii) the combination of antagomiR and miRNA replacement therapy. One of the solid results emerging from different independent studies is that miRNA replacement therapy can enhance the antitumor effects of the antitumor drugs. The second important conclusion of the reviewed studies is that the combination of anti-miRNA and miRNA replacement strategies may lead to excellent results, in terms of antitumor effects. PMID:27175518

  6. The Values of Coronary Circulating miRNAs in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guiyu; Cui, Yuxia; Jia, Zhenghua; Yue, Yunan; Yang, Shuixiang

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of miRNA regulation in atrial fibrillation (AF) occurrence and development is still unclear, especially, the regulating values of coronary circulating miRNAs has not been reported. Based on our AF radiofrequency ablation clinical practice and previous miRNA study, we proposed a hypothesis that the coronary circulating miRNA might much better reflect the regulating state and metabolic level of myocardial miRNA in AF patient. To investigate the regulating values of coronary circulation miRNA, 90 AF patients were selected and compared with 90 healthy subjects, the changes of coronary circulating miRNA differential expression profile in the whole genome were observed in this study. We found out that compared with autologous peripheral blood (PB), 6 miRNAs were upregulated and 8 miRNA downregulated in AF patients’ coronary sinus blood (CSB) significantly, especially, the expression of miR-1266, miR-4279 and miR-4666a-3p were obviously increased. Compared with normal donors’ peripheral blood, 16 miRNAs were upregulated and 24 miRNAs downregulated dramatically in patients’ peripheral blood, among them, the miR-3171 decreased, but miR-892a and miR-3149 increased significantly from the early to end stages of AF. Our results indicated that the coronary circulating miRNA can really reflect the regulating values of miRNA in AF patient; the level of miRNA change in 3 types of AF may reflect the severity of AF clinical and pathophysiological advance; The miR-892a, miR-3171 and miR-3149 may be used as biomarkers for earlier diagnosis, while miR-1266, miR-4279 and miR-4666a-3p may serve as potential intervening targets for AF patient in future. PMID:27855199

  7. Differential miRNA expression between equine ovulatory and anovulatory follicles.

    PubMed

    Donadeu, F X; Schauer, S N

    2013-10-01

    Relatively little is known about the physiological roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) during follicular development. Previous evidence from in vitro studies suggests specific roles for a subset of miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-23a, miR-145, miR-503, miR-224, miR-383, miR-378, miR-132, and miR-212, in regulating ovarian follicle development. The objective of this study was to gain insight on the involvement of these miRNAs during follicle maturation. Follicular fluid was aspirated from dominant follicles (>32 mm) during the ovulatory season (July to October) and the anovulatory season (January to March) in each of 5 mares, and the levels of steroids, IGF1, and miRNAs were analyzed by immunoassays and quantitative PCR. Levels of progesterone, testosterone, and IGF1 were lower (P ≤ 0.05) in anovulatory than in ovulatory follicles. Relative to ovulatory follicles, anovulatory follicles had higher (P < 0.05) mean levels of miR-21, miR-23b, miR-378, and miR-202 and tended to have higher (P = 0.06) levels of miR-145. Levels of miR-224 and miR-383 could not be detected in follicular fluid. These novel results indicate a physiological association between increases in follicular miRNA levels and seasonal anovulation in mares; further studies should elucidate the precise involvement of miR-21, miR-23b, miR-145, miR-378, and miR-202 in follicle maturation in the mare.

  8. Amoeboid olivine aggregates from CH carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide

    2014-08-01

    Amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) in CH carbonaceous chondrites are texturally and mineralogically similar to those in other carbonaceous chondrite groups. They show no evidence for alteration and thermal metamorphism in an asteroidal setting and consist of nearly pure forsterite (Fa<3; in wt%, CaO = 0.1-0.8, Cr2O3 = 0.04-0.48; MnO < 0.5), anorthite, Al-diopside (in wt%, Al2O3 = 0.7-8.1; TiO2 < 1), Fe,Ni-metal, spinel, and, occasionally, low-Ca pyroxene (Fs1Wo2-3), and calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). The CAIs inside AOAs are composed of hibonite, grossite, melilite (Åk13-44), spinel, perovskite, Al,Ti-diopside (in wt%, Al2O3 up to 19.6; TiO2 up to 13.9), and anorthite. The CH AOAs, including CAIs within AOAs, have isotopically uniform 16O-rich compositions (average Δ17O = -23.4 ± 2.3‰, 2SD) and on a three-isotope oxygen diagram plot along ∼slope-1 line. The only exception is a low-Ca pyroxene-bearing AOA 1-103 that shows a range of Δ17O values, from -24‰ to -13‰. Melilite, grossite, and hibonite in four CAIs within AOAs show no evidence for radiogenic 26Mg excess (δ26Mg). In contrast, anorthite in five out of six AOAs measured has δ26Mg corresponding to the inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratio of (4.3 ± 0.7) × 10-5, (4.2 ± 0.6) × 10-5, (4.0 ± 0.3) × 10-5, (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10-5, and (3.0 ± 2.6) × 10-6. Anorthite in another AOA shows no resolvable δ26Mg excess; an upper limit on the initial 26Al/27Al ratio is 5 × 10-6. We infer that CH AOAs formed by gas-solid condensation and aggregation of the solar nebula condensates (forsterite and Fe,Ni-metal) mixed with the previously formed CAIs. Subsequently they experienced thermal annealing and possibly melting to a small degree in a 16O-rich gaseous reservoir during a brief epoch of CAI formation. The low-Ca pyroxene-bearing AOA 1-103 may have experienced incomplete melting and isotope exchange in an 16O-poor gaseous reservoir. The lack of resolvable δ26Mg excess in melilite, grossite, and

  9. MiR-143 and MiR-145 Regulate IGF1R to Suppress Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Zhang, Suyang; Yan, Xin; Feng, Hui; Pang, Wenjing; Wang, Yanbo; Wang, Xueliang; Fu, Zhen; Liu, Yanqing; Zhao, Chihao; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Chen, Xi; Wang, Yalei

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) is a transmembrane receptor that is activated by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and by a related hormone called IGF-2. It belongs to the large class of tyrosine kinase receptors and plays an important role in colorectal cancer etiology and progression. In this study, we used bioinformatic analyses to search for miRNAs that potentially target IGF1R. We identified specific target sites for miR-143 and miR-145 (miR-143/145) in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the IGF1R gene. These miRNAs are members of a cluster of miRNAs that have been reported to exhibit tumor suppressor activity. Consistent with the bioinformatic analyses, we identified an inverse correlation between miR-143/145 levels and IGF1R protein levels in colorectal cancer tissues. By overexpressing miR-143/145 in Caco2, HT29 and SW480 colorectal cancer cells, we experimentally validated that miR-143/145 directly recognizes the 3′-UTR of the IGF1R transcript and regulates IGF1R expression. Furthermore, the biological consequences of the targeting of IGF1R by miR-143/145 were examined by cell proliferation assays in vitro. We demonstrated that the repression of IGF1R by miR-143/145 suppressed the proliferation of Caco2 cells. Taken together, our findings provide evidence for a role of the miR-143/145 cluster as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer through the inhibition of IGF1R translation. PMID:25474488

