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Sample records for miami beach florida

  1. 33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.605 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States as defined at 33 CFR... Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. 334.605 Section 334.605 Navigation and Navigable...

  2. 76 FR 29642 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Miami Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... establishing special local regulations on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of ] Miami Beach, Florida... will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach, Florida. Approximately 25 high... Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach, Florida during the Miami Super Boat Grand Prix. The special...

  3. Wild coastline birds as reservoirs of broad-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Miami Beach, Florida.

    PubMed

    Poirel, Laurent; Potron, Anaïs; De La Cuesta, Carolina; Cleary, Timothy; Nordmann, Patrice; Munoz-Price, L Silvia

    2012-05-01

    A high rate of broad-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates was identified from seagull and pelican feces collected in the Miami Beach, Florida, area. The most commonly identified resistance determinants were CMY-2 and CTX-M-15. Those wild birds might be therefore considered vehicles for wide dissemination of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the United States.

  4. 33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard... REGULATIONS § 334.605 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. (a) The area.... U.S. Government vessels include, but are not limited to, U.S. Coast Guard and Coast Guard...

  5. 77 FR 26229 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach... the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of multiple U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) units, both land and waterside. The facility has one of the...

  6. 77 FR 42652 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach... 334 to establish a new restricted area in the waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of multiple U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) units,...

  7. Miami, Florida: The Magic City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2008-01-01

    With its subtropical climate and intimate ties to Latin America, Miami is like no other city in the United States. More than 65 percent of its population is Hispanic, and Spanish is the most commonly heard language. Situated at the southern tip of the 500-mile-long Florida peninsula, Miami is the largest urban area in the southeastern United…

  8. ANNUAL VOLUME OF PROCEEDINGS, ADDRESSES, AND RESEARCH PAPERS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING AND EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT OF THE ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIALS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA (53D, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 14-19, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOSTER, CHARLES W.

    A VERBATIM REPORTING OF PRESENTATIONS MADE AT THE 53D ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIALS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA, HELD IN MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 14-19, 1967, INCLUDES THE KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY THE HONORABLE BARRY G. LOWES, CHAIRMAN OF THE METROPOLITAN TORONTO BOARD OF EDUCATION, ON PURPOSES, PROBLEMS, AND…

  9. CDC Advises Pregnant Women to Avoid Miami Beach Due to Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnant Women to Avoid Miami Beach Due to Zika Florida Gov. Rick Scott says 5 cases of ... on Friday that five cases of locally transmitted Zika virus have occurred there. Until now, local transmission ...

  10. Stratigraphy of the Upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    The upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone is probably the most stratigraphically-complex formation in the Cenozoic of Florida. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Ft. Thompson Formation to the west in southeast Palm Beach County (west of I-95); to the west in Broward County (west of the Turnpike); and to the north in south Broward County (along U.S. 27). The Miami overlies and very locally vertically grades into the Ft. Thompson in all of Dade County. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Anastasia Formation to the north and east in southeast Palm Beach County (east of I-95), and to the northeast in east Broward County (east of the Turnpike). The Miami laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Key Largo Limestone to the southeast in extreme southeast Dade County, and overlies and locally vertically grades into the Key Largo in the Lower Keys, south Monroe County. The Miami unconformably overlies the Pliocene Tamiami Formation and pinches out to the west in northeast mainland Monroe and southeast Collier Counties, and also pinches out to the north in east-central Palm Beach County. In all areas, the Miami Limestone is either overlain unconformably by very discontinuous undifferentiated surficial sediments or forms land surface.

  11. Quality of ground water in the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida, 1996-1998, with emphasis on contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradner, Anne; McPherson, Benjamin F.; Miller, Ronald L.; Kish, George; Bernard, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The high permeability of the sand and limestone sediments and shallow water table of the Biscayne aquifer make ground water vulnerable to contamination by human activities. To assess potential contamination in the aquifer, untreated ground water was sampled from 30 public-supply wells (40-165 feet deep) in Broward, Miami-Dade, and Palm Beach Counties, 32 shallow wells (10-50 feet deep) in a recently urbanized (residential and light commercial) part of Broward County, and 3 shallow reference wells in Broward County. Results from sample analyses indicate that major ions, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace element concentrations were generally within the range indicative of background concentrations, except for: (1) substantially higher bromide concentrations in water from public-supply wells in southern Miami-Dade County; (2) a few relatively high (greater than 2 milligrams per liter) concentrations of nitrate in water from public-supply wells near agricultural lands in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties; and (3) a few relatively high concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) in water from some shallow urban wells near golf courses. Pesticides were detected in every public-supply well, in most of the shallow, urban monitoring wells (78 percent), and in one reference well; however, no pesticide concentration exceeded any drinking-water standard. Fifteen different pesticides or their degradation products were detected. The most frequently detected pesticides were atrazine and tebuthiuron; less frequently detected were the herbicides diuron, fenuron, prometon, metolachlor, simazine, and 2,6-diethylaniline. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in most of the public-supply wells (77 percent) and shallow, urban wells (91 percent) and in two of the three reference wells. Thirty-two different VOCs were detected in ground water in the Biscayne aquifer, with cis-1,2-dichloroethene the most frequently detected VOC in the public

  12. Florida Officials Announce New Zika Zone in Miami

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161491.html Florida Officials Announce New Zika Zone in Miami News comes just weeks ... 2016 FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new Zika zone was declared Thursday by Florida health ...

  13. Analysis of water quality and circulation of four recreational Miami beaches through the use of Lagrangian Coherent Structures.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, L A; Olascoaga, M J; Reniers, A

    2014-06-15

    Four popular, recreational beaches in Miami, FL are Hobie Beach, Virginia Key Beach, Crandon Park Beach, and Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park. While all of the beaches are within a few miles of each other in Biscayne Bay, they have greatly differing water qualities, as determined by the testing for fecal indicator bacteria performed by the Florida Department of Health. Using the geodesic theory of transport barriers, we identify Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in each area. We show how these material curves, which shape circulation and mixing patterns, can be used to explain the incongruous states of the water at beaches that should be comparable. The LCSs are computed using a hydrodynamic model and verified through field experimentation at each beach.

  14. Miami, Florida metropolitan area as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A view looking east shows the cities from Hollywood to Homestead in the greater Miami area. The photograph is centered directly over the city of Miami at approximately 25.5 degrees north and 80.5 degrees west. The average elevation of the area is 6 feet above mean sea level. Extensive drainage has taken place since the late 19th century to prevent massive flooding. The Miami River is one of the main drainage structures and is visible as a straight diagonal line near the center of the picture. Many of the small lakes in the lower portion of the view are catch ponds for runoff water. Many of the major roads are visible: Highway A1A follows the coast and ends at Miami Beach. Interstate 95 parallels the coast. The Taniami trail to the west across the Everglades (center-bottom) links Miami Beach to the mainland.

  15. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ScienceCinema

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2016-07-12

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  16. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  17. 78 FR 40427 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 32-Miami, Florida; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Almod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Activity; Almod Diamonds, Ltd. (Jewelry and Precious Stones); Miami, Florida The Greater Miami Foreign... Board on behalf of Almod Diamonds, Ltd. (ADL), located in Miami, Florida. The notification conforming...

  18. 78 FR 68814 - Foreign-Trade Zone 32-Miami, Florida, Authorization of Production Activity, Brightstar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 39707-39708, 07/02/2013). The FTZ Board has..., Brightstar Corporation (Cell Phone Kitting), Miami, Florida On June 26, 2013, The Greater Miami Chamber...

  19. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  20. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  1. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and... in cases of great emergency, no vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of...

  2. 77 FR 63289 - Foreign-Trade Zone 32-Miami, Florida; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... Board (the Board) by the Greater Miami Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 32, to amend its application to reorganize FTZ 32 zone under the alternative site framework (77 FR 43048-43049, 7/23/2012). The... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 32--Miami, Florida; Application for Reorganization...

  3. 78 FR 39707 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 32-Miami, Florida; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Activity; Brightstar Corporation; (Cell Phone Kitting); Miami, Florida The Greater Miami Chamber of... cell phones and cell phone accessories. Pursuant to 15 CFR 400.14(b), FTZ activity would be limited to... during customs entry procedures that apply to cell phones (duty rate 0%) for the foreign status...

  4. 78 FR 22363 - Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-Orlando Passenger Rail Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    .... 4321 et seq.) (NEPA) and FRA's Procedures for Considering Environmental Impacts (64 FR 28545, May 26... Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-- Orlando... service proposed by the private company, All Aboard Florida--Operations LLC (AAF), between Miami...

  5. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Atlantic Ocean beach, Virginia to Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, R.M.; Johnson, R.W.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying maps show the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach from Cape Henry, Virginia to Cape Fear, North Carolina and from Savannah Bach Georgia to Miami Beach, Florida. The survey was made March 23-24, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the normal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone would be as much as 1,400 feet. The location of the flight lines is shown on the index map below. No abnormal radioactivity was detected along the northern flight line between Cape Henry, Virginia and Cape Fear, North Carolina. Along the southern flight line fourteen areas of abnormal radioactivity were detected between Savannah Beach, Georgia and Anastasia Island, Florida as shown on the map on the left. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently due to radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits with occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity sue to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given on the accompanying map indicates only those localities of greater-than-average radioactivity and, therefore suggest areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more

  6. World Saccharum Collection at the USDA Subtropical Research Station, National Germplasm Repository Miami, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1980, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), established a genebank, the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Miami, Florida. This repository is devoted to conservation of subtropical and tropical fruit, sugarcane and related grasses and ornamen...

  7. 76 FR 80333 - Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone; Miami, Florida Area Under Alternative Site Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... the Board (74 FR 1170-1173, 1/12/09 (correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09); 75 FR 71069-71070, 11/22/10... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone; Miami, Florida Area Under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board (the Board) by...

  8. 55th Yearbook of the National Reading Conference (Miami, Florida, November 30-December 3, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, James V., Ed.; Schallert, Diane L., Ed.; Fairbanks, Colleen M., Ed.; Worthy, Jo, Ed.; Maloch, Beth, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Close to 1,100 people attended the 55th Annual Meeting of the National Reading Conference at the Intercontinental Hotel in Miami, Florida from November 30-December 3, 2005. A record number of proposals were submitted this year (548), with 392 papers, symposia, and round tables accepted. This year's conference theme was inclusiveness and synthesis…

  9. HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Beliefs among Haitian Adolescents in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelin, Louis Herns; McCoy, H. Virginia; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined HIV/AIDS knowledge and beliefs in Haitian adolescents in an HIV epicenter, Miami-Dade Florida. This study examined survey data from 300 Haitian adolescents, aged 13 through 18, from both low- and middle-income neighborhoods. A sub-sample of 80 adolescents was selected for in-depth interviews and continuous observations with…

  10. 33 CFR 165.726 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami River, Miami, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Seventh Coast Guard...

  11. 33 CFR 165.726 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami River, Miami, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Seventh Coast Guard...

  12. 33 CFR 165.726 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami River, Miami, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Seventh Coast Guard...

  13. 78 FR 68026 - Foreign-Trade Zone 32-Miami, Florida, Authorization of Production Activity, Almod Diamonds, Ltd...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 40427, 7-5-2013). The..., Almod Diamonds, Ltd. (Jewelry and Precious Stones), Miami, Florida On June 21, 2013, the Greater Miami... the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Almod Diamonds, Ltd., within FTZ 32--Site 1, in...

  14. 76 FR 33157 - Safety Zones; July 4th Fireworks Displays Within the Captain of the Port Miami Zone, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ..., Key Biscayne, Lauderdale by the Sea, Miami Beach, Pompano Beach, Stuart, and West Palm Beach, Florida.... This safety zone will be enforced from 9 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. 10. Pompano Beach, Florida. All waters... regulated area will be enforced from 9 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. on July 4, 2011. (10) Pompano Beach, FL....

  15. Characterization and evaluation of five jaboticaba accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of five Jaboticaba (Myrciaria caulifloria) cultivars ‘MC-05-06’, ‘MC-05-14’, ‘MC-05-12’, ‘MC-06-15,’ and ‘MC-06-14’ were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clona...

  16. 33 CFR 165.726 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami River, Miami, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... District's salinity dam in approximate position 25°48′4″ N, 80°15′6″ W. (2) The Tamiami Canal from its... River and the Tamiami Canal to the South Florida Water Management District's salinity dam, as well as...

  17. 33 CFR 165.726 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Miami River, Miami, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... District's salinity dam in approximate position 25°48′4″ N, 80°15′6″ W. (2) The Tamiami Canal from its... River and the Tamiami Canal to the South Florida Water Management District's salinity dam, as well as...

  18. Hurricane modification and adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Klima, Kelly; Lin, Ning; Emanuel, Kerry; Morgan, M Granger; Grossmann, Iris

    2012-01-17

    We investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps.

  19. Hurricane Modification and Adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.; Morgan, G.; Grossmann, I.

    2012-12-01

    Annual losses from tropical cyclones (TCs) in the United States are estimated to average about $10-billion/year. Damages can be caused by wind, storm surge, and floods. Some U.S. coastal areas experience high TC wind speeds and contain geophysical features vulnerable to storm surges and flooding. Since the Miami-Dade County coastline contains a range of topography, bathymetry and infrastructure with different susceptibilities to TCs, optimal policy choices regarding methods to reduce TC damages depend strongly on locale. Various adaptation techniques, including "hardening", are available to reduce damages from TCs. Strategies to reduce the intensity of a TC, while still hypothetical, offer a very different approach to reducing damages. Here we investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps.

  20. Changes in saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer, Hialeah-Miami Springs area, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Howard; Ratzlaff, Karl W.

    1989-01-01

    A lobe of salty groundwater that had intruded the Hialeah-Miami Springs area municipal well field, adjacent to the Miami and Tamiami Canals in Dade County, Florida, was stabilized after flow-regulation structures were installed in the canals in 1946. However, in 1971, the saltwater began to readvance toward the center of the well field because of water level declines caused by large increases in withdrawals during a near-record dry season. To better protect the well field, a temporary flow-regulation structure, constructed in 1971, in the Tamiami Canal was moved in 1976 to a permanent site, about 3,000 ft farther seaward; this converted that tidal reach of canal to a controlled reach under a sustained freshwater head. This water management procedure resulted in dilution of the intruding saltwater lobe and a marked concentration of its size even though large municipal withdrawals continued. (USGS)

  1. Urban Evapotranspiration and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Miami - Dade, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, T.; Hopper, W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) concentrations are leading indicators of secular climate change. With increasing awareness of the consequences of climate change, methods for monitoring this change are becoming more important daily. Of particular interest is the carbon dioxide exchange between natural and urban landscapes and the correlation of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Monitoring Evapotranspiration (ET) is important for assessments of water availability for growing populations. ET is surprisingly understudied in the hydrologic cycle considering ET removes as much as 80 to over 100% of precipitation back into the atmosphere as water vapor. Lack of understanding in spatial and temporal ET estimates can limit the credibility of hydrologic water budgets designed to promote sustainable water use and resolve water-use conflicts. Eddy covariance (EC) methods are commonly used to estimate ET and CO2 fluxes. The EC platform consist of a (CSAT) 3-D Sonic Anemometer and a Li-Cor Open Path CO2/ H2O Analyzer. Measurements collected at 10 Hz create a very large data sets. A EC flux tower located in the Snapper Creek Well Field as part of a study to estimate ET for the Miami Dade County Water and Sewer project. Data has been collected from December 17, 2009 to August 30, 2010. QA/QC is performed with the EdiRe data processing software according to Ameri-flux protocols. ET estimates along with other data--latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, rainfall, air temperature, wind speed and direction, solar irradiance, net radiation, soil-heat flux and relative humidity--can be used to aid in the development of water management policies and regulations. Currently, many financial institutions have adopted an understanding about baseline environmental monitoring. The “Equator Principle” is an example of a voluntary standard for managing social and environmental risk in project financing and has changed the way in which projects are financed.

  2. Trends in Kaposi's Sarcoma in Miami Beach from 1987 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Zeichner, Simon B.; Ruiz, Ana L.; Suciu, Gabriel P.; Zeichner, Rachel Lerner; Rodriguez, Estelamari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a rare low-grade vascular tumor associated with the human herpes virus 8. By analyzing the epidemiology, staging, and treatment of KS, we hoped to improve the quality of care at our institution. Methods. Review of the Mount Sinai Medical Center tumor registry database in Miami Beach, FL, USA, identified 143 cases of KS between January 1, 1987 and December 31, 2007. Results. The majority of patients were non-Hispanic whites, non smoking males diagnosed between 1987 and 1996. Most of the patients were HIV positive, with an equal percentage diagnosed with local or distant disease. Most patients received no chemotherapy or radiation. There were no significant differences in patient survival based on sex, HIV status, or radiation received. There was a trend toward improved survival among older patients who smoked, received no chemotherapy, and had localized stage at diagnosis. Multivariate analysis revealed that non-Hispanic whites had a significant worse survival than Hispanic whites (HR = 0.55, 95% CI (0.33, 0.90), P = 0.02). Patients diagnosed between 1987 and 1996 had a worse survival than those between 1997 and 2007 (HR = 0.33 (95% CI 0.19, 0.55), P < 0.0001). Conclusion. This large retrospective study provides further insight into KS. Ethnicity and date of diagnosis are important predictors of long-term survival. PMID:23320191

  3. An overview of urban stormwater-management practices in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Agencies with jurisdiction over stormwater-management systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida, include the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). These agencies are primarily concerned with minor drainage systems that handle runoff from storms with return periods of 10 years or less (DERM), major drainage systems that handle runoff from storms with return periods of 25 years or more (SFWMD), and runoff from major roadways (FDOT). All drainage regulations require retention of at least a specified water-quality volume (defined volume of surface runoff), typically the first inch of runoff. The DERM and FDOT intensity duration frequency (IDF) curves used as a basis for design are similar but different, with differences particularly apparent for short-duration storms. The SFWMD 25-year 3-day storm incorporates an IDF curve that is substantially different from both the IDF curves of DERM and FDOT. A DERM methodology for designing closed exfiltration systems is applicable to storms of 1-hour duration, but is not applicable to all storms with a given T-year return period. A trench design that is applicable to all storms with a given T-year return period is presented as an alternative approach.

  4. Presence of Alcohol and Drugs in Hispanic Versus Non-Hispanic Youth Suicide Victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Daniel; Kosoy, Jennifer Ellyn; Ayllon, Karla Diaz; Acuna, Juan

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the association between the presence of drugs and alcohol at time of suicide in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic youth suicide victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Medical Examiner's records of 435 persons aged 24 years or younger classified as suicides in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from 1990 to 2011 were reviewed. Hispanic youth in Miami-Dade County, Florida were 1.62 times more likely than non-Hispanic youth to have used drugs and alcohol at time of suicide (OR 1.62; 95 % CI 1.07-2.04; p = 0.049). Firearm use was significantly associated with drug and alcohol use at time of death. Use of drugs and alcohol at the time of death are important risk factors for suicide in Hispanic youth.

  5. Aquifer coefficients determined from multiple well effects, Fernandina Beach, Florida.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentley, C.B.

    1979-01-01

    On September 30, 1977, a large industrial plant in Fernandina Beach, Florida, shut down six artesian wells that had been pumping continuously for several weeks from the Floridan aquifer. Two wells continued pumping until November 20, 1977, at which time the shutdown wells were restarted. A transmissivity of 30 000 ft2 day-1 (2800 m2 day-1) and a storage coefficient of between 2.5 x 10-4 and 4.0 x 10-4 were computed.-from Author

  6. 76 FR 28130 - Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice... sole Receiver for Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida, (OTS No. 15445) on May 6, 2011. Dated: May...

  7. Outbreak of cutaneous larva migrans at a children's camp--Miami, Florida, 2006.

    PubMed

    2007-12-14

    On July 19, 2006, the director of a children's aquatic sports day camp notified the Miami-Dade County Health Department (MDCHD) of three campers who had received a diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans (CLM), or "creeping eruption," a skin condition typically caused by dog or cat hookworm larvae of the genus Ancylostoma. MDCHD conducted an investigation to determine the source and magnitude of the outbreak and prevent additional illness. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which identified exposure to cat feces in a playground sandbox as the likely source of infection. Although CLM outbreaks are reported rarely to the Florida Department of Health, evidence indicates that CLM is a potential health hazard in Florida. This disease cluster highlights the importance of appropriate environmental hygiene practices and education in preventing CLM.

  8. Recurrence flooding in Miami Beach as an indicator of accelerating rates of sea level rise along the US Atlantic coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Bray, R. L.; Kirtman, B. P.; Wu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2006, the coastal community of Miami Beach has experienced an increasing rate of flooding, which caused severe property damage and significant disruptions to daily life. To evaluate the flooding frequency and its causes, we conducted a temporal analysis of tide gauge, rain, media report, insurance claim, and photo records from Miami Beach of the past 16 years. The analysis shows that most flooding events occur after heavy rain (> 80 mm) during high tide conditions, but also after the fall equinox tides regardless of rain events. In 2013, a "clear sky" flooding event also occurred just before the spring equinox. We also evaluated changes in flooding frequency over the past 16 years. Our analysis reveals that since 2006, rain-induced events increased by 33% and tide-induced events quadrupled, from 2 events during 1998-2005 to 8-16 events in 2006-2013. In order to understand the causes for the observed increase in flooding frequency, we analyzed the the nearby Virginia Key tide gauge record. We used the Ensemble Emperical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) technique to evaluate trend change in the record and found a significant acceleration in the rate of sea level rise (SLR) since 2006. The average rate of SLR since 2006 is 9±4 mm/yr, which is significantly higher than the global average rate of 3.2±0.4 mm/yr. We also have looked how SLR in the Miami area relates to the large-scale ocean circulation from a very high resolution global climate model simulation. The model results indicate that a weakening of the entire Gulf Stream system (decrease in kinetic energy) is correlated with increasing sea level in the Miami area. Our results support the hypothesis postulated by previous studies that accelerating rate of SLR along the US Atlantic coast are cause by the weakening of the Gulf Stream (e.g., Ezer et al., 2013).

  9. Wave energy level and geographic setting correlate with Florida beach water quality.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Haus, Brian K; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kelly, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-15

    Many recreational beaches suffer from elevated levels of microorganisms, resulting in beach advisories and closures due to lack of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. We conducted the first statewide beach water quality assessment by analyzing decadal records of fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci and fecal coliform) levels at 262 Florida beaches. The objectives were to depict synoptic patterns of beach water quality exceedance along the entire Florida shoreline and to evaluate their relationships with wave condition and geographic location. Percent exceedances based on enterococci and fecal coliform were negatively correlated with both long-term mean wave energy and beach slope. Also, Gulf of Mexico beaches exceeded the thresholds significantly more than Atlantic Ocean ones, perhaps partially due to the lower wave energy. A possible linkage between wave energy level and water quality is beach sand, a pervasive nonpoint source that tends to harbor more bacteria in the low-wave-energy environment.

  10. Wave energy level and geographic setting correlate with Florida beach water quality.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Haus, Brian K; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kelly, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-15

    Many recreational beaches suffer from elevated levels of microorganisms, resulting in beach advisories and closures due to lack of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. We conducted the first statewide beach water quality assessment by analyzing decadal records of fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci and fecal coliform) levels at 262 Florida beaches. The objectives were to depict synoptic patterns of beach water quality exceedance along the entire Florida shoreline and to evaluate their relationships with wave condition and geographic location. Percent exceedances based on enterococci and fecal coliform were negatively correlated with both long-term mean wave energy and beach slope. Also, Gulf of Mexico beaches exceeded the thresholds significantly more than Atlantic Ocean ones, perhaps partially due to the lower wave energy. A possible linkage between wave energy level and water quality is beach sand, a pervasive nonpoint source that tends to harbor more bacteria in the low-wave-energy environment. PMID:26892203

  11. The World Sugarcane and Related Grasses Collection at USDA/ARS Genebank Repository in Miami, Florida, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In early 1980’s the USDA-ARS established the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) a network of gene banks to preserve genetic resources of importance to National and International agriculture. The National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Miami, Florida is one of these repositories. This repo...

  12. Morphological and physio-chemical characterization of five Canistel accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of five canistel cultivars, 'Fairchild','E11', 'Keisau', 'TREC#3' and 'TREC 3680' were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clonal accessions during July and August, ...

  13. Integrated solid waste management of Palm Beach County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the Palm Beach County, Florida integrated municipal solid waste management system (IMSWMS), the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWMS.

  14. Pleistocene barrier bar seaward of ooid shoal complex near Miami, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Shinn, Eugene A.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    An ooid sand barrier bar of Pleistocene age was deposited along the seaward side of an ooid shoal complex southwest of Miami, Florida. The bar is 35 km long, about 0.8 km wide, elongate parallel with the trend of the ooid shoal complex and perpendicular to channels between individual shoals. A depression 1.6 km wide, interpreted as a back-barrier channel, isolates the bar from the ooid shoals. During sea-level fall and subaerial exposure of the bar, the ooid sand was cemented in place, preventing migration of the barrier. No Holocene analogue of this sand body is recognized, perhaps because of the relative youthfulness of Holocene ooid shoals. This Pleistocene ooid shoal complex, with its reservoir-size barrier bar, may serve as a refined model for exploration in ancient ooid sand belts.

  15. The Curriculum Development Project for the Medical Laboratory Technology Program at Miami-Dade Junior College, Miami, Florida. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Junior Coll., FL. Div. of Allied Health Studies.

    During Phase I of an Allied Health Professions Basic Improvement Grant, a five-member committee developed a curriculum for a medical laboratory technology program at Miami-Dade Junior College by: (1) defining competencies which differentiate a certified laboratory assistant from a medical laboratory technician, (2) translating expected laboratory…

  16. Correlation analysis of a ground-water level monitoring network, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey cooperative ground-water monitoring program in Miami-Dade County, Florida, expanded from 4 to 98 continuously recording water-level monitoring wells during the 1939-2001 period. Network design was based on area specific assessments; however, no countywide statistical assessments of network coverage had been performed for the purpose of assessing network redundancy. To aid in the assessment of network redundancy, correlation analyses were performed using S-PLUS 2000 statistical analysis software for daily maximum water-level data from 98 monitoring wells for the November 1, 1973, to October 31, 2000 period. Because of the complexities of the hydrologic, water-supply, and water-management systems in Miami-Dade County and the changes that have occurred to these systems through time, spatial and temporal variations in the degree of correlation had to be considered. To assess temporal variation in correlation, water-level data from each well were subdivided by year and by wet and dry seasons. For each well, year, and season, correlation analyses were performed on the data from those wells that had available data. For selected wells, the resulting correlation coefficients from each year and season were plotted with respect to time. To assess spatial variation in correlation, the coefficients determined from the correlation analysis were averaged. These average wet- and dry-season correlation coefficients were plotted spatially using geographic information system software. Wells with water-level data that correlated with a coefficient of 0.95 or greater were almost always located in relatively close proximity to each other. Five areas were identified where the water-level data from wells within the area remained correlated with that of other wells in the area during the wet and dry seasons. These areas are located in or near the C-1 and C-102 basins (2 wells), in or near the C-6 and C-7 basins (2 wells), near the Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority

  17. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow

  18. Profile of the Older Population Living in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Zevallos, Juan C.; Wilcox, Meredith L.; Jean, Naomie; Acuña, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Florida has the greatest proportion (19%) of older population (65 years or older) in the United States. The age distribution of its residents, in conjunction with a major shift in the leading cause of death within all age groups from acute illnesses to chronic disease, creates unprecedented health care challenges for the state. The objective of this study is to profile the older population living in Miami-Dade County (MDC) using 3 population-based, household-based surveys conducted over the past 5 years. This study examined cross-sectional data (demographics, health outcomes, risk factors, health assess, and utilization) collected from probability-sampled, household-based surveys conducted in 3 areas of MDC: north Miami-Dade, Little Haiti, and South Miami. The questionnaire was administered face-to-face by trained interviewers in English, Spanish, French, or Creole. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member aged 65 years or older (n = 935). One consenting adult answered the questionnaire on behalf of household members. The mean age of the respondent (60% females) was 60 years. Overall, respondents were predominantly African-Americans, Hispanics, and blacks of Haitian origin. One-third of all households fell below the US poverty thresholds. One-quarter of all households had at least 1 member who was uninsured within the year before the survey. Twenty percent of households had at least 1 member with an acute myocardial infarction or stroke during the year before the survey. Bone density tests and blood stool tests were strikingly underutilized. The health outcomes most prevalent within household members were cardiovascular diseases followed by cancer, anxiety/depression, obesity, asthma, and bone fractures. Twenty percent of households reported having at least 1 current smoker. Overall, emergency rooms were the most commonly used places of care after doctor's offices. Findings of 3 household-based surveys show a predominantly

  19. Profile of the Older Population Living in Miami-Dade County, Florida: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Zevallos, Juan C; Wilcox, Meredith L; Jean, Naomie; Acuña, Juan M

    2016-05-01

    Florida has the greatest proportion (19%) of older population (65 years or older) in the United States. The age distribution of its residents, in conjunction with a major shift in the leading cause of death within all age groups from acute illnesses to chronic disease, creates unprecedented health care challenges for the state. The objective of this study is to profile the older population living in Miami-Dade County (MDC) using 3 population-based, household-based surveys conducted over the past 5 years.This study examined cross-sectional data (demographics, health outcomes, risk factors, health assess, and utilization) collected from probability-sampled, household-based surveys conducted in 3 areas of MDC: north Miami-Dade, Little Haiti, and South Miami. The questionnaire was administered face-to-face by trained interviewers in English, Spanish, French, or Creole. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member aged 65 years or older (n = 935). One consenting adult answered the questionnaire on behalf of household members.The mean age of the respondent (60% females) was 60 years. Overall, respondents were predominantly African-Americans, Hispanics, and blacks of Haitian origin. One-third of all households fell below the US poverty thresholds. One-quarter of all households had at least 1 member who was uninsured within the year before the survey. Twenty percent of households had at least 1 member with an acute myocardial infarction or stroke during the year before the survey. Bone density tests and blood stool tests were strikingly underutilized. The health outcomes most prevalent within household members were cardiovascular diseases followed by cancer, anxiety/depression, obesity, asthma, and bone fractures. Twenty percent of households reported having at least 1 current smoker. Overall, emergency rooms were the most commonly used places of care after doctor's offices.Findings of 3 household-based surveys show a predominantly elderly

  20. Assessing the environmental justice consequences of flood risk: a case study in Miami, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Marilyn C.; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2015-09-01

    Recent environmental justice (EJ) research has emphasized the need to analyze social inequities in the distribution of natural hazards such as hurricanes and floods, and examine intra-ethnic diversity in patterns of EJ. This study contributes to the emerging EJ scholarship on exposure to flooding and ethnic heterogeneity by analyzing the racial/ethnic and socioeconomic characteristics of the population residing within coastal and inland flood risk zones in the Miami Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), Florida—one of the most ethnically diverse MSAs in the U.S. and one of the most hurricane-prone areas in the world. We examine coastal and inland flood zones separately because of differences in amenities such as water views and beach access. Instead of treating the Hispanic population as a homogenous group, we disaggregate the Hispanic category into relevant country-of-origin subgroups. Inequities in flood risk exposure are statistically analyzed using socio-demographic variables derived from the 2010 U.S. Census and 2007-2011 American Community Survey estimates, and 100-year flood risk zones from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Social vulnerability is represented with two neighborhood deprivation indices called economic insecurity and instability. We also analyze the presence of seasonal/vacation homes and proximity to public beach access sites as water-related amenity variables. Logistic regression modeling is utilized to estimate the odds of neighborhood-level exposure to coastal and inland 100-year flood risks. Results indicate that neighborhoods with greater percentages of non-Hispanic Blacks, Hispanics, and Hispanic subgroups of Colombians and Puerto Ricans are exposed to inland flood risks in areas without water-related amenities, while Mexicans are inequitably exposed to coastal flood risks. Our findings demonstrate the importance of treating coastal and inland flood risks separately while controlling for water-related amenities, and

  1. Helicopter electromagnetic survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Prinos, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a helicopter electromagnetic survey flown over the Model Land Area in southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, to map saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer. The survey, which is located south and east of Florida City, Florida, covers an area of 115 square kilometers with a flight-line spacing of 400 meters. A five-frequency, horizontal, coplanar bird with frequencies ranging from 400 to 100,000 Hertz was used. The data were interpreted using differential resistivity analysis and inversion to produce cross sections and resistivity depth-slice maps. The depth of investigation is as deep as 100 meters in freshwater-saturated portions of the Biscayne aquifer and the depth diminishes to about 50 meters in areas that are intruded by saltwater. The results compare favorably with ground-based, time-domain electromagnetic soundings and induction logs from observation wells in the area. The base of a high-resistivity, freshwater-saturated zone mapped in the northern 2 kilometers of the survey area corresponds quite well with the base of the surficial aquifer that has been determined by drilling. In general, saltwater in the survey area extends 9 to 12 kilometers inland from the coast; however, there is a long nose of saltwater centered along the Card Sound Road Canal that extends 15 kilometers inland. The cause of this preferential intrusion is likely due to uncontrolled surface flow along the canal and subsequent leakage of saltwater into the aquifer. Saltwater also extends farther inland in the area between U.S. Highway 1 and Card Sound Road than it does to the west of this area. Until 1944, a railroad grade occupied the current location of U.S. Highway 1. Borrow ditches associated with the railroad grade connected to Barnes Sound and allowed saltwater to flow during droughts and storm surges to within a few kilometers of Florida City. Relicts of this saltwater that settled to the bottom of the Biscayne aquifer can be seen in the helicopter

  2. Direct-current resistivity data from 94 sites in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Cathleen J.

    1988-01-01

    Direct-current resistivity data were collected from 94 vertical electric sounding profiles in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Direct-current resistivity data, which may be used to determine the location and thicknesses of shallow, semipermeable marls or locate zones of high chloride concentration, are presented in this report. The resistivity data consist of field data, smoothed data, layer resistivity from smoothed data, and Cartesian graphs of resistivity in relation to depth for 94 sites located in northeastern Palm Beach County. (USGS)

  3. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow

  4. Use of Farmers Markets by Mothers of WIC Recipients, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Benjamin M.; Gayle, Tamara L.; Saravia, Diana C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Farmers market-based interventions, including the Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), represent a promising strategy for improving dietary behaviors in low-income communities. Little is known, however, about the health-related characteristics of low-income parents who frequent farmers markets in urban settings. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between family-health factors and the use of farmers markets by mothers of WIC recipients. Methods We recruited a convenience sample of mothers of children seeking care at a primary care clinic in a large urban public hospital in Miami, Florida, in 2011 (n = 181 total). The clinic was adjacent to a newly established farmers market at the hospital. Each mother completed an interviewer-administered survey that included self-reported measures of maternal and child health, acculturation, dietary behaviors, food insecurity, and use of farmers markets. Results Reported use of farmers markets was independently associated with maternal history of diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–38.3) and increased maternal vegetable (but not fruit) consumption (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.5–8.1). Intended future use of farmers markets was independently associated with being unemployed (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0–5.7), increased maternal vegetable consumption (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1–5.7), and food insecurity (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3–10.3). Conclusions This study provides a snapshot of factors associated with farmers market use in a diverse population of urban low-income families. Understanding these factors may inform public health approaches to increase fresh fruit and vegetable consumption in communities at high risk for preventable chronic conditions. PMID:23764344

  5. Floridas Miami Tequesta Indian Site, Its Calusa Indian Locations, the Matacumbe Keys, and Orlandos Wikiwa Springs Generate Environmentally Significant EMFs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Dougall, Jean S.; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, David M.

    2003-10-01

    Florida purchased the Tequesta ([Langue] doc Christ Spirit-signal) Indian site along the Miami River site that vigorously pulsates with even minor rainstorms entering or leaving the area. Although there is a laughable chimera of a fountain of youth associated with Ponce de Leons discovery of the Florida peninsula in about AD 1513, the Calusa (Royal Christ Jesus Spirit-signal) Indian Nation has an associated significance with EMF signals they possibly monitored throughout their area of activity. Our efforts have also led to the investigation of cultural and other influences implied by the Matacumbe Keys that indicate a shared commonality of awareness with Native Americans of the northeast such as Metacomet, or regions like Maines Grand Lake Matagamon and its associated electromagnetic Spirit Signal. Wikiwa Springs near Orlando shares much with Massachusetts (adherent of serpent Jesus Christ Spirit-signal) Natick, and New Hampshires Naticook Island. These are the locales of environmentally sensitive instrumentation.

  6. 76 FR 61744 - Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield Beach, Florida; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield Beach, Florida; Notice of Negative... Register on March 17, 2011 (76 FR 14698). Workers of the subject firm are engaged in activities related to... a foreign country. Conclusion After reconsideration, I affirm the original notice of...

  7. Black Immigrant Mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, and Their Children's Readiness for School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Lauren; Spielberger, Julie; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos

    2012-01-01

    This report compares the circumstances and characteristics of Black immigrant mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, to those of Latina immigrant and Black native-born mothers, focusing on those living in distressed areas. The study also compares the early developmental outcomes of their children. When controlling for parental and child…

  8. Improved Outcomes with Computer-Assisted Instruction in Mathematics and English Language Skills for Hispanic Students in Need of Remedial Education at Miami Dade College, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassiliou, John

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 180 first-time-in-college (FTIC) students at Miami Dade College, Florida in need of remedial instruction in basic mathematics, reading, and sentence skills utilized the A[superscript +]dvancer[R] College Readiness Online software. Significant results were found with increased ACCUPLACER[R] scores; number of students who avoided at…

  9. Preventive Health Care for the Elderly. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Finance. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session (Miami, Florida).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Finance.

    This document presents witnesses' testimonies and additional information from the Senate hearing held in Miami, Florida to examine the issue of preventive health services, focusing on risk reduction and health promotion programs for the elderly. The goal of the hearing was to examine efforts to identify people with high risks of developing a…

  10. Politics in Education: A Case Study of the Florida Community College System Legislative Program with an Emphasis on Miami-Dade Community College Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Andres S.

    This paper urges colleges to take an active role in the political decision-making process and uses the lobbying efforts of Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC) as an example. The paper first notes the inability of the Florida community colleges to foster a concise public image, the concomitant lack of attention paid by the state legislature to the…

  11. Origin of modern quartzarenite beach sands in a temperate climate, Florida and Alabama, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, Joseph L.; McBride, Earle F.

