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Sample records for micro-electrical-mechanical systems mems

  1. Failure analysis for micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Tangyunyong, P.; Barton, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Micro-Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is an emerging technology with demonstrated potential for a wide range of applications including sensors and actuators for medical, industrial, consumer, military, automotive and instrumentation products. Failure analysis (FA) of MEMS is critically needed for the successful design, fabrication, performance analysis and reliability assurance of this new technology. Many devices have been examined using techniques developed for integrated circuit analysis, including optical inspection, scanning laser microscopy (SLM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared (IR) microscopy, light emission (LE) microscopy, acoustic microscopy and acoustic emission analysis. For example, the FIB was used to microsection microengines that developed poor performance characteristics. Subsequent SEM analysis clearly demonstrated the absence of wear on gear, hub, and pin joint bearing surfaces, contrary to expectations. Another example involved the use of infrared microscopy for thermal analysis of operating microengines. Hot spots were located, which did not involve the gear or hub, but indicated contact between comb structures which drive microengines. Voltage contrast imaging proved useful on static and operating MEMS in both the SEM and the FIB and identified electrostatic clamping as a potentially significant contributor to failure mechanisms in microengines. This work describes MEMS devices, FA techniques, failure modes, and examples of FA of MEMS.

  2. A Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based Cryogenic Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Bierden, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present our first results on the development and evaluation of a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. A MEMS silicon-based DM chip with 32 channels, in which each channel is 300 μm × 300 μm in size, was mounted on a silicon substrate in order to minimize distortion and prevent it from being permanently damaged by thermal stresses introduced by cooling. The silicon substrate was oxidized to obtain electric insulation and had a metal fan-out pattern on the surface. For cryogenic tests, we constructed a measurement system consisting of a Fizeau interferometer, a cryostat cooled by liquid N2, zooming optics, electric drivers. The surface of the mirror at 95 K deformed in response to the application of a voltage, and no significant difference was found between the deformation at 95 K and that at room temperature. The power dissipation by the cryogenic DM was also measured, and we suggest that this is small enough for it to be used in a space cryogenic telescope. The properties of the DM remained unchanged after five cycles of vacuum pumping, cooling, warming, and venting. We conclude that fabricating cryogenic DMs employing MEMS technology is a promising approach. Therefore, we intend to develop a more sophisticated device for actual use, and to look for potential applications including the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology & Astrophysics (SPICA), and other missions.

  3. Multiscale analysis of liquid lubrication trends from industrial machines to micro-electrical-mechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Donald W; Irving, Douglas L; Kingon, Angus I; Krim, Jacqueline; Padgett, Clifford W

    2007-08-28

    An analytic multiscale expression is derived that yields conditions for effective liquid lubrication of oscillating contacts via surface flow over multiple time and length scales. The expression is a logistics function that depends on two quantities, the fraction of lubricant removed at each contact and a scaling parameter given by the logarithm of the ratio of the contact area to the product of the lubricant diffusion coefficient and the cycle time. For industrial machines the expression confirms the need for an oil mist. For magnetic disk drives, the expression predicts that existing lubricants are sufficient for next-generation data storage. For micro-electrical-mechanical systems, the expression predicts that a bound + mobile lubricant composed of tricresyl phosphate on an octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer will be effective only for temperatures greater than approximately 200 K and up to approximately MHz oscillation frequencies. PMID:17661501

  4. Split-resonator integrated-post MEMS gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A split-resonator integrated-post vibratory microgyroscope may be fabricated using micro electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques. The microgyroscope may include two gyroscope sections bonded together, each gyroscope section including resonator petals, electrodes, and an integrated half post. The half posts are aligned and bonded to act as a single post.

  5. MEMS in Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyke, J. C.; Michalicek, M. A.; Singaraju, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) provide an emerging technology that has the potential for revolutionizing the way space systems are designed, assembled, and tested. The high launch costs of current space systems are a major determining factor in the amount of functionality that can be integrated in a typical space system. MEMS devices have the ability to increase the functionality of selected satellite subsystems while simultaneously decreasing spacecraft weight. The Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL) is supporting the development of a variety of MEMS related technologies as one of several methods to reduce the weight of space systems and increase their performance. MEMS research is a natural extension of PL research objectives in micro-electronics and advanced packaging. Examples of applications that are under research include on-chip micro-coolers, micro-gyroscopes, vibration sensors, and three-dimensional packaging technologies to integrate electronics with MEMS devices. The first on-orbit space flight demonstration of these and other technologies is scheduled for next year.

  6. University Research Program in Robotics - "Technologies for Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems in directed Stockpile Work (DSW) Radiation and Campaigns", Final Technical Annual Report, Project Period 9/1/06 - 8/31/07

    SciTech Connect

    James S. Tulenko; Carl D. Crane

    2007-12-13

    The University Research Program in Robotics (URPR) is an integrated group of universities performing fundamental research that addresses broad-based robotics and automation needs of the NNSA Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and Campaigns. The URPR mission is to provide improved capabilities in robotics science and engineering to meet the future needs of all weapon systems and other associated NNSA/DOE activities.

  7. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed.

  8. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  9. Design of a MEMS-based retina scanning system for biometric authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woittennek, Franziska; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Schelinski, Uwe; Grüger, Heinrich

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing need for reliable authentication for a number of applications such as e commerce. Common authentication methods based on ownership (ID card) or knowledge factors (password, PIN) are often prone to manipulations and may therefore be not safe enough. Various inherence factor based methods like fingerprint, retinal pattern or voice identifications are considered more secure. Retina scanning in particular offers both low false rejection rate (FRR) and low false acceptance rate (FAR) with about one in a million. Images of the retina with its characteristic pattern of blood vessels can be made with either a fundus camera or laser scanning methods. The present work describes the optical design of a new compact retina laser scanner which is based on MEMS (Micro Electric Mechanical System) technology. The use of a dual axis micro scanning mirror for laser beam deflection enables a more compact and robust design compared to classical systems. The scanner exhibits a full field of view of 10° which corresponds to an area of 4 mm2 on the retinal surface surrounding the optical disc. The system works in the near infrared and is designed for use under ambient light conditions, which implies a pupil diameter of 1.5 mm. Furthermore it features a long eye relief of 30 mm so that it can be conveniently used by persons wearing glasses. The optical design requirements and the optical performance are discussed in terms of spot diagrams and ray fan plots.

  10. Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) for mechanical engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1996-11-18

    The ongoing advances in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) are providing man-kind the freedom to travel to dimensional spaces never before conceivable. Advances include new fabrication processes, new materials, tailored modeling tools, new fabrication machines, systems integration, and more detailed studies of physics and surface chemistry as applied to the micro scale. In the ten years since its inauguration, MEMS technology is penetrating industries of automobile, healthcare, biotechnology, sports/entertainment, measurement systems, data storage, photonics/optics, computer, aerospace, precision instruments/robotics, and environment monitoring. It is projected that by the turn of the century, MEMS will impact every individual in the industrial world, totaling sales up to $14 billion (source: System Planning Corp.). MEMS programs in major universities have spawned up all over the United States, preparing the brain-power and expertise for the next wave of MEMS breakthroughs. It should be pointed out that although MEMS has been initiated by electrical engineering researchers through the involvement of IC fabrication techniques, today it has evolved such that it requires a totally multi-disciplinary team to develop useful devices. Mechanical engineers are especially crucial to the success of MEMS development, since 90% of the physical realm involved is mechanical. Mechanical engineers are needed for the design of MEMS, the analysis of the mechanical system, the design of testing apparatus, the implementation of analytical tools, and the packaging process. Every single aspect of mechanical engineering is being utilized in the MEMS field today, however, the impact could be more substantial if more mechanical engineers are involved in the systems level designing. In this paper, an attempt is made to create the pathways for a mechanical engineer to enter in the MEMS field. Examples of application in optics and medical devices will be used to illustrate how mechanical

  11. Automated multiscale measurement system for MEMS characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyda, W.; Burla, A.; Haist, T.; Zimmermann, J.; Osten, W.; Sawodny, O.

    2010-05-01

    In former publications we presented an automated multiscale measurement system (AMMS) based on an adaptable active exploration strategy. The system is armed with several sensors linked by indicator algorithms to identify unresolved defects and to trigger finer resolved measurements. The advantage of this strategy in comparison to single sensor approaches is its high flexibility which is used to balance the conflict between measurement range, resolution and duration. For an initial proof of principle we used the system for inspection of microlens arrays. An even higher challenge for inspection systems are modern micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). MEMS consist of critical functional components which range from several millimeters down to micrometers and typically have tolerances in sub-micron scale. This contribution is focused on the inspection of MEMS using the example of micro calibration devices. This new class of objects has completely different surface characteristics and features hence it is necessary to adapted the components of the AMMS. Typical defects found on calibration devices are for example broken actuator combs and springs, surface cracks or missing features. These defects have less influence on the optical properties of the surface and the MEMS surface generates more complex intensity distributions in comparison microlense arrays. At the same time, the surface features of the MEMS have a higher variety and less periodicity which reduce the performance of currently used algorithms. To meet these requirements, we present new indicator algorithms for the automated analysis of confocal as well as conventional imaging data and show initial multiscale inspection results.

  12. Design and Simulation of MEMS Enabled Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Mark

    2001-03-01

    Over the past two decades considerable progress in microsystems (MEMS) fabrication technologies has been made resulting in a variety of commercially successful devices. Most of these devices have required application specific fabrication steps, which must be developed, and the lack of proper design tools often resulted in repeated prototyping that was expensive and time consuming. Further development of MEMS enabled commercial products and reduction of the time to market requires implementation of a concurrent design methodology through better design tools and standardization of the fabrication processes. The cross-disciplinary nature of MEMS-Enabled Systems necessitates designers with different backgrounds to work together in understanding the effects of one sub-system on another and this requires a top-down approach to integrated system design. Design tools that can facilitate this communication and reduce the need for excessive prototype fabrication and test iterations and significantly reduce cost and time-to-market are vitally important. The main focus of this article is to describe the top-down design methodology and and ongoing research on tools that facilitate concurrent design of MEMS enabled systems.

  13. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuators for Antenna Reconfigurability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chun, Donghoon; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator for patch antenna reconfiguration, is presented for the first time. A key feature is the capability of multi-band operation without greatly increasing the antenna element dimensions. Experimental results demonstrate that the center frequency can be reconfigured from few hundred MHz to few GHz away from the nominal operating frequency.

  14. Introduction to applications and industries for Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2003-07-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have gained acceptance as viable products for many commercial and government applications. MEMS are currently being used as displays for digital projection systems, sensors for airbag deployment systems, inkjet print head systems, and optical routers. This paper will discuss current and future MEMS applications. What are MEMS? MEMS are typically defined as microscopic devices designed, processed, and used to interact or produce changes within a local environment. A mechanical, electrical, or chemical stimulus can be used to create a mechanical, electrical, or chemical response in a local environment. These smaller, more sophisticated devices that think, act, sense, and communicate are replacing their bulk counterparts in many traditional applications.

  15. MEMS reliability in a vibration environment

    SciTech Connect

    TANNER,DANELLE M.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; STAKE,JOHN R.; SMITH,NORMAN F.

    2000-02-03

    MicroElectricalMechanical Systems (MEMS) were subjected to a vibration environment that had a peak acceleration of 120g and spanned frequencies from 20 to 2000 Hz. The device chosen for this test was a surface-micromachined microengine because it possesses many elements (springs, gears, rubbing surfaces) that may be susceptible to vibration. The microengines were unpowered during the test. The authors observed 2 vibration-related failures and 3 electrical failures out of 22 microengines tested. Surprisingly, the electrical failures also arose in four microengines in the control group indicating that they were not vibration related. Failure analysis revealed that the electrical failures were due to shorting of stationary comb fingers to the ground plane.

  16. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  17. 78 FR 22293 - Certain Microelectromechanical Systems (“MEMS Devices”) and Products Containing Same; Institution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Microelectromechanical Systems (``MEMS Devices'') and Products Containing Same... United States after importation of certain microelectromechanical systems (``MEMS Devices'') and products... after importation of certain microelectromechanical systems (``MEMS Devices'') and products...

  18. 78 FR 16531 - Certain Microelectromechanical Systems (“MEMS Devices”) and Products Containing Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Microelectromechanical Systems (``MEMS Devices'') and Products Containing Same; Notice of... Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Microelectromechanical Systems (``MEMS Devices'') and... microelectromechanical systems (``MEMS devices'') and products containing same. The complaint names as respondents...

  19. A 2-DOF MEMS positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mathews, James; Dallas, Tim E.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and testing of a 2 degree of freedom MEMS positioning system. Sandia National Laboratories' MEMS foundry process was utilized for the fabrication of the device; this process incorporates five layers of polysilicon and four sacrificial layers of silicon dioxide. The actuation was achieved by identical comb-drives on both axes. The comb drives produce a displacement of ~ 4 μm which was amplified to ~ 30 μm by the use of a distance multiplier. A pin and track arrangement in the X and Y arms, extending from the actuator assembly, allows bi-axis motion. The stage is connected to the central pin. For testing the performance of the fabricated design a custom made optical characterization setup was assembled. To provide the actuation signals to the stage, a Keithley 2400 source meter was programmed using LabView to provide actuation voltages from 0-100 V with a 2 volt step. An optical microscope, interfaced with a Canon S5 IS digital camera, was used to record the actuation events for the measurement of in-plane displacement. Displacement at the various actuation voltages was obtained using a National Instruments' Vision image analysis software routine. The device has been tested and demonstrates a useful design for realizing a bi-directional 2-D positioning system. The positioning system is capable of 0 - 30 μm of motion in both the X and Y axes, with displacement showing a quadratic relationship with the applied voltage.

  20. Performance assessment of MEMS adaptive optics in tactical airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    1999-09-01

    Tactical airborne electro-optical systems are severely constrained by weight, volume, power, and cost. Micro- electrical-mechanical adaptive optics provide a solution that addresses the engineering realities without compromising spatial and temporal compensation requirements. Through modeling and analysis, we determined that substantial benefits could be gained for laser designators, ladar, countermeasures, and missile seekers. The developments potential exists for improving seeker imagery resolution 20 percent, extending countermeasures keep-out range by a factor of 5, doubling the range for ladar detection and identification, and compensating for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft boundary layers. Innovative concepts are required for atmospheric pat hand boundary layer compensation. We have developed design that perform these tasks using high speed scene-based wavefront sensing, IR aerosol laser guide stars, and extended-object wavefront beacons. We have developed a number of adaptive optics system configurations that met the spatial resolution requirements and we have determined that sensing and signal processing requirements can be met. With the help of micromachined deformable mirrors and sensor, we will be able to integrate the systems into existing airborne pods and missiles as well as next generation electro-optical systems.

  1. A MEMS-based, wireless, biometric-like security system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Joshua D.; Schneiter, John L.; Leiby, Grant A.; McCarter, Steven; Smith, Jeremiah; Budka, Thomas P.

    2010-04-01

    We present a system for secure identification applications that is based upon biometric-like MEMS chips. The MEMS chips have unique frequency signatures resulting from fabrication process variations. The MEMS chips possess something analogous to a "voiceprint". The chips are vacuum encapsulated, rugged, and suitable for low-cost, highvolume mass production. Furthermore, the fabrication process is fully integrated with standard CMOS fabrication methods. One is able to operate the MEMS-based identification system similarly to a conventional RFID system: the reader (essentially a custom network analyzer) detects the power reflected across a frequency spectrum from a MEMS chip in its vicinity. We demonstrate prototype "tags" - MEMS chips placed on a credit card-like substrate - to show how the system could be used in standard identification or authentication applications. We have integrated power scavenging to provide DC bias for the MEMS chips through the use of a 915 MHz source in the reader and a RF-DC conversion circuit on the tag. The system enables a high level of protection against typical RFID hacking attacks. There is no need for signal encryption, so back-end infrastructure is minimal. We believe this system would make a viable low-cost, high-security system for a variety of identification and authentication applications.

  2. Carbon microelectromechanical systems (C-MEMS) based microsupercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Richa; Beidaghi, Majid; Chen, Wei; Wang, Chunlei

    2015-05-01

    The rapid development in miniaturized electronic devices has led to an ever increasing demand for high-performance rechargeable micropower scources. Microsupercapacitors in particular have gained much attention in recent years owing to their ability to provide high pulse power while maintaining long cycle lives. Carbon microelectromechanical systems (C-MEMS) is a powerful approach to fabricate high aspect ratio carbon microelectrode arrays, which has been proved to hold great promise as a platform for energy storage. C-MEMS is a versatile technique to create carbon structures by pyrolyzing a patterned photoresist. Furthermore, different active materials can be loaded onto these microelectrode platforms for further enhancement of the electrochemical performance of the C-MEMS platform. In this article, different techniques and methods in order to enhance C-MEMS based various electrochemical capacitor systems have been discussed, including electrochemical activation of C-MEMS structures for miniaturized supercapacitor applications, integration of carbon nanostructures like carbon nanotubes onto C-MEMS structures and also integration of pseudocapacitive materials such as polypyrrole onto C-MEMS structures.

  3. Polarization Reconfigurable Patch Antenna Using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chun, Donghoon; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    2002-01-01

    The paper demonstrates a nearly square patch antenna integrated with a novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator for reconfiguring the polarization. Experimental results demonstrate that at a fixed frequency, the polarization can be reconfigured, from circular to linear.

  4. Digital reflection holography based systems development for MEMS testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; Liansheng, Sui; Asundi, Anand

    2010-05-01

    MEMS are tiny mechanical devices that are built onto semiconductor chips and are measured in micrometers and nanometers. Testing of MEMS device is an important part in carrying out their functional assessment and reliability analysis. Development of systems based on digital holography (DH) for MEMS inspection and characterization is presented in this paper. Two DH reflection systems, table-top and handheld types, are developed depending on the MEMS measurement requirements and their capabilities are presented. The methodologies for the systems are developed for 3D profile inspection and static & dynamic measurements, which is further integrated with in-house developed software that provides the measurement results in near real time. The applications of the developed systems are demonstrated for different MEMS devices for 3D profile inspection, static deformation/deflection measurements and vibration analysis. The developed systems are well suitable for the testing of MEMS and Microsystems samples, with full-field, static & dynamic inspection as well as to monitor micro-fabrication process.

  5. Advanced MEMS systems for optical communication and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horenstein, M. N.; Stewart, J. B.; Cornelissen, S.; Sumner, R.; Freedman, D. S.; Datta, M.; Kani, N.; Miller, P.

    2011-06-01

    Optical communication and adaptive optics have emerged as two important uses of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) devices based on electrostatic actuation. Each application uses a mirror whose surface is altered by applying voltages of up to 300 V. Previous generations of adaptive-optic mirrors were large (~1 m) and required the use of piezoelectric transducers. Beginning in the mid-1990s, a new class of small MEMS mirrors (~1 cm) were developed. These mirrors are now a commercially available, mature technology. This paper describes three advanced applications of MEMS mirrors. The first is a mirror used for corona-graphic imaging, whereby an interferometric telescope blocks the direct light from a distant star so that nearby objects such as planets can be seen. We have developed a key component of the system: a 144-channel, fully-scalable, high-voltage multiplexer that reduces power consumption to only a few hundred milliwatts. In a second application, a MEMS mirror comprises part of a two-way optical communication system in which only one node emits a laser beam. The other node is passive, incorporating a retro-reflective, electrostatic MEMS mirror that digitally encodes the reflected beam. In a third application, the short (~100-ns) pulses of a commercially-available laser rangefinder are returned by the MEMS mirror as a digital data stream. Suitable low-power drive systems comprise part of the system design.

  6. Failure analysis issues in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2005-07-01

    Failure analysis and device characterization of MEMS components are critical steps in understanding the root causes of failure and improving device performance. At the wafer and die level these tasks can be performed with little or no sample preparation. Larger challenges occur after fabrication when the device is packaged, capped, sealed, or otherwise obstructed from view. The challenges and issues of MEMS failure analysis lie in identifying the root cause of failure for these packaged, capped, and sealed devices without perturbing the device or its immediate environment. Novel methods of gaining access to the device or preparing the device for analysis are crucial to accurately determining the root cause of failure. This paper will discuss issues identified in performing root cause failure analysis of packaged MEMS devices, as well as the methods employed to analyze them.

  7. Reconfigurable Array Antenna Using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chun, Donghoon; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper demonstrates a patch antenna integrated with a novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator for reconfiguring the operating frequency. Experimental results demonstrate that the center frequency can be reconfigured by as much as 1.6 percent of the nominal operating frequency at K-Band In addition, a novel on-wafer antenna pattern measurement technique is demonstrated.

  8. Development of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) forceps for intraocular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhisitkul, R B; Keller, C G

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To develop silicon microforceps for intraocular surgery using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology, the application of microchip fabrication techniques for the production of controllable three dimensional devices on the micrometre scale. Methods: Prototype MEMS forceps were designed and manufactured for intraocular surgery. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate device tip construction. Designs using both thermal expansion actuators and conventional mechanical activation were tested in human cadaver eyes and in vivo rabbit eyes to assess functionality in standard vitreoretinal surgery. Results: MEMS forceps were constructed with various tip designs ranging from 100 μm to 2 mm in length. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed accurate construction of micro features such as forceps teeth as small as tens of micrometres. In surgical testing, the silicon forceps tips were effective in surgical manoeuvres, including grasping retinal membranes and excising tissue. The mechanical actuator design on a 20 gauge handle was more operational in the intraocular environment than the thermal expansion actuator design. While handheld operation was possible, the precision of the forceps was best exploited when mounted on a three axis micromanipulator. Conclusion: MEMS microforceps are feasible for conventional vitreoretinal surgery, and offer advances in terms of small scale, operating precision, and construction tolerance. PMID:16299136

  9. Wearable Wireless Telemetry System for Implantable BioMEMS Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Renita E.

    2008-01-01

    Telemetry systems of a type that have been proposed for the monitoring of physiological functions in humans would include the following subsystems: Surgically implanted or ingested units that would comprise combinations of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)- based sensors [bioMEMS sensors] and passive radio-frequency (RF) readout circuits that would include miniature loop antennas. Compact radio transceiver units integrated into external garments for wirelessly powering and interrogating the implanted or ingested units. The basic principles of operation of these systems are the same as those of the bioMEMS-sensor-unit/external-RFpowering- and-interrogating-unit systems described in "Printed Multi-Turn Loop Antennas for Biotelemetry" (LEW-17879-1) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 6 (June 2007), page 48, and in the immediately preceding article, "Hand-Held Units for Short-Range Wireless Biotelemetry" (LEW-17483-1). The differences between what is reported here and what was reported in the cited prior articles lie in proposed design features and a proposed mode of operation. In a specific system of the type now proposed, the sensor unit would comprise mainly a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor located in the annular region of a loop antenna (more specifically, a square spiral inductor/ antenna), all fabricated as an integral unit on a high-resistivity silicon chip. The capacitor electrodes, the spiral inductor/antenna, and the conductor lines interconnecting them would all be made of gold. The dimensions of the sensor unit have been estimated to be about 110.4 mm. The external garment-mounted powering/ interrogating unit would include a multi-turn loop antenna and signal-processing circuits. During operation, this external unit would be positioned in proximity to the implanted or ingested unit to provide for near-field, inductive coupling between the loop antennas, which we have as the primary and secondary windings of an electrical transformer.

  10. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuator for Reconfigurable Patch Antenna Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2001-01-01

    A microstrip patch antenna with two contact actuators along the radiating edges for frequency reconfiguration was demonstrated at K-band frequencies. The layout of the antenna is shown in the following figure. This antenna has the following advantages over conventional semiconductor varactor-diode-tuned patch antennas: 1. By eliminating the semiconductor diode and its nonlinear I-V characteristics, the antenna minimizes intermodulation signal distortion. This is particularly important in digital wireless systems, which are sensitive to intersymbol interference caused by intermodulation products. 2. Because the MEMS actuator is an electrostatic device, it does not draw any current during operation and, hence, requires a negligible amount of power for actuation. This is an important advantage for hand-held, battery-operated, portable wireless systems since the battery does not need to be charged frequently. 3. The MEMS actuator does not require any special epitaxial layers as in the case of diodes and, hence, is cost effective.

  11. Opportunities and challenges for MEMS technology in Army missile systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    1999-07-01

    The military market drives the thrust for the development of robust, high performance MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control systems, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, aerodynamic flow control, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Army missile applications will be a fertile market for MEMS products, such as MEMS-based inertial sensors. MEMS technology should significantly enhance performance and provide more robust mission capability in applications where arrays of MEMS devices are required. The Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center is working diligently with other government agencies, academia, and industry to develop high performing MEMS devices to withstand shock, vibration, temperature, humidity, and long-term storage conditions often encountered by Army missile systems. The goals of the ongoing DARPA MEMS technology programs will meet a significant portion of the Army missile systems requirements. In lieu of presenting an all-inclusive review of Army MEMS applications, this paper addresses a number of opportunities and associated challenges for MEMS systems operating in military environments. Near term applications and the less mature, high-risk applications of MEMS devices are addressed.

  12. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira

    2015-05-01

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  13. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    SciTech Connect

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira

    2015-05-15

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  14. Controlling Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, D.; Schneider, W.; Osiander, R.; Champion, J. L.; Darrin, A. G.; Douglas, D.; Swanson, T. D.

    2003-01-01

    Small spacecraft, including micro and nanosats, as they are envisioned for future missions, will require an alternative means to achieve thermal control due to their small power and mass budgets. One of the proposed alternatives is Variable Emittance (Vari-E) Coatings for spacecraft radiators. Space Technology-5 (ST-5) is a technology demonstration mission through NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) that will utilize Vari-E Coatings. This mission involves a constellation of three (3) satellites in a highly elliptical orbit with a perigee altitude of ~200 km and an apogee of ~38,000 km. Such an environment will expose the spacecraft to a wide swing in the thermal and radiation environment of the earth's atmosphere. There are three (3) different technologies associated with this mission. The three technologies are electrophoretic, electrochromic, and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The ultimate goal is to make use of Vari-E coatings, in order to achieve various levels of thermal control. The focus of this paper is to highlight the Vari-E Coating MEMS instrument, with an emphasis on the Electronic Control Unit responsible for operating the MEMS device. The Test & Evaluation approach, along with the results, is specific for application on ST-5, yet the information provides a guideline for future experiments and/or thermal applications on the exterior structure of a spacecraft.

  15. Uncertainty quantification in capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pax, Benjamin J.

    Development of radio frequency micro electrical-mechanical systems (RF MEMS) has led to novel approaches to implement electrical circuitry. The introduction of capacitive MEMS switches, in particular, has shown promise in low-loss, low-power devices. However, the promise of MEMS switches has not yet been completely realized. RF-MEMS switches are known to fail after only a few months of operation, and nominally similar designs show wide variability in lifetime. Modeling switch operation using nominal or as-designed parameters cannot predict the statistical spread in the number of cycles to failure, and probabilistic methods are necessary. A Bayesian framework for calibration, validation and prediction offers an integrated approach to quantifying the uncertainty in predictions of MEMS switch performance. The objective of this thesis is to use the Bayesian framework to predict the creep-related deflection of the PRISM RF-MEMS switch over several thousand hours of operation. The PRISM switch used in this thesis is the focus of research at Purdue's PRISM center, and is a capacitive contacting RF-MEMS switch. It employs a fixed-fixed nickel membrane which is electrostatically actuated by applying voltage between the membrane and a pull-down electrode. Creep plays a central role in the reliability of this switch. The focus of this thesis is on the creep model, which is calibrated against experimental data measured for a frog-leg varactor fabricated and characterized at Purdue University. Creep plasticity is modeled using plate element theory with electrostatic forces being generated using either parallel plate approximations where appropriate, or solving for the full 3D potential field. For the latter, structure-electrostatics interaction is determined through immersed boundary method. A probabilistic framework using generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) is used to create surrogate models to mitigate the costly full physics simulations, and Bayesian calibration and forward

  16. Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) Pressure Sensor for Footwear

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Galambos, Paul C.; Wheeler, Jason W.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Givler, Richard C.

    2008-09-23

    Footwear comprises a sole and a plurality of sealed cavities contained within the sole. The sealed cavities can be incorporated as deformable containers within an elastic medium, comprising the sole. A plurality of micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensors are respectively contained within the sealed cavity plurality, and can be adapted to measure static and dynamic pressure within each of the sealed cavities. The pressure measurements can provide information relating to the contact pressure distribution between the sole of the footwear and the wearer's environment.

  17. A MEMS-based miniature DNA analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.; Gonzalez, C.; Hadley, D.

    1995-04-25

    We detail the design and development of a miniature thermal cycling instrument for performing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that uses microfabricated, silicon-based reaction chambers. The MEMS-based, battery-operated instrument shows significant improvements over commercial thermal cycling instrumentation. Several different biological systems have been amplified and verified with the miniature PCR instrument including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus; both cloned and genomic DNA templates of {beta} globin; and the genetic disease, Cystic Fibrosis from human DNA. The miniaturization of a PCR thermal cycler is the initial module of a fully-integrated portable, low-power, rapid, and highly efficient bioanalytical instrument.

  18. MEMS- and NEMS-based smart devices and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2001-11-01

    The microelectronics industry has seen explosive growth during the last thirty years. Extremely large markets for logic and memory devices have driven the development of new materials, and technologies for the fabrication of even more complex devices with features sized now don at the sub micron and nanometer level. Recent interest has arisen in employing these materials, tools and technologies for the fabrication of miniature sensors and actuators and their integration with electronic circuits to produce smart devices and systems. This effort offers the promise of: 1) increasing the performance and manufacturability of both sensors and actuators by exploiting new batch fabrication processes developed including micro stereo lithographic an micro molding techniques; 2) developing novel classes of materials and mechanical structures not possible previously, such as diamond like carbon, silicon carbide and carbon nanotubes, micro-turbines and micro-engines; 3) development of technologies for the system level and wafer level integration of micro components at the nanometer precision, such as self-assembly techniques and robotic manipulation; 4) development of control and communication systems for MEMS devices, such as optical and RF wireless, and power delivery systems, etc. A novel composite structure can be tailored by functionalizing carbon nano tubes and chemically bonding them with the polymer matrix e.g. block or graft copolymer, or even cross-linked copolymer, to impart exceptional structural, electronic and surface properties. Bio- and Mechanical-MEMS devices derived from this hybrid composite provide a new avenue for future smart systems. The integration of NEMS (NanoElectroMechanical Systems), MEMS, IDTs (Interdigital Transducers) and required microelectronics and conformal antenna in the multifunctional smart materials and composites results in a smart system suitable for sensing and control of a variety functions in automobile, aerospace, marine and civil

  19. Research on MEMS sensor in hydraulic system flow detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Yindong; Liu, Dong; Ji, Yulong; Jiang, Jihai; Sun, Yuqing

    2010-12-01

    With the development of mechatronics technology and fault diagnosis theory, people regard flow information much more than before. Cheap, fast and accurate flow sensors are urgently needed by hydraulic industry. So MEMS sensor, which is small, low cost, well performed and easy to integrate, will surely play an important role in this field. Based on the new method of flow measurement which was put forward by our research group, this paper completed the measurement of flow rate in hydraulic system by setting up the mathematical model, using numerical simulation method and doing physical experiment. Based on viscous fluid flow equations we deduced differential pressure-velocity model of this new sensor and did optimization on parameters. Then, we designed and manufactured the throttle and studied the velocity and pressure field inside the sensor by FLUENT. Also in simulation we get the differential pressure-velocity curve .The model machine was simulated too to direct experiment. In the static experiments we calibrated the MEMS sensing element and built some sample sensors. Then in a hydraulic testing system we compared the sensor signal with a turbine meter. It presented good linearity and could meet general hydraulic system use. Based on the CFD curves, we analyzed the error reasons and made some suggestion to improve. In the dynamic test, we confirmed this sensor can realize high frequency flow detection by a 7 piston-pump.

  20. Research on MEMS sensor in hydraulic system flow detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Yindong; Liu, Dong; Ji, Yulong; Jiang, Jihai; Sun, Yuqing

    2011-05-01

    With the development of mechatronics technology and fault diagnosis theory, people regard flow information much more than before. Cheap, fast and accurate flow sensors are urgently needed by hydraulic industry. So MEMS sensor, which is small, low cost, well performed and easy to integrate, will surely play an important role in this field. Based on the new method of flow measurement which was put forward by our research group, this paper completed the measurement of flow rate in hydraulic system by setting up the mathematical model, using numerical simulation method and doing physical experiment. Based on viscous fluid flow equations we deduced differential pressure-velocity model of this new sensor and did optimization on parameters. Then, we designed and manufactured the throttle and studied the velocity and pressure field inside the sensor by FLUENT. Also in simulation we get the differential pressure-velocity curve .The model machine was simulated too to direct experiment. In the static experiments we calibrated the MEMS sensing element and built some sample sensors. Then in a hydraulic testing system we compared the sensor signal with a turbine meter. It presented good linearity and could meet general hydraulic system use. Based on the CFD curves, we analyzed the error reasons and made some suggestion to improve. In the dynamic test, we confirmed this sensor can realize high frequency flow detection by a 7 piston-pump.

  1. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Broadband Light Source Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.