  10. Transcription factor NRF2 regulates miR-1 and miR-206 to drive tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anju; Happel, Christine; Manna, Soumen K.; Acquaah-Mensah, George; Carrerero, Julian; Kumar, Sarvesh; Nasipuri, Poonam; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Dewi, Ruby; Boros, Laszlo G.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gabrielson, Edward; Wong, Kwok K.; Girnun, Geoffrey; Biswal, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which deregulated nuclear factor erythroid-2–related factor 2 (NRF2) and kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) signaling promote cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis are poorly understood. Using an integrated genomics and 13C-based targeted tracer fate association (TTFA) study, we found that NRF2 regulates miR-1 and miR-206 to direct carbon flux toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, reprogramming glucose metabolism. Sustained activation of NRF2 signaling in cancer cells attenuated miR-1 and miR-206 expression, leading to enhanced expression of PPP genes. Conversely, overexpression of miR-1 and miR-206 decreased the expression of metabolic genes and dramatically impaired NADPH production, ribose synthesis, and in vivo tumor growth in mice. Loss of NRF2 decreased the expression of the redox-sensitive histone deacetylase, HDAC4, resulting in increased expression of miR-1 and miR-206, and not only inhibiting PPP expression and activity but functioning as a regulatory feedback loop that repressed HDAC4 expression. In primary tumor samples, the expression of miR-1 and miR-206 was inversely correlated with PPP gene expression, and increased expression of NRF2-dependent genes was associated with poor prognosis. Our results demonstrate that microRNA-dependent (miRNA-dependent) regulation of the PPP via NRF2 and HDAC4 represents a novel link between miRNA regulation, glucose metabolism, and ROS homeostasis in cancer cells. PMID:23921124

  11. Association reactions at low pressure. II - The CH3(+)/CH3CN system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewan, Murray J.; Denison, Arthur B.; Huntress, Wesley T.; Anicich, Vincent G.; Snodgrass, J.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction between CH3(+) and CH3CN is examined at pressures between 8 x 10 to the -8th and 1 x 10 to the -3rd Torr in an ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. At pressures below 3 x 10 to the -5th Torr the reaction is bimolecular and proceeds through exothermic channels with a rate coefficient of 1.8 x 10 to the -9th cu cm/s. Competing with the exothermic bimolecular process is a bimolecular association which, it is suggested, results from radiative stabilization of (CH3CNCH3+)-asterisk. At pressures above 3 x 10 to the -5th Torr the reaction becomes termolecular with a rate coefficient 1.9 x 10 to the -22nd cm exp 6/s. The change to termolecular kinetics is due to an increasing fraction of the (CH3CNCH3+)-asterisk complexes being stabilized by collision. At still higher pressures the reaction becomes bimolecular again, corresponding to the onset of saturation when almost every complex is stabilized by collision and the rate coefficient approaches the collision rate.

  12. Further development of a global pollution model for CO, CH4, and CH2 O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, L. K.

    1975-01-01

    Global tropospheric pollution models are developed that describe the transport and the physical and chemical processes occurring between the principal sources and sinks of CH4 and CO. Results are given of long term static chemical kinetic computer simulations and preliminary short term dynamic simulations.

  13. Ice chemistry of acetaldehyde reveals competitive reactions in the first step of the Strecker synthesis of alanine: formation of HO-CH(CH3)-NH2 vs. HO-CH(CH3)-CN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresneau, Aurélien; Danger, Grégoire; Rimola, Albert; Duvernay, Fabrice; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of compound formation in laboratory simulated astrophysical environments is an important challenge in obtaining information on the chemistry occurring in these environments. We here investigate by means of both laboratory experiments and quantum chemical calculations the ice-based reactivity of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) with ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in excess of water (H2O) promoted by temperature. A priori, this study should give information on alanine (2HN-CH(CH3)-COOH) formation (the simplest chiral amino acid detected in meteorites), since these reactions concern the first steps of its formation through the Strecker synthesis. However, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry with HC14N or HC15N isotopologues and B3LYP-D3 results converge to indicate that an H2O-dominated ice containing CH3CHO, NH3 and HCN not only leads to the formation of α-aminoethanol (2HN-CH(CH3)-OH, the product compound of the first step of the Strecker mechanism) and its related polymers (2HN-(CH(CH3)-O)n-H) due to reaction between CH3CHO and NH3, but also to the 2-hydroxypropionitrile (HO­-CH(CH3)-CN) and its related polymers (H-(O-CH(CH3))n-CN) from direct reaction between CH3CHO and HCN. The ratio between these two species depends on the initial NH3/HCN ratio in the ice. Formation of α-aminoethanol is favoured when the NH3 concentration is larger than HCN. We also show that the presence of water is essential for the formation of HO­-CH(CH3)-CN, contrarily to 2HN-CH(CH3)-OH whose formation also takes place in absence of H2O ice. As in astrophysical ices NH3 is more abundant than HCN, formation of α-aminoethanol should consequently be favoured compared to 2-hydroxypropionitrile, thus pointing out α-aminoethanol as a plausible intermediate species for alanine synthesis through the Strecker mechanism in astrophysical ices.

  14. miR-21, miR-221 and miR-150 Are Deregulated in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarlinova, Miroslava; Halasa, Mirko; Mistuna, Dusan; Musak, Ludovit; Iliev, Robert; Slaby, Ondrej; Mazuchova, Jana; Valentova, Vanda; Plank, Lukas; Halasova, Erika

    2016-10-01

    The Aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of miR-21, miR-221, miR-150, let-7a and miR-126a in peripheral blood of 71 patients with colorectal cancer and 80 matched healthy control individuals. We determined expression levels of these microRNAs in peripheral blood samples and used small nucleolar RNA (RNU48) as an internal control. Expression levels of miR-21 (p<0.0001) and miR-221 (p<0.0001) were significantly higher, whereas expression levels of miR-150 (p=0.0054) were significantly lower in the blood samples of patients with colorectal cancer in comparison to the control group. The combination of these three microRNAs enabled us to distinguish patients with colorectal cancer from healthy donors with a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 74% (p<0.0001). We did not observe any correlation of the studied microRNAs with clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer, indicating that expression of these microRNAs is more likely related to the host response to the tumour than the tumour itself.

  15. Measurements of stable isotope ratios ({sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4}; {sup 12}CH{sub 3}/{sup 12}CH{sub 3}) in landfill methane using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmaschi, P.; Harris, G.W.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure variations in the isotopic composition of methane (CH{sub 4}) produced by a municipal solid waste landfill in Germany. A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer was used to determine isotopic ratios of {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} and {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} in biogas samples taken directly from various branches of the gas collection system. The {delta}{sup 13} values for CH{sub 4} showed very small variations; however, the {delta}{sup 13} values for carbon dioxide C0{sub 2} were substantially larger. The {delta}D values of CH{sub 4} exhibited variations corresponding to samples taken from sections filled at different time periods. Oxygen consumption was correlated with the {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4} and the {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} consistent with partial bacterial oxidation of methane. A negative correlation between {delta}D and {delta}{sup 13}C(CH{sub 4}) and between {delta}{sup 13}C(CO{sub 2}) and {delta}{sup 13}C(CH{sub 4}) in samples showing no oxidation was attributed to slightly varying contributions of CO{sub 2} reduction and acetate fermentation. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Synthesis, characterisation and biological aspects of copper(II) dithiocarbamate complexes, [Cu{S2CNR(CH2CH2OH)}2], (R = Me, Et, Pr and CH2CH2OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Geraldo M.; Menezes, Daniele C.; Cavalcanti, Camila A.; dos Santos, Jaqueline A. F.; Ferreira, Isabella P.; Paniago, Eucler B.; Wardell, James L.; Wardell, Solange M. S. V.; Krambrock, Klaus; Mendes, Isolda C.; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2011-03-01

    Cu(II) dithiocarbamates, [Cu{S2CNR(CH2CH2OH)}2], R = Me (1), Et (2), Pr (3) and CH2CH2OH (4), have been prepared from HNR(CH2CH2OH) (R = Me, Et, Pr and CH2CH2OH), CS2 and Cu(OAc)2. Characterisation of the complexes were generally achieved by infrared and EPR spectroscopies and, in addition, for (2) and (3), by X-ray crystallography at 120 K. Complex (2) crystallises as a Cu-S linked dimer, in which the CH2CH2OH groups have a cis arrangement in each monomer but are trans to those in the other monomer partner. On the other hand complex (3) exists in the solid state in the form of two similar and independent centrosymmetric monomers. The weak antiferromagnetic coupling, present in similar complexes, was absent in complexes (1)-(3). The in vitro activity of (1)-(4) was investigated against colonies of Candida albicans, Sthaphyloccocus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They all displayed MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) values against C. albicans close to those found for Fluconazole. All complexes were inert towards Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria, S. aureus and P. auruginosa, respectively.