    2007-10-01

    Quartzarenite coastal sands extending from eastern Louisiana eastward to Apalachee Bay, Florida, are anomalous: their position 7° north of the Tropic of Cancer contrasts with most other known modern quartzarenites, most of which are in a tropical setting. To determine the origin of these quartzarenite beach sands, we compared the mineralogy of samples taken from Alabama and Florida beaches, rivers that supply sand to the coast, and well cuttings representative of sandstone bedrock exposed in the Alabama coastal plain. To help assess the abundance of recycled quartz, and accepting the conventional wisdom that rounded sand-size quartz grains are recycled, we quantified the roundness of quartz grains in thin sections of river, beach, and well samples. We also determined the abundance of recycled grains with authigenic quartz using cathodoluminescence. River sands on Precambrian and Paleozoic bedrock in the study area have subarkose and sublitharenite compositions. However, as far as 200 km inland from the coast, river sands have attained quartzarenite composition and all rivers are presently delivering sand with at least 97% quartz to the coast. Rivers develop quartzarenite sand composition where they traverse poorly consolidated Tertiary sandstones, all of which we sampled are composed of > 95% quartz. Published experimental work indicates that abrasional rounding of sand-size quartz by rivers is insignificant and rounding in beaches is extremely slow. Hence, the abundance of quartz grains with some degree of rounding (96% for beaches; > 75% for rivers) further attests to the abundance of recycled quartz.

  12. Methods to quantify seepage beneath Levee 30, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional, cross-sectional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model and a simple application of Darcy?s law were used to quantify ground-water flow (from a wetlands) beneath Levee 30 in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Geologic and geophysical data, vertical seepage data from the wetlands, canal discharge data, ground-water-level data, and surface-water-stage data collected during 1995 and 1996 were used as boundary conditions and calibration data for the ground-water flow model and as input for the analytical model. Vertical seepage data indicated that water from the wetlands infiltrated the subsurface, near Levee 30, at rates ranging from 0.033 to 0.266 foot per day when the gates at the control structures along Levee 30 canal were closed. During the same period, stage differences between the wetlands (Water Conservation Area 3B) and Levee 30 canal ranged from 0.11 to 1.27 feet. A layer of low-permeability limestone, located 7 to 10 feet below land surface, restricts vertical flow between the surface water in the wetlands and the ground water. Based on measured water-level data, ground-water flow appears to be generally horizontal, except in the direct vicinity of the canal. The increase in discharge rate along a 2-mile reach of the Levee 30 canal ranged from 9 to 30 cubic feet per second per mile and can be attributed primarily to ground-water inflow. Flow rates in Levee 30 canal were greatest when the gates at the control structures were open. The ground-water flow model data were compared with the measured ground-water heads and vertical seepage from the wetlands. Estimating the horizontal ground-water flow rate beneath Levee 30 was difficult owing to the uncertainty in the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the main flow zone of the Biscayne aquifer. Measurements of ground-water flows into Levee 30 canal, a substantial component of the water budget, were also uncertain, which lessened the ability to validate the model results. Because of vertical

  13. Proceedings of the 2010 CIAE Pre-Conference (59th, Clearwater Beach, Florida, October 24-26, 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission for International Adult Education (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 International Pre-Conference of the Commission on International Adult Education (CIAE), American Association for Adult & Continuing (AAACE), was successfully conducted from October 24-26, at the Hilton Clearwater Beach Resort, Clearwater Beach, Florida. This publication includes the papers presented during the conference. These are: (1)…

  14. Altitude of water table, surficial aquifer, Palm Beach County, Florida, April 24-26, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    Water levels in Palm Beach County, Florida, were measured in April 1984 to determine the altitude of the water table in the surficial aquifer. A total of 104 wells and 50 surface-water measurement sites were used to contour the altitude of the water table at 2 and 4-foot intervals. The water-level measurements made in April represent low-water levels near the end of south Florida 's dry season. Contours of the water table at this time ranged from 22 feet above sea level in the north-central part of the county to 2 feet near the coast. (USGS)

  15. Environmental Aspects of Sites Like America's Stonehenge, (AS), Florida's Miami Tequesta Site, and Lowell's A.D. 1069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Michael Ann; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2002-04-01

    Subtle ``instrumentation" is often unnoticed. Stone-chamber transponder-receivers are principle and secondary wave detectors, part of the ``technologic" arsenal of men like Passaconaway/Metacomen of colonial-era Massachusetts, or the earthquake-predicting Shawnee Tecumseh of the Ohio Valley region, during 1811-1813. An Ohio stone-effigy ``serpent" is a thunderstorm precursor signal indicator. The Hopi require similar ``equipment," when duping gullible ``rain-dance" patrons. Tornado/waterspout activity is documented right in the Tequesta site at the river in Miami, Florida, which generates detectable signals. Columbus could have used similar ``secret sacred science" previously learned from American Indians, and thereby successfully predicted an anomalous hurricane on a subsequent trip. These, and the Hawaiian volcano goddess Pelee, seem to be a mythic equivalent of electromagnetically generated signals, i.e., a metaphor for ``environmental applied physics" we detect at A.S.

  16. Public health assessment for Munisport landfill, North Miami, Dade County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD084535442. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-28

    The Munisport Landfill site is an inactive landfill in, and owned by, the City of North Miami, Florida. The site is an urban area adjacent to the Oleta River Recreational Area, a state mangrove preserve, and Biscayne Bay. Soil, sediments, surface water, and ground water are contaminated. The authors selected ammonia, benzene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, carbon disulfide, chloromethane, coliform bacteria, dieldrin, lead, methylene chloride, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), styrene, vanadium, and zinc as contaminants of concern. Accidentally ingesting contaminated soil and surface water, and breathing contaminated smoke are completed human exposure pathways. Children who swam in the landfill lakes risked bacterial and viral infections. Based on the available data, the authors categorize the Munisport Landfill site as an indeterminate public health hazard.

  17. Encephalitis associated with cat scratch disease--Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, 1994.

    PubMed

    1994-12-16

    On August 14, 1994, the Broward County Public Health Unit of the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services was notified of three children from Pompano Beach who were hospitalized with encephalitis attributed to cat scratch disease (CSD). All three children (aged 5, 6, and 11 years) were previously healthy and had no histories of seizure disorders or diagnoses of CSD. This report summarizes the investigation of these cases.

  18. Large wave at Daytona Beach, Florida, explained as a squall-line surge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; List, J.H.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Stumpf, R.P.; Hansen, M.

    1995-01-01

    On a clear calm evening during July 1992, an anomalously large wave, reportedly 6 m high struck the Daytona Beach, Florida area. It is hypothesized that a squall line and associated pressure jump, travelling at the speed of a free gravity wave, coupled resonantly with the sea surface forming the large wave or "squall-line surge'. The wave was forced along the length of the squall line, with the greatest amplitude occurring at the water depth satisfying the resonant condition. -from Authors

  19. Formation of 'Beach Rock' at Siesta Key, Florida and its influence on barrier island development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spurgeon, D.; Davis, R.A.; Shinnu, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seaward-dipping strata of carbonate-cemented shell debris located along the coast of Siesta Key on the Gulf Coast of the Florida peninsula have long been interpreted to be beachrock equivalent in age to the Pleistocene Anastasia Formation (Stage 5e) of the east coast of Florida. Detailed examination of thin sections along with radiometric dating and isotopic analyses demonstrates clearly that this is a Holocene deposit that is not beachrock but was lithified in a meteoric environment. Whole rock dates, dates from shells only, and from cement only demonstrate that these beach deposits were in place by at least 1800 yr BP and might have been there as long ago as 4300 yr BP. This means that some type of barrier island was in place at that time. Previous investigations have depicted Siesta Key as having a maximum age of 3000 yr with these deposits being located about 2 km landward of the beach deposits. This suggests that the beach deposits might have been the site of the original position of Siesta Key. These data also indicate that sea level must have been near its present position at the time that these foreshore beach deposits were deposited; sometime between 1800 and 4300 yr ago. This scenario indicates that sea level along this coastal reach probably reached its present level at least about 2000 yr ago. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Proceedings of the 1998 Photovoltaic Performance and Reliability Workshop; Cocoa Beach, Florida; November 3-5, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.

    1998-12-17

    This proceedings is the compilation of all papers presented at the 11th PV Performance and Reliability Workshop held at the Doubletree Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida, on November 3-5, 1998. The workshop was hosted by the Florida Solar Energy Center. This year's workshop included presentations from 29 speakers and had 110 attendees.

  1. Comprehensive summary of beach renourishment and offshore sand removal impacts for Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demopoulos, A.W.J.; Gualtieri, D.J.; Neils, A.; Huge, D.

    2011-01-01

    An essential first step in the scope of environmental impacts for a sediment mining project is a formulation of specific purpose, precise needs, and estimated impacts. For each individual project, scope must be described, acceptable alternatives must be determined, critical environmental issues must be identified, and mitigation measures must be resolved. Appropriate Federal and State regulations will often require evidence that sand placement is a reasonable alternative to shoreline protection. If so, material to be extracted from the borrow site must be characterized. Candidates must identify the extent of the potential area for sand resources, complete with screening criteria, and site-specific information must be obtained. Alternatives must be identified, compared, and contrasted. And, importantly, the most cost-effective and environmentally sound approach must be determined for the project to move forward. Florida's beaches and coastlines once provided natural protection against storm damage, while simultaneously supporting aquatic ecosystems and both commercial and recreational fisheries. However, beach erosion associated with regional construction and development of the coastline has reduced the effectiveness of natural storm protection. Coastal beaches are, in geological terms, ever-shifting and evolving through natural processes of erosion and replenishment. With permanent structures in place, such as seawalls, jetties, and revetments, natural shoreline is compartmentalized, dynamics are interrupted, and sediment is no longer replenished. Coastal erosion is often a problem where the natural sediment source is deficient. Many of Florida's beaches are now in need of beach replenishment to reduce the high level of damage caused by coastal flooding. Strategic placement of beach fill is a logical means for improving the stability of a shoreline where such a project is economically and environmentally feasible. Sand placement effectively extends the shoreline

  2. Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Almost the entire state of Florida, USA (28.0N, 81.5W) can be seen in this single view from space. The large urban area on the SE coast is the greater Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton and West Palm Beach complex. Half way up the coast is the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral where the space shuttle lifts off into space. Even at this great distance, the huge Vehicle Assembly Building, causeway and launch areas can still be easily seen.

  3. Recruiting a Diverse Set of Future Geoscientists through Outreach to Middle and High School Students and Teachers in Miami, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, D.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Draper, G.; Rego, R.; Gebelein, J.

    2014-12-01

    Florida International University (FIU), the State University of Florida in Miami is a large enrollment, federally recognized Minority Serving Institution with over 70% of the undergraduate population coming from groups underrepresented in the geoscience workforce. Recruiting local students into the geosciences is challenging because geology is not well integrated into the local school curriculum, the geology is poorly exposed in the low-relief south Florida region and many first generation college students are reluctant to enter unfamiliar fields. We describe and present preliminary findings from Growing Community Roots for the Geosciences in Miami, FL, a 2-year, NSF funded project run by the Department of Earth and Environment at FIU which aims to inform students enrolled in the local middle and high schools to educational and career opportunities in the geosciences. The project takes a multi-faceted approach which includes direct outreach through social media platforms and school visits, a 1-week workshop for middle school teachers and a 2-week summer camp aimed at high school students. An outreach team of undergraduate geoscience majors were recruited to build and maintain informational resources on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Google Plus and to accompany FIU faculty on visits to local middle schools and high schools. Both the teacher workshop and the summer camp included lectures on geoscience careers, fundamental concepts of solid earth and atmospheric science, hands on exercises with earth materials, fossils and microscopy, exercises with Google Earth imagery and GIS, and field trips to local geological sites and government facilities. Participants were surveyed at the beginning of the programs on their general educational background in math and science and their general attitudes of and interest in geoscience careers. Post program surveys showed significant increases in the comfort of teaching topics in geoscience among teachers and an increased

  4. Occurrence and potential transport of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds from wastewater-treatment plant influent and effluent to groundwater and canal systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    An increased demand for fresh groundwater resources in South Florida has prompted Miami-Dade County to expand its water reclamation program and actively pursue reuse plans for aquifer recharge, irrigation, and wetland rehydration. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD) and the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), initiated a study in 2008 to assess the presence of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds in the influent and effluent at three regional wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) operated by the WASD and at one WWTP operated by the City of Homestead, Florida (HSWWTP).

  5. Water resources of southeastern Florida, with special reference to geology and ground water of the Miami area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Garald G.; Ferguson, G.E.; Love, S.K.

    1955-01-01

    partly occupied by fresh-water lakes and marshes. Elsewhere in southern Florida the deposits are mainly limestone and sandy terrace deposits. The Pliocene surface upon which there Pleistocene sediments were deposited was highest to the north and west of the present Everglades and Kissimmee River basin, and it sloped gently to the south, southeast, and east. On this slightly sloping floor, alternately submerged and emerged, the later materials were built; these materials, modified by wind, rain, and surface and ground waters. Have largely determined the present topographic and ecologic character of southern Florida. The most important aquifer in southern Florida, and the one in which most of the wells are developed, is the Biscayne aquifer. It is composed of parts of the Tamiami formation (Miocene), Caloosahatchee marl (Pliocene), fort Thompson formation, Anastasia formation, Key Largo limestone, Miami oolite, and Pamlico sand (Pleistoncene). In some parts of southern Florida, the Pamlico sand and the Anastasia formation are not a part of the Biscayne aquifer; however, they are utilized in the development of small water supplies. Most of the Calossahatchee marl and the Fort Thompson formation in the Lake Okeechobeee area is of very low permeability. In the northern Everglades their less permeable parts contain highly mineralized waters, which appear to have been trapped since the invasions by the Pleistocene seas. These waters have been modified by dilution with fresh ground water and by chemical reactions with surrounding materials. Sea-level fluctuations, starting at the close of the Pliocene with highest levels and progressing toward the Recent with successively lower levels. Have built a series of nearly flat marine terraces abutting against one another much like a series of broad stairsteps. Erosion and solution have deface and, in places, have obliterated the original surficial forms of these old sea bottoms, shores, and shoreline feathers,

  6. 46 CFR 7.100 - Florida Reefs and Keys from Miami, FL to Marquesas Keys, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... longitude 80°08′ W. to latitude 25°46.1′ N. longitude 80°05.0′ W. (Miami Lighted Whistle Buoy “M”); thence to Fowey Rocks Light (latitude 25°35.4′ N. longitude 80°05.8′ W.); thence to Pacific Reef Light (latitude 25°22.3′ N. longitude 80°08.5′ W.) thence to Carysfort Reef Light (latitude 25°13.3′ N....

  7. 46 CFR 7.100 - Florida Reefs and Keys from Miami, FL to Marquesas Keys, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... longitude 80°08′ W. to latitude 25°46.1′ N. longitude 80°05.0′ W. (Miami Lighted Whistle Buoy “M”); thence to Fowey Rocks Light (latitude 25°35.4′ N. longitude 80°05.8′ W.); thence to Pacific Reef Light (latitude 25°22.3′ N. longitude 80°08.5′ W.) thence to Carysfort Reef Light (latitude 25°13.3′ N....

  8. 46 CFR 7.100 - Florida Reefs and Keys from Miami, FL to Marquesas Keys, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... longitude 80°08′ W. to latitude 25°46.1′ N. longitude 80°05.0′ W. (Miami Lighted Whistle Buoy “M”); thence to Fowey Rocks Light (latitude 25°35.4′ N. longitude 80°05.8′ W.); thence to Pacific Reef Light (latitude 25°22.3′ N. longitude 80°08.5′ W.) thence to Carysfort Reef Light (latitude 25°13.3′ N....

  9. 46 CFR 7.100 - Florida Reefs and Keys from Miami, FL to Marquesas Keys, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... longitude 80°08′ W. to latitude 25°46.1′ N. longitude 80°05.0′ W. (Miami Lighted Whistle Buoy “M”); thence to Fowey Rocks Light (latitude 25°35.4′ N. longitude 80°05.8′ W.); thence to Pacific Reef Light (latitude 25°22.3′ N. longitude 80°08.5′ W.) thence to Carysfort Reef Light (latitude 25°13.3′ N....

  10. 46 CFR 7.100 - Florida Reefs and Keys from Miami, FL to Marquesas Keys, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... longitude 80°08′ W. to latitude 25°46.1′ N. longitude 80°05.0′ W. (Miami Lighted Whistle Buoy “M”); thence to Fowey Rocks Light (latitude 25°35.4′ N. longitude 80°05.8′ W.); thence to Pacific Reef Light (latitude 25°22.3′ N. longitude 80°08.5′ W.) thence to Carysfort Reef Light (latitude 25°13.3′ N....

  11. The biosphere: Problems and solutions; Proceedings of the Miami International Symposium on the Biosphere, Miami Beach, FL, April 23, 24, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    The objective of the Miami International Symposium on the Biosphere was to provide a forum for the presentation of the latest research findings on the environmental effects of human activities. The topics discussed are related to biosphere reserves, environmental aspects of hydrocarbon fuels, radioactivity and nuclear waste, land management, acid rains, water quality, water resources, coastal resources management, the pollution of rivers, industrial waste, economic development and the environment, health hazards and solutions, endangered species, environmentally compatible systems, space pollution, and global considerations. Attention is given to questions regarding global security and sustainable development, environethics as a global strategy for environmental quality, a gestalt approach to the environment, potential indicators for monitoring biosphere reserves, a review of regional impacts associated with the development of U.S. synthetic fuel resources, water resources in the Soviet Union, and pollution-free pesticides.

  12. Florida red tide and human health: a pilot beach conditions reporting system to minimize human exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2008-08-25

    With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While many of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida's west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for

  13. Florida red tide and human health: a pilot beach conditions reporting system to minimize human exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2008-08-25

    With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While many of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida's west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for

  14. HIV-related risk behaviors and seropositivity among homeless drug-abusing women in Miami, Florida.

    PubMed

    Metsch, L R; McCoy, C B; McCoy, H V; Shultz, J M; Lai, S; Weatherby, N L; McAnany, H; Correa, R; Anwyl, R S

    1995-01-01

    This article examines the multifaceted interactions among homelessness, HIV, substance abuse, and gender. Data were collected on 1,366 chronic drug users using a nationally standardized validated instrument within the Miami CARES project of a multisite federally funded program. HIV testing accompanied by pretest and posttest counseling was conducted on-site by certified phlebotomists and counselors. In addition to descriptive analyses and corresponding tests of significance, logistic regression analyses were used to clarify the complex associations between the outcome variables of homelessness and HIV, recognizing difficulties of determining temporal sequence. HIV infection was found to be 2.35 times more prevalent among homeless women than homeless men and significantly higher for homeless women. The findings indicate that among women, homelessness and HIV have a highly interactive effect increasing the vulnerability of this population and thus rendering them an extremely important priority population on which to focus public health efforts and programs. PMID:8788698

  15. Blood lead levels in children and environmental lead contamination in Miami inner city, Florida.

    PubMed

    Gasana, Janvier; Hlaing, WayWay M; Siegel, Kristy A; Chamorro, Armando; Niyonsenga, Theophile

    2006-09-01

    Studies have shown that the environmental conditions of the home are important predictors of health, especially in low-income communities. Understanding the relationship between the environment and health is crucial in the management of certain diseases. One health outcome related to the home environment among urban, minority, and low-income children is childhood lead poisoning. The most common sources of lead exposure for children are lead paint in older, dilapidated housing and contaminated dust and soil produced by accumulated residue of leaded gasoline. Blood lead levels (BLL) as low as 10 microg/dL in children are associated with impaired cognitive function, behavior difficulties, and reduced intelligence. Recently, it is suggested that the standard for intervention be lowered to BLL of 5 microg/dl. The objectives of our report were to assess the prevalence of lead poisoning among children under six years of age and to quantify and test the correlations between BLL in children and lead exposure levels in their environment. This cross-sectional analysis was restricted to 75 children under six years of age who lived in 6 zip code areas of inner city Miami. These locations exhibited unacceptably high levels of lead dust and soil in areas where children live and play. Using the 5 microg/dL as the cutoff point, the prevalence of lead poisoning among the study sample was 13.33%. The study revealed that lead levels in floor dust and window sill samples were positively and significantly correlated with BLL among children (p < 0.05). However, the correlations between BLL and the soil, air, and water samples were not significant. Based on this pilot study, a more comprehensive environmental study in surrounding inner city areas is warranted. Parental education on proper housecleaning techniques may also benefit those living in the high lead-exposed communities of inner city Miami.

  16. Blood Lead Levels in Children and Environmental Lead Contamination in Miami Inner City, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Gasana, Janvier; Hlaing, WayWay M.; Siegel, Kristy A.; Chamorro, Armando; Niyonsenga, Theophile

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that the environmental conditions of the home are important predictors of health, especially in low-income communities. Understanding the relationship between the environment and health is crucial in the management of certain diseases. One health outcome related to the home environment among urban, minority, and low-income children is childhood lead poisoning. The most common sources of lead exposure for children are lead paint in older, dilapidated housing and contaminated dust and soil produced by accumulated residue of leaded gasoline. Blood lead levels (BLL) as low as 10 μg/dL in children are associated with impaired cognitive function, behavior difficulties, and reduced intelligence. Recently, it is suggested that the standard for intervention be lowered to BLL of 5 μg/dl. The objectives of our report were to assess the prevalence of lead poisoning among children under six years of age and to quantify and test the correlations between BLL in children and lead exposure levels in their environment. This cross-sectional analysis was restricted to 75 children under six years of age who lived in 6 zip code areas of inner city Miami. These locations exhibited unacceptably high levels of lead dust and soil in areas where children live and play. Using the 5 μg/dL as the cutoff point, the prevalence of lead poisoning among the study sample was 13.33%. The study revealed that lead levels in floor dust and window sill samples were positively and significantly correlated with BLL among children (p < 0.05). However, the correlations between BLL and the soil, air, and water samples were not significant. Based on this pilot study, a more comprehensive environmental study in surrounding inner city areas is warranted. Parental education on proper housecleaning techniques may also benefit those living in the high lead-exposed communities of inner city Miami. PMID:16968968

  17. Chlorophyll distribution in continental shelf sediments off West Palm Beach, Florida and west end, Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, John J.; Gibson, Robert A.

    1983-07-01

    Measurements were made of chlorophyll- a and phaeophytin- a in calcareous sediments along transects off the east coast of Florida (75-190 m) and the west coast of Grand Bahama Island (170-300 m). Solvent partitioning showed that chlorophyll- a concentrations never exceeded 0·1 mg m -2 at either location, most as degradation products. Total pigment concentrations (chlorophyll and phaeopigments) ranged from 0·18-1·83 mg m -2 in sediments off Grand Bahama Island and 2·50 to 20·65 mg m -2 off West Palm Beach. Pigments, expressed per gram dry weight of sediments, increased with depth across the Florida Continental Shelf. This is probably due to differences in sediment character between near-shore and off-shore sediments.

  18. HIV, HBV, and HCV infections among drug-involved, inner-city, street sex workers in Miami, Florida.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, James A; Surratt, Hilary L; Kurtz, Steven P

    2006-03-01

    This study describes the rates of HIV, HBV, and HCV seropositivity among drug-involved, female street sex workers in low-income, inner-city sections of Miami, Florida; further, their sociodemographic characteristics, drug use, and sexual risk behaviors were assessed; and predictors of infection were reported. A sample of 586 sex workers was recruited through targeted sampling methods, interviewed, and counseled and tested for the presence of antibody to HIV, HBV, and HCV. Respondents' median age was 38 years, median time in sex work was 14 years, all were heavily involved in the use of alcohol and drugs, and 42% were homeless. More than half (51.0%) had engaged in unprotected vaginal sex in the past month. Prevalences were HIV, 22.4%; HBV, 53.4%; HCV, 29.7%. A multidimensional public health program must address not only issues related to unsafe sex, but also the problems of drug abuse, homelessness, and other lifestyle factors that contribute to risk behaviors. PMID:16378168

  19. Food safety practices among pregnant women and mothers in the women, infants, and children program, Miami, Florida.

    PubMed

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L; Dixon, Zisca; Huffman, Fatma G

    2007-05-01

    Pregnant women and infants are two groups at the highest risk of severe outcomes from foodborne illnesses. We surveyed adult clients of a Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic serving predominately African Americans in inner-city Miami, Florida, to assess food safety practices. Eligible and consenting women completed a 23-item self-administered survey with questions concerning food handling practices around the Partnership for Food Safety Education's Fight BAC! campaign constructs of "clean", "separate" (not cross-contaminated), "cook", and "chill". Of 342 eligible clients, 299 (87.4%) consented to participate. In general, the clients' food safety practices were most problematic in the cook and chill constructs. Using a cooking thermometer, refrigerating foods within 2 h, and thawing them safely were the least commonly reported safe practices. Women who were pregnant with their first child had the lowest food safety practice scores. Of the 62 pregnant participants, 32 (51.6%) reported eating hot dogs or deli meats without first reheating them some of the time or more often, and 22 (35.5%) reported eating soft cheeses and blue-veined cheeses some of the time or more often, putting the women at risk of listeriosis. Although all women in the WIC program could benefit from food safety education, these findings indicate that women during their first pregnancy should especially be targeted for food safety education.

  20. Food safety practices among pregnant women and mothers in the women, infants, and children program, Miami, Florida.

    PubMed

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L; Dixon, Zisca; Huffman, Fatma G

    2007-05-01

    Pregnant women and infants are two groups at the highest risk of severe outcomes from foodborne illnesses. We surveyed adult clients of a Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic serving predominately African Americans in inner-city Miami, Florida, to assess food safety practices. Eligible and consenting women completed a 23-item self-administered survey with questions concerning food handling practices around the Partnership for Food Safety Education's Fight BAC! campaign constructs of "clean", "separate" (not cross-contaminated), "cook", and "chill". Of 342 eligible clients, 299 (87.4%) consented to participate. In general, the clients' food safety practices were most problematic in the cook and chill constructs. Using a cooking thermometer, refrigerating foods within 2 h, and thawing them safely were the least commonly reported safe practices. Women who were pregnant with their first child had the lowest food safety practice scores. Of the 62 pregnant participants, 32 (51.6%) reported eating hot dogs or deli meats without first reheating them some of the time or more often, and 22 (35.5%) reported eating soft cheeses and blue-veined cheeses some of the time or more often, putting the women at risk of listeriosis. Although all women in the WIC program could benefit from food safety education, these findings indicate that women during their first pregnancy should especially be targeted for food safety education. PMID:17536684

  1. HIV risk, seropositivity and predictors of infection among homeless and non-homeless women sex workers in Miami, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Surratt, H L; Inciardi, J A

    2004-07-01

    Although homelessness has frequently been associated with substance abuse, and has been established as a predictor of HIV risk among substance abusers, little is known about the impact of homelessness on HIV risk among female sex workers. This analysis investigated the contribution of homelessness to sexual risk taking among a sample of 485 female sex workers recruited into an HIV prevention programme in Miami, Florida, 41.6% of whom considered themselves to be currently homeless. Findings indicated that in comparison to non-homeless sex workers, significantly more homeless sex workers were daily users of alcohol and crack, and their past month sex work reflected significantly more frequent vaginal and oral sex acts, higher levels of unprotected vaginal sex and more numerous sexual activities while 'high' on drugs. At the same time, a significantly greater proportion of homeless sex workers encountered customers that refused to use condoms than did the non-homeless sex workers. There were no significant differences in HIV seropositivity between the homeless and non-homeless women (22.5 and 24.9%, respectively), primarily because the majority of the women in the study cycled in and out of homelessness. PMID:15223529

  2. Sand patties provide evidence for the presence of Deepwater Horizon oil on the beaches of the West Florida Shelf.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, L D; Basso, J; Pulster, E; Paul, J H

    2015-08-15

    The ecological consequences of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill are both long-term and pervasive. The distribution of toxicity and mutagenicity in the Gulf of Mexico suggests oil from the DWH spill could have contaminated the West Florida Shelf (WFS). We utilized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analysis to determine presence and potential origin of oil contaminants in beach sand patty samples. PAH profiles from WFS beaches were statistically significantly similar to DWH contaminated samples from the Northeast Gulf of Mexico (Gulf Shores, AL; Ft. Pickens, FL). Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS), a major component of Corexit 9500 dispersant was also detected in the sediments. DOSS concentrations ranged from 1.6 to 5.5ngg(-1) dry weight. Additionally, two samples from DWH oil contaminated beaches were acutely toxic and one WFS beach sediment sample was mutagenic. These observations provide support for the theory that DWH oil made its way onto beaches of the WFS.

  3. Florida Red Tide and Human Health: A Pilot Beach Conditions Reporting System to Minimize Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2008-01-01

    With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While may of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida’s west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway lower symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting

  4. Results of time-domain electromagnetic soundings in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Prinos, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) soundings were made in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties to aid in mapping the landward extent of saltwater in the Biscayne aquifer. A total of 79 soundings were collected in settings ranging from urban to undeveloped land, with some of the former posing problems of land access and interference from anthropogenic features. TEM soundings combined with monitoring-well data were used to determine if the saltwater front had moved since the last time it was mapped, to provide additional spatial coverage where existing monitoring wells were insufficient, and to help interpret a previously collected helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) survey flown in the southernmost portion of the study area. TEM soundings were interpreted as layered resistivity-depth models. Using information from well logs and water-quality data, the resistivity of the freshwater saturated Biscayne aquifer is expected to be above 30 ohm-meters, and the saltwater-saturated aquifer will have resistivities of less than 10 ohm-meters allowing determination of water quality from the TEM interpretations. TEM models from 29 soundings were compared to electromagnetic induction logs collected in nearby monitoring wells. In general, the agreement of these results was very good, giving confidence in the use of the TEM data for mapping saltwater encroachment.

  5. Accelerated beach erosion in the south Atlantic coastal zone: is mitigation of artificially renourished beaches in SE Florida a rational practice or folly

    SciTech Connect

    Finkl, C.W. Jr.; Matlack, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The natural erosion of sandy beaches is a world wide problem that is often exacerbated by the structural controls that are designed to mitigate shoreline recession. As seen elsewhere, the deployment of groins and other erosion-control structures has met meager success along the Atlantic coast of south Florida. Artificial renourishment, placement of sand on the beach from land or offshore borrows, is a relatively new nonstructural attempt to reduce shoreline retreat. Our study of sandy shores lying downdrift of jettied inlets identifies restricted sand bypassing that results in classical shoreline offsets. Many of the beaches that were previously renourished are again classified, by the Corps of Engineers, as critically eroded and local governments are now requesting additional rounds of renourishment. Attempts to stabilize renourished shores by planting dune grass, beach scraping, and scarp reduction, as in the Port Everglades area, have failed. Sediment loss at the John U. Lloyd Beach since 1976, for example, is in excess of 500,000 m/sup 3/. In this area, erosion is accelerated and chronic. The severity of localized erosion is highlighted here by assuming a worst case scenario without renourishment or structural control. Hurricane-induced storm surge and overwash could, before renourishment is attempted in 1986 or 1987, cut through the barrier even sooner. Such a breach would expose the port facilities to direct effects of the sea. Joint studies by geoscientists and planners are needed to determine whether continued renourishment of eroded beaches in developed areas is essential, practical, or even advisable.

  6. Electrical resistivity and porosity structure of the upper Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Dean; Yeboah-Forson, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Square array electrical soundings were made at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer distributed between 1 and 20 km from the shoreline. These soundings were modeled to investigate how resistivity varies spatially and with depth in the upper 15 m of the aquifer. Porosity was estimated from the modeled formation resistivity and observed pore fluid resistivity with Archie's Law. The models were used to interpolate resistivity and porosity surfaces at -2, -5, -8, and -15 m elevations. Modeled resistivity in the unsaturated zone is generally higher than 300 Ω m with the resistivity at sites with thick unsaturated zones greater than 1000 Ω m. Resistivity in the saturated zone ranges from 30 to 320 Ω m. At many sites in the western portions of the study area, resistivity is constant or increases with depth whereas sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge exhibit a distinct low resistivity zone (ρ < 45 Ω m) at elevations ranging between -5 and -10 m. At one site near the shore of Biscayne Bay, the resistivity is less than 10 Ω m at -5 m elevation reflecting the presence of salt water in the aquifer. The estimated porosity ranges between 14% and 71% with modal values near 25%. The porosity structure varies both with depth and spatially. Western sites exhibit a high porosity zone at shallow depths best expressed in a NE-SW trending zone of 40-50% porosity situated near the western margin of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge. This zone roughly corresponds in depth with the Q5 chronostratigraphic unit of the Miami Fm. which constitutes the upper flow unit of the Biscayne Aquifer. The highest porosity (>50%) is seen at elevations below -5 m at sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge and likely corresponds to solution features. The general NE-SW trend of the resistivity and porosity structure suggests a causal connection with the Pleistocene paleogeography and sedimentary environments.

  7. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.; Bortner, T.E.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island in Florida. This survey was made May 4, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude , parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent and intensity of the radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1400 feet. The accompanying map and index map show the approximate locations of the areas of greater-than-average radioactivity and the location of the traverse flown. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently caused by radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits which occur locally along the beach in the region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given in the accompanying map showing the localities of greater-than-average radioactivity therefore, suggests area in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  8. Florida International University: development and accreditation of Miami's Public College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rock, John A; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Dambach, George; O'Leary, J Patrick; Markham, Sanford; Bagby, Larry; Seecharan, Khaleel; Berkman, Ronald M

    2009-10-01

    Anticipating pressing health care needs in the region, Florida International University (FIU) proposed the FIU College of Medicine (COM), which was approved by the Florida Board of Governors in March 2006. The FIU COM provides a program of study enabling graduates to pursue a wide spectrum of professional careers. This includes careers in general and subspecialty private practice, academic medicine, public service, health care, and public policy leadership. Irrespective of career choice, the special emphasis of the FIU COM mission is its focus on community health in a diverse metropolitan region. Clinical facilities are met through a public partner and multiple private hospital affiliations. Educational objectives are organized into five strands reflecting the breadth of medical education and running concurrently through the four-year curriculum: (1) human biology, (2) disease, illness, and injury, (3) clinical medicine, (4) professional development, and (5) medicine and society. Founding teaching faculty with expertise in the core basic sciences will not only introduce core scientific concepts during the initial seven months but reinforce these same concepts during organ system integrated courses and clerkships. The Neighborhood Health Education Learning Program is an FIU COM innovation in which each medical student is a member of a team that throughout the four-year curriculum identifies and addresses health care needs and factors affecting health outcomes. Preliminary approval of FIU COM was conferred in February 2008, with the first cohort of 40 students matriculating in August 2009. PMID:19881442

  9. Diarrheal Illness among Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program Participants in Miami, Florida: Implications for Nutrition Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Evelyn P.; Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L.; Huffman, Fatma G.; Dixon, Zisca

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess risk factors for diarrheal illness among clients of a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic in Miami, FL. Design: A cross-sectional survey with questions about demographics, food safety practices, and diarrheal illness. Setting: WIC clinic operated by the Miami-Dade County Health…

  10. A Snapshot of Teacher Perceptions on Full Inclusion in an International Urban Community: Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watnick, Beryl; Sacks, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    Miami Dade County Public Schools serves an international community with the highest poverty rate of any large U.S. city as well as the highest percentage of immigrants calling it "home" of any large city throughout the world. This article examines: (a) how Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS), the fifth largest school district in the United…

  11. Trends in Alcohol Knowledge and Drinking Patterns Among Students Who Visited Daytona Beach, Florida, During Spring Break, 1981-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gerardo M.

    1986-01-01

    Assesses changes in student knowledge of and patterns related to drinking. Using data collected from college students visiting Daytona Beach, Florida, during spring break, found that trends toward increased consumption of alcoholic beverages among college students which occurred prior to 1981 have now stabilized and are beginning to reverse…

  12. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, Lake Worth, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-03-01

    PNNL and Florida Solar Energy Center worked with Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County to upgrade an empty 1996 home with a 14.5 SEER AC, heat pump water heater, CFLs, more attic insulation, and air sealing to cut utility bills $872 annually.

  13. Prevalence of and risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection among STD clinic clientele in Miami, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Weisbord, J; Trepka, M; Zhang, G; Smith, I; Brewer, T

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common chronic blood borne viral infection in the United States. We assessed the HCV prevalence, risk factors, and sensitivity of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) routine screening criteria among clients of a large urban sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic. Methods: Participants were recruited from a public STD clinic in Miami, Florida, and were interviewed regarding known and potential risk factors. The survey assessed CDC screening criteria, as well as other risk factors (for example, intranasal drug use, history of incarceration, exchanging sex for money, number of lifetime sex partners, and history of an STD). Testing was done by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and confirmed by recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). Results: The prevalence of anti-HCV positivity was 4.7%. Four variables were significantly associated with being anti-HCV positive, independent of confounding factors. These included injection drug use (odds ratio (OR) = 31.6; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 11.0 to 90.5); history of incarceration (OR = 3.0; 95% CI 1.1 to 8.1); sexual contact with an HCV positive person (OR 12.7; 95% CI 2.5 to 64.7); and older age (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2, 1.6). The sensitivity of CDC's routine screening criteria was 69% and specificity was 91%. Conclusions: The prevalence of anti-HCV in this clinic was similar to that determined in studies of comparable populations. Having sexual contact with an HCV positive person and history of incarceration were independently associated with being anti-HCV positive. CDC's screening criteria identified approximately two thirds of the anti-HCV positive participants. PMID:12576631

  14. Fluid inclusions in vadose cement with consistent vapor to liquid ratios, Pleistocene Miami Limestone, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.; Halley, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Vadose cements in the Late Pleistocene Miami Limestone contain regions with two-phase aqueous fluid inclusions that have consistent vapor to liquid (V-L) ratios. When heated, these seemingly primary inclusions homogenize to a liquid phase in a range between 75??C and 130??C (mean = 100??C) and have final melting temperatures between -0.3?? and 0.0??C. The original distribution of Th was broadened during measurements because of fluid inclusion reequilibration. The narrow range of Th in these fluid inclusions suggest unusually consistent V-L ratios. They occur with small, obscure, single phase liquid-filled inclusions, which infer a low temperature origin (less than 60??C), and contradict the higher temperature origin implied by the two phase inclusions. The diagenetic environment producing these seemingly primary fluid inclusions can be inferred from the origin of the host calcite enclosing them. The ??18O composition of these cements (-4 to-5.5%., PDB) and the fresh water in the fluid inclusions are consistent with precipitation from low-temperature meteoric water. The carbon-isotope composition of the vadose cements that contain only rare two-phase fluid inclusions are comparable to the host rock matrix (??13C between 0 and +4%., PDB). Cements that contain common two-phase fluid-inclusions have a distinctly lighter carbon isotopic composition of -3 to -5%.. The carbon isotope composition of cements that contain common two-phase inclusions are about 6%. lighter than those of other vadose cements; models of early meteoric diagenesis indicate that this is the result of precipitation from water that has been influenced by soil gas CO2. Our hypothesis is that the primary fluid inclusions, those with consistent V-L ratios and the single-phase liquid inclusions, form at near-surface temperature (25??C) and pressure when consistent proportions of soil gas and meteoric water percolating through the vadose zone are trapped within elongate vacuoles. This study corroborates

  15. Local Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus - Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida, June-August 2016.