    2003-01-01

    A miniature, low-power broadband light source has been developed for aerospace applications, including calibrating spectrometers and powering miniature optical sensors. The initial motivation for this research was based on flight tests of a Fabry-Perot fiberoptic temperature sensor system used to detect aircraft engine exhaust gas temperature. Although the feasibility of the sensor system was proven, the commercial light source optically powering the device was identified as a critical component requiring improvement. Problems with the light source included a long stabilization time (approximately 1 hr), a large amount of heat generation, and a large input electrical power (6.5 W). Thus, we developed a new light source to enable the use of broadband optical sensors in aerospace applications. Semiconductor chip-based light sources, such as lasers and light-emitting diodes, have a relatively narrow range of emission wavelengths in comparison to incandescent sources. Incandescent light sources emit broadband radiation from visible to infrared wavelengths; the intensity at each wavelength is determined by the filament temperature and the materials chosen for the filament and the lamp window. However, present commercial incandescent light sources are large in size and inefficient, requiring several watts of electrical power to obtain the desired optical power, and they emit a large percentage of the input power as heat that must be dissipated. The miniature light source, developed jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Lighting Innovations Institute, requires one-fifth the electrical input power of some commercial light sources, while providing similar output light power that is easily coupled to an optical fiber. Furthermore, it is small, rugged, and lightweight. Microfabrication technology was used to reduce the size, weight, power consumption, and potential cost-parameters critical to future aerospace applications. This chip

  2. Carbon material based microelectromechanical system (MEMS): Fabrication and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenjun

    This PhD dissertation presents the exploration and development of two carbon materials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon fiber (CF), as either key functional components or unconventional substrates for a variety of MEMS applications. Their performance in three different types of MEMS devices, namely, strain/stress sensors, vibration-powered generators and fiber solar cells, were evaluated and the working mechanisms of these two non-traditional materials in these systems were discussed. The work may potentially enable the development of new types of carbon-MEMS devices. Carbon nanotubes were selected from the carbon family due to several advantageous characteristics that this nanomaterial offers. They carry extremely high mechanical strength (Ey=1TPa), superior electrical properties (current density of 4x109 A/cm2), exceptional piezoresistivity (G=2900), and unique spatial format (high aspect ratio hollow nanocylinder), among other properties. If properly utilized, all these merits can give rise to a variety of new types of carbon nanotube based micro- and nanoelectronics that can greatly fulfill the need for the next generation of faster, smaller and better devices. However, before these functions can be fully realized, one substantial issue to cope with is how to implement CNTs into these systems in an effective and controllable fashion. Challenges associated with CNTs integration include very poor dispersibility in solvents, lack of melting/sublimation point, and unfavorable rheology with regard to mixing and processing highly viscous, CNT-loaded polymer solutions. These issues hinder the practical progress of CNTs both in a lab scale and in the industrial level. To this end, a MEMS-assisted electrophoretic deposition technique was developed, aiming to achieve controlled integration of CNT into both conventional and flexible microsystems at room temperature with a relatively high throughput. MEMS technology has demonstrated strong capability in developing

  3. MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) for Automotive and Consumer Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Jiri; Gómez, Udo-Martin

    MEMS sensors gained over the last two decades an impressive width of applications: (a) ESP: A car is skidding and stabilizes itself without driver intervention (b) Free-fall detection: A laptop falls to the floor and protects the hard drive by parking the read/write drive head automatically before impact. (c) Airbag: An airbag fires before the driver/occupant involved in an impending automotive crash impacts the steering wheel, thereby significantly reducing physical injury risk. MEMS sensors are sensing the environmental conditions and are giving input to electronic control systems. These crucial MEMS sensors are making system reactions to human needs more intelligent, precise, and at much faster reaction rates than humanly possible. Important prerequisites for the success of sensors are their size, functionality, power consumption, and costs. This technical progress in sensor development is realized by micro-machining. The development of these processes was the breakthrough to industrial mass-production for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Besides leading-edge micromechanical processes, innovative and robust ASIC designs, thorough simulations of the electrical and mechanical behaviour, a deep understanding of the interactions (mainly over temperature and lifetime) of the package and the mechanical structures are needed. This was achieved over the last 20 years by intense and successful development activities combined with the experience of volume production of billions of sensors. This chapter gives an overview of current MEMS technology, its applications and the market share. The MEMS processes are described, and the challenges of MEMS, compared to standard IC fabrication, are discussed. The evolution of MEMS requirements is presented, and a short survey of MEMS applications is shown. Concepts of newest inertial sensors for ESP-systems are given with an emphasis on the design concepts of the sensing element and the evaluation circuit for achieving

  4. Wearable Wireless Telemetry System for Implantable Bio-MEMS Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Renita E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The wearable garment pick-up antenna and the implantable chip antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry, the relative RF magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the distance and angle, and the current density on the strip conductors, for the implantable chip antenna.

  5. Wearable wireless telemetry system for implantable bio-MEMS sensors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Rainee N; Miranda, Félix A; Wilson, Jeffrey D; Simons, Renita E

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The implantable chip antenna and the wearable garment pick-up antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry and the relative magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the angle, for the implantable chip antenna.

  6. Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Based Microfluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Muhammad Waseem; Tayyaba, Shahzadi; Afzulpurkar, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) based microfluidic devices have gained popularity in biomedicine field over the last few years. In this paper, a comprehensive overview of microfluidic devices such as micropumps and microneedles has been presented for biomedical applications. The aim of this paper is to present the major features and issues related to micropumps and microneedles, e.g., working principles, actuation methods, fabrication techniques, construction, performance parameters, failure analysis, testing, safety issues, applications, commercialization issues and future prospects. Based on the actuation mechanisms, the micropumps are classified into two main types, i.e., mechanical and non-mechanical micropumps. Microneedles can be categorized according to their structure, fabrication process, material, overall shape, tip shape, size, array density and application. The presented literature review on micropumps and microneedles will provide comprehensive information for researchers working on design and development of microfluidic devices for biomedical applications. PMID:21747700

  7. Wearable wireless telemetry system for implantable bio-MEMS sensors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Rainee N; Miranda, Félix A; Wilson, Jeffrey D; Simons, Renita E

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The implantable chip antenna and the wearable garment pick-up antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry and the relative magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the angle, for the implantable chip antenna. PMID:17946365

  8. The Development of a Portable Hard Disk Encryption/Decryption System with a MEMS Coded Lock

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wenyuan; Tang, Jian; Xu, Peng; Li, Yibin; Li, Shengyong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a novel portable hard-disk encryption/decryption system with a MEMS coded lock is presented, which can authenticate the user and provide the key for the AES encryption/decryption module. The portable hard-disk encryption/decryption system is composed of the authentication module, the USB portable hard-disk interface card, the ATA protocol command decoder module, the data encryption/decryption module, the cipher key management module, the MEMS coded lock controlling circuit module, the MEMS coded lock and the hard disk. The ATA protocol circuit, the MEMS control circuit and AES encryption/decryption circuit are designed and realized by FPGA(Field Programmable Gate Array). The MEMS coded lock with two couplers and two groups of counter-meshing-gears (CMGs) are fabricated by a LIGA-like process and precision engineering method. The whole prototype was fabricated and tested. The test results show that the user's password could be correctly discriminated by the MEMS coded lock, and the AES encryption module could get the key from the MEMS coded lock. Moreover, the data in the hard-disk could be encrypted or decrypted, and the read-write speed of the dataflow could reach 17 MB/s in Ultra DMA mode. PMID:22291566

  9. MEMS Microshutter Array System for James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J.; Adachi, Tomoko; Allen, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Bajikar, Sateesh; Beamesderfer, Michael; Bradley, Ruth; Denis, Kevin; Costen, Nick; Ewin, Audrey; Franz, Dave; Hess, Larry; Hu, Ron; Jackson, Kamili; Jhabvala, Murzy; Kelly, Dan; King, Todd; Kletetschka, Gunther; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lynch, Barney; Miller, Timothy; Moseley, Harvey; Mikula, Vilem; Mott. Brent; Oh, Lance

    2008-01-01

    A complex MEMS microshutter array system has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for use as a multi-object aperture array for a Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec). The NIRSpec is one of the four major instruments carried by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next generation of space telescope after the Hubble Space Telescope retires. The microshutter arrays (MSAs) are designed for the selective transmission of light with high efficiency and high contrast. It is demonstrated in Figure 1 how a MSA is used as a multiple object selector in deep space. The MSAs empower the NIRSpec instrument simultaneously collect spectra from more than 100 targets therefore increases the instrument efficiency 100 times or more. The MSA assembly is one of three major innovations on JWST and the first major MEMS devices serving observation missions in space. The MSA system developed at NASA GSFC is assembled with four quadrant fully addressable 365x171 shutter arrays that are actuated magnetically, latched and addressed electrostatically. As shown in Figure 2, each MSA is fabricated out of a 4' silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer using MEMS bulk-micromachining technology. Individual shutters are close-packed silicon nitride membranes with a pixel size close to 100x200 pm (Figure 3). Shutters are patterned with a torsion flexure permitting shutters to open 90 degrees with a minimized mechanical stress concentration. In order to prevent light leak, light shields are made on to the surrounding frame of each shutter to cover the gaps between the shutters and the Game (Figure 4). Micro-ribs and sub-micron bumps are tailored on hack walls and light shields, respectively, to prevent sticktion, shown in Figures 4 and 5. JWST instruments are required to operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 35K, though they are to be subjected to various levels of ground tests at room temperature. The shutters should therefore maintain nearly flat in the entire temperature range

  10. MEMS compatible illumination and imaging micro-optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer, A.; Dannberg, P.; Duparré, J.; Höfer, B.; Schreiber, P.; Scholles, M.

    2007-01-01

    The development of new MOEMS demands for cooperation between researchers in micromechanics, optoelectronics and microoptics at a very early state. Additionally, microoptical technologies being compatible with structured silicon have to be developed. The microoptical technologies used for two silicon based microsystems are described in the paper. First, a very small scanning laser projector with a volume of less than 2 cm 3, which operates with a directly modulated lasers collimated with a microlens, is shown. The laser radiation illuminates a 2D-MEMS scanning mirror. The optical design is optimized for high resolution (VGA). Thermomechanical stability is realized by design and using a structured ceramics motherboard. Secondly, an ultrathin CMOS-camera having an insect inspired imaging system has been realized. It is the first experimental realization of an artificial compound eye. Micro-optical design principles and technology is used. The overall thickness of the imaging system is only 320 μm, the diagonal field of view is 21°, and the f-number is 2.6. The monolithic device consists of an UV-replicated microlens array upon a thin silica substrate with a pinhole array in a metal layer on the back side. The pitch of the pinholes differs from that of the lens array to provide individual viewing angle for each channel. The imaging chip is directly glued to a CMOS sensor with adapted pitch. The whole camera is less than 1mm thick. New packaging methods for these systems are under development.

  11. MEMS CHIP CO2 SENSOR FOR BUILDING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Anton Carl Greenwald

    2005-09-14

    The objective of this research was to develop an affordable, reliable sensor to enable demand controlled ventilation (DCV). A significant portion of total energy consumption in the United States is used for heating or air conditioning (HVAC) buildings. To assure occupant safety and fresh air levels in large buildings, and especially those with sealed windows, HVAC systems are frequently run in excess of true requirements as automated systems cannot now tell the occupancy level of interior spaces. If such a sensor (e.g. thermostat sized device) were available, it would reduce energy use between 10 and 20% in such buildings. A quantitative measure of ''fresh air'' is the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) present. An inert gas, CO{sub 2} is not easily detected by chemical sensors and is usually measured by infrared spectroscopy. Ion Optics research developed a complete infrared sensor package on a single MEMS chip. It contains the infrared (IR) source, IR detector and IR filter. The device resulting from this DOE sponsored research has sufficient sensitivity, lifetime, and drift rate to meet the specifications of commercial instrument manufacturers who are now testing the device for use in their building systems.

  12. An integrated thermal compensation system for MEMS inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Sheng-Ren; Teng, Li-Tao; Chao, Jen-Wei; Sue, Chung-Yang; Lin, Chih-Hsiou; Chen, Hong-Ren; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2014-03-04

    An active thermal compensation system for a low temperature-bias-drift (TBD) MEMS-based gyroscope is proposed in this study. First, a micro-gyroscope is fabricated by a high-aspect-ratio silicon-on-glass (SOG) process and vacuum packaged by glass frit bonding. Moreover, a drive/readout ASIC, implemented by the 0.25 µm 1P5M standard CMOS process, is designed and integrated with the gyroscope by directly wire bonding. Then, since the temperature effect is one of the critical issues in the high performance gyroscope applications, the temperature-dependent characteristics of the micro-gyroscope are discussed. Furthermore, to compensate the TBD of the micro-gyroscope, a thermal compensation system is proposed and integrated in the aforementioned ASIC to actively tune the parameters in the digital trimming mechanism, which is designed in the readout ASIC. Finally, some experimental results demonstrate that the TBD of the micro-gyroscope can be compensated effectively by the proposed compensation system.

  13. An Integrated Thermal Compensation System for MEMS Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sheng-Ren; Teng, Li-Tao; Chao, Jen-Wei; Sue, Chung-Yang; Lin, Chih-Hsiou; Chen, Hong-Ren; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2014-01-01

    An active thermal compensation system for a low temperature-bias-drift (TBD) MEMS-based gyroscope is proposed in this study. First, a micro-gyroscope is fabricated by a high-aspect-ratio silicon-on-glass (SOG) process and vacuum packaged by glass frit bonding. Moreover, a drive/readout ASIC, implemented by the 0.25 μm 1P5M standard CMOS process, is designed and integrated with the gyroscope by directly wire bonding. Then, since the temperature effect is one of the critical issues in the high performance gyroscope applications, the temperature-dependent characteristics of the micro-gyroscope are discussed. Furthermore, to compensate the TBD of the micro-gyroscope, a thermal compensation system is proposed and integrated in the aforementioned ASIC to actively tune the parameters in the digital trimming mechanism, which is designed in the readout ASIC. Finally, some experimental results demonstrate that the TBD of the micro-gyroscope can be compensated effectively by the proposed compensation system. PMID:24599191

  14. Technical Challenges in Reliable Microelectronics Packaging of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2000-01-01

    MEMS have shown a significant promise in the last decade for a variety of applications such as air-bag, pressure sensors, accelerometer, microgyro, chemical sensors, artificial nose, etc. Standard semiconductor microelectronics packaging needs the integrated circuits (IC) to be protected from the harsh environment, and provide electrical communication with the other parts of the circuit, facilitate thermal dissipation efficiently, and impart mechanical strength to the silicon die. Microelectronics packaging involves wafer dicing, bonding, lead attachment, encapsulation to protect from the environment, electrical integrity, and package leak tests to assure the reliable IC packaging technology. Active elements or microstructures in MEMS devices often interfaces with the hostile environment where packaging leak tests and testing of such devices using chemical and mechanical parameters will be very difficult and expensive. Packaging of MEMS is significantly complex as they serve to protect from the environment and microstructures interact with the same environment to measure or affect the desired physical or chemical parameters. The most of the silicon circuitry is sensitive to temperature, moisture, magnetic field, light, and electromagnetic interference. The package must then protect the on-board silicon circuitry while simultaneously exposing the microsensor to the effect it measures to assure the packaging technology of MEMS. MEMS technology has a major application in developing a microspacecraft for space systems provided reliability of MEMS packaging technology is sufficiently addressed. This MEMS technology would eventually miniaturize many of the components of the spacecraft to reach the NASA's goal by building faster, cheaper, better, smaller spacecraft to explore the space more effectively. This paper discusses the latest developments in the MEMS technology and challenging technical issues in the packaging of hermetically sealed and non-hermetically sealed

  15. Performance of a MEMS-base Adaptive Optics Optical Coherency Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J; Zadwadzki, R J; Jones, S; Olivier, S; Opkpodu, S; Werner, J S

    2008-01-16

    We have demonstrated that a microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror can be flattened to < 1 nm RMS within controllable spatial frequencies over a 9.2-mm aperture making it a viable option for high-contrast adaptive optics systems (also known as Extreme Adaptive Optics). The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) measures wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy for metrology and wavefront control. Consistent flattening, required testing and characterization of the individual actuator response, including the effects of dead and low-response actuators. Stability and repeatability of the MEMS devices was also tested. An error budget for MEMS closed loop performance will summarize MEMS characterization.

  16. An Integrated MEMS Sensor Cluster System for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, Seun; Scott, Michael A.; Beeler, George B.; Bartlett, James E.; Collins, Richard S.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts to reduce viscous drag on airfoils could results in a considerable saving for the operation of flight vehicles including those of space transportation. This reduction of viscous drag effort requires measurement and active control of boundary layer flow property on an airfoil. Measurement of viscous drag of the boundary layer flow over an airfoil with minimal flow disturbance is achievable with newly developed MEMS sensor clusters. These sensor clusters provide information that can be used to actively control actuators to obtain desired flow properties or design a vehicle to satisfy particular boundary layer flow criteria. A series of MEMS sensor clusters has been developed with a data acquisition and control module for local measurements of shear stress, pressure, and temperature on an airfoil. The sensor cluster consists of two shear stress sensors, two pressure sensors, and two temperature sensors on a surface area of 1.24 mm x 1.86 mm. Each sensor is 300 microns square and is placed on a flexible polyimide sheet. The shear stress sensor is a polysilicon hot-film resistor, which is insulated by a vacuum cavity of 200 x 200 x 2 microns. The pressure sensors are silicon piezoresistive type, and the temperature sensors are also hot film polysilicon resistors. The total size of the cluster including sensors and electrical leads is 1 Omm x 1 Omm x 0.1 mm. A typical sensitivity of shear stress sensor is 150 mV/Pascal, the pressure sensors are an absolute type with a measurement range from 9 to 36 psia with 0.8mV/V/psi sensitivity, and the temperature sensors have a measurement resolution of 0.1 degree C. The sensor clusters are interfaced to a data acquisition and control module that consists of two custom ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) and a micro-controller. The data acquisition and control module transfers data to a host PC that configures and controls a total of three sensor clusters. Functionality of the entire system has been tested in

  17. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) investigation of thermal uniformity in a thermal cycling based calibration chamber for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Xulong; Luo, Xiaobing; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Micro-electrical-mechanical system (MEMS) has become important for many industries such as automotive, home appliance, portable electronics, especially with the emergence of Internet of Things. Volume testing with temperature compensation has been essential in order to provide MEMS based sensors with repeatability, consistency, reliability, and durability, but low cost. Particularly, in the temperature calibration test, temperature uniformity of thermal cycling based calibration chamber becomes more important for obtaining precision sensors, as each sensor is different before the calibration. When sensor samples are loaded into the chamber, we usually open the door of the chamber, then place fixtures into chamber and mount the samples on the fixtures. These operations may affect temperature uniformity in the chamber. In order to study the influencing factors of sample-loading on the temperature uniformity in the chamber during calibration testing, numerical simulation work was conducted first. Temperature field and flow field were simulated in empty chamber, chamber with open door, chamber with samples, and chamber with fixtures, respectively. By simulation, it was found that opening chamber door, sample size and number of fixture layers all have effects on flow field and temperature field. By experimental validation, it was found that the measured temperature value was consistent with the simulated temperature value.

  18. MEMS sensors and wireless telemetry for distributed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Warmack, R.J.; Smith, S.F.

    1998-02-01

    Selectively coated cantilevers are being developed at ORNL for chemical and biological sensing. The sensitivity can exceed that of other electro-mechanical devices as parts-per-trillion detection can be demonstrated for certain species. The authors are now proceeding to develop systems that employ electrically readable microcantilevers in a standard MEMS process and standard CMOS processes. One of their primary areas of interest is chemical sensing for environmental applications. Towards this end, they are presently developing electronic readout of a mercury-sensitive coated cantilever. In order to field arrays of distributed sensors, a wireless network for data reporting is needed. For this, the authors are developing on-chip spread-spectrum encoding and modulation circuitry to improve the robustness and security of sensor data in typical interference- and multipath-impaired environments. They have also provided for a selection of distinct spreading codes to serve groups of sensors in a common environment by the application of code-division multiple-access techniques. Most of the RF circuitry they have designed and fabricated in 0.5 {micro}m CMOS has been tested and verified operational to above 1 GHz. The initial intended operation is for use in the 915 MHz Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) band. This paper presents measured data on the microcantilever-based mercury detector. They also present design data and measurements of the RF telemetry chip.

  19. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) for enzymatic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeetender, Amritsar; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Stiharu, Ion G.; Balagopal, Ganesharam

    2004-08-01

    Early enzymatic identification and confirmation is essential for diagnosis and prevention as in the case of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Biochemical markers continue to be an important clinical tool for the enzymatic detection. The advent of MEMS devices can enable the use of various microstructures for the detection of enzymes. In this study, the concept of MEMS is applied for the detection of enzyme reaction, in which microcantilevers undergo changes in mechanical behavior that can be optically detected when enzyme molecules adsorb on their surface. This paper presents the static behavior of microcantilevers under Horse Radish Peroxide (HRP) enzyme reaction. The reported experimental results provide valuable information that will be useful in the development of MEMS sensors for enzymatic detection. The surface stress produced due to enzyme reactions results in the bending of cantilevers as similar to the influencing of thermal stress in the cantilevers. This paper also reports the influence of thermal gradient on the microcantilevers.

  20. Compliant membranes for the development of MEMS dual-backplate capacitive microphone using the SUMMiT V fabrication process.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, David

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this project is the investigation of compliant membranes for the development of a MicroElectrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS) microphone using the Sandia Ultraplanar, Multilevel MEMS Technology (SUMMiT V) fabrication process. The microphone is a dual-backplate capacitive microphone utilizing electrostatic force feedback. The microphone consists of a diaphragm and two porous backplates, one on either side of the diaphragm. This forms a capacitor between the diaphragm and each backplate. As the incident pressure deflects the diaphragm, the value of each capacitor will change, thus resulting in an electrical output. Feedback may be used in this device by applying a voltage between the diaphragm and the backplates to balance the incident pressure keeping the diaphragm stationary. The SUMMiT V fabrication process is unique in that it can meet the fabrication requirements of this project. All five layers of polysilicon are used in the fabrication of this device. The SUMMiT V process has been optimized to provide low-stress mechanical layers that are ideal for the construction of the microphone's diaphragm. The use of chemical mechanical polishing in the SUMMiT V process results in extremely flat structural layers and uniform spacing between the layers, both of which are critical to the successful fabrication of the MEMS microphone. The MEMS capacitive microphone was fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories and post-processed, packaged, and tested at the University of Florida. The microphone demonstrates a flat frequency response, a linear response up to the designed limit, and a sensitivity that is close to the designed value. Future work will focus on characterization of additional devices, extending the frequency response measurements, and investigating the use of other types of interface circuitry.

  1. Softening and Hardening of a Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) Oscillator in a Nonlinear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sarah; Edmonds, Terrence

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems or MEMS are used in a variety of today's technology and can be modeled using equations for nonlinear damped harmonic oscillators. Mathematical expressions have been formulated to determine resonance frequency shifts as a result of hardening and softening effects in MEMS devices. In this work we experimentally test the previous theoretical analysis of MEMS resonance frequency shifts in the nonlinear regime. Devices were put under low pressure at room temperature and swept through a range of frequencies with varying AC and DC excitation voltages to detect shifts in the resonant frequency. The MEMS device studied in this work exhibits a dominating spring softening effect due to the device's physical make-up. The softening effect becomes very dominant as the AC excitation is increased and the frequency shift of the resonance peak becomes quite significant at these larger excitations. Hardening effects are heavily dependent on mechanical factors that make up the MEMS devices. But they are not present in these MEMS devices. I will present our results along with the theoretical analysis of the Duffing oscillator model. This work was supported by NSF grant DMR-1461019 (REU) and DMR-1205891 (YL).

  2. Wireless remote weather monitoring system based on MEMS technologies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong-Hua; Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chia-Yen

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a wireless remote weather monitoring system based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies comprising sensors for the measurement of temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed and direction, integrated on a single chip. The sensing signals are transmitted between the Octopus II-A sensor nodes using WSN technology, following amplification and analog/digital conversion (ADC). Experimental results show that the resistance of the micro temperature sensor increases linearly with input temperature, with an average TCR (temperature coefficient of resistance) value of 8.2 × 10(-4) (°C(-1)). The resistance of the pressure sensor also increases linearly with air pressure, with an average sensitivity value of 3.5 × 10(-2) (Ω/kPa). The sensitivity to humidity increases with ambient temperature due to the effect of temperature on the dielectric constant, which was determined to be 16.9, 21.4, 27.0, and 38.2 (pF/%RH) at 27 °C, 30 °C, 40 °C, and 50 °C, respectively. The velocity of airflow is obtained by summing the variations in resistor response as airflow passed over the sensors providing sensitivity of 4.2 × 10(-2), 9.2 × 10(-2), 9.7 × 10(-2) (Ω/ms(-1)) with power consumption by the heating resistor of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5 W, respectively. The passage of air across the surface of the flow sensors prompts variations in temperature among each of the sensing resistors. Evaluating these variations in resistance caused by the temperature change enables the measurement of wind direction.

  3. Wireless remote weather monitoring system based on MEMS technologies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong-Hua; Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chia-Yen

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a wireless remote weather monitoring system based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies comprising sensors for the measurement of temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed and direction, integrated on a single chip. The sensing signals are transmitted between the Octopus II-A sensor nodes using WSN technology, following amplification and analog/digital conversion (ADC). Experimental results show that the resistance of the micro temperature sensor increases linearly with input temperature, with an average TCR (temperature coefficient of resistance) value of 8.2 × 10(-4) (°C(-1)). The resistance of the pressure sensor also increases linearly with air pressure, with an average sensitivity value of 3.5 × 10(-2) (Ω/kPa). The sensitivity to humidity increases with ambient temperature due to the effect of temperature on the dielectric constant, which was determined to be 16.9, 21.4, 27.0, and 38.2 (pF/%RH) at 27 °C, 30 °C, 40 °C, and 50 °C, respectively. The velocity of airflow is obtained by summing the variations in resistor response as airflow passed over the sensors providing sensitivity of 4.2 × 10(-2), 9.2 × 10(-2), 9.7 × 10(-2) (Ω/ms(-1)) with power consumption by the heating resistor of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5 W, respectively. The passage of air across the surface of the flow sensors prompts variations in temperature among each of the sensing resistors. Evaluating these variations in resistance caused by the temperature change enables the measurement of wind direction. PMID:22163762

  4. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Teng; Oral, H Sarp; Wang, Yandong; Settlemyer, Bradley W; Atchley, Scott; Yu, Weikuan

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  5. RF Telemetry System for an Implantable Bio-MEMS Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Hall, David G.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a novel miniature inductor and a pick-up antenna for contact less powering and RF telemetry from implantable bio-MEMS sensors are presented. The design of the inductor and the pick-up antenna are discussed. In addition, the measured characteristics at the design frequency of 330 MHz have been shown.

  6. Application of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor in a power radiation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Gao; Jing, Yang; Si, Jiang; Debo, Wang

    2016-08-01

    A power radiation monitoring system based on thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensors is studied. This monitoring system consists of three modules: a data acquisition module, a data processing and display module, and a data sharing module. It can detect the power radiation in the environment and the date information can be processed and shared. The measured results show that the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor and the power radiation monitoring system both have a relatively good linearity. The sensitivity of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor is about 0.101 mV/mW, and the sensitivity of the monitoring system is about 0.038 V/mW. The voltage gain of the monitoring system is about 380 times, which is relatively consistent with the theoretical value. In addition, the low-frequency and low-power module in the monitoring system is adopted in order to reduce the electromagnetic pollution and the power consumption, and this work will extend the application of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor in more areas. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11304158), the Province Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu (No. BK20140890), the Open Research Fund of the Key Laboratory of MEMS of Ministry of Education, Southeast University (No. 3206005302), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (Nos. NY213024, NY215139).

  7. Backside preparation and failure analysis for packaged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walraven, Jeremy A.; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Barr, David L.; Anderson, Richard E.; Kilgo, Alice; Maciel, John J.; Morrison, Richard; Karabudak, Nafiz N.

    2004-12-01

    Failure analysis tools and techniques that identify root cause failure mechanisms are key components to improving MEMS technology. Failure analysis and characterization are relatively simple at the wafer and die level where chip access is straightforward. However, analysis and characterization of packaged parts or components encapsulated with covers, caps, etc may be more cumbersome and lead to problems assessing the root cause of failure. This paper will discuss two methods used to prepare the backside of the package/device to allow for failure analysis and inspection of different MEMS components without removing the cap, cover, or lid on the device and/or the package. One method for backside preparation was grinding and polishing the package for IR inspection. This method involved backfilling the package cavity with epoxy to hold the die in place. The other method involved opening a window through the backside of the package, exposing the die for IR inspection. Failure analysis results showed both methods of backside preparation were successful in revealing the failure mechanisms on two different MEMS technologies.

  8. Backside preparation and failure analysis for packaged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walraven, Jeremy A.; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Barr, David L.; Anderson, Richard E.; Kilgo, Alice; Maciel, John J.; Morrison, Richard; Karabudak, Nafiz N.

    2005-01-01

    Failure analysis tools and techniques that identify root cause failure mechanisms are key components to improving MEMS technology. Failure analysis and characterization are relatively simple at the wafer and die level where chip access is straightforward. However, analysis and characterization of packaged parts or components encapsulated with covers, caps, etc may be more cumbersome and lead to problems assessing the root cause of failure. This paper will discuss two methods used to prepare the backside of the package/device to allow for failure analysis and inspection of different MEMS components without removing the cap, cover, or lid on the device and/or the package. One method for backside preparation was grinding and polishing the package for IR inspection. This method involved backfilling the package cavity with epoxy to hold the die in place. The other method involved opening a window through the backside of the package, exposing the die for IR inspection. Failure analysis results showed both methods of backside preparation were successful in revealing the failure mechanisms on two different MEMS technologies.

  9. Guide to the Marine Education Materials System (MEMS). Educational Series No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammisch, Susan C.; Lanier, James A.

    This guidebook has been prepared to orient persons wishing to use the Marine Education Materials System (MEMS), a project supported by the Office of Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce. Entries to the system were compiled by the education staff of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science.…

  10. Miniaturization of components and systems for space using MEMS-technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönland, Tor-Arne; Rangsten, Pelle; Nese, Martin; Lang, Martin

    2007-06-01

    Development of MEMS-based (micro electro mechanical system) components and subsystems for space applications has been pursued by various research groups and organizations around the world for at least two decades. The main driver for developing MEMS-based components for space is the miniaturization that can be achieved. Miniaturization can not only save orders of magnitude in mass and volume of individual components, but it can also allow increased redundancy, and enable novel spacecraft designs and mission scenarios. However, the commercial breakthrough of MEMS has not occurred within the space business as it has within other branches such as the IT/telecom or automotive industries, or as it has in biotech or life science applications. A main explanation to this is the highly conservative attitude to new technology within the space community. This conservatism is in many senses motivated by a very low risk acceptance in the few and costly space projects that actually ends with a space flight. To overcome this threshold there is a strong need for flight opportunities where reasonable risks can be accepted. Currently there are a few flight opportunities allowing extensive use of new technology in space, but one of the exceptions is the PRISMA program. PRISMA is an international (Sweden, Germany, France, Denmark, Norway, Greece) technology demonstration program with focus on rendezvous and formation flying. It is a two satellite LEO mission with a launch scheduled for the first half of 2009. On PRISMA, a number of novel technologies e.g. RF metrology sensor for Darwin, autonomous formation flying based on GPS and vision-based sensors, ADN-based "green propulsion" will be demonstrated in space for the first time. One of the satellites will also have a miniaturized propulsion system onboard based on MEMS-technology. This novel propulsion system includes two microthruster modules, each including four thrusters with micro- to milli-Newton thrust capability. The novelty

  11. Assessment and Assurance of Microelectronics Packaging Technology of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2000-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have shown a significant promise in the last decade for a variety of applications such as air-bag, pressure sensors, accelerometer, microgyro, etc. Standard semiconductor microelectronics packaging needs the integrated circuits to be protected from the harsh environment, and provide electrical communication with the other parts of the circuit, facilitate thermal dissipation efficiently, and impart mechanical strength to the silicon die. Microelectronics packaging involves wafer dicing, bonding, lead attachment, encapsulation to protect from the environment, electrical integrity, and package leak tests to assure the packaging technology. In the case of MEMS the microstructures (active elements) often interfaces with the hostile environment where packaging leak tests and testing of such devices using chemical and mechanical parameters will be very difficult and expensive. Packaging of MEMS is significantly complex as they serve to protect from the environment and microstructures interact with the same environment to measure or affect the desired physical or chemical parameters. The most of the silicon circuitry is sensitive to temperature, moisture, magnetic field, light, and electromagnetic interference. The package must then protect the on-board silicon circuitry while simultaneously exposing the microsensor to the effect it 'measures to assure the MEMS technology by lowering the risk to zero. MEMS technology has a major application in developing a microspacecraft for space systems provided assurance of MEMS technology is sufficiently addressed nondestructively. This technology would eventually miniaturize many of the components of the spacecraft to reach the NASA's safety and mission assurance goal by building faster, cheaper, better, smaller spacecraft to explore the space more effectively by teaming-up with the other NASA centers using the limited resources available. This paper discusses the latest developments in the MEMS

  12. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Duane E.