  17. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K.

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems. PMID:27379053

  18. A defect in inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes in the osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1996-01-01

    Macrophages were activated by administration of an inflammatory lipid metabolite, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc), to wild type mice but not murine (microphthalmic) osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mutant mice. In vitro treatment of wild type mouse peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc efficiently activated macrophages whereas lyso-Pc-treatment of mi mutant mouse peritoneal cells resulted in no activation of macrophages. Generation of macrophage activating factor requires a precursor protein, serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and participation of lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes. Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes was found to be defective in mi mutant mice. PMID:8881764

  19. Inference of Target Gene Regulation via miRNAs during Cell Senescence by Using the MiRaGE Server.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Y-H

    2012-08-01

    miRNAs have recently been shown to play a key role in cell senescence, by downregulating target genes. Thus, inference of those miRNAs that critically downregulate target genes is important. However, inference of target gene regulation by miRNAs is difficult and is often achieved simply by investigating significant upregulation during cell senescence. Here, we inferred the regulation of target genes by miRNAs, using the recently developed MiRaGE server, together with the change in miRNA expression during fibroblast IMR90 cell senescence. We revealed that the simultaneous consideration of 2 criteria, the up(down)regulation and the down(up) regulatiion of target genes, yields more feasible miRNA, i.e., those that are most frequently reported to be down/upregulated and/or to possess biological backgrounds that induce cell senescence. Thus, when analyzing miRNAs that critically contribute to cell senescence, it is important to consider the level of target gene regulation, simultaneously with the change in miRNA expression.

  20. Analyzing the miRNA-Gene Networks to Mine the Important miRNAs under Skin of Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Husile

    2016-01-01

    Genetic networks provide new mechanistic insights into the diversity of species morphology. In this study, we have integrated the MGI, GEO, and miRNA database to analyze the genetic regulatory networks under morphology difference of integument of humans and mice. We found that the gene expression network in the skin is highly divergent between human and mouse. The GO term of secretion was highly enriched, and this category was specific in human compared to mouse. These secretion genes might be involved in eccrine system evolution in human. In addition, total 62,637 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in human integument genes (IGs), while 26,280 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in mouse IGs. The interactions between miRNAs and IGs in human are more complex than those in mouse. Furthermore, hsa-miR-548, mmu-miR-466, and mmu-miR-467 have an enormous number of targets on IGs, which both have the role of inhibition of host immunity response. The pattern of distribution on the chromosome of these three miRNAs families is very different. The interaction of miRNA/IGs has added the new dimension in traditional gene regulation networks of skin. Our results are generating new insights into the gene networks basis of skin difference between human and mouse. PMID:27689084

  1. miRNA and mRNA expression analysis reveals potential sex-biased miRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Jun; Liang, Tingming

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mRNAs may be differentially expressed between males and females. This study aimed to perform expression analysis of mRNA and its main regulatory molecule, microRNA (miRNA), to discuss the potential sex-specific expression patterns using abnormal expression profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Generally, deregulated miRNAs and mRNAs had consistent expression between males and females, but some miRNAs may be oppositely expressed in specific diseases: up-regulated in one group and down-regulated in another. Studies of miRNA gene families and clusters further confirmed that these sequence or location related miRNAs might have opposing expression between sexes. The specific miRNA might have greater expression divergence across different groups, suggesting flexible expression across different individuals, especially in tumor samples. The typical analysis regardless of the sex will ignore or balance these sex-specific deregulated miRNAs. Compared with flexible miRNAs, their targets of mRNAs showed relative stable expression between males and females. These relevant results provide new insights into miRNA-mRNA interaction and sex difference. PMID:28045090

  2. Acupuncture Decreases NF-κB p65, miR-155, and miR-21 and Increases miR-146a Expression in Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jialing; Huang, Kangbai; Zhong, Guoxin; Huang, Yong; Li, Suhe; Qu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jiping

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used to treat chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for centuries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acupuncture at Zusanli (ST36), Zhongwan (CV12), and Pishu (BL20) acupoints on weight changes of rats, histological changes of gastric glands, and expressions changes of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, microRNA- (miR-) 155, miR-21, and miR-146a in CAG rats induced by N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) combined with irregular diet. Consequently, we found that acupuncture treatment elevated body weight of rats significantly when compared to the model group. By observing histological changes, we found that the acupuncture group showed better improvement of gastric mucosa injury than the model group. Our results also demonstrated upregulation of NF-κB p65, miR-155, and miR-21 in gastric tissue of CAG rats and a positive correlation between miR-155 and miR-21. Relatively, expression of miR-146a was downregulated and negative correlation relationships between miR-146a and miR-155/miR-21 in CAG rats were observed. Additionally, expressions of NF-κB p65, miR-155, and miR-21 were downregulated and miR-146a was upregulated after acupuncture treatment. Taken together, our data imply that acupuncture can downregulate NF-κB p65, miR-155, and miR-21 and upregulate miR-146a expression in CAG rats. NF-κB p65, miR-155, miR-21, and miR-146a may play important roles in therapeutic effect of acupuncture in treating CAG. PMID:27293468

  3. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section and |<mi>Vmi><mi>tb>| in Events with One Charged Lepton, Large Missing Transverse Energy, and Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D’Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2014-12-31

    We report a measurement of single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of mi>smi>=1.96 mi>TeVmi> using a data set corresponding to 7.5 mi>fbmi>-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the single top quark decay process mi>t>mi>Wmi>b>mi>νmi>b> by requiring the presence of an electron or muon, a large imbalance of transverse momentum indicating the presence of a neutrino, and two or three jets including at least one originating from a bottom quark. An artificial neural network is used to discriminate the signal from backgrounds. We measure a single top quark production cross section of 3.04-0.53+0.57 mi>pb> and set a lower limit on the magnitude of the coupling between the top quark and bottom quark |

  4. miR-193b Regulates Mcl-1 in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiamin; Zhang, Xiao; Lentz, Cindy; Abi-Daoud, Marie; Paré, Geneviève C.; Yang, Xiaolong; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Tron, Victor A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in gene regulation, and their expression is frequently dysregulated in cancer cells. In a previous study, we reported that miR-193b represses cell proliferation and regulates cyclin D1 in melanoma cells, suggesting that miR-193b could act as a tumor suppressor. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-193b also down-regulates myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in melanoma cells. MicroRNA microarray profiling revealed that miR-193b is expressed at a significantly lower level in malignant melanoma than in benign nevi. Consistent with this, Mcl-1 is detected at a higher level in malignant melanoma than in benign nevi. In a survey of melanoma samples, the level of Mcl-1 is inversely correlated with the level of miR-193b. Overexpression of miR-193b in melanoma cells represses Mcl-1 expression. Previous studies showed that Mcl-1 knockdown cells are hypersensitive to ABT-737, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w. Similarly, overexpression of miR-193b restores ABT-737 sensitivity to ABT-737–resistant cells. Furthermore, the effect of miR-193b on the expression of Mcl-1 seems to be mediated by direct interaction between miR-193b and seed and seedless pairing sequences in the 3′ untranslated region of Mcl-1 mRNA. Thus, this study provides evidence that miR-193b directly regulates Mcl-1 and that down-regulation of miR-193b in vivo could be an early event in melanoma progression. PMID:21893020

  5. Healing in the Sámi North

    PubMed Central

    Stabbursvik, Ellen Anne Buljo

    2010-01-01

    There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today’s tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today’s changing global society. PMID:20862528

  6. Vibrational Coupling Pathways in the CH Stretch Region of CH_3OH and CH_3OD as Revealed by IR and Ftmw-Ir Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twagirayezu, Sylvestre; Wang, Xiaoliang; Perry, David S.; Neill, Justin L.; Muckle, Matt T.; Pate, Brooks H.; Xu, Li-Hong