    PubMed

    Likos, Anna; Griffin, Isabel; Bingham, Andrea M; Stanek, Danielle; Fischer, Marc; White, Stephen; Hamilton, Janet; Eisenstein, Leah; Atrubin, David; Mulay, Prakash; Scott, Blake; Jenkins, Patrick; Fernandez, Danielle; Rico, Edhelene; Gillis, Leah; Jean, Reynald; Cone, Marshall; Blackmore, Carina; McAllister, Janet; Vasquez, Chalmers; Rivera, Lillian; Philip, Celeste

    2016-09-30

    During the first 6 months of 2016, large outbreaks of Zika virus disease caused by local mosquito-borne transmission occurred in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories, but local mosquito-borne transmission was not identified in the continental United States (1,2). As of July 22, 2016, the Florida Department of Health had identified 321 Zika virus disease cases among Florida residents and visitors, all occurring in either travelers from other countries or territories with ongoing Zika virus transmission or sexual contacts of recent travelers.* During standard case investigation of persons with compatible illness and laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection (i.e., a specimen positive by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR], or positive Zika immunoglobulin M [IgM] with supporting dengue serology [negative for dengue IgM antibodies and positive for dengue IgG antibodies], or confirmation of Zika virus neutralizing antibodies by plaque reduction neutralization testing [PRNT]) (3), four persons were identified in Broward and Miami-Dade counties whose infections were attributed to likely local mosquito-borne transmission. Two of these persons worked within 120 meters (131 yards) of each other but had no other epidemiologic connections, suggesting the possibility of a local community-based outbreak. Further epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of the worksites and surrounding neighborhood identified a total of 29 persons with laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection and likely exposure during late June to early August, most within an approximate 6-block area. In response to limited impact on the population of Aedes aegypti mosquito vectors from initial ground-based mosquito control efforts, aerial ultralow volume spraying with the organophosphate insecticide naled was applied over a 10 square-mile area beginning in early August and alternated with aerial larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies

  16. Local Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus - Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida, June-August 2016.

    PubMed

    Likos, Anna; Griffin, Isabel; Bingham, Andrea M; Stanek, Danielle; Fischer, Marc; White, Stephen; Hamilton, Janet; Eisenstein, Leah; Atrubin, David; Mulay, Prakash; Scott, Blake; Jenkins, Patrick; Fernandez, Danielle; Rico, Edhelene; Gillis, Leah; Jean, Reynald; Cone, Marshall; Blackmore, Carina; McAllister, Janet; Vasquez, Chalmers; Rivera, Lillian; Philip, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    During the first 6 months of 2016, large outbreaks of Zika virus disease caused by local mosquito-borne transmission occurred in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories, but local mosquito-borne transmission was not identified in the continental United States (1,2). As of July 22, 2016, the Florida Department of Health had identified 321 Zika virus disease cases among Florida residents and visitors, all occurring in either travelers from other countries or territories with ongoing Zika virus transmission or sexual contacts of recent travelers.* During standard case investigation of persons with compatible illness and laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection (i.e., a specimen positive by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR], or positive Zika immunoglobulin M [IgM] with supporting dengue serology [negative for dengue IgM antibodies and positive for dengue IgG antibodies], or confirmation of Zika virus neutralizing antibodies by plaque reduction neutralization testing [PRNT]) (3), four persons were identified in Broward and Miami-Dade counties whose infections were attributed to likely local mosquito-borne transmission. Two of these persons worked within 120 meters (131 yards) of each other but had no other epidemiologic connections, suggesting the possibility of a local community-based outbreak. Further epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of the worksites and surrounding neighborhood identified a total of 29 persons with laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection and likely exposure during late June to early August, most within an approximate 6-block area. In response to limited impact on the population of Aedes aegypti mosquito vectors from initial ground-based mosquito control efforts, aerial ultralow volume spraying with the organophosphate insecticide naled was applied over a 10 square-mile area beginning in early August and alternated with aerial larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies

  17. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles cover 9250 square miles of land in north-central Florida. The area includes moderately thick sections of platform sediments covering the pre-Cretaceous Peninsular Arch. Surficial materials are composed of Tertiary or more recent deposits. A search of available literature revealed no known significant uranium deposits. Sixty-four uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly in this report. All appear to be related to culture. One well-defined group of anomalies appear to have higher uranium concentrations and are closely associated with the Hawthorne Formation. These few anomalies are considered significant and suggest that more detailed local resource studies should concentrate in this area. Magnetic data appear to suggest complexities in the Paleozoic and older basement material. While some linear features appear related to known diabase dikes, several isolated features are not accounted for by known information.

  18. Urban storm-water runoff data for a residential area, Pompano Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, H.C.; Hardee, Jack; Miller, Robert A.

    1978-01-01

    Rainfall, storm-sewer discharge, and water-quality analyses of storm runoff are summarized for a single-family residential area near Pompano Beach, Florida. The area of the drainage basin is 41 acres of which 61 percent is pervious sod lawns and 39 percent is impervious roofs, driveways and streets. The land surface is nearly flat with a gentle, eastward slope. Storm runoff flows eastward along grass swales into a sewer collection system on the eastern boundary of the area that in turn joins a 36-inch diameter storm drain. Runoff loads of 12 or more water-quality constituents were computed for 32 storms between April 1974 and September 1975. Chemical analyses of rainfall for 3 storms are included. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Prototype demonstration studies of production of methane from municipal solid waste at Pompano Beach, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Faroog, S.; Daly, E.; Dasgupta, A.; Gerrish, M.P.; Sengupta, S.; Wong, K.F.

    1980-12-01

    A prototype demonstration plant for the production of methane from anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in amounts up to 100 tons per day is built at Pompano Beach, Florida. The plant is capable of producing 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas per ton of municipal waste. Approximately half of the gas is methane, the other half CO/sub 2/ along with some trace gases. In this plant the raw municipal solid waste is shredded, ferrous metals removed magnetically and air classified to obtain an organic-rich light weight fraction, which is periodically mixed with sewage sludge and fed into the anaerobic digester. The processed effluent is filtered in a vacuum filter and the emerging filter cake is disposed on the nearby existing sanitary landfill. The filtrate is recirculated into the digester. Various gas, solid and liquid streams coming out of the digester are analyzed for physical, chemical and biological pollution parameters.

  20. A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Final /s/ in Miami Cuban Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes the variation of syllable- and word-final /s/ among two generations of Cubans in Miami, Florida (USA): older, early exile immigrants who arrived in Miami as adults in the 1960s and 1970s, and young Miami-born Cubans whose maternal and paternal grandparents immigrated to Miami from Cuba prior to 1980. Since sibilant weakening is…

  1. Methodology for estimating nutrient loads discharged from the east coast canals to Biscayne Bay, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, Arthur C.

    1999-01-01

    Biscayne Bay is an oligotrophic, subtropical estuary located along the southeastern coast of Florida that provides habitat for a variety of plant and animal life. Concern has arisen with regard to the ecological health of Biscayne Bay because of the presence of nutrient-laden discharges from the east coast canals that drain into the bay. This concern, as well as planned diversion of discharges for ecosystem restoration from the urban and agricultural corridors of Miami-Dade County to Everglades National Park, served as the impetus for a study conducted during the 1996 and 1997 water years to estimate nutrient loads discharged from the east coast canals into Biscayne Bay. Analytical results indicated that the highest concentration of any individual nutrient sampled for in the study was 4.38 mg/L (milligrams per liter) for nitrate at one site, and the lowest concentrations determined were below the detection limits for orthophosphate at six sites and nitrite at four sites. Median concentrations for all the sites were 0.75 mg/L for total organic nitrogen, 0.10 mg/L for ammonia, 0.02 mg/L for nitrite, 0.18 mg/L for nitrate, 0.20 mg/L for nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, 0.02 mg/L for total phosphorus, and 0.005 mg/L for orthophosphate. The maximum total phosphorus concentration of 0.31 mg/L was the only nutrient concentration to exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1986) water-quality criteria. High concentrations of total phosphorus usually reflect contamination as a result of human activities. Five sites exceeded the fresh-water quality standard of 0.5 mg/L for ammonia concentration as determined by the Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management. Median total organic nitrogen concentrations were higher in urban and forested/wetland areas than in agricultural areas; median concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, and nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen were higher in agricultural areas than in urban and forested/wetland areas; and ammonia, total

  2. Relationships between sand and water quality at recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew C; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Piggot, Alan M; Klaus, James S; Zhang, Yifan

    2011-12-15

    Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p < 0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (r(s) = 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (r(s) = 0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (r(s) = 0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Florida's beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality.

  3. Evaluation of the use of reach transmissivity to quantify leakage beneath Levee 31N, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemeth, Mark S.; Wilcox, Walter M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ground- and surface-water model (MODBRANCH) was developed to estimate ground-water flow beneath Levee 31N in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and to simulate hydrologic conditions in the surrounding area. The study included compilation of data from monitoring stations, measurement of vertical seepage rates in wetlands, and analysis of the hydrogeologic properties of the ground-water aquifer within the study area. In addition, the MODBRANCH code was modified to calculate the exchange between surface-water channels and ground water using a relation based on the concept of reach transmissivity. The modified reach-transmissivity version of the MODBRANCH code was successfully tested on three simple problems with known analytical solutions. It was also tested and determined to function adequately on one field problem that had previously been solved using the unmodified version of the software. The modified version of MODBRANCH was judged to have performed satisfactorily, and it required about 60 percent as many iterations to reach a solution. Additionally, its input parameters are more physically-based and less dependent on model-grid spacing. A model of the Levee 31N area was developed and used with the original and modified versions of MODBRANCH, which produced similar output. The mean annual modeled ground-water heads differed by only 0.02 foot, and the mean annual canal discharge differed by less than 1.0 cubic foot per second. Seepage meters were used to quantify vertical seepage rates in the Everglades wetlands area west of Levee 31N. A comparison between results from the seepage meters and from the computer model indicated substantial differences that seemed to be a result of local variations in the hydraulic properties in the topmost part of the Biscayne aquifer. The transmissivity of the Biscayne aquifer was estimated to be 1,400,000 square feet per day in the study area. The computer model was employed to simulate seepage of ground water beneath Levee 31N

  4. 76 FR 8656 - Safety Zone; Miami International Triathlon, Bayfront Park, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Miami International Triathlon, Bayfront... establishing a temporary safety zone in the waters east of Bayfront Park for the Miami International Triathlon in Miami, Florida. The triathlon is scheduled to take place on March 20, 2011. The temporary...

  5. 77 FR 44522 - Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... Park, in Miami, Florida during the 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami...

  6. The fate of wastewater-derived nitrate in the subsurface of the Florida Keys: Key Colony Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griggs, E.M.; Kump, L.R.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2003-01-01

     Shallow injection is the predominant mode of wastewater disposal for most tourist-oriented facilities and some residential communities in the US Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Concern has been expressed that wastewater nutrients may be escaping from the saline groundwater system into canals and surrounding coastal waters and perhaps to the reef tract 10 km offshore, promoting unwanted algal growth and degradation of water quality. We performed a field study of the fate of wastewater-derived nitrate in the subsurface of a Florida Keys residential community (Key Colony Beach, FL) that uses this disposal method, analyzing samples from 21 monitoring wells and two canal sites. The results indicate that wastewater injection at 18–27 m depth into saline groundwater creates a large buoyant plume that flows quickly (within days) upward to a confining layer 6 m below the surface, and then in a fast flow path toward a canal 200 m to the east within a period of weeks to months. Low-salinity groundwaters along the fast flow path have nitrate concentrations that are not significantly reduced from that of the injected wastewaters (ranging from 400 to 600 μmol kg−1). Portions of the low-salinity plume off the main axis of flow have relatively long residence times (>2 months) and have had their nitrate concentrations strongly reduced by a combination of mixing and denitrification. These waters have dissolved N2 concentrations up to 1.6 times air-saturation values with δ15 N[N2]=0.5-5‰, δ15N[NO3-]=16-26‰, and calculated isotope fractionation factors of about −12±4‰, consistent with denitrification as the predominant nitrate reduction reaction. Estimated rates of denitrification of wastewater in the aquifer are of the order of 4 μmol kg-1 N day-1 or 0.008 day-1. The data indicate that denitrification reduces the nitrate load of the injected wastewater substantially, but not completely, before it discharges to nearby canals.

  7. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Miami, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, a quality-assurance plan has been created for use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Miami to conduct water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Miami USGS for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures that are documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the Miami USGS quality-assurance plans for surface-water and ground-water activities.

  8. Using multiple geochemical tracers to characterize the hydrogeology of the submarine spring off Crescent Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Reich, C.D.; Spechler, R.M.; Kindinger, J.L.; Moore, W.S.

    2001-01-01

    A spectacular submarine spring is located about 4 km east of Crescent Beach, FL, in the Atlantic Ocean. The single vent feature of Crescent Beach Spring provides a unique opportunity to examine onshore-offshore hydrogeologic processes, as well as point source submarine ground water discharge. The Floridan aquifer system in northeastern Florida consists of Tertiary interspersed limestone and dolomite strata. Impermeable beds confine the water-bearing zones under artesian pressure. Miocene and younger confining strata have been eroded away at the vent feature, enabling direct hydrologic communication of Eocene ground water with coastal bottom waters. The spring water had a salinity of 6.02, which was immediately diluted by ambient seawater during advection/mixing. The concentration of major solutes in spring water and onshore well waters confirm a generalized easterly flow direction of artesian ground water. Nutrient concentrations were generally low in the reducing vent samples, and the majority of the total nitrogen species existed as NH3. The submarine ground water tracers, Rn-222 (1174 dpm I-1, dpm), methane (232 nM) and barium (294.5 nM) were all highly enriched in the spring water relative to ambient seawater. The concentrations of the reverse redox elements U, V and Mo were expectedly low in the submarine waters. The strontium isotope ratio of the vent water (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70798) suggests that the spring water contain an integrated signature indicative of Floridan aquifer system ground water. Additional Sr isotopic ratios from a series of surficial and Lower Floridan well samples suggest dynamic ground water mixing, and do not provide clear evidence for a single hydrogeologic water source at the spring vent. In this karst-dominated aquifer, such energetic mixing at the vent feature is expected, and would be facilitated by conduit and fractured flow. Radium isotope activities were utilized to estimate flow-path trajectories and to provide information on

  9. Florida From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Taken during the STS-95 mission from a point over Cuba, this photo shows an oblique, foreshortened view of the Florida Peninsula, with the light blue, shallow seafloor of both the Florida Keys (curving across the bottom of the view) and the Bahama banks (right). 'Popcorn' cumulus cloud covers Miami and the Southern Everglades, although the built-up area from Ft. Lauderdale to West Palm Beach can be discerned. Lake Okeechobee is the prominent waterbody in Florida. Cape Canaveral is shown well, half way up the peninsula. Orlando appears as the lighter patch West (left) of Cape Canaveral, near the middle of the peninsula. Cape Hatteras appears top right, with the North part of Chesapeake Bay also visible. This is a visibility of 16 degrees of latitude (23 degrees N over Cuba to 39 degrees at Baltimore), showing unusual atmospheric clarity.

  10. Quality-of-water data, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1970-1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.; Lietz, Arthur C.

    1976-01-01

    One of the most pressing problems of Palm Beach County, Florida, is the present and potential contamination of the surface and ground-water resources. The canals which dissect the urban and agricultural areas are convenient receptacles for storm-water runoff, sewage effluent, and agricultural wastes. Contaminants in the canals may enter the shallow aquifer as the canal water infiltrates. The quality of water in the shallow aquifer is further influenced by constituents in infiltrating rainwater, septic tank effluent, and many other sources of contamination. The County Health Department has stated that many of the canals and lakes, including Lake Worth, an estuary, have reached levels of contamination rendering them unfit for recreation (Land and others, 1972). The purpose of this report is to: (1) Compile the basic water-quality data collected during 1970-75 as a part of the monitoring program. (2) Make these data available in a usable form to assist in urban and regional planning of the county 's water resources. The water-quality programs include 36 surface-water stations on canals and lakes and 136 ground-water stations which have been regularly sampled. Both urban and agricultural areas are included in the sampling programs. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Geologic and hydrologic data from a test-monitor well at Fernandina Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, David P.

    1980-01-01

    A 2,102-foot observation well was drilled at Fernandina Beach, Florida, to obtain geologic and hydrologic data. Drill cuttings, water samples, and water-level measurements were collected. Geologist's, driller's, and geophysical logs were completed. The well is constructed with 12-inch diameter casing to a depth of 515 feet and 6-inch diameter casing from 515 to 2,000 feet. The remainder is open hole. The uppermost 500 feet of material penetrated by the well consists of sand, clay, limestone, and dolomite. In the remainder of the hole, the material consists of fragmental and granular limestone and massive to finely crystalline dolomite, which comprise the Floridan aquifer in the area. After the well was completed, water levels in the monitored zone, 2,000 to 2,102 feet, were above land surface. During July and August 1979, water levels ranged from about 8 to 13 feet above land surface. Chloride concentrations of water sampled through the drill stem from a depth of 632 to 2,039 feet ranged from 25 to 710 milligrams per liter. Chloride increased markedly below 2,039 feet to a maximum of 7,800 milligrams per liter at 2,094 feet. After completion of the well, chloride was 8,100 milligrams per liter. (USGS)

  12. Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Florida’s beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality. PMID:22071324

  13. Quality of water recovered from a municipal effluent injection well in the Floridan aquifer system, Pompano Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.; Irwin, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    Approximately 69 million gallons of backflow from an injection well used for the disposal of secondary treated municipal effluent in the Floridan aquifer system near Pompano Beach, Florida, was periodically sampled for inorganic quality from March 1975 through March 1977. Analyses of the backflow effluent showed a concomitant increase in dissolved solids and a change in ionic composition as a function of cumulative volume of backflow. Both the increase in dissolved solids and the change in major ionic composition were directly related to an estimated 6 to 7 percent mixing of the moderately saline water in the Florida aquifer system with the injected system with the injected effluent. Although an estimated 3.5 billion gallons of effluent was injected into the aquifer system during the 16-year operation of the Collier Manor treatment plant, only 65 to 70 million gallons was backflowed before the chloride concentration approached 250 milligrams per liter. (USGS)

  14. Establishment of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Other Microorganisms on a Beach Replenishment Site in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, D. M.; Will, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Beach replenishment is a widely used method of controlling coastal erosion. To reduce erosional losses from wind, beach grasses are often planted on the replenishment sands. However, there is little information on the microbial populations in this material that may affect plant establishment and growth. The objectives of this research were to document changes in the populations of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and other soil microorganisms in replenishment materials and to determine whether roots of transplanted beach grasses become colonized by beneficial microbes. The study was conducted over a 2-year period on a replenishment project in northeastern Florida. Three sampling locations were established at 1-km intervals along the beach. Each location consisted of three plots: an established dune, replenishment sand planted with Uniola paniculata and Panicum sp., and replenishment sand left unplanted. Fungal and bacterial populations increased rapidly in the rhizosphere of beach grasses in the planted plots. However, no bacteria were recovered that could fix significant amounts of N2. The VAM fungi established slowly on the transplanted grasses. Even after two growing seasons, levels of root colonization and sporulation were significantly below those found in the established dune. There was a shift in the dominant VAM fungi found in the planted zone with respect to those in the established dunes. The most abundant species recovered from the established dunes were Glomus deserticola, followed by Acaulospora scrobiculata and Scutellospora weresubiae. The VAM fungi that colonized the planted zone most rapidly were Glomus globiferum, followed by G. deserticola and Glomus aggregatum. PMID:16347547

  15. 33 CFR 117.305 - Miami River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Miami River. 117.305 Section 117.305 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.305 Miami River. (a) General. Public vessels...

  16. 33 CFR 117.305 - Miami River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Miami River. 117.305 Section 117.305 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.305 Miami River. (a) General. Public vessels...

  17. Generic Pharmaceutical Association (GPhA) - 2015 Annual Meeting (February 9-11, 2015 - Miami Beach, Florida, USA).

    PubMed

    Bowman, M

    2015-02-01

    The Generic Pharmaceutical Association (GPhA) chairman Craig Wheeler (Momenta Pharmaceuticals), welcomed attendees to the 2015 Annual Meeting by reflecting on the contributions of the generic industry over the past year and some of the challenges that lie ahead. In 2014, 86% of prescriptions dispensed in the U.S. were generic, contributing to the USD 1.4 trillion savings generated by the industry since its inception; however, there are still many challenges to face, including consolidation of customers, lag in Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) approval timelines, restrictive Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) programs and labeling legislations. The continued drive into the branded business by many GPhA member companies has resulted in the association planning a structural division for companies involved in biologic and biosimilar products. During the 3-day meeting, attendees listened to expert panels discuss major business, regulatory and market trends developing in the generic industry, with insights from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and market analysts. The meeting also provided attendees with numerous opportunities to socialize and network with key decision makers in the industry.

  18. High numbers of Staphylococcus aureus at three bathing beaches in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Green, Melissa; Echeverry, Andrea; Bonilla, Tonya D; Stinson, Corine Melanie; Hartz, Aaron; Rogerson, Andrew; McCorquodale, Donald S

    2013-01-01

    While the value of Staphylococcus aureus as an indicator for non-enteric diseases is unclear, understanding its prevalence in recreational beaches would prove useful, given its pathogenic potential. Staphylococcus aureus levels were evaluated in sand and seawater at three beaches during one year. To elucidate possible S. aureus sources or colonization trends, distribution in sand was analyzed at Hollywood Beach. Staphylococcus aureus levels fluctuated throughout the study with highest average densities detected in dry sand (3.46 × 10⁵ CFU/g, Hobie Beach), particularly at beaches with high human density. Patchy distribution marked hotspots of human use and/or possible bacterial re-growth. Data from a brief epidemiological survey indicated a very slight association between beach usage and skin conditions; suggesting high S. aureus levels in sand may not necessarily constitute major health risks. Because the possibility of disease transmission exists, particularly to children and immuno-compromised beach-goers, periodic surveying of highly frequented beaches seems warranted.

  19. The Effect of Coastal Development on Storm Surge Flooding in Biscayne Bay, Florida, USA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Liu, H.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Barrier islands and associated bays along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts are a favorite place for both living and visiting. Many of them are vulnerable to storm surge flooding because of low elevations and constantly being subjected to the impacts of storms. The population increase and urban development along the barrier coast have altered the shoreline configuration, resulting in a dramatic change in the coastal flooding pattern in some areas. Here we present such a case based on numerical simulations of storm surge flooding caused by the1926 hurricane in the densely populated area surrounding Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The construction of harbor and navigation channels, and the development of real estate and the roads connecting islands along Biscayne Bay have changed the geometry of Biscayne Bay since 1910s. Storm surge simulations show that the Port of Miami and Dodge Island constructed by human after 1950 play an important role in changing storm surge inundation pattern along Biscayne Bay. Dodge Island enhances storm surge and increases inundation in the area south of the island, especially at the mouth of Miami River (Downtown of Miami), and reduces storm surge flooding in the area north of the island, especially in Miami Beach. If the Hurricane Miami of 1926 happened today, the flooding area would be reduced by 55% and 20% in the Miami Beach and North Miami areas, respectively. Consequently, it would prevent 400 million of property and 10 thousand people from surge flooding according to 2010 U.S census and 2007 property tax data. Meanwhile, storm water would penetrate further inland south of Dodge Island and increase the flooding area by 25% in the Miami River and Downtown Miami areas. As a result, 200 million of property and five thousand people would be impacted by storm surge.

  20. Hydrogeology of a zone of secondary permeability in the surficial aquifer of eastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, L.J.; Miller, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The surficial aquifer is the primary source of freshwater for the heavily developed coastal area in eastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Well fields are generally located in a discontinuous zone of higher secondary permeability, the northernmost extension of the Biscayne aquifer in the surficial aquifer, that extends from the Juno Beach area south to Broward County and varies in width from about 4 to 15 miles. The zone was formed by varying dissolution of aquifer limestone materials during Pleistocene age changes in sea level, and ranges in depth from about sea level to 220 feet below sea level. Because of proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and saltwater estuaries, the aquifer is susceptible to saltwater intrusion. Ground water to the west of the zone of higher secondary permeability is of poor quality. The ground water is calcium bicarbonate dominant. Dissolved solids, calcium carbonate hardness, and chloride are greatest along the saltwater intruded coastline and in the western part of the study area where diluted residual seawater exists. Total organic carbon increases inland due to infiltration of rainwater through thicker layers of organic soils. Ground-water levels in the surficial aquifer in eastern Palm Beach County are strongly influenced by controlled levels in canals. In March 1981, after 12 months of below average rainfall, ground-water levels ranged from about 2 feet above sea level along the coast to nearly 21 feet above sea level 15 miles inland in the northwest section of the study area. (USGS)

  1. Miami "Zone" Gives Schools Intensive Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the intensive support given to some of the lowest-performing schools in the Miami-Dade County, Florida. One of these schools is Miami Jackson High School, one of Florida's worst-performing schools. For two of the last three years, it has brought its state grade up from an F to a D. But now the initiative,…

  2. An Evaluation of the Special Educational Project for Migrant Children in Dade County Public Schools, Miami, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Educational Project for Migrant Children, Naranja, FL.

    Evaluated are the various features of a project for the education of migrant children in a rural section of Florida. The objectives of the program were to ascertain the special educational needs of this population and to develop programs to meet their needs; to offer necessary supplemental and remedial activities and social and educational…

  3. The Miami, Florida, Young Men's Survey: HIV prevalence and risk behaviors among urban young men who have sex with men who have ever runaway.

    PubMed

    LaLota, Marlene; Kwan, Bonnie W; Waters, Melinda; Hernandez, Leticia E; Liberti, Thomas M

    2005-06-01

    Youth in urban areas with a history of running away from home often have special needs. Importantly, risk factors for HIV/AIDS might be associated with such a history. We assessed the association between having a history of running away from home and the occurrence of HIV infection and risk behavior among young men who have sex with men (YMSM), aged 15-22 years. A cross-sectional epidemiologic and behavioral survey was conducted between 1995 and 1996 in Miami, Florida, as part of a national Young Men's Survey. Of 488 YMSM, the prevalence of HIV infection among those with a history of running away from home was 10.5% (adjusted odds ratio=3.4; 95% CI 1.5-7.8). YMSM who had ever run away were more likely to be HIV infected, be out of school, and have ever had vaginal or anal sex with females, been forced to have sex, injected drugs, and used needles for self-tattooing or body piercing. The prevalence of HIV infection and associated risk behaviors among runaways was high, highlighting the ongoing need for prevention and social support services for youth with a history of running away from home. PMID:15917503

  4. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

    2001-02-28

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  5. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

    2001-02-01

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  6. A report from the 68th annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (March 5-9, 2010 - Miami, Florida, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2010-06-01

    Although a study using eye-tracking technology to assess the focus of attention when evaluating the beauty of a face demonstrated a marked attentional preference for the eye area (Cula, G.O. et al., Abst P1636), the skin at large is a main factor that reveals information about a person to everyone else with whom he or she comes into contact. Be it because of disease or because of aging, improving the appearance of the skin is as important as relieving pain, itch or other troublesome symptoms caused by skin diseases. Moreover, this can be much more important in a place like South Miami Beach, where bare skin is revealed on much more than just the face ... at least under normal circumstances, when the weather is not as surprisingly chilly as it was in March 2010 during the AAD annual meeting However, if beauty is very important for many people, health is important for everybody, and important news was also discussed on treatments for common and less common cutaneous diseases, ranging from psoriasis, acne and atopic dermatitis to a broad range of blistering, papulosquamous and granulomatous diseases. These are among the most important issues reviewed in the following report, which in combination with expert insight interviews freely accessible from the Access Dermatology website and the full abstracts from the meeting, available for download from the AAD website, will hopefully improve dermatologists' approach to treating skin diseases through use of the most novel therapies. Treatment is important, but so is prevention, and in that sense an important issue discussed during the meeting, which was nicely covered in an interview with Dr. Darrell S. Riegel from the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at the New York University School of Medicine, was that protecting the skin from sunlight and artificial tanning beds is essential for preventing malignancies such as melanoma, while not jeopardizing adequate availability of active vitamin D. A fitting message is

  7. PROCEEDINGS AND SUMMARY REPORT: WORKSHOP ON THE FATE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY IN AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS, MAY 8-10, 2001, WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Workshop on the Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Mercury in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments was held on May 8-10, 2001 in West Palm Beach, Florida. The workshop was conducted by the USEPA's Office of Research and Development and cosponsored by the U.S. Geological S...

  8. THE APPLICATION OF PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID PROBES FOR RAPID DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF EUBACTERIA, STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN RECREATIONAL BEACHES OF S. FLORIDA. (R828830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, S...

  9. Effect of a Shore-Oblique Ridge on Beach and Bar Morphodynamics at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Processes linking beach and bar response to external wave forcing are poorly understood where spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, two persistant surfzone sand bars occur in a region that also includes cape-associated shoals and multiple shore-oblique ridges at depths below the fair-weather wave base of sediment transport. These features transform incoming deep-water waves, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy along- and cross-shore. To observe beach and sandbar response in this complex environment we have collected and georectified hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Comparisons of imagery to monthly differential GPS surveys reveal that a double-bar system, with ~25-50 m spacing between crests, has persisted over the last 2 years. Welding of the inner and outer bars occurs intermittently. The preferred welding location coincides with a dune overwash area that has been an erosion hotspot (EHS) over the last decade. Strong nor'easter activity in November 2011 activated wave breaking across a large (~10 km long, ~500 m wide, ~5 m tall) shore-oblique subaqueous ridge that intersects the nearshore system at the EHS. Our observations allow testing of a hypothesis that the ridge controls nearshore morphodynamics through two mechanisms: 1) by focusing, dissipating, and shadowing wave energy, especially during storm events and 2) by providing a sediment source to the nearshore system. The former mechanism is supported through image and survey analysis that shows beach and bar behavior differ updrift and downdrift of the ridge-beach intersection. Three ADCPs were deployed during the early 2010-2011 and late 2011-2012 winter nor'easter seasons to measure wave transformation and current structures in this region. During the most recent deployment, an instrument on the ridge's leeward side was nearly completely buried, yet measured bottom currents (< 50 cm/s) do not

  10. Hydrostratigraphic Framework and Selection and Correlation of Geophysical Log Markers in the Surficial Aquifer System, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system is the major source of freshwater for public water supply in Palm Beach County, Florida, yet many previous studies of the hydrogeology of this aquifer system have focused only on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal area (Land and others, 1973; Swayze and others, 1980; Swayze and Miller, 1984; Shine and others, 1989). Population growth in the county has resulted in the westward expansion of urbanized areas into agricultural areas and has created new demands on the water resources of the county. Additionally, interest in surface-water resources of central and western areas of the county has increased. In these areas, plans for additional surface-water storage reservoirs are being made under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan originally proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District (1999), and stormwater treatment areas have been constructed by the South Florida Water Management District. Surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Everglades are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology (Harvey and others, 2002). Most of the previous hydrogeologic and ground-water flow simulation studies of the surficial aquifer system have not utilized a hydrostratigraphic framework, in which stratigraphic or sequence stratigraphic units, such as those proposed in Cunningham and others (2001), are delineated in this stratigraphically complex aquifer system. A thick zone of secondary permeability mapped by Swayze and Miller (1984) was not subdivided and was identified as only being within the Anastasia Formation of Pleistocene age. Miller (1987) published 11 geologic sections of the surficial aquifer system, but did not delineate any named stratigraphic units in these sections. This limited interpretation has resulted, in part, from the complex facies changes within rocks and sediments of the surficial aquifer

  11. HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the Household Hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to: 1) Quantity the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County Florida’s (the County) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal s...

  12. Lithologic logs and geophysical logs from test drilling in Palm Beach County, Florida, since 1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, Leo J.; McGovern, Michael C.; Fischer, John N.

    1980-01-01

    Test-hole data that may be used to determine the hydrogeology of the zone of high permeability in Palm Beach County, Fla., are presented. Lithologic logs from 46 test wells and geophysical logs from 40 test wells are contained in this report. (USGS)

  13. Hydraulics and geology related to beach restoration in Lee County, Florida. [Captiva Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winton, T. (Principal Investigator); Brooks, H. K.; Degner, J.; Ruth, B.

    1981-01-01

    The erosion problem on Captiva Island is discussed. It is due to a deficit in the sand budget of the littoral drift system; a system with losses due to attrition of the particles and mass losses into the lagoons, to offshore, and to lateral transport. The effect that reopening Blind Pass would have, and the placement of sediment retaining structures in the surf zone at the northern and southern limits of the Captiva beach system, wave examined. A geological approach was used to study the origin and dynamic changes that have occurred. Through hydraulic modeling, changes that will occur by reopening and stabilizing Blind Pass are predicted. It is concluded that if the island is to be stabilized, beach nourishment with proper amounts and particle size is a necessity and that jetties adequate to restrict lateral and offshore losses are essential. It is shown that the reopening of Blind Pass would have minimal effects on the passes to the north and south, and would improve the environmental conditions in the sound with no adverse effects on the beach system.

  14. Health assessment for Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc. , Pompano Beach, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD041184383. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-31

    The Wilson Concepts site in northeastern Broward County, Florida has been manufacturing precision-machined parts since 1976. Waste cleaners, coolants, and lubricants were discharged directly onto the ground or overflowed from underground holding tanks subsequently spilling into an on-site dry-well storm drain. Carter and Crawley, a computer parts manufacturing company, began operation at the site on January 3, 1989. The 1986 analytic results reported in the NUS Site Screening Investigation (EPA, 1986) indicated that ground water on-site contains elevated concentrations. The soil and subsurface soil contamination levels did not exceed health concern screening levels. Based on the available information, this site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via inhalation, ingestion, and dermal absorption of contaminants. The contaminants include vinyl chloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, cyanide, copper, 1,1-dichloroethene, lead, nickel, and 1,1-dichloroethane in ground water and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane and 1,1-dichloroethene in storm water. To date, the population identified to be of greatest concern is on-site workers.

  15. Hydrogeologic and Hydraulic Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer System, and Origin of High Salinity Groundwater, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, Florida, have focused mostly on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal areas. These studies have not placed the hydrogeology in a framework in which stratigraphic units in this complex aquifer system are defined and correlated between wells. Interest in the surficial aquifer system has increased because of population growth, westward expansion of urbanized areas, and increased utilization of surface-water resources in the central and western areas of the county. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to delineate the hydrogeologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, based on a lithostratigraphic framework, and to evaluate hydraulic properties and characteristics of units and permeable zones within this framework. A lithostratigraphic framework was delineated by correlating markers between all wells with data available based primarily on borehole natural gamma-ray geophysical log signatures and secondarily, lithologic characteristics. These correlation markers approximately correspond to important lithostratigraphic unit boundaries. Using the markers as guides to their boundaries, the surficial aquifer system was divided into three main permeable zones or subaquifers, which are designated, from shallowest to deepest, zones 1, 2, and 3. Zone 1 is above the Tamiami Formation in the Anastasia and Fort Thompson Formations. Zone 2 primarily is in the upper part or Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation, and zone 3 is in the Ochopee Limestone Member of the Tamiami Formation or its correlative equivalent. Differences in the lithologic character exist between these three zones, and these differences commonly include differences in the nature of the pore space. Zone 1 attains its greatest thickness (50 feet or more

  16. Origins and delineation of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer and changes in the distribution of saltwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Fitterman, David V.

    2014-01-01

    salinities ranging from 1.4 to 32 practical salinity units (PSU) upstream of the salinity control structures. Time-series electromagnetic induction log data from monitoring wells G–3601, G–3608, and G–3701, located adjacent to the Biscayne, Snapper Creek, and Black Creek Canals, respectively, and upstream of the salinity control structures, indicated shallow influxes of conductive water in the aquifer that likely resulted from leakage of brackish water or saltwater from these canals. The determination that saltwater influxes were recent is supported by the similarity in the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope composition in samples from the Snapper Creek Canal, 1.6 kilometers (km) inland of a salinity control structure, and in samples from well G–3608, which is adjacent to the canal, as well as by the relative ages of the water sampled from well G–3608 and other wells open to the aquifer below the saltwater interface. Historical and recent salinity information from the Card Sound Road Canal, monitoring well FKS8 located adjacent to the canal, and the 2001 helicopter electromagnetic survey indicated that saltwater may occasionally leak from this canal as far inland as 15 km. This leakage may be prevented or reduced by a salinity control structure that was installed in May 2010. Saltwater also may have leaked from the Princeton Canal. Results of geochemical sampling and analysis indicate a close correspondence between droughts and saltwater intrusion. Tritium/helium-3 apparent (piston-flow) ages determined from samples of saltwater with chloride concentrations of about 1,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or greater generally corresponded to a period during which droughts were frequent. Comparison of average daily air temperatures in Miami, Florida, with estimates of recharge temperatures determined from the dissolved gas composition in water samples indicated that saltwater likely entered the aquifer in April or early May when water levels are typically at their lowest

  17. Origins and delineation of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer and changes in the distribution of saltwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Fitterman, David V.