    2003-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) using a Stirling thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode or can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly employ techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces, limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration. The MEMS cooler has potential applications across a broad range of industries such as the biomedical, computer, automotive, and aerospace industries. The basic capabilities it provides can be categorized into four key areas: 1) Extended environmental temperature range in harsh environments; 2) Lower operating temperatures for electronics and other components; 3) Precision spatial and temporal thermal control for temperature-sensitive devices; and 4) The enabling of microsystem devices that require active cooling and/or temperature control. The rapidly expanding capabilities of semiconductor processing in general, and microsystems packaging in particular, present a new opportunity to extend Stirling-cycle cooling to the MEMS domain. The comparatively high capacity and efficiency possible with a MEMS Stirling cooler provides a level of active cooling that is impossible at the microscale with current state-of-the-art techniques. The MEMS cooler technology builds on decades of research at Glenn on Stirling-cycle machines, and capitalizes on Glenn s emerging microsystems capabilities.

  13. Robust and versatile software system for optimal design of MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Byung M.; Lee, Sang H.; Huh, Jae S.

    2000-04-01

    A CAD-integrated total design system for MEMS is developed which can perform analysis and design for mechanical performance of a MEMS structure. The software works in a parametric CAD platform and makes users to do from CAD modeling and analysis to design optimization. Basic philosophy is to assure robustness, versatility and user friendliness. To satisfy these requirements; 1) Design variables are selectable directly form CAD model, 2) Commercial codes are utilized as many as available, and 3) Design sensitivity analysis must be simple and robust. Commercial finite element codes and some newly developed modules are integrated in the system for analysis. For design sensitivity analysis, two approaches were implemented: finite difference method and the Taguchi method. The approximate methods adopted seem to be simple and robust, which can be applied to design of complex practical structures. The design sensitivity analysis by finite difference method, with nonlinear programming and trade-off study, gives satisfactory results. The Taguchi method module is integrated for robust optimal design of MEMS structure. Although it is not meant to find the exact optimum point, it is applicable to practical problems where performance characteristics are hard to evaluate, since this does not require any derivative information. Two examples are taken to examine performance of the developed design tool and proposed methodology. It relieves much of the difficulties often met in conventional design works and has shown practicability for structural design of MEMS.

  14. A dynamic system matching technique for improving the accuracy of MEMS gyroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Stubberud, Peter A.; Stubberud, Stephen C.; Stubberud, Allen R.

    2014-12-10

    A classical MEMS gyro transforms angular rates into electrical values through Euler's equations of angular rotation. Production models of a MEMS gyroscope will have manufacturing errors in the coefficients of the differential equations. The output signal of a production gyroscope will be corrupted by noise, with a major component of the noise due to the manufacturing errors. As is the case of the components in an analog electronic circuit, one way of controlling the variability of a subsystem is to impose extremely tight control on the manufacturing process so that the coefficient values are within some specified bounds. This can be expensive and may even be impossible as is the case in certain applications of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensors. In a recent paper [2], the authors introduced a method for combining the measurements from several nominally equal MEMS gyroscopes using a technique based on a concept from electronic circuit design called dynamic element matching [1]. Because the method in this paper deals with systems rather than elements, it is called a dynamic system matching technique (DSMT). The DSMT generates a single output by randomly switching the outputs of several, nominally identical, MEMS gyros in and out of the switch output. This has the effect of 'spreading the spectrum' of the noise caused by the coefficient errors generated in the manufacture of the individual gyros. A filter can then be used to eliminate that part of the spread spectrum that is outside the pass band of the gyro. A heuristic analysis in that paper argues that the DSMT can be used to control the effects of the random coefficient variations. In a follow-on paper [4], a simulation of a DSMT indicated that the heuristics were consistent. In this paper, analytic expressions of the DSMT noise are developed which confirm that the earlier conclusions are valid. These expressions include the various DSMT design parameters and, therefore, can be used as design tools for DSMT

  15. A dynamic system matching technique for improving the accuracy of MEMS gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubberud, Peter A.; Stubberud, Stephen C.; Stubberud, Allen R.

    2014-12-01

    A classical MEMS gyro transforms angular rates into electrical values through Euler's equations of angular rotation. Production models of a MEMS gyroscope will have manufacturing errors in the coefficients of the differential equations. The output signal of a production gyroscope will be corrupted by noise, with a major component of the noise due to the manufacturing errors. As is the case of the components in an analog electronic circuit, one way of controlling the variability of a subsystem is to impose extremely tight control on the manufacturing process so that the coefficient values are within some specified bounds. This can be expensive and may even be impossible as is the case in certain applications of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensors. In a recent paper [2], the authors introduced a method for combining the measurements from several nominally equal MEMS gyroscopes using a technique based on a concept from electronic circuit design called dynamic element matching [1]. Because the method in this paper deals with systems rather than elements, it is called a dynamic system matching technique (DSMT). The DSMT generates a single output by randomly switching the outputs of several, nominally identical, MEMS gyros in and out of the switch output. This has the effect of 'spreading the spectrum' of the noise caused by the coefficient errors generated in the manufacture of the individual gyros. A filter can then be used to eliminate that part of the spread spectrum that is outside the pass band of the gyro. A heuristic analysis in that paper argues that the DSMT can be used to control the effects of the random coefficient variations. In a follow-on paper [4], a simulation of a DSMT indicated that the heuristics were consistent. In this paper, analytic expressions of the DSMT noise are developed which confirm that the earlier conclusions are valid. These expressions include the various DSMT design parameters and, therefore, can be used as design tools for DSMT

  16. Simulation of Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS) for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, J. L.; Barclay, R. B.; Dutta, S. B.; Freund, M. M.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Moseley, S. H.

    2000-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing optical micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) components for potential application in Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) science instruments. In this work, we present an overview of the electro-mechanical simulation of three MEMS components for NGST, which include a reflective micro-mirror array and transmissive microshutter array for aperture control for a near infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrometer and a large aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot tunable filter for a NIR wide field camera. In all cases the device must operate at cryogenic temperatures with low power consumption and low, CMOS compatible, voltages. The goal of our simulation efforts is to adaquately predict both the performance and the reliability of the devices during ground handling, launch, and operation to prevent failures late in the development process and during flight. This goal requires detailed modeling and validation of complex electro-thermal-mechanical interactions and very large non-linear deformations, often involving surface contact. Various parameters such as spatial dimensions and device response are often difficult to measure reliably at these small scales. In addition, these devices are fabricated from a wide variety of materials including surface micro-machined aluminum, reactive ion etched (RIE) silicon nitride, and deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) bulk single crystal silicon. The above broad set of conditions combine to be a formidable challenge for space flight qualification analysis. These simulations represent NASA/GSFC's first attempts at implementing a comprehensive strategy to address complex MEMS structures.

  17. Angle extended linear MEMS scanning system for 3D laser vision sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yajun; Zhang, Yinxin; Yang, Huaidong; Zhu, Pan; Gai, Ye; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Zhanhua

    2016-09-01

    Scanning system is often considered as the most important part for 3D laser vision sensor. In this paper, we propose a method for the optical system design of angle extended linear MEMS scanning system, which has features of huge scanning degree, small beam divergence angle and small spot size for 3D laser vision sensor. The principle of design and theoretical formulas are derived strictly. With the help of software ZEMAX, a linear scanning optical system based on MEMS has been designed. Results show that the designed system can extend scanning angle from ±8° to ±26.5° with a divergence angle small than 3.5 mr, and the spot size is reduced for 4.545 times.

  18. Micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS)-based fiber optic grating sensor for improving weapon stabilization and fire control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sean Z.; Xu, Guoda; Qui, Wei; Lin, Freddie S.; Testa, Robert C.; Mattice, Michael S.

    2000-06-01

    A MEMS-based fiber optic grating sensor (FOGS) for improving weapon stabilization and fire control has been investigated and developed. The technique overwrites two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) onto a polarization-preserving optical fiber core. A MEMS diaphragm is fabricated and integrated with the overlaid FBGs to enhance the performance and reliability of the sensor. A simulation model for the MEMS-FOGS was derived, and simulation results concerning load, angle, strain, and temperature were obtained. The fabricated MEMS diaphragm and the overlaid FBGs are packaged together and mounted on a specially designed cantilever beam system. User-friendly software for sensing system design and data analysis has been developed and can be used to control other sensing systems. The combined multifunctional sensitive. The fully developed sensing system is expected to find applications in fire control, weapon stabilization, and other areas where accurately sensing strain and temperature is critical.

  19. Application of MEMS Accelerometers and Gyroscopes in Fast Steering Mirror Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Yang, Wenshu; Peng, Zhenming; Tang, Tao; Li, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    In a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system, high control bandwidth is the most effective way to enhance the closed-loop performance. However, the control system usually suffers a great deal from mechanical resonances and time delays induced by the low sampling rate of CCDs. To meet the requirements of high precision and load restriction, fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are usually used in traditional FSM tracking control systems. In recent years, the MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope are becoming smaller and lighter and their performance have improved gradually, so that they can be used in a fast steering mirror (FSM) to realize the stabilization of the line-of-sight (LOS) of the control system. Therefore, a tentative approach to implement a CCD-based FSM tracking control system, which uses MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes as feedback components and contains an acceleration loop, a velocity loop and a position loop, is proposed. The disturbance suppression of the proposed method is the product of the error attenuation of the acceleration loop, the velocity loop and the position loop. Extensive experimental results show that the MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes can act the similar role as the FOG with lower cost for stabilizing the LOS of the FSM tracking control system. PMID:27023557

  20. Application of MEMS Accelerometers and Gyroscopes in Fast Steering Mirror Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Yang, Wenshu; Peng, Zhenming; Tang, Tao; Li, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    In a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system, high control bandwidth is the most effective way to enhance the closed-loop performance. However, the control system usually suffers a great deal from mechanical resonances and time delays induced by the low sampling rate of CCDs. To meet the requirements of high precision and load restriction, fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are usually used in traditional FSM tracking control systems. In recent years, the MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope are becoming smaller and lighter and their performance have improved gradually, so that they can be used in a fast steering mirror (FSM) to realize the stabilization of the line-of-sight (LOS) of the control system. Therefore, a tentative approach to implement a CCD-based FSM tracking control system, which uses MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes as feedback components and contains an acceleration loop, a velocity loop and a position loop, is proposed. The disturbance suppression of the proposed method is the product of the error attenuation of the acceleration loop, the velocity loop and the position loop. Extensive experimental results show that the MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes can act the similar role as the FOG with lower cost for stabilizing the LOS of the FSM tracking control system.

  1. Application of MEMS Accelerometers and Gyroscopes in Fast Steering Mirror Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Yang, Wenshu; Peng, Zhenming; Tang, Tao; Li, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    In a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system, high control bandwidth is the most effective way to enhance the closed-loop performance. However, the control system usually suffers a great deal from mechanical resonances and time delays induced by the low sampling rate of CCDs. To meet the requirements of high precision and load restriction, fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are usually used in traditional FSM tracking control systems. In recent years, the MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope are becoming smaller and lighter and their performance have improved gradually, so that they can be used in a fast steering mirror (FSM) to realize the stabilization of the line-of-sight (LOS) of the control system. Therefore, a tentative approach to implement a CCD-based FSM tracking control system, which uses MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes as feedback components and contains an acceleration loop, a velocity loop and a position loop, is proposed. The disturbance suppression of the proposed method is the product of the error attenuation of the acceleration loop, the velocity loop and the position loop. Extensive experimental results show that the MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes can act the similar role as the FOG with lower cost for stabilizing the LOS of the FSM tracking control system. PMID:27023557

  2. Dynamics simulation of MEMS device embedded-hard-disk-drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiaping; Chai, Jie; Lim, Boon Baun; Chen, Shixin

    2002-04-01

    Currently, hard disk drives (HHD) use rotating disks to store digital data and magnetic recording heads are flying on the disk to read/write data. The recording heads are mounted on a slider- suspension assembly, which makes heads move from one track to another on the disk. The heads movement is controlled by close-loop feedback servo system. It is well known that dynamic behaviors of head-slider-suspension-assembly (HSA) system are of great influence on the track per inch capacity of HDD1,2. As the problem is structurally complex, it is usually investigated using experimental methods or finite element simulation models 3. Furthermore, the dual-stage servo system, that is, a conventional VCM as the primary stage and a MEMS actuator as the secondary stage for MEMS device embedded HAS, has resulted in more difficulties in predicting HDD dynamic performance. This paper presents studies of the problem using macromodeling simulation approach. It applies efficient FEM based sub-structuring synthesis (SSS)4 and fast boundary element method (BEM) approaches incorporated with system dynamics technology to investigate dynamic characteristics of MEMS actuator embedded HAS system for HDD.

  3. The application of multilayer elastic beam in MEMS safe and arming system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guozhong Shi, Gengchen; Sui, Li; Yi, Futing; Wang, Bo

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, a new approach for a multilayer elastic beam to provide a driving force and driving distance for a MEMS safe and arming system is presented. In particular this is applied where a monolayer elastic beam cannot provide adequate driving force and driving distance at the same time in limited space. Compared with thicker elastic beams, the bilayer elastic beam can provide twice the driving force of a monolayer beam to guarantee the MEMS safe and arming systems work reliably without decreasing the driving distance. In this paper, the theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental verification of the multilayer elastic beam is presented. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the bilayer elastic provides 1.8–2 times the driving force of a monolayer, and a method that improves driving force without reducing the driving distance.

  4. Monitoring the performance of geosynthetic materials within pavement systems using MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attoh-Okine, Nii O.; Ayenu-Prah, Albert Y.; Mensah, Stephen A.

    2005-05-01

    Geosynthetic materials have found useful applications when unbound aggregates have been placed on cohesive soil with very weak subgrade. They have also been successfully used in retarding reflective cracking in both flexible and composite pavements. There are many applications of geosynthetics in pavement engineering yet there is considerable lack of understanding in the behavior of the material. Geosynthetic materials exhibit very peculiar properties in the area of tensile strength and reinforcement. MEMS are miniature sensing or actuating devices that can interact with other environments (provided no adverse reaction occurs) to either obtain information or alter it. With remote query capability, it appears such devices can be embedded in pavement systems as testing and monitoring tools. The aim of this paper is to propose both field and laboratory methods for monitoring geotextile performance using MEMS.

  5. Radio Frequency (RF) Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Switches for Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Scardelletti, Maximillian C.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) is an emerging technology for radio frequency (RF) systems because it has the potential to dramatically decrease loss and improve efficiency. In this paper, we address the design and fabrication of novel MEMS switches being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. Two types of switches are being developed: a microstrip series single pole single throw (SPST) switch and a coplanar waveguide (CPW) series SPST and single pole double throw (SPDT) switches. These are being fabricated as an integral part of 50 Ohm microstrip and CPW RF integrated circuits using microfabrication techniques. The construction of the switch relies on a cantilever beam that is partially supported by a dielectric post. The cantilever beam is electro-magnetically actuated. To decrease stiction, a Si3N4 thin film is deposited over the contact area. Thus, when the switch is closed, the ON-state insertion loss is governed by the parallel plate capacitance formed by the two contacts. The isolation in the OFF-state is governed by the parasitic capacitance when the cantilever is in the up position. RF MEMS switches have been demonstrated with 80% lower insertion loss than conventional solid state devices (GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) and Silicon PIN diodes) based switches. For example, a conventional GaAs five-bit phase shifter which is required for beam steering in a phased array antenna has approximately 7 dB of insertion loss at 26.5 GHz where as a comparable MEMS based phase shifter is expected to have only 2 dB of insertion loss. This translates into 56% lower power dissipation and therefore decreases the thermal load on the spacecraft and also reduces the power amplifier requirements. These benefits will enable NASA to build the next generation of deep space science crafts and micro/nano satellites.

  6. Experimental Identification of Smartphones Using Fingerprints of Built-In Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Gianmarco; Steri, Gary; Dimc, Franc; Giuliani, Raimondo; Kamnik, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The correct identification of smartphones has various applications in the field of security or the fight against counterfeiting. As the level of sophistication in counterfeit electronics increases, detection procedures must become more accurate but also not destructive for the smartphone under testing. Some components of the smartphone are more likely to reveal their authenticity even without a physical inspection, since they are characterized by hardware fingerprints detectable by simply examining the data they provide. This is the case of MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems) components like accelerometers and gyroscopes, where tiny differences and imprecisions in the manufacturing process determine unique patterns in the data output. In this paper, we present the experimental evaluation of the identification of smartphones through their built-in MEMS components. In our study, three different phones of the same model are subject to repeatable movements (composing a repeatable scenario) using an high precision robotic arm. The measurements from MEMS for each repeatable scenario are collected and analyzed. The identification algorithm is based on the extraction of the statistical features of the collected data for each scenario. The features are used in a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the smartphone. The results of the evaluation are presented for different combinations of features and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) outputs, which show that detection accuracy of higher than 90% is achievable. PMID:27271630

  7. Experimental Identification of Smartphones Using Fingerprints of Built-In Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

    PubMed

    Baldini, Gianmarco; Steri, Gary; Dimc, Franc; Giuliani, Raimondo; Kamnik, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The correct identification of smartphones has various applications in the field of security or the fight against counterfeiting. As the level of sophistication in counterfeit electronics increases, detection procedures must become more accurate but also not destructive for the smartphone under testing. Some components of the smartphone are more likely to reveal their authenticity even without a physical inspection, since they are characterized by hardware fingerprints detectable by simply examining the data they provide. This is the case of MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems) components like accelerometers and gyroscopes, where tiny differences and imprecisions in the manufacturing process determine unique patterns in the data output. In this paper, we present the experimental evaluation of the identification of smartphones through their built-in MEMS components. In our study, three different phones of the same model are subject to repeatable movements (composing a repeatable scenario) using an high precision robotic arm. The measurements from MEMS for each repeatable scenario are collected and analyzed. The identification algorithm is based on the extraction of the statistical features of the collected data for each scenario. The features are used in a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the smartphone. The results of the evaluation are presented for different combinations of features and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) outputs, which show that detection accuracy of higher than 90% is achievable. PMID:27271630

  8. Experimental Identification of Smartphones Using Fingerprints of Built-In Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

    PubMed

    Baldini, Gianmarco; Steri, Gary; Dimc, Franc; Giuliani, Raimondo; Kamnik, Roman

    2016-06-03

    The correct identification of smartphones has various applications in the field of security or the fight against counterfeiting. As the level of sophistication in counterfeit electronics increases, detection procedures must become more accurate but also not destructive for the smartphone under testing. Some components of the smartphone are more likely to reveal their authenticity even without a physical inspection, since they are characterized by hardware fingerprints detectable by simply examining the data they provide. This is the case of MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems) components like accelerometers and gyroscopes, where tiny differences and imprecisions in the manufacturing process determine unique patterns in the data output. In this paper, we present the experimental evaluation of the identification of smartphones through their built-in MEMS components. In our study, three different phones of the same model are subject to repeatable movements (composing a repeatable scenario) using an high precision robotic arm. The measurements from MEMS for each repeatable scenario are collected and analyzed. The identification algorithm is based on the extraction of the statistical features of the collected data for each scenario. The features are used in a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the smartphone. The results of the evaluation are presented for different combinations of features and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) outputs, which show that detection accuracy of higher than 90% is achievable.

  9. Commercial-Off-The-Shelf Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Flow-Measurement Probes Fabricated And Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip

    2002-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional tubing instrumentation for measuring airflow, designers and technicians at the NASA Glenn Research Center have been fabricating packaging components and assembling a set of unique probes using commercial-off-the-shelf microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) integrated circuits (computer chips). Using MEMS as an alternative has some compelling advantages over standard measurement devices. Sensor technologies have matured through high-production usage in industries such as automotive and aircraft manufacturers. Currently, MEMS are the choice in applications such as tire pressure monitors, altimeters, pneumatic controls, cable leak detectors, and consumer appliances. Conventional instrumentation uses tubing buried in the model aerodynamic surfaces or wind tunnel walls. The measurements are made when pressure is introduced at the tube opening. The pressure then must travel the tubing for lengths ranging from 20 to hundreds of feet before reaching an electronic signal conditioner. This condition causes a considerable amount of damping and requires measurements to be made only after the test rig has reached steady-state operation. The electronic MEMS pressure sensor is able to take readings continuously under dynamic states in nearly real time. The use of stainless steel tubing for pressure measurements requires many tubes to be cleaned, cut to length, carefully installed, and delicately deburred and spliced for use. A cluster of a few hundred 1/16-in.- (0.0625-in.-) diameter tubes (not uncommon in research testing facilities) can be several inches in diameter and may weigh enough to require two men to handle. Replacing hard tubing with electronic chips can eliminate much of the bulk. Each sensor would fit on the tip of the 1/16-in. tubing with room to spare. The P592 piezoresistive silicon pressure sensor (Lucas NovaSensor, Fremont, CA) was chosen for this project because of its cost, availability, and tolerance to extreme ambient

  10. Infrastructure, Technology and Applications of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Jakubczak, J.F.; Krygowski, T.W.; Miller, S.L.; Montague, S.; Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1999-07-09

    A review is made of the infrastructure, technology and capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories for the development of micromechanical systems. By incorporating advanced fabrication processes, such as chemical mechanical polishing, and several mechanical polysilicon levels, the range of micromechanical systems that can be fabricated in these technologies is virtually limitless. Representative applications include a micro-engine driven mirror, and a micromachined lock. Using a novel integrated MEMS/CMOS technology, a six degree-of-freedom accelerometer/gyroscope system has been designed by researchers at U.C. Berkeley and fabricated on the same silicon chip as the CMOS control circuits to produce an integrated micro-navigational unit.

  11. System-in Package of Integrated Humidity Sensor Using CMOS-MEMS Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2015-10-01

    Temperature/humidity microchips with micropump were fabricated using a CMOS-MEMS process and combined with ZigBee modules to implement a sensor system in package (SIP) for a ubiquitous sensor network (USN) and/or a wireless communication system. The current of a diode temperature sensor to temperature and a normalized current of FET humidity sensor to relative humidity showed linear characteristics, respectively, and the use of the micropump has enabled a faster response. A wireless reception module using the same protocol as that in transmission systems processed the received data within 10 m and showed temperature and humidity values in the display.

  12. MEMS in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Francis E.

    2001-03-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) can be termed as a crossroad technology. Cross road in the sense that it is an amalgamation of various disciplines to produce a solution. Cross road also, in the sense that it is disruptive to the way that solutions used to be provided. At the crossroad, a decision needs to be made either to do things the old way or to embrace the new technology. In this paper, a review is made to the research and development of MEMS technology with potentially widespread applications in Singapore. In most cases, these are preparations to a possible acceleration of MEMS related industry in this part of the world. However, the author also noted that the transfer of MEMS technology from the laboratory to the industry is not a trivial matter. A major decision has to be made due to the high capital outlay and the high operational costs involved. Further, many production related issues such as yield and packaging have to be considered. A large number of MEMS commercial outfits such as Bosch are serving internal customers. As a small country with limited resources, Singapore places great emphasis on building up MEMS research and development activities to support future high value-added design and fabrication. In this paper, some of the MEMS activities in the national universities and institutes in Singapore are introduced, and some recent progress and development of MEMS technology in Singapore are presented.

  13. New emerging MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounier, Eric; Eloy, Jean-Christophe

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents the trends for the years to come for the different MEMS markets. Consumer applications have really started to push the MEMS business in 2005. Many different devices are involved, like pressure sensors (altimeters), microphones, accelerometers, gyroscopes . . . One of the most significant consequences is that all the Top 50 semiconductor companies are now looking at these MEMS applications as possible growth areas. Another result of the growth of the MEMS market is the strong growth of the foundries and contract manufacturers. We have seen growth of more than 35% in 2005 compared to 2004 and we expect similar growth in the next 3 years. We will review the next MEMS applications which have currently a high growth: Si microphones, microdisplays (for RPTV, portable projectors or automotive HUDs), gyroscopes and micro-fuel cells. In the longer term, micro-source of energy could also become an important MEMS market. In term of milestones, the following points can be highlighted: -In 2005 market, the MEMS market is 5.1 B worldwide and very fragmented in terms of companies and products. -In 2010, it will be a 9.7 B market worldwide. MEMS foundries and contract manufacturers will account for at least 8 % of the world market with several being public companies. More than 50% of today's systems companies who have integrated fabs will be using external manufacturers. Several large integrated companies will have created independent MEMS spin-offs and IC manufacturers will be deeply involved in MEMS manufacturing. -In 2015, it will be an 18 B$ market worldwide with no longer systems manufacturers with internal fabs. And we forecast that 50% of the total market will be in the hands of semiconductor manufacturers.

  14. Biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS): Revolution in drug delivery and analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Jivani, Rishad R; Lakhtaria, Gaurang J; Patadiya, Dhaval D; Patel, Laxman D; Jivani, Nurrudin P; Jhala, Bhagyesh P

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in microelectromechanical system has facilitated the microfabrication of polymeric substrates and the development of the novel class of controlled drug delivery devices. These vehicles have specifically tailored three dimensional physical and chemical features which together, provide the capacity to target cell, stimulate unidirectional controlled release of therapeutics and augment permeation across the barriers. Apart from drug delivery devices microfabrication technology's offer exciting prospects to generate biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models. BioMEMS are capable of analysing biochemical liquid sample like solution of metabolites, macromolecules, proteins, nucleic acid, cells and viruses. This review summarized multidisciplinary application of biomedical microelectromechanical systems in drug delivery and its potential in analytical procedures. PMID:26903763

  15. Biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS): Revolution in drug delivery and analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jivani, Rishad R.; Lakhtaria, Gaurang J.; Patadiya, Dhaval D.; Patel, Laxman D.; Jivani, Nurrudin P.; Jhala, Bhagyesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Advancement in microelectromechanical system has facilitated the microfabrication of polymeric substrates and the development of the novel class of controlled drug delivery devices. These vehicles have specifically tailored three dimensional physical and chemical features which together, provide the capacity to target cell, stimulate unidirectional controlled release of therapeutics and augment permeation across the barriers. Apart from drug delivery devices microfabrication technology’s offer exciting prospects to generate biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models. BioMEMS are capable of analysing biochemical liquid sample like solution of metabolites, macromolecules, proteins, nucleic acid, cells and viruses. This review summarized multidisciplinary application of biomedical microelectromechanical systems in drug delivery and its potential in analytical procedures. PMID:26903763

  16. IR performance study of an adaptive coded aperture "diffractive imaging" system employing MEMS "eyelid shutter" technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalanobis, A.; Reyner, C.; Patel, H.; Haberfelde, T.; Brady, David; Neifeld, Mark; Kumar, B. V. K. Vijaya; Rogers, Stanley

    2007-09-01

    Adaptive coded aperture sensing is an emerging technology enabling real time, wide-area IR/visible sensing and imaging. Exploiting unique imaging architectures, adaptive coded aperture sensors achieve wide field of view, near-instantaneous optical path repositioning, and high resolution while reducing weight, power consumption and cost of air- and space born sensors. Such sensors may be used for military, civilian, or commercial applications in all optical bands but there is special interest in diffraction imaging sensors for IR applications. Extension of coded apertures from Visible to the MWIR introduces the effects of diffraction and other distortions not observed in shorter wavelength systems. A new approach is being developed under the DARPA/SPO funded LACOSTE (Large Area Coverage Optical search-while Track and Engage) program, that addresses the effects of diffraction while gaining the benefits of coded apertures, thus providing flexibility to vary resolution, possess sufficient light gathering power, and achieve a wide field of view (WFOV). The photonic MEMS-Eyelid "sub-aperture" array technology is currently being instantiated in this DARPA program to be the heart of conducting the flow (heartbeat) of the incoming signal. However, packaging and scalability are critical factors for the MEMS "sub-aperture" technology which will determine system efficacy as well as military and commercial usefulness. As larger arrays with 1,000,000+ sub-apertures are produced for this LACOSTE effort, the available Degrees of Freedom (DOF) will enable better spatial resolution, control and refinement on the coding for the system. Studies (SNR simulations) will be performed (based on the Adaptive Coded Aperture algorithm implementation) to determine the efficacy of this diffractive MEMS approach and to determine the available system budget based on simulated bi-static shutter-element DOF degradation (1%, 5%, 10%, 20%, etc..) trials until the degradation level where it is

  17. A comparison between different error modeling of MEMS applied to GPS/INS integrated systems.

    PubMed

    Quinchia, Alex G; Falco, Gianluca; Falletti, Emanuela; Dovis, Fabio; Ferrer, Carles

    2013-07-24

    Advances in the development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have made possible the fabrication of cheap and small dimension accelerometers and gyroscopes, which are being used in many applications where the global positioning system (GPS) and the inertial navigation system (INS) integration is carried out, i.e., identifying track defects, terrestrial and pedestrian navigation, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), stabilization of many platforms, etc. Although these MEMS sensors are low-cost, they present different errors, which degrade the accuracy of the navigation systems in a short period of time. Therefore, a suitable modeling of these errors is necessary in order to minimize them and, consequently, improve the system performance. In this work, the most used techniques currently to analyze the stochastic errors that affect these sensors are shown and compared: we examine in detail the autocorrelation, the Allan variance (AV) and the power spectral density (PSD) techniques. Subsequently, an analysis and modeling of the inertial sensors, which combines autoregressive (AR) filters and wavelet de-noising, is also achieved. Since a low-cost INS (MEMS grade) presents error sources with short-term (high-frequency) and long-term (low-frequency) components, we introduce a method that compensates for these error terms by doing a complete analysis of Allan variance, wavelet de-nosing and the selection of the level of decomposition for a suitable combination between these techniques. Eventually, in order to assess the stochastic models obtained with these techniques, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) of a loosely-coupled GPS/INS integration strategy is augmented with different states. Results show a comparison between the proposed method and the traditional sensor error models under GPS signal blockages using real data collected in urban roadways.

  18. A Comparison between Different Error Modeling of MEMS Applied to GPS/INS Integrated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Quinchia, Alex G.; Falco, Gianluca; Falletti, Emanuela; Dovis, Fabio; Ferrer, Carles

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have made possible the fabrication of cheap and small dimension accelerometers and gyroscopes, which are being used in many applications where the global positioning system (GPS) and the inertial navigation system (INS) integration is carried out, i.e., identifying track defects, terrestrial and pedestrian navigation, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), stabilization of many platforms, etc. Although these MEMS sensors are low-cost, they present different errors, which degrade the accuracy of the navigation systems in a short period of time. Therefore, a suitable modeling of these errors is necessary in order to minimize them and, consequently, improve the system performance. In this work, the most used techniques currently to analyze the stochastic errors that affect these sensors are shown and compared: we examine in detail the autocorrelation, the Allan variance (AV) and the power spectral density (PSD) techniques. Subsequently, an analysis and modeling of the inertial sensors, which combines autoregressive (AR) filters and wavelet de-noising, is also achieved. Since a low-cost INS (MEMS grade) presents error sources with short-term (high-frequency) and long-term (low-frequency) components, we introduce a method that compensates for these error terms by doing a complete analysis of Allan variance, wavelet de-nosing and the selection of the level of decomposition for a suitable combination between these techniques. Eventually, in order to assess the stochastic models obtained with these techniques, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) of a loosely-coupled GPS/INS integration strategy is augmented with different states. Results show a comparison between the proposed method and the traditional sensor error models under GPS signal blockages using real data collected in urban roadways. PMID:23887084

  19. System Model for MEMS based Laser Ultrasonic Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.

    2002-01-01

    A need has been identified for more advanced nondestructive Evaluation technologies for assuring the integrity of airframe structures, wiring, etc. Laser ultrasonic inspection instruments have been shown to detect flaws in structures. However, these instruments are generally too bulky to be used in the confined spaces that are typical of aerospace vehicles. Microsystems technology is one key to reducing the size of current instruments and enabling increased inspection coverage in areas that were previously inaccessible due to instrument size and weight. This paper investigates the system modeling of a Micro OptoElectroMechanical System (MOEMS) based laser ultrasonic receiver. The system model is constructed in software using MATLAB s dynamical simulator, Simulink. The optical components are modeled using geometrical matrix methods and include some image processing. The system model includes a test bench which simulates input stimuli and models the behavior of the material under test.

  20. MEMS- and NEMS-based complex adaptive smart devices and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2001-10-01

    The microelectronics industry has seen explosive growth during the last thirty years. Extremely large markets for logic and memory devices have driven the development of new materials, and technologies for the fabrication of even more complex devices with feature sizes now down at the sub micron and nanometer level. Recent interest has arisen in employing these materials, tools and technologies for the fabrication of miniature sensors and actuators and their integration with electronic circuits to produce smart devices and systems. This effort offers the promise of: 1) increasing the performance and manufacturability of both sensors and actuators by exploiting new batch fabrication processes developed including micro stereo lithographic and micro molding techniques; 2) developing novel classes of materials and mechanical structures not possible previously, such as diamond like carbon, silicon carbide and carbon nanotubes, micro-turbines and micro-engines; 3) development of technologies for the system level and wafer level integration of micro components at the nanometer precision, such as self-assembly techniques and robotic manipulation; 4) development of control and communication systems for MEMS devices, such as optical and RF wireless, and power delivery systems, etc. A novel composite structure can be tailored by functionalizing carbon nanotubes and chemically bonding them with the polymer matrix e.g. block or graft copolymer, or even cross-linked copolymer, to impart exceptional structural, electronic and surface properties. Bio- and mechanical-MEMS devices derived from this hybrid composite provide a new avenue for future smart systems.

  1. Development of strapdown inertial navigation system with MEMS sensors, barometric altimeter and ultrasonic range meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholopov, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    The results of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) tests with 9 degrees of freedom MEMS sensor MPU-9150 (triaxial accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer), pressure sensor LPS331 and ultrasonic range meter HC-SR04, implemented on the FPGA Altera Cyclone-II evaluation board DE1 is considered. SINS measures the spatial coordinates and altitude relative to the starting point, the orientation angles and distances to obstacles along the way. It is shown that the relative error of the spatial coordinates estimation does not exceed 1.1% in interval of some minutes.