    2011-06-01

    Infrared spectra of jet-cooled CH_3OD and CH_3OH in the CH stretch region are observed by coherence-converted population transfer Fourier transform microwave-infrared (CCPT-FTMW-IR) spectroscopy (E torsional species only) and by slit-jet single resonance spectroscopy (both A and E torsional species, CH_3OH only). Previously, we reported the analysis of ν_3 symmetric CH stretch region (2750-2900 Cm-1), and the present work extends the analysis to higher frequency (2900-3020 Cm-1). The overall observed spectra contain 17 interacting vibrational bands for CH_3OD and 28 for CH_3OH. The signs and magnitudes of the torsional tunneling splittings are deduced for three CH fundamentals (ν_3, ν_9, ν_2) of both molecules and are compared to a model calculation and to ab initio theory. The number and distribution of observed vibrational bands indicate that the CH stretch bright states couple first to doorway states that are binary combinations of bending modes. In the parts of the spectrum where doorway states are present, the observed density of coupled states is comparable to the total density of vibrational states in the molecule, but where there are no doorway states, only the CH stretch fundamentals are observed. A time-dependent interpretation of the present FTMW-IR spectra indicates a fast (˜ 200 fs) initial decay of the bright state followed by second, slower redistribution (˜ 1-3 ps). The qualitative agreement of the present data with the time-dependent experiments of Iwaki and Dlott provides further support for the similarity of the fastest vibrational relaxation processes in the liquid and gas phases. Twagirayezu, S.; Clasp, T. N.; Perry, D. S.; Neill, J. L.; Muckle, M. T.; Pate, B. H. J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 6818 Iwaki, L. K.; Dlott, D. D. J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 9101

  7. miR-138/miR-222 Overexpression Characterizes the miRNome of Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Carmela; Granata, Ilaria; Iaffaldano, Laura; D'Argenio, Valeria; Del Monaco, Valentina; Maruotti, Giuseppe Maria; Omodei, Daniela; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Martinelli, Pasquale; Salvatore, Francesco; Guarracino, Mario Rosario; Sacchetti, Lucia; Pastore, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    Clinical findings and data obtained in animal models indicate that nutrient uptake and exposure to environmental agents during pregnancy may affect fetal/newborn gestational programming, thereby resulting in obesity and/or obesity-related disorders in offspring. Human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hA-MSCs) differentiate into adipocytes and are thus a suitable model to investigate adipocyte functions in obesity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the miRNome of hA-MSCs and its contribution to obesity in pregnancy. To this aim we used the following: (i) high-resolution small RNA sequencing to characterize the microRNA (miRNA) profiles of hA-MSCs of 13 obese (Ob-) and 7 control (Co-) pregnant women at delivery; (ii) multiple-method integrated bioinformatics to predict the metabolic pathways potentially miRNA deregulated in Ob-hA-MSCs; and (iii) microarray mRNA expression profiling to verify obese-associated mRNA alterations. In summary, 12 miRNAs were differentially expressed between Ob-hA-MSCs and Co-hA-MSCs, with a multiple-methods bioinformatic consensus on miR-138-5p and miR-222-3p, which were overexpressed in Ob-hA-MSCs versus Co-hA-MSCs. The top 20 significant pathways predicted to be deregulated through miR-138-5p and/or miR-222-3p/target interaction included fat cell differentiation and deposits, lipid/carbohydrate homeostasis, response to stress, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, and ischemia. In conclusion, our finding of miR-138-5p/miR-222-3p overexpression in Ob-hA-MSCs, together with the transcriptomic data, suggests that these miRNAs in obese pregnancy could derange metabolic pathways previously found impaired in tissues from obese adults or in obesity-associated disorders and concur to modify gestational programming as has been demonstrated in animal models. This raises the possibility of using diet-based strategies to normalize the perinatal miRNome in obesity.

  8. MiR-421, miR-155 and miR-650: emerging trends of regulation of cancer and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Qureshi, Muhammad Zahid; Coskunpinar, Ender; Naqvi, Syed Kamran-Ul-Hassan; Yaylim, Ilhan; Ismail, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming progressively more understandable that between transcription and translation there lies another versatile regulator that quantitatively controls the expression of mRNAs. Identification of miRNAs as key regulators of wide ranging signaling cascades and modulators of different cell-type and context dependent activities attracted basic and clinical scientists to study modes and mechanisms in details. In line with this approach overwhelmingly increasing in vivo and in vitro studies are deepening our understanding regarding miR-421, mir-155 and miR-650 mediated regulation of cellular activities. We also attempt to provide an overview of long non coding RNAs.

  9. Computational prediction of the localization of microRNAs within their pre-miRNA.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Mickael; Diallo, Abdoulaye Banire; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA species derived from hairpin-forming miRNA precursors (pre-miRNA) and acting as key posttranscriptional regulators. Most computational tools labeled as miRNA predictors are in fact pre-miRNA predictors and provide no information about the putative miRNA location within the pre-miRNA. Sequence and structural features that determine the location of the miRNA, and the extent to which these properties vary from species to species, are poorly understood. We have developed miRdup, a computational predictor for the identification of the most likely miRNA location within a given pre-miRNA or the validation of a candidate miRNA. MiRdup is based on a random forest classifier trained with experimentally validated miRNAs from miRbase, with features that characterize the miRNA-miRNA* duplex. Because we observed that miRNAs have sequence and structural properties that differ between species, mostly in terms of duplex stability, we trained various clade-specific miRdup models and obtained increased accuracy. MiRdup self-trains on the most recent version of miRbase and is easy to use. Combined with existing pre-miRNA predictors, it will be valuable for both de novo mapping of miRNAs and filtering of large sets of candidate miRNAs obtained from transcriptome sequencing projects. MiRdup is open source under the GPLv3 and available at http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/∼blanchem/mirdup/.

  10. Computational prediction of the localization of microRNAs within their pre-miRNA

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Mickael; Diallo, Abdoulaye Banire; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA species derived from hairpin-forming miRNA precursors (pre-miRNA) and acting as key posttranscriptional regulators. Most computational tools labeled as miRNA predictors are in fact pre-miRNA predictors and provide no information about the putative miRNA location within the pre-miRNA. Sequence and structural features that determine the location of the miRNA, and the extent to which these properties vary from species to species, are poorly understood. We have developed miRdup, a computational predictor for the identification of the most likely miRNA location within a given pre-miRNA or the validation of a candidate miRNA. MiRdup is based on a random forest classifier trained with experimentally validated miRNAs from miRbase, with features that characterize the miRNA–miRNA* duplex. Because we observed that miRNAs have sequence and structural properties that differ between species, mostly in terms of duplex stability, we trained various clade-specific miRdup models and obtained increased accuracy. MiRdup self-trains on the most recent version of miRbase and is easy to use. Combined with existing pre-miRNA predictors, it will be valuable for both de novo mapping of miRNAs and filtering of large sets of candidate miRNAs obtained from transcriptome sequencing projects. MiRdup is open source under the GPLv3 and available at http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/∼blanchem/mirdup/. PMID:23748953