    2014-01-01

    salinities ranging from 1.4 to 32 practical salinity units (PSU) upstream of the salinity control structures. Time-series electromagnetic induction log data from monitoring wells G–3601, G–3608, and G–3701, located adjacent to the Biscayne, Snapper Creek, and Black Creek Canals, respectively, and upstream of the salinity control structures, indicated shallow influxes of conductive water in the aquifer that likely resulted from leakage of brackish water or saltwater from these canals. The determination that saltwater influxes were recent is supported by the similarity in the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope composition in samples from the Snapper Creek Canal, 1.6 kilometers (km) inland of a salinity control structure, and in samples from well G–3608, which is adjacent to the canal, as well as by the relative ages of the water sampled from well G–3608 and other wells open to the aquifer below the saltwater interface. Historical and recent salinity information from the Card Sound Road Canal, monitoring well FKS8 located adjacent to the canal, and the 2001 helicopter electromagnetic survey indicated that saltwater may occasionally leak from this canal as far inland as 15 km. This leakage may be prevented or reduced by a salinity control structure that was installed in May 2010. Saltwater also may have leaked from the Princeton Canal. Results of geochemical sampling and analysis indicate a close correspondence between droughts and saltwater intrusion. Tritium/helium-3 apparent (piston-flow) ages determined from samples of saltwater with chloride concentrations of about 1,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or greater generally corresponded to a period during which droughts were frequent. Comparison of average daily air temperatures in Miami, Florida, with estimates of recharge temperatures determined from the dissolved gas composition in water samples indicated that saltwater likely entered the aquifer in April or early May when water levels are typically at their lowest

  18. Residue dynamics of acephate and methamidophos in urban dooryard citrus foliage, Pompano Beach, Florida--August-September 1978.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, G E; Bogan, M D

    1980-06-01

    Residues of acephate and its toxic metabolite methamidophos, attributable to the State-Federal program for eradication of the citrus blackfly (CBF) [Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby] on citrus foliage, were assessed in urban areas in Pompano Beach, Florida. Eighteen dooryard citrus trees were sampled on two line transects, each ca 1.6 km long, along two city streets. The trees were sampled twice monthly for five months, beginning before chemical treatments were applied, continuing through the acephate treatment period, and ending when residues decreased below the limits of detection. Acephate and methamidophos residues, as high as 302.5 ppm and 15.8 ppm, respectively, were detected on leaves within one day after the first of a series of three treatments. Significant conversion of acephate to methamidophose was observed. Of the 143 samples collected, 114 contained measurable residues of both compounds; methamidophos accounted for an average of 19 percent of the total residues. Both compounds degraded rapidly, however, and residues averaged below 1 ppm approximately four weeks after the third treatment in the series. Average foliar half-lives for acephate and methamidophos were 8.93 days (SD = 2.52) and 8.40 days (SD = 2.55), respectively.

  19. Assessment of water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1989-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess ground-water and surface-water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District in northern Palm Beach County from 1989 to 1994. Contamination of the surficial aquifer system and availability of a potable water supply have become of increasing concern. The study consisted of sampling 11 ground-water wells and 14 surface- water sites for determination of major inorganic constituents and physical characteristics, trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and synthetic organic compounds. Sodium and chloride concentrations exceeded Florida drinking-water standards in ground water at two wells, dissolved- solids concentrations at five ground-water wells and one surface-water site, and color values at all 11 ground-water wells and all 14 surface-water sites. Other constituents also exhibited concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards. Cadmium and zinc concentrations exceeded the standards in ground water at one well, and lead concentrations exceeded the standard in ground water at five wells. Nitrogen and phosphorus specie concentrations did not exceed respective drinking-water standards in any ground-water or surface-water samples. Several synthetic organic compounds were detected at or above 50 micrograms per liter in water samples collected from six ground-water wells and three surface-water sites.

  20. 33 CFR 117.307 - Miami River, North Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Miami River, North Fork. 117.307 Section 117.307 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.307 Miami River, North Fork. The draw...

  1. 33 CFR 117.307 - Miami River, North Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miami River, North Fork. 117.307 Section 117.307 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.307 Miami River, North Fork. The draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.307 - Miami River, North Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Miami River, North Fork. 117.307 Section 117.307 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.307 Miami River, North Fork. The draw...

  3. 33 CFR 117.307 - Miami River, North Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Miami River, North Fork. 117.307 Section 117.307 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.307 Miami River, North Fork. The draw...

  4. 33 CFR 117.307 - Miami River, North Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Miami River, North Fork. 117.307 Section 117.307 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.307 Miami River, North Fork. The draw...

  5. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow near the Lantana Landfill, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Wexler, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Lantana landfill in Palm Beach County has a surface that is 40 to 50 feet above original ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash. Parts of the landfill are below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate that leachate-enriched ground water along the eastern perimeter of the landfill has moved about 500 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride and nutrients within the leachate-enriched ground water were greater than background concentrations. The surficial aquifer system in the area of the landfill consists primarily of sand of moderate permeability, from land surface to a depth of about 68 feet deep, and consists of sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone of high permeability from a depth of about 68 feet to a depth of 200 feet. The potentiometric surface in the landfill is higher than that in adjacent areas to the east, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow was made using a telescoping-grid technique where a model covering a large area is used to determine boundaries and fluxes for a finer scale model. A regional flow model encompassing a 500-square mile area in southeastern Palm Beach County was used to calculate ground-water fluxes in a 126.5-square mile subregional area. Boundary fluxes calculated by the subregional model were then used to calculate boundary fluxes for a local model of the 3.75-square mile area representing the Lantana landfill site and vicinity. Input data required for simulating ground-water flow in the study area were obtained from the regional flow models, thus, effectively coupling the models. Additional simulations were made using the local flow model to predict effects of possible remedial actions on the movement of solutes in the ground-water system. Possible remedial actions simulated included capping the landfill with an impermeable layer

  6. Hydrogeology and the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, R.S.; Memberg, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The virtually untapped Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a supplemental source of water for public use in the highly populated coastal area of Palm Beach County. A recent study was conducted to delineate the distribution of salinity in relation to the local hydrogeology and assess the potential processes that might control (or have affected) the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system in the study area consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer and ranges in age from Paleocene to Oligocene. Included at its top is part of a lowermost Hawthorn Group unit referred to as the basal Hawthorn unit. The thickness of this basal unit is variable, ranging from about 30 to 355 feet; areas where this unit is thick were paleotopographic lows during deposition of the unit. The uppermost permeable zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer occur in close association with an unconformity at the base of the Hawthorn Group; however, the highest of these zones can be up in the basal unit. A dolomite unit of Eocene age generally marks the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer, but the top of this dolomite unit has a considerable altitude range: from about 1,200 to 2,300 feet below sea level. Additionally, where the dolomite unit is thick, its top is high and the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system, as normally defined, probably is not present. An upper zone of brackish water and a lower zone of water with salinity similar to that of seawater (saline-water zone) are present in the Floridan aquifer system. The brackish-water and saline-water zones are separated by a transition zone (typically 100 to 200 feet thick) in which salinity rapidly increases with depth. The transition zone was defined by using a salinity of 10,000 mg/L (milligrams per liter) of dissolved-solids concentration (about 5,240 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its top and 35,000 mg/L of dissolved

  7. Factors affecting compliance with colorectal cancer screening among households residing in the largely Haitian community of Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Meredith Leigh; Acuña, Juan Manuel; de la Vega, Pura Rodriguez; Castro, Grettel; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-05-01

    The United States Black population is disproportionately affected by colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of incidence and mortality. Studies suggest that screening rates are lower among Blacks compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). However, studies on CRC screening within Black subgroups are lacking. This study examined disparities in blood stool test (BST) compliance and colonoscopy use by race/ethnicity (Haitian, NHW, non-Hispanic Black [NHB], and Hispanic) among randomly selected households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida.This study used cross-sectional, health and wellness data from a random-sample, population-based survey conducted within 951 households in Little Haiti between November 2011 and December 2012. BST compliance and colonoscopy use were self-reported and defined, conservatively, as the use of BST within the past 2 years and the ever use of colonoscopy by any household member. Factors associated with BST compliance and colonoscopy use were identified using logistic regression models. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member ≥50 years (n = 666).Nearly half of the households were compliant with BST (rate [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 45% [41%-49%]) and completed colonoscopy (rate [95% CI] = 53% [49%-58%]). Compliance with BST was not associated with race/ethnicity (P = 0.76). Factors independently associated with BST compliance included low educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.63, P = 0.03), being single (AOR = 0.47, P = 0.004), retirement (AOR = 1.96, P = 0.01), and the presence of diagnosed health problems (AOR = 1.24, P = 0.01). Colonoscopy use was lower among Haitian households (46%) compared with NHW (63%), NHB (62%), and Hispanic households (54%) (P = 0.002). Factors independently associated with colonoscopy use included identifying as NHB (compared with Haitian) (AOR = 1.80, P = 0.05), being single (AOR = 0.44, P = 0

  8. 77 FR 21446 - Safety Zone; Volvo Ocean Racing Youth Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Volvo Ocean Racing Youth Regatta, Biscayne... establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida during the Volvo Ocean... a safety zone. All waters of the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Miami, Florida encompassed...

  9. The Spanish Family Guidance Center of Miami.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hispanic Research Center: Research Bulletin, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Two major programs of the Spanish Family Guidance Center, a facility that addresses the mental health needs of Hispanics in the Greater Miami (Florida) area, are described in this report. One program, the Spanish Drug Rehabilitation Project (completed in 1977), compared a series of activities including: (1) research on the characteristics of…

  10. Tangential Planning at the University of Miami.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Edward Thaddeus, II

    1991-01-01

    The University of Miami (Florida) has both institutional and department-specific task forces studying seven planning issues from different perspectives, to be coordinated with the central strategic planning process at the appropriate time. Issues include curriculum, interdisciplinary program development, administrative productivity, faculty…

  11. Building Bridges: Miami "Ambassadors" Visit Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Toni Fuss

    2001-01-01

    Describes a three-week exchange program where William H. Turner Technical Arts High School (Miami, Florida) students participated in the U.S./Russian student exchange program. Focuses on the students' stereotypes before the trip and their interview comments following the trip about the hardships in Russia. (CMK)

  12. Using state-of-the-art technology to evaluate saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer of Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The fresh groundwater supplies of many communities have been adversely affected or limited by saltwater intrusion. An insufficient understanding of the origin of intruded saltwater may lead to inefficient or ineffective water-resource management. A 2008–2012 cooperative U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Miami-Dade County study of saltwater intrusion describes state-of-the art technology used to evaluate the origin and distribution of this saltwater.

  13. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Wilson Concepts of Florida, Pompano Beach, FL. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-22

    The 2-acre Wilson Concepts of Florida site operated as a manufacturing and metal-finishing facility in Pompano Beach, Broward County, Florida. From 1974 to 1987, Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc., used the site to manufacture jet aircraft engine parts, metal-working machinery, and for associated operations, such as precision machining, drilling and milling of metal parts, vibratory deburring, degreasing, steam cleaning, and spray coating of parts. Chemicals used at the site included a variety of hydraulic and lubricating oils, metal protection agents, water coolants, methylene chloride, methyl ethyl ketone, and chemical cleaners. As a result of several inspections from 1976 through 1989, the Broward County Environmental Quality Control Board (BCEQCB) identified poor waste handling practices, including discharge of industrial wastes onto the ground. The ROD addresses onsite soil and ground water. EPA investigations have shown that the soil and ground water contamination associated with the site is no longer considered a health threat under current or likely land use conditions. Therefore, there are no contaminants of concern affecting the site.

  14. 2-D and 3-D Visualization of the Freshwater/Saltwater Mixing Front, and Zones of Preferential Groundwater Flow in the Karst Biscayne Coastal Aquifer using Electromagnetic Induction Techniques, Miami, Southeastern Florida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalker, J. C.; Glaccum, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Biscayne aquifer is unconfined, composed primarily of Karst limestone, and underlies all of Miami-Dade County and much of Biscayne Bay in southeastern Florida. It is the sole source of drinking water for the 3 million inhabitants of the city of Miami and Miami-Dade County, as well as portions of Broward and Monroe Counties. Saltwater intrusion is a prominent problem for all coastal aquifers including the Biscayne aquifer. Simple and quick detection of the three-dimensional saltwater/freshwater interface has been problematic without the use of extensive sounding surveys or multiple well sampling. We are developing a technique combining rapid EM-31 surface surveys with EM-31 vertical soundings to model the depth to the saltwater/freshwater front at two sites located within a half mile of Biscayne Bay. The EM-31 has a maximum signal penetration of about 25ft allowing for accurate near shore surveys. Depths to the saltwater have ranged from over 25 ft inland to less than 2-3 ft near the Bay and saltwater mangroves. Changes in conductivity along survey lines of equal elevation that are equidistant from the Bay may indicate zones of preferential flow due to conduit networks or the presence of backfill, both of which exacerbate saltwater intrusion. All surveys show a rapid change from fresh to brackish water as you move toward the Bay indicating a shallow and abrupt mixing zone. Using a simple depth-modeling program, a wire frame contour map of the mixing zone can be constructed. This technique has proven to be a quick, inexpensive method for first-order hydrogeological and spatial analysis of the saltwater/freshwater interface. In an allied study we are using down-hole electromagnetic induction techniques with an EM-39 tool on existing wells, analyzing fluctuations in conductivity within the saltwater zone to look for zones of high permeability in the aquifer. Conductivity fluctuates within the mixing zone from brackish values to values equivalent to Biscayne Bay

  15. Occurrence of Organic Compounds in Source and Finished Samples from Seven Drinking-Water Treatment Facilities in Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, conducted a reconnaissance study in 2008 to determine the occurrence of 228 organic compounds in raw, source (untreated) and finished (treated) drinking water at seven municipal water-treatment facilities in Miami-Dade County. Results of this sampling study showed that 25 (about 11 percent) of the 228 organic compounds were detected in at least one source water sample and 22 (about 10 percent) were detected in at least one finished water sample. The concentrations of organic compounds in source water samples were less than or equal to 0.2 (u or mu)g/L (micrograms per liter). The concentrations of organic compounds in finished water samples were generally less than or equal to 0.5 (u or mu)g/L, with the exception of bromoform (a possible disinfection byproduct) at estimated concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 2.8 (u or mu)g/L and diethyl phthalate (a plasticizer compound) at 2 (u or mu)g/L.

  16. High Resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale to model porosity and permeability in the Miami Limestone in South Florida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface water flow within the Biscayne aquifer is controlled by the heterogeneous distribution of porosity and permeability in the karst Miami Limestone and the presence of numerous dissolution and mega-porous features. The dissolution features and other high porosity areas can create preferential flow paths and direct recharge to the aquifer, which may not be accurately conceptualized in groundwater flow models. As hydrologic conditions are undergoing restoration in the Everglades, understanding the distribution of these high porosity areas within the subsurface would create a better understanding of subsurface flow. This research utilizes ground penetrating radar to estimate the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the Miami Limestone at centimeter scale resolution at the laboratory scale. High frequency GPR antennas were used to measure changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through limestone samples under varying volumetric water contents. The Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) was then applied in order to estimate porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates ranged from 45.2-66.0% from the CRIM model and correspond well with estimates of porosity from analytical and digital image techniques. Dielectric permittivity values of the limestone solid phase ranged from 7.0 and 13.0, which are similar to values in the literature. This research demonstrates the ability of GPR to identify the cm scale spatial variability of aquifer properties that influence subsurface water flow which could have implications for groundwater flow models in the Biscayne and potentially other shallow karst aquifers.

  17. Carbonate slope and platform accumulations: Lower Florida Keys

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, E.A.; Lidz, B.H.; Kindinger, J.L. ); Hine, A.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Approximately 500 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data off the lower Florida Keys reveal (1) a linear reef and trough seaward of the more shallow platform margin reefs and (2) possible late Pleistocene to early Holocene reef and beach-dune deposits 80-100 m below sea level. The linear reef and sand-filled trough are an extension of a reef-and-trough system that extends more than 300 km along the southeast Florida reef tract. In the study area, the outer reef is shallow (-10 m at its top), has relief of up to 30 m, and is separated from the platform margin reef by a 0.5-km-wide, 30-m-deep sediment-filled trough. The outer reef trend is locally broken, and reefs vary in size. Farther north near Miami, the outer reef has lower relief, and the trough separating it from the platform margin is narrower. A 6-m-long rock core recovered from the crest of the outer reef trend in the lower Florida Keys, off Sand Key reef, reveals a Pleistocene massive coral facies that has a thin (< 1 m) Holocene reef veneer. Farther seaward, where the sea floor slopes into the Straits of Florida, thick (5-8 m) fringing-reef and barrier beach-dune deposits are buried beneath thin Holocene slope deposits 80-100 m below sea level. Beach-dune accumulations are distinguished from reef buildups by the presence of seaward and landward seismic reflections. Fringing-reef buildups, in contrast, are massive and lack reflectors. Both beach-dune and reef buildups are overlain by thin Holocene slope sediments. The beach-dune deposits are probably indicative of a paleoshoreline that existed between 9,000 and 15,000 yr ago.

  18. 77 FR 60302 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The..., 2012. The event consists of 30 participants launching self-propelled flying machines from a 30ft ramp..., Miami, Florida. The event consists of 30 participants launching self- propelled flying machines from...

  19. Annotated bibliography of the geology and hydrology of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causaras, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    References and abstracts from 149 hydrologic and geologic investigations concerning the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida have been compiled to prepare an annotated bibliography. The references are listed alphabetically by the author 's name. (USGS)

  20. 33 CFR 165.761 - Security Zones; Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami, and Port of Key West, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127 respectively, during transits entering or departing the... carrying cargoes of particular hazard or liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126... vessels carrying liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127...

  1. 33 CFR 165.761 - Security Zones; Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami, and Port of Key West, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127 respectively, during transits entering or departing the... carrying cargoes of particular hazard or liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126... vessels carrying liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127...

  2. 33 CFR 165.761 - Security Zones; Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami, and Port of Key West, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127 respectively, during transits entering or departing the... carrying cargoes of particular hazard or liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126... vessels carrying liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127...

  3. 33 CFR 165.761 - Security Zones; Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami, and Port of Key West, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127 respectively, during transits entering or departing the... carrying cargoes of particular hazard or liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126... vessels carrying liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127...

  4. 33 CFR 165.761 - Security Zones; Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami, and Port of Key West, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127 respectively, during transits entering or departing the... carrying cargoes of particular hazard or liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126... vessels carrying liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) as defined in 33 CFR parts 120, 126 and 127...

  5. Linking Asian/Pacific Collections to America. Proceedings of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (14th, Miami Beach, Florida, June 25-27, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, R. N., Ed.

    The Asian/Pacific population in the United States is growing. Therefore, it is important to know what types of collections and facilities are available for ethnic groups within U.S. libraries. This is the issue addressed by the Asian/Pacific Librarians Association (APALA) at this conference. The four speeches are: "Redefining 'Asia/Pacific' in the…

  6. Ground-water quality at the site of a proposed deep-well injection system for treated wastewater, West Palm Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A.; Meyer, Frederick W.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected scientific and technical information before, during, and after construction of a deep test well at the location of a future regional waste-water treatment plant to be built for the city of West Palm Beach, Florida. Data from the test well will be used by the city in the design of a proposed deep-well injection system for disposal of effluent from the treatment plant. Shallow wells in the vicinity of the drilling site were inventoried and sampled to provide a data base for detecting changes in ground water quality during construction and later operation of the deep wells. In addition, 16 small-diameter monitor wells, ranging in depth from 10 to 162 feet, were drilled at the test site. During the drilling of the deep test well, water samples were collected weekly from the 16 monitor wells for determination of chloride content and specific conductance. Evidence of small spills of salt water were found in monitor wells ranging in depth from 10 to 40 feet. Efforts to remove the salt water from the shallow unconfined aquifer by pumping were undertaken by the drilling contractor at the request of the city of West Palm Beach. The affected area is small and there has been a reduction of chloride concentration.

  7. Archive of boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS field activities 01ASR01, 01ASR02, 02ASR01, 02ASR02, Miami, Florida, November 2001-January 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Wiese, Dana S.; Flocks, James G.

    2002-01-01

    This appendix consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data collected in canals in the Lake Belt Area of Miami, Florida. These data were acquired in November and December of 2001 and January and February of 2002 using a 4.9-m (16-ft) jonboat. The data are available in a variety of formats, including binary, ASCII, HTML, shapefiles, and GIF images. Binary data are in Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format and may be downloaded for further processing or display. The SEG-Y data files are too large to fit on one CD-ROM, so they have been distributed onto two CD-ROMs as explained below. Reference maps and GIF images of the profiles may be viewed with your web browser. The GIS information provided is compatible with ESRI's GIS software. A reconnaissance test line (02ASR02-02b02) was collected northwest of the survey area during Field Activity 02ASR02 for possible use in a future project. It is archived here for organizational purposes only.

  8. Assessing the Impact of Urban Runoff in Recreational Beaches in South Carolina and Florida Using Culturable and QPCR Fecal Indicator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban/suburban runoff carries a variety of pollutants that often includes bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial water quality of recreational beaches impacted solely by urban runoff through the use of cu...

  9. The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study and Evaluability Assessment. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

  10. Long-Term Observations of a Coastal Countercurrent on the Southeast Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal circulation along the southeast Florida shelf is strongly related to the dynamics of the Florida Current as a part of the western boundary current system. We have conducted long-term observations with a mooring array deployed on the Ft. Lauderdale FL shelf. The array consists of a bottom ADCP mooring at 11 m isobath on the Dania Beach Shelf providing almost continuous observations since 1999 and a bottom ADCP mooring deployed on the Miami Terrace near Pompano Beach at 240 m isobath since 2007. There is a strong variability of the coastal current at this location on time scales ranging from hours to months, which is explained by the proximity to the Florida Current. An interesting feature revealed during these observations is an intermittent coastal countercurrent. This coastal countercurrent is seasonally modulated, reversing its direction during the summer season. The appearance of the countercurrent on the southeast Florida shelf and its relation to the Florida Current and undercurrent have not yet been completely understood. The possible physical mechanism behind this feature of the coastal circulation on the Southeast Florida shelf and practical applications are being discussed.

  11. ALA in Miami Beach: Summer Bummer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annichiarico, Mark; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of the 1994 American Library Association Convention. Highlights include problems with the location; teen violence; federal legislation; awards; speakers; gender issues and technology, including video games and the Internet; intellectual freedom; multiculturalism and librarian recruitment; CD-ROM; and exhibits. (LRW)

  12. Statistical analysis and mapping of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer, water conservation areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-02-25

    during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999. Mean October water levels during 2000–2009 were generally higher than during 1990–1999 in much of western Miami-Dade County, but were lower in a large part of eastern Miami-Dade County.

  13. Statistical analysis and mapping of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer, water conservation areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-01-01

    during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999. Mean October water levels during 2000–2009 were generally higher than during 1990–1999 in much of western Miami-Dade County, but were lower in a large part of eastern Miami-Dade County.

  14. Description and evaluation of the effects of urban and agricultural development on the surficial aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County was studied during 1982-85 to determine the effects of increased urban and agricultural development on groundwater levels, flow directions, and quality. The surficial aquifer system and its geologic matrix are divisible into three zones on the bases of relative permeabilities and lithologic characteristics. The two greatest water users in the county, public supply utilities and agricultural irrigators, increased total water withdrawals by 123 and 50%, respectively, during 1970-80. By 1980, 76% of public supply withdrawals were from zones I and II of the surficial aquifer system, whereas groundwater pumpage for irrigation decreased to 9% of the total irrigation water used. Increases in groundwater withdrawals for public supply were greatest in the southeast and central coastal parts of the county and served as an indicator for potential changes of flow directions and water quality in the surficial aquifer system. Residual seawater, emplaced in the aquifer system during the Pleistocene Epoch, is still prevalent in the central and western parts of Palm Beach County where low permeabilities in the geologic matrix have retarded its dilution. Chemical analyses of canal-water and groundwater samples collected in April 1984 were used to evaluate the effects of groundwater/surface water exchange on the quality of water during canal conveyance across the area containing residual seawater. (USGS)

  15. Growing Community Roots for the Geosciences in Miami, Florida, A Program Aimed at High School and Middle School Students to Increase Awareness of Career and Educational Opportunities in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, D.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Gebelein, J.; Draper, G.; Rego, R.

    2013-12-01

    Growing Community Roots for the Geosciences is a 2-year pilot recruitment project run by the Department of Earth and Environment at Florida International University (FIU) and funded by the NSF OEDG (Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences) program. FIU, the State University of Florida in Miami is a federally recognized Minority Serving Institution with over 70% of the undergraduate population coming from groups underrepresented in the geoscience workforce. The goal of this project is to inform students enrolled in the local middle and high schools to career opportunities in the geosciences and to promote pathways for underrepresented groups to university geoscience degree programs. The first year's program included a 1-week workshop for middle school teachers and a 2-week summer camp aimed at high school students in the public school system. The teacher workshop was attended by 20 teachers who taught comprehensive and physical science in grades 6-8. It included lectures on geoscience careers, fundamental concepts of solid earth and atmospheric science, hands on exercises with earth materials, fossils and microscopy, interpretation of landform with Google Earth imagery, and a field trip to a local working limestone quarry. On the first day of the workshop, participants were surveyed on their general educational background in science and their familiarity and comfort with teaching basic geoscience concepts. On the final day, the teachers participated in a group discussion where we discussed how to make geoscience topics and careers more visible in the school curriculum. The 2-week summer camp was attended by 21 students entering grades 9-12. The program included hands on exercises on geoscience and GIS concepts, field trips to local barrier islands, the Everglades, a limestone quarry and a waste to energy facility, and tours of the NOAA National Hurricane Center and the FIU SEM lab. Participants were surveyed on their general educational background

  16. Tools and data acquisition of borehole geophysical logging for the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant in support of a groundwater, surface-water, and ecological monitoring plan, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs were obtained from selected exploratory coreholes in the vicinity of the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant. The geophysical logging tools used and logging sequences performed during this project are summarized herein to include borehole logging methods, descriptions of the properties measured, types of data obtained, and calibration information.

  17. Direct Entry Enrollments of Miami-Dade County High School Graduates: Fall and Spring (Winter) Terms, 1996-97 through 2000-01. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Anne

    This document is a report on the enrollment of high school graduates from Miami-Dade County (Florida) at Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC). The report includes statistics on students from Florida high schools as well as out-of-state high schools. Provided are demographics on the students, including ethnicity, gender, and type of high school…

  18. Evaluation of Emerging Contaminants of Concern at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant Based on Seasonal Events, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, Arthur C.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has identified highly treated wastewater as a possible water source for the restoration of natural water flows and hydroperiods in selected coastal areas, including the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands. One potential source of reclaimed wastewater for the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands is the effluent from the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant in southern Miami-Dade County. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Wastewater Reuse Technology Pilot Project Delivery Team, initiated a study to assess the presence of emerging contaminants of concern in the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant influent and effluent using current wastewater-treatment methods. As part of the study, 24-hour composite and discrete samples were collected at six locations (influent at plants 1 and 2, effluent pump, reuse train, chlorine dioxide unit, and ultraviolet pilot unit) at the plant during: (1) a dry-season, low-flow event on March 2-3, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 83.7 million gallons per day; (2) a wet-season, average-flow event on July 20-21, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 89.7 million gallons per day; and (3) high-rate disinfection tests on October 5 and 20, 2004, with average flow rates of 84.1 and 119.6 million gallons per day, respectively. During these four sampling events, 26, 27, 29, and 35 constituents were detected, respectively. The following transformations in concentration were determined in the waste stream: -100 to 180 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 85 percent at the reuse train on March 2-3, 2004, and -100 to 1,609 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 832 percent at the reuse train on July 20-21, 2004; -100 to -37 percent at the effluent pump, -100 to -62 percent at the reuse train, -100 to -56 percent at the chlorine dioxide unit, and -100 to -40 percent at the ultraviolet pilot unit on October 5, 2004; and -100 to -4 percent at the

  19. Comparison of Pleistocene and Holocene barrier island beach-to-offshore sequences, Georgia and northeast Florida coasts, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, James D.; Scott, Richard M.

    1983-03-01

    Well-exposed vertical sequences of Pleistocene shoreline deposits are rare on the coastal plain of the southeastern United States. An important exception is an exposure along the St. Mary's River on the Georgia-Florida state line. This outcrop contains an excellent depositional strike section of a prograding offshore, shoreface, foreshore and backshore sequence with well-preserved physical and biogenic sedimentary structures. Offshore sediments are composed of highly bioturbated, muddy fine sand. Distinct burrows and bedding become progressively more abundant upward through a transition zone into shoreface deposits. The shoreface is dominated by the trace fossil Ophiomorpha nodosa and physical sedimentary structures are poorly preserved. Foreshore sediments contain low-angle seaward dipping beds, high-angle landward dipping beds and ripple laminae. Heavy-mineral accumulations in the backshore accentuate bedding and biogenic structures such as ghost crab and insect burrows and bioturbation by amphipods. Direct correlation of most primary physical and biogenic sedimentary structures and textures can be made between the Pleistocene and Holocene beach-to-offshore facies assemblages. However, our studies of the Pleistocene indicate that the existing Holocene vertical sequence model for the Georgia coast needs to be modified to account for biogenically produced post-depositional effects.

  20. The Ecological Condition of Gulf of Mexico Resources from Perdido Key to Port St. Joe, Florida, USA: Part I. Coastal Beach Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using the approach established by EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a shoreline monitoring survey was conducted in August and September 1999, encompassing the Florida Panhandle from Perdido Key, Florida to Port St. Joe, Florida. The objective of this ...

  1. Miami Drug Court Gives Drug Defendants a Second Chance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Newlyn, Andrea K.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Diversion and Drug Treatment program, known as "Drug Court," in Miami (Florida) in which nonviolent drug offenders have prosecution of their cases deferred while they participate in a court-ordered drug-rehabilitation program. Those who successfully complete the program have their cases dismissed. Whereas typical recidivism rates for…

  2. Solar energy system economic evaluation: final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Loxahatchee, Florida Operational Test Site (OTS) is developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  3. Urban Systemic Reform: A Discussion Among Policy Makers, Implementors, and Evaluators Interactive Symposium: Cross-Site Evaluation of the Urban Systemic Progam. An Evolution from Miami-Dade USI to Miami RISE USP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Constance; Wongbundhit, Yuwadee

    Florida's Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) is preparing all children for success in the mathematics and science, technology-dependent 21st century. Ongoing National Science Foundation funding catalyzed substantial changes in the systemic reform movement of mathematics and science education from 1994-99. The Miami-Dade USI produced…

  4. Seabed ripple morphology and surficial sediment size at the SAX04 experiments near Fort Walton Beach, Florida, fall 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanes, Daniel M.; Erikson, Li H.; Lescinski, Jamie M.R.; Harney, Jodi N.; Carter, Carissa L.; Hatcher, Gerry A.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Rubin, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Data presented in this report originates from measurements obtained off the Florida coast (fig. 1) as part of the Sediment Acoustics Experiment (SAX04) and Ripples Department Research Initiative (DRI) (Office of Naval Research (ONR), Critical Benthic Environmental Processes and Modeling, Long Range BAA 04-001, Sept. 10, 2003). The aim of this document is to present methods employed to extract data and the resulting measured ripple characteristics (ripple height, wavelength, and orientation) and seabed grain sizes. Application and analysis of the data with respect to hydro- and morphodynamics will be addressed in subsequent reports. Sediment transport in the coastal region is a complex process involving interactions between flow dynamics, sediments, and bedforms. Sediment type and bed geometry directly influence entrainment of sediments into suspension, and at sites where ripples occur (sand formations on the order of several cm high and less than two meter long wavelengths), the understanding of ripple dynamics is an essential component in improving sediment transport models. To gain a better understanding and ability to predict sediment transport, a field study was undertaken to investigate morphology, orientation, and dynamics of ripples on the seafloor. The data obtained from the field campaign also supports an on-going effort to study the effects of ripples on low grazing acoustic penetration into sandy marine sediments for the detection of objects, such as mines (Jackson and others, 2002).

  5. 77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa... establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach, Florida... approximately 20 aircraft engaging in aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

  6. Crumbling Schools: Tens of Millions Wasted in Slow, Sloppy Construction, and Miami-Dade Children Are the Losers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenziper, Debbie; Grotto, Jason

    This series of articles examines the condition of public schools and public school construction in Florida's Miami and Dade Counties. To prepare the series, the Miami Herald studied thousands of pages of construction records, correspondence, school district reports, and accounting statements over 15 years. It analyzed state and national…

  7. Florida Educational Facilities, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…

  8. Pattern of Melanoma Incidence in Miami, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Tim E.; Garcia, Norberto

    1981-01-01

    Although melanoma causes only 1.4 percent of cancers nationally, it accounts for 3.6 percent of cancers in southern Flordia. The authors conducted an incidence survey to determine if the distribution of melanoma was a function of population density, an outdoors lifestyle, or the presence of an older population. PMID:7277525

  9. Estimation of capture zones and drawdown at the Northwest and West Well Fields, Miami-Dade County, Florida, using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis: recent (2004) and proposed conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakefield, Linzy K.; Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Chartier, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Travel-time capture zones and drawdown for two production well fields, used for drinking-water supply in Miami-Dade County, southeastern Florida, were delineated by the U.S Geological Survey using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis. The well fields, designed to supply a combined total of approximately 250 million gallons of water per day, pump from the highly transmissive Biscayne aquifer in the urban corridor between the Everglades and Biscayne Bay. A transient groundwater flow model was developed and calibrated to field data to ensure an acceptable match between simulated and observed values for aquifer heads and net exchange of water between the aquifer and canals. Steady-state conditions were imposed on the transient model and a post-processing backward particle-tracking approach was implemented. Multiple stochastic realizations of horizontal hydraulic conductivity, conductance of canals, and effective porosity were simulated for steady-state conditions representative of dry, average and wet hydrologic conditions to calculate travel-time capture zones of potential source areas of the well fields. Quarry lakes, formed as a product of rock-mining activities, whose effects have previously not been considered in estimation of capture zones, were represented using high hydraulic-conductivity, high-porosity cells, with the bulk hydraulic conductivity of each cell calculated based on estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, lake depths and aquifer thicknesses. A post-processing adjustment, based on calculated residence times using lake outflows and known lake volumes, was utilized to adjust particle endpoints to account for an estimate of residence-time-based mixing of lakes. Drawdown contours of 0.1 and 0.25 foot were delineated for the dry, average, and wet hydrologic conditions as well. In addition, 95-percent confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the capture zones and drawdown contours to delineate a zone of uncertainty about the median estimates

  10. Estimation of capture zones and drawdown at the Northwest and West Well Fields, Miami-Dade County, Florida, using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis: recent (2004) and proposed conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakefield, Linzy K.; Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Chartier, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Travel-time capture zones and drawdown for two production well fields, used for drinking-water supply in Miami-Dade County, southeastern Florida, were delineated by the U.S Geological Survey using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis. The well fields, designed to supply a combined total of approximately 250 million gallons of water per day, pump from the highly transmissive Biscayne aquifer in the urban corridor between the Everglades and Biscayne Bay. A transient groundwater flow model was developed and calibrated to field data to ensure an acceptable match between simulated and observed values for aquifer heads and net exchange of water between the aquifer and canals. Steady-state conditions were imposed on the transient model and a post-processing backward particle-tracking approach was implemented. Multiple stochastic realizations of horizontal hydraulic conductivity, conductance of canals, and effective porosity were simulated for steady-state conditions representative of dry, average and wet hydrologic conditions to calculate travel-time capture zones of potential source areas of the well fields. Quarry lakes, formed as a product of rock-mining activities, whose effects have previously not been considered in estimation of capture zones, were represented using high hydraulic-conductivity, high-porosity cells, with the bulk hydraulic conductivity of each cell calculated based on estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, lake depths and aquifer thicknesses. A post-processing adjustment, based on calculated residence times using lake outflows and known lake volumes, was utilized to adjust particle endpoints to account for an estimate of residence-time-based mixing of lakes. Drawdown contours of 0.1 and 0.25 foot were delineated for the dry, average, and wet hydrologic conditions as well. In addition, 95-percent confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the capture zones and drawdown contours to delineate a zone of uncertainty about the median estimates

  11. Approach for delineation of contributing areas and zones of transport to selected public-supply wells using a regional ground-water flow model, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, R.A.; Patterson, R.D.; Orzol, L.L.; Dixon, Joann

    2001-01-01

    Rapid urban development and population growth in Palm Beach County, Florida, have been accompanied with the need for additional freshwater withdrawals from the surficial aquifer system. To maintain water quality, County officials protect capture areas and determine zones of transport of municipal supply wells. A multistep process was used to help automate the delineation of wellhead protection areas. A modular ground-water flow model (MODFLOW) Telescopic Mesh Refinement program (MODTMR) was used to construct an embedded flow model and combined with particle tracking to delineate zones of transport to supply wells; model output was coupled with a geographic information system. An embedded flow MODFLOW model was constructed using input and output file data from a preexisting three-dimensional, calibrated model of the surficial aquifer system. Three graphical user interfaces for use with the geographic information software, ArcView, were developed to enhance the telescopic mesh refinement process. These interfaces include AvMODTMR for use with MODTMR; AvHDRD to build MODFLOW river and drain input files from dynamically segmented linear (canals) data sets; and AvWELL Refiner, an interface designed to examine and convert well coverage spatial data layers to a MODFLOW Well package input file. MODPATH (the U.S. Geological Survey particle-tracking postprocessing program) and MODTOOLS (the set of U.S. Geological Survey computer programs to translate MODFLOW and MODPATH output to a geographic information system) were used to map zones of transport. A steady-state, five-layer model of the Boca Raton area was created using the telescopic mesh refinement process and calibrated to average conditions during January 1989 to June 1990. A sensitivity analysis of various model parameters indicates that the model is most sensitive to changes in recharge rates, hydraulic conductivity for layer 1, and leakance for layers 3 and 4 (Biscayne aquifer). Recharge (58 percent); river (canal

  12. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Oriole Beach, Garcon Point, Holley, South of Holley and Navarre quadrangles, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, Marvin A.; Bohman, Larry R.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on the Oriole Beach-Garcon Point-Holley-South of Holley-Navarre, Fla., topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the shores of Santa Rosa Sound and the Gulf of Mexico from Pensacola Beach eastward to the Narrows near Fort Walton Beach, Fla. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Ala., since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Ala. (USGS)

  13. Interior showing both 425 and 427 North Miami Avenue, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior showing both 425 and 427 North Miami Avenue, view looking west, pressed tin ceiling in 425 North Miami is visible on the left - Chaille Commercial Building, 425-429 North Miami Avenue, Miami, Miami-Dade County, FL

  14. 76 FR 9278 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Guard proposes to establish a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach... held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida. Approximately 50 offshore power... safety zone around a race area in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida. Persons...