  2. MEMS-based system and image processing strategy for epiretinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Hu, Jie; Qi, Jin; Gu, Chaochen; Peng, Yinghong

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prostheses have the potential to restore some level of visual function to the patients suffering from retinal degeneration. In this paper, an epiretinal approach with active stimulation devices is presented. The MEMS-based processing system consists of an external micro-camera, an information processor, an implanted electrical stimulator and a microelectrode array. The image processing strategy combining image clustering and enhancement techniques was proposed and evaluated by psychophysical experiments. The results indicated that the image processing strategy improved the visual performance compared with direct merging pixels to low resolution. The image processing methods assist epiretinal prosthesis for vision restoration.

  3. MEMS-based system and image processing strategy for epiretinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Hu, Jie; Qi, Jin; Gu, Chaochen; Peng, Yinghong

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prostheses have the potential to restore some level of visual function to the patients suffering from retinal degeneration. In this paper, an epiretinal approach with active stimulation devices is presented. The MEMS-based processing system consists of an external micro-camera, an information processor, an implanted electrical stimulator and a microelectrode array. The image processing strategy combining image clustering and enhancement techniques was proposed and evaluated by psychophysical experiments. The results indicated that the image processing strategy improved the visual performance compared with direct merging pixels to low resolution. The image processing methods assist epiretinal prosthesis for vision restoration. PMID:26405885

  4. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  5. Motion estimation by integrated low cost system (vision and MEMS) for positioning of a scooter "Vespa"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, A.; Milan, N.; Pirotti, F.; Vettore, A.

    2011-12-01

    In the automotive sector, especially in these last decade, a growing number of investigations have taken into account electronic systems to check and correct the behavior of drivers, increasing road safety. The possibility to identify with high accuracy the vehicle position in a mapping reference frame for driving directions and best-route analysis is also another topic which attracts lot of interest from the research and development sector. To reach the objective of accurate vehicle positioning and integrate response events, it is necessary to estimate time by time the position, orientation and velocity of the system. To this aim low cost GPS and MEMS (sensors can be used. In comparison to a four wheel vehicle, the dynamics of a two wheel vehicle (e.g. a scooter) feature a higher level of complexity. Indeed more degrees of freedom must be taken into account to describe the motion of the latter. For example a scooter can twist sideways, thus generating a roll angle. A slight pitch angle has to be considered as well, since wheel suspensions have a higher degree of motion with respect to four wheel vehicles. In this paper we present a method for the accurate reconstruction of the trajectory of a motorcycle ("Vespa" scooter), which can be used as alternative to the "classical" approach based on the integration of GPS and INS sensors. Position and orientation of the scooter are derived from MEMS data and images acquired by on-board digital camera. A Bayesian filter provides the means for integrating the data from MEMS-based orientation sensor and the GPS receiver.

  6. Fast Simulating High Order Models Application to Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yacine, Z.; Benfdila, A.; Djennoune, S.

    2009-03-05

    The approximation of high order systems by low order models is one of the important problems in system theory. The use of a reduced order model makes it easier to implement analysis, simulations and control system designs. Numerous methods are available in the literature for order reduction of linear continuous systems in time domain as well as in frequency domain. But, this is not the case for non linear systems. The well known Trajectory Piece-Wise Linear approach (TPWL) elaborated to nonlinear model order reduction guarantees a simplification and an accurate representation of the behaviour of strongly non linear systems handling local and global approximation. The present attempt is towards evolving an improvement for the TPWL order reduction technique, which ensures a good quality of approximation combining the advantages of the Krylov subspaces method and the local linearization. We illustrate the technique on a MEMS circuit (Micro Electro-Mechanical System)

  7. CMOS-MEMS Chemiresistive and Chemicapacitive Chemical Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Nathan S.

    Integrating chemical sensors with testing electronics is a powerful technique with the potential to lower power and cost and allow for lower system limits of detection. This thesis explores the possibility of creating an integrated sensor system intended to be embedded within respirator cartridges to notify the user that hazardous chemicals will soon leak into the face mask. For a chemical sensor designer, this application is particularly challenging due to the need for a very sensitive and cheap sensor that will be exposed to widely varying environmental conditions during use. An octanethiol-coated gold nanoparticle chemiresistor to detect industrial solvents is developed, focusing on characterizing the environmental stability and limits of detection of the sensor. Since the chemiresistor was found to be highly sensitive to water vapor, a series of highly sensitive humidity sensor topologies were developed, with sensitivities several times previous integrated capacitive humidity sensors achieved. Circuit techniques were then explored to reduce the humidity sensor limits of detection, including the analysis of noise, charge injection, jitter and clock feedthrough in a charge-based capacitance measurement (CBCM) circuit and the design of a low noise Colpitts LC oscillator. The characterization of high resistance gold nanoclusters for capacitive chemical sensing was also performed. In the final section, a preconcentrator, a heater element intended to release a brief concentrated pulse of analate, was developed and tested for the purposes of lowering the system limit of detection.

  8. Nanotechnology: MEMS and NEMS and their applications to smart systems and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2003-10-01

    The microelectronics industry has seen explosive growth during the last thirty years. Extremely large markets for logic and memory devices have driven the development of new materials, and technologies for the fabrication of even more complex devices with features sizes now down at the sub micron and nanometer level. Recent interest has arisen in employing these materials, tools and technologies for the fabrication of miniature sensors and actuators and their integration with electronic circuits to produce smart devices and systems. This effort offers the promise of: (1) increasing the performance and manufacturability of both sensors and actuators by exploiting new batch fabrication processes developed including micro stereo lithographic and micro molding techniques; (2) developing novel classes of materials and mechanical structures not possible previously, such as diamond like carbon, silicon carbide and carbon nanotubes, micro-turbines and micro-engines; (3) development of technologies for the system level and wafer level integration of micro components at the nanometer precision, such as self-assembly techniques and robotic manipulation; (4) development of control and communication systems for MEMS devices, such as optical and RF wireless, and power delivery systems, etc. A novel composite structure can be tailored by functionalizing carbon nano tubes and chemically bonding them with the polymer matrix e.g. block or graft copolymer, or even cross-linked copolymer, to impart exceptional structural, electronic and surface properties. Bio- and Mechanical-MEMS devices derived from this hybrid composite provide a new avenue for future smart systems. The integration of NEMS (NanoElectroMechanical Systems), MEMS, IDTs (Interdigital Transducers) and required microelectronics and conformal antenna in the multifunctional smart materials and composites results in a smart system suitable for sending and control of a variety functions in automobile, aerospace, marine and

  9. RF MEMS and Their Applications in NASA's Space Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Daniel; Ponchak, George E.; Simons, Rainee N.; Zaman, Afroz; Kory, Carol; Wintucky, Edwin; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Scardelletti, Maximilian; Lee, Richard; Nguyen, Hung

    2001-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) and microwave communication systems rely on frequency, amplitude, and phase control circuits to efficiently use the available spectrum. Phase control circuits are required for electronically scanning phase array antennas that enable radiation pattern shaping, scanning, and hopping. Two types of phase shifters, which are the phase control circuits, are most often used. The first is comprised of two circuits with different phase characteristics such as two transmission lines of different lengths or a high pass and low pass filter and a switch that directs the RF power through one of the two circuits. Alternatively, a variable capacitor, or varactor, is used to change the effective electrical path length of a transmission line, which changes the phase characteristics. Filter banks are required for the diplexer at the front end of wide band communication satellites. These filters greatly increase the size and mass of the RF/microwave systems, but smaller diplexers may be made with a low loss varactor or a group of capacitors, a switch and an inductor.

  10. Control of MEMS-based actuator array for micro smart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, Yves-Andre; Fukuta, Yamato; Zhou, Lingfei; Mita, Yoshio; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2005-02-01

    In the present work, the authors were focused on control modes used in distributed microsystems. Especially, they studied distributed manipulation like motion active surface that have been an important topic in micro and nanofabrication field. After comparing advantages and drawbacks between centralized, decentralized and distributed control systems, they decided to apply the control mode to an airflow active surface based on pneumatic microactuator array, and fabricated by MEMS technology. The size of the device is about 35x35 mm2 for 560 MEMS-based actuators and holes respectively at the front- and the back-side of the silicon substrate. In a first approach, and to overcome fabrication problems of the micro-smart system, combining electronic and electro mechanic elements, a co-design software/hardware solution was implemented. By this way, and using a digital image captured from a CCD camera, autonomy of the distributed microsystems could be developed. Afterward, a feedback control strategy was elaborated by applying principles of autonomous mobile robots that lend it to. A first prototype, validating all control mode principles was successfully implemented directly in software. Experiment results demonstrated advantages and good performances of the method.

  11. Design and experimental results for a compact laser printer optical system with MEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takatoshi; Seki, Daisuke; Fujii, Shuichi; Mukai, Yukihiro

    2010-02-01

    There are many features expected by printer users, which include high resolution, low price, compact size, color, high speed printing and so on. Laser printers generally utilize a polygon mirror as a reflector in their optical configurations, but the usual size of the polygon mirror prevents laser scanning unit from being made much smaller. We have been conducting research on techniques which can contribute to reducing the optical unit size. Although oscillating mirror made with MEMS technology enables the system to be compact, it requires a sophisticated optical design having an increased number of constraints due to the change in angular velocity which varies depending on the orientation of the mirror, while the polygon mirror allows the scanning with constant speed. Using a small MEMS mirror is one of the critical issues concerning the reduction of cost. We have successfully resolved all the challenges listed above by using high-precision free-form optical surfaces and an optical layout making efficient use of 3D space. Our techniques can make the unit size much smaller and reduce the price. The optical path is designed to have a ray passing through a lens twice. We report both theoretical and experimental results for this system.

  12. Nanotechnology and MEMS-based systems for civil infrastructure safety and security: Opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Nidia; Saafi, Mohamed

    2006-03-01

    Critical civil infrastructure systems such as bridges, high rises, dams, nuclear power plants and pipelines present a major investment and the health of the United States' economy and the lifestyle of its citizens both depend on their safety and security. The challenge for engineers is to maintain the safety and security of these large structures in the face of terrorism threats, natural disasters and long-term deterioration, as well as to meet the demands of emergency response times. With the significant negative impact that these threats can have on the structural environment, health monitoring of civil infrastructure holds promise as a way to provide information for near real-time condition assessment of the structure's safety and security. This information can be used to assess the integrity of the structure for post-earthquake and terrorist attacks rescue and recovery, and to safely and rapidly remove the debris and to temporary shore specific structural elements. This information can also be used for identification of incipient damage in structures experiencing long-term deterioration. However, one of the major obstacles preventing sensor-based monitoring is the lack of reliable, easy-to-install, cost-effective and harsh environment resistant sensors that can be densely embedded into large-scale civil infrastructure systems. Nanotechnology and MEMS-based systems which have matured in recent years represent an innovative solution to current damage detection systems, leading to wireless, inexpensive, durable, compact, and high-density information collection. In this paper, ongoing research activities at Alabama A&M University (AAMU) Center for Transportation Infrastructure Safety and Security on the application of nanotechnology and MEMS to Civil Infrastructure for health monitoring will presented. To date, research showed that nanotechnology and MEMS-based systems can be used to wirelessly detect and monitor different damage mechanisms in concrete structures

  13. Environmental Monitoring System for Home-Delivery Service of Packages by Using MEMS Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takayuki; Masaki, Kentaro; Maenaka, Kazusuke

    Nowadays, home-delivery services of packages are imperative in everyday life. These service industries are trying to provide cheaper, faster and safer service. However, package condition and handling during transportation are not disclosed to a customer. In this study, we realized a prototype system by MEMS technology for measuring the environmental conditions around a package for home-delivery service. The system includes barometric pressure, temperature, relative humidity and three dimensional acceleration (shock) sensing devices, as well as an interface circuitry. The system is a size of 115 × 54 × 10 mm3 and a weight of 50 g. We measured the package conditions during the transportation by three Japanese domestic home-delivery services, and using data mining, we were able to obtain a representation of the package's circumstances.

  14. MEMS-based flow cytometry: microfluidics-based cell identification system by fluorescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, W K; Liang, C K; Huang, J Z

    2004-01-01

    This study utilizes MEMS technology to realize a novel low-cost microfluidics-based biochip system for flow-type cell handling. Powered by vacuum pump, the microfluidic driving system enables cells to move in order one by one in the biochip by an effect of sheath flow prefocus. Then, cells are guided to a fluorescent inspection region where two detection tasks such as cell image identification and cell counting are conducted. Currently, the glass-based biochip has been manufactured and all the related devices have been well set up in our laboratory. With this proposed prototype system, typical results about cell separation of yeast cell and PC-3 cell are available and their separated images are also presented, respectively. PMID:17270801

  15. MEMS technologies for rf communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qun; Kim, B. K.

    2001-04-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) represents an exciting new technology derived from the same fabricating processes used to make integrated circuits. The trends of growing importance of the wireless communications market is toward the system with minimal size, cost and power consumption. For the purpose of MEMS R&D used for wireless communications, a history and present situation of MEMS device development are reviewed in this paper, and an overview of MEMS research topics on RF communication applications and the state of the art technologies are also presented here.

  16. MEMS Rate Sensors for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambino, Joel P.

    1999-01-01

    Micromachined Electro Mechanical System Rate sensors offer many advantages that make them attractive for space use. They are smaller, consume less power, and cost less than the systems currently available. MEMS Rate Sensors however, have not been optimized for use on spacecraft. This paper describes an approach to developing MEMS Rate Sensors systems for space use.

  17. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based fiber optic sensor and sensor network for improving weapon stabilization and fire control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sean Z.; Xu, Guoda; Qiu, Wei; Lin, Freddie S.; Testa, Robert C.; Mattice, Michael S.

    2000-08-01

    A MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based fiber optic sensor and sensor network for improving weapon stabilization and fire control have been developed. Fabrication involves overwriting two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) onto a polarization-preserving optical fiber core. A MEMS diaphragm is fabricated and integrated with the overlaid FBGs to enhance the performance and reliability of the sensor. A simulation model for the MEMS fiber optic sensor and sensor network has been derived, and simulation results concerning load, angle, strain, and temperature have been obtained. The fabricated MEMS diaphragm and the overlaid FBGs have been packaged together on the basis of simulation results and mounted on a specially designed cantilever system. The combined multifunctional MEMS fiber optic sensor and sensor network is cost-effective, fast, rugged enough to operate in harsh environmental conditions, compact, and highly sensitive.

  18. Design of Small MEMS Microphone Array Systems for Direction Finding of Outdoors Moving Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Jingchang; Song, Enliang; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a MEMS microphone array system scheme is proposed which implements real-time direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for moving vehicles. Wind noise is the primary source of unwanted noise on microphones outdoors. A multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm is used in this paper for direction finding associated with spatial coherence to discriminate between the wind noise and the acoustic signals of a vehicle. The method is implemented in a SHARC DSP processor and the real-time estimated DOA is uploaded through Bluetooth or a UART module. Experimental results in different places show the validity of the system and the deviation is no bigger than 6° in the presence of wind noise. PMID:24603636

  19. Design of small MEMS microphone array systems for direction finding of outdoors moving vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Jingchang; Song, Enliang; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a MEMS microphone array system scheme is proposed which implements real-time direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for moving vehicles. Wind noise is the primary source of unwanted noise on microphones outdoors. A multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm is used in this paper for direction finding associated with spatial coherence to discriminate between the wind noise and the acoustic signals of a vehicle. The method is implemented in a SHARC DSP processor and the real-time estimated DOA is uploaded through Bluetooth or a UART module. Experimental results in different places show the validity of the system and the deviation is no bigger than 6° in the presence of wind noise.

  20. Attitude Heading Reference System Using MEMS Inertial Sensors with Dual-Axis Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Li; Ye, Lingyun; Song, Kaichen; Zhou, Yang

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a low cost and small size attitude and heading reference system based on MEMS inertial sensors. A dual-axis rotation structure with a proper rotary scheme according to the design principles is applied in the system to compensate for the attitude and heading drift caused by the large gyroscope biases. An optimization algorithm is applied to compensate for the installation angle error between the body frame and the rotation table's frame. Simulations and experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the AHRS. The results show that the proper rotation could significantly reduce the attitude and heading drifts. Moreover, the new AHRS is not affected by magnetic interference. After the rotation, the attitude and heading are almost just oscillating in a range. The attitude error is about 3° and the heading error is less than 3° which are at least 5 times better than the non-rotation condition. PMID:25268911

  1. Low-Loss, High-Isolation Microwave Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Switches Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.

    2002-01-01

    Switches, electrical components that either permit or prevent the flow of electricity, are the most important and widely used electrical devices in integrated circuits. In microwave systems, switches are required for switching between the transmitter and receiver; in communication systems, they are needed for phase shifters in phased-array antennas, for radar and communication systems, and for the new class of digital or software definable radios. Ideally, switches would be lossless devices that did not depend on the electrical signal's frequency or power, and they would not consume electrical power to change from OFF to ON or to maintain one of these two states. Reality is quite different, especially at microwave frequencies. Typical switches in microwave integrated circuits are pin diodes or gallium arsenide (GaAs) field-effect transistors that are nonlinear, with characteristics that depend on the power of the signal. In addition, they are frequency-dependent, lossy, and require electrical power to maintain a certain state. A new type of component has been developed that overcomes most of these technical difficulties. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) switches rely on mechanical movement as a response to an applied electrical force to either transmit or reflect electrical signal power. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been actively developing MEMS for microwave applications for over the last 5 years. Complete fabrication procedures have been developed so that the moving parts of the switch can be released with near 100-percent yield. Moreover, the switches fabricated at Glenn have demonstrated state-of-the-art performance. A typical MEMS switch is shown. The switch extends over the signal and ground lines of a finite ground coplanar waveguide, a commonly used microwave transmission line. In the state shown, the switch is in the UP state and all the microwave power traveling along the transmission line proceeds unimpeded. When a potential difference is applied

  2. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  3. A Step Made Toward Designing Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Structures With High Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical design of microelectromechanical systems-particularly for micropower generation applications-requires the ability to predict the strength capacity of load-carrying components over the service life of the device. These microdevices, which typically are made of brittle materials such as polysilicon, show wide scatter (stochastic behavior) in strength as well as a different average strength for different sized structures (size effect). These behaviors necessitate either costly and time-consuming trial-and-error designs or, more efficiently, the development of a probabilistic design methodology for MEMS. Over the years, the NASA Glenn Research Center s Life Prediction Branch has developed the CARES/Life probabilistic design methodology to predict the reliability of advanced ceramic components. In this study, done in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University, the ability of the CARES/Life code to predict the reliability of polysilicon microsized structures with stress concentrations is successfully demonstrated.

  4. End-coupled optical waveguide MEMS devices in the indium phosphide material system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruessner, Marcel W.; Siwak, Nathan; Amarnath, Kuldeep; Kanakaraju, S.; Chuang, Wen-Hsien; Ghodssi, Reza

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate electrostatically actuated end-coupled optical waveguide devices in the indium phosphide (InP) material system. The design of a suitable layer structure and fabrication process for actuated InP-based waveguide micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) is reviewed. Critical issues for optical design, such as coupling losses, are discussed and their effect on device performance is evaluated. Several end-coupled waveguide devices are demonstrated, including 1 × 2 optical switches and resonant sensors with integrated optical readout. The 1 × 2 optical switches exhibit low-voltage operation (<7 V), low crosstalk (-26 dB), reasonable loss (3.2 dB) and switching speed suitable for network restoration applications (140 µs, 2 ms settling time). Experimental characterization of the integrated cantilever waveguide resonant sensors shows high repeatability and accuracy, with a standard deviation as low as σ = 50 Hz (0.027%) for fresonant = 184.969 kHz. By performing focused-ion beam (FIB) milling on a sensor, a mass sensitivity of Δm/Δf = 5.3 × 10-15 g Hz-1 was measured, which is competitive with other sensors. Resonant frequencies as high as f = 1.061 MHz (Qeffective = 159.7) have been measured in air with calculated sensitivity Δm/Δf = 1.1 × 10-16 g Hz-1. Electrostatic tuning of the resonator sensors was also examined. The prospect of developing InP MEMS devices monolithically integrated with active optical components (lasers, LEDs, photodetectors) is discussed.

  5. Reliability of materials in MEMS : residual stress and adhesion in a micro power generation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.

    2007-09-01

    The reliability of thin film systems is important to the continued development of microelectronic and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The reliability of these systems is often tied to the ability of the films to remain adhered to its substrate. By measuring the amount of energy to separate the film from the substrate, researchers can predicts film lifetimes. Recent work has resulted in several different testing techniques to measure this energy including spontaneous buckling, indentation induced delamination and four point bending. This report focuses on developing quantifiable adhesion measurements for multiple thin film systems used in MEMS and other thin film systems of interest to Sandia programs. First, methods of accurately assessing interfacial toughness using stressed overlayer methods are demonstrated using both the W/Si and Au/Si systems. For systems where fracture only occurs along the interface, such as Au/Si, the calculated fracture energies between different tests are identical if the energy put into the system is kept near the needed strain energy to cause delamination. When the energy in the system is greater than needed to cause delamination, calculated adhesion energies can increase by a factor of three due to plastic deformation. Dependence of calculated adhesion energies on applied energy in the system was also shown when comparisons of four point bending and stressed overlayer test methods were completed on Pt/Si systems. The fracture energies of Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2} were studied using four-point bending and compressive overlayers. Varying the thickness of the Ti film from 2 to 17 nm in a Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2} system, both test methods showed an increase of adhesion energy until the nominal Ti thickness was 12nm. Then the adhesion energy began to decrease. While the trends in toughness are similar, the magnitude of the toughness values measured between the test methods is not the same, demonstrating the difficulty in extracting mode I toughness

  6. Sandia MEMS

    2002-06-13

    SUMMiT V (Sandia Ultra planar Multi level MEMS Technology) is a 5 level surface micromachine fabrication technology, which customers intornal and external to Sandia can access to fabricate prototype MEMS devices. This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Provide enabling educational information (including pictures, videos, technical information) c) Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standardmore » Parts Library) d) Facilitate the process of having MEMS fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories e) Facilitate the process of having post-fabrication services performed. While there exist some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with software package AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. Nole that the customer must purchase his/her own copy of Aut0CAD to use with these files.« less

  7. Triz in Mems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Prakash R.

    1999-11-01

    TRIZ is a Russian abbreviation. Genrich Altshuller developed it fifty years ago in the former Soviet Union. He examined thousands of inventions made in different technological systems and formulated a 'Theory of Inventive problem solving' (TRIZ). Altshuller's research of over fifty years on Creativity and Inventive Problem Solving has led to many different classifications, methods and tools of invention. Some of these are, Contradictions table, Level of inventions, Patterns in evolution of technological systems, ARIZ-Algorithm for Inventive Problem Solving, Diagnostic problem solving and Anticipatory Failure Determination. MEMS research consists of conceptual design, process technology and including of various Mechanical, ELectrical, Thermal, Magnetic, Acoustic and other effects. MEMS system s are now rapidly growing in complexity. Each system will thus follow one or more 'patterns of evolution' as given by Altshuller. This paper attempts to indicate how various TRIZ tools can be used in MEMS research activities.

  8. Micro space power system using MEMS fuel cell for nano-satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongkwang; Kim, Taegyu

    2014-08-01

    A micro space power system using micro fuel cell was developed for nano-satellites. The power system was fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication technologies. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell was selected in consideration of space environment. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was selected as a hydrogen source while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was selected as an oxygen source. The power system consists of a micro fuel cell, micro-reactor, micro-pump, and fuel cartridges. The micro fuel cell was fabricated on a light-weight and corrosion-resistant glass plates. The micro-reactor was used to generate hydrogen from NaBH4 alkaline solution via a catalytic hydrolysis reaction. All components such as micro-pump, fuel cartridges, and auxiliary battery were integrated for a complete power system. The storability of NaBH4 solution was evaluated at -25 °C and the performance of the micro power system was measured at various operating conditions. The power output of micro power system reasonably followed up the given electric load conditions.

  9. MEMS Reliability Assurance Guidelines for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Brian (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This guide is a reference for understanding the various aspects of microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS, with an emphasis on device reliability. Material properties, failure mechanisms, processing techniques, device structures, and packaging techniques common to MEMS are addressed in detail. Design and qualification methodologies provide the reader with the means to develop suitable qualification plans for the insertion of MEMS into the space environment.

  10. Observability analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS integration system with gyroscope G-sensitivity errors.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen; Hu, Xiaoping; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua; Luo, Bing

    2014-08-28

    Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously.

  11. Observability Analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS Integration System with Gyroscope G-Sensitivity Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chen; Hu, Xiaoping; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua; Luo, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously. PMID:25171122

  12. MEMS Using SOI Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Tony K.

    1999-01-01

    At NASA, the focus for smaller, less costly missions has given impetus for the development of microspacecraft. MicroElectroMechanical System (MEMS) technology advances in the area of sensor, propulsion systems, and instruments, make the notion of a specialized microspacecraft feasible in the immediate future. Similar to the micro-electronics revolution,the emerging MEMS technology offers the integration of recent advances in micromachining and nanofabrication techniques with microelectronics in a mass-producible format,is viewed as the next step in device and instrument miniaturization. MEMS technology offers the potential of enabling or enhancing NASA missions in a variety of ways. This new technology allows the miniaturization of components and systems, where the primary benefit is a reduction in size, mass and power. MEMS technology also provides new capabilities and enhanced performance, where the most significant impact is in performance, regardless of system size. Finally,with the availability of mass-produced, miniature MEMS instrumentation comes the opportunity to rethink our fundamental measurement paradigms. It is now possible to expand our horizons from a single instrument perspective to one involving multi-node distributed systems. In the distributed systems and missions, a new system in which the functionality is enabled through a multiplicity of elements. Further in the future, the integration of electronics, photonics, and micromechanical functionalities into "instruments-on-a-chip" will provide the ultimate size, cost, function, and performance advantage. In this presentation, I will discuss recent development, requirement, and applications of various MEMS technologies and devices for space applications.

  13. Advancing MEMS Technology Usage through the MUMPS (Multi-User MEMS Processes) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, D. A.; Markus, K. W.; Dhuler, V.; Mahadevan, R.; Cowen, A.

    1995-01-01

    In order to help provide access to advanced micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies and lower the barriers for both industry and academia, the Microelectronic Center of North Carolina (MCNC) and ARPA have developed a program which provides users with access to both MEMS processes and advanced electronic integration techniques. The four distinct aspects of this program, the multi-user MEMS processes (MUMP's), the consolidated micro-mechanical element library, smart MEMS, and the MEMS technology network are described in this paper. MUMP's is an ARPA-supported program created to provide inexpensive access to MEMS technology in a multi-user environment. It is both a proof-of-concept and educational tool that aids in the development of MEMS in the domestic community. MUMP's technologies currently include a 3-layer poly-silicon surface micromachining process and LIGA (lithography, electroforming, and injection molding) processes that provide reasonable design flexibility within set guidelines. The consolidated micromechanical element library (CaMEL) is a library of active and passive MEMS structures that can be downloaded by the MEMS community via the internet. Smart MEMS is the development of advanced electronics integration techniques for MEMS through the application of flip chip technology. The MEMS technology network (TechNet) is a menu of standard substrates and MEMS fabrication processes that can be purchased and combined to create unique process flows. TechNet provides the MEMS community greater flexibility and enhanced technology accessibility.

  14. Method and system for automated on-chip material and structural certification of MEMS devices

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; DeBoer, Maarten P.; Smith, Norman F.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.

    2003-05-20

    A new approach toward MEMS quality control and materials characterization is provided by a combined test structure measurement and mechanical response modeling approach. Simple test structures are cofabricated with the MEMS devices being produced. These test structures are designed to isolate certain types of physical response, so that measurement of their behavior under applied stress can be easily interpreted as quality control and material properties information.

  15. MEMS Memory Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carley, L. Richard; El-Sayed, Rany Tawfik; Guillou, David F.; Alfaro, Fernando; Fedder, Gary K.; Schlosser, Steven W.; Griffin, John L.; Nagle, David F.; Ganger, Gregory R.; Bain, James

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a design example that illustrates the potential of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to perform the mechanical positioning required for addressing stored data and to enable an entirely new mechanism for reading and writing magnetic data. Specifically, MEMS sensors and actuators can be used to achieve active servo control of the separation between magnetic probe tips and a media surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This allows mechanical position to be used to selectively write magnetic marks in a continuous thin-film magnetic media. In addition, MEMS sensors can be used to measure the separation between a magnetic probe tip and the media with a noise floor of roughly 22 picometers, allowing them to be used as position sensors in a magnetic force microscope (MFM) style data detection system.

  16. Integrated Inductors for RF Transmitters in CMOS/MEMS Smart Microsensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Wan; Takao, Hidekuni; Sawada, Kazuaki; Ishida, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of an inductor by complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible processes for integrated smart microsensor systems that have been developed to monitor the motion and vital signs of humans in various environments. Integration of radio frequency transmitter (RF) technology with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor/micro electro mechanical systems (CMOS/MEMS) microsensors is required to realize the wireless smart microsensors system. The essential RF components such as a voltage controlled RF-CMOS oscillator (VCO), spiral inductors for an LC resonator and an integrated antenna have been fabricated and evaluated experimentally. The fabricated RF transmitter and integrated antenna were packaged with subminiature series A (SMA) connectors, respectively. For the impedance (50 Ω) matching, a bonding wire type inductor was developed. In this paper, the design and fabrication of the bonding wire inductor for impedance matching is described. Integrated techniques for the RF transmitter by CMOS compatible processes have been successfully developed. After matching by inserting the bonding wire inductor between the on-chip integrated antenna and the VCO output, the measured emission power at distance of 5 m from RF transmitter was -37 dBm (0.2 μW).

  17. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  18. Review of polymer MEMS micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Brian J.; Meng, Ellis

    2016-01-01

    The development of polymer micromachining technologies that complement traditional silicon approaches has enabled the broadening of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. Polymeric materials feature a diverse set of properties not present in traditional microfabrication materials. The investigation and development of these materials have opened the door to alternative and potentially more cost effective manufacturing options to produce highly flexible structures and substrates with tailorable bulk and surface properties. As a broad review of the progress of polymers within MEMS, major and recent developments in polymer micromachining are presented here, including deposition, removal, and release techniques for three widely used MEMS polymer materials, namely SU-8, polyimide, and Parylene C. The application of these techniques to create devices having flexible substrates and novel polymer structural elements for biomedical MEMS (bioMEMS) is also reviewed.

  19. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  20. Pedestrian mobile mapping system for indoor environments based on MEMS IMU and range camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haala, N.; Fritsch, D.; Peter, M.; Khosravani, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes an approach for the modeling of building interiors based on a mobile device, which integrates modules for pedestrian navigation and low-cost 3D data collection. Personal navigation is realized by a foot mounted low cost MEMS IMU, while 3D data capture for subsequent indoor modeling uses a low cost range camera, which was originally developed for gaming applications. Both steps, navigation and modeling, are supported by additional information as provided from the automatic interpretation of evacuation plans. Such emergency plans are compulsory for public buildings in a number of countries. They consist of an approximate floor plan, the current position and escape routes. Additionally, semantic information like stairs, elevators or the floor number is available. After the user has captured an image of such a floor plan, this information is made explicit again by an automatic raster-to-vector-conversion. The resulting coarse indoor model then provides constraints at stairs or building walls, which restrict the potential movement of the user. This information is then used to support pedestrian navigation by eliminating drift effects of the used low-cost sensor system. The approximate indoor building model additionally provides a priori information during subsequent indoor modeling. Within this process, the low cost range camera Kinect is used for the collection of multiple 3D point clouds, which are aligned by a suitable matching step and then further analyzed to refine the coarse building model.

  1. MRI contrast using solid-state, B1-distorting, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microresonant devices (MRDs).

    PubMed

    Ciocan, Razvan; Lenkinski, Robert E; Bernstein, Jonathan; Bancu, Mirela; Marquis, Robert; Ivanishev, Alex; Kourtelidis, Fotini; Matsui, Aya; Borenstein, Jeffrey; Frangioni, John V

    2009-04-01

    Presently, signal generation in MRI depends on the concentration and relaxivity of protons or other MR-active nuclei, and contrast depends on local differences in signal. In this proof-of-principle study, we explore the use of nonchemical, solid-state devices for generating detectable signal and/or contrast in vitro and in vivo. We introduce the concept of microresonant devices (MRDs), which are micron-sized resonators fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Fifteen-micrometer (15-microm)-thick, coil MRDs were designed to resonate at the 3T Larmor frequency of protons (127.7 MHz) and were fabricated using tantalum (Ta) oxide thin-film capacitors and copper-plated spiral inductors. The performance of MRDs having final diameters of 300, 500, and 1000 microm were characterized in saline using a radio frequency (RF) scanning microscope and a clinical 3T MR scanner. The measured B(1) fields of 300 microm to 1000 microm MRDs ranged from 3.25 microT to 3.98 microT, and their quality factors (Q) ranged from 3.9 to 7.2. When implanted subcutaneously in the flank of a mouse, only MRDs tuned to the resonant frequency of protons generated a measurable in vivo B(1) field. This study lays the foundation for a new class of solid-state contrast agents for MRI.

  2. A scoping review of studies comparing the medication event monitoring system (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence.