  11. MERLIN Performance Simulation of Global CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Amediek, A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide that will contribute to global warming, significantly. Large uncertainties exist for example in the estimation of tropical and boreal wetlands which provide a large natural source of atmospheric methane. Particularly sensitive are the northern high latitude regions where permafrost melting and gas hydrate instabilities in ice shelves may drive tomorrow's climate. The overall goal of MERLIN (Methane Remote Lidar Mission) which is the joint Franco-German climate monitoring initiative is to provide better information on methane sources on a global basis during all seasons. This will be achieved by means of inverse modelling using space-based lidar measurements of the column-weighted dry-air mixing ratio of CH4, commonly referred to as XCH4, as input data. The latter is a function of the measured differential-absorption optical depth (DAOD) on one hand, and the calculated path-integrated differential-absorption cross section of the selected on-/off-line wavelengths, commonly referred to as integrated weighting function (IWF), on the other hand. To model the MERLIN measurement precision we assumed statistically independent error sources for both parameters. Based on careful selection of the sounding wavelengths in the near IR around 1.64 μm it is found that the random errors in IWF which stem from uncertainties in the geophysical parameters like surface pressure error or errors in the temperature and humidity profiles remain small compared to those from measurement of DAOD. A total of 177 shot-pairs are averaged, which corresponds to a horizontal resolution of 50 km for each observation, in order to obtain a measurement precision of about 1 %. The surface reflectance in nadir direction, which is a key parameter in the precision analysis, is modelled using MODIS data over land and surface wind speed data over water. Cloud coverage and aerosol/cloud extinction of

  12. Spatiotemporal Expression and Molecular Characterization of miR-344b and miR-344c in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Jia-Wen; Abdullah, Syahril; Cheah, Pike-See

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA known to regulate brain development. The expression of two novel miRNAs, namely, miR-344b and miR-344c, was characterized during mouse brain developmental stages in this study. In situ hybridization analysis showed that miR-344b and miR-344c were expressed in the germinal layer during embryonic brain developmental stages. In contrast, miR-344b was not detectable in the adult brain while miR-344c was expressed exclusively in the adult olfactory bulb and cerebellar granular layer. Stem-loop RT-qPCR analysis of whole brain RNAs showed that expression of the miR-344b and miR-344c was increased as brain developed throughout the embryonic stage and maintained at adulthood. Further investigation showed that these miRNAs were expressed in adult organs, where miR-344b and miR-344c were highly expressed in pancreas and brain, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis suggested miR-344b and miR-344c targeted Olig2 and Otx2 mRNAs, respectively. However, luciferase experiments demonstrated that these miRNAs did not target Olig2 and Otx2 mRNAs. Further investigation on the locality of miR-344b and miR-344c showed that both miRNAs were localized in nuclei of immature neurons. In conclusion, miR-344b and miR-344c were expressed spatiotemporally during mouse brain developmental stages. PMID:27034842

  13. miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit colorectal cancer progression by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiheng; Liu, Shaojun; Tian, Li; Wu, Minghao; Ai, Feiyan; Tang, Wuliang; Zhao, Lian; Ding, Juan; Zhang, Liyang; Tang, Anliu

    2015-11-10

    miR-124 and miR-506 are reportedly down-regulated and associated with tumor progression in many cancers, but little is known about their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we found that the miR-124 and miR-506 levels were significantly lower in human CRC tissues than in controls, as indicated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization histochemistry. We also found that the overexpression of miR-124 or miR-506 inhibited tumor cell progression and increased sensitivity to chemotherapy in vitro. Increased miR-124 or miR-506 expression also inhibited tumor cell proliferation and invasion in vivo. Luciferase reporter assays and western blotting were used to determine the association between miR-124, miR-506 and their target genes, DNMTs. We further identified that miR-124 and miR-506 directly targeted DNMT3B and indirectly targeted DNMT1. The overexpression of miR-124 and miR-506 reduced global DNA methylation and restored the expression of E-cadherin, MGMT and P16. In conclusion, our data showed that miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit progression and increase sensitivity to chemotherapy by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1 in CRC. These findings may provide novel avenues for the development of targeted therapies.

  14. Stratospheric CH3CN from the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Waters, Joe W.; Khosravi, Rashid; Brasseur, Guy P.; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Read, William G.

    CH3CN in the stratosphere has been measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), providing the first global CH3CN dataset. The MLS observations are in broad agreement with past high and midlatitude observations of CH3CN, although concentrations are a little larger than previously observed. In the tropics, where CH3CN has not up to now been measured, a persistent ‘peak’ in the profiles is seen around 22 hPa, which may be evidence of a tropical stratospheric CH3CN source. Comparisons are made with the NCAR SOCRATES model, including runs having an artificial tropical stratospheric CH3CN source.

  15. Coupling of CH stretching and bending vibrations in trihalomethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.S.; Green, W.H. Jr.; Cheng, C.; Moore, C.B.

    1987-06-01

    The vibrational spectra of HCCl/sub 3/, HCF/sub 3/, HCCl/sub 2/F, and HCClF/sub 2/ have been measured in the vapor from the CH stretching fundamental through to the fifth overtone (i.e., v/sub 1/ = 6, where v/sub 1/ is the number of quanta in the CH stretching mode), using FTIR and photoacoustic spectrometers. Instead of a single strong CH overtone progression, additional strong bands attributable to Fermi-resonant combination tones are prominent in the spectra. The CH stretch is found to be most strongly coupled to the CH bending mode and much less strongly coupled to the heavy atom motions. The resolved band structures are analyzed in the following paper to give quantitative stretch--bend coupling constants for these CH oscillators.

  16. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Erwin, J. T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-09-01

    We adapted a multispecies escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1% below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10% of the N2 escape rate. Observations of the CH4 profile by the New Horizons/ALICE spectrograph can constrain the CH4 escape rate and provide a unique test for escape models.

  17. 4. SOUTH SIDE, WITH SUBSTATION (MI98D) AT RIGHT AND SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SOUTH SIDE, WITH SUBSTATION (MI-98-D) AT RIGHT AND SOUTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-E) AT LEFT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Powerhouse, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  18. 1. EAST FRONT AND NORTH SIDES, WITH SUBSTATION (MI98D) AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAST FRONT AND NORTH SIDES, WITH SUBSTATION (MI-98-D) AT LEFT AND SPILLWAY SEPARATING WALL (MI-98-B) IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Powerhouse, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  19. Vibrational energy levels of CH5+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2008-12-01

    We present a parallelized contracted basis-iterative method for calculating numerically exact vibrational energy levels of CH5+ (a 12-dimensional calculation). We use Radau polyspherical coordinates and basis functions that are products of eigenfunctions of bend and stretch Hamiltonians. The bend eigenfunctions are computed in a nondirect product basis with more than 200×106 functions and the stretch functions are computed in a product potential optimized discrete variable basis. The basis functions have amplitude in all of the 120 equivalent minima. Many low-lying levels are well converged. We find that the energy level pattern is determined in part by the curvature and width of the valley connecting the minima and in part by the slope of the walls of this valley but does not depend on the height or shape of the barriers separating the minima.

  20. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications.

  1. MI as a Predictor of Students' Performance in Reading Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajhashemi, Karim

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether performance in MI could predict the performance in reading competency. The other objectives were to identify the components of MI which are correlated with the reading test scores, and to determine the relationship between the multiple intelligences and reading proficiency. A descriptive and ex post…

  2. 11. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., AMORY Onehalf mi. S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., AMORY One-half mi. S of MS. 6, 1.5 mi. NW of Amory. Aerial view, close-up, from SE of St. Louis and San Francisco RR bridge. David Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, photographer, August 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  3. Co-expressed miRNAs in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Sally; López, Rocío; Andrade, Rafael E; Rodriguez-Urrego, Paula A; López-Kleine, Liliana; Torres, Maria Mercedes

    2016-08-01

    Co-expression networks may provide insights into the patterns of molecular interactions that underlie cellular processes. To obtain a better understanding of miRNA expression patterns in gastric adenocarcinoma and to provide markers that can be associated with histopathological findings, we performed weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) and compare it with a supervised analysis. Integrative analysis of target predictions and miRNA expression profiles in gastric cancer samples was also performed. WGCNA identified a module of co-expressed miRNAs that were associated with histological traits and tumor condition. Hub genes were identified based on statistical analysis and network centrality. The miRNAs 100, let-7c, 125b and 99a stood out for their association with the diffuse histological subtype. The 181 miRNA family and miRNA 21 highlighted for their association with the tumoral phenotype. The integrated analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles showed the let-7 miRNA family playing a central role in the regulatory relationships.