  15. Non-Resident and Foreign Enrollment at Miami-Dade Community College, 1990 Compared to 1994. Research Report No. 95-11R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Cathy

    A July 1995 report by Florida's Miami-Dade Community College examined reasons for a decline in enrollment among first-time-in-college students, including non-Florida residents, from fall 1990 to fall 1994. This report looks at the change in credits generated by non-Florida residents and foreign students over the same period. Study findings…

  16. Political Asylum Applicants. Financial Effect on Local Services in the Miami Area. Fact Sheet for the Honorable Bob Graham and the Honorable Connie Mack, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    This fact sheet discusses the effect of Nicaraguan immigrants entering the country at Brownsville (Texas) on local service providers in Miami (Florida). During individual meetings held on February 1, 1989 with Miami area officials, concerns were expressed over the immigrants' general welfare and the financial strain on local organizations…

  17. 77 FR 16928 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Miami River, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... congestion during Miami Marlins home baseball games poses a safety concern. This 90 day test deviation will... of Miami Marlins home baseball games. Tugs and tugs with tows, public vessels of the United...

  18. A Gathering Storm: How Palm Beach County Schools Fail Poor and Minority Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona, Lisa A.; Wheelock, Anne; First, Joan

    This report takes a hard look at the day-to-day workings of Palm Beach County (Florida) schools to explain why the systemic change model of Florida's current reform legislation is likely to fail the students in greatest need of improved schooling. The Palm Beach County School District is the 4th largest district in Florida, and the 15th largest in…

  19. Transformation of Palm Beach Community College to Palm Beach State College: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basiratmand, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to examine the organization and leadership change process of Palm Beach State College, a publicly funded institution in Florida, as it embarked on offering bachelor's degree programs. The study examined the organizational change process and the extent to which Palm Beach State College's organization…

  20. ENTEROCOCCI IN THE WATER COLUMN AND SHORELINE INTERSTITIAL WATERS AT BEACHES ON THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SANTA ROSA SOUND, PENSACOLA, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interstitial water in the swash zone, that area of a beach where waves continuously wash up on the sand, is suspected of accumulating microbes. If pathogens are concentrated in the interstitial water or if they grow, they may pose a health risk, especially for children. This st...

  1. The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study And Evaluability Assessment. Final Report. Chapin Hall Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This publication reports findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

  2. Under one roof: the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis model for spinal cord injury research.

    PubMed

    Kleitman, N

    2001-06-01

    Concentrating a wide range of spinal cord injury (SCI) research laboratories in a single location to accelerate progress and draw attention to the promise of SCI research has made The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis one of the most publicly recognized and often controversial research groups in the neurosciences. A "Center of Excellence" at the University of Miami School of Medicine, the Miami Project also serves as a model for SCI research programs being developed nationally and internationally. Founded in 1985, the Miami Project set out on an unprecedented path-to develop a research center dedicated to improving treatments for SCI by bridging basic and clinical science. In doing so, neurosurgeon Barth Green, M.D., enlisted not only a multidisciplinary team of scientists but also a devoted following of financial donors and volunteer research subjects, and support from the University of Miami and Florida legislature. Highly visible spokespersons, including cofounder ex-Miami Dolphin Nick Buoniconti and his son Marc, brought the issue of SCI paralysis and the promise of research before the public, the media, and sports communities. As progress in the neurosciences has raced ahead, public attention to medical research, and SCI research in particular, has grown exponentially. This review will assess the Miami Project as a model for disease-based research that unites academic, philanthropic, and patient communities in a common cause.

  3. 76 FR 65378 - Safety Zone; The Florida Orchestra Pops in the Park Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... vicinity of Spa Beach in St. Petersburg, Florida during The Florida Orchestra Pops in the Park Fireworks... place in St. Petersburg, Florida. The fireworks will be launched from Spa Beach. The fireworks will... zone encompasses certain waters of Tampa Bay in the vicinity of Spa Beach in St. Petersburg,...

  4. Earthquake Impact on Miami Haitian Americans: The Role of Family/Social Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Andrea; Marcelin, Louis Herns; Schmitz, Susan; Hausmann, Vicky; Shultz, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who are indirectly exposed to disasters may be affected psychologically. The impact of the 2010 Haiti earthquake reverberated throughout the Haitian American community in Miami, Florida. Many within the community held strong transnational family and friendship bonds to their homeland. We examined associations between indicators of…

  5. Caring for Immigrants: Health Care Safety Nets in Los Angeles, New York, Miami, and Houston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Leighton; Freilich, Alyse

    This report assesses how the loss of Medicaid coverage following welfare reform has influenced changes in health care systems for immigrants in four urban areas: Los Angeles, California; New York, New York; Houston, Texas; and Miami, Florida. Survey data indicate that over half of low-income immigrants were uninsured in 1998, a level roughly…

  6. 76 FR 49301 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... (NPRM) entitled USCG-2011-0044 in the Federal Register (76 FR 24837). We received no comments on the... establishing a permanent regulated navigation area (RNA) on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The RNA will be... Bank and the Rickenbacker Causeway Bridge. All vessels within the RNA are: required to transit the...

  7. 76 FR 24837 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... Guard proposes to establish a permanent regulated navigation area (RNA) on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The RNA would be enforced annually on the Saturday and Sunday of the second week in...

  8. 76 FR 53822 - Safety Zone; Labor Day at the Landing Santa Rosa Sound, Fort Walton Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ..., Florida extending 150 yards around a fireworks barge that will be positioned between Fort Walton Beach... for a portion of the Santa Rosa Sound in Fort Walton Beach, Florida extending 150 yards around a... safety zone: A portion of the Santa Rosa Sound in Fort Walton Beach, FL extending 150 yards around...

  9. On the Season, a Report of a Public Health Project Conducted Among Negro Migrant Agricultural Workers in Palm Beach County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Robert H.; Northcutt, Travis J., Jr.

    A 5-year project to develop public health services for migrant workers was initiated in Florida in 1956. The project staff consisted of 8 public health personnel: 2 public health nurses, a public health educator, a public health nutritionist, a medical social worker, a part-time sanitarian, a liaison worker, and a secretary. Two practicing…

  10. Interior view of 435 (right) and 439 (left) North Miami, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of 435 (right) and 439 (left) North Miami, Pressed tin ceiling is visible in both portions, view looking northeast - Dennis Apartments, 433-447 North Miami Avenue, Miami, Miami-Dade County, FL

  11. Florida Everglades and Keys, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Though much of southern Florida is covered by clouds, the Florida Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire Florida Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.

  12. Miami's Iron Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rist, Marilee C.

    1993-01-01

    Dade County (Florida) Public School Superintendent Octavio Visiedo demonstrated his four-star leadership capabilities in the wake of Hurricane Andrew's devastation. For weeks, Visiedo tirelessly directed military personnel and school workers in massive clean-up and repair efforts. When all but 10 of the district's 287 schools opened in…

  13. Hearing on H.R. 670, The School Completion and Incentives Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session (Miami, Florida).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document presents witness testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing. Statements are included from Representatives Claude Pepper, Carl Perkins, Charles Hayes, and Nick Rahall. Witnesses providing testimony include: (1) Joseph Fernandez, Superintendent of Dade County Public Schools, Florida; (2) Nan Rich, who describes…

  14. Children, Youth, and Families in the Southeast. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (Miami, Florida, October 14, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    Presenting the third of five regional fact-finding committee hearings across the United States, this document includes live testimony and prepared statements from social organizations and state and county offices in Florida, Arkansas, Louisiana, Georgia, South Carolina, and Mississippi. Representatives of these agencies reported their efforts to…

  15. WebWise 2.0: The Power of Community. WebWise Conference on Libraries and Museums in the Digital World Proceedings (9th, Miami Beach, Florida, March 5-7, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David

    2009-01-01

    Since it was coined by Tim O'Reilly in formulating the first Web 2.0 Conference in 2004, the term "Web 2.0" has definitely caught on as a designation of a second generation of Web design and experience that emphasizes a high degree of interaction with, and among, users. Rather than simply consulting and reading Web pages, the Web 2.0 generation is…

  16. Ladybeetle predator, Delphastus catalinae, may control new invasive pest of Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ficus Whitefly (Singhiella simplex) was first reported in Miami-Dade County in August 2007. Since then, the whitefly has been found throughout southern Florida, as well as along both coasts of Florida up to central Florida. This invasive pest causes infested plants to exhibit leaf yellowing, followe...

  17. 76 FR 21367 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    .... Phillip Frost, Miami Beach, Florida; to acquire voting shares of Coconut Grove Bankshares, Inc., and thereby indirectly acquire voting shares of Coconut Grove Bank, both of Miami, Florida. Board of...

  18. South Florida Coastal Sediment Ecological Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Julian, Paul

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the degree of sediment contamination in several South Florida estuaries. During the 2010 National Condition Assessment, Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute collected water column, sediment and biotic data from estuaries across the entire state of Florida. Sediments were analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, zinc and total polychlorinated biphenyls and were compared relative to empirically derived sediment quality guidelines. As a result of this data collection and assessment effort, it was determined that the degree of contamination with respect to sediment was low for all southern Florida estuaries assessed, except the Miami River which was determined to be considerably contaminated. However only one monitoring location was used to assess the Miami River, and as such should be viewed with caution. A low degree of contamination was determined for Biscayne Bay sediments, possibly indicating a recovery from its previously reported higher contaminant level. PMID:26084967

  19. Coastal land loss in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Florida has approximately 593 mi of shoreline fronting on the Atlantic Ocean and Straits of Florida and approximately 673 mi of shoreline fronting on the Gulf of Mexico with an additional 5,000 mi of bay and estuary shoreline. Of a statewide total of 818.9 mi of open coast sandy beaches, 337.2 mi or 41.2% of the beaches are identified as erosion problem areas. These erosion problem areas include those beaches with a moderate or low erosion rate, but with a narrow width fronting a highly developed area, and those restored beaches with an active maintenance nourishment program. Of these erosion problem areas, 217.8 mi or 26.6% of the statewide beach length are areas of critical erosion; that is, segments of the shoreline where substantial development or recreation interests are threatened by the erosion processes. On a shorewide basis, the Atlantic Ocean beaches of Florida typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}3 ft per year, while the Gulf of Mexico beaches typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}2 ft per year. Many of the problem areas have shoreline erosion rates in the magnitude of between {minus}3 and {minus}5 ft per year. The most extreme erosion rates are occurring along the southern portion of St. Joseph Peninsula at Cape San Bias where the annual shoreline recession exceeds {minus}20 ft. Erosion conditions in Florida are most apparent as a result of storm tides and storm wave activity. Extreme meteorological events inflict significant erosion conditions in all beach areas of the state. Historical shoreline changes are often the cumulative effect of a number of storm events and their cycles of poststorm recovery. Erosion and damage from recent storms as well as efforts to mitigate storm damage have heightened the erosion problems and incited a public response through coastal construction regulation and beach management planning.

  20. Bringing the Microcomputer into the Junior High: A Success Story from Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Benjamin S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the introduction of an Apple II microcomputer into Miami Lakes (Florida) Junior High School and its success in generating enthusiasm among teachers, students, parents, and the community. (Author/RW)

  1. 78 FR 22814 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... significant effect on the human environment. This proposed rule involves a special local regulation issued...

  2. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... display by day a red flag, of not less than 16 square feet, at the masthead, or not less than 10 feet above the upper deck if the vessel has no mast; at night a red light shall be displayed in the positions... obstruct vessel movements or obstruct or interfere with range lights. (6) Vessels carrying explosives...

  3. 33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... display by day a red flag, of not less than 16 square feet, at the masthead, or not less than 10 feet above the upper deck if the vessel has no mast; at night a red light shall be displayed in the positions... obstruct vessel movements or obstruct or interfere with range lights. (6) Vessels carrying explosives...

  4. Effects of lowering interior canal stages on salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer in Southeast Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.

    1975-01-01

    Land in southeast Palm Beach County is undergoing a large-scale change in use, from agricultural to residential. To accommodate residential use, a proposal has been made by developers to the Board of the Lake Worth Drainage District to lower the canal stages in the interior part of the area undergoing change. This report documents one of the possible effects of such lowering. Of particular interest to the Board was whether the lower canal stages would cause an increase in salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer along the coast. The two main tools used in the investigation were a digital model for aquifer evaluation and an analytical technique for predicting the movement of the salt-water front in response to a change of ground-water flow into the ocean. The method of investigation consisted of developing a digital ground-water flow model for three east-west test strips. They pass through the northern half of municipal well fields in Lake Worth, Delray Beach, and Boca Raton. The strips were first modeled with no change in interior canal stages. Then they were modeled with a change in canal stages of 2 to 4 feet (0.6 to 1.6 metres). Also, two land development schemes were tested. One was for a continuation of the present level of land development, simulated by continuing the present pumpage rates. The second scheme was for land development to continue until the maximum allowable densities were reached, simulated by increasing the pumping rates. The results of the test runs for an east-west strip through Lake Worth show that lowering part of the interior canal water levels 3 feet (1.0 metre), as done in 1961, does not affect the aquifer head or salt-water intrusion along the coastal area of Lake Worth. As a result, no effect in the coastal area would be expected as a result of canal stage lowering in other, interior parts of the study area. Results from the other test runs show that lowering interior canal water levels by as much as 4 feet (1.2 metres) would

  5. 78 FR 33969 - Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a special local regulation on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean... Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach, Florida. Approximately 40 high-speed power boats are anticipated...

  6. Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six Florida universities: Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida State University (FSU) and Florida A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, and University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of Florida. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of Florida, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.

  7. 76 FR 53824 - Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ..., Miami, FL in the Federal Register (76 FR 24840). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public... Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place on Sunday... swim portion of the triathlon. Discussion of Rule On October 30, 2011, Paramount Productions, LLC...

  8. Water withdrawals, use, discharge, and trends in Florida, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, the estimated amount of water withdrawn in Florida was 20,148 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), of which 59 percent was saline and 41 percent was fresh. Ground water accounted for 62 percent of freshwater withdrawals and surface water accounted for the remaining 38 percent. Ninety-two percent of the 15.98 million people in Florida relied on ground water for their drinking water needs in 2000. Almost all of the saline water withdrawals (99.9 percent) were from surface water. Public supply accounted for 43 percent of ground water withdrawn in 2000, followed by agricultural self-supplied (39 percent), commercial-industrial self-supplied (including mining) (8.5 percent), recreational irrigation (4.5 percent), domestic self-supplied (4 percent), and power generation (1 percent). Agricultural self-supplied accounted for 62 percent of fresh surface water withdrawn in 2000, followed by power generation (20 percent), public supply (8 percent), recreational irrigation (6 percent), and commercial-industrial self-supplied (4 percent). Almost all of saline water withdrawn was used for power generation. The largest amount of freshwater was withdrawn in Palm Beach County and the largest amount of saline water was withdrawn in Hillsborough County. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh ground water occurred in Miami-Dade, Polk, Orange, Palm Beach, Broward, and Collier Counties. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh surface water occurred in Palm Beach, Hendry, and Escambia Counties. The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest amount of freshwater withdrawn (49 percent). About 62 percent of the total ground water withdrawn was from the Floridan aquifer system; 17 percent was from the Biscayne aquifer. Most of the surface water used in Florida was from managed and maintained canal systems or large water bodies. Major sources of fresh surface water include the Caloosahatchee River, Deer Point Lake, Hillsborough

  9. Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, A.E.; Richmond, B.M.; Fletcher, C.H.; ,

    2000-01-01

    Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

  10. Intensified coastal development behind nourished beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Scott; Lazarus, Eli; Limber, Patrick; Goldstein, Evan; Thorpe, Curtis; Ballinger, Rhoda

    2016-04-01

    Population density, housing development, and property values in coastal counties along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts continue to rise despite increasing hazard from storm impacts. Since the 1970s, beach nourishment, which involves importing sand to deliberately widen an eroding beach, has been the main strategy in the U.S. for protecting coastal properties from erosion and flooding hazards. Paradoxically, investment in hazard protection may intensify development. Here, we examine the housing stock of all existing shorefront single-family homes in Florida - a microcosm of U.S. coastal hazards and development - to quantitatively compare development in nourishing and non-nourishing towns. We find that nourishing towns now account for more than half of Florida's coastline, and that houses in nourishing towns are larger and more numerous. Even as the mean size of single-family homes nationwide has grown steadily since 1970, Florida's shorefront stock has exceeded the national average by 34%, and in nourishing towns by 45%. This emergent disparity between nourishing and non-nourishing towns in Florida demonstrates a pattern of intensifying coastal risk, and is likely representative of a dominant trend in coastal development more generally. These data lend empirical support to the hypothesis that US coastal development and hazard mitigation through beach nourishment have become dynamically coupled.

  11. Attitudes of Florida Academic Physicians toward the Florida Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Herold, A E

    1996-05-01

    An Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Physicians was given the charge in 1992 of studying Florida academic physician's participation in the Florida Medical Association. It was postulated that academic physicians may participate less in organized medicine than community physicians and, therefore, may be a group that should be selectively targeted during membership campaigns. Data was obtained from the American Medical Association Masterfiles about Florida academic and community physician membership in the FMA and AMA. Academic physicians at the four academic medical centers in Florida were surveyed about their attitudes toward organized medicine, especially the Florida Medical Association. Unlike any other state in the Federation, more academic physicians than community physicians were members of the state society (46.9% v 43.5%) p < 0.05, which was accounted for mainly women academic physicians. There were substantial differences across the academic medical centers with the University of Florida at Gainesville and Jacksonville being overrepresented, the University of South Florida having average membership, and the University of Miami being underrepresented. Florida academic and community physician membership in the AMA was 34.6% and 38.5% respectively, which was consistent with national trends. Academic physicians at the University of Florida campuses rated their relationship and communication with the FMA as being better than academic physicians at the University of South Florida and Miami. Academic physicians at all four medical centers rated membership dues as being too high relative to the benefits derived, but there was indirect evidence to suggest that this was an apparent and not real barrier. Also, academic physicians thought that the FMA represented community physicians more effectively than academic physicians. The state of Florida is unique in that more academic physicians than community physicians are members of the state medical society. The differences by

  12. Energy efficiency at the University of Miami

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, V.; Anzoategui, F.

    1996-07-01

    The University of Miami (UM) has embarked on a very important and worthwhile mission: ``To make UM one of the most energy efficient universities in the nation by the year 2000``. In order for the University to meet this goal the authors knew they would need to take advantage of all the available technologies and address the freon issues. In June 1990 the Coral Gables Campus had five chilled Water Production Plants, each representing small independent systems serving from four to ten buildings. Because of energy conservation measures of the past, each plant had excess capacity. At that time they also had identified about 600 tons of old falling-apart air conditioning equipment. The Capital Construction Program was beginning design efforts for a new Music Recital Hall and an addition to the Law Library. With all this considered it made sense to develop a common chilled water loop to connect these plants and provide a vehicle to capitalize on available capacity. In early 1991 Florida Power and Light offered a new CILC rate with criteria that the chilled water plants met. It allowed them to produce air conditioning at 5.8 cents a kWh, compared to 7.5 cents a kWh, at the buildings. This, added to the reality of not having to maintain or replace the old systems, made this the number 1 priority project. They were convinced that this could give them a competitive edge over other institutions because it insured that they could produce air conditioning at the least cost per square foot.

  13. Definition and interpretation of Holocene shorelines in the south Atlantic coastal zone, southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Finkl, C.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    There is a wide variety of contemporary shorelines in southeastern Florida. Distinctive types range from rocky platforms, tidal flats, mangroves and marshes, to sand and gravel beaches. Because the natural sequence of shorelines in the urban coastal corridor from Miami to Palm Beach is partly obscured by dredge and fill operations initiated in the early 1920's, some coastal segments are subject to re-interpretation. Analysis of early aerial photographs, old coastal charts and bore log data indicates a much more complicated sequence of Recent coastlines than is generally appreciated. Before development, much of the coastal zone contained complicated networks of fresh-water marshes and lakes with lagoons, bays, and sounds lying behind extensively developed spits. The larger spits prograded southward (downdrift) forming long coastwise sounds that eventually led into fresh-water marshes such as Lake Mabel (now Port Everglades). When new inlets were cut to link the ICW with the sea, the spits were beheaded to form what are now called barrier islands. After subsequent inlet stabilization with inadequate sand bypassing, some spits became welded to the shore and others eroded away. Extension of boundaries marking the back sides of barriers landward into the marshes, to the position of the ICW, is not only an erroneous definition of barrier island width but dangerous for emergency (storm surge) planning because the barriers were never this wide. Beach ridge plains, ridge and swale topography, dune-covered limestone ridges, and some fossil reefs such as Key Biscayne have in addition been mistakenly identified as barrier islands.

  14. Beach sands

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbridge, R.W.; Lowrie, A.

    1988-01-01

    Beach sands are the residual of climatic and sea level processes interacting in an oscillating geologic continuum. The location of a shoreface is the result of tectonic, sedimentary, oceanographic, and climatic processes, all interweaving to create a single location. The combining processes include passive continental margin subsidence, lithospheric flexuring and epirogenic uplift, depositional processes, fluvial transportation traits, sediment compaction and lithostatic pressure, global wind and ocean currents, global average temperature, and insolation rate. These mechanisms are either synergistic or algebraically additive, positive or negative, and act with periodicities ranging from 10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 0/ years. Sea level oscillations have maximal impact, with climate-weather characteristics and associated oscillation ranges occurring at different periods: plate margin rifted-basin tectonics at 10/sup 8/ years, characterized by periods of major glacial activity lasting 10/sup 7/ years and sea level oscillation ranges of up to 0.5 km; regional basin evolution at 10/sup 7/ years and oscillation ranges of several hundreds of meters; local basin tectonics and sedimentation patterns and long-term sets of climate and sea level oscillation patterns at 10/sup 6/ years, with oscillation ranges of up to 125 m and averaging 50 m; individual glacial and sea level cycles (controlled by planetary orbital motions and insolation) at 10/sup 5/ and 10/sup 4/ years, and oscillation ranges of up to 125 m and averaging 50 m; medium-term climate cycles at 10/sup 3/ years, characterized by peaks of storminess and oscillation ranges of meters to decameters; short-term climate-weather cycles at 10/sup 2/, 10/sup 1/, and 10/sup 0/ years, and oscillation ranges of meters to centimeters. All of these processes impact on sea level oscillations, thus, on the shoreface, leaving a residuum of beach sands.

  15. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 82-224-1336, Miami Fire Department, Miami, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, S.

    1983-07-01

    To evaluate the possibility that fire fighters had been exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during an electrical fire inside an underground transformer vault, samples were collected 3 days after the fire, and subsequent to cleanup of the vault by the power company. The results support the findings of other studies which indicate that polychlorinated dibenzofurans are trace contaminants of technical grade PCB oils and may be produced during fires involving PCBs.

  16. The University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, L. E.; Smith, S. L.; Minnett, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    /tropical HAB organism, Karenia brevis, and its environmental interactions; and (3) exploring the relationship between microbial indicators and human health effects in sub/tropical recreational marine waters. There are three Facilities Cores supporting this research in Genomics, Remote Sensing, and Toxic Algal Culture. To accomplish this research program in subtropical/tropical oceans and human health, the University of Miami Oceans & Human Health Center collaborates with interdisciplinary scientists at Florida International University (FIU), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Miami Dade County Dept of Health, the University of Florida, and other institutions, as well as other Oceans and Human Health Centers and researchers.

  17. The 47th annual Florida pesticide residue workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an introductory article to a special section of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry consisting of publications from the 47th Annual Florida Pesticide Residue Workshop held in St. Pete Beach, FL in July of 2010....

  18. Analysis of the Enrollment Loss among First-Time-in-College Students Attending Miami-Dade Community College. Research Report No. 95-07R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brann, Herman I.

    From fall 1990 to fall 1994, Florida's Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC) experienced a decline in enrollment among first-time-in-college students. To determine reasons for the decline, M-DCC examined characteristics and high school of origin of first-time students in the period, categorizing students as direct-entry (i.e., entering within 1…

  19. Two new promising cultivars of mango for Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mango cultivars are mostly the result of random selections from open pollinated chance seedlings of indigenous or introduced germplasm. The National Germplasm Repository (genebank) at the Subtropical Horticulture Research Station (SHRS) in Miami, Florida is an important mango germplasm repository an...

  20. Florida International University Annual Accountability Report, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Miami-Dade County voters sent a strong message on November 4, 2014, in a rare (as per public university practices) referendum on their public university's role in their community. The voters made it clear that they want Florida International University (FIU) to expand--to provide more and better educational opportunities for their community, by a…

  1. 77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship... Indiantown Road and Donald Ross Road, just offshore of Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach...

  2. 76 FR 24813 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... establishing a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida for the Fourth... on June 17, 2011 and conclude on June 19, 2011. The boat races will be held in the Atlantic Ocean... the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach, FL encompassed within an imaginary line connecting...

  3. 78 FR 57061 - Special Local Regulation; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL in the Federal Register (78 FR 40079). We received no comments ] on... event consists of approximately 100 participants launching 30 self-propelled flying objects from a...

  4. 'Miami Sunrise', 'Miami Sunset', and Tangelo', three new cultivars of Tecoma guarume.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the release of Tecoma guarume ‘Miami Sunrise’, ‘Miami Sunset’, and ‘Tangelo’, superior seedling selections of a semi-deciduous subtropical/tropical flowering shrub, through the National Germplasm System. These three selections each showed consistent color variation that warranted their...

  5. 78 FR 54599 - Safety Zone; 2013 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... during the 2013 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place...

  6. 76 FR 24840 - Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... during the 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to...

  7. 77 FR 63720 - Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and... the Federal Register (77 FR 2012- 18455). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public... during the 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place...

  8. A Profile of Employed Students at Miami-Dade Community College. Research Report #94-20R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Sylvia K.

    A study was conducted at Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC), in Florida, to determine the demographic and academic characteristics of students by their employment status. Surveys were sent to a sample of 3,045 students classified as unemployed, working 1-20 hours per week, working 21-40 hours per week, or working more than 40 hours per week.…

  9. Virtual Beach Manager Toolset

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Virtual Beach Manager Toolset (VB) is a set of decision support software tools developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tools are being developed under the umbrella of...

  10. 33 CFR 80.730 - Miami Harbor, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miami Harbor, FL. 80.730 Section... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.730 Miami Harbor, FL. A line drawn across the seaward extremity of the Miami Harbor Government Cut Jetties....

  11. Miami Dade College and the Engaging Power of the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, the president of Miami Dade College describes the anchoring role that the institution plays in the Miami metropolitan region, with a particular emphasis on the many arts and cultural contributions. These efforts, combined with the economic and workforce development endeavors, make Miami Dade College a model anchor institution.

  12. To provide for the conveyance of the David W. Dyer Federal Building and United States Courthouse in Miami, Florida, to Miami Dade College in Miami Dade County, Florida.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Mica, John L. [R-FL-7

    2013-04-17

    04/18/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Clinical and Immunologic Manifestations of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease in a Miami Population Compared to a Midwestern US Caucasian Population

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Marcos E.; Perez, Magdalena; Pignac-Kobinger, Judith; Marx, Emily Triana; Tozman, Elaine M.; Greidinger, Eric L.; Hoffman, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective A cross-sectional study of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) was performed to determine if there were identifiable differences in the clinical expression of MCTD associated with race or ethnicity. Methods Miami, Florida, and Midwestern US (Missouri) Caucasian MCTD cohorts were studied. Clinical and laboratory features of the 2 MCTD cohorts were compared. A concurrently collected cohort of Sm-positive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was studied as a control. Disease activity and severity and functional status were measured. CD4+CD25high-expressing T-regulatory cells were enumerated and serum soluble L selectin was measured as biomarkers of disease activity. Results The Miami and Missouri Caucasian MCTD groups, while differing from the SLE group, were largely similar; however, gastroesophageal reflux, sclerodactyly, and malar rash were significantly more frequent in the Missouri MCTD group and alopecia was more frequent in the Miami MCTD group. Significant clinical and laboratory differences were found between the Miami MCTD and Miami SLE groups despite similar disease duration, activity, severity and functional status. Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), hand swelling, synovitis, myositis, and sclerodactyly were all significantly more common in RNP-positive MCTD versus Sm-positive SLE subjects. Conclusion Ethnic differences were observed in the frequency of end-organ involvement in the Miami MCTD versus the Missouri Caucasian MCTD groups. Clinical and laboratory features of all MCTD groups were clearly different from the SLE group, despite similar disease activity, disease severity, and functional status. Disease activity measures appeared to behave similarly as valid measures of disease activity in SLE and MCTD. PMID:18260175

  14. Impact of anthropogenic development on coastal ground-water hydrology in southeastern Florida, 1900-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, Robert A.; Dixon, Joann; Koehmstedt, John A.; Ishman, Scott; Lietz, A.C.; Marella, Richard L.; Telis, Pamela A.; Rodgers, Jeff; Memberg, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Southeastern Florida is an area that has been subject to widely conflicting anthropogenic stress to the Everglades and coastal ecosystems. This stress is a direct consequence of the 20th century economic competition for limited land and water resources needed to satisfy agricultural development and its expansion, its displacement by burgeoning urban development, and the accompanying growth of the limestone mining industry. The development of a highly controlled water-management system designed to reclaim land for urban and agricultural development has severely impacted the extent, character, and vitality of the historic Everglades and coastal ecosystems. An extensive conveyance system of canals, levees, impoundments, surface- water control structures, and numerous municipal well fields are used to sustain the present-day Everglades hydrologic system, prevent overland flow from moving eastward and flooding urban and agricultural areas, maintain water levels to prevent saltwater intrusion, and provide an adequate water supply. Extractive mining activities expanded considerably in the latter part of the 20th century, largely in response to urban construction needs. Much of the present-day urban-agricultural corridor of southeastern Florida lies within an area that is no more than 15 feet above NGVD 1929 and formerly characterized by freshwater marsh, upland, and saline coastal wetland ecosystems. Miami- Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties have experienced explosive population growth, increasing from less than 4,000 inhabitants in 1900 to more than 5 million in 2000. Ground-water use, the principal source of municipal supply, has increased from about 65 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) obtained from 3 well fields in 1930 to more than 770 Mgal/d obtained from 65 well fields in 1995. Water use for agricultural supply increased from 505 Mgal/d in 1953 to nearly 1,150 Mgal/d in 1988, but has since declined to 764 Mgal/d in 1995, partly as a result of displacement of the

  15. Measuring the effects of morphological changes to sea turtle nesting beaches over time with LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Anderson, Sharolyn J.; Sutton, Paul C.

    2015-10-01

    Sea turtle nesting beaches in southeastern Florida were evaluated for changes from 1999 to 2005 using LiDAR datasets. Changes to beach volume were correlated with changes in several elevation-derived characteristics, such as elevation and slope. In addition, these changes to beach geomorphology were correlated to changes in nest success, illustrating that beach alterations may affect sea turtle nesting behavior. The ability to use LiDAR datasets to quickly and efficiently conduct beach comparisons for habitat use represents another benefit to this high spatial resolution data.

  16. Terrestrial-based lidar beach topography of Fire Island, New York, June 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, Owen T.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Lee, Kathryn G.; Kimbrow, Dustin R.

    2016-02-19

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) in Florida and the USGS Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center (LMG WSC) in Montgomery, Alabama, collaborated to gather alongshore terrestrial-based lidar beach elevation data at Fire Island, New York. This high-resolution elevation dataset was collected on June 11, 2014, to characterize beach topography and document ongoing beach evolution and recovery, and is part of the ongoing beach monitoring within the Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Project GS2-2B. This USGS data series includes the resulting processed elevation point data (xyz) and an interpolated digital elevation model (DEM).

  17. VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ROAD. NOTE THE RESIDENCES ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF BEACH ROAD. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Variation in Miami Cuban Spanish Interrogative Intonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvord, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    The interrogative intonation of Cubans and Cuban Americans living in Miami is investigated. Two different intonation patterns are used in this variety of Spanish to convey absolute interrogative meaning: one with a falling final contour, as has been observed in Cuban Spanish, and one with a rising final contour, as is used in American English and…

  19. Chemistry of Consumer Goods Taught at Miami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Described is a course in the chemistry of consumer goods, for both chemistry students and non-science majors, at the University of Miami. This course is intended to bridge the gap between the world of the chemist in the laboratory and the life of the ordinary consumer. (BT)

  20. Andrew's Aftermath: Hurricane "Saves" Miami Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan

    1994-01-01

    Examines the impact of Hurricane Andrew on the Miami-Dade Public Library System (MDPLS). Topics discussed include the community's response to the sudden lack of library services; the use of library branches as emergency relief centers and communications centers; library disaster policies; and visions for MDPLS under a new director. (LRW)

  1. Mental health impact of the 2010 Haiti earthquake on the Miami Haitian population: A random-sample survey

    PubMed Central

    Messiah, Antoine; Acuna, Juan M; Castro, Grettel; de la Vega, Pura Rodríguez; Vaiva, Guillaume; Shultz, James; Neria, Yuval; De La Rosa, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the mental health consequences of the January 2010 Haiti earthquake on Haitians living in Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2–3 years following the event. A random-sample household survey was conducted from October 2011 through December 2012 in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Haitian participants (N = 421) were assessed for their earthquake exposure and its impact on family, friends, and household finances; and for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and major depression; using standardized screening measures and thresholds. Exposure was considered as “direct” if the interviewee was in Haiti during the earthquake. Exposure was classified as “indirect” if the interviewee was not in Haiti during the earthquake but (1) family members or close friends were victims of the earthquake, and/or (2) family members were hosted in the respondent's household, and/or (3) assets or jobs were lost because of the earthquake. Interviewees who did not qualify for either direct or indirect exposure were designated as “lower” exposure. Eight percent of respondents qualified for direct exposure, and 63% qualified for indirect exposure. Among those with direct exposure, 19% exceeded threshold for PTSD, 36% for anxiety, and 45% for depression. Corresponding percentages were 9%, 22% and 24% for respondents with indirect exposure, and 6%, 14%, and 10% for those with lower exposure. A majority of Miami Haitians were directly or indirectly exposed to the earthquake. Mental health distress among them remains considerable two to three years post-earthquake. PMID:26753105

  2. 76 FR 26931 - Safety Zone; Second Annual Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of... will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach, Florida. Approximately 30...

  3. 77 FR 13102 - Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the St. Lucie South Beach and Dune...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... ending 5 p.m. July 18, 2011. A public comment meeting was held June 29, 2011 at the St. Lucie County.... Lucie West Library J Building, 500 NW. California Blvd., Port St. Lucie, 34986, 5. USACE Palm Beach... St. Lucie South Beach and Dune Restoration Project located in St. Lucie County, Florida AGENCY:...

  4. Footloose in Florida: A Bibliography of Books in Recorded and Braille Formats for Young Readers from Preschool through Junior High. Silver Summer Scrapbook--Summer Library Program, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumner, Mary Ann, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography comprises an alphabetical listing of 40 books about Florida available in special formats. The list has books about going barefoot; the Florida beaches and inlands; and general beach stories. The reading levels of the books range from preschool through junior high school. Formats included in the bibliography are cassette…

  5. Louisiana's statewide beach cleanup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindstedt, Dianne M.; Holmes, Joseph C.

    1989-01-01

    Litter along Lousiana's beaches has become a well-recognized problem. In September 1987, Louisiana's first statewide beach cleanup attracted about 3300 volunteers who filled 16,000 bags with trash collected along 15 beaches. An estimated 800,173 items were gathered. Forty percent of the items were made of plastic and 11% were of polystyrene. Of all the litter collected, 37% was beverage-related. Litter from the oil and gas, commercial fishing, and maritime shipping industries was found, as well as that left by recreational users. Although beach cleanups temporarily rid Louisiana beaches of litter, the real value of the effort is in public participation and education. Civic groups, school children, and individuals have benefited by increasing their awareness of the problems of trash disposal.

  6. Miami's Tequesta Site: Could It Be a Native American Study Site For Natural Periodicities Associated With Tornados, Hurricanes, or Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Dougall, Jean S.; Mc Leod, David M.; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2002-10-01

    Florida invested in preserving the Tequesta Indians' "Stonehenge-like" site along the Miami River. Direct observation, and telecast reports, show that a strong association exists between this area and Native American place names, hurricanes, tornados, a waterspout, and other nearby phenomena. Electromagnetic stimulation of human nervous systems in areas like these, discernable by appropriately sensitive individuals when these types of events occur, could plausibly account for some correct "predictions" of events like earthquakes. Various sensory modalities may be activated there. It may be important to understand other historic aspects associated with cultural artifacts like Miami's Tequesta remains. If it also generates instrumentally detectable signals that correlate with visual, "auditory," or nerve ending "tinglings" like those cited by the psychiatrist Arthur Guirdham in books like his Obsessions, applied physicists could partly vindicate the investment and also provide a net return. Society and comparative religious study may benefit.

  7. Geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Vacher, H. L.; Shinn,

    1997-01-01

    This chapter discusses the geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys, and focuses on the islands formed of Pleistocene limestone. These islands, which are crossed when driving from Miami to Key West, are typically regarded as "the Florida Keys." The outstanding and fragile character of ecosystems on and around the Florida Keys has prompted State and Federal efforts to protect and preserve the remaining public portions of the region. The Florida Keys were largely ignored during the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, although the waters just offshore provided a major shipping thoroughfare to and from the New World. The Florida Keys are now recognized as one of the great recreational and environmental resources of the United States. The islands are outposts of a laid-back, tropical resort culture that has as its foundation warmth and clear water. A significant part of the attraction is fishing, diving, and boating around the area's coral reefs, which the islands protect. But the reefs were not always so highly valued. The Florida Keys that have protected the reefs for millennia, may now be the source of the agents that may accomplish what Agassiz thought was beyond man's power a century ago.