    PubMed

    El Alili, Mohamed; Vrijens, Bernard; Demonceau, Jenny; Evers, Silvia M; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2016-07-01

    Different methods are available for measuring medication adherence. In this paper, we conducted a scoping review to identify and summarize evidence of all studies comparing the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence. A literature search was performed using the open database www.iAdherence.org that includes all original studies reporting findings from the MEMS. Papers comparing methods for measuring adherence to solid oral formulations were included. Data was extracted using a standardized extraction table. A total of 117 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including 251 comparisons. Most frequent comparisons were against self-report (n = 119) and pill count (n = 59). Similar outcome measures were used in 210 comparisons (84%), among which 78 used dichotomous variables (adherent or not) and 132 used continuous measures (adherence expressed as percentage). Furthermore, 32% of all comparisons did not estimate adherence over the same coverage period and 44% of all comparisons did not use a statistical method or used a suboptimal one. Only eighty-seven (35%) comparisons had similar coverage periods, similar outcome measures and optimal statistical methods. Compared to MEMS, median adherence was grossly overestimated by 17% using self-report, by 8% using pill count and by 6% using rating. In conclusion, among all comparisons of MEMS versus alternative methods for measuring adherence, only a few used adequate comparisons in terms of outcome measures, coverage periods and statistical method. Researchers should therefore use stronger methodological frameworks when comparing measurement methods and be aware that non-electronic measures could lead to overestimation of medication adherence. PMID:27005306

  3. A scoping review of studies comparing the medication event monitoring system (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence.

    PubMed

    El Alili, Mohamed; Vrijens, Bernard; Demonceau, Jenny; Evers, Silvia M; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2016-07-01

    Different methods are available for measuring medication adherence. In this paper, we conducted a scoping review to identify and summarize evidence of all studies comparing the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence. A literature search was performed using the open database www.iAdherence.org that includes all original studies reporting findings from the MEMS. Papers comparing methods for measuring adherence to solid oral formulations were included. Data was extracted using a standardized extraction table. A total of 117 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including 251 comparisons. Most frequent comparisons were against self-report (n = 119) and pill count (n = 59). Similar outcome measures were used in 210 comparisons (84%), among which 78 used dichotomous variables (adherent or not) and 132 used continuous measures (adherence expressed as percentage). Furthermore, 32% of all comparisons did not estimate adherence over the same coverage period and 44% of all comparisons did not use a statistical method or used a suboptimal one. Only eighty-seven (35%) comparisons had similar coverage periods, similar outcome measures and optimal statistical methods. Compared to MEMS, median adherence was grossly overestimated by 17% using self-report, by 8% using pill count and by 6% using rating. In conclusion, among all comparisons of MEMS versus alternative methods for measuring adherence, only a few used adequate comparisons in terms of outcome measures, coverage periods and statistical method. Researchers should therefore use stronger methodological frameworks when comparing measurement methods and be aware that non-electronic measures could lead to overestimation of medication adherence.

  4. Performance assessment of bio-inspired systems: flow sensing MEMS hairs.

    PubMed

    Droogendijk, H; Casas, J; Steinmann, T; Krijnen, G J M

    2015-01-01

    Despite vigorous growth in biomimetic design, the performance of man-made devices relative to their natural templates is still seldom quantified, a procedure which would however significantly increase the rigour of the biomimetic approach. We applied the ubiquitous engineering concept of a figure of merit (FoM) to MEMS flow sensors inspired by cricket filiform hairs. A well known mechanical model of a hair is refined and tailored to this task. Five criteria of varying importance in the biological and engineering fields are computed: responsivity, power transfer, power efficiency, response time and detection threshold. We selected the metrics response time and detection threshold for building the FoM to capture the performance in a single number. Crickets outperform actual MEMS on all criteria for a large range of flow frequencies. Our approach enables us to propose several improvements for MEMS hair-sensor design.

  5. Novel Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) Packaging for the Skin of the Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrin, M. Ann; Osiander, Robert; Lehtonen, John; Farrar, Dawnielle; Douglas, Donya; Swanson, Ted

    2004-01-01

    This paper includes a discussion of the novel packaging techniques that are needed to place MEMS based thermal control devices on the skin of various satellites, eliminating the concern associated with potential particulates &om integration and test or the launch environment. Protection of this MEMS based thermal device is achieved using a novel polymer that is both IR transmissive and electrically conductive. This polymer was originally developed and qualified for space flight application by NASA at the Langley Research Center. The polymer material, commercially known as CPI, is coated with a thin layer of ITO and sandwiched between two window-like frames. The packaging of the MEMS based radiator assembly offers the benefits of micro-scale devices in a chip on board fashion, with the level of protection generally found in packaged parts.

  6. Development of blood extraction system designed by female mosquito's blood sampling mechanism for bio-MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2005-02-01

    A compact and wearable wristwatch type Bio-MEMS such as a health monitoring system (HMS) to detect blood sugar level for diabetic patient, was newly developed. The HMS consists of (1) a indentation unit with a microneedle to generate the skin penetration force using a shape memory alloy(SMA) actuator, (2) a pumping unit using a bimorph PZT piezoelectric actuator to extract the blood and (3) a gold (Au) electrode as a biosensor immobilized GOx and attached to the gate electrode of MOSFET to detect the amount of Glucose in extracted blood. GOx was immobilized on a self assembled spacer combined with an Au electrode by the cross-link method using BSA as an additional bonding material. The device can extract blood in a few microliter through a painless microneedle with the negative pressure by deflection of the bimorph PZT piezoelectric actuator produced in the blood chamber, by the similar way the female mosquito extracts human blood with muscle motion to flex or relax. The performances of the liquid sampling ability of the pumping unit through a microneedle (3.8mm length, 100μm internal diameter) using the bimorph PZT piezoelectric microactuator were measured. The blood extraction micro device could extract human blood at the speed of 2μl/min, and it is enough volume to measure a glucose level, compared to the amount of commercial based glucose level monitor. The electrode embedded in the blood extraction device chamber could detect electrons generated by the hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide produced by the reaction between GOx and glucose in a few microliter extracted blood, using the constant electric current measurement system of the MOSFET type hybrid biosensor. The output voltage for the glucose diluted in the chamber was increased lineally with increase of the glucose concentration.

  7. Critical dimension: MEMS road map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulingue, Marc; Knutrud, Paul

    2007-03-01

    The use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology in mechanical, biotechnology, optical, communications, and ink jet is growing. Critical dimensions in MEMS devices are getting smaller and processes are constantly facing new metrology challenges. This paper will examine some critical dimension metrology needs and challenges for MEMS using resist-on-silicon structures. It is shown that the use of automated optical CD metrology can meet emerging measurement requirements while bringing the advantages of a non-destructive, high throughput and precise methodology.

  8. Miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention documents the efforts on the research and development of a miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system. A miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system is presented; Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) based alignment algorithm for space applications is discussed. Two navigation cameras are also included to measure the range and range rate which can be integrated into the GPS/MEMS IMU system to enhance the navigation solution.

  9. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  10. European MEMS foundries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Patric R.

    2003-01-01

    According to the latest release of the NEXUS market study, the market for MEMS or Microsystems Technology (MST) is predicted to grow to $68B by the year 2005, with systems containing these components generating even higher revenues and growth. The latest advances in MST/MEMS technology have enabled the design of a new generation of microsystems that are smaller, cheaper, more reliable, and consume less power. These integrated systems bring together numerous analog/mixed signal microelectronics blocks and MEMS functions on a single chip or on two or more chips assembled within an integrated package. In spite of all these advances in technology and manufacturing, a system manufacturer either faces a substantial up-front R&D investment to create his own infrastructure and expertise, or he can use design and foundry services to get the initial product into the marketplace fast and with an affordable investment. Once he has a viable product, he can still think about his own manufacturing efforts and investments to obtain an optimized high volume manufacturing for the specific product. One of the barriers to successful exploitation of MEMS/MST technology has been the lack of access to industrial foundries capable of producing certified microsystems devices in commercial quantities, including packaging and test. This paper discusses Multi-project wafer (MPW) runs, requirements for foundries and gives some examples of foundry business models. Furthermore, this paper will give an overview on MST/MEMS services that are available in Europe, including pure commercial activities, European project activities (e.g. Europractice), and some academic services.

  11. MEMS digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, R. C.; Tang, T. K.; Calvet, R.; Fossum, E. R.

    2007-02-01

    MEMS technology uses photolithography and etching of silicon wafers to enable mechanical structures with less than 1 μm tolerance, important for the miniaturization of imaging systems. In this paper, we present the first silicon MEMS digital auto-focus camera for use in cell phones with a focus range of 10 cm to infinity. At the heart of the new silicon MEMS digital camera, a simple and low-cost electromagnetic actuator impels a silicon MEMS motion control stage on which a lens is mounted. The silicon stage ensures precise alignment of the lens with respect to the imager, and enables precision motion of the lens over a range of 300 μm with < 5 μm hysteresis and < 2 μm repeatability. Settling time is < 15 ms for 200 μm step, and < 5ms for 20 μm step enabling AF within 0.36 sec at 30 fps. The precise motion allows COTS optics to maintain MTF > 0.8 at 20 cy/mm up to 80% field over the full range of motion. Accelerated lifetime testing has shown that the alignment and precision of motion is maintained after 8,000 g shocks, thermal cycling from - 40 C to 85 C, and operation over 20 million cycles.

  12. Design and fabrication of a sensor integrated MEMS/NANO-skin system for human physiological response measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Hongjie; Lin, Yingzi

    2010-04-01

    Human state in human-machine systems highly affects the system performance, and should be monitored. Physiological cues are more suitable for monitoring the human state in human-machine system. This study was focused on developing a new sensing system, i.e. NANO-Skin, to non-intrusively measure physiological cues from human-machine contact surfaces for human state recognition. The first part was to analyze the relation between human state and physiological cues. Generally, heart rate, skin conductance, skin temperature, operating force, blood alcohol concentration, sweat rate, and electromyography have close relation with human state, and can be measured from human skin. The second part was to compare common sensors, MEMS sensors, and NANO sensors. It was found that MEMS sensors and NANO sensors can offer unique contributions to the development of NANO-Skin. The third part was to discuss the design and manufacture of NANO-Skin. The NANO-Skin involves five components, the flexible substrate, sensors, special integrated circuit, interconnection between sensors and special integrated circuit, and protection layer. Experiments were performed to verify the measurement accuracy of NANO-Skin. It is feasible to use NANO-Skins to non-intrusively measure physiological cues from human-machine contact surfaces for human state recognition.

  13. Remote heart function monitoring: role of the CardioMEMS HF System.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Emilio; D'Elia, Emilia; La Rovere, Maria T; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a pandemic condition that is challenging cardiology today. The primary economical and social burden of this syndrome is hospitalization rate whose costs represent the highest ones within the entire healthcare management. Remote monitoring of physiological data, obtained through self-reporting via telephone calls or, automatically, using external devices is a potential novel approach to implement management of patients with heart failure and reduce hospitalization rates. Relatively large but, sometimes, contradicting information exists about the efficacy of remote monitoring via different noninvasive approaches to reduce the economical and social burden of heart failure management. This leaves still partly unaddressed this critical issue and generates the need for new approaches. In this context, the CardioMEMS device that can chronically monitor pulmonary pressures from a small microchip inserted transvenously in the pulmonary artery seems to represent an innovative tool to challenge hospitalization rates. Consecutive analyses from the CHAMPION study had indeed documented the efficacy of the CardioMEMS in the remote monitoring of the pulmonary circulation status of patients with heart failure and in providing adequate information to optimally manage such patients with the final result of a significant hospitalization rate reduction. The striking information here is that this appears to be true in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction also. Overall, the reports from the CHAMPION study encourage the use of CardioMEMS but larger populations are needed to definitively prove its value. PMID:26881785

  14. MEMS device for spacecraft thermal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theordore D. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A micro-electromechanical device that comprises miniaturized mechanical louvers, referred to as Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) louvers are employed to achieve a thermal control function for spacecraft and instruments. The MEMS louvers are another form of a variable emittance control coating and employ micro-electromechanical technology. In a function similar to traditional, macroscopic thermal louvers, the MEMS louvers of the present invention change the emissivity of a surface. With the MEMS louvers, as with the traditional macroscopic louvers, a mechanical vane or window is opened and closed to allow an alterable radiative view to space.

  15. MEMS/MOEMS application to optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2001-09-01

    The paper describes brief summary of current MEMS technology and its application to optics. The optical application is one of the most important applications of MEMS because of two reasons; one is that the micromachine technology can provide high performances and new functionalities for optical systems and the other is that those optical microsystems can satisfy market demands for optical communication networks, displays, data storage and sensors. Opportunities for MEMS-based devices in optical communication networks are discussed. Some specific examples of MEMS optical switches are described.

  16. Analysis, fabrication and testing of a MEMS-based micropropulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayt, Robert Louis, Jr.

    seconds. However, the reduction in Reynolds number with increased chamber temperature causes viscous dissipation to increase and thruster efficiencies to decline. The efficiencies vary with Reynolds number in the same fashion as their unheated counterparts, which confirms that Reynolds number is the governing similarity parameter. The thruster was operated at a temperature of 420°C, and demonstrated an Isp of 83 seconds. This represents an Isp efficiency of 79% for an 8.25:1 area ratio nozzle. These results suggest that MEMS-based micropropulsion systems offer higher performance at lower mass, when operated at Reynolds numbers above 2500 for both heated and unheated thrusters. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  17. Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM)A Meteoroid Model for the Inner Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, H.; Jones, J.; Kaufman, B.; Suggs, R.; Cook, W.; Smith, S.

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to overcome some of the deficiencies of existing meteoroid models, NASA's Space Environments and Effects Program sponsored a three year research effort at the University of Western Ontario. The resulting understanding of the sporadic meteoroid environment - particularly the nature and distribution of the sporadic sources - was then incorporated into a new meteoroid environment model (MEM) by members of the Space Environments Team at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses some of the revolutionary aspects of MEM which include: a) identification of the sporadic radiants with real sources of meteoroids, such as comets, b) a physics-based approach which yields accurate fluxes and directionality for interplanetary spacecraft anywhere from .2 AU to 2 AU, and c) velocity distributions obtained from theory and validated against observation. Use of the model, which gives penetrating fluxes and average impact speeds on the surfaces of a cube-like structure are also described, along with its current limitations and plans for future improvements.

  18. Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM): A Meteoroid Model for the Inner Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Heather A.; Jones, Jim; Kauffman, Billy; Suggs, Robert; Cooke, William; Smith, Steven

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to overcome some of the deficiencies of existing meteoroid models, NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program sponsored a three year research effort at the University of Western Ontario. The resulting understanding of the sporadic meteoroid environment - particularly the nature and distribution of the sporadic sources - were then incorporated into a new Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM) by members of the Space Environments Team at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses some of the revolutionary aspects of MEM which include a) identification of the sporadic radiants with real sources of meteoroids, such as comets, b) a physics-based approach which yields accurate fluxes and directionality for interplanetary spacecraft anywhere from 0.2 astronomical units (AU) to 2 AU, and c) velocity distributions obtained from theory and validated against observation. Use of the model, which gives penetrating fluxes and average impact speeds on the surfaces of a cube-like structure, is also described along with its current limitations and plans for future improvements.

  19. Applications of ferrofluids in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, V. K.; Pant, R. P.; Vinod Kumar, .

    2008-12-01

    The micro-pump is one of the most promising micro-flow devices. At micro-level electronically controlled pumping of any fluid by a mechanical pump is not so easy and reliable. In the realm of nano-tech materials, ferrofluids have unique properties in both liquids and solids and have potential applications for MEMS/NEMS devices. This paper presents two new types of concepts, a micro-flowmeter based on a micro-turbine made using MEMS technology and the other is a micro-pump based on ferrofluidic actuation. In our first device an optical photovoltaic sensor has also been integrated with this device, and the micro-turbine rotates with a speed of 50000 rpm. We have fabricated a ferrofluid-based glass micro-pump of size 20 × 20 × 10 mm^{3}, in which micro actuation is electrically controlled by NdFeB (N50) permanent magnets (diameter 5 × 3 mm, B_{r} = 1400 mT, coercive field H_c=840 ,kA/m) with a ferrofluid bearing. The device is able to pump the fluid at the rate of 10 μ L/actuation. Figs 3, Refs 19.

  20. MEMS Rate Sensors for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambino, Joel

    2000-01-01

    Micromachined Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) Rate Sensors are an enabling technology for Nanosatellites. The recent award of a Nanosatellite program to the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) underscores the urgency of the development of these systems for space use. The Guidance Navigation and Control Center (GNCC) at the GSFC is involved in several efforts to develop this technology. The GNCC seeks to improve the performance of these sensors and develop flight ready systems for spacecraft use by partnering with industry leaders in MEMS Rate Sensor development. This paper introduces Microgyros and discusses the efforts in progress at the GNCC to improve the performance of these units and develop MEMS Rate Sensors for space use.

  1. Wafer scale interdigitated nanoelectrode devices functionalized using a MEMS-based deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Rivas, A.; Carcenac, F.; Saya, D.; Séverac, C.; Nicu, L.; Vieu, C.

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports on a methodology to elaborate interdigitated nanoelectrode devices (INDs) at the wafer scale, relying on a mix-and-match process which combines proximity optical lithography and electron beam lithography. An optimum exposure dose allowed fabricating nanodevices, at the wafer level, with a successful yield of 97%. The final devices are bonded onto conventional TO-8 packages. Electrical characterization in a short-circuited nanoelectrode is performed, revealing a 230 µΩ cm resistivity value at 23 °C. A MEMS-based spotter made of cantilevers (called Bioplume) has been used to obtain precise functionalization of the INDs with sub-picoliter volume solutions. These INDs are the basis of multiple tunnel junction nanodevices, intended to serve as novel highly sensitive nanobiosensors.

  2. Challenges in the Packaging of MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Malshe, A.P.; Singh, S.B.; Eaton, W.P.; O'Neal, C.; Brown, W.D.; Miller, W.M.

    1999-03-26

    The packaging of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is a field of great importance to anyone using or manufacturing sensors, consumer products, or military applications. Currently much work has been done in the design and fabrication of MEMS devices but insufficient research and few publications have been completed on the packaging of these devices. This is despite the fact that packaging is a very large percentage of the total cost of MEMS devices. The main difference between IC packaging and MEMS packaging is that MEMS packaging is almost always application specific and greatly affected by its environment and packaging techniques such as die handling, die attach processes, and lid sealing. Many of these aspects are directly related to the materials used in the packaging processes. MEMS devices that are functional in wafer form can be rendered inoperable after packaging. MEMS dies must be handled only from the chip sides so features on the top surface are not damaged. This eliminates most current die pick-and-place fixtures. Die attach materials are key to MEMS packaging. Using hard die attach solders can create high stresses in the MEMS devices, which can affect their operation greatly. Low-stress epoxies can be high-outgassing, which can also affect device performance. Also, a low modulus die attach can allow the die to move during ultrasonic wirebonding resulting to low wirebond strength. Another source of residual stress is the lid sealing process. Most MEMS based sensors and devices require a hermetically sealed package. This can be done by parallel seam welding the package lid, but at the cost of further induced stress on the die. Another issue of MEMS packaging is the media compatibility of the packaged device. MEMS unlike ICS often interface with their environment, which could be high pressure or corrosive. The main conclusion we can draw about MEMS packaging is that the package affects the performance and reliability of the MEMS devices. There is a

  3. Of magnetic imaging system experiments and micro electro-mechanical systems "of mise and MEMS"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, William C.

    Magnetic fields can occur over an extremely broad range of amplitudes, and spatial and temporal scales. Practical scientific and engineering systems have fields ranging in strength from pico-tesla to hundreds of tesla. Furthermore, spatial variations can range in scale from nanometers to tens of meters, and temporal variations can range from picoseconds to hours. Due to these large variations, many different devices and methods have been previously designed for measuring and mapping magnetic fields. The primary application area for the systems developed here is magnetic microsystems. Such systems make use of one or more microscale electromagnets, soft magnets, and/or permanent magnets for sensors, actuators, inductors, electronics, biomedical devices, etc. A single magnet dimension may range from one mum to hundreds of mum, and the overall area of interest may span over distances of millimeters to centimeters. To map the stray fields from such structures, a field measurement tool must be capable of measuring fields ranging from mT to T, while mapping over distances of millimeters with a spatial resolution of approximately one mum. This current study is focused only on static fields, but time-varying fields are of great interest and could be addressed in further research. This research focuses on the development of two tools that meet the requirements of microscale magnetic measurements. The first tool is based on an optical method and excels at extremely rapid measurements of large spatial regions. The second tool is a raster based system that focuses on high magnetic and spatial accuracy. The optical system quantitatively maps the stray magnetic fields of microscale magnetic structures with field resolution down to 50 muT and spatial resolution down to 4 mum. The system uses a magneto-optical indicator film (MOIF) in conjunction with an upright reflective polarizing light microscope to generate optical images of the magnetic field perpendicular to the image plane

  4. Of magnetic imaging system experiments and micro electro-mechanical systems "of mise and MEMS"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, William C.

    Magnetic fields can occur over an extremely broad range of amplitudes, and spatial and temporal scales. Practical scientific and engineering systems have fields ranging in strength from pico-tesla to hundreds of tesla. Furthermore, spatial variations can range in scale from nanometers to tens of meters, and temporal variations can range from picoseconds to hours. Due to these large variations, many different devices and methods have been previously designed for measuring and mapping magnetic fields. The primary application area for the systems developed here is magnetic microsystems. Such systems make use of one or more microscale electromagnets, soft magnets, and/or permanent magnets for sensors, actuators, inductors, electronics, biomedical devices, etc. A single magnet dimension may range from one mum to hundreds of mum, and the overall area of interest may span over distances of millimeters to centimeters. To map the stray fields from such structures, a field measurement tool must be capable of measuring fields ranging from mT to T, while mapping over distances of millimeters with a spatial resolution of approximately one mum. This current study is focused only on static fields, but time-varying fields are of great interest and could be addressed in further research. This research focuses on the development of two tools that meet the requirements of microscale magnetic measurements. The first tool is based on an optical method and excels at extremely rapid measurements of large spatial regions. The second tool is a raster based system that focuses on high magnetic and spatial accuracy. The optical system quantitatively maps the stray magnetic fields of microscale magnetic structures with field resolution down to 50 muT and spatial resolution down to 4 mum. The system uses a magneto-optical indicator film (MOIF) in conjunction with an upright reflective polarizing light microscope to generate optical images of the magnetic field perpendicular to the image plane

  5. On-Chip Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Fourier Transform Infrared (MEMS FT-IR) Spectrometer-Based Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M; Sakr, Mohammad; Mortada, Bassem; Medhat, Mostafa; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we study the detection of acetylene (C2H2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) gases in the near-infrared (NIR) range using an on-chip silicon micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer in the wavelength range 1300-2500 nm (4000-7692 cm(-1)). The spectrometer core engine is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using a deep-etching technology producing self-aligned components. The light is free-space propagating in-plane with respect to the silicon chip substrate. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator corresponding to about 30 cm(-1) resolution. Multi-mode optical fibers are used to connect light between the wideband light source, the interferometer, the 10 cm gas cell, and the optical detector. A wide dynamic range of gas concentration down to 2000 parts per million (ppm) in only 10 cm length gas cell is demonstrated. Extending the wavelength range to the mid-infrared (MIR) range up to 4200 nm (2380 cm(-1)) is also experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, using a bulk micro-machined on-chip MEMS FT-IR spectrometer. The obtained results open the door for an on-chip optical gas sensor for many applications including environmental sensing and industrial process control in the NIR/MIR spectral ranges.

  6. Using a Floating-Gate MOS Transistor as a Transducer in a MEMS Gas Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Barranca, Mario Alfredo Reyes; Mendoza-Acevedo, Salvador; Flores-Nava, Luis M.; Avila-García, Alejandro; Vazquez-Acosta, E. N.; Moreno-Cadenas, José Antonio; Casados-Cruz, Gaspar

    2010-01-01

    Floating-gate MOS transistors have been widely used in diverse analog and digital applications. One of these is as a charge sensitive device in sensors for pH measurement in solutions or using gates with metals like Pd or Pt for hydrogen sensing. Efforts are being made to monolithically integrate sensors together with controlling and signal processing electronics using standard technologies. This can be achieved with the demonstrated compatibility between available CMOS technology and MEMS technology. In this paper an in-depth analysis is done regarding the reliability of floating-gate MOS transistors when charge produced by a chemical reaction between metallic oxide thin films with either reducing or oxidizing gases is present. These chemical reactions need temperatures around 200 °C or higher to take place, so thermal insulation of the sensing area must be assured for appropriate operation of the electronics at room temperature. The operation principle of the proposal here presented is confirmed by connecting the gate of a conventional MOS transistor in series with a Fe2O3 layer. It is shown that an electrochemical potential is present on the ferrite layer when reacting with propane. PMID:22163478

  7. Scene-based nonuniformity correction algorithm for MEMS-based un-cooled IR image system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liquan; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yuejin; Hui, Mei; Zhou, Xiaoxiao

    2009-08-01

    Almost two years after the investors in Sarcon Microsystems pulled the plug, the micro-cantilever array based uncooled IR detector technology is again attracting more and more attention because of its low cost and high credibility. An uncooled thermal detector array with low NETD is designed and fabricated using MEMS bimaterial microcantilever structures that bend in response to thermal change. The IR images of objects obtained by these FPAs are readout by an optical method. For the IR images, one of the most problems of FPN is complicated by the fact that the response of each FPA detector changes due to a variety of factors, causing the nonuniformity pattern to slowly drift in time. Thus, it is required to remove the nonuniformity. A scene-based nonuniformity correction algorithm was discussed in this paper, against to the traditional calibration-based and other scene-based techniques, which has the better correct performance; better MSE compared with traditional methods can be obtained. Great compute and analysis have been realized by using the discussed algorithm to the simulated data and real infrared scene data respectively. The experimental results demonstrate, the corrected image by this algorithm not only yields highest Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio values (PSNR), but also achieves best visual quality.

  8. Using a floating-gate MOS transistor as a transducer in a MEMS gas sensing system.

    PubMed

    Barranca, Mario Alfredo Reyes; Mendoza-Acevedo, Salvador; Flores-Nava, Luis M; Avila-García, Alejandro; Vazquez-Acosta, E N; Moreno-Cadenas, José Antonio; Casados-Cruz, Gaspar

    2010-01-01

    Floating-gate MOS transistors have been widely used in diverse analog and digital applications. One of these is as a charge sensitive device in sensors for pH measurement in solutions or using gates with metals like Pd or Pt for hydrogen sensing. Efforts are being made to monolithically integrate sensors together with controlling and signal processing electronics using standard technologies. This can be achieved with the demonstrated compatibility between available CMOS technology and MEMS technology. In this paper an in-depth analysis is done regarding the reliability of floating-gate MOS transistors when charge produced by a chemical reaction between metallic oxide thin films with either reducing or oxidizing gases is present. These chemical reactions need temperatures around 200 °C or higher to take place, so thermal insulation of the sensing area must be assured for appropriate operation of the electronics at room temperature. The operation principle of the proposal here presented is confirmed by connecting the gate of a conventional MOS transistor in series with a Fe(2)O(3) layer. It is shown that an electrochemical potential is present on the ferrite layer when reacting with propane.

  9. Efforts in developing design and simulation tools for MEMS: DS/MEMS and CA/MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sung Kie; Kwak, Byung M.; Kwon, Jang-Hyuk; Chang, Su-Young; Huh, Jae S.; Kim, Eugene

    2002-04-01

    In this work, multi-physics simulation software (CA/MEMS) and design-optimization software (DS/MEMS) tailored for MEMS devices are introduced. The CA/MEMS, which is a simulation engine for DS/MEMS, is a 3-D multi-physics analysis code utilizing various numerical methods such as FEM, BEM and FVM to efficiently model MEMS application problems. The current CA/MEMS includes analysis- modules for structural, thermal, electric, electromagnetic and fluidic fields and is capable of the analyses of various coupled- field problems for MEMS applications. DS/MEMS is design optimization engine for MEMS devices. With integrating CA/MEMS and pre/post processor into CAD environment, DS/MEMS is organized to work in parametric CAD platform. DS/MEMS consists of optimal design module and robust design module. The optimal design module provides users three methods nonlinear programming, Taguchi parameter design and the response surface method. The robust design module, which is specially developed for MEMS application, can be used to minimize the perturbation of performances of MEMS devices under uncertainties of MEMS devices, such as process tolerance and the change of operating environments. To verify the efficiency and accuracy of CA/MEMS and the practical usefulness of DS/MEMS, we have been comparing the simulated results of CA/MEMS with those of other commercial codes and experimental data of manufactured MEMS devices, and investigating the performances of the optimized designs through DS/MEMS.

  10. MEMS AO for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Mike; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Levine, B. Martin; Samuele, Rocco; Lane, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; Jung, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for planet finding using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Adaptive Optics (AO). The use of a deformable mirror (DM) is described as a part of the instrument that was designed with a nulling interferometer. The strategy that is used is described in detail.

  11. MEMS scanning micromirror for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Strathman, Matthew; Liu, Yunbo; Keeler, Ethan G; Song, Mingli; Baran, Utku; Xi, Jiefeng; Sun, Ming-Ting; Wang, Ruikang; Li, Xingde; Lin, Lih Y

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an endoscopic-inspired imaging system employing a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) micromirror scanner to achieve beam scanning for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Miniaturization of a scanning mirror using MEMS technology can allow a fully functional imaging probe to be contained in a package sufficiently small for utilization in a working channel of a standard gastroesophageal endoscope. This work employs advanced image processing techniques to enhance the images acquired using the MEMS scanner to correct non-idealities in mirror performance. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  12. On-Orbit, Immuno-Based, Label-Free White Blood Cell Counting System with Microelectromechanical Sensor Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Aurora Flight Sciences, in partnership with Draper Laboratory, has developed a miniaturized system to count white blood cells in microgravity environments. The system uses MEMS technology to simultaneously count total white blood cells, the five white blood cell differential subgroups, and various lymphocyte subtypes. The OILWBCS-MEMS detection technology works by immobilizing an array of white blood cell-specific antibodies on small, gold-coated membranes. When blood flows across the membranes, specific cells' surface protein antigens bind to their corresponding antibodies. This binding can be measured and correlated to cell counts. In Phase I, the partners demonstrated surface chemistry sensitivity and specificity for total white blood cells and two lymphocyte subtypes. In Phase II, a functional prototype demonstrated end-to-end operation. This rugged, miniaturized device requires minimal blood sample preparation and will be useful for both space flight and terrestrial applications.

  13. Molecular sensors for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Yung

    Molecular sensors, known as pressure-sensitive paint and temperature-sensitive paint, are applied inside MEMS devices to obtain the internal and external flow fields. The spatial resolution for the PSP and TSP measurements has improved to 5 mum. The low-pressure PSP sensor has been investigated for use in MEMS measurements, with an application range from continuum flow to transition flow. PSP and TSP measurements in different micro devices have been obtained with the flow fields covering steady and unsteady, subsonic and supersonic flow. In microchannel measurements, the pressure distributions inside the microchannel have been obtained for Knudsen number from 0.006 to 0.8. Compressibility and rarefaction effects can be observed in the PSP data. Detailed information at the channel inlet was also collected to discuss the entrance effect for different flow regimes. For micronozzle experiments, four different micronozzles have been fabricated to study geometry effects at the micro scale. The pressure maps inside the micronozzle devices have been obtained with PSP sensors. A modified schlieren technique is used to compare the PSP results and investigate the shock wave behavior at high- and low-pressure conditions. Thick viscous layers in the micronozzle have been observed in the low-pressure measurements. For microjet impingements, heat transfer measurements have been collected with different microjet devices by using TSP sensors. For supersonic impinging microjet measurements, both pressure and temperature data have been obtained at different pressure ratios, impingement angles and impingement distances. Measurements reveal that the magnitude and number of shock cells decreases in the micro scale due to strong viscous effects. For microturbine measurements, averaged results of PSP and TSP measurements have been obtained for a rotation speed from 1300 to 4000 rpm. Phase-averaged results have been collected by using a laser triggering system at rotation speed of 1400 rpm

  14. An Accurate and Fault-Tolerant Target Positioning System for Buildings Using Laser Rangefinders and Low-Cost MEMS-Based MARG Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Guan, Dongxue; Landry, René; Cheng, Jianhua; Sydorenko, Kostyantyn

    2015-01-01

    Target positioning systems based on MEMS gyros and laser rangefinders (LRs) have extensive prospects due to their advantages of low cost, small size and easy realization. The target positioning accuracy is mainly determined by the LR's attitude derived by the gyros. However, the attitude error is large due to the inherent noises from isolated MEMS gyros. In this paper, both accelerometer/magnetometer and LR attitude aiding systems are introduced to aid MEMS gyros. A no-reset Federated Kalman Filter (FKF) is employed, which consists of two local Kalman Filters (KF) and a Master Filter (MF). The local KFs are designed by using the Direction Cosine Matrix (DCM)-based dynamic equations and the measurements from the two aiding systems. The KFs can estimate the attitude simultaneously to limit the attitude errors resulting from the gyros. Then, the MF fuses the redundant attitude estimates to yield globally optimal estimates. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FKF-based system can improve the target positioning accuracy effectively and allow for good fault-tolerant capability.