  4. Operation of the NuMI beam monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, Robert M.; Indurthy, Dharma; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Pavlovich, Zarko; Proga, Marek; Bishai, Mary; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett; Harris, Deborah A.; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; McDonald, Jeffrey; Naples, Donna; Northacker, David; Erwin, Albert; Ping, Huican; Velissaris, Cristos; /Texas U. /Brookhaven /Fermilab /Pittsburgh U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-06-01

    The NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) facility produces an intense neutrino beam for experiments. The NuMI Beam Monitoring system is four arrays of ion chambers that measure the intensity and distribution of the remnant hadron and tertiary muon beams produced in association with the neutrinos. The ion chambers operate in an environment of high particle fluxes and high radiation.

  5. 77 FR 38472 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Pontiac, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Pontiac, MI AGENCY: Federal... Class D airspace within the Pontiac, MI, area by changing the name of the airport from ] Oakland-Pontiac... International Airport and adjusting the geographic coordinates within Class D airspace to coincide with the...

  6. 75 FR 39145 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Flint, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment of Class C Airspace; Flint, MI... legal description of the Bishop International Airport, Flint, MI, Class C airspace area by amending the... affect the ARP location, which defines the Class C airspace area's center point. The Rule This...

  7. A values-based Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention for pediatric obesity: study design and methods for MI Values.

    PubMed

    Bean, Melanie K; Mazzeo, Suzanne E; Stern, Marilyn; Bowen, Deborah; Ingersoll, Karen

    2011-09-01

    To reduce pediatric obesity in clinical settings, multidisciplinary behaviorally-based treatment programs are recommended. High attrition and poor compliance are two difficulties frequently encountered in such programs. A brief, empathic and directive clinical intervention, Motivational Interviewing (MI), might help address these motivational and behavioral issues, ultimately resulting in more positive health outcomes. The efficacy of MI as an adjunct in the treatment of pediatric obesity remains relatively understudied. MI Values was developed to implement within an existing multidisciplinary treatment program for obese, ethnically diverse adolescents, the T.E.E.N.S. Program (Teaching, Encouragement, Exercise, Nutrition, Support). T.E.E.N.S. participants who consent to MI Values are randomized to either MI or an education control condition. At weeks 1 and 10 of T.E.E.N.S. participation, the subset of participants assigned to the MI condition engages in individual MI sessions and control participants view health education videos. All MI sessions are audiotaped and coded to monitor treatment fidelity, which has been satisfactory thus far. Participants complete comprehensive assessments at baseline, 3- and 6-month follow-ups. We hypothesize that MI participants will demonstrate greater reductions in Body Mass Index (BMI) percentile, improved diet and physical activity behaviors, better compliance with T.E.E.N.S., and lower attrition than participants in the control group. We present study design and methods for MI Values as well as data on feasibility of recruitment methods and treatment integrity. At study completion, findings will contribute to the emerging literature examining the efficacy of MI in the treatment of pediatric obesity.

  8. MiR-126 and miR-126* regulate shear-resistant firm leukocyte adhesion to human brain endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Camilla; Edwards, Laura J.; de Vries, Helga E.; Sharrack, Basil; Male, David K.; Romero, Ignacio A.

    2017-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to brain endothelial cells, the blood-brain barrier main component, is a critical step in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Leukocyte adhesion is mediated mainly by selectins, cell adhesion molecules and chemokines induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IFNγ, but the regulation of this process is not fully clear. This study investigated the regulation of firm leukocyte adhesion to human brain endothelium by two different brain endothelial microRNAs (miRs), miR-126 and miR-126*, that are downregulated by TNFα and IFNγ in a human brain endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3. Using a leukocyte adhesion in vitro assay under shear forces mimicking blood flow, we observed that reduction of endothelial miR-126 and miR-126* enhanced firm monocyte and T cell adhesion to hCMEC/D3 cells, whereas their increased expression partially prevented THP1, Jurkat and primary MS patient-derived PBMC firm adhesion. Furthermore, we observed that miR-126* and miR-126 downregulation increased E-selectin and VCAM1, respectively, while miR-126 overexpression reduced VCAM1 and CCL2 expression by hCMEC/D3 cells, suggesting that these miRs regulate leukocyte adhesion by modulating the expression of adhesion-associated endothelial mRNA targets. Hence, human brain endothelial miR-126 and miR-126* could be used as a therapeutic tool to reduce leukocyte adhesion and thus reduce neuroinflammation. PMID:28358058

  9. Water deficit down-regulates miR398 and miR408 in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Živko; Stanisavljević, Nemanja; Mikić, Aleksandar; Radović, Svetlana; Maksimović, Vesna

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), recently recognized as important regulator of gene expression at posttranscriptional level, have been found to be involved in plant stress responses. The observation that some miRNAs are up- or down regulated by stress implies that they could play vital roles in plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stress. We investigated the effect of water stress treatment during 10 days on expression of conserved miRNAs-miR398a/b and miR408 in pea plants. This time frame reflects the changes as close as possible to the changes where water stress causes visible effects under field condition. It was observed that dehydration strongly down regulates the expression of both miR398a/b and miR408 in pea roots and shoots. The down-regulation of miR398a/b and the up-regulation of potential target genes - copper superoxide dismutase, CSD1, highlight the involvement of this miRNA in pea stress response. To the contrary, the mRNA level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 5 (COX5b) did not change in roots and shoots of water-stressed plants, compared to control (well) hydrated plants. This suggests that COX5b is not the target of miR398, or that its expression is regulated by some other mechanism. P1B-ATPase expression increased during water deficit only in the shoots of pea; in the roots there were no changes in expression. Our results help to understand the possible role of investigated miRNAs and their contribution to pea capacity to cope with water deficit.

  10. MiR-101 and miR-144 Regulate the Expression of the CFTR Chloride Channel in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Fatemat; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Crawford, Melissa; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Kirkby, Stephen; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that plays a critical role in the lung by maintaining fluid homeostasis. Absence or malfunction of CFTR leads to Cystic Fibrosis, a disease characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. We recently reported that air pollutants such as cigarette smoke and cadmium negatively regulate the expression of CFTR by affecting several steps in the biogenesis of CFTR protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently received a great deal of attention as both biomarkers and therapeutics due to their ability to regulate multiple genes. Here, we show that cigarette smoke and cadmium up-regulate the expression of two miRNAs (miR-101 and miR-144) that are predicted to target CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells. When premature miR-101 and miR-144 were transfected in human airway epithelial cells, they directly targeted the CFTR 3′UTR and suppressed the expression of the CFTR protein. Since miR-101 was highly up-regulated by cigarette smoke in vitro, we investigated whether such increase also occurred in vivo. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks demonstrated an up-regulation of miR-101 and suppression of CFTR protein in their lungs. Finally, we show that miR-101 is highly expressed in lung samples from patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when compared to control patients. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic cigarette smoking up-regulates miR-101 and that this miRNA could contribute to suppression of CFTR in the lungs of COPD patients. PMID:23226399

  11. Regulation of turkey myogenic satellite cell migration by MicroRNAs miR-128 and miR-24.

    PubMed

    Velleman, S G; Harding, R L

    2016-12-05

    Myogenic satellite cells are an adult stem cell responsible for all post-hatch muscle growth in poultry. As a stem cell population, satellite cells are highly heterogeneous, but the origin of this heterogeneity remains unclear. Heterogeneity is, in part, regulated by gene expression. One method of endogenous gene regulation that may contribute to heterogeneity is microRNAs (miRNAs). Two miRNAs previously shown to regulate poultry myogenic satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, miR-128 and miR-24, were studied to determine if they also affected satellite cell migration. Satellite cell migration is an essential step for both proliferation and differentiation. During proliferation, satellite cells will migrate and align to form new myofibers or donate their nuclei to existing myofibers leading to muscle fiber hypertrophy or regeneration. Transient transfection of miRNA specific mimics to each miRNA reduced migration of satellite cells following a cell culture scratch at 72 h of proliferation when the cultures were 90 to 100% confluent. However, only the migration in cells transfected with miR-24 mimics at 24 and 30 h following the scratch was significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) to around 70% of the distance migrated by controls. Alternately, transfection with inhibitors specific to miR-128 or miR-24 significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased migration between 147 and 252% compared to their controls between 24 and 48 h following the scratch. These data demonstrate that miR-128 and miR-24 play a role in myogenic satellite cell migration, which will impact muscle development and growth.