  8. Hydrogeology of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2000-01-01

    Results from 35 new test coreholes and aquifer-test, water-level, and water-quality data were combined with existing hydrogeologic data to define the extent, thickness, hydraulic properties, and degree of confinement of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida. This aquifer, previously known to be present only in southeastern Florida (Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties) below, and to the west of, the Biscayne aquifer, extends over most of central-south Florida, including eastern and central Collier County and southern Hendry County; it is the same as the lower Tamiami aquifer to the north, and it becomes the water-table aquifer and the upper limestone part of the lower Tamiami aquifer to the west. The aquifer generally is composed of gray, shelly, lightly to moderately cemented limestone with abundant shell fragments or carbonate sand, abundant skeletal moldic porosity, and minor quartz sand. The gray limestone aquifer comprises the Ochopee Limestone of the Tamiami Formation, and, in some areas, the uppermost permeable part of an unnamed formation principally composed of quartz sand. Underlying the unnamed formation is the Peace River Formation of the upper Hawthorn Group, the top of which is the base of the surficial aquifer system. Overlying the aquifer and providing confinement in much of the area is the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The thickness of the aquifer is comparatively uniform, generally ranging from 30 to 100 feet. The unnamed formation part of the aquifer is up to 20 feet thick. The Ochopee Limestone accumulated in a carbonate ramp depositional system and contains a heterozoan carbonate-particle association. The principal rock types of the aquifer are pelecypod lime rudstones and floatstones and permeable quartz sands and sandstones. The pore types are mainly intergrain and separate vug (skeletal-moldic) pore spaces. The rock fabric and associated primary and secondary pore spaces combine to form a dual diffuse

  9. Geographic variation in the mycangial mycoflora of Xyleborus glabratus in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laurel wilt kills Persea borbonia and other American members of the Lauraceae. It is caused by Raffaelea lauricola, a fungal symbiont of an exotic ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus. R. lauricola and other fungi were quantified in X. glabratrus collected from three locations in Florida. A Miami-Da...

  10. Miami International Airport stormwater NPDES plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, A.I.; Goldman, J.Z.; Schmidt, M.F.; Clark, E.E.

    1994-12-31

    Miami International Airport (MIA) is endeavoring to essentially double its traffic volume by the turn of the century. This is a great challenge since the site is already highly developed. Space, safety and other constraints make it difficult to implement conventional detention/retention stormwater practices. Other practices were evaluated to control stormwater quantity/quality, since some of the downstream bodies of water are flood-prone or environmentally sensitive.

  11. NASA applications project in Miami County, Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, R. Norberto; Lozano-Garcia, D. Fabian; Wyss, Phillip J.; Johannsen, Chris J.

    1989-01-01

    The study site selection is intended to serve all of the different research areas within the project, i.e., soil conditions, soil management, etc. There are seven major soil associations or soils formed on similar landscapes in the Miami Co., and over 38 soil series that were mapped. Soil sampling was conducted in some sites because of its variability in soils and cover types, variable topography, and presence of erosion problems. Results from analysis of these soil data is presented.

  12. Death in Miami: AIDS, Gender, and Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddlee

    In "God's Work," an episode of the "Miami Vice" television series in which a gay character comes home to reunite with a childhood friend and ex-lover who is dying of AIDS, the show is at odds with itself over the issue of sexuality and AIDS. At one level, that of the "coming-out" story of the main character, it presents the gay character in a…

  13. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  14. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols.

  15. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols. PMID:21499552

  16. Hawaii Beach Monitoring Program: Beach Profile Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Hillman, Kindra P.

    2001-01-01

    Coastal erosion is widespread and locally severe in Hawaii and other low-latitude areas. Typical erosion rates in Hawaii are in the range of 15 to 30 cm/yr (0.5 to 1 ft/yr; Hwang, 1981; Sea Engineering, Inc., 1988; Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc.,1991). Recent studies on Oahu (Fletcher et al., 1997; Coyne et al., 1996) have shown that nearly 24%, or 27.5 km (17.1 mi) of an original 115 km (71.6 mi) of sandy shoreline (1940's) has been either significantly narrowed (17.2 km; 10.7 mi) or lost (10.3 km; 6.4 mi). Nearly one-quarter of the islands' beaches have been significantly degraded over the last half-century and all shorelines have been affected to some degree. Oahu shorelines are by far the most studied, however, beach loss has been identified on the other islands as well, with nearly 13 km (8 mi) of beach likely lost due to shoreline hardening on Maui (Makai Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc., 1991). Causes of coastal erosion and beach loss in Hawaii are numerous but, unfortunately, poorly understood and rarely quantified. Construction of shoreline protection structures limits coastal land loss, but does not alleviate beach loss and may actually accelerate the problem by prohibiting sediment deposition in front of the structures. Other factors contributing to beach loss include: a) reduced sediment supply; b) large storms; and, c) sea-level rise. Reduction in sand supply, either from landward or seaward (primarily reef) sources, can have a myriad of causes. Obvious causes such as beach sand mining and emplacement of structures that interrupt natural sediment transport pathways or prevent access to backbeach sand deposits, remove sediment from the active littoral system. More complex issues of sediment supply can be related to reef health and carbonate production which, in turn, may be linked to changes in water quality. Second, the accumulated effect of large storms is to transport sediment beyond the littoral system. Third

  17. Hurricane & Tropical Storm Impacts over the South Florida Metropolitan Area: Mortality & Government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon Pagan, I. C.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1985, the South Florida Metropolitan area (SFMA), which covers the counties of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach, has been directly affected by 9 tropical cyclones: four tropical storms and 5 hurricanes. This continuous hurricane and tropical storm activity has awakened the conscience of the communities, government, and private sector, about the social vulnerability, in terms of age, gender, ethnicity, and others. Several factors have also been significant enough to affect the vulnerability of the South Florida Metropolitan area, like its geographic location which is at the western part of the Atlantic hurricane track, with a surface area of 6,137 square miles, and elevation of 15 feet. And second, from the 2006 Census estimate, this metropolitan area is the 7th most populous area in the United States supporting almost 1,571 individuals per square mile. Mortality levels due to hurricanes and tropical storms have fluctuated over the last 21 years without any signal of a complete reduction, a phenomenon that can be related to both physical characteristics of the storms and government actions. The average annual death count remains almost the same from 4.10 between 1985 and 1995 to 4 from 1996 to 2006. However, the probability of occurrence of a direct impact of an atmospheric disturbance has increase from 0.3 to 0.6, with an average of three hurricane or tropical storm direct impacts for every five. This analysis suggests an increasing problem with regard to atmospheric disturbances-related deaths in the South Florida Metropolitan area. In other words, despite substantial increases in population during the last 21 years, the number of tropical cyclone-related deaths is not declining; it's just being segregated among more storms. Gaps between each impact can be related to mortality levels. When that time increases in five years or more, such as Bob and Andrew or Irene and Katrina, or decreases in weeks or months, such as Harvey and Irene or Katrina and Wilma

  18. BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

  19. A Case Study: Bilingualism - The Link to International Trade in Miami.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Andre; Cote, Ellyn

    The metropolitan Miami area is a thriving bilingual community that uniquely exemplifies the utility of Spanish for business careers. Miami is unique in its large Latin population, the success of this population, and the proximity of Miami to the Caribbean and Latin American markets. The impact of the Latin population of Miami on education and…

  20. Teacher Quality Roadmap: Improving Policies and Practices in the Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In partnership with the Urban League of Greater Miami, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) released "Teacher Quality Roadmap: Improving Policies and Practices in Miami," an in-depth study of the work rules Miami-Dade teachers. This look at the state of teacher policies in Miami-Dade County Public Schools explores the district's contract…

  1. Organic aerosols in the Miami area, USA: temporal variability of atmospheric particles and wet/dry deposition.

    PubMed

    Lang, Qingyong; Zhang, Qian; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter and both wet and dry deposition was collected over a period of nine months at one location in the metropolitan area of Miami, Florida. Molecular distributions and concentrations of n-alkanes, fatty acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and hopanes were determined using weekly composite samples over this time period in order to determine temporal variability, and their possible dependence on climatic parameters such as temperature, rainfall and wind direction and frequency. Based on molecular distributions of the compounds studied, potential emission sources for the atmospheric particles were assessed and suggested to be mainly derived from automobile exhaust and natural sources. Although wet and dry deposition processes were observed to remove about equal amounts of organic aerosols from the Miami atmosphere, dry deposition was dominant in the removal of anthropogenically derived compounds such as PAHs and hopanes. Only very limited seasonal trends were observed, while wind direction and frequency was found to be the most important meteorological parameter controlling the temporal variability of the organic aerosols. This is the first detailed report of this nature for the Miami area.

  2. Virtual Beach: Decision Support Tools for Beach Pathogen Prediction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Virtual Beach Managers Tool (VB) is decision-making software developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tool is being developed under the umbrella of EPA's Advanced Monit...

  3. Public perceptions of Florida red tide risks.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Sara E; Nierenberg, Kate; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Tobin, Graham A

    2009-07-01

    This research integrates theoretical frameworks of risk perception, social amplification of risk, and the role of place-specific contexts in order to explore the various perceptions surrounding Florida red tides. Florida red tides are naturally occurring events that are increasing in frequency, duration, and severity. This has implications for public health, the local economy, and ecosystem health. While many of the negative impacts of Florida red tides are not easily controlled, some of the secondary impacts may be mitigated through individuals' responses. However, public perception and consequent reactions to Florida red tides have not been investigated. This research uses questionnaire surveys, and semi-structured interviews, to explore the various perceptions of the risk surrounding red tides. Surveys and interviews were conducted along two Florida west coast beaches. The results indicate that the underlying foundations of the social amplification of the risk framework are applicable to understanding how individuals form perceptions of risk relative to red tide events. There are key differences between the spatial locations of individuals and corresponding perceptions, indicating that place-specific contexts are essential to understanding how individuals receive and interpret risk information. The results also suggest that individuals may be lacking efficient and up-to-date information about Florida red tides and their impacts because of inconsistent public outreach. Overall, social and spatial factors appear to be influential as to whether individuals amplify or attenuate the risks associated with Florida red tides.

  4. Morphodynamics of Prograding Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term coastal evolution often results from the cumulative effects of small residual differences between relatively large signals. In light of dire projections of sea level rise over the next several decades to century, there is a strong societal need for accurate forecasts of net interannual- to decadal-scale coastal change. However, our present understanding of the processes responsible for storm-induced erosion and coastal recession is significantly more advanced than our knowledge of coastal recovery during calm periods. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with progading beaches we synthesize findings from a long-term (15 years) beach morphology monitoring program in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Most of the beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) were eroded during the two intense winters of 1997/1998 (a major El Niño event) and 1998/1999 (a moderate La Niña event). Subsequent to these winters the beaches have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year resulting in significant shoreline advance. During this same period as many as two to three new foredunes formed with backshore beach profiles accumulating sand at rates of well over 10 m3/m/yr. Interestingly, these large signals of horizontal and vertical coastal advance have occurred on beaches in which nearshore morphological variability is dominated by net offshore sandbar migration. Net offshore sandbar migration follows a three-stage process; bar generation near the shoreline, seaward migration, and bar degeneration in the outer nearshore with a cyclic return period of approximately 4 to 5 years in the region. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for the sediment supplied to the beaches and dunes during the study

  5. New tropical fruit hosts of Scirtothrips dorsalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and its relative abundance on them in South Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilli thrips, Scritothrips dorsalis Hood, recently established in the southeast region of the United States, poses an economic threat to a wide-range of ornamental and vegetable plants. During scouting and sampling various hosts at different commercial nursery locations in Florida (Miami-Dade Count...

  6. Genetic diversity and conservation of Ipomoea microdactyla (Convolvulaceae) – An endemic vine from the Bahamas, Cuba, and Southeastern Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ipomoea microdactyla Griseb. (Convolvulaceae) is restricted to the Bahamian archipelago, Cuba, and southeastern Florida. The species is listed as endangered in U.S.A. where it is mostly restricted to the hyper-fragmented pine rockland of Miami-Dade County. Using seven DNA microsatellite loci, we ass...

  7. Virtual Beach 3: User's Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beac...

  8. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide.

  9. [Fungi at the beach].

    PubMed

    Szepetiuk, G; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    2010-01-01

    Fungi responsible for dermatomycoses survive in a resting phase inside diverse parts of the environment. Sand in the wet, partly wet and dry portions of the beaches frequently contains dermatophytes, yeasts and moulds. These microorganisms possibly infect skin and nails during summertime.

  10. Researchers study impact of Hurricane Opal on Florida coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Gregory W.; Armbruster, Charles K.; Xu, J. P.; Grymes, John M., III; Huh, Oscar K.

    On October 4, 1995, over 2000 km of coast-line stretching from southwest Florida to Louisiana was struck by storm-generated waves as Hurricane Opal moved northward across the Gulf of Mexico toward landfall east of Pensacola Beach, Florida (Figure 1).Approximately 12 hours before landfall on October 4, Opal neared category 5 strength (measured on the Saffir/Simpson scale) with sustained wind speeds of over 65 m s-1. Storm surge levels of ˜5 m were estimated across the Northwest Florida shelf by the National Hurricane Center (NHC), resulting in the overwash of most of Santa Rosa Island, the most extensively affected section of coast in the Gulf.

  11. HIGH-ANGLE AEOLIAN CROSSBEDDING AT TRAIL RIDGE, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Force, Eric; Garnar, Tom

    1985-01-01

    This paper described new evidence concerning the origin of the Trail Ridge mineral sands deposit in Florida. Rarely exposed sections of the orebody exhibit structures indicative of sand dune formation rather than coastal beach sand accumulation. The implications for mineral sands exploration, and therefore resources, in the southeastern USA are highlighted.

  12. U.S. Geological Survey programs in Florida, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The safety, health, and economic well-being of Florida?s citizens are important to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which is involved in water-related, geologic, biological, land use, and mapping issues in many parts of the State. The USGS office in Tallahassee acts as the liaison for all studies conducted by USGS scientists in Florida. Water resources activities are conducted not only from the office in Tallahassee, but also from offices in Miami, Tampa, and Altamonte Springs (Orlando). Scientists in these offices investigate surface water, ground water and water quality in Florida, working in cooperation with other Federal, State and local agencies and organizations. The USGS Center for Coastal Geology and Regional Marine Studies was established in St. Petersburg in 1988, in cooperation with the University of South Florida. The Center conducts a wide variety of research on mineral resources and on coastal and regional marine problems, including coastal erosion, climate change, wetlands deterioration, and coastal pollution. A USGS mapping office is located in St. Petersburg. Also, the Earth Science Information Center (ESIC) in Tallahassee provides USGS information to customers and directs inquiries to the appropriate USGS office or State agency on earth science topics, particularly those related to cartography, geography, aerial photography, and digital data. Biologists at the USGS Florida Caribbean Science Center, located in Gainesville, conduct biological and ecosystem studies in Florida, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

  13. Palm Beach School Board Acquisition of Relocatable Classrooms Examined. OPPAGA Special Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

    This report, responding to a Florida legislative request, examines the Palm Beach County School Board's planned purchase of concrete relocatable classrooms. The report presents a number of findings and recommendations. Concrete units are more expensive than models with metal stud walls; both types meet state building code standards. The district…

  14. Improving School Readiness: A Brief Report from the Palm Beach County Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Gouvea, Marcia; Rich, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building a system of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas that have…

  15. Palm Beach County's Prime Time Initiative: Improving the Quality of After-School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    This report covers the third year of Chapin Hall's process evaluation of the Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida, a system-building effort to strengthen the quality of after-school programs in the county. During the past two decades, the after-school field has expanded enormously, partly in response to increasing concern about…

  16. 78 FR 11094 - Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth... Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Lake Worth Inlet, West Palm Beach, Florida, to...

  17. Supporting Low-Income Parents of Young Children: The Palm Beach County Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Rich, Lauren; Gouvea, Marcia; Winje, Carolyn; Scannell, Molly; Harden, Allen; Berg, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building an infrastructure of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas…

  18. 77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic... Daytona Beach, Florida during the Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves air show. The event is scheduled to take...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of...

  19. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (south Florida). Florida pompano. [Trachinotus carolinus

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C.

    1986-04-01

    Florida pompano is a marine species that is especially common along the Florida coast. Florida pompano is an excellent food fish, so it supports an important commercial and recreational fishery. Larvae live in the open sea, but juveniles use waters along beaches as nursery grounds. Juvenile pompano eat planktonic but mostly benthic invertebrates. Adults feed on invertebrates and fish. Pompano prefer temperatures of 28 to 32/sup 0/C, and adults apparently prefer salinities of 28 to 37 ppt. Pompano died at dissolved oxygen concentrations of 2.5 ppM.

  20. CDC Ends Zika Travel Advisory for Miami Neighborhood

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161032.html CDC Ends Zika Travel Advisory for Miami Neighborhood Pregnant women still ... News) -- U.S. health officials on Monday lifted the Zika virus travel advisory that urged pregnant women to ...

  1. 33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 80°09.7′ W.) drawn across St. Lucie Inlet. (e) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter...

  2. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  3. 33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 80°09.7′ W.) drawn across St. Lucie Inlet. (e) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter...

  4. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  5. 33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 80°09.7′ W.) drawn across St. Lucie Inlet. (e) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter...

  6. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  7. 33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 80°09.7′ W.) drawn across St. Lucie Inlet. (e) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter...

  8. 33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 80°09.7′ W.) drawn across St. Lucie Inlet. (e) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter...

  9. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  10. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  11. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast Orange Beach quadrangle, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, John C.; Bohman, Larry R.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on the Orange Beach topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the shores of Wolf Bay, Perdido Bay, and Bayou St. John and adjacent areas in the vicinity of Orange Beach, Ala., and along the beaches exposed to the Gulf of Mexico, from Romar Beach, Ala., eastward to Perdido Key, in Florida. Damage from wind and tidal waves was widespread. The greatest damage occurred along Perdido Key in Alabama and Florida where many homes were destroyed and the highway was washed out in several places. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Ala., since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Ala. (USGS)

  12. Electromagnetic methods for rapidly characterizing porosity distributions in the upper part of the Biscayne aquifer, southern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.; Cunningham, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Gregory J. Mount1, Xavier Comas1, and Kevin J. Cunningham2 1Department of Geosciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 2U.S. Geological Survey, 3110 SW 9th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315 Although conventional hydrological techniques of aquifer characterization, which rely on data obtained from boreholes and wells can provide very valuable direct information about porosity, storativity and transmissivity, they are invasive and can often become time consuming and relatively expensive. Near-surface electromagnetic techniques, such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), provide indirect measurements of aquifer properties that complement traditional point measurements and provide a laterally continuous subsurface image in an efficient and cost effective manner with a minimal impact on the environment. We investigated the carbonate rocks of the uppermost part (3-5 meters) of the Biscayne aquifer in Everglades National Park to better understand the distribution of karst features that can create concentrated flow of groundwater, nutrients, and contaminants. As the Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in southern Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade counties, knowledge about these features could create a more complete understanding of a critical natural resource. These macroporous elements contribute to the overall storage, permeability, and transmissivity of the aquifer and for that reason, delineation of their distribution and areal extent should aid in the development of more accurate groundwater flow models. The macroporous elements create numerous hyperbolic diffractions in GPR common offset profiles, and these diffractions are used directly used to estimate two-dimensional (2D) models of electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity in the subsurface. Such models are further contrasted with one-dimensional (1D) velocity models using GPR common mid-point surveys at selected locations. In order to estimate

  13. Predaceous ants, beach replenishment, and nest placement by sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Wetterer, James K; Wood, Lawrence D; Johnson, Chris; Krahe, Holly; Fitchett, Stephanie

    2007-10-01

    Ants known for attacking and killing hatchling birds and reptiles include the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren), tropical fire ant [Solenopsis geminata (Fabr.)], and little fire ant [Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger)]. We tested whether sea turtle nest placement influenced exposure to predaceous ants. In 2000 and 2001, we surveyed ants along a Florida beach where green turtles (Chelonia mydas L.), leatherbacks (Dermochelys coriacea Vandelli), and loggerheads (Caretta caretta L.) nest. Part of the beach was artificially replenished between our two surveys. As a result, mean beach width experienced by nesting turtles differed greatly between the two nesting seasons. We surveyed 1,548 sea turtle nests (2000: 909 nests; 2001: 639 nests) and found 22 ant species. S. invicta was by far the most common species (on 431 nests); S. geminata and W. auropunctata were uncommon (on 3 and 16 nests, respectively). In 2000, 62.5% of nests had ants present (35.9% with S. invicta), but in 2001, only 30.5% of the nests had ants present (16.4% with S. invicta). Turtle nests closer to dune vegetation had significantly greater exposure to ants. Differences in ant presence on turtle nests between years and among turtle species were closely related to differences in nest placement relative to dune vegetation. Beach replenishment significantly lowered exposure of nests to ants because on the wider beaches turtles nested farther from the dune vegetation. Selective pressures on nesting sea turtles are altered both by the presence of predaceous ants and the practice of beach replenishment.

  14. Getting Aquainted with Beaches and Coasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWall, Allan E.

    1980-01-01

    Explains how a shoreline is formed and how it changes, and why its changes do not always coincide with human plans. Subjects discussed include beaches, beach processes, inlets and beaches, and a marine glossary. (Author/DS)

  15. Hydrologic effects of area B flood control plan on urbanization of Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohout, F.A.; Hartwell, J.H.

    1967-01-01

    Swampy low land (Area B) that fringes the Everglades west of Metropolitan Miami, Florida (Area A) probably will be urbanized in the future. Area B will be protected from flooding by huge pumps that will pump water westward from Area B over a levee system into Conservation Area 3B. The total capacity of the pumps will be about 13,400 cubic feet per second which is sufficient to lower water levels 2 inches per day in the 203 square miles of Area B. As this capacity is about equal to the highest gravity-flow discharge to the ocean through existing canals of the Miami area, a great potential. will exist, not only for control of floods, but also for beneficial control and management of a major segment of the water resources in southeastern Florida.

  16. Improved Beach Zone Segmentation From Airborne Lidar Measurements Using Intensity Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starek, M. J.; Vemula, R. K.; Slatton, C.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.

    2007-05-01

    In an effort to monitor beach zone stability along the St. Augustine Beach region of Florida, high-resolution airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) data are routinely acquired by the University of Florida's Geosensing and Engineering Mapping (GEM) Center. ALSM, often referred to as Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), systems enable sub-meter sampling of the near-shore coastal topography and the subsequent creation of digital elevation images with rms errors of less than 10cm over minimally-vegetated surfaces, such as beaches. Currently, there are seven collection dates spanning August 2003 to February 2007. This high spatial resolution coupled with the multiple acquisitions through time provided several results: two separate beach nourishment efforts were captured in the data allowing sediment spreading rate to be modeled and volume loss quantified, shoreline change rates were estimated for temporal scales ranging from a few months to over two years at various spatial frequencies from < 5m to > 300m, storm and seasonal wave climate induced shoreline response were modeled, and novel approaches to morphological feature extraction and identification of localized erosional hot- spots were developed. All previous analyses are based on range measurements; however, the ALSM system also records the intensity (peak voltage from the APD) for each return. Intensity has traditionally been under utilized as a feature for image classification because it does not represent true terrain radiance. We show that in areas with minimal topographic relief, such as beaches, intensity measures have great potential for improved beach zone segmentation. Segmentation of the beach zone is important for several factors including identification of the wet-dry line for traditional shoreline comparison and change-detection, and removal of water points to allow analysis of beach-only zones. Several intensity-based features are extracted from ALSM training data collected along the St. Augustine

  17. Florida Everglades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Spanning the southern tip of the Florida Peninsula and most of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park is the only subtropical preserve in North America. It contains both temperate and tropical plant communities, including sawgrass prairie, mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands, and hardwood hammocks, as well as marine and estuarine environments. The park is known for its rich bird life, particularly large wading birds, such as the roseate spoonbill, wood stork, great blue heron, and a variety of egrets. It is also the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 2, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  18. Using probabilities of enterococci exceedance and logistic regression to evaluate long term weekly beach monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Diana; Lopez, Jose V; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Fleisher, Jay M

    2016-02-01

    Recreational water quality surveillance involves comparing bacterial levels to set threshold values to determine beach closure. Bacterial levels can be predicted through models which are traditionally based upon multiple linear regression. The objective of this study was to evaluate exceedance probabilities, as opposed to bacterial levels, as an alternate method to express beach risk. Data were incorporated into a logistic regression for the purpose of identifying environmental parameters most closely correlated with exceedance probabilities. The analysis was based on 7,422 historical sample data points from the years 2000-2010 for 15 South Florida beach sample sites. Probability analyses showed which beaches in the dataset were most susceptible to exceedances. No yearly trends were observed nor were any relationships apparent with monthly rainfall or hurricanes. Results from logistic regression analyses found that among the environmental parameters evaluated, tide was most closely associated with exceedances, with exceedances 2.475 times more likely to occur at high tide compared to low tide. The logistic regression methodology proved useful for predicting future exceedances at a beach location in terms of probability and modeling water quality environmental parameters with dependence on a binary response. This methodology can be used by beach managers for allocating resources when sampling more than one beach. PMID:26837832

  19. Using probabilities of enterococci exceedance and logistic regression to evaluate long term weekly beach monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Diana; Lopez, Jose V; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Fleisher, Jay M

    2016-02-01

    Recreational water quality surveillance involves comparing bacterial levels to set threshold values to determine beach closure. Bacterial levels can be predicted through models which are traditionally based upon multiple linear regression. The objective of this study was to evaluate exceedance probabilities, as opposed to bacterial levels, as an alternate method to express beach risk. Data were incorporated into a logistic regression for the purpose of identifying environmental parameters most closely correlated with exceedance probabilities. The analysis was based on 7,422 historical sample data points from the years 2000-2010 for 15 South Florida beach sample sites. Probability analyses showed which beaches in the dataset were most susceptible to exceedances. No yearly trends were observed nor were any relationships apparent with monthly rainfall or hurricanes. Results from logistic regression analyses found that among the environmental parameters evaluated, tide was most closely associated with exceedances, with exceedances 2.475 times more likely to occur at high tide compared to low tide. The logistic regression methodology proved useful for predicting future exceedances at a beach location in terms of probability and modeling water quality environmental parameters with dependence on a binary response. This methodology can be used by beach managers for allocating resources when sampling more than one beach.

  20. University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Asfour, Shihab, S.

    2007-01-29

    This report documents all activity of the University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center (MIIAC) grant awarded by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP). This grant was coordinated through a collaborative effort with the Center for Advanced Energy Systems (CAES) located at Rutgers University in New Jersey (www.caes.rutgers.edu) which acted as the program’s Field Manager. The grant’s duration included fiscal years 2003-2006 (September 2002 – August 2006), and operated under the direction of Dr. Shihab Asfour, Director (MIIAC). MIIAC’s main goal was to provide energy assessments for local manufacturing firms. Energy consumption, productivity enhancement, and waste management were the focus of each assessment. Energy savings, cost savings, implementation costs, and simple payback periods were quantified using scientific methodologies and techniques. Over the four-year period of the grant, the total number of industrial assessments conducted was 91, resulting in 604 assessment recommendations and the following savings: 73,519,747 kWh, 435,722 MMBTU, and $10,024,453 in cost savings. A total of 16 undergraduate and graduate students were trained on energy assessment. Companies in over 40 different zip codes were assessed.

  1. Inland Transport of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Pierce, Richard; Cheng, Yung Sung; Henry, Michael S; Blum, Patricia; Osborn, Shannon; Nierenberg, Kate; Pederson, Bradley A; Fleming, Lora E; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Florida red tides, an annual event off the west coast of Florida, are caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins, brevetoxins, which kill fish, sea birds, and marine mammals, as well as sickening humans who consume contaminated shellfish. These toxins become part of the marine aerosol, and can also be inhaled by humans and other animals. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant increase in symptoms and decrease lung function in asthmatics after only one hour of beach exposure during an onshore Florida red tide bloom.This study constructed a transect line placing high volume air samplers to measure brevetoxins at sites beginning at the beach, moving approximately 6.4 km inland. One non-exposure and 2 exposure studies, each of 5 days duration, were conducted. No toxins were measured in the air during the non-exposure period. During the 2 exposure periods, the amount of brevetoxins varied considerably by site and by date. Nevertheless, brevetoxins were measured at least 4.2 kilometers from the beach and/or 1.6 km from the coastal shoreline. Therefore, populations sensitive to brevetoxins (such as asthmatics) need to know that leaving the beach may not discontinue their environmental exposure to brevetoxin aerosols.

  2. Variation of the Beach Profile, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Ho, T.; Li, A.; Perez, A.; Wong, Y.; Bissell, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean Beach is a 7-km-long stretch of beach that is the western boundary of the city of San Francisco with the Pacific Ocean. This beach is exposed to large winter waves produced in the North Pacific and smaller summer waves from both the North and South Pacific. Recent decades have seen an increased rate of erosion at the south end of the beach that has led to the partial collapse of a parking lot, and continued erosion threatens both public and private infrastructure. To gain an understanding of the variation in beach profiles we established six cross-shore profiles approximately 1 km apart. Each profile represents a part of the beach that experiences different wave conditions, caused by refraction across the San Francisco Bar, and thus has a different morphologic response to offshore sea conditions. The six sub-aerial profiles were measured using a total station one week apart in August 2006. All profiles increased in elevation and five of the six profiles showed the early formation or continued growth of berms. The same profiles will be re-analyzed in the autumn to determine further change, and compared to data collected by a 2004 SF-ROCKS group that also studied Ocean Beach. We will relate beach profile change to wave conditions measured at an offshore buoy to determine what wave conditions cause profile accretion or erosion. The results of this study will shed light on the processes occurring at Ocean Beach and will help us to understand why the south end of the beach is eroding.

  3. Biking to work in Miami. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, O.

    1982-08-01

    The objective of the project was to produce and distribute a guide to commuting by bicycle in the Miami metropolitan area. The area is uniquely suited to bicycling because of its pleasant year-round climate and relatively flat topography. Persuading even a small percentage of automobile commuters to try biking to work could result in substantial energy savings in Miami as in most other major metropolitan areas. Seven of the largest employment centers in the area were selected as major commuter destinations suitable for bicycle commuters. Safe and scenic ways of commuting to these areas by bicycle were mapped and described in a series of short narratives. Additional material on safe riding techniques and the choice of equipment was developed. The resulting 40 page booklet, Biking to Work in Miami, was printed and distributed by the author to local cycling groups, bicycle interests, and others. Copies were also sent to interested parties outside the Miami area. The initial reception has been very encouraging and a number of favorable reply cards have been received with useful comments and suggestions. A revised version aimed at stimulating bikers to avail of the soon-to-be-opened rapid transit system is being considered. A writer for the Miami Herald is interested in using parts of the Guide for a series in the newspaper.

  4. Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti (Florida cottonmouth) Diet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grajal-Puche, Alejandro; Josimovich, Jillian; Falk, Bryan; Reed, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Agkistrodon piscivorus is a generalist predator that feeds on a variety of prey, including snakes (Gloyd and Conant 1990. Snakes of the Agkistrodon Complex: A Monographic Review. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Oxford, Ohio. 614 pp.; Lillywhite et al. 2002. Herpetol. Rev. 33:259–260; Hill and Beaupre 2008. Copeia 2008:105–114). Cemophora coccinea (Scarletsnake) is not known as one of the 26 species of snakes consumed by A. piscivorus (Ernst and Ernst 2011. Venomous Reptiles of the United States, Canada, and Northern Mexico: Volume 1. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 193 pp.). On 16 June 2015, at 2210 h, we found a dead-on-road A. piscivorus (total length [TL] = 51.0 cm) in Everglades National Park on Main Park Road, 1.88 km S Pa-hay-okee, Miami-Dade Co., Florida, USA (25.414085°N, 80.78183146°W, WGS84; elev. 3 m). The snake had been killed by a vehicle and some internal organs were exposed. Visible stomach contents included a small (TL ca. 15 cm) C. coccinea. Photographic vouchers of the A. piscivorus (UF-Herpetology 177194) and C. coccinea (UF-Herpetology 177195) were deposited in the Division of Herpetology, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. Despite the fact that these species are sympatric over large areas of the southeastern United States, this is the first known documented predation of C. coccinea by A. piscivorus.

  5. Household-level disparities in cancer risks from vehicular air pollution in Miami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Timothy W.; Grineski, Sara E.; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2015-09-01

    Environmental justice (EJ) research has relied on ecological analyses of socio-demographic data from areal units to determine if particular populations are disproportionately burdened by toxic risks. This article advances quantitative EJ research by (a) examining whether statistical associations found for geographic units translate to relationships at the household level; (b) testing alternative explanations for distributional injustices never before investigated; and (c) applying a novel statistical technique appropriate for geographically-clustered data. Our study makes these advances by using generalized estimating equations to examine distributive environmental inequities in the Miami (Florida) metropolitan area, based on primary household-level survey data and census block-level cancer risk estimates of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) exposure from on-road mobile emission sources. In addition to modeling determinants of on-road HAP cancer risk among all survey participants, two subgroup models are estimated to examine whether determinants of risk differ based on disadvantaged minority (Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black) versus non-Hispanic white racial/ethnic status. Results reveal multiple determinants of risk exposure disparities. In the model including all survey participants, renter-occupancy, Hispanic and non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity, the desire to live close to work/urban services or public transportation, and higher risk perception are associated with greater on-road HAP cancer risk; the desire to live in an amenity-rich environment is associated with less risk. Divergent subgroup model results shed light on the previously unexamined role of racial/ethnic status in shaping determinants of risk exposures. While lower socioeconomic status and higher risk perception predict significantly greater on-road HAP cancer risk among disadvantaged minorities, the desire to live near work/urban services or public transport predict significantly greater risk among

  6. Beach-cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

  7. Satellite applications to a coastal inlet study, Clearwater Beach, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y. H.; Smutz, M.; Ruth, B. E.; Brooks, H. K.

    1977-01-01

    Two sets of LANDSAT magnetic tapes were obtained and displayed on the screen of an IMAGE 100 computer. Spectral analysis was performed to produce various signatures, their extent and location. Subsequent ground truth observations and measurements were gathered by means of hydrographic surveys and low-altitude aerial photography for interpretation and calibration of the LANDSAT data. Finally, a coastal engineering assessment based on the LANDSAT data was made. Recommendations to the City of Clearwater regarding the navigational channel alignment and dredging practice are presented in the light of the inlet stability.

  8. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET.

  9. Parasailing fatalities in southwest Florida.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barbara C; Harding, Brett E

    2009-12-01

    Parasailing is a recreational sport that is generally considered to be of little risk to the participants. Typically, the passenger launches from a motorboat with a specially designed winch that pulls him or her back to the boat at the end of the ride. The sport is not regulated at the federal, state, or county level. There have been few reports of injuries to parasailors. Additionally, there have been only 2 fatalities reported to the United States Coast Guard in a 10-year review. We report the details of these 2 deaths, those of a mother and daughter riding in a tandem parasail, which occurred on Fort Myers Beach in 2001, as well as an additional case of a parasailing fatality that occurred in southwest Florida in 1999. These cases illustrate the injuries seen in such fatalities and the hazards posed by adverse weather conditions and faulty equipment, as well as the impairment of passenger judgment by drugs and/or alcohol.

  10. Energy conservation at The University of Miami

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, V.; Anzoategui, F.

    1995-06-01

    The University of Miami (UM) has embarked on a very important and worthwhile mission: {open_quotes}To make UM one of the most energy efficient Universities in the Nation by the year 2000.{close_quotes} In order for the University to meet this goal we knew we would need to take advantage of all the available technologies and address the freon issues. In June 1990 the Coral Gables Campus had five chilled Water Production Plants, each representing small independent systems serving from four to ten buildings. Because of energy conservation measures of the past (i.e. elimination, reheat, first generation lighting retrofits, and some diversity), each plant had excess capacity. At that time we also had identified about 600 tons of old falling apart air conditioning equipment. Our Capital Construction Program was beginning design efforts for a new Music Recital Hall and an addition to the Law Library. With all this considered it made sense to develop a common chilled water loop to connect these plants and provide a vehicle to capitalize on available capacity. As this concept took shape it became evident that a master chilled water loop encircling the entire campus would address the next 20 years of campus development. This 20 year plan would require various phases of development. Phase I would connect three chilled water production plants and enable us to supply chilled water to seven existing facilities with approximately 600 tons of old inefficient air conditioning equipment and supply chilled water to the new Law and Music facilities, (approximately 400 tons) without buying any additional chillers.

  11. Estimating porosity and solid dielectric permittivity in the Miami Limestone using high-frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Gregory J.; Comas, Xavier

    2014-10-01

    Subsurface water flow in South Florida is largely controlled by the heterogeneous nature of the karst limestone in the Biscayne aquifer and its upper formation, the Miami Limestone. These heterogeneities are amplified by dissolution structures that induce changes in the aquifer's material and physical properties (i.e., porosity and dielectric permittivity) and create preferential flow paths. Understanding such patterns are critical for the development of realistic groundwater flow models, particularly in the Everglades, where restoration of hydrological conditions is intended. In this work, we used noninvasive ground penetrating radar (GPR) to estimate the spatial variability in porosity and the dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone at centimeter-scale resolution to evaluate the potential for field-based GPR studies. A laboratory setup that included high-frequency GPR measurements under completely unsaturated and saturated conditions was used to estimate changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through Miami Limestone samples. The Complex Refractive Index Model was used to derive estimates of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates of the samples ranged between 45.2 and 66.0% and showed good correspondence with estimates of porosity using analytical and digital image techniques. Solid dielectric permittivity values ranged between 7.0 and 13.0. This study shows the ability of GPR to image the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity in the Miami Limestone and shows potential for expanding these results to larger scales and other karst aquifers.