  15. An Accurate and Fault-Tolerant Target Positioning System for Buildings Using Laser Rangefinders and Low-Cost MEMS-Based MARG Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Guan, Dongxue; Landry, René Jr.; Cheng, Jianhua; Sydorenko, Kostyantyn

    2015-01-01

    Target positioning systems based on MEMS gyros and laser rangefinders (LRs) have extensive prospects due to their advantages of low cost, small size and easy realization. The target positioning accuracy is mainly determined by the LR’s attitude derived by the gyros. However, the attitude error is large due to the inherent noises from isolated MEMS gyros. In this paper, both accelerometer/magnetometer and LR attitude aiding systems are introduced to aid MEMS gyros. A no-reset Federated Kalman Filter (FKF) is employed, which consists of two local Kalman Filters (KF) and a Master Filter (MF). The local KFs are designed by using the Direction Cosine Matrix (DCM)-based dynamic equations and the measurements from the two aiding systems. The KFs can estimate the attitude simultaneously to limit the attitude errors resulting from the gyros. Then, the MF fuses the redundant attitude estimates to yield globally optimal estimates. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FKF-based system can improve the target positioning accuracy effectively and allow for good fault-tolerant capability. PMID:26512672

  16. An algorithm for selection and design of hybrid power supplies for MEMS with a case study of a micro-gas chromatograph system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. A.; Sastry, A. M.

    The Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS)-environmental monitor testbed (EMT) is a multi-component microelectromechanical system (MEMS), incorporating complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) materials for high-precision circuits used for integrated sensors such as micro-g accelerometers, micro-gyroscopes, and pressure sensors. The WIMS-EMT duty cycle, like many autonomous MEMS systems, has low-power standby periods for sensing, and high-power pulses for R/F transmission and reception. In this paper, we present results of three strategies for providing power to this system, including (1) specification of a single, aggregate power supply, resulting in a single battery electrochemistry and cell size; (2) specification of several power supplies, by a priori division of power sources by power range; and (3) specification of an arbitrary number of power "bundles," based on available space in the device. The second approach provided the best results of mass (0.032 kg) and volume (0.028 L) among the three approaches. The second and third approaches provided the best battery lifetime results; both systems produced lifetimes in excess of 2E3 h. Future work will incorporate CMOS operational amplifier (op-amp) technologies to accommodate large voltage fluxes in many MEMS devices, and implementation of our approaches into a user-friendly code.

  17. Acceleration of dormant storage effects to address the reliability of silicon surface micromachined Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Candelaria, Sam A.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Duesterhaus, Michelle Ann; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Timpe, Shannon J.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Skousen, Troy J.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Parson, Ted Blair

    2006-06-01

    Qualification of microsystems for weapon applications is critically dependent on our ability to build confidence in their performance, by predicting the evolution of their behavior over time in the stockpile. The objective of this work was to accelerate aging mechanisms operative in surface micromachined silicon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting surfaces that are stored for many years prior to use, to determine the effects of aging on reliability, and relate those effects to changes in the behavior of interfaces. Hence the main focus was on 'dormant' storage effects on the reliability of devices having mechanical contacts, the first time they must move. A large number ({approx}1000) of modules containing prototype devices and diagnostic structures were packaged using the best available processes for simple electromechanical devices. The packaging processes evolved during the project to better protect surfaces from exposure to contaminants and water vapor. Packages were subjected to accelerated aging and stress tests to explore dormancy and operational environment effects on reliability and performance. Functional tests and quantitative measurements of adhesion and friction demonstrated that the main failure mechanism during dormant storage is change in adhesion and friction, precipitated by loss of the fluorinated monolayer applied after fabrication. The data indicate that damage to the monolayer can occur at water vapor concentrations as low as 500 ppm inside the package. The most common type of failure was attributed to surfaces that were in direct contact during aging. The application of quantitative methods for monolayer lubricant analysis showed that even though the coverage of vapor-deposited monolayers is generally very uniform, even on hidden surfaces, locations of intimate contact can be significantly depleted in initial concentration of lubricating molecules. These areas represent defects in the film prone to adsorption of water or

  18. Combined photonics and MEMS function demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum-Spahn, Olga; Warren, Mial E.; Hou, Hong Q.; Carson, Richard F.; Choquette, Kent D.; Rodgers, M. Steven; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1998-04-01

    We discuss tow examples of integration of micro- electromechanical system (MEMs) and a photonic device. In the first instance, a MEMs locking device pin is driven by a voltage generated by photovoltaic cells connected in series, which are driven by a laser. In the second case, a VCSEL emitting at 1.06 micrometers is packaged together with a metallized MEMs shutter. By appropriate alignment to the opening in the shutter, the VCSEL is turned on and off by the movement of the Si chopper wheel.

  19. Design of Surface Micromachined Compliant MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Anthony Bradley

    2002-12-31

    The consideration of compliant mechanisms as Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is the focus of this research endeavor. MEMS are micron to millimeter devices that combine electrical, mechanical, and information processing capabilities on the same device. These MEMS need some mechanical motion or parts that move relative to each other. This relative motion, using multiple parts, is not desired because of the assembly requirement and the friction introduced. Compliant devices limits or eliminates friction and the need for multi-component assembly. Compliant devices improve designs by creating single piece mechanisms. The purpose of this research is to validate surface micromachining as a viable fabrication process for compliant MEMS designs. Specifically, this research has sought to fabricate a micro-compliant gripper and a micro-compliant clamp to illustrate the process. While other researchers have created compliant MEMs, most have used comb-drive actuation methods and bulk micromachining processes. This research focused on fully-compliant devices that use device flexibility for motion and actuation. Validation of these compliant MEMS is achieved by structural optimization of device design and functional performance testing. This research contributes to the ongoing research in MEMS by evaluating the potential of using surface micromachining as a process for fabricating compliant micro-mechanisms.

  20. Design of Surface micromachined Compliant MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Anthony Bradley

    2002-08-01

    The consideration of compliant mechanisms as Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is the focus of this research endeavor. MEMS are micron to millimeter devices that combine electrical, mechanical, and information processing capabilities on the same device. These MEMS need some mechanical motion or parts that move relative to each other. This relative motion, using multiple parts, is not desired because of the assembly requirement and the friction introduced. Compliant devices limits or eliminates friction and the need for multi-component assembly. Compliant devices improve designs by creating single piece mechanisms. The purpose of this research is to validate surface micromachining as a viable fabrication process for compliant MEMS designs. Specifically, this research has sought to fabricate a micro-compliant gripper and a micro-compliant clamp to illustrate the process. While other researchers have created compliant MEMS, most have used comb-drive actuation methods and bulk micromachining processes. This research focuses on fully-compliant devices that use device flexibility for motion and actuation. Validation of these compliant MEMS is achieved by structural optimization of device design and functional performance testing. This research contributes to the ongoing research in MEMS by evaluating the potential of using surface micromachining as a process for fabricating compliant micro-mechanisms.

  1. MEMS glaucoma monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Smitha; Austin, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Glaucoma is a serious disease, affecting millions of people worldwide requiring continuous monitoring of Intra Ocular Pressure (IOP) to avoid the risk of blindness. Current laboratory measurements are infrequent, intrusive and do not indicate the progression of the disease. The paper reports on the development of an implantable Glaucoma monitoring system that can monitor IOP in the eye to indicate any elevation in risk to the patient. A mathematical model of the anterior chamber of the eye was used to analyze the complex fluid flow and pressure balance in the eye. This was done in order to determine the performance requirements of the actuator, sensor and transmission electronics that could be integrated on a single microchip using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, to carry out the testing internally. The accuracy of the system was theoretically tested against results from external medical tests. The results were found to be comparable.

  2. W-Coating for MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Mani, S.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1999-07-08

    The integration of miniaturized mechanical components has spawned a new technology known as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Surface micromachining, defined as the fabrication of micromechanical structures from deposited thin films, is one of the core technological processes underlying MEMS. Surface micromachined structures have a large ratio of surface area to volume which makes them particularly vulnerable to adhesion to the substrate or adjacent structures during release or in use--a problem is called stiction. Since microactuators can have surfaces in normal or sliding contact, function and wear are critical issues for reliable operation of MEMS devices. Surface modifications are needed to reduce adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures. In this paper, we will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with Tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. We will discuss the effect of wet and vapor phase cleans along with different process variables. Endurance of the W coating is important, especially in applications where wear due to repetitive contacts with the film may occur. Further, tungsten is hard and chemically inert, Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this, approach manufacturable.

  3. A Dual-Linear Kalman Filter for Real-Time Orientation Determination System Using Low-Cost MEMS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Yuan, Xuebing; Liu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To provide a long-time reliable orientation, sensor fusion technologies are widely used to integrate available inertial sensors for the low-cost orientation estimation. In this paper, a novel dual-linear Kalman filter was designed for a multi-sensor system integrating MEMS gyros, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer. The proposed filter precludes the impacts of magnetic disturbances on the pitch and roll which the heading is subjected to. The filter can achieve robust orientation estimation for different statistical models of the sensors. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the estimated attitude angles are reduced by 30.6% under magnetic disturbances. Owing to the reduction of system complexity achieved by smaller matrix operations, the mean total time consumption is reduced by 23.8%. Meanwhile, the separated filter offers greater flexibility for the system configuration, as it is possible to switch on or off the second stage filter to include or exclude the magnetometer compensation for the heading. Online experiments were performed on the homemade miniature orientation determination system (MODS) with the turntable. The average RMSE of estimated orientation are less than 0.4° and 1° during the static and low-dynamic tests, respectively. More realistic tests on two-wheel self-balancing vehicle driving and indoor pedestrian walking were carried out to evaluate the performance of the designed MODS when high accelerations and angular rates were introduced. Test results demonstrate that the MODS is applicable for the orientation estimation under various dynamic conditions. This paper provides a feasible alternative for low-cost orientation determination. PMID:26907294

  4. A Dual-Linear Kalman Filter for Real-Time Orientation Determination System Using Low-Cost MEMS Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Yuan, Xuebing; Liu, Sheng

    2016-02-20

    To provide a long-time reliable orientation, sensor fusion technologies are widely used to integrate available inertial sensors for the low-cost orientation estimation. In this paper, a novel dual-linear Kalman filter was designed for a multi-sensor system integrating MEMS gyros, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer. The proposed filter precludes the impacts of magnetic disturbances on the pitch and roll which the heading is subjected to. The filter can achieve robust orientation estimation for different statistical models of the sensors. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the estimated attitude angles are reduced by 30.6% under magnetic disturbances. Owing to the reduction of system complexity achieved by smaller matrix operations, the mean total time consumption is reduced by 23.8%. Meanwhile, the separated filter offers greater flexibility for the system configuration, as it is possible to switch on or off the second stage filter to include or exclude the magnetometer compensation for the heading. Online experiments were performed on the homemade miniature orientation determination system (MODS) with the turntable. The average RMSE of estimated orientation are less than 0.4° and 1° during the static and low-dynamic tests, respectively. More realistic tests on two-wheel self-balancing vehicle driving and indoor pedestrian walking were carried out to evaluate the performance of the designed MODS when high accelerations and angular rates were introduced. Test results demonstrate that the MODS is applicable for the orientation estimation under various dynamic conditions. This paper provides a feasible alternative for low-cost orientation determination.

  5. Si-based RF MEMS components.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Baker, Michael Sean; Fleming, James Grant; Stewart, Harold D.; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-01-01

    Radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) are an enabling technology for next-generation communications and radar systems in both military and commercial sectors. RF MEMS-based reconfigurable circuits outperform solid-state circuits in terms of insertion loss, linearity, and static power consumption and are advantageous in applications where high signal power and nanosecond switching speeds are not required. We have demonstrated a number of RF MEMS switches on high-resistivity silicon (high-R Si) that were fabricated by leveraging the volume manufacturing processes available in the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL), a Class-1, radiation-hardened CMOS manufacturing facility. We describe novel tungsten and aluminum-based processes, and present results of switches developed in each of these processes. Series and shunt ohmic switches and shunt capacitive switches were successfully demonstrated. The implications of fabricating on high-R Si and suggested future directions for developing low-loss RF MEMS-based circuits are also discussed.

  6. Functional Micro-Dispensers based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) integrated with fabrics as functional materials to protect humans from mosquito feeding.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Ulrich R; Gurman, Pablo; Clark, Gary G; Elman, Noel

    2015-12-28

    Functional Micro-Dispensers (FMDs) based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) were designed to deliver spatial repellents that reduce the ability of mosquitoes to feed on humans. FMDs were integrated with fabrics as functional materials for protection against mosquito bites. The use of MEMS devices provides an unprecedented control over the release kinetics by means of integration with electronics for selective and timely activation of each device to perform controlled release of pesticides in air. In addition, because MEMS manufacturing techniques evolved from the microelectronic industry, FMDs can be mass produced at very low cost. Trials using FMDs that contained transfluthrin improved protection against mosquito feeding in human subjects above that of permethrin-treated uniform fabric worn on the arm of the volunteer. The overall reduction in feeding was approximately 90% compared to the untreated fabric control, and about 50% reduction compared to the permethrin-treated fabric control. The devices were efficacious over course of 32 days. FMDs have the potential for a simple and cost-effective implementation for mass adoption as wearable devices integrated in fabrics as active functional materials.

  7. MEMS Louvers for Thermal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champion, J. L.; Osiander, R.; Darrin, M. A. Garrison; Swanson, T. D.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanical louvers have frequently been used for spacecraft and instrument thermal control purposes. These devices typically consist of parallel or radial vanes, which can be opened or closed to vary the effective emissivity of the underlying surface. This project demonstrates the feasibility of using Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology to miniaturize louvers for such purposes. This concept offers the possibility of substituting the smaller, lighter weight, more rugged, and less costly MEMS devices for such mechanical louvers. In effect, a smart skin that self adjusts in response to environmental influences could be developed composed of arrays of thousands of miniaturized louvers. Several orders of magnitude size, weight, and volume decreases are potentially achieved using micro-electromechanical techniques. The use of this technology offers substantial benefits in spacecraft/instrument design, integration and testing, and flight operations. It will be particularly beneficial for the emerging smaller spacecraft and instruments of the future. In addition, this MEMS thermal louver technology can form the basis for related spacecraft instrument applications. The specific goal of this effort was to develop a preliminary MEMS device capable of modulating the effective emissivity of radiators on spacecraft. The concept pursued uses hinged panels, or louvers, in a manner such that heat emitted from the radiators is a function of louver angle. An electrostatic comb drive or other such actuator can control the louver position. The initial design calls for the louvers to be gold coated while the underlying surface is of high emissivity. Since, the base MEMS material, silicon, is transparent in the InfraRed (IR) spectrum, the device has a minimum emissivity when closed and a maximum emissivity when open. An initial set of polysilicon louver devices was designed at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in conjunction with the Thermal Engineering Branch at

  8. Close Up - Mem Fox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Mem Fox, a teacher educator and children's book author well known throughout the world. Discusses writing books for children, and the mistakes she made early in her career as a writer. Notes that Mem is a tireless advocate for meaningful literacy instruction, and her "Radical Reflections: Passionate Opinions on Teaching,…

  9. MEMS Applications in Aerodynamic Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, E.; Mehregany, M.; Bang, C.

    1998-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) embodies the integration of sensors, actuators, and electronics on a single substrate using integrated circuit fabrication techniques and compatible bulk and surface micromachining processes. Silicon and its derivatives form the material base for the MEMS technology. MEMS devices, including microsensors and microactuators, are attractive because they can be made small (characteristic dimension about 100 microns), be produced in large numbers with uniform performance, include electronics for high performance and sophisticated functionality, and be inexpensive. For aerodynamic measurements, it is preferred that sensors be small so as to approximate measurement at a point, and in fact, MEMS pressure sensors, wall shear-stress sensors, heat flux sensors and micromachined hot wires are nearing application. For the envisioned application to wind tunnel models, MEMS sensors can be placed on the surface or in very shallow grooves. MEMS devices have often been fabricated on stiff, flat silicon substrates, about 0.5 mm thick, and therefore were not easily mounted on curved surfaces. However, flexible substrates are now available and heat-flux sensor arrays have been wrapped around a curved turbine blade. Electrical leads can also be built into the flexible substrate. Thus MEMS instrumented wind tunnel models do not require deep spanwise grooves for tubes and leads that compromise the strength of conventionally instrumented models. With MEMS, even the electrical leads can potentially be eliminated if telemetry of the signals to an appropriate receiver can be implemented. While semiconductor silicon is well known for its electronic properties, it is also an excellent mechanical material for MEMS applications. However, silicon electronics are limited to operations below about 200 C, and silicon's mechanical properties start to diminish above 400 C. In recent years, silicon carbide (SiC) has emerged as the leading material candidate for

  10. Challenges in the Packaging of MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, WILLIAM D.; EATON, WILLIAM P.; MALSHE, AJAY P.; MILLER, WILLIAM M.; O'NEAL, CHAD; SINGH, SUSHILA B.

    1999-09-24

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) packaging is much different from conventional integrated circuit (IC) packaging. Many MEMS devices must interface to the environment in order to perform their intended function, and the package must be able to facilitate access with the environment while protecting the device. The package must also not interfere with or impede the operation of the MEMS device. The die attachment material should be low stress, and low outgassing, while also minimizing stress relaxation overtime which can lead to scale factor shifts in sensor devices. The fabrication processes used in creating the devices must be compatible with each other, and not result in damage to the devices. Many devices are application specific requiring custom packages that are not commercially available. Devices may also need media compatible packages that can protect the devices from harsh environments in which the MEMS device may operate. Techniques are being developed to handle, process, and package the devices such that high yields of functional packaged parts will result. Currently, many of the processing steps are potentially harmful to MEMS devices and negatively affect yield. It is the objective of this paper to review and discuss packaging challenges that exist for MEMS systems and to expose these issues to new audiences from the integrated circuit packaging community.

  11. Characterization of Kova-Pyrex Anodically Bonded Samples: A New Packaging Approach for MEMS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargo, S.; Green, A.; Mueller, J.; Bame, D.; Reinicke, R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to anodically bond Kovar to Pyrex 7740 significantly expands the packaging approaches available for MEMS devices. This technique greatly simplifies and reliably interconnects micropropulsion MEMS components (thrusters, valves) with the attached propellant system.

  12. Monolithic integration of a MOSFET with a MEMS device

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Reid; Draper, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An integrated microelectromechanical system comprises at least one MOSFET interconnected to at least one MEMS device on a common substrate. A method for integrating the MOSFET with the MEMS device comprises fabricating the MOSFET and MEMS device monolithically on the common substrate. Conveniently, the gate insulator, gate electrode, and electrical contacts for the gate, source, and drain can be formed simultaneously with the MEMS device structure, thereby eliminating many process steps and materials. In particular, the gate electrode and electrical contacts of the MOSFET and the structural layers of the MEMS device can be doped polysilicon. Dopant diffusion from the electrical contacts is used to form the source and drain regions of the MOSFET. The thermal diffusion step for forming the source and drain of the MOSFET can comprise one or more of the thermal anneal steps to relieve stress in the structural layers of the MEMS device.

  13. MEMS reliability assessment program: progress to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III; Skelton, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    As the Army transforms into a more lethal, lighter and agile force, the technologies that support these systems must decrease in size while increasing in intelligence. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are one such technology that the Army and Department of Defense will rely on heavily to achieve these objectives. Current and future military applications of MEMS devices include safety and arming devices, fuzing devices, various guidance systems, sensors/detectors, inertial measurement units, tracking devices, radio frequency devices, wireless RFIDs and network systems, GPSs, radar systems, mobile base systems, satellites, missiles and the like.

  14. The Impact of Emerging MEMS-Based Microsystems on US Defense Applications

    SciTech Connect

    STAPLE,BEVAN D.; JAKUBCZAK II,JEROME F.

    2000-01-20

    This paper examines the impact of inserting Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) into US defense applications. As specific examples, the impacts of micro Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs), radio frequency MEMS (RF MEMS), and Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) to provide integrated intelligence, communication, and control to the defense infrastructure with increased affordability, functionality, and performance are highlighted.

  15. Printed Antennas Made Reconfigurable by Use of MEMS Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2005-01-01

    A class of reconfigurable microwave antennas now undergoing development comprise fairly conventional printed-circuit feed elements and radiating patches integrated with novel switches containing actuators of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type. In comparison with solid-state electronic control devices incorporated into some prior printed microwave antennas, the MEMS-based switches in these antennas impose lower insertion losses and consume less power. Because the radio-frequency responses of the MEMS switches are more nearly linear, they introduce less signal distortion. In addition, construction and operation are simplified because only a single DC bias line is needed to control each MEMS actuator.

  16. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than

  17. A Three-Dimensional Microdisplacement Sensing System Based on MEMS Bulk-Silicon Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junjie; Lei, Lihua; Chen, Xin; Cai, Xiaoyu; Li, Yuan; Han, Tao

    2014-01-01

    For the dimensional measurement and characterization of microsized and nanosized components, a three-dimensional microdisplacement sensing system was developed using the piezoresistive effect in silicon. The sensor was fabricated using microelectromechanical system bulk-silicon technology, and it was validated using the finite element method. A precise data acquisition circuit with an accuracy of 20 μV was designed to obtain weak voltage signals. By calibration, the sensing system was shown to have a sensitivity of 17.29 mV/μm and 4.59 mV/μm in the axial and lateral directions, respectively; the nonlinearity in these directions was 0.8% and 1.0% full scale, respectively. A full range of 4.6 μm was achieved in the axial direction. Results of a resolution test indicated that the sensing system had a resolution of 5 nm in the axial direction and 10 nm in the lateral direction. PMID:25360581

  18. On-line smoothing for an integrated navigation system with low-cost MEMS inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai; Lai, Ying-Chih; Chang, Chin-Chia; Cai, Jia-Ming; Huang, Shih-Ching

    2012-12-13

    The integration of the Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely applied to seamlessly determine the time-variable position and orientation parameters of a system for navigation and mobile mapping applications. For optimal data fusion, the Kalman filter (KF) is often used for real-time applications. Backward smoothing is considered an optimal post-processing procedure. However, in current INS/GPS integration schemes, the KF and smoothing techniques still have some limitations. This article reviews the principles and analyzes the limitations of these estimators. In addition, an on-line smoothing method that overcomes the limitations of previous algorithms is proposed. For verification, an INS/GPS integrated architecture is implemented using a low-cost micro-electro-mechanical systems inertial measurement unit and a single-frequency GPS receiver. GPS signal outages are included in the testing trajectories to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method in comparison to conventional schemes.

  19. memP

    SciTech Connect

    Chambreau, C.

    2010-02-05

    The lightweight heap profiling tool memP Version 1 provides a library that can be used with MPI applications that make use of heap memory allocations to provide profile data based on the per-task high-water-mark of heap allocation. The memP output is generated as a text report that can present summary information or specific detail of the allocation call site data for each task The memP library source code is based on teh mpiP MPI profiling library (http://mpip.sourceforge.net), but is substantially different in functionality and organization.

  20. memP

    2010-02-05

    The lightweight heap profiling tool memP Version 1 provides a library that can be used with MPI applications that make use of heap memory allocations to provide profile data based on the per-task high-water-mark of heap allocation. The memP output is generated as a text report that can present summary information or specific detail of the allocation call site data for each task The memP library source code is based on teh mpiP MPI profilingmore » library (http://mpip.sourceforge.net), but is substantially different in functionality and organization.« less

  1. Three-axis MEMS Accelerometer for Structural Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbin, E.; Koleda, A.; Nesterenko, T.; Vtorushin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system accelerometers are widely used for metrological measurements of acceleration, tilt, vibration, and shock in moving objects. The paper presents the analysis of MEMS accelerometer that can be used for the structural inspection. ANSYS Multiphysics platform is used to simulate the behavior of MEMS accelerometer by employing a finite element model and MATLAB/Simulink tools for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems.

  2. Micromachined sensor systems on a chip: The integration of MEMS with CMOS and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Montague, S.; Sniegowski, J.

    1997-03-01

    The monolithic integration of micromechanical devices with their controlling electronics offers potential increases in performance as well as decreased cost for these devices. Analog Devices has demonstrated the commercial viability of this integration by interleaving micromechanical fabrication steps with microelectronic fabrication steps to produce a single-axis accelerometer on a chip. A next-generation integrated technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories eliminates many of the constraints associated with Analog`s process. This new technology enables the manufacture of complex micromachined sensor systems on a chip. An overview of Sandia`s micromachined system-on-a-chip technology along with application of the technology to inertial sensor systems designed by researchers at U.C. Berkeley will be given.

  3. MEMS scanner mirror based system for retina scanning and in eye projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woittennek, Franziska; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Dallmann, Hans-Georg; Schelinski, Uwe; Grüger, Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    Many applications could benefit from miniaturized systems to scan blood vessels behind the retina in the human eye, so called "retina scanning". This reaches from access control to sophisticated security applications and medical devices. High volume systems for consumer applications require low cost and a user friendly operation. For example this includes no need for removal of glasses and self-adjustment, in turn guidance of focus and point of attraction by simultaneous projection for the user. A new system has been designed based on the well-known resonantly driven 2-d scanner mirror of Fraunhofer IPMS. A combined NIR and VIS laser system illuminates the eye through an eye piece designed for an operating distance allowing the use of glasses and granting sufficient field of view. This usability feature was considered to be more important than highest miniaturization. The modulated VIS laser facilitates the projection of an image directly onto the retina. The backscattered light from the continuous NIR laser contains the information of the blood vessels and is detected by a highly sensitive photo diode. A demonstrational setup has been realized including readout and driving electronics. The laser power was adjusted to an eye-secure level. Additional security features were integrated. Test measurements revealed promising results. In a first demonstration application the detection of biometric pattern of the blood vessels was evaluated for issues authentication in.

  4. MEMS based pumped liquid cooling systems for micro/nano spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, G. C.; Shakkottai, P.; Sur, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    The electronic and other payload power densities in future micro/nano spacecraft are expected to exceed 25 Watts/cm(sup 2) and require advanced thermal control concepts and technologies to keep their payload within allowable temperature limits. This paper presents background on the need for pumped liquid cooling systems for future micro/nano spacecraft and results from this ongoing experimental investigation.

  5. An Implantable MEMS Micropump System for Drug Delivery in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gensler, Heidi; Sheybani, Roya; Li, Po-Ying; Lo, Ronalee; Meng, Ellis

    2012-01-01

    We present the first implantable drug delivery system for controlled dosing, timing, and location in small animals. Current implantable drug delivery devices do not provide control over these factors or are not feasible for implantation in research animals as small as mice. Our system utilizes an integrated electrolysis micropump, is refillable, has an inert drug reservoir for broad drug compatibility, and is capable of adjustment to the delivery regimen while implanted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for characterization of electrodes on glass substrate and a flexible Parylene substrate. Benchtop testing of the electrolysis actuator resulted in flow rates from 1 to 34 μL/min on glass substrate and up to 6.8 μL/min on Parylene substrate. The fully integrated system generated a flow rate of 4.72 ± 0.35 μL/min under applied constant current of 1.0 mA while maintaining a power consumption of only ~3 mW. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo application of the system for anti-cancer drug delivery in mice. PMID:22273985

  6. Combined photonics and MEMs function demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Warren, M.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Choquette, K.D.; Rogers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Carson, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have recently demonstrated two prototypes where photonics and microelectromechanical system (MEMs) technologies have been integrated to show proof-of-principle functionality for weapon surety functions. These activities are part of a program which is exploring the miniaturization of electromechanical components for making weapon systems safer. Such miniaturization can lead to a low-cost, small, high-performance ``systems-on-a-chip``, and have many applications ranging from advanced military systems to large-volume commercial markets like automobiles, rf or land-based communications networks and equipment, or commercial electronics. One of the key challenges in realization of the microsystem is integration of several technologies including digital electronics; analog and rf electronics, optoelectronics (light emitting and detecting devices and circuits), sensors and actuators, and advanced packaging technologies. In this work the authors describe efforts in integrating MEMs and photonic functions and the fabrication constraints on both system components. Here, they discuss two examples of integration of MEMs and a photonic device. In the first instance, a MEMs locking device pin is driven by a voltage generated by photovoltaic cells connected in series, which are driven by a laser. In the second case, a VCSEL emitting at 1.06 {micro}m is packaged together with a metallized MEMs shutter. By appropriate alignment to the opening in the shutter, the VCSEL is turned on and off by the movement of the Si chopper wheel.

  7. Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging System Using Spread Spectrum and MEMS Technology for Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Tiete, Jelmer; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Indoor localization of persons and objects poses a great engineering challenge. Previously developed localization systems demonstrate the use of wideband techniques in ultrasound ranging systems. Direct sequence and frequency hopping spread spectrum ultrasound signals have been proven to achieve a high level of accuracy. A novel ranging method using the frequency hopping spread spectrum with finite impulse response filtering will be investigated and compared against the direct sequence spread spectrum. In the first setup, distances are estimated in a single-access environment, while in the second setup, two senders and one receiver are used. During the experiments, the micro-electromechanical systems are used as ultrasonic sensors, while the senders were implemented using field programmable gate arrays. Results show that in a single-access environment, the direct sequence spread spectrum method offers slightly better accuracy and precision performance compared to the frequency hopping spread spectrum. When two senders are used, measurements point out that the frequency hopping spread spectrum is more robust to near-far effects than the direct sequence spread spectrum. PMID:24553084

  8. BioMEMs.

    PubMed

    Gross, Brooks A

    2004-01-01

    This session is intended to provide insight into the development of BioMEMS in the academic and industrial settings and address the current challenges facing R&D. Each speaker will address the field of bioMEMS and collaborations between academia and industry from his point-of-view and provide examples of developmental successes and failures in his setting. The speakers will also submit potential solutions to the organizational problems they presently face and foresee in the future. As a panel, the speakers will exchange ideas with the attendees with the hope of collectively introducing solutions to the problems submitted during the talks and general guidelines for successful R&D of BioMEMS through productive collaboration among engineers and scientists of different disciplines and between academia and industry. Speakers: Professor Kensall D. Wise (Professor of EECS and Director of WIMS, U of Michigan), Dr. Michael A. Huff (Director of the MEMS Exchange), Colin Brenan (CTO, Biotrove).

  9. WGP structures patterned by Lloyd's mirror laser interference lithography system integrate into MEMS physical sensor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Kuo-Chun; Hong, Shuo-Ting; Lin, Te-Hsun; Chuang, Tzu-Han; Fu, Chien-Chung

    2016-03-01

    Wire-grid polarizers (WGPs) are composed of 1-D nanoscale periodic structures and are widely used in liquid crystal display devices to enhance the brightness and improve the utilization rate of the backlight source. This paper proposes the design and application of a WGP device for an microelectromechanical system physical force sensor derived through an optical measurement method. Infrared (IR) light was served as the signal source, with the initial angle set incident to the WGP, which was fabricated on microstructures such as cantilever beam, thin-film or bridge structures. According to the operation principle, when a physical force affects the microstructures, the incident angle of the signal light changes, which easily produces different transmission signal values for detection by an IR photodetector. Therefore, the proposed system can be used for optical contactless sensing in physical force sensing modules. Furthermore, the WGP structure introduced in this paper was defined using laser interference lithography and deposited with Al by E-beam evaporation.

  10. Sacrificial bridges for MEMS fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Min; Chen, Yang-Che; Fong, Chien-Fu; Guu, Yunn-Horng; Chen, Rongshun; Yeh, J. Andrew; Hou, Max T.

    2011-09-01

    This study discusses sacrificial bridges that are used to release MEMS devices. Before being released, sacrificial bridges connect all the component structures into an integral structure. Solder bump bonding is used to mount the MEMS chip on another chip or a printed circuit board (PCB) and to maintain the alignment among all component structures after removal of the sacrificial bridges. Two types of sacrificial bridges were designed, analyzed and fabricated. The fabrication process—which used low resistivity single crystal silicon (SCS) wafers as the device material—was developed to implement the sacrificial bridges. Novel SCS through silicon vias (TSVs), which interconnect stacked chips, was made using the same process. An electrostatic comb drive actuator was fabricated and mounted onto a PCB. The fabricated actuator was tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the fabrication process, sacrificial bridges and SCS TSVs. The results show that the actuator worked well. Its maximum displacement and resonant frequency were 69.9 µm and 406 Hz, respectively. This method is promising for the delivery of a novel 3D system in package for MEMS devices.