  12. miR-15b and miR-21 as Circulating Biomarkers for Diagnosis of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ivo D’Urso, Pietro; Fernando D’Urso, Oscar; Damiano Gianfreda, Cosimo; Mezzolla, Valeria; Storelli, Carlo; Marsigliante, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are lethal primary intracranial tumors. To date, little information on the role of deregulated genes in gliomas have been identified. As the involvement of miRNAs in the carcinogenesis is well known, we carried out a pilot study to identify, as potential biomarkers, differentially expressed microRNAs in blood samples of patients affected by glioma. We studied the miRNAs’ expression, by means of microarray and Real-Time PCR, in 30 blood samples from glioma patients and in 82 blood samples of patients suffering from: (a) various neurological disorders (n=30), (b) primary B-lymphoma of the Central Nervous System (PCNSL, n=36) and (c) secondary brain metastases (n=16). By quantitative real time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we identified significantly increased levels of two candidate biomarkers, miR-15b and miR-21, in blood of patients affected by gliomas. ROC analysis of miR-15b biomarker levels allowed to differentiate patients with tumour from patients without glioma. Furthermore, combined expression analyses of miR15b and miR-21 distinguished between patients with and without glioma (90% sensitivity and 100% specificity). In addition, a decrement in the expression levels of miR-16 characterized glioblastomas compared to low grade and anaplastic gliomas. In conclusion, this pilot study suggest that it’s possible to identify the disease state by meaning miR-15b and miR-21 markers in blood, while miR-16 can be used to distinguish glioblastoma from other grade gliomas. They can potentially be used as biomarkers for non-invasive diagnosis of gliomas; further studies are mandatory to confirm our preliminary findings. PMID:27047250

  13. MiR-101 and miR-144 regulate the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in the lung.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Fatemat; Nuovo, Gerard J; Crawford, Melissa; Boyaka, Prosper N; Kirkby, Stephen; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that plays a critical role in the lung by maintaining fluid homeostasis. Absence or malfunction of CFTR leads to Cystic Fibrosis, a disease characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. We recently reported that air pollutants such as cigarette smoke and cadmium negatively regulate the expression of CFTR by affecting several steps in the biogenesis of CFTR protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently received a great deal of attention as both biomarkers and therapeutics due to their ability to regulate multiple genes. Here, we show that cigarette smoke and cadmium up-regulate the expression of two miRNAs (miR-101 and miR-144) that are predicted to target CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells. When premature miR-101 and miR-144 were transfected in human airway epithelial cells, they directly targeted the CFTR 3'UTR and suppressed the expression of the CFTR protein. Since miR-101 was highly up-regulated by cigarette smoke in vitro, we investigated whether such increase also occurred in vivo. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks demonstrated an up-regulation of miR-101 and suppression of CFTR protein in their lungs. Finally, we show that miR-101 is highly expressed in lung samples from patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when compared to control patients. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic cigarette smoking up-regulates miR-101 and that this miRNA could contribute to suppression of CFTR in the lungs of COPD patients.

  14. Regulation of Bone Formation During Disuse by miRNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nicholas; Choi, Catherine Y.; Alwood, Joshua S.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts lose bone structure during long-duration spaceflight. These changes are due, in part, to insufficient bone formation by the osteoblast cells. Little is known about the role that small (approximately 22 nucleotide), non-coding micro-RNAs (miRNAs) play in the osteoblast response to microgravity. We hypothesize that osteoblast-lineage cells alter their miRNA status during microgravity exposure, contributing to impaired bone formation during weightlessness. To simulate weightlessness, female mice (C57BL/6, Charles River, 10 weeks of age, n = 6) were hindlimb unloaded for 12 days. Age-matched and normally ambulating mice served as controls (n=6). To assess the expression of miRNAs in skeletal tissue, the right and left tibia of the mice were collected ex vivo and cleaned of soft-tissue and marrow. Total RNA was collected from tibial bone and relative abundance was measured for miRNAs of interest using quantitative real time PCR array looking at 372 unique and well-characterized mature miRNAs using the delta-delta Ct method. Transcripts of interest were normalized to an average of 6 reference RNAs. Preliminary results show that hindlimb unloading decreased the expression of 14 miRNAs to less than 1.4-2.9X control levels and increased the expression of 5 miRNAs relative to the control mice greater than 1-2-1.5X (p less than 0.05, respectively). Using the miRSystem we assessed overlapping target genes predicted to be regulated by multiple members of the 19 differentially expressed miRNAs as well as in silico predicted targets of our individual miRNAs. Our miRSystem results indicated that a number of our differentially expressed miRNAs were regulators of genes related to the Wnt-Beta Catenin pathway-a known regulator of bone health-and, interestingly, the estrogen-mediated cell-cycle regulation pathway, which may indicate that simulated weightlessness induced systemic hormonal changes that contributed to bone loss. We plan to follow up these findings by measuring

  15. Airway Epithelial miRNA Expression Is Altered in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen D.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Love, Michael I.; Peng, Jeffrey C.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Nguyen, Christine; Solon, Margaret; Nguyen, Cindy; Barczak, Andrea J.; Zlock, Lorna T.; Blagev, Denitza P.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Ansel, K. Mark; Arron, Joseph R.; Erle, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Changes in airway epithelial cell differentiation, driven in part by IL-13, are important in asthma. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation in many systems and could contribute to epithelial abnormalities in asthma. Objectives: To determine whether airway epithelial miRNA expression is altered in asthma and identify IL-13–regulated miRNAs. Methods: We used miRNA microarrays to analyze bronchial epithelial brushings from 16 steroid-naive subjects with asthma before and after inhaled corticosteroids, 19 steroid-using subjects with asthma, and 12 healthy control subjects, and the effects of IL-13 and corticosteroids on cultured bronchial epithelial cells. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected microarray results. Measurements and Main Results: Most (12 of 16) steroid-naive subjects with asthma had a markedly abnormal pattern of bronchial epithelial miRNA expression by microarray analysis. Compared with control subjects, 217 miRNAs were differentially expressed in steroid-naive subjects with asthma and 200 in steroid-using subjects with asthma (false discovery rate < 0.05). Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids had modest effects on miRNA expression in steroid-naive asthma, inducing a statistically significant (false discovery rate < 0.05) change for only nine miRNAs. qPCR analysis confirmed differential expression of 22 miRNAs that were highly differentially expressed by microarrays. IL-13 stimulation recapitulated changes in many differentially expressed miRNAs, including four members of the miR-34/449 family, and these changes in miR-34/449 family members were resistant to corticosteroids. Conclusions: Dramatic alterations of airway epithelial cell miRNA levels are a common feature of asthma. These alterations are only modestly corrected by inhaled corticosteroids. IL-13 effects may account for some of these alterations, including repression of miR-34/449 family members that have established roles in airway

  16. miR-200 Regulates Endometrial Development During Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Patricia T; Mainigi, Monica A; Word, R Ann; Kraus, W Lee; Mendelson, Carole R

    2016-09-01

    For successful embryo implantation, endometrial stromal cells must undergo functional and morphological changes, referred to as decidualization. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate implantation and decidualization are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that the estradiol- and progesterone-regulated microRNA (miR)-200 family was markedly down-regulated in mouse endometrial stromal cells prior to implantation, whereas zinc finger E-box binding homeobox-1 and -2 and other known and predicted targets were up-regulated. Conversely, miR-200 was up-regulated during in vitro decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells. Knockdown of miR-200 negatively affected decidualization and prevented the mesenchymal-epithelial transition-like changes that accompanied decidual differentiation. Notably, superovulation of mice and humans altered miR-200 expression. Our findings suggest that hormonal alterations that accompany superovulation may negatively impact endometrial development and decidualization by causing aberrant miR-200 expression.