  12. Are Hispanics the new ’Threat’? Minority Group Threat and Fear of Crime in Miami-Dade County*

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, David; Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    Research examining the determinants of fear of crime has arguably raised more questions than it has answered. This exploratory study addresses one of the compelling questions that remains unanswered: what is the role of ethnicity, both at the community and individual levels, in understanding variation in fear of crime? Guided by racial or minority group threat theory, we examine the relative sizes of both the Black and Latino populations as indicators of minority group threat to determine their role in understanding individual fear of crime in a city where Latinos represent a much larger proportion of the population than Blacks (Miami-Dade County, Florida). Furthermore, the race and ethnic backgrounds of the respondents are also considered to evaluate their role in understanding variation in the fear of crime. Using both Census tract-level data and data collected from a NIDA sponsored grant that was part of a larger study about physically disabled residents, our findings reveal that in Miami-Dade County where Blacks are highly segregated from whites, the relative size of the Latino population is a predictor of fear of crime among white residents. Implications of this finding are considered, including a call for more nuanced research focusing on the predictors of fear of crime within multiethnic communities. PMID:19227693

  13. Feedback mechanisms linking barrier island transgression and storm response with beach-dune interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines the multi-scale feedback relationship of event-scale sediment exchange between beach and dune with long-term barrier island transgression. Using field and remotely sensed data from Santa Rosa Island in northwest Florida and South Padre Island in Texas, it is shown how the alongshore variation in storm washover and breaching is coherent (but in different ways) with transverse ridges that developed on the inner-shelf as the island transgressed. Model results suggest that the ridges are reinforced during tropical storms and hurricanes through the offshore transport of beach and dune sediment eroded by the storm surge. These ridges force an alongshore variation in beach and nearshore state that determines the aeolian transport potential and available sediment supplied from beach to dune. On Santa Rosa Island, dune aeolian transport and dune heights are limited by the steep beachface, such that the largest dunes are found at the crest of the transverse ridges where the beachface is more intermediate. In contrast, Aeolian transport and dune heights are shown to be supply limited on Padre Island, which has a relatively dissipative nearshore and beach. The largest dunes on Padre Island are found between transverse ridges where the profile is more intermediate and sediment is more readily supplied by inter- and supra-tidal swash bars. As a consequence, the largest storm surge and washover occurs at the transverse ridges where the dunes are small, while on Santa Rosa Island, the storm surge is greater where the dunes are larger leading to greater loss of sediment offshore. While Padre Island and Santa Rosa Island represent different beach states and exhibit different mechanisms of beach-dune interaction and storm impact, it is shown that small-scale beach-dune interaction is as much dependent on the geologic framework of the island, which developed as it transgressed, as the transgression and storm response are dependent on the exchange of sediment

  14. Overview of Pacific Island carbonate beach systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, B.M.; ,

    2000-01-01

    Beach systems in Pacific Islands are Holocene deposits of reef-dervied and terrigenous sediment. Thus, geologic setting is important in determining the success at which beach systems are established. Generally, older islands exhibit better beach system development. Although modern beach systems are composed of Holocene sediment, development of suitable accommodation space requires more geologic time.

  15. PAH concentrations in Coquina (Donax spp.) on a sandy beach shoreline impacted by a marine oil spill.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Richard A; Vestal, Alexandra; Welch, Christina; Barnes, Gracie; Pelot, Robert; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick

    2014-06-15

    The BP MC252 well failure in the Gulf of Mexico, April 2010 caused concern for crude oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure along the sandy beaches of the Florida Panhandle. We began collections of Coquina clams (Donax spp.) from the surf zone of Florida Panhandle beaches to monitor PAH contamination to compliment analysis of surf zone sand samples. These clams had higher levels of PAHs relative to ambient sand, and this allowed us to continue to monitor PAH levels after sand concentrations fell below limits of detection. PAH levels in the Coquina tissues were highly variable, perhaps indicative of the heterogeneous distribution of oil and tar on the beaches and exposure to tar particles. Overall, PAH levels decreased continuously in both sand and Coquina tissues, reaching limits of detection within one and two years respectively after oil landed on Florida Panhandle beaches. Our work suggests these surf zone molluscs may be used to monitor pollutant exposure along high energy sandy beach shorelines. PMID:24775069

  16. 75 FR 9616 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Hearing in the Federal Register (74 FR 34048) for a proposed amendment that would change the legal name of... rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit and serve all... President & Associate General Council, Florida Power & Light Company, P.O. Box 14000, Juno Beach, FL...

  17. Beach Volume Change Using Uav Photogrammetry Songjung Beach, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, C. I.; Oh, T. S.

    2016-06-01

    Natural beach is controlled by many factors related to wave and tidal forces, wind, sediment, and initial topography. For this reason, if numerous topographic data of beach is accurately collected, coastal erosion/acceleration is able to be assessed and clarified. Generally, however, many studies on coastal erosion have limitation to analyse the whole beach, carried out of partial area as like shoreline (horizontal 2D) and beach profile (vertical 2D) on account of limitation of numerical simulation. This is an important application for prevention of coastal erosion, and UAV photogrammetry is also used to 3D topographic data. This paper analyses the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to 3D map and beach volume change. UAV (Quadcopter) equipped with a non-metric camera was used to acquire images in Songjung beach which is located south-east Korea peninsula. The dynamics of beach topography, its geometric properties and estimates of eroded and deposited sand volumes were determined by combining elevation data with quarterly RTK-VRS measurements. To explore the new possibilities for assessment of coastal change we have developed a methodology for 3D analysis of coastal topography evolution based on existing high resolution elevation data combined with low coast, UAV and on-ground RTK-VRS surveys. DSMs were obtained by stereo-matching using Agisoft Photoscan. Using GCPs the vertical accuracy of the DSMs was found to be 10 cm or better. The resulting datasets were integrated in a local coordinates and the method proved to be a very useful fool for the detection of areas where coastal erosion occurs and for the quantification of beach change. The value of such analysis is illustrated by applications to coastal of South Korea sites that face significant management challenges.

  18. Miami's "Zone" Teaches Lessons about Low-Performing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Ledyard

    2009-01-01

    Miami-Dade County Public Schools invested in an intensive, three-year program to improve the learning of students in its 39 lowest-performing schools. Known as the Zone, these schools experienced mixed success, with elementary schools reducing the gap between various groups of students while middle and high schools were less successful. However,…

  19. Culture Clash Invades Miami: Oral Histories and Ethnography Center Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Using a critical race theory (CRT) framework, this article compares the playwriting methods of the Chicano--Latino theater trio, Culture Clash, to a counterstorytelling methodology. The author uncovers the tenets of a critical race theater in the trio's site-specific ethnographic play, "Radio Mambo: Culture Clash Invades Miami". He argues that…

  20. Student Satisfaction With Residence Hall Life at Miami. Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Michael J.

    A random sample of students living in university housing at Miami University were surveyed about their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with three broad features of hall life: hall relationships, policies and programs; facilities and services; and staff. A list of 42 factors that were thought to relate to overall satisfaction with housing were…

  1. Promoting Positive Youth Development: The Miami Youth Development Project (YDP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtines, William M.; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Berman, Steven L.; Lorente, Carolyn Cass; Briones, Ervin; Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Albrecht, Richard; Garcia, Arlen J.; Arrufat, Ondina

    2008-01-01

    The Miami Youth Development Project (YDP) had its beginnings in the early 1990s as a grassroots response to the needs of troubled (multiproblem) young people in the community (Arnett, Kurtines, & Montgomery, 2008, this issue). YDP is an important outcome of efforts to create positive youth development interventions that draw on the strengths of…

  2. Implementing Guided Pathways at Miami Dade College: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Thomas; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Jenkins, Davis

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, working groups from across the eight campuses of Miami Dade College (MDC) conducted a wide-ranging examination of why many students were not completing their programs. These groups identified a number of reasons for student attrition. Students were unclear about how to progress through programs--they had too many course and program…

  3. Background Information concerning Miami-Dade Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losak, John; And Others

    Seven essays are presented that deal with the students, instruction, and administration of Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC). First, John Losak considers the M-DCC student population since 1969, providing data on ethnicity, age of students, male/female enrollments, foreign student enrollments, program diversity, skill level of enrolling…

  4. An Alternative Approach to Water Regulations for Public Health Protection at Bathing Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Elmir, Samir M.; Fleming, Lora E.

    2013-01-01

    New approaches should be considered as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) moves rapidly to develop new beach monitoring guidelines by the end of 2012, as these guidelines serve as the basis by which states and territories with coasts along the oceans and Great Lakes can then develop and implement monitoring programs for recreational waters. We describe and illustrate one possible approach to beach regulation termed as the “Comprehensive Toolbox within an Approval Process (CTBAP).” The CTBAP consists of three components. The first is a “toolbox” consisting of an inventory of guidelines on monitoring targets, a series of measurement techniques, and guidance to improve water quality through source identification and prevention methods. The second two components are principles of implementation. These include first, “flexibility” to encourage and develop an individualized beach management plan tailored to local conditions and second, “consistency” of this management plan to ensure a consistent national level of public health protection. The results of this approach are illustrated through a case study at a well-studied South Florida recreational marine beach. This case study explores different monitoring targets based on two different health endpoints (skin versus gastrointestinal illness) and recommends a beach regulation program for the study beach that focuses predominately on source prevention. PMID:23431320

  5. Human Health at the Beach

    MedlinePlus

    ... near the site where polluted discharges enter the water. Pollution can also come from high concentrations of farm ... is available online. Other Beach Safety Topics Beyond water pollution, there are other potential threats to human health ...

  6. Characterization of the spatial distribution of porosity in the eogenetic karst Miami Limestone using ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; McClellan, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeologic characterization of karst limestone aquifers is difficult due to the variability in the spatial distribution of porosity and dissolution features. Typical methods for aquifer investigation, such as drilling and pump testing, are limited by the scale or spatial extent of the measurement. Hydrogeophysical techniques such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) can provide indirect measurements of aquifer properties and be expanded spatially beyond typical point measures. This investigation used a multiscale approach to identify and quantify porosity distribution in the Miami Limestone, the lithostratigraphic unit that composes the uppermost portions of the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami Dade County, Florida. At the meter scale, laboratory measures of porosity and dielectric permittivity were made on blocks of Miami Limestone using zero offset GPR, laboratory and digital image techniques. Results show good correspondence between GPR and analytical porosity estimates and show variability between 22 and 66 %. GPR measurements at the field scale 10-1000 m investigated the bulk porosity of the limestone based on the assumption that a directly measured water table would remain at a consistent depth in the GPR reflection record. Porosity variability determined from the changes in the depth to water table resulted in porosity values that ranged from 33 to 61 %, with the greatest porosity variability being attributed to the presence of dissolution features. At the larger field scales, 100 - 1000 m, fitting of hyperbolic diffractions in GPR common offsets determined the vertical and horizontal variability of porosity in the saturated subsurface. Results indicate that porosity can vary between 23 and 41 %, and delineate potential areas of enhanced recharge or groundwater / surface water interactions. This study shows porosity variability in the Miami Limestone can range from 22 to 66 % within 1.5 m distances, with areas of high macroporosity or karst dissolution features

  7. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida. [The Everglades agricultural area, Lake Okeechobee, and the Suwanee River basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Chen, E.; Martsolf, J. D.; Jones, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Transparencies, prints, and computer compatible tapes of temperature differential and thermal inertia for the winter of 1978 to 1979 were obtained. Thermal inertial differences in the South Florida depicted include: drained organic soils of the Everglades agricultural area, undrained organic soils of the managed water conservation areas of the South Florida water management district, the urbanized area around Miami, Lake Okeechobee, and the mineral soil west of the Everglades agricultural area. The range of wetlands and uplands conditions within the Suwanee River basin was also identified. It is shown that the combination of wetlands uplands surface features of Florida yield a wide range of surface temperatures related to wetness of the surface features.

  8. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  9. Popham Beach, Maine: An example of engineering activity that saved beach property without harming the beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Joseph T.

    2013-10-01

    Beach and property erosion on coasts is a widespread and chronic problem. Historical approaches to this issue, including seawalls and sand replenishment, are often inappropriate or too expensive. In Maine, seawalls were banned in 1983 and replenishment is too costly to employ. Replacement of storm-damaged buildings is also not allowed, and a precedent case on Popham Beach, Maine required that the owner remove an unpermitted building from a site where an earlier structure was damaged. When the most popular park in Maine, Popham Beach State Park, experienced inlet associated erosion that threatened park infrastructure (a bathhouse), temporary measures were all that the law allowed. Because it was clear that the inlet channel causing the erosion would eventually change course, the state opted to erect a temporary seawall with fallen trees at the site. This may or may not have slowed the erosion temporarily, but reassured the public that "something was being done". Once a storm cut a new tidal inlet channel and closed off the old one, tidal water still entered the former channel and continued to threaten the bathhouse. To ultimately save the property, beach scraping was employed. Sand was scraped from the lower beach to construct a sand berm that deflected the tidal current away from the endangered property. This action created enough time for natural processes to drive the remains of the former spit onto the beach and widen it significantly. Whereas many examples of engineering practices exist that endanger instead of saving beaches, this example is one of an appropriate engineering effort to rescue unwisely located beach-front property.

  10. Methods and Skills for Research on Foreign Educational Systems. A Report on the NASFA/EAIE 1994 Seminars (Coral Gables, Florida, June 3-5 [and] Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, November 22-23). PIER World Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich-Langen, Caroline, Ed.

    The report presents results of two seminars, held in Miami (Florida) and Cambridge (England), in which representatives of two groups, The European Association for International Education and the National Association for Foreign Student Affairs: Association of International Educators, met for intensive discussion of the methods for and design of…

  11. Innovations at Miami practice show promise for treating high-risk Medicare patients.

    PubMed

    Tanio, Craig; Chen, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Patients with five or more chronic conditions drive most Medicare costs. Our organization, ChenMed, developed a scalable primary care-led delivery model that focuses on this population while getting reimbursed through full-risk capitation by Medicare Advantage plans. ChenMed is a primary care-led group practice based in Florida that serves low-to-moderate-income elderly patients, largely through the Medicare Advantage program. Our model includes a number of innovations: a one-stop-shop approach for delivering multispecialty services in the community, smaller physician panel sizes of 350-450 patients that allow for intensive health coaching and preventive care, on-site physician pharmacy dispensing, a collaborative physician culture with peer review, and customized information technology. These innovations have improved patient medication adherence, increased the time doctors and patients spend together, and led to high rates of patient satisfaction. Additionally, our Medicare patients have substantially lower rates of hospital use than their peers in the Miami Medicare market. Creating chronic disease centers focused on seniors with multiple chronic conditions is a promising delivery system innovation with major potential to improve the cost and quality of care.

  12. Can Home-Based HIV Rapid Testing Reduce HIV Disparities Among African Americans in Miami?

    PubMed

    Kenya, Sonjia; Okoro, Ikenna S; Wallace, Kiera; Ricciardi, Michael; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Prado, Guillermo

    2016-09-01

    Sixty percent of African Americans have had an HIV test, yet this population disproportionately contributes to AIDS mortality, suggesting that testing is not occurring early enough to achieve optimal outcomes. OraQuick, the first Food and Drug Administration-approved home-based HIV rapid test (HBHRT) could potentially increase testing rates. We assessed whether community health workers (CHWs) paired with HBRHT could improve HIV screening and health care access among African Americans in Miami, Florida. In October-November 2013, 60 African Americans were enrolled and randomized to the experimental condition, which received CHW assistance to complete HBHRT, or the control condition, which were instructed to complete HBHRT independently. Intervention participants were significantly (p ≤ .05) more likely than control participants to complete HBHRT and, if positive, get linked to HIV care (100% vs. 83%) χ(2) (1, N = 60) = 5.46, p ≤ .02. We concluded that CHW-assisted HBHRT may be a promising strategy to improve HIV testing and care among African Americans. PMID:27091604

  13. Solar-energy workshops held at Miami-Dade Public Libraries, 1981-1982. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Over a two year period, the Miami-Dade Public Library System gave 12 free solar energy programs throughout Dade County in its various branches; Solar Water Heater Workshops, where registered participants actually took part in building or putting together a solar water heater. Kick-off programs were also given free-of-charge by a number of local solar companies, to inform the audience about solar energy in general and the solar workshops in particular. Average registered attendance at these workshops was twenty, not including the crowds of onlookers at the outdoor building sessions or the earlier kick-off programs, which often had an audience of sixty or more. A later phone check of ten workshop participants picket at random revealed four who had built or were building their own solar systems, three who were considering the purchase of -or had already bought - a domestic solar water heater, one who was reported to be no longer interested by his son, and two who could not be reached. One of the completed heaters has been donated to a local Girl Scout troop, where it is on permanent exhibit; another will be placed in a new library branch, with appropriate publicity about its source. Florida Power and Light, which formerly viewed our early workshops with suspicion, sent a speaker to our final program to announce financial assistance to those who wanted to buy a solar hot water heater.

  14. Ground-based lidar beach topography of Fire Island, New York, April 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, Owen T.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Spore, Nicholas J.; Brodie, Katherine L.; McNinch, Jesse E.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in Florida and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility in Duck, North Carolina, collaborated to gather alongshore ground-based lidar beach elevation data at Fire Island, New York. This high-resolution elevation dataset was collected on April 10, 2013, to characterize beach topography following substantial erosion that occurred during Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall on October 29, 2012, and multiple, strong winter storms. The ongoing beach monitoring is part of the Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Project GS2-2B. This USGS data series includes the resulting processed elevation point data (xyz) and an interpolated digital elevation model (DEM).

  15. Understanding Variability in Beach Slope to Improve Forecasts of Storm-induced Water Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, K. S.; Stockdon, H. F.; Long, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards combines measurements of beach morphology with storm hydrodynamics to produce forecasts of coastal change during storms for the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines of the United States. Wave-induced water levels are estimated using modeled offshore wave height and period and measured beach slope (from dune toe to shoreline) through the empirical parameterization of Stockdon et al. (2006). Spatial and temporal variability in beach slope leads to corresponding variability in predicted wave setup and swash. Seasonal and storm-induced changes in beach slope can lead to differences on the order of a meter in wave runup elevation, making accurate specification of this parameter essential to skillful forecasts of coastal change. Spatial variation in beach slope is accounted for through alongshore averaging, but temporal variability in beach slope is not included in the final computation of the likelihood of coastal change. Additionally, input morphology may be years old and potentially very different than the conditions present during forecast storm. In order to improve our forecasts of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards, the temporal variability of beach slope must be included in the final uncertainty of modeled wave-induced water levels. Frequently collected field measurements of lidar-based beach morphology are examined for study sites in Duck, North Carolina, Treasure Island, Florida, Assateague Island, Virginia, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, with some records extending over a period of 15 years. Understanding the variability of slopes at these sites will help provide estimates of associated water level uncertainty which can then be applied to other areas where lidar observations are infrequent, and improve the overall skill of future forecasts of storm-induced coastal change. Stockdon, H. F., Holman, R. A., Howd, P. A., and Sallenger Jr, A. H. (2006). Empirical parameterization of setup

  16. Sea level variation as an indicator of Florida current volume transport: comparisons with direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Maul, G A; Chew, F; Bushnell, M; Mayer, D A

    1985-01-18

    Sea level measurements from tide gauges at Miami, Florida, and Cat Cay, Bahamas, and bottom pressure measurements from a water depth of 50 meters off Jupiter, Florida, and a water depth of 10 meters off Memory Rock, Bahamas, were correlated with 81 concurrent direct volume transport observations in the Straits of Florida. Daily-averaged sea level from either gauge on the Bahamian side of the Straits was poorly correlated with transport. Bottom pressure off Jupiter had a linear coefficient of determination ofr(2) = 0.93, and Miami sea level, when adjusted for weather effects, had r(2) = 0.74; the standard errors of estimating transports were +/- 1.2 x 10(6) and +/- 1.9 x 10(6) cubic meters per second, respectively. A linear multivariate regression, which combined bottom pressure, weather, and the submarine cable observations between Jupiter and the Bahamas, had r(2) = 0.94 with a standard error of estimating transport of +/- 1.1 x 10(6) cubic meters per second. These results suggest that a combination of easily obtained observations is sufficient to adequatelv monitor the daily volume transport fluctuations of the Florida Current. PMID:17742102

  17. Alternative energy source II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 6 - Nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume examines conventional nuclear energy, breeder reactors, and thermonuclear energy. The particular papers presented consider current developments in nuclear breeder technology, fusion-driven fissile fuel breeder systems, and the fusion fission hybrid reactor. The implications of nuclear energy utilization in the Phillipines and the internationally safeguarded atomic fuel exchanger center for the Asian-Pacific basin are also discussed.

  18. Miami International Conference on Alternative Energy Sources, 5th, Miami Beach, FL, December 13-15, 1982, Proceedings of Condensed Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    1982-10-01

    The rate of progress and state of the art in various alternative energy systems is assessed in a series of extended abstracts. Renewable energy sources such as hydroelectricity, solar heating, wind power, solar cells, bioconversion, OTEC, and alcohol are discussed. Attention is given to thermal energy storage, solar stills, hydrogen fuel systems, and the economics of wind power. Fusion, breeder, and fission reactors are considered, as are geothermal energy extraction, wave energy systems, the CO2 effects on the atmosphere caused by burning fuels, and conservation and waste utilization technologies. Finally, energy education programs and national energy policy are investigated

  19. Alternative energy sources II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 4 - Indirect solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume gives consideration to the topics of wood energy, wind turbines and siting, wind power generation, wave and current energy, tide energy and ocean thermal energy. Particular attention is given to the performance analysis of vertical axis wind turbines, estimating wind potential for small scale energy generation, and the effects of wind integration with conventional electrical generating systems. The development of tidal power in Korea, the design of the OTEC Seacoast Test Facility at Keahole Point, Hawaii, and wind energy utilization possibilities in Turkey are reviewed.

  20. Alternative energy sources II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 9 - Conservation, economics, and policy; Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    The book examines the topics of waste utilization, conservation, and energy economics and policy. Energy supply and demand, energy economics and planning, and energy strategies and policies are reviewed. Papers are presented on the contributions to the energy supply of the industrialized countries from nuclear energy and regenerative energy flows, a method for estimating escalation and interest during construction, and a comparison of the incentives used to stimulate energy production between the United States and Japan.

  1. Alternative energy sources II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 5 - Geothermal power/energy program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume examines the geothermal resource and geothermal energy utilization, and surveys regional energy programs worldwide. The particular papers presented on geothermal energy include those on the temperature indicators for geothermal use, geothermal drilling research in the United States, and geothermal energy and biofuel production in agriculture. Energy programs from India, Egypt, Turkey, Greece and Puerto Rico are reviewed.

  2. Landing Techniques in Beach Volleyball

    PubMed Central

    Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (χ2(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (χ2(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (χ2(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key Points About 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot. Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women. Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions. Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions. PMID:24149150

  3. Landing techniques in beach volleyball.

    PubMed

    Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (χ(2)(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (χ(2)(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (χ(2)(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key PointsAbout 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot.Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women.Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions.Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions. PMID:24149150

  4. 78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking... Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat Race scheduled for August 24-25... powerboat racing regatta. The event will be held on the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY and will...

  5. 75 FR 41926 - Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, New Smyrna Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, New Smyrna Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation... Beach for New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq....

  6. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  7. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  8. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  9. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  10. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  11. The Relationship between Social Support and Psychological Distress among Hispanic Elders in Miami, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruza-Guet, Maria-Cristina; Spokane, Arnold R.; Caskie, Grace I. L.; Brown, Scott C.; Szapocznik, Jose

    2008-01-01

    This study compared 5 psychological models of the relationship between social support (SS) and behavioral health. These theoretical models, which have garnered some level of prior empirical support, were as follows: (a) main effects, (b) buffering effects, (c) social exchange, (d) equity, and (e) protective health outcomes of providing SS. A…

  12. 52nd Yearbook of the National Reading Conference (Miami, Florida, December 4-7, 2002)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbanks, Colleen M., Ed.; Worthy, Jo, Ed.; Maloch, Beth, Ed.; Hoffman, James V., Ed.; Schallert, Diane L., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The National Reading Conference (NRC) Yearbook represents an archive of conference reports that have undergone the rigorous review that research demands, as well as an indicator of topics, ideas and concerns that occupied participants during the annual conference. With this 52nd volume of the Yearbook, the editors hope the reader finds a broad…

  13. Leatherback nests increasing significantly in Florida, USA; trends assessed over 30 years using multilevel modeling.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Kelly; Sims, Michelle; Meylan, Anne; Witherington, Blair; Brost, Beth; Crowder, Larry B

    2011-01-01

    Understanding population status for endangered species is critical to developing and evaluating recovery plans mandated by the Endangered Species Act. For sea turtles, changes in abundance are difficult to detect because most life stages occur in the water. Currently, nest counts are the most reliable way of assessing trends. We determined the rate of growth for leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) nest numbers in Florida (USA) using a multilevel Poisson regression. We modeled nest counts from 68 beaches over 30 years and, using beach-level covariates (including latitude), we allowed for partial pooling of information between neighboring beaches. This modeling approach is ideal for nest count data because it recognizes the hierarchical structure of the data while incorporating variables related to survey effort. Nesting has increased at all 68 beaches in Florida, with trends ranging from 3.1% to 16.3% per year. Overall, across the state, the number of nests has been increasing by 10.2% per year since 1979. Despite being a small population (probably < 1000 individuals), this nesting population may help achieve objectives in the federal recovery plan. This exponential growth rate mirrors trends observed for other Atlantic populations and may be driven partially by improved protection of nesting beaches. However, nesting is increasing even where beach protection has not been enhanced. Climate variability and associated marine food web dynamics, which could enhance productivity and reduce predators, may be driving this trend. PMID:21516903

  14. Mangos of Florida, country contribution: Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Florida; geographical distribution of mangos in Florida; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests an...

  15. Miocene drowning of temperate (Foramol) carbonate platform: upper Miami Terrace

    SciTech Connect

    Carannante, G.; Simone, L.; Neumann, C.

    1986-05-01

    Oligocene neritic rocks dredged from 350 m on the upper Miami Terrace exhibit repeated phosphatization as well as a filled void system containing post-Burdigalian foraminifera. During drowning, a neritic hardground was subjected to both pelagic deposition (infills) and repeated marine exposure (borings, P-coatings, etc). The neritic grainstone-packstone contains large benthic foraminifera, red algae, bryozoans, pelecypods, ahermatypic corals, echinoids, and some planktonic foraminifera. This composition association is the Foramol type characteristic of temperate to subtropical neritic environments such as the present Mediterranean, Brazilian, and New Zealand shelves. These temperate sediments derive from the local biocoenose, and accumulate slowly in deep sheets of loose skeletal debris. They become relict seaward where they are often bored, corroded, stained, glauconitized, and cemented into hardgrounds. Locally, hemipelagic cover might produce a palimpsest sequence. Recent Foramol-type platforms are undergoing drowning. The Miami Terrace is compared to very similar Miocene Foramol-type platforms now exposed in the southern Apennines. Both are characterized by neritic sequences passing upward into hemipelagics, via a palimpsest interval marked by glauconitic, phosphatic, iron-stained grains often mineralized into hardgrounds. The drowning of the Miami Terrace hence coincided with and, the authors suppose, was a result of the shift from a rapid, oligotrophic, tropical accumulation to a slow, temperate, eutrophic carbonate accumulation caused in turn by a temporary paleo-oceanographic shift to cooler, richer, neritic conditions within the history of this now subtropical setting.

  16. Preliminary report: medical examiner reports of deaths associated with Hurricane Andrew--Florida, August 1992.

    PubMed

    1992-09-01

    On August 24, 1992, at 1:40 a.m. eastern daylight time (EDT), rain bands associated with Hurricane Andrew reached the eastern coast of Florida. At 4:45 a.m. EDT, Hurricane Andrew made landfall 35 miles southeast of Miami at Homestead, with sustained winds of 145 miles per hour (mph) and gusts of 164 mph. These winds extended 45 miles outward of the storm center. The storm moved across the state at 18 mph toward the Gulf of Mexico (Figure 1). The tidal surge on the eastern coast was estimated at 7-19 feet. During the storm, approximately 2.5 million Florida residents were left without electrical power, and approximately 56,000 family dwelling units were destroyed or severely damaged. This report presents preliminary data from Florida medical examiner (ME) offices about deaths attributed to Hurricane Andrew.

  17. 75 FR 24997 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... COMMISSION FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment... Energy Point Beach, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2... Licensee and Owner from ``FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC'' to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach, LLC.''...

  18. Differentiating Experts' Anticipatory Skills in Beach Volleyball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal-Bruland, Rouwen; Mooren, Merel; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined how perceptual-motor expertise and watching experience contribute to anticipating the outcome of opponents' attacking actions in beach volleyball. To this end, we invited 8 expert beach volleyball players, 8 expert coaches, 8 expert referees, and 8 control participants with no beach volleyball experience to watch videos…

  19. Geophysical Investigation Along the Great Miami River From New Miami to Charles M. Bolton Well Field, Cincinnati, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.; Dumouchelle, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Three geophysical profiling methods were tested to help characterize subsurface materials at selected transects along the Great Miami River, in southwestern Ohio. The profiling methods used were continuous seismic profiling (CSP), continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), and continuous electromagnetic profiling (CEP). Data were collected with global positioning systems to spatially locate the data along the river. The depth and flow conditions of the Great Miami River limited the amount and quality of data that could be collected with the CSP and CRP methods. Data from the CSP were generally poor because shallow reflections (less than 5 meters) were mostly obscured by strong multiple reflections and deep reflections (greater than 5 meters) were sparse. However, modeling of CRP data indicated broad changes in subbottom geology, primarily below about 3 to 5 meters. Details for shallow electrical conductivity (resistivity) (less than 3 meters) were limited because of the 5-meter electrode spacing used for the surveys. For future studies of this type, a cable with 3-meter electrode spacing (or perhaps even 1-meter spacing) might best be used in similar environments to determine shallow electrical properties of the stream-bottom materials. CEP data were collected along the entire reach of the Great Miami River. The CRP and CEP data did not correlate well, but the CRP electrode spacing probably limited the correlation. Middle-frequency (3,510 hertz) and high-frequency (15,030 hertz) CEP data were correlated to water depth. Low-frequency (750 hertz) CEP data indicate shallow (less than 5-meter) changes in electrical conductivity. Given the variability in depth and flow conditions on a river such as the Great Miami, the CEP method worked better than either the CSP or CRP methods.

  20. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  1. Beach lamination: Nature and origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, H.E.

    1969-01-01

    A distinctive two-fold sedimentation unit characterizes lamination in the upper swash zone of beaches. Within the unit a fine and/or a heavy mineral rich layer at the base grades upward into a coarser and/or a heavy mineral poor layer at the top. This distinctive type of lamination results from grain segregation within bed flow during wave backwash. ?? 1969.

  2. The shapes of beach pebbles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentworth, Chester K.

    1923-01-01

    There is much confusion in geologic literature as to the shapes of fluvial and beach pebbles and the differences between them, if differences exist. Though the contrary has been asserted, most geologists who have written on the subject appear to hold the view that beach pebbles are generally flatter than river pebbles, having discoid, lozenge-shaped, ellipsoid, or oval forms. It is asserted by some that these forms are produced by pushing of the rock fragments to and fro by the waves. Others have considered that the shapes of the original fragments and the inherent structure of the rock are dominant in determining the shapes of beach pebbles, and with this view the writer is in accord. That beach pebbles, even those composed of massive igneous rocks are commonly of a flattened oval form seems certain, as has been stated elsewhere, but this fact is probably to be attributed to the development of such forms from original flat fragments or from rocks of schistose structure or to the segregation of such forms under the peculiar action of the waves, rather than to their production by a specialized wave abrasion.

  3. Inside the "Long Beach Way"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

  4. Virtual Beach 3: user's guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyterski, Mike; Brooks, Wesley; Galvin, Mike; Wolfe, Kurt; Carvin, Rebecca; Roddick, Tonia; Fienen, Mike; Corsi, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beach closures or the issuance of swimming advisories due to pathogen contamination. However, researchers, scientists, engineers, and students interested in studying relationships between water quality indicators and ambient environmental conditions will find VB3 useful. VB3 reads input data from a text file or Excel document, assists the user in preparing the data for analysis, enables automated model selection using a wide array of possible model evaluation criteria, and provides predictions using a chosen model parameterized with new data. With an integrated mapping component to determine the geographic orientation of the beach, the software can automatically decompose wind/current/wave speed and magnitude information into along-shore and onshore/offshore components for use in subsequent analyses. Data can be examined using simple scatter plots to evaluate relationships between the response and independent variables (IVs). VB3 can produce interaction terms between the primary IVs, and it can also test an array of transformations to maximize the linearity of the relationship The software includes search routines for finding the "best" models from an array of possible choices. Automated censoring of statistical models with highly correlated IVs occurs during the selection process. Models can be constructed either using previously collected data or forecasted environmental information. VB3 has residual diagnostics for regression models, including automated outlier identification and removal using DFFITs or Cook's Distances.

  5. Post-storm beach and dune recovery: Implications for barrier island resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Chris; Wernette, Phil; Rentschlar, Elizabeth; Jones, Hannah; Hammond, Brianna; Trimble, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The ability of beaches and dunes to recover following an extreme storm is a primary control of barrier island response to sea-level rise and changes in the frequency and/or magnitude of storm surges. Whereas erosion of the beach and dune occurs over hours and days, it can be years to decades before the beach and dune are able to recover to their pre-storm state. As a consequence, there are numerous descriptions of near-instantaneous beach and dune erosion due to storms, the immediate onshore transport of sand, and the initial phases of beach and dune recovery following a storm, but a paucity of data on long-term beach and dune recovery. A combination of previously published data from Galveston Island, Texas and new remotely sensed data from Santa Rosa Island, Florida is used in the present study to quantify the rate of dune recovery for dissipative and intermediate beach types, respectively. Recovery of the dune height and volume on Galveston Island was observed within two years following Hurricane Alicia (1983) and was largely complete within six years of the storm, despite extensive washover. In contrast, the dunes on Santa Rosa Island in Northwest Florida began to recover four years after Hurricane Ivan (2004), and only after the profile approached its pre-storm level and the rate of vegetation recovery (regrowth) was at a maximum. Results show that complete recovery of the largest dunes (in height and volume) will take approximately 10 years on Santa Rosa Island, which suggests that these sections of the island are particularly vulnerable to significant change in island morphology if there is also a change in the frequency and magnitude of storm events. In contrast, the areas of the island with the smallest dunes before Hurricane Ivan exhibited a rapid recovery, but no further growth in profile volume and dune height beyond the pre-storm volume and height, despite continued recovery of the largest dunes to their pre-storm height. A change in storm magnitude and

  6. Sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams.

    PubMed

    Kako, Shin'ichiro; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Magome, Shinya

    2010-05-01

    This study attempts to establish a system for the sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams placed at the Ookushi beach, Goto Islands, Japan, to establish the temporal variability in the quantities of beach litter every 90 min over a one and a half year period. The time series of the quantities of beach litter, computed by counting pixels with a greater lightness than a threshold value in photographs, shows that litter does not increase monotonically on the beach, but fluctuates mainly on a monthly time scale or less. To investigate what factors influence this variability, the time derivative of the quantity of beach litter is compared with satellite-derived wind speeds. It is found that the beach litter quantities vary largely with winds, but there may be other influencing factors. PMID:20392465

  7. USE OF COMPOSITE DATA SETS FOR SOURCE-TRACKING ENTEROCCOCCI IN THE WATER COLUMN AND SHORELINE INTERSTITIAL WATERS ON PENSACOLA BEACH, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genthner, Fred J., Joseph B. James, Diane F. Yates and Stephanie D. Friedman. Submitted. Use of Composite Data Sets for Source-Tracking Enterococci in the Water Column and Shoreline Interstitial Waters on Pensacola Beach Florida. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 33 p. (ERL,GB 1212).

    So...

  8. Regional Similarities and Consistent Patterns of Local Variation in Beach Sand Bacterial Communities throughout the Northern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent characterization of the bacterial community structure in beach sands has revealed patterns of biogeography similar to those observed in aquatic environments. Studies to date, however, have mainly focused on subtidal sediments from marine beaches. Here, we investigate the bacterial diversity, using Illumina-based sequencing of the V5-V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, at 11 beaches representing those next to the Great Lakes, Florida, and the Pacific Ocean. The alpha diversity differed significantly among regions (P < 0.0001), while the within-region diversity was more similar. The beta diversity also differed by region (P < 0.001), where freshwater sands had significantly higher abundances of taxa within the Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia than marine environments. In contrast, marine sands harbored greater abundances of Gammaproteobacteria and Planctomycetes, and those from Florida had more Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Marine beaches had significantly different phylogenetic community structures (P ≤ 0.018), but freshwater and Florida beaches showed fewer within-region phylogenetic differences. Furthermore, regionally distinct patterns in taxonomic variation were observed in backshore sands, which had communities distinct from those in nearshore sands (P < 0.001). Sample depth minimally influenced the community composition. The results of this study reveal distinct bacterial community structures in sand on a broad geographic scale but moderate regional similarity and suggest that local variation is primarily related to the distance from the shoreline. This study offers a novel comparison of the bacterial communities in freshwater and marine beach sands and provides an important basis for future comparisons and analyses to elucidate factors affecting microbial ecology in this underexplored environment. IMPORTANCE This study presents a large-scale geographic characterization of the bacterial communities present in beach

  9. 77 FR 71734 - Proposed Modification of the Miami, FL, Class B Airspace Area; and the Ft Lauderdale, FL, Class C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Modification of the Miami, FL, Class B Airspace... the Class B airspace at Miami, FL, and the Class C airspace at Ft Lauderdale, FL. The purpose of these..., January 28, 2013, will be held at the Wings Over Miami Air Museum, Kendall-Tamiami Executive...

  10. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 165.779 Section 165.779 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.779 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL...) Enforcement period. This rule will be in enforced annually on Columbus Day weekend, starting at 12:01 p.m....

  11. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 165.779 Section 165.779 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.779 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL...) Enforcement period. This rule will be in enforced annually on Columbus Day weekend, starting at 12:01 p.m....

  12. 78 FR 66796 - Self-Regulatory Organizations: Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    .... 70346 (September 9, 2013), 78 FR 56762 (September 13, 2013) (SR-MIAX-2013- 41). The previous transaction... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations: Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and... 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on October 24, 2013, Miami International...

  13. 78 FR 56960 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and... 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on August 30, 2013, Miami International...

  14. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735 Section 80.735 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A...

  15. Unequal Access, Unequal Results: Equitable Teacher Distribution in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sudipti; Waymack, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    At the request of the Urban League of Miami, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) analyzed the distribution of teachers in Miami-Dade County Public Schools. In this paper, the authors examine teacher-level data to determine whether indicators correlated with teacher quality vary across the district based on socioeconomic differences, and…

  16. 78 FR 34417 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... Market Maker''). See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 69507 (May 3, 2013), 78 FR 27269 (May 9, 2013... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing of... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on May 22, 2013, Miami International Securities Exchange...

  17. 78 FR 38776 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...\\ and Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on June 12, 2013, Miami...

  18. 78 FR 27462 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... component of ToM at this time. \\3\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 69007 (February 28, 2013), 78 FR... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on April 24, 2013, Miami International Securities Exchange...

  19. 78 FR 9098 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and... Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on January 29, 2013, Miami...

  20. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 165.779 Section 165.779 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.779 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated navigation area encompasses all waters in Biscayne Bay...