  11. MEMS and microfluidics for diagnostics devices.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Y; Gurman, P

    2010-06-01

    There are conditions in clinical medicine demanding critical therapeutic decisions. These conditions necessitate accuracy, rapidity, accessibility, cost-effectiveness and mobility. New technologies have been developed in order to address these challenges. Microfluidics and Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems are two of such technologies. Microfluidics, a discipline that involves processing fluids at the microscale in etched microchannels, is being used to build lab- on-a-chip systems to run chemical and biological assays. These systems are being transformed into handheld devices designed to be used at remote settings or at the bedside. MEMS are microscale electromechanical elements integrated in lab chip systems or used as individual components. MEMS based sensors represents a highly developed field with successful commercialized products currently being incorporated into vitro,ex vivo and in vivo devices. In the present paper several examples of microfluidic devices and MEMS sensors are introduced together with some current examples of commercialized products. Future challenges and trends will be discussed. PMID:20199381

  12. Laser Interferometry for Harsh Environment MEMS Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieva, Patricia

    2008-03-01

    Silicon-based MEMS technology has enabled the fabrication of a broad range of sensor and actuator systems that are having a great impact in areas that benefit from miniaturization and increased functionality. The main advantage of Si-based MEMS technologies is their possibility of integration with microelectronics thus allowing the economical production of smart microsystems. In the automotive industry for example, there is a need for inexpensive smart MEMS sensors for engine control applications. For instance, smart MEMS sensors capable of operating ``in cylinder'', where temperatures are around 400 C, could continuously monitor the combustion quality of the cylinders of automotive engines thus leading to reduced emissions and improved fuel economy. However, when the environment temperature is too high (>180 C), conventional Si-based microelectronics suffer from severe performance degradation, thus making smart Si-based MEMS impractical. Hence, further development, in terms of new MEMS materials and/or new technologies, is needed especially where high temperature capability is crucial to realizing improved electronic control. Remote sensing through optical signal detection has major advantages for safe signal transmission in harsh environments. It is highly resistant to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI) and at the same time, it eliminates the necessity of on-board electronics, which has been one of the main obstacles in the development of smart MEMS sensors for high temperature applications. An economical way to deal with higher temperatures and other aggressive environmental conditions is to build MEMS sensors out of robust materials (e.g. Silicon nitride, SiC) and integrate them with optical signal detection techniques to form MOEMS. In this paper, we review recent trends for the use of laser interferometry for MEMS sensors in the context of using them for high temperature applications. Technological challenges faced in

  13. Understanding multi-scale structural evolution in granular systems through gMEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2013-06-01

    We show how the rheological response of a material to applied loads can be systematically coded, analyzed and succinctly summarized, according to an individual grain's property (e.g. kinematics). Individual grains are considered as their own smart sensor akin to microelectromechanical systems (e.g. gyroscopes, accelerometers), each capable of recognizing their evolving role within self-organizing building block structures (e.g. contact cycles and force chains). A symbolic time series is used to represent their participation in such self-assembled building blocks and a complex network summarizing their interrelationship with other grains is constructed. In particular, relationships between grain time series are determined according to the information theory Hamming distance or the metric Euclidean distance. We then use topological distance to find network communities enabling groups of grains at remote physical metric distances in the material to share a classification. In essence grains with similar structural and functional roles at different scales are identified together. This taxonomy distills the dissipative structural rearrangements of grains down to its essential features and thus provides pointers for objective physics-based internal variable formalisms used in the construction of robust predictive continuum models.

  14. BioMEMS in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nuxoll, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The drive to design micro-scale medical devices which can be reliably and uniformly mass produced has prompted many researchers to adapt processing technologies from the semiconductor industry. By operating at a much smaller length scale, the resulting biologically-oriented microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS) provide many opportunities for improved drug delivery: Low-dose vaccinations and painless transdermal drug delivery are possible through precisely engineered microneedles which pierce the skin's barrier layer without reaching the nerves. Low-power, low-volume BioMEMS pumps and reservoirs can be implanted where conventional pumping systems cannot. Drug formulations with geometrically complex, extremely uniform micro- and nano-particles are formed through micromolding or with microfluidic devices. This review describes these BioMEMS technologies and discusses their current state of implementation. As these technologies continue to develop and capitalize on their simpler integration with other MEMS-based systems such as computer controls and telemetry, BioMEMS' impact on the field of drug delivery will continue to increase.

  15. Liquid Tunable Microlenses based on MEMS techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xuefeng; Jiang, Hongrui

    2013-01-01

    The recent rapid development in microlens technology has provided many opportunities for miniaturized optical systems, and has found a wide range of applications. Of these microlenses, tunable-focus microlenses are of special interest as their focal lengths can be tuned using micro-scale actuators integrated with the lens structure. Realization of such tunable microlens generally relies on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies. Here, we review the recent progress in tunable liquid microlenses. The underlying physics relevant to these microlenses are first discussed, followed by description of three main categories of tunable microlenses involving MEMS techniques, mechanically driven, electrically driven, and those integrated within microfluidic systems. PMID:24163480

  16. MEMS Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenBerg, A.; Spiering, V. L.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; Elwenspoek, M.; Bergveld, P.

    1995-01-01

    Micro-technology enables the manufacturing of all kinds of components for miniature systems or micro-systems, such as sensors, pumps, valves, and channels. The integration of these components into a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) drastically decreases the total system volume and mass. These properties, combined with the increasing need for monitoring and control of small flows in (bio)chemical experiments, makes MEMS attractive for space applications. The level of integration and applied technology depends on the product demands and the market. The ultimate integration is process integration, which results in a one-chip system. An example of process integration is a dosing system of pump, flow sensor, micromixer, and hybrid feedback electronics to regulate the flow. However, for many applications, a hybrid integration of components is sufficient and offers the advantages of design flexibility and even the exchange of components in the case of a modular set up. Currently, we are working on hybrid integration of all kinds of sensors (physical and chemical) and flow system modules towards a modular system; the micro total analysis system (micro TAS). The substrate contains electrical connections as in a printed circuit board (PCB) as well as fluid channels for a circuit channel board (CCB) which, when integrated, form a mixed circuit board (MCB).

  17. In-situ Iberian pig carcass classification using a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based near infrared (NIR) spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Rojas, E; Pérez-Marín, D; De Pedro-Sanz, E; Guerrero-Ginel, J E; Garrido-Varo, A

    2012-03-01

    Iberian pig (IP) products are gourmet foods highly appreciated at international markets, reaching high prices, because of its exquisite flavors. At present, there aren't practical and affordable analytical methods which can authenticate every single piece put on the market. This paper reports on the performance of a handheld micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based spectrometer (1600-2400nm) for authentication-classification of individual IP carcasses into different commercial categories. Performance (accuracy and instrumental design) of the instrument was compared with that of high-resolution NIRS monochromators (400-2500nm). A total of 300 carcasses of IPs raised under different feeding regimes ("Acorn", "Recebo" and "Feed") were analyzed in three modes (intact fat in the carcass, skin-free subcutaneous fat samples and melted fat samples). The best classification results for the MEMS instrument were: 93.9% "Acorn" carcasses correctly classified, 96.4% "Feed" and 60.6% "Recebo", respectively. Evaluation of model performance confirmed the suitability of the handheld device for individual, fast, non-destructive, low-cost analysis of IP carcasses on the slaughterhouse line.

  18. The NASA GSFC MEMS Colloidal Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Eric H.; Jamieson, Brian G.; Norgaard, Peter C.; Chepko, Ariane B.

    2004-01-01

    A number of upcoming missions require different thrust levels on the same spacecraft. A highly scaleable and efficient propulsion system would allow substantial mass savings. One type of thruster that can throttle from high to low thrust while maintaining a high specific impulse is a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) colloidal thruster. The NASA GSFC MEMS colloidal thruster has solved the problem of electrical breakdown to permit the integration of the electrode on top of the emitter by a novel MEMS fabrication technique. Devices have been successfully fabricated and the insulation properties have been tested to show they can support the required electric field. A computational finite element model was created and used to verify the voltage required to successfully operate the thruster. An experimental setup has been prepared to test the devices with both optical and Time-Of-Flight diagnostics.

  19. IC-Compatible Technologies for Optical MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, T.W.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1999-04-30

    Optical Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (Optical MEMS) Technology holds the promise of one-day producing highly integrated optical systems on a common, monolithic substrate. The choice of fabrication technology used to manufacture Optical MEMS will play a pivotal role in the size, functionality and ultimately the cost of optical Microsystems. By leveraging the technology base developed for silicon integrated circuits, large batches of routers, emitters, detectors and amplifiers will soon be fabricated for literally pennies per part. In this article we review the current status of technologies used for Optical MEMS, as well as fabrication technologies of the future, emphasizing manufacturable surface micromachining approaches to producing reliable, low-cost devices for optical communications applications.

  20. Application of MEMS blazed gratings in WDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongfeng; Yu, Honglin; Kang, Zhiping

    2009-05-01

    For the shortage and limitation of ruled grating that have ghost lines and stray light because of period error and ruling irregularity, a method for making a wavelength division multiplexer (WDM) based on Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) blazed grating is proposed. The basic composition of WDM based on MEMS blazed grating is introduced according to the method. The process realizing MEMS blazed grating and means for improving diffraction efficiency are also introduced. MEMS blazed grating is numerical simulated and analyzed in laboratory virtual instrument engineering workbench (LabVIEW), the diffraction intensity distribution of blazed grating is presented, it is shown that the blazed grating, period is 2000nm and blazed angle is 20 degree, have the best division effect for light wave with wavelength about 1.55μm by the results. At the same time, the 3D layout of WDM is provided in ZEMAX, and the rays in WDM are traced also. It is indicated by the results when the channel spacing is greater than or equal to 50nm, the division effect is in evidence. It achieves the capability of Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing (CWDM). It is proved that MEMS blazed grating can be applied well in WDM by all the results.

  1. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  2. Monitoring of slope-instabilities and deformations with Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) in wireless ad-hoc Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnhardt, C.; Fernández-Steeger, T. M.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    In most mountainous regions, landslides represent a major threat to human life, properties and infrastructures. Nowadays existing landslide monitoring systems are often characterized by high efforts in terms of purchase, installation, maintenance, manpower and material. In addition (or because of this) only small areas or selective points of the endangered zone can be observed by the system. Therefore the improvement of existing and the development of new monitoring and warning systems are of high relevance. The joint project "Sensor based Landslide Early Warning Systems" (SLEWS) deals with the development of a prototypic Alarm- and Early Warning system (EWS) for different types of landslides using low-cost micro-sensors (MEMS) integrated in a wireless sensor network (WSN). Modern so called Ad-Hoc, Multi-Hop wireless sensor networks (WSN) are characterized by a self organizing and self-healing capacity of the system (autonomous systems). The network consists of numerous individual and own energy-supply operating sensor nodes, that can send data packages from their measuring devices (here: MEMS) over other nodes (Multi-Hop) to a collection point (gateway). The gateway provides the interface to central processing and data retrieval units (PC, Laptop or server) outside the network. In order to detect and monitor the different landslide processes (like fall, topple, spreading or sliding) 3D MEMS capacitive sensors made from single silicon crystals and glass were chosen to measure acceleration, tilting and altitude changes. Based on the so called MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) technology, the sensors combine very small mechanical and electronic units, sensing elements and transducers on a small microchip. The mass production of such type of sensors allows low cost applications in different areas (like automobile industries, medicine, and automation technology). Apart from the small and so space saving size and the low costs another advantage is the energy

  3. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  4. Quasi-optical MEMS switching array technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weikang

    During this Ph.D. dissertation research, both experimental and theoretical investigations have been conducted to develop new micro-elecro-mechancical systems (MEMS) based technologies and new device concepts for the microwave and millimeter wave frequency range. A proof-of-principle E-band (60GHz˜90GHz) MEMS switching array has been successful designed and constructed, where 400 MEMS switches form a two dimensional array on a 2inch x 2inch quartz substrate. The E-band MEMS grid array switch has demonstrated >6 dB maximum isolation at 76 GHz and >10 dB on/off contrast ratio at 70˜85 GHz. Extensive work has been carried out with the aim of developing a compact impedance matching method for quasi-optic grid arrays. A new device concept is presented, where bulk micro-machining techniques are utilized to create a new class of artificial materials with continuously variable dielectric constant for use in millimeter wave quasi-optical systems. Based on this bulk micro-machined material, two novel quasi-optical impedance transformers have been modeled, designed, and characterized, which provide ideal impedance matching for quasi-optical systems. Photonic bandgap (PBG) RF circuit models also have been studied for microwave and millimeter wave applications. During the course of this development activity, materials characteristics have been analyzed for their suitability in quasi-optical grid array circuit and RF MEMS device applications. Air bridge MEMS switches have been designed, fabricated and characterized for microwave and millimeter wave applications.

  5. Stability, Nonlinearity and Reliability of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang; Chen, Di

    2007-01-01

    Electrostatic micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) is a special branch with a wide range of applications in sensing and actuating devices in MEMS. This paper provides a survey and analysis of the electrostatic force of importance in MEMS, its physical model, scaling effect, stability, nonlinearity and reliability in detail. It is necessary to understand the effects of electrostatic forces in MEMS and then many phenomena of practical importance, such as pull-in instability and the effects of effective stiffness, dielectric charging, stress gradient, temperature on the pull-in voltage, nonlinear dynamic effects and reliability due to electrostatic forces occurred in MEMS can be explained scientifically, and consequently the great potential of MEMS technology could be explored effectively and utilized optimally. A simplified parallel-plate capacitor model is proposed to investigate the resonance response, inherent nonlinearity, stiffness softened effect and coupled nonlinear effect of the typical electrostatically actuated MEMS devices. Many failure modes and mechanisms and various methods and techniques, including materials selection, reasonable design and extending the controllable travel range used to analyze and reduce the failures are discussed in the electrostatically actuated MEMS devices. Numerical simulations and discussions indicate that the effects of instability, nonlinear characteristics and reliability subjected to electrostatic forces cannot be ignored and are in need of further investigation.

  6. VCSELs for interferometric readout of MEMS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkland, Darwin K.; Geib, Kent M.; Peake, Gregory M.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Baker, Michael S.; Okandan, Murat

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of single-frequency VCSELs (vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers) for sensing the position of a moving MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) object with resolution much less than 1nm. Position measurement is the basis of many different types of MEMS sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure sensors. Typically, by switching from a traditional capacitive electronic readout to an interferometric optical readout, the resolution can be improved by an order of magnitude with a corresponding improvement in MEMS sensor performance. Because the VCSEL wavelength determines the scale of the position measurement, laser wavelength (frequency) stability is desirable. This paper discusses the impact of VCSEL amplitude and frequency noise on the position measurement.

  7. MEMS-Based Spinning Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A nozzle body and assembly for delivering atomized fuel to a combustion chamber. The nozzle body is rotatably mounted onto a substrate. One or more curvilinear fuel delivery channels are in flow communication with an internal fuel distribution cavity formed in the nozzle body. Passage of pressurized fuel through the nozzle body causes the nozzle body to rotate. Components of the nozzle assembly are formed of silicon carbide having surfaces etched by deep reactive ion etching utilizing MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology. A fuel premix chamber is carried on the substrate in flow communication with a supply passage in the nozzle body.

  8. Respiratory Magnetogram Detected with a MEMS Device

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Nicolas, Saul M.; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Herrera-May, Agustin L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Pedro; Figueras, Eduard; Gutierrez-D., Edmundo A.; Tapia, Jesus A.; Trejo, Argelia; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by the brain or the heart are very useful in clinical diagnostics. Therefore, magnetic signals produced by other organs are also of considerable interest. Here we show first evidence that thoracic muscles can produce a strong magnetic flux density during respiratory activity, that we name respiratory magnetogram. We used a small magnetometer based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), which was positioned inside the open thoracic cage of anaesthetized and ventilated rats. With this new MEMS sensor of about 20 nT resolution, we recorded a strong and rhythmic respiratory magnetogram of about 600 nT. PMID:24046516

  9. MEMS-BASED 3D CONFOCAL SCANNING MICROENDOSCOPE USING MEMS SCANNERS FOR BOTH LATERAL AND AXIAL SCAN.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Erkang; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Liang, Wenxuan; Li, Xingde; Xie, Huikai

    2014-08-15

    A fiber-optic 3D confocal scanning microendoscope employing MEMS scanners for both lateral and axial scan was designed and constructed. The MEMS 3D scan engine achieved a lateral scan range of over ± 26° with a 2D MEMS scanning micromirror and a depth scan of over 400 μm with a 1D MEMS tunable microlens. The lateral resolution and axial resolution of this system were experimentally measured as 1.0 μm and 7.0 μm, respectively. 2D and 3D confocal reflectance images of micro-patterns, micro-particles, onion skins and acute rat brain tissue were obtained by this MEMS-based 3D confocal scanning microendoscope.

  10. A novel prototyping method for die-level monolithic integration of MEMS above-IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Paul-Vahe; Zhang, Qing; Saha, Tanmoy; Mahdavi, Sareh; Allidina, Karim; Nabki, Frederic; El Gamal, Mourad

    2013-06-01

    This work presents a convenient and versatile prototyping method for integrating surface-micromachined microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) directly above IC electronics, at the die level. Such localized implementation helps reduce development costs associated with the acquisition of full-sized semiconductor wafers. To demonstrate the validity of this method, variants of an IC-compatible surface-micromachining MEMS process are used to build different MEMS devices above a commercial transimpedance amplifier chip. Subsequent functional assessments for both the electronics and the MEMS indicate that the integration is successful, validating the prototyping methodology presented in this work, as well as the suitability of the selected MEMS technology for above-IC integration.

  11. Shifting the Inertial Navigation Paradigm with MEMS Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Timothy; Brady, Tye; Bishop, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Why don t you use MEMS? is one of the most common questions posed to navigation systems engineers designing inertial navigation solutions in the modern era. The question stems from a general understanding that great strides have been made in terrestrial MEMS accelerometers and attitude rate sensors in terms of accuracy, mass, and power. Yet, when compared on a unit-to-unit basis, MEMS devices do not provide comparable performance (accuracy) to navigation grade sensors. This paper will propose a paradigm shift where the comparison in performance is between multiple MEMS devices and a single navigation grade sensor. The concept is that systematically, a sufficient number of MEMS sensors may mathematically provide comparable performance to a single navigation grade device and be competitive in terms power and mass allocations when viewed on a systems level. The implication is that both inertial navigation system design and fault detection, identification, and recovery could benefit from a system of MEMS devices in the same way that swarm sensing has benefited Earth observation and astronomy. A survey of the state of the art in inertial sensor accuracy scaled by mass and power will be provided to show the specific error in MEMS and navigation graded devices, a mathematical comparison of multi-unit to single-unit sensor errors will be developed, and preliminary applications to Constellation vehicles will be explored.

  12. Shifting the Intertial Navigation Paradigm with the MEMS Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Timothy P., II; Bishop, Robert H.; Brady, Tye

    2010-01-01

    "Why don't you use MEMS?" is of the most common questions posed to navigation systems engineers designing inertial navigation solutions in the modern era. The question stems from a general understanding that great strides have been made in terrestrial MEMS accelerometers and attitude rate sensors in terms of accuracy, mass, and power. Yet, when compared on a unit-to-unit basis, MEMS devices do not provide comparable performance (accuracy) to navigation grade sensors in several key metrics. This paper will propose a paradigm shift where the comparison in performance is between multiple MEMS devices and a single navigation grade sensor. The concept is that systematically, a sufficient number of MEMS sensors may mathematically provide comparable performance to a single navigation grade device and be competitive in terms power and mass allocations when viewed on a systems level. The implication is that both inertial navigation system design and fault detection, identification, and recovery could benefit from a system of MEMS devices in the same way that swarm sensing has benefited Earth observation and astronomy. A survey of the state of the art in inertial sensor accuracy scaled by mass and power will be provided to show the scaled error in MEMS and navigation graded devices, a mathematical comparison of multi-unit to single-unit sensor errors will be developed, and preliminary application to an Orion lunar skip atmospheric entry trajectory will be explored.

  13. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  14. The 18 mm[superscript 2] Laboratory: Teaching MEMS Development with the SUMMiT Foundry Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallas, T.; Berg, J. M.; Gale, R. O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the goals, pedagogical system, and educational outcomes of a three-semester curriculum in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The sequence takes engineering students with no formal MEMS training and gives them the skills to participate in cutting-edge MEMS research and development. The evolution of the curriculum from…

  15. Review on the modeling of electrostatic MEMS.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Chun; Lee, Hsin-Li; Chang, Pei-Zen; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic-driven microelectromechanical systems devices, in most cases, consist of couplings of such energy domains as electromechanics, optical electricity, thermoelectricity, and electromagnetism. Their nonlinear working state makes their analysis complex and complicated. This article introduces the physical model of pull-in voltage, dynamic characteristic analysis, air damping effect, reliability, numerical modeling method, and application of electrostatic-driven MEMS devices. PMID:22219707

  16. Review on the Modeling of Electrostatic MEMS

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Wan-Chun; Lee, Hsin-Li; Chang, Pei-Zen; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic-driven microelectromechanical systems devices, in most cases, consist of couplings of such energy domains as electromechanics, optical electricity, thermoelectricity, and electromagnetism. Their nonlinear working state makes their analysis complex and complicated. This article introduces the physical model of pull-in voltage, dynamic characteristic analysis, air damping effect, reliability, numerical modeling method, and application of electrostatic-driven MEMS devices. PMID:22219707

  17. Aerospace applications of mass market MEMS products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Karin; Kroetz, Gerhard; Schalk, Josef; Mueller, Gerhard

    2002-07-01

    Aerospace applications of MEMS products, originally developed for automotive mass markets, are discussed. Various sensor examples with a high dual use potential are presented: inertial sensing, flow and gas sensing, robust micro sensors including SiC- and GaN-based devices, as well as first approaches towards flexible and distributed microsystems. In Europe the automotive industry is one of the main MEMS market drivers, simply because of the sheer size of this market and Europe's strong position in this industrial field. Main MEMS activities are development and integration of vehicle dynamics sensing systems, passenger safety and navigation systems, air and fuel intake systems, as well as sensor systems for exhaust gas after treatment and climate control. Benefits on the customer side are increased safety, passenger comfort and reduced fuel consumption. Benefits on the manufacturer's side are increased sub-system integration, modularity and reduced production cost. In the future the aerospace industry is likely to benefit from the introduction of micro-systems for the same reasons as the automotive industry. Interests of the aerospace industry are increasing safety and reliability of airplane operation, health and state monitoring of fuselage and airplane subsystems as well as improving service and maintenance procedures. In comparison to automotive applications, the numbers of devices needed is likely to be much smaller, however, new challenges arise in so far as distributed sensing and actuating microsystems will be needed. The idea is to identify and to exploit synergies between automotive mass market MEMS applications and lower-volume aerospace ones. The effort necessary to meet aerospace requirements and the extent of necessary trade-offs in customizing automotive MEMS is addressed considering the above-mentioned examples.

  18. MEMS/NEMS Devices and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Darrin J.; Zorman, Christian A.; Mehregany, Mehran

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have played key roles in many important areas, for example transportation, communication, automated manufacturing, environmental monitoring, health care, defense systems, and a wide range of consumer products. MEMS are inherently small, thus offering attractive characteristics such as reduced size, weight, and power dissipation and improved speed and precision compared to their macroscopic counterparts. Integrated circuits (IC) fabrication technology has been the primary enabling technology for MEMS besides a few special etching, bonding and assembly techniques. Microfabrication provides a powerful tool for batch processing and miniaturization of electromechanical devices and systems into a dimensional scale, which is not achievable by conventional machining techniques. As IC fabrication technology continues to scale toward deep sub-micron and nano-meter feature sizes, a variety of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) can be envisioned in the foreseeable future. Nano-scale mechanical devices and systems integrated with nanoelectronics will open a vast number of new exploratory research areas in science and engineering. NEMS will most likely serve as an enabling technology merging engineering with the life sciences in ways that are not currently feasible with the micro-scale tools and technologies. MEMS has been applied to a wide range of fields. Over hundreds of micro-devices have been developed for specific applications. It is thus difficult to provide an overview covering every aspect of the topic. In this chapter, key aspects of MEMS technology and application impacts are illustrated through selecting a few demonstrative device examples, which consist of pressure sensors, inertial sensors, optical and wireless communication devices. Microstructure examples with dimensions on the order of sub-micron are presented with fabrication technologies for future NEMS applications. Although MEMS has experienced significant growth over

  19. Monitoring of slope-instabilities and deformations with Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) in wireless ad-hoc Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnhardt, C.; Fernández-Steeger, T. M.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    In most mountainous regions, landslides represent a major threat to human life, properties and infrastructures. Nowadays existing landslide monitoring systems are often characterized by high efforts in terms of purchase, installation, maintenance, manpower and material. In addition (or because of this) only small areas or selective points of the endangered zone can be observed by the system. Therefore the improvement of existing and the development of new monitoring and warning systems are of high relevance. The joint project "Sensor based Landslide Early Warning Systems" (SLEWS) deals with the development of a prototypic Alarm- and Early Warning system (EWS) for different types of landslides using low-cost micro-sensors (MEMS) integrated in a wireless sensor network (WSN). Modern so called Ad-Hoc, Multi-Hop wireless sensor networks (WSN) are characterized by a self organizing and self-healing capacity of the system (autonomous systems). The network consists of numerous individual and own energy-supply operating sensor nodes, that can send data packages from their measuring devices (here: MEMS) over other nodes (Multi-Hop) to a collection point (gateway). The gateway provides the interface to central processing and data retrieval units (PC, Laptop or server) outside the network. In order to detect and monitor the different landslide processes (like fall, topple, spreading or sliding) 3D MEMS capacitive sensors made from single silicon crystals and glass were chosen to measure acceleration, tilting and altitude changes. Based on the so called MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) technology, the sensors combine very small mechanical and electronic units, sensing elements and transducers on a small microchip. The mass production of such type of sensors allows low cost applications in different areas (like automobile industries, medicine, and automation technology). Apart from the small and so space saving size and the low costs another advantage is the energy

  20. Nondestructive optical characterization of MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    2013-10-01

    Advances in emerging technology of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are one of the most challenging tasks in today's experimental mechanics. More specifically, development of these miniature devices requires sophisticated design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and characterization tools that have multiphysics and multiscale capabilities, especially as MEMS are being developed for use at harsh conditions. In harsh-environment and high-performance guidance applications inertial sensors must be sensitive to low rates of rotation yet survive the high blast loads associated with the initial launch. In this multi-year study a set of tuning fork gyroscopes (TFGs) were subjected to a series of increasing g-loads (culminating at approximately 60,000 g's) with measurements of shape made after each test. High-g-testing was conducted within the large test chamber using a custom fabricated mini powder gun. A custom set of test sample packages were hermetically sealed with glass lids to allow optical inspection of components while preserving the operating (vacuum) environment. Optical and interferometric measurements have been made prior to and after each shock g-loading. The shape of the TFG test articles was measured using optoelectronic laser interferometric microscope (OELIM) methodology. Line traces were extracted from pertinent structures to clearly examine changes in the TFG. Failure of the die was observed in the form of fractures below the chip surface as well as fractures in the glass lid sealing the package.

  1. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  2. Ultra-Low-Power MEMS Selective Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetter, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a system for gas sensing that includes an ultra-low-power MEMS (microelectromechanical system) gas sensor, combined with unique electronic circuitry and a proprietary algorithm for operating the sensor. The electronics were created from scratch, and represent a novel design capable of low-power operation of the proprietary MEMS gas sensor platform. The algorithm is used to identify a specific target gas in a gas mixture, making the sensor selective to that target gas.

  3. Performance Thresholds for Application of MEMS Inertial Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, Geoffrey N.

    1995-01-01

    We review types of inertial sensors available and current usage of inertial sensors in space and the performance requirements for these applications. We then assess the performance available from micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices, both in the near and far term. Opportunities for the application of these devices are identified. A key point is that although the performance available from MEMS inertial sensors is significantly lower than that achieved by existing macroscopic devices (at least in the near term), the low cost, low size, and power of the MEMS devices opens up a number of applications. In particular, we show that there are substantial benefits to using MEMS devices to provide vibration, and for some missions, attitude sensing. In addition, augmentation for global positioning system (GPS) navigation systems holds much promise.

  4. MEMS Incandescent Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret; King, Kevin; Kim, Lynn; Hansler, Richard; Jones, Eric; George, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    A MEMS-based, low-power, incandescent light source is being developed. This light source is fabricated using three bonded chips. The bottom chip consists of a reflector on Silicon, the middle chip contains a Tungsten filament bonded to silicon and the top layer is a transparent window. A 25-micrometer-thick spiral filament is fabricated in Tungsten using lithography and wet-etching. A proof-of-concept device has been fabricated and tested in a vacuum chamber. Results indicate that the filament is electrically heated to approximately 2650 K. The power required to drive the proof-of-concept spiral filament to incandescence is 1.25 W. The emitted optical power is expected to be approximately 1.0 W with the spectral peak at 1.1 microns. The micromachining techniques used to fabricate this light source can be applied to other MEMS devices.

  5. An Adaptive Low-Cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU Tightly-Coupled Integration System with Aiding Measurement in a GNSS Signal-Challenged Environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifan; Zhang, Hai; Li, You; Li, Zheng

    2015-09-18

    The main aim of this paper is to develop a low-cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU tightly-coupled integration system with aiding information that can provide reliable position solutions when the GNSS signal is challenged such that less than four satellites are visible in a harsh environment. To achieve this goal, we introduce an adaptive tightly-coupled integration system with height and heading aiding (ATCA). This approach adopts a novel redundant measurement noise estimation method for an adaptive Kalman filter application and also augments external measurements in the filter to aid the position solutions, as well as uses different filters to deal with various situations. On the one hand, the adaptive Kalman filter makes use of the redundant measurement system's difference sequence to estimate and tune noise variance instead of employing a traditional innovation sequence to avoid coupling with the state vector error. On the other hand, this method uses the external height and heading angle as auxiliary references and establishes a model for the measurement equation in the filter. In the meantime, it also changes the effective filter online based on the number of tracked satellites. These measures have increasingly enhanced the position constraints and the system observability, improved the computational efficiency and have led to a good result. Both simulated and practical experiments have been carried out, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at limiting the system errors when there are less than four visible satellites, providing a satisfactory navigation solution.

  6. Characterization of glass on electronics in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Shefali; Delaney, Drew; Xu, DaXue; Murphy, Gene; Denton, Heidi L.; Hughes, Henry G.

    1999-09-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been around for many years. However, reliability issues, increasing costs, and die sizes are pushing the technology beyond its current capabilities. Integrating a micromachined sensor with its control circuitry on a single piece of silicon offers a cost and a performance advantage over the conventional two chip sensor. The enhancements offered by an integrated MEMS device are leading to many new challenges. The ability to encapsulate the MEMS device without affecting the integrated circuit is a key concern. One method of hermetically sealing the MEMS uses a frit glass which can cause potential damage to the integrated circuit because of the sealing parameters used. In standard CMOS processing, the integrated circuit is not subjected to high temperatures once the devices are built, whereas in wafer level packaging, high temperatures are involved. The high temperatures and the glass composition associated with the sensor capping process could be detrimental to these devices. A test vehicle was developed, therefore, to evaluate the compatibility of the CMOS and the sensor capping processes. The electrical results suggest that the glass and bonding process do not degrade the transistor performance.

  7. An Adaptive Low-Cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU Tightly-Coupled Integration System with Aiding Measurement in a GNSS Signal-Challenged Environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifan; Zhang, Hai; Li, You; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to develop a low-cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU tightly-coupled integration system with aiding information that can provide reliable position solutions when the GNSS signal is challenged such that less than four satellites are visible in a harsh environment. To achieve this goal, we introduce an adaptive tightly-coupled integration system with height and heading aiding (ATCA). This approach adopts a novel redundant measurement noise estimation method for an adaptive Kalman filter application and also augments external measurements in the filter to aid the position solutions, as well as uses different filters to deal with various situations. On the one hand, the adaptive Kalman filter makes use of the redundant measurement system’s difference sequence to estimate and tune noise variance instead of employing a traditional innovation sequence to avoid coupling with the state vector error. On the other hand, this method uses the external height and heading angle as auxiliary references and establishes a model for the measurement equation in the filter. In the meantime, it also changes the effective filter online based on the number of tracked satellites. These measures have increasingly enhanced the position constraints and the system observability, improved the computational efficiency and have led to a good result. Both simulated and practical experiments have been carried out, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at limiting the system errors when there are less than four visible satellites, providing a satisfactory navigation solution. PMID:26393605

  8. Variable Emissivity Through MEMS Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrin, Ann Garrison; Osiander, Robert; Champion, John; Swanson, Ted; Douglas, Donya; Grob, Lisa M.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses a new technology for variable emissivity (vari-e) radiator surfaces, which has significant advantages over traditional radiators and promises an alternative design technique for future spacecraft thermal control systems. All spacecraft rely on radiative surfaces to dissipate waste heat. These radiators have special coatings, typically with a low solar absorptivity and a high infrared-red emissivity, that are intended to optimize performance under the expected heat load and thermal sink environment. The dynamics of the heat loads and thermal environment make it a challenge to properly size the radiator and often require some means of regulating the heat rejection rate of the radiators in order to achieve proper thermal balance. Specialized thermal control coatings, which can passively or actively adjust their emissivity offer an attractive solution to these design challenges. Such systems would allow intelligent control of the rate of heat loss from a radiator in response to heat load and thermal environmental variations. Intelligent thermal control through variable emissivity systems is well suited for nano and pico spacecraft applications where large thermal fluctuations are expected due to the small thermal mass and limited electric resources. Presently there are three different types of vari-e technologies under development: Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) louvers, Electrochromic devices, and Electrophoretic devices. This paper will describe several prototypes of micromachined (MEMS) louvers and experimental results for the emissivity variations measured on theses prototypes. It will further discuss possible actuation mechanisms and space reliability aspects for different designs. Finally, for comparison parametric evaluations of the thermal performances of the new vari-e technology and standard thermal control systems are presented in this paper.