  17. miRNA Regulation of Immune Tolerance in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schjenken, John E; Zhang, Bihong; Chan, Hon Y; Sharkey, David J; Fullston, Tod; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-03-01

    To support embryo implantation, the female reproductive tract must provide a tolerogenic immune environment. Seminal fluid contact at conception contributes to activating the endometrial gene expression and immune cell changes required for robust implantation, influencing not only the quality of the ensuing pregnancy but also the health of offspring. miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles in biological processes, including regulation of the immune environment. miRNAs are known to contribute to gene regulation in pregnancy and are altered in pregnancy pathologies. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs participate in establishing immune tolerance at conception, and may contribute to the regulatory effects of seminal fluid in generating tolerogenic dendritic cells and T regulatory cells. This review highlights those miRNAs implicated in programming immune cells that are critical during the peri-conception period and explores how seminal fluid may regulate female tract miRNA expression following coitus.

  18. Implications of miRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingfang

    2011-01-01

    With the exponential growth of research efforts on non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) in the past decade, miRNAs have been demonstrated to be important in many major human diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Due to the broad regulatory function of miRNAs, alterations of their expression can have profound consequences on multiple critical genes and pathways. One of the major issues related to the success of treating advanced colorectal cancer is chemoresistance. In this review, we will present some of the recent advancements in miRNA research related to chemoresistance mechanisms to 5-FU based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer and cancer stem cells. We believe that this miRNA-mediated resistance mechanism will offer novel strategies to develop future anti-cancer therapies.

  19. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  20. OCDB: a database collecting genes, miRNAs and drugs for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Anna P; Distefano, Rosario; Wefer, Hugo A; Ferro, Alfredo; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive and unwilling thoughts (obsessions) giving rise to anxiety. The patients feel obliged to perform a behavior (compulsions) induced by the obsessions. The World Health Organization ranks OCD as one of the 10 most disabling medical conditions. In the class of Anxiety Disorders, OCD is a pathology that shows an hereditary component. Consequently, an online resource collecting and integrating scientific discoveries and genetic evidence about OCD would be helpful to improve the current knowledge on this disorder. We have developed a manually curated database, OCD Database (OCDB), collecting the relations between candidate genes in OCD, microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the pathophysiology of OCD and drugs used in its treatments. We have screened articles from PubMed and MEDLINE. For each gene, the bibliographic references with a brief description of the gene and the experimental conditions are shown. The database also lists the polymorphisms within genes and its chromosomal regions. OCDB data is enriched with both validated and predicted miRNA-target and drug-target information. The transcription factors regulations, which are also included, are taken from David and TransmiR. Moreover, a scoring function ranks the relevance of data in the OCDB context. The database is also integrated with the main online resources (PubMed, Entrez-gene, HGNC, dbSNP, DrugBank, miRBase, PubChem, Kegg, Disease-ontology and ChEBI). The web interface has been developed using phpMyAdmin and Bootstrap software. This allows (i) to browse data by category and (ii) to navigate in the database by searching genes, miRNAs, drugs, SNPs, regions, drug targets and articles. The data can be exported in textual format as well as the whole database in.sql or tabular format. OCDB is an essential resource to support genome-wide analysis, genetic and pharmacological studies. It also facilitates the evaluation of genetic data

  1. OCDB: a database collecting genes, miRNAs and drugs for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Privitera, Anna P.; Distefano, Rosario; Wefer, Hugo A.; Ferro, Alfredo; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive and unwilling thoughts (obsessions) giving rise to anxiety. The patients feel obliged to perform a behavior (compulsions) induced by the obsessions. The World Health Organization ranks OCD as one of the 10 most disabling medical conditions. In the class of Anxiety Disorders, OCD is a pathology that shows an hereditary component. Consequently, an online resource collecting and integrating scientific discoveries and genetic evidence about OCD would be helpful to improve the current knowledge on this disorder. We have developed a manually curated database, OCD Database (OCDB), collecting the relations between candidate genes in OCD, microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the pathophysiology of OCD and drugs used in its treatments. We have screened articles from PubMed and MEDLINE. For each gene, the bibliographic references with a brief description of the gene and the experimental conditions are shown. The database also lists the polymorphisms within genes and its chromosomal regions. OCDB data is enriched with both validated and predicted miRNA-target and drug-target information. The transcription factors regulations, which are also included, are taken from David and TransmiR. Moreover, a scoring function ranks the relevance of data in the OCDB context. The database is also integrated with the main online resources (PubMed, Entrez-gene, HGNC, dbSNP, DrugBank, miRBase, PubChem, Kegg, Disease-ontology and ChEBI). The web interface has been developed using phpMyAdmin and Bootstrap software. This allows (i) to browse data by category and (ii) to navigate in the database by searching genes, miRNAs, drugs, SNPs, regions, drug targets and articles. The data can be exported in textual format as well as the whole database in.sql or tabular format. OCDB is an essential resource to support genome-wide analysis, genetic and pharmacological studies. It also facilitates the evaluation of genetic data

  2. MiR-21 and MiR-155 promote non-small cell lung cancer progression by downregulating SOCS1, SOCS6, and PTEN.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xinying; Liu, Yuxia; Wang, Yong; Meng, Mingming; Wang, Kaifei; Zang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Sheng; Sun, Xiaohua; Cui, Lei; Pan, Lei; Liu, Sanhong

    2016-12-20

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. MiR-21 and miR-155 are the most amplified miRNAs in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), and are critical promoters of NSCLC progression. However, it remains unclear how miR-21 and miR-155 induce cancer progression, and whether these miRNAs share common targets, such as tumor suppressor genes required to prevent NSCLC. Here we report that miR-21 and miR-155 levels are elevated in NSCLC and are proportional to the progression of the disease. In addition, miR-21 and miR-155 share nearly 30% of their predicted target genes, including SOCS1, SOCS6, and PTEN, three tumor suppressor genes often silenced in NSCLC. Consequently, antagonizing miR-21, miR-155 or both potently inhibited tumor progression in xenografted animal models of NSCLC. Treatment with miR-21 and miR-155 inhibitors in combination was always more effective against NSCLC than treatment with a single inhibitor. Furthermore, levels of miR-21 and miR-155 expression correlated inversely with overall and disease-free survival of NSCLC patients. Our findings reveal that miR-21 and miR-155 promote the development of NSCLC, in part by downregulating SOCS1, SOCS6, and PTEN. Combined inhibition of miR-21 and miR-155 could improve the treatment of NSCLC.

  3. Growth inhibitory effects of miR-221 and miR-222 in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Ryo; Sato, Mitsuo; Kakumu, Tomohiko; Hase, Tetsunari; Yogo, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Eiichi; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Both pro- and anti-oncogenic roles of miR-221 and miR-222 microRNAs are reported in several types of human cancers. A previous study suggested their oncogenic role in invasiveness in lung cancer, albeit only one cell line (H460) was used. To further evaluate involvement of miR-221 and miR-222 in lung cancer, we investigated the effects of miR-221 and miR-222 overexpression on six lung cancer cell lines, including H460, as well as one immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cell line, HBEC4. miR-221 and miR-222 induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like changes in a minority of HBEC4 cells but, unexpectedly, both the microRNAs rather suppressed their invasiveness. Consistent with the prior report, miR-221 and miR-222 promoted growth in H460; however, miR-221 suppressed growth in four other cell lines with no effects in one, and miR-222 suppressed growth in three cell lines but promoted growth in two. These are the first results to show tumor-suppressive effects of miR-221 and mi