  1. Salinity tolerance of non-native Asian swamp eels (Teleostei: Synbranchidae) in Florida, USA: Comparison of three populations and implications for dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, P.J.; Nico, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Three populations of non-native Asian swamp eels are established in peninsular Florida (USA), and comprise two different genetic lineages. To assess potential for these fish to penetrate estuarine habitats or use coastal waters as dispersal routes, we determined their salinity tolerances. Swamp eels from the three Florida populations were tested by gradual (chronic) salinity increases; additionally, individuals from the Miami population were tested by abrupt (acute) salinity increases. Results showed significant tolerance by all populations to mesohaline waters: Mean survival time at 14 ppt was 63 days. The Homestead population, a genetically distinct lineage, exhibited greater tolerance to higher salinity than Tampa and Miami populations. Acute experiments indicated that swamp eels were capable of tolerating abrupt shifts from 0 to 16 ppt, with little mortality over 10 days. The broad salinity tolerance demonstrated by these experiments provides evidence that swamp eels are physiologically capable of infiltrating estuarine environments and using coastal waters to invade new freshwater systems. ?? 2009 US Government.

  2. Data on ground-water levels and ground-water/surface-water relations in the Great Miami River and Little Miami River valleys, southwestern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, William P.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data were collected in September, October, and November 1993 to define the ground-water levels and the ground-water/surface-water relations in the vicinity of Dayton, Ohio. In this report, water levels are listed for 678 wells completed in sand and gravel. Data from 101 streamflow measurements made at selected sites along the Great Miami, Stillwater, Mad, and Little Miami Rivers and their tributaries during 2-day gain-loss study also are listed. Surface-water altitudes were determined at 11 stream-gaging stations and 39 other streamflow measurement sites. Discharge data for measurements made at 30 storm-sewer outfalls are given. Streamflow and discharge data obtained during the study were used to calculate the gain or loss of streamflow along 16 selected reaches of the Great Miami, Stillwater, Mad, and Little Miami Rivers. Streambed-conductivity data obtained by use of seepage meters at nine different sites also are given.

  3. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marirosa; Hunter, Shayla; Cyterski, Mike; Peed, Lindsay A; Kelty, Catherine A; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Prieto, Lourdes; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-11-01

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamination could be present at beaches solely impacted by urban runoff. Accurately estimating risk requires understanding sources, concentrations, and transport mechanisms of microbial contaminants in these environments. By applying microbial source tracking methods and empirical modeling, we assessed the presence and level of human contamination at urban runoff impacted recreational beaches. We also identified environmental parameters and pollution sources that can influence the concentration and transport of culturable and molecular fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in systems impacted solely by urban runoff. Water samples and physico-chemical parameters were collected from shoreline locations from three South Carolina (SC) beaches (five locations per beach) and two Florida (FL) beaches (three locations per beach). Each SC beach was directly impacted by swashes or tidal creeks receiving stormwater runoff from the urbanized area and therefore were designated as swash drain associated (SDA) beaches, while FL beaches were designated as non-swash drain associated (NSDA). Sampling in swash drains (SD; three sites per SD) directly impacting each SC beach was also conducted. Results indicate that although culturable (enterococci) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (EC23S857, Entero1, and GenBac3) FIB concentrations were, on average, higher at SD locations, SDA beaches did not have consistently higher molecular FIB signals compared to NSDA beaches. Both human-associated markers (HF183 and HumM2) were concomitantly found only at SDA beaches. Bacteroidales species-specific qPCR markers (BsteriF1 and BuniF2) identified differences in the Bacteroidales community, depending on beach

  4. Kennedy Space Center and the Florida Atlantic coast area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A vertical view of the Kennedy Space Center and the Florida Atlantic coast area is seen in this Skylab 4 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photography taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. This photograph shows the major land-ocean features of the Florida coast from near Vero Beach northward to Cape Canaveral and the KSC complex. The launch pads for the Skylab missions are clearly visible. Various shades of red portray differences in the vegetation such as shown in the patterns in the agricultural area near Vero Beach. At KSC, the nearly continuous and uniform red color shows that most of the land areas are heavily vegetated. The white coastal beach areas are strongly contrasted to the red land and the blue Atlantic Ocean. Old dunal areas in KSC are visible on Merritt Island which is separated from the Launch areas by the Banana River and from the mainland by the Indian River. Federal and state highways and numerous cause

  5. Transport of anomalous low-salinity waters from the Mississippi River flood of 1993 to the Straits of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Paula S.; Lee, Thomas N.; Podesta, Guillermo P.

    1996-07-01

    Recent field studies in the southern Straits of Florida revealed the existence of Mississippi River outflow embedded in the Florida Current and adjacent coastal waters. Surface thermosalinograph measurements for the period of 10-13 September 1993 indicated a band of low-salinity water measuring approximately 40 km wide and 30 m in depth extending from south of Key West to Miami, a distance of 260 km. Surface salinity values as low as 31 psu were found. The estimated volume of the band is approximately 33.3 × 10 10 m 3 for the Key West to Miami region, thereby requiring roughly 1.2 × 10 10 m 3 of fresh water to mix with oceanic waters to produce this low-salinity band. The only nearby, dynamically viable, source for such a large volume of fresh water is the Mississippi River during its flood stage in 1993. The proposed transport mechanism for the transport of flood waters from the shelf in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico to the Straits of Florida is via the Loop Current through entrainment. Salinity records from offshore C-MAN towers indicate that the low-salinity band persisted off the lower Florida Keys for approximately 3 months. The variability in the flow field in the southern Straits occurs in a 30-70 day band due to the meandering of the Florida Current and the subsequent formation, and propagation, of cyclonic gyres off the Dry Tortugas. This variability in the flow field had a clear affect on the evolution of the low-salinity band, as observed by the salinity records from the C-MAN towers. Because the band traveled as a lens in the upper 30 m of the water column and because its evolution was highly dependent on the variability within the Gulf Stream System, it was a good indicator of the mixing and exchange of offshore waters with shallow waters of the Florida reef tract and Florida Bay.

  6. Central Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This view of central Florida, USA (28.0N, 81.5W) shows both coasts of the Florida peninsula with Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center readily visible in the center on the Atlantic coast. Other features on the Earth which are visible through the clouds include Tampa Bay, several lakes and the Gulf of Mexico on Florida's east coast. The space shuttle's tail fin and both orbital maneuvering systems (OMS) pods are seen in the foreground.

  7. Recharge into a shingle beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, T.

    1984-04-01

    Traditionally, groundwater recharge in the U.K. has been calculated by the Penman method on a monthly basis, using values of potential evaporation derived from averaged meteorological data and monthly totals of rainfall. Recent work by K.W.F. Howard and J.W. Lloyd has shown that these monthly totals considerably underestimate recharge calculated over shorter time periods and they suggested that 1-day, or at worst, 10-day intervals should be used. In this paper field experiments to measure recharge into a shingle beach are reported. These experiments were made with a lysimeter over a 6-yr. period and have shown that recharge into the shingle occurs whenever significant precipitation occurs, even during the summer months. The Penman model is shown to be unrealistic for estimating recharge into such a beach and an alternative model for calculating recharge is proposed. This model is shown to yield good results.

  8. The Stocker AstroScience Center at Florida International University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The new Stocker AstroScience Center located on the MMC campus at Florida International University in Miami Florida represents a unique facility for STEM education that arose from a combination of private, State and university funding. The building, completed in the fall of 2013, contains some unique spaces designed not only to educate, but also to inspire students interested in science and space exploration. The observatory consists of a 4-story building (3 floors) with a 24” ACE automated telescope in an Ash dome, and an observing platform above surrounding buildings. Some of the unique features of the observatory include an entrance/exhibition hall with a 6-ft glass tile floor mural linking the Florida climate to space travel, a state-of-the art telescope control that looks like a starship bridge, and displays such as “Music from the universe”. The observatory will also be the focus of our extensive public outreach program that is entering its 20 year.

  9. Florida Energy Assurance Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Niescja E.; Murtagh, William; Guthrie, Kevin; Nykyri, Katariina; Radasky, William A.; Senkowicz, Eric

    2012-08-01

    This spring, Florida held the nation's first statewide emergency preparedness training and exercises geared specifically to the aftermath of severe geomagnetic events. Funded by the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) via a Department of Energy grant and held in collaboration with Watch House International, Inquesta Corporation, and the Florida Institute of Technology, the 17-19 April 2012 workshop had 99 on-site attendees in an oceanfront hotel in Melbourne, Florida, as well as 16 over live Web streaming. The workshop was the capstone to a three-month season of 21 regional space weather training sessions and workshops serving 386 attendees in total.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Munisport Landfill site, Dade County, North Miami, FL. (First remedial action), July 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-26

    The 291-acre Munisport Landfill site, including a 170-acre, inactive municipal landfill, is within the city of North Miami, Dade County, Florida. The city of North Miami leased 291 acres to Munisport for recreational development in 1971 which began filling low-lying areas of the site with clean fill and construction debris. In 1975, a temporary permit allowed solid waste to be used as fill above the water table. However, in 1976, a State inspection found twelve 55-gallon drums that were leaking wastes onsite; a violation was issued, and these drums were removed offsite by the city. Landfilling operations ceased in 1981, but closure has not yet taken place. Leachate from the landfill waste still poses a significant threat to the aquatic organisms in the Mangrove Preserve. The ground water is no longer used for potable purposes as a result of salt water intrusion. The contaminants of concern affecting the ground water include VOCs such as benzene and toluene; other organics; metals, such as arsenic, chromium, and lead; and other inorganics.

  11. H2O2 levels in rainwater collected in south Florida and the Bahama Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zika, R.; Saltzman, E.; Chameides, W. L.; Davis, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of H2O2 in rainwater collected in Miami, Florida, and the Bahama Islands area indicate the presence of H2O2 concentration levels ranging from 100,000 to 700,000 M. No systematic trends in H2O2 concentration were observed during an individual storm, in marked contrast to the behavior of other anions for example, NO3(-), SO4(-2), and Cl(-). The data suggest that a substantial fraction of the H2O2 found in precipitation is generated by aqueous-phase reactions within the cloudwater rather than via rainout and washout of gaseous H2O2.

  12. A Cultural Perspective on Sexual Health: HIV Positive and Negative Monolingual Hispanic Women in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Villar-Loubet, Olga M; Vamos, Szonja; Jones, Deborah L; Lopez, Eliot; Weiss, Stephen M

    2011-06-01

    This study explored feelings and attitudes with regard to HIV and sexual health among 82 monolingual Spanish-speaking, HIV-positive (n = 30) and at-risk women (n = 52), participating in the NOW en Español Project-a cognitive behavioral sexual risk-reduction intervention in Miami, Florida. Hispanic cultural values and beliefs, such as machismo, marianismo, and sexual silence, emerged throughout the intervention as important determinants of sexual behavior. Recommendations for integrating these culture-specific issues in sexual health interventions for Hispanic women are provided.

  13. A Cultural Perspective on Sexual Health: HIV Positive and Negative Monolingual Hispanic Women in South Florida

    PubMed Central

    Villar-Loubet, Olga M.; Vamos, Szonja; Jones, Deborah L.; Lopez, Eliot; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored feelings and attitudes with regard to HIV and sexual health among 82 monolingual Spanish-speaking, HIV-positive (n = 30) and at-risk women (n = 52), participating in the NOW en Español Project—a cognitive behavioral sexual risk-reduction intervention in Miami, Florida. Hispanic cultural values and beliefs, such as machismo, marianismo, and sexual silence, emerged throughout the intervention as important determinants of sexual behavior. Recommendations for integrating these culture-specific issues in sexual health interventions for Hispanic women are provided. PMID:24994949

  14. Contact with beach sand among beach-goers and risk of illness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recently, numerous studies of fecal contamination of beach sand have triggered interest among scientists, the news media, and the general public. Evidence shows that beach sand harbors higher concentrations of fecal indicator organisms (microbes considered to indicate...

  15. Illness associated with red tide--Nassau County, Florida, 2007.

    PubMed

    2008-07-01

    A "red tide" is a harmful algal bloom that occurs when toxic, microscopic algae in seawater proliferate to a higher-than-normal concentration (i.e., bloom), often discoloring the water red, brown, green, or yellow. Red tides can kill fish, birds, and marine mammals and cause illness in humans. Florida red tide is caused by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces toxins called brevetoxins and is most commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico; however, K. brevis blooms also can occur along the Atlantic coast. On September 25, 2007, a cluster of respiratory illnesses was reported to the Nassau County Health Department (NCHD) in northeastern Florida. All of the ill persons were employed at a beach restoration worksite by a dredging company operating at Fernandina Beach; they reported symptoms of eye or respiratory irritation (e.g., coughing, sneezing, sniffling, and throat irritation). NCHD and the Florida Department of Health promptly conducted epidemiologic and environmental investigations and determined the illnesses likely were associated with exposure to a red tide along the Atlantic coast. These actions highlight the importance of rapid investigation of health concerns with potential environmental causes to enable timely notification of the public and prevent further illness.

  16. Illness associated with red tide--Nassau County, Florida, 2007.

    PubMed

    2008-07-01

    A "red tide" is a harmful algal bloom that occurs when toxic, microscopic algae in seawater proliferate to a higher-than-normal concentration (i.e., bloom), often discoloring the water red, brown, green, or yellow. Red tides can kill fish, birds, and marine mammals and cause illness in humans. Florida red tide is caused by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces toxins called brevetoxins and is most commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico; however, K. brevis blooms also can occur along the Atlantic coast. On September 25, 2007, a cluster of respiratory illnesses was reported to the Nassau County Health Department (NCHD) in northeastern Florida. All of the ill persons were employed at a beach restoration worksite by a dredging company operating at Fernandina Beach; they reported symptoms of eye or respiratory irritation (e.g., coughing, sneezing, sniffling, and throat irritation). NCHD and the Florida Department of Health promptly conducted epidemiologic and environmental investigations and determined the illnesses likely were associated with exposure to a red tide along the Atlantic coast. These actions highlight the importance of rapid investigation of health concerns with potential environmental causes to enable timely notification of the public and prevent further illness. PMID:18600196

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Chemform, Inc. , Site, Operable Unit Two, Pompano Beach, FL, September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Chemform, Inc. Site in Pompano Beach, Florida. This remedy applies to Operable Unit Two at the site which pertains to the site-related soil contamination. Due to an extensive cleanup of the site related contaminant sources, and a significant reduction in soil contaminant levels, no further Superfund action is necessary to address Operable Unit Two at the site.

  18. Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print.

    PubMed

    Nevers, Meredith B; Whitman, Richard L

    2011-12-15

    Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards. PMID:22059560

  19. Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards.

  20. USING HYDROGRAPHIC DATA AND THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH MODEL TO TEST PREDICTIONS OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling study of 2006 Huntington Beach (Lake Erie) beach bacteria concentrations indicates multi-variable linear regression (MLR) can effectively estimate bacteria concentrations compared to the persistence model. Our use of the Virtual Beach (VB) model affirms that fact. VB i...

  1. NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS USING EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence shows that traditional persistence-based beach closure decision making is inadequate, beaches are closed when they could be open and kept open when they should be closed. Intense interest is now focused on efforts to nowcast beach conditions using surrogate variables, su...

  2. VISUAL BEACH: SOFTWARE FOR ACHIEVING BEACH AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act of 2000 directs the EPA to assure that 100% of significant public beaches are managed by 2008. Under the Act EPA is developing a program to monitor beach water quality and strategies for timely notification of the public...

  3. 76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC in the Federal Register (76 FR 124). We received... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY:...

  4. Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 20th, Miami Beach, FL, August 18-23, 1985, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2, & 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-12-01

    Topics related to aerospace power are discussed, taking into account trends and issues of military space power systems technology, space station power system advanced development, the application and use of nuclear power for future spacecraft, the current status of advanced solar array technology development, the application of a parabolic trough concentrator to space station power needs, life test results of the Intelsat-V nickel-cadmium battery, and metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries. Other subjects explored are concerned with alternative fuels, biomass energy, biomedical power, coal gasification, electric power cycles, and electric propulsion. Attention is given to an advanced terrestrial vehicle electric propulsion systems assessment, fuel cells as electric propulsion power plants, a sinewave synthesis for high efficiency dc-ac conversion, steam desulfurization of coal, leadless transfer of energy into the body to power implanted blood pumps, oil production via entrained flow pyrolysis of biomass, and a New Zealand synthetic gasoline plant.

  5. Atlantic coastline of Florida as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Atlantic coastline of Florida from Daytona Beach southward to Palm Beach area, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 17th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 123 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 27 hours and 12 minutes. Cape Kennedy area is in center of picture. Small cumulus cloud puffs cover part of the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39, although the Vehicle Assembly Building and crawlerways can be seen. The city of Orlando, some 50 miles inland from Cape Kennedy, is also in the photograph.

  6. Changing Salinity Patterns in Biscayne Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    Biscayne Bay, Fla., is a 428-square-mile (1,109-square-kilometer) subtropical estuarine ecosystem that includes Biscayne National Park, the largest marine park in the U.S. national park system (fig. 1). The bay began forming between 5,000 and 3,000 years ago as sea level rose and southern Florida was flooded. Throughout most of its history, the pristine waters of the bay supported abundant and diverse fauna and flora, and the bay was a nursery for the adjacent coral-reef and marine ecosystems. In the 20th century, urbanization of the Miami-Dade County area profoundly affected the environment of the bay. Construction of powerplants, water-treatment plants, and solid-waste sites and large-scale development along the shoreline stressed the ecosystem. Biscayne National Monument was established in 1968 to ?preserve and protect for the education, inspiration, recreation and enjoyment of present and future generations a rare combination of terrestrial, marine, and amphibious life in a tropical setting of great natural beauty? (Public Law 90?606). The monument was enlarged in 1980 and designated a national park.

  7. 7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING 27TH BENT LANDWARD TO MAXWELL'S RESTAURANT, NEPTUNE'S GALLEY (RIGHT OF CENTER) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  8. 8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  9. 127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS Sheet 8 of 11 (#3281) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  10. 120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 2 of 11 (#3274) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  11. 123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS Sheet 5 of 11 (#3277) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  12. 10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING (LEFT-RIGHT) CAPTAIN'S GALLEY'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  13. 130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. Sheet 11 of 11 (#3284) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  14. 125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6A of 11 (#3279) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  15. 104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, LOOKING SOUTH. BANDSHELL IS AT RIGHT Photograph #1574-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  16. 126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS Sheet 7 of 11 (#3280) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  17. 111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER MID-SECTION TO END Sheet 2 of 9 (#3253) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  18. 129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. Sheet lO of 11 (#3283) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  19. 124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6 of 11 (#3278) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  20. 121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 3 of 11 (#3275) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  1. 45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  2. 110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER APPROACH TO MID-SECTION Sheet 1 of 9 (#3252) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  3. 122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXTENSION TO PIER Sheet 4 of 11 (#3276) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  4. 128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING DETAILS Sheet 9 of 11 (#3282) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  5. BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE BEACH. BEACH ROAD IS 14' WIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma in a Perdido Key Beach Mouse (Peromyscus poliontus trissyllepsis)

    PubMed Central

    Aitken-Palmer, Copper; Kiupel, Matti; Russell, Kathy; Hayes, Linda; Heard, Darryl

    2012-01-01

    The Perdido Key beach mouse (Peromyscus poliontus trissyllepsis) is an endangered mammal indigenous to the panhandle beaches of Northwest Florida. A captive 3.5-y-old female mouse was evaluated because of severe pruritus, diffuse alopecia, skin reddening, and ulcerations over the dorsum of her body. Initial skin biopsy of the affected area suggested bacterial dermatitis but was inconclusive. Despite empiric antibiotic, anthelmintic, and antihistamine treatments, she continued to decline and developed severe ulcerations over the majority of her body. Postmortem histopathologic evaluation led to a tentative diagnosis of epitheliotropic lymphoma, suggestive of a mycosis fungoides T-cell–type cutaneous lymphoma. However, immunohistochemistry results challenged this diagnosis, indicating that the lesion was actually an epidermotropic B-cell lymphoma. Spontaneous cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are rare in rodents and had not previously been reported to occur in Perdido Key beach mice. This case report provides initial evidence that the Perdido Key beach mouse is susceptible to cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. PMID:22546914

  7. AN/PSS-14 mine detection performance on beaches and in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinway, William J.; Perry, Larry; Maningo, Richard; Ngan, Peter; Locke, Mark

    2004-04-01

    Data collections were conducted using the AN/PSS-14 mine detector on three beach areas in Florida. A few samples of inert anti-tank (AT) and anti-personnel (AP) mines were buried at Jacksonville Beach, Cocoa Beach, and Clearwater Beach. The mines were buried in a variety of sand conditions varying from dry to saturated. The saturated sand conditions included the surf zone with up to two feet of water surge over the buried mine area. Test results indicate a good probability of detection (Pd) of all the buried mines by the AN/PSS-14 Ground Penetration Radar (GPR) and Metal Detector (MD), with a low false alarm rate. This paper will detail test conditions under which the mines were buried, soil dielectric and attenuation parameters measured versus water content in each condition, and interpretation of data in such highly attenuated (400-600 dB attenuation per meter) and extremely conductive soil. In addition, the theory of evanescent electromagnetic waves will be discussed in terms of the performance.

  8. Data on selected deep wells in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.A.; Lidz, Lauralee; Meyer, F.W.

    1982-01-01

    A data base of 870 deep wells was assembled for the south Florida part of the Southeastern Limestone Regional Aquifer Study. The data in this report are for wells in Broward, Collier , Dade, Hendry, Lee, Martin, Monroe, Palm Beach, and St. Lucie Counties. Data are compiled for water wells, oil test wells, injection wells, and monitor wells. These data consist of: (1) well identification and geographic location; (2) well construction and site use; (3) logs available (geologic and geophysical); and (4) selected water-quality parameters. The well locations are shown, by counties, on maps. The number of wells in each county are: Broward, 6; Collier, 237; Dade, 61; Hendry, 130; Lee, 226; Martin, 91; Monroe, 34; Palm Beach, 33; and St. Lucie, 52. Data are stored in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval system (WATSTORE) in the following files: header, water-quality, and ground-water site inventory (GWSI). (USGS)

  9. Springs of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenau, Jack C.; Faulkner, Glen L.; Hendry, Charles W.; Hull, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    The first comprehensive report of Florida's springs, which contains both a story of the springs and a collection of facts about them, was published thirty years ago (Ferguson and others, 1947). Since then, much additional data on springs have been gathered and the current report, Springs of Florida, makes a wealth of information on springs available to the public. Springs of Florida, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, publishers, and the Bureau of Water Resources Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, is intended to provide sufficient background information for a lucid understanding of the nature and occurrence of the springs in the State.

  10. Southern Florida's River of Grass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Florida's Everglades is a region of broad, slow-moving sheets of water flowing southward over low-lying areas from Lake Okeechobeeto the Gulf of Mexico. In places this remarkable 'river of grass' is 80 kilometers wide. These images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer show the Everglades region on January 16, 2002. Each image covers an area measuring 191 kilometers x 205 kilometers. The data were captured during Terra orbit 11072.

    On the left is a natural color view acquired by MISR's nadir camera. A portion of Lake Okeechobee is visible at the top, to the right of image center. South of the lake, whose name derives from the Seminole word for 'big water,' an extensive region of farmland known as the Everglades Agricultural Area is recognizable by its many clustered squares. Over half of the sugar produced in United States is grown here. Urban areas along the east coast and in the northern part of the image extend to the boundaries of Big Cypress Swamp, situated north of Everglades National Park.

    The image on the right combines red-band data from the 46-degree backward, nadir and 46-degree forward-viewing camera angles to create a red, green, blue false-color composite. One of the interesting uses of the composite image is for detecting surface water. Wet surfaces appear blue in this rendition because sun glitter produces a greater signal at the forward camera's view angle. Wetlands visible in these images include a series of shallow impoundments called Water Conservation Areas which were built to speed water flow through the Everglades in times of drought. In parts of the Everglades, these levees and extensive systems such as the Miami and Tamiami Canals have altered the natural cycles of water flow. For example, the water volume of the Shark River Slough, a natural wetland which feeds Everglades National Park, is influenced by the Tamiami Canal. The unique and intrinsic value of the Everglades is now widely recognized, and efforts to restore

  11. NASA diagonal-braked test vehicle evaluation of traction characteristics of grooved and ungrooved runway surfaces at Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida, 8-9 May 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two runways were evaluated under artificially wetted conditions with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle (DBV). Results of the evaluation which included a pavement drainage analysis, a pavement skid resistance analysis, and a DBV wet/dry stopping distance ratio analysis indicated that the ungrooved runway surfaces had poor water drainage characteristics and poor skid resistance under wet conditions at high speeds especially in rubbercoated areas of the runways. Grooving runways to a transverse 1-1/4 x 1/4 x 1/4 inch pattern greatly improved both the water drainage and pavement skid resistance capability of these asphaltic concrete surfaces.

  12. Assessment of swimming associated health effects in marine bathing beach: an example from Morib beach (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Pauzi, Norfasmawati Mohd; Hamdan, Munashamimi; Sham, Shaharuddin Mohd

    2015-03-15

    A survey among beachgoers was conducted to determine the swimming associated health effects experienced and its relationship with beach water exposure behaviour in Morib beach. For beach water exposure behaviour, the highest frequency of visit among the respondents was once a year (41.9%). For ways of water exposure, whole body exposure including head was the highest (38.5%). For duration of water exposure, 30.8% respondents prefer to be in water for about 30 min with low possibilities of accidental ingestion of beach water. A total of 30.8% of beachgoers in Morib beach were reported of having dermal symptoms. Bivariate analysis showed only water activity, water contact and accidental ingestion of beach water showed significant association with swimming associated health effects experienced by swimmers. This study output showed that epidemiological study can be used to identify swimming associated health effects in beach water exposed to faecal contamination.

  13. Five years of beach drainage survey on a macrotidal beach (Quend-Plage, northern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Olivier; Toulec, Renaud; Combaud, Anne; Villemagne, Guillaume; Barrier, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    A drainage system was installed in 2008 on the macrotidal beach of Quend-Plage, close to Abbeville (Somme, northern France), following a period of significant erosion of recreational areas. The "Direction départementale des territoires et de la mer" (French Coastal Department Authority) has requested a biannual survey in order to validate the beach drainage setup and its efficiency. This paper presents the methodology used for this survey, and the response of the coastal system to this soft engineering method for preventing erosion. These five years of drainage operation have strongly modified the morphology of the beach. Three main modifications occurred: (i) accretion of the upper beach and foredune, (ii) erosion of the lower and middle beach and (iii) a slight shift in directions of the beach bars and troughs. These morphological changes finally led to the stabilization of the beach.

  14. A ground-water sapping landscape in the Florida Panhandle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, S. A.; Boyd, K. F.; Wolff, C. G.; Spitz, W. J.

    1995-07-01

    Drainage networks that have formed by ground-water sapping are developed in the highly permeable sands of the Citronelle Formation in the Florida Panhandle. The valleys resemble those formed on Hawaii, the Colorado Plateau and on Mars, but they have developed without significant lithologic controls. Drainage patterns range from trellis to dentritic depending on the effect of beach ridges and relative relief. Many of the drainage networks are not fully developed, and the adjacent uplands have been modified by marine, aeolian, and to a limited extent fluvial processes. Extension of the networks appears to be episodic, as a result of fires, hurricanes, and human activities, which damage or destroy vegetation.

  15. Long Beach's Pivotal Turn around RTI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Judy

    2008-01-01

    This article briefly describes the tiered approach to intervention adopted by the Long Beach Unified School District. Long Beach Unified School District is the state's third largest urban school district with more than 90,000 students, 84 percent of whom are minority and 68 percent of whom qualify for free and reduced price lunch, and where over…

  16. PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

  17. A Study of Sandy Beach Zonation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Steve K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the study of sandy beach zonations as a seashore activity for either high school or lower-level college courses in biology, ecology, or marine biology. Students first draw a profile of a beach scene and then collect specimens from the zones of the shore. In a laboratory, students identify their specimens and relate them to the beach…

  18. Family and cultural influences on cervical cancer screening among immigrant Latinas in Miami-Dade County, USA.

    PubMed

    Madhivanan, Purnima; Valderrama, Diana; Krupp, Karl; Ibanez, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer disproportionately affects minorities, immigrants and low-income women in the USA, with disparities greatest among Latino immigrants. We examined barriers and facilitators to cervical cancer screening practices among a group of immigrant Latino women in Florida, USA. Between January and May 2013, six focus group discussions, involving 35 participants, were conducted among Hispanic women in Miami to explore their knowledge, beliefs about cervical cancer and facilitators and barriers to cervical cancer screening using a theoretical framework. The data showed that family support, especially from female relatives, was an important facilitator of screening and treatment. Women, however, reported prioritising family health over their own, and some expressed fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Major obstacles to receiving a Pap smear included fear that it might result in removal of the uterus, discomfort about being seen by a male doctor and concern that testing might stigmatise them as being sexually promiscuous or having a sexually transmitted disease. Targeted education on cancer and prevention is critically needed in this population. Efforts should focus on women of all ages since younger women often turn to older female relatives for advice.

  19. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-05-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5-10 microg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m(3). The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction.

  20. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1 h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5–10 μg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m3. The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction. PMID:19879288

  1. Effects of beach cast cleaning on beach quality, microbial food web, and littoral macrofaunal biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Torleif; Råberg, Sonja; Fell, Sabine; Carlsson, Per

    2004-06-01

    At the end of the summer, drifting filamentous red algae cover shallow bottoms and accumulate in huge cast walls on the open shores of the non-tidal central Baltic Sea. The hypotheses that beach cleaning increases water clarity, decreases the organic content of the sand, and increases the species diversity in the shallow zone closest to the shore, were tested through field investigations and experiments. Cleaned shorelines were compared with un-cleaned shorelines at two sites with different intensity of beach cleaning in a rural area of SE Sweden. The results show that water clarity was significantly increased off the intensively cleaned beach but not off the moderately cleaned one. Similarly, the total leakage of nitrogenous compounds decreased off the intensively cleaned beach, but not off the moderately cleaned. The organic content of the sand was lower on both cleaned beaches compared with nearby un-cleaned beaches. The total animal biomass was significantly lower on the intensively cleaned beach compared with the un-cleaned beach, but the moderately cleaned beach gave no such effect. The difference in biodiversity and community structure between cleaned and un-cleaned beaches was insignificant. The most obvious difference in species composition was a much higher number of planktivore opossum shrimps of the genus Mysis and Praunus on the un-cleaned beaches. The bacterial production and the amount of ciliates larger than 20 mm were also higher on un-cleaned beaches, indicating that the microbial food web off the un-cleaned beaches is stimulated by the discharge of decomposing algal material. The conclusion of the study is that mechanical cleaning reduces the organic content of the beach sand and may change the water quality and microbial production, but the effect on the macrofaunal biodiversity is insignificant.

  2. A field data assessment of contemporary models of beach cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.R.; Psuty, N.P.; Bauer, B.O.; Carter, R.W.G.

    1996-01-01

    Cusp formation was observed during an instrumented, daily profiled, time series of a reflective beach in Canaveral National Seashore, Florida on January 5, 1988. The monitored cusp embayment formed by erosion of the foreshore and the cusp series had a mean spacing of approximately 28 m. During this time, inshore fluid flows were dominated by two standing edge waves at frequencies of 0.06 Hz (primary) and 0.035 Hz (secondary) whereas incident waves were broadbanded at 0.12-0.16 Hz. Directly measured flows (and indirectly estimated swash excursion) data support both the standing wave subharmonic model and the self-organization model of cusp formation in this study.

  3. Syphilis and gonorrhea in Miami: similar clustering, different trends.

    PubMed

    Hamers, F F; Peterman, T A; Zaidi, A A; Ransom, R L; Wroten, J E; Witte, J J

    1995-08-01

    During the second half of the 1980s, Miami had a syphilis epidemic while gonorrhea rates decreased. To determine whether the direction of these trends truly differed within all population subgroups or whether they resulted from aggregating groups within which trends were similar, records from four sexually transmitted disease clinics from 1986 to 1990 and census data from 1990 were used to compare race-, sex-, age-, and zip code-specific groups. Syphilis and gonorrhea clustering was similar; 50% of cases occurred in the same zip codes, representing 10% of the population. In all groups, gonorrhea decreased (aggregate 48%) while syphilis first increased (aggregate 47%) and then decreased. Determining reasons for these different trends may facilitate controlling these diseases.

  4. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Broward County, Florida, 1939-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Fish, J.E.; Causaras, C.R.; Poore, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the surficial aquifers, of southeast Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. In the initial phase of the study, an inventory was made of existing data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies of Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. This report indexes through tables and maps, the ground-water quality, ground-water level, surface-water stage, and geologic data bases for Broward County. (USGS)

  5. Stormwater-runoff data for a highway area, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardee, Jack; Miller, Robert A.; Mattraw, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    Rainfall, stormwater runoff, and water-quality data are summarized for a highway area near Pompano Beach, Florida. Loads for 21 water-quality constituents were computed for the runoff from 45 storm events between April 1975 and July 1977. The size of the basin is 58.3 acres and 36 percent impervious. Stormwater runoff from urban watersheds represent an unqualified but possibly major source of contaminants to the numerous canals in south Florida. The quantification of the contaminate load from different land-use areas will assist governmental agencies involved with pollution control in evaluating alternative drainage system designs. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Head-started Kemp’s ridley turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) nest recorded in Florida: Possible implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaver, Donna J.; Lamont, Margaret M.; Maxwell, Sharon; Walker, Jennifer Shelby; Dillingham, Ted

    2016-01-01

    A head-started Kemp’s ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) was documented nesting on South Walton Beach, Florida on 25 May 2015. This record supports the possibility that exposure to Florida waters after being held in captivity through 1–3 yrs of age during the head-starting process may have influenced future nest site selection of this and perhaps other Kemp’s ridley turtles. Such findings could have important ramifications for marine water experimentation and release site selection for turtles that have been reared in captivity.

  7. 4 More Cases of Local Zika Infection Reported in Miami Area

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160353.html 4 More Cases of Local Zika Infection Reported in Miami Area But aerial spraying ... 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Four more cases of Zika infection that were likely spread through mosquito bites ...

  8. 76 FR 56004 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Miami-Dade County, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... line on its Southern Region, Jacksonville Division, Miami Subdivision, extending between milepost SX 1036.8 and the end of the track at milepost SX 1037.5, including approximately 1,300 feet of...

  9. 77 FR 4247 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    .... Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone (202) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Miami International Boat Show Operations Manager has requested temporary modifications to the operating... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

  10. Dynamics of Shengjini beach (Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashi, Ferim; Nikolli, Pal

    2015-04-01

    Dynamics of Shengjini beach (Albania) Pal Nikolli , Ferim GASHI Through archaeological and historical data, presentations of ancient topographic, cartographic materials (topographic maps obtained at different periods from 1870 to 1990), aerial photographs (2007), satellite images (2014) and direct measurements, paper defines and analyzes the position of the coastline of Shengjini beach (Lezha) from century XVI until today. The coastline of the Shengjini city (port) to Drin River estuary is oriented north-south direction and is approximately 10.5 km long. This part of the coast is sandy and sediment comes mainly from the River Drin and distributed by currents along the coast. In this paper are make provision for the position of the coastline in the future and analyzed the possibilities of human intervention in the coastal environment , etc. This work forms the basis for the issuance of necessary data required for various projections at the coastal environment Shëngjini. Results of this study will have a significant impact on state policies for integrated management of the coastal zone in the study and development of tourism. Key words: GIS, Remonte Sennsing, cartography, management of coastal zone, tourism, environment.

  11. Hydrologic almanac of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, Richard C.; Conover, Clyde Stuart

    1981-01-01

    This first edition is a ready reference source of information on various facts and features about water in Florida. It is aimed primarily to help bust politicians, writers, agency officials, water managers, planners, consultants, educators, hydrologists, engineers, scientists, and the general public answer questions that arise on comparative and statistical aspects on the hydrology of Florida. It contains statistical comparative data, much of which was especially prepared for the almanac, a glossary of technical terms, tabular material, and conversion factors. Also included is a selective bibliography of 174 reports on water in Florida. (USGS)

  12. Florida-focused climate change lesson demonstrations from the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of Florida-focused climate change activities will be featured as part of the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops. In a combined effort from Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and University of South Florida's Coalition for Science Literacy (CSL), and supported by NASA's NICE initiative, the ASK Florida professional development workshops are a series of workshops designed to enhance and support climate change information and related pedagogical skills for middle school science teachers from Title-I schools in Florida. These workshops took place during a two-year period from 2011 to 2013 and consisted of two cohorts in Hillsborough and Volusia counties in Florida. Featured activities include lab-style exercises demonstrating topics such as storm surge and coastal geometry, sea level rise from thermal expansion, and the greenhouse effect. These types of labs are modified so that they allow more independent, inquiry thinking as they require teachers to design their own experiment in order to test a hypothesis. Lecture based activities are used to cover a broad range of topics including hurricanes, climate modeling, and sink holes. The more innovative activities are group activities that utilize roll-playing, technology and resources, and group discussion. For example, 'Climate Gallery Walk' is an activity that features group discussions on each of the climate literacy principles established by the United States Global Change Research Program. By observing discussions between individuals and groups, this activity helps the facilitators gather information on their previous knowledge and identify possible misconceptions that will be addressed within the workshops. Furthermore, 'Fact or Misconception' presents the challenge of identifying whether a given statement is fact or misconception based on the material covered throughout the workshops. It serves as a way to

  13. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N., longitude...

  14. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N. longitude...

  15. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N., longitude...

  16. 33 CFR 80.735 - Miami, FL to Long Key, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. 80.735... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.735 Miami, FL to Long Key, FL. (a) A line... Creek to the radar dome charted on Long Key at approximate position latitude 24°49.3′ N. longitude...

  17. Pollution of Florida's rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Cromartie, R.S. 3d. )

    1991-12-01

    Pollution of Florida's waterways is a serious problem. Sources of pollution include sewage, storm water runoff, faulty septic tanks, improperly constructed landfills, and obstruction by causeway bridges. Some of the major causes and solutions are discussed.

  18. Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Pooler, P.S.; Loveland, R.E.; Botton, M.L.; Michels, S.F.; Weber, R.G.; Carter, Daniel B.

    2002-01-01

    We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

  19. Hail Formation in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various

  20. Tar loads on Omani beaches

    SciTech Connect

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.