  9. High Volume Manufacturing and Field Stability of MEMS Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jack

    Low volume MEMS/NEMS production is practical when an attractive concept is implemented with business, manufacturing, packaging, and test support. Moving beyond this to high volume production adds requirements on design, process control, quality, product stability, market size, market maturity, capital investment, and business systems. In a broad sense, this chapter uses a case study approach: It describes and compares the silicon-based MEMS accelerometers, pressure sensors, image projection systems, and gyroscopes that are in high volume production. Although they serve several markets, these businesses have common characteristics. For example, the manufacturing lines use automated semiconductor equipment and standard material sets to make consistent products in large quantities. Standard, well controlled processes are sometimes modified for a MEMS product. However, novel processes that cannot run with standard equipment and material sets are avoided when possible. This reliance on semiconductor tools, as well as the organizational practices required to manufacture clean, particle-free products partially explains why the MEMS market leaders are integrated circuit manufacturers. There are other factors. MEMS and NEMS are enabling technologies, so it can take several years for high volume applications to develop. Indeed, market size is usually a strong function of price. This becomes a vicious circle, because low price requires low cost - a result that is normally achieved only after a product is in high volume production. During the early years, IC companies reduced cost and financial risk by using existing facilities for low volume MEMS production. As a result, product architectures are partially determined by capabilities developed for previous products. This chapter includes a discussion of MEMS product architecture with particular attention to the impact of electronic integration, packaging, and surfaces. Packaging and testing are critical, because they are

  10. High Volume Manufacturing and Field Stability of MEMS Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jack

    Low volume MEMS/NEMS production is practical when an attractive concept is implemented with business, manufacturing, packaging, and test support. Moving beyond this to high volume production adds requirements on design, process control, quality, product stability, market size, market maturity, capital investment, and business systems. In a broad sense, this chapter uses a case study approach: It describes and compares the silicon-based MEMS accelerometers, pressure sensors, image projection systems, and gyroscopes that are in high volume production. Although they serve several markets, these businesses have common characteristics. For example, the manufacturing lines use automated semiconductor equipment and standard material sets to make consistent products in large quantities. Standard, well controlled processes are sometimes modified for a MEMS product. However, novel processes that cannot run with standard equipment and material sets are avoided when possible. This reliance on semiconductor tools, as well as the organizational practices required to manufacture clean, particle-free products partially explains why the MEMS market leaders are integrated circuit manufacturers. There are other factors. MEMS and NEMS are enabling technologies, so it can take several years for high volume applications to develop. Indeed, market size is usually a strong function of price. This becomes a vicious circle, because low price requires low cost - a result that is normally achieved only after a product is in high volume production. During the early years, IC companies reduced cost and financial risk by using existing facilities for low volume MEMS production. As a result, product architectures are partially determined by capabilities developed for previous products. This chapter includes a discussion of MEMS product architecture with particular attention to the impact of electronic integration, packaging, and surfaces. Packaging and testing are critical, because they are

  11. Calibration of High Frequency MEMS Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Humphreys, William M.; Bartram, Scott M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and controlling aircraft noise is one of the major research topics of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One of the measurement technologies used to acquire noise data is the microphone directional array (DA). Traditional direction array hardware, consisting of commercially available condenser microphones and preamplifiers can be too expensive and their installation in hard-walled wind tunnel test sections too complicated. An emerging micro-machining technology coupled with the latest cutting edge technologies for smaller and faster systems have opened the way for development of MEMS microphones. The MEMS microphone devices are available in the market but suffer from certain important shortcomings. Based on early experiments with array prototypes, it has been found that both the bandwidth and the sound pressure level dynamic range of the microphones should be increased significantly to improve the performance and flexibility of the overall array. Thus, in collaboration with an outside MEMS design vendor, NASA Langley modified commercially available MEMS microphone as shown in Figure 1 to meet the new requirements. Coupled with the design of the enhanced MEMS microphones was the development of a new calibration method for simultaneously obtaining the sensitivity and phase response of the devices over their entire broadband frequency range. Over the years, several methods have been used for microphone calibration. Some of the common methods of microphone calibration are Coupler (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous), Pistonphone, Electrostatic actuator, and Free-field calibration (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous). Traditionally, electrostatic actuators (EA) have been used to characterize air-condenser microphones for wideband frequency ranges; however, MEMS microphones are not adaptable to the EA method due to their construction and very small diaphragm size. Hence a substitution-based, free-field method was developed to

  12. Multi-function optical characterization and inspection of MEMS components using stroboscopic coherence scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapilouw, Abraham Mario; Chen, Liang-Chia; Xuan-Loc, Nguyen; Chen, Jin-Liang

    2014-08-01

    A Micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) is a widely used component in many industries, including energy, biotechnology, medical, communications, and automotive industries. However, effective inspection systems are also needed to ensure the functional reliability of MEMS. This study developed a stroboscopic coherence scanning Interferometry (SCSI) technique for measuring key characteristics typically used as criteria in MEMS inspections. Surface profiles of MEMS both static and dynamic conditions were measured by means of coherence scanning Interferometry (CSI). Resonant frequencies of vibrating MEMS were measured by deformation of interferogram fringes for out-of-plane vibration and by image correlation for in-plane vibration. The measurement bandwidth of the developed system can be tuned up to three megahertz or higher for both in-plane and out-of-plane measurement of MEMS.

  13. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  14. MEMS Actuators for Improved Performance and Durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearsley, James M.

    Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices take advantage of force-scaling at length scales smaller than a millimeter to sense and interact with directly with phenomena and targets at the microscale. MEMS sensors found in everyday devices like cell-phones and cars include accelerometers, gyros, pressure sensors, and magnetic sensors. MEMS actuators generally serve more application specific roles including micro- and nano-tweezers used for single cell manipulation, optical switching and alignment components, and micro combustion engines for high energy density power generation. MEMS rotary motors are actuators that translate an electric drive signal into rotational motion and can serve as rate calibration inputs for gyros, stages for optical components, mixing devices for micro-fluidics, etc. Existing rotary micromotors suffer from friction and wear issues that affect lifetime and performance. Attempts to alleviate friction effects include surface treatment, magnetic and electrostatic levitation, pressurized gas bearings, and micro-ball bearings. The present work demonstrates a droplet based liquid bearing supporting a rotary micromotor that improves the operating characteristics of MEMS rotary motors. The liquid bearing provides wear-free, low-friction, passive alignment between the rotor and stator. Droplets are positioned relative to the rotor and stator through patterned superhydrophobic and hydrophilic surface coatings. The liquid bearing consists of a central droplet that acts as the motor shaft, providing axial alignment between rotor and stator, and satellite droplets, analogous to ball-bearings, that provide tip and tilt stable operation. The liquid bearing friction performance is characterized through measurement of the rotational drag coefficient and minimum starting torque due to stiction and geometric effects. Bearing operational performance is further characterized by modeling and measuring stiffness, environmental survivability, and high

  15. BioMEMS –Advancing the Frontiers of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    James, Teena; Mannoor, Manu Sebastian; Ivanov, Dentcho V.

    2008-01-01

    Biological and medical application of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) is currently seen as an area of high potential impact. Integration of biology and microtechnology has resulted in the development of a number of platforms for improving biomedical and pharmaceutical technologies. This review provides a general overview of the applications and the opportunities presented by MEMS in medicine by classifying these platforms according to their applications in the medical field.

  16. MEMS-IDT-based microaccelerometers and gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1999-09-01

    The integration of MEMS, IDTs and required microelectronics and conformal antenna to realize a hybrid accelerometer and gyroscope device is presented in this paper. The inertial navigation system uses both gyroscopes and accelerometers to measure the state of motion of a target or a missile by sensing the changes in that state caused by accelerations. This unique combination of technologies results in conformal sensors that can be remotely sensed by a RF system with the advantage of no power requirements at the sensor site. The device presented here possess typical advantages of MEM sensors including the additional benefits of robustness, excellent sensitivity, surface conformability, durability and applicability to wireless antenna systems. Compared to conventional ones, these new sensor have no moving mechanical parts ultimately giving rise to inherent robustness and durability. Consequently, there is no electronics to balance or measure the movement of moving structures, which leads to even smaller micro device.

  17. Hydrophobic coatings for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doms, M.; Feindt, H.; Kuipers, W. J.; Shewtanasoontorn, D.; Matar, A. S.; Brinkhues, S.; Welton, R. H.; Mueller, J.

    2008-05-01

    Different kinds of thin-film coatings were investigated with regard to their applicability as hydrophobic coatings for MEMS. The films were deposited onto silicon and borosilicate glass substrates by spincoating of Dyneon™ PTFE and PFA, plasmapolymerization of HMDS-N and C4F8 as well as liquid-phase and vapor-phase coating of SAMs from DDMS, FDTS, FOTS and Geleste Aquaphobe™ CM. The layer properties were analyzed using profilometry, FTIR, SEM and contact angle measurements. Furthermore, the adhesion of the layers to the substrates was determined in an acetone ultrasonic bath. The influence of various deposition process parameters on the properties of the films was investigated. As these layers can be used in microfluidic systems, as water-repellent layers and as anti-stiction coatings, they are suited for versatile fields of application.

  18. Planarization techniques for MEMS: enabling new structures and enhancing manufacturability

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    Planarization techniques such as chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) have emerged as enabling technologies for the manufacturing of multi- level metal interconnects used in high-density Integrated Circuits (IC). An overview of general planarization techniques for MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and, in particular, the extension of CMP from sub-micron IC manufacturing to the fabrication of complex surface-micromachined MEMS will be presented. Planarization technique alleviates processing problems associated with fabrication of multi-level polysilicon structures, eliminates design constraints linked with non-planar topography, and provides an avenue for integrating different process technologies. The CMP process and present examples of the use of CMP in fabricating MEMS devices such as microengines, pressure sensors, and proof masses for accelerometers along with its use for monolithically integrating MEMS devices with microelectronics are presented.

  19. Technology development of RF MEMS switches on printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Pin

    Today, some engineers have shifted their focus on the micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) to pursue better technological advancements. Recent development in RF MEMS technologies have lead to superior switch characteristics, i.e., very low insertion loss, very low power requirements, and high isolation comparing to the conventional semiconductor devices. This success has promised the potential of MEMS to revolutionize RF and microwave system implementation for the next generation of communication applications. However, RF MEMS switches integrated monolithically with various RF functional components on the same substrate to create multifunctional and reconfigurable complete communication systems remains to be a challenge research topic due to the concerns of the high cost of packaging process and the high cost of RF matching requirements in module board implementation. Furthermore, the fabrication of most RF MEMS switches requires thickness control and surface planarization of wide metal lines prior to deposition of a metal membrane bridge, which poses a major challenge to manufacturability. To ease the fabrication of RF MEMS switches and to facilitate their integration with other RF components such as antennas, phase delay lines, tunable filters, it is imperative to develop a manufacturable RF MEMS switch technology on a common substrate housing all essential RF components. Development of a novel RF MEMS technology to build a RF MEMS switch and provide a system-level packaging on microwave laminated printed circuit boards (PCBs) are proposed in this dissertation. Two key processes, high-density inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (HDICP CVD) for low temperature dielectric deposition, and compressive molding planarization (COMP) for the temporary sacrificial polymer planarization have been developed for fabricating RF MEMS switches on PCBs. Several membrane-type capacitive switches have been fabricated showing excellent RF performance and dynamic

  20. MEMS Reliability: Infrastructure, Test Structures, Experiments, and Failure Modes

    SciTech Connect

    TANNER,DANELLE M.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; EATON,WILLIAM P.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; CLEMENT,J. JOSEPH; MILLER,WILLIAM M.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; PETERSON,KENNETH A.

    2000-01-01

    The burgeoning new technology of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) shows great promise in the weapons arena. We can now conceive of micro-gyros, micro-surety systems, and micro-navigators that are extremely small and inexpensive. Do we want to use this new technology in critical applications such as nuclear weapons? This question drove us to understand the reliability and failure mechanisms of silicon surface-micromachined MEMS. Development of a testing infrastructure was a crucial step to perform reliability experiments on MEMS devices and will be reported here. In addition, reliability test structures have been designed and characterized. Many experiments were performed to investigate failure modes and specifically those in different environments (humidity, temperature, shock, vibration, and storage). A predictive reliability model for wear of rubbing surfaces in microengines was developed. The root causes of failure for operating and non-operating MEMS are discussed. The major failure mechanism for operating MEMS was wear of the polysilicon rubbing surfaces. Reliability design rules for future MEMS devices are established.

  1. MEMS/ECD Method for Making Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te3 Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, James; Huang, Chen-Kuo; Ryan, Margaret; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Herman, Jennifer; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A method of fabricating Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te3-based thermoelectric microdevices involves a combination of (1) techniques used previously in the fabrication of integrated circuits and of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and (2) a relatively inexpensive MEMS-oriented electrochemical-deposition (ECD) technique. The present method overcomes the limitations of prior MEMS fabrication techniques and makes it possible to satisfy requirements.

  2. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications.

  3. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications. PMID:26459443

  4. Giant Piezoelectricity on Si for Hyperactive MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S. H.; Park, J.; Kim, D. M.; Aksyuk, V. A.; Das, R. R.; Bu, S. D.; Felker, D. A.; Lettieri, J.; Vaithyanathan, V.; Bharadwaja, S. S. N.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.; Chen, Y. B.; Sun, H. P.; Folkman, C. M.; Jang, H. W.; Kreft, D. J.; Streiffer, S. K.; Ramesh, R.; Pan, X. Q.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Schlom, D. G.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Blick, R. H.; Eom, C. B.

    2011-11-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) incorporating active piezoelectric layers offer integrated actuation, sensing, and transduction. The broad implementation of such active MEMS has long been constrained by the inability to integrate materials with giant piezoelectric response, such as Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT). We synthesized high-quality PMN-PT epitaxial thin films on vicinal (001) Si wafers with the use of an epitaxial (001) SrTiO3 template layer with superior piezoelectric coefficients (e31,f = -27 ± 3 coulombs per square meter) and figures of merit for piezoelectric energy-harvesting systems. We have incorporated these heterostructures into microcantilevers that are actuated with extremely low drive voltage due to thin-film piezoelectric properties that rival bulk PMN-PT single crystals. These epitaxial heterostructures exhibit very large electromechanical coupling for ultrasound medical imaging, microfluidic control, mechanical sensing, and energy harvesting.

  5. Evaluation of MEMS-Based Wireless Accelerometer Sensors in Detecting Gear Tooth Faults in Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David George; Lambert, Nicholas A.; Wagoner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostics capability of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based rotating accelerometer sensors in detecting gear tooth crack failures in helicopter main-rotor transmissions was evaluated. MEMS sensors were installed on a pre-notched OH-58C spiral-bevel pinion gear. Endurance tests were performed and the gear was run to tooth fracture failure. Results from the MEMS sensor were compared to conventional accelerometers mounted on the transmission housing. Most of the four stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing and most of the CI's used gave indications of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS system performed well and lasted the entire test. All MEMS accelerometers gave an indication of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS systems performed as well, if not better, than the stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing with regards to gear tooth fault detection. For both the MEMS sensors and stationary sensors, the fault detection time was not much sooner than the actual tooth fracture time. The MEMS sensor spectrum data showed large first order shaft frequency sidebands due to the measurement rotating frame of reference. The method of constructing a pseudo tach signal from periodic characteristics of the vibration data was successful in deriving a TSA signal without an actual tach and proved as an effective way to improve fault detection for the MEMS.

  6. COTS MEMS Flow-Measurement Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip; Smith, Floyd A.; Blank, Greg; Cruzan, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional tubing instrumentation for measuring airflow, designers and technicians at Glenn Research Center have been fabricating packaging components and assembling a set of unique probes that contain commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chips. MEMS sensor chips offer some compelling advantages over standard macroscopic measurement devices. MEMS sensor technology has matured through mass production and use in the automotive and aircraft industries. At present, MEMS are the devices of choice for sensors in such applications as tire-pressure monitors, altimeters, pneumatic controls, cable leak detectors, and consumer appliances. Compactness, minimality of power demand, rugged construction, and moderate cost all contribute to making MEMS sensors attractive for instrumentation for future research. Conventional macroscopic flow-measurement instrumentation includes tubes buried beneath the aerodynamic surfaces of wind-tunnel models or in wind-tunnel walls. Pressure is introduced at the opening of each such tube. The pressure must then travel along the tube before reaching a transducer that generates an electronic signal. The lengths of such tubes typically range from 20 ft (approx.= 6 m) to hundreds of feet (of the order of 100 m). The propagation of pressure signals in the tubes damps the signals considerably and makes it necessary to delay measurements until after test rigs have reached steady-state operation. In contrast, a MEMS pressure sensor that generates electronic output can take readings continuously under dynamic conditions in nearly real time. In order to use stainless-steel tubing for pressure measurements, it is necessary to clean many tubes, cut them to length, carefully install them, delicately deburr them, and splice them. A cluster of a few hundred 1/16-in.- (approx.=1.6-mm-) diameter tubes (such clusters are common in research testing facilities) can be several inches (of the order of 10

  7. Ten ways to destroy a prototype MEMS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velden, Stephen; Powlesland, Ian; Singh, Jugdutt

    2011-12-01

    Prototyping a Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) device is a very different process to that employed for a standard Integrated Circuit (IC) or Printed Circuit Board (PCB). While the manufacturing methods for MEMS devices largely derive from the IC industry MEMS present many unique manufacturability challenges. These challenges typically relate to two distinct features, specifically; mechanics of the device and the packaging of the device. This paper discusses some of the potential pitfalls in the manufacture of a MEMS prototype; more specifically the paper considers issues leading to low yield rates in a MEMS prototype developed by the authors and then discusses possible improvements to enable a better chance of success. This discussion first identifies some of the more significant MEMS sensor design features that contributed to a low yield and then presents design improvements that could significantly increase the yield. Following this is the identification of several issues involved in packaging the sensor, which had the effect of reducing the yield further; in this case improvements in the packaging are suggested. Also discussed are some general prototyping problems researchers may face that with careful planning may be avoided.

  8. Piezoelectric MEMS for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Isaku

    2015-12-01

    Recently, piezoelectric MEMS have been intensively investigated to create new functional microdevices, and some of them have already been commercialized such as MEMS gyrosensors or miropumps of inkjet printer head. Piezoelectric energy harvesting is considered to be one of the promising future applications of piezoelectric MEMS. In this report, we introduce the deposition of the piezoelectric PZT thin films as well as lead-free KNN thin films. We fabricated piezoelectric energy harvesters of PZT and KNN thin films deposited on stainless steel cantilevers and compared their power generation performance.

  9. Critical issues for the application of integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies to inertial measurement units

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Ellis, J.R.; Montague, S.; Allen, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    One of the principal applications of monolithically integrated micromechanical/microelectronic systems has been accelerometers for automotive applications. As integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies such as those developed by U.C. Berkeley, Analog Devices, and Sandia National Laboratories mature, additional systems for more sensitive inertial measurements will enter the commercial marketplace. In this paper, the authors will examine key technology design rules which impact the performance and cost of inertial measurement devices manufactured in integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies. These design parameters include: (1) minimum MEMS feature size, (2) minimum CMOS feature size, (3) maximum MEMS linear dimension, (4) number of mechanical MEMS layers, (5) MEMS/CMOS spacing. In particular, the embedded approach to integration developed at Sandia will be examined in the context of these technology features. Presently, this technology offers MEMS feature sizes as small as 1 {micro}m, CMOS critical dimensions of 1.25 {micro}m, MEMS linear dimensions of 1,000 {micro}m, a single mechanical level of polysilicon, and a 100 {micro}m space between MEMS and CMOS. This is applicable to modern precision guided munitions.

  10. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  11. Image Registration for Stability Testing of MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Blake, Peter N.; Morey, Peter A.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Chambers, Victor J.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2011-01-01

    Image registration, or alignment of two or more images covering the same scenes or objects, is of great interest in many disciplines such as remote sensing, medical imaging. astronomy, and computer vision. In this paper, we introduce a new application of image registration algorithms. We demonstrate how through a wavelet based image registration algorithm, engineers can evaluate stability of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). In particular, we applied image registration algorithms to assess alignment stability of the MicroShutters Subsystem (MSS) of the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This work introduces a new methodology for evaluating stability of MEMS devices to engineers as well as a new application of image registration algorithms to computer scientists.

  12. Strength of Polysilicon for MEMS Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; LaVan, David A.

    1999-07-20

    The safe, secure and reliable application of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) devices requires knowledge about the distribution in material and mechanical properties of the small-scale structures. A new testing program at Sandia is quantifying the strength distribution using polysilicon samples that reflect the dimensions of critical MEMS components. The strength of polysilicon fabricated at Sandia's Microelectronic Development Laboratory was successfully measured using samples 2.5 microns thick, 1.7 microns wide with lengths between 15 and 25 microns. These tensile specimens have a freely moving hub on one end that anchors the sample to the silicon die and allows free rotation. Each sample is loaded in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a computer-controlled Nanoindenter. The stress-strain curve is calculated using the specimen cross section and gage length dimensions verified by measuring against a standard in the SEM.

  13. MEMS Packaging - Current Issues and Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    DRESSENDORFER,PAUL V.; PETERSON,DAVID W.; REBER,CATHLEEN ANN

    2000-01-19

    The assembly and packaging of MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) devices raise a number of issues over and above those normally associated with the assembly of standard microelectronic circuits. MEMS components include a variety of sensors, microengines, optical components, and other devices. They often have exposed mechanical structures which during assembly require particulate control, space in the package, non-contact handling procedures, low-stress die attach, precision die placement, unique process schedules, hermetic sealing in controlled environments (including vacuum), and other special constraints. These constraints force changes in the techniques used to separate die on a wafer, in the types of packages which can be used in the assembly processes and materials, and in the sealing environment and process. This paper discusses a number of these issues and provides information on approaches being taken or proposed to address them.

  14. Mechanical properties of silicones for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Fellner, T.; Wilde, J.; Wallrabe, U.

    2008-06-01

    This paper focuses on the mechanical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) relevant for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) applications. In view of the limited amount of published data, we analyzed the two products most commonly used in MEMS, namely RTV 615 from Bayer Silicones and Sylgard 184 from Dow Corning. With regard to mechanical properties, we focused on the dependence of the elastic modulus on the thinner concentration, temperature and strain rate. In addition, creep and thermal aging were analyzed. We conclude that the isotropic and constant elastic modulus has strong dependence on the hardening conditions. At high hardening temperatures and long hardening time, RTV 615 displays an elastic modulus of 1.91 MPa and Sylgard 184 of 2.60 MPa in a range up to 40% strain.

  15. Design of a novel MEMS gyroscope array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lv, Xiaoyong; Sun, Feng

    2013-01-28

    This paper reports a novel four degree-of-freedom (DOF) MEMS vibratory gyroscope. A MEMS gyroscope array is then presented using the novel gyroscope unit. In the design of the proposed 4-DOF MEMS vibratory gyroscope, the elements of the drive-mode are set inside the whole gyroscope architecture, and the elements of sense-mode are set around the drive-mode, which thus makes it possible to combine several gyroscope units into a gyroscope array through sense-modes of all the units. The complete 2-DOF vibratory structure is utilized in both the drive-mode and sense-mode of the gyroscope unit, thereby providing the desired bandwidth and inherent robustness. The gyroscope array combines several gyroscope units by using the unique detection mass, which will increase the gain of sense-mode and improve the sensitivity of the system. The simulation results demonstrate that, compared to a single gyroscope unit, the gain of gyroscope array (n = 6) is increased by about 8 dB; a 3 dB bandwidth of 100 Hz in sense-mode and 190 Hz in drive-mode are also provided. The bandwidths of both modes are highly matched with each other, providing a bandwidth of 100 Hz for the entire system, thus illustrating that it could satisfy the requirements in practical applications.

  16. MEMS Micro-Valve for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, I.; Tang, W. C.; Bame, D. P.; Tang, T. K.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the development of a Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) valve that is designed to meet the rigorous performance requirements for a variety of space applications, such as micropropulsion, in-situ chemical analysis of other planets, or micro-fluidics experiments in micro-gravity. These systems often require very small yet reliable silicon valves with extremely low leak rates and long shelf lives. Also, they must survive the perils of space travel, which include unstoppable radiation, monumental shock and vibration forces, as well as extreme variations in temperature. Currently, no commercial MEMS valve meets these requirements. We at JPL are developing a piezoelectric MEMS valve that attempts to address the unique problem of space. We begin with proven configurations that may seem familiar. However, we have implemented some major design innovations that should produce a superior valve. The JPL micro-valve is expected to have an extremely low leak rate, limited susceptibility to particulates, vibration or radiation, as well as a wide operational temperature range.

  17. Design of a Novel MEMS Gyroscope Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lv, Xiaoyong; Sun, Feng

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a novel four degree-of-freedom (DOF) MEMS vibratory gyroscope. A MEMS gyroscope array is then presented using the novel gyroscope unit. In the design of the proposed 4-DOF MEMS vibratory gyroscope, the elements of the drive-mode are set inside the whole gyroscope architecture, and the elements of sense-mode are set around the drive-mode, which thus makes it possible to combine several gyroscope units into a gyroscope array through sense-modes of all the units. The complete 2-DOFvibratory structure is utilized in both the drive-mode and sense-mode of the gyroscope unit, thereby providing the desired bandwidth and inherent robustness. The gyroscope array combines several gyroscope units by using the unique detection mass, which will increase the gain of sense-mode and improve the sensitivity of the system. The simulation results demonstrate that, compared to a single gyroscope unit, the gain of gyroscope array (n = 6)is increased by about 8 dB; a 3 dB bandwidth of 100 Hz in sense-mode and 190 Hz in drive-mode are also provided. The bandwidths of both modes are highly matched with each other, providing a bandwidth of 100 Hz for the entire system, thus illustrating that it could satisfy the requirements in practical applications. PMID:23358367

  18. Optically transduced MEMS magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Langlois, Eric

    2014-03-18

    MEMS magnetometers with optically transduced resonator displacement are described herein. Improved sensitivity, crosstalk reduction, and extended dynamic range may be achieved with devices including a deflectable resonator suspended from the support, a first grating extending from the support and disposed over the resonator, a pair of drive electrodes to drive an alternating current through the resonator, and a second grating in the resonator overlapping the first grating to form a multi-layer grating having apertures that vary dimensionally in response to deflection occurring as the resonator mechanically resonates in a plane parallel to the first grating in the presence of a magnetic field as a function of the Lorentz force resulting from the alternating current. A plurality of such multi-layer gratings may be disposed across a length of the resonator to provide greater dynamic range and/or accommodate fabrication tolerances.

  19. MemAxes Visualization Software

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-28

    Hardware advancements such as Intel's PEBS and AMD's IBS, as well as software developments such as the perf_event API in Linux have made available the acquisition of memory access samples with performance information. MemAxes is a visualization and analysis tool for memory access sample data. By mapping the samples to their associated code, variables, node topology, and application dataset, MemAxes provides intuitive views of the data.

  20. Solid oxide MEMS-based fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Jankowksi, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2007-03-13

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

  1. Solid polymer MEMS-based fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-22

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

  2. An Opto-MEMS Multiobject Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, K.; Ninkov, Z.; Zwarg, D.

    2000-05-01

    Optical MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Structures) are an enabling technology for a new class of optical instrumentation designs. An opto-MEMS device consists of an array of microfabricated structures, each of which modulates the phase and/or amplitude of an incident light beam. Typically the devices consist of an array of moveable micromirrors - each of which reflects an incident beam in a unique direction (tilt), or with a unique phase shift (piston). One widely available opto-MEMS device is the Texas Instruments' Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). The DMD is an array of 16 micron x 16 micron square mirrors postioned on a 17 micron pitch. Each mirror can tilt +/- 10 degrees from the normal - reflecting a normally incident light beam +/- 20 degrees. By positioning the DMD in an intermediate image plane in an optical system, portions of the image can be directed into- or out-of the input pupil of the follow-on imaging optics. RIT is utilizing the DMD to construct a prototype multiobject spectrograph (RIT-MOS) for visible observations with terrestrial telescopes. The DMD array replaces the input slit of an imaging spectrograph, forming a 'virtual', programmable slit assembly. By acquiring a pre-image of the astronomical field, it is possible to select a multidude of objects, and to program the DMD to pass only those objects into the input optics of the imaging spectrograph. We will report on the design and characterizatotion of the RIT-MOS, as well as preliminary imaging results.

  3. Reliability Testing Procedure for MEMS IMUs Applied to Vibrating Environments

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Giorgio; Somà, Aurelio

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion of micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology applied to navigation systems is rapidly increasing, but currently, there is a lack of knowledge about the reliability of this typology of devices, representing a serious limitation to their use in aerospace vehicles and other fields with medium and high requirements. In this paper, a reliability testing procedure for inertial sensors and inertial measurement units (IMU) based on MEMS for applications in vibrating environments is presented. The sensing performances were evaluated in terms of signal accuracy, systematic errors, and accidental errors; the actual working conditions were simulated by means of an accelerated dynamic excitation. A commercial MEMS-based IMU was analyzed to validate the proposed procedure. The main weaknesses of the system have been localized by providing important information about the relationship between the reliability levels of the system and individual components. PMID:22315550

  4. Microsensors and MEMS for health monitoring of composite and aircraft structures in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1999-07-01

    Microsensors and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently being applied to the structural health monitoring of critical aircraft components. The approach integrates acoustic emission, strain gauges, MEMS accelerometers and vibration monitoring devices with signal processing electronics to provide real-time indicators of incipient failure of aircraft components with a known history of catastrophic failure due to fracture.

  5. MEMS: A new approach to micro-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1997-12-31

    MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and their fabrication technologies provide great opportunities for application to micro-optical systems (MOEMS). Implementing MOEMS technology ranges from simple, passive components to complicated, active systems. Here, an overview of polysilicon surface micromachining MEMS combined with optics is presented. Recent advancements to the technology, which may enhance its appeal for micro-optics applications are emphasized. Of all the MEMS fabrication technologies, polysilicon surface micromachining technology has the greatest basis in and leverages the most the infrastructure for silicon integrated circuit fabrication. In that respect, it provides the potential for very large volume, inexpensive production of MOEMS. This paper highlights polysilicon surface micromachining technology in regards to its capability to provide both passive and active mechanical elements with quality optical elements.

  6. MEMS Micropropulsion Activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Juergen; Chakraborty, Indrani; Vargo, Stephen; Bame, David; Marrese, Colleen; Tang, William C.

    1999-01-01

    A status of MEMS-based micropropulsion activities conducted at JPL will be given. These activities include work conducted on the so called Vaporizing Liquid Micro-Thruster (VLM) which recently underwent proof-of-concept testing, demonstrating the ability to vaporize water propellant at 2 W and 2 V. Micro-ion engine technologies, such m field emitter arrays and micro-grids are being studied. Focus in the field emitter area is on arrays able to survive in thruster plumes and micro-ion engine plasmas to serve as neutralizers aW engine cathodes. Integrated, batch-fabricated Ion repeller grid structures are being studied as well as different emitter tip materials are being investigated to meet these goals. A micro-isolation valve is being studied to isolate microspacecraft feed system during long interplanetary cruises, avoiding leakage and prolonging lifetime and reliability of such systems. This concept relies on the melting of a thin silicon barrier. Burst pressure values as high as 2,900 psig were obtained for these valves and power requirements to melt barriers ranging between 10 - 50 microns in thickness, as determined through thermal finite element calculations, varied between 10 - 30 W to be applied over a duration of merely 0.5 ms.

  7. Highly elastic conductive polymeric MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhhammer, J.; Zens, M.; Goldschmidtboeing, F.; Seifert, A.; Woias, P.

    2015-02-01

    Polymeric structures with integrated, functional microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) elements are increasingly important in various applications such as biomedical systems or wearable smart devices. These applications require highly flexible and elastic polymers with good conductivity, which can be embedded into a matrix that undergoes large deformations. Conductive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a suitable candidate but is still challenging to fabricate. Conductivity is achieved by filling a nonconductive PDMS matrix with conductive particles. In this work, we present an approach that uses new mixing techniques to fabricate conductive PDMS with different fillers such as carbon black, silver particles, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Additionally, the electrical properties of all three composites are examined under continuous mechanical stress. Furthermore, we present a novel, low-cost, simple three-step molding process that transfers a micro patterned silicon master into a polystyrene (PS) polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) replica with improved release features. This PS/PTFE mold is used for subsequent structuring of conductive PDMS with high accuracy. The non sticking characteristics enable the fabrication of delicate structures using a very soft PDMS, which is usually hard to release from conventional molds. Moreover, the process can also be applied to polyurethanes and various other material combinations.

  8. MEMS technology to achieve miniaturization, redundancy, and new functionality in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönland, Tor-Arne; Bendixen, Maria; Bejhed, Johan; Johansson, Håkan; Jonsson, Kerstin; Rangsten, Pelle

    2011-02-01

    Development of MEMS-based (Micro Electro Mechanical System) components and subsystems for space applications has been going on for at least two decades. The main driver for developing MEMS components for space is miniaturization through reduced mass, volume and power of individual components. However, the commercial breakthrough of MEMS has not occurred within the space business as it has within other branches such as the IT/telecom, the automotive industry, or other areas. In addition to miniaturization, increased redundancy and improved (or in some cases unique) performance has also been achieved by using MEMS-based components. MEMS pressure sensors integrated into the mechanical housing of another component is one example. Another example is an isolation valve which is both redundant and has an integrated particle filter on a single silicon chip weighing less than one gram. Currently there are few space missions using allowing newly developed MEMS devices onboard, but one of the exceptions is the Swedish-built Prisma satellites. One of the Prisma satellites has a MEMS-based cold gas propulsion system onboard, which contains a number of miniaturized and novel components. This paper presents the MEMS based cold gas propulsion system developed for Prisma including a number of novel components and their maiden spaceflight onboard Prisma last year.

  9. Standard semiconductor packaging for high-reliability low-cost MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harney, Kieran P.

    2005-01-01

    Microelectronic packaging technology has evolved over the years in response to the needs of IC technology. The fundamental purpose of the package is to provide protection for the silicon chip and to provide electrical connection to the circuit board. Major change has been witnessed in packaging and today wafer level packaging technology has further revolutionized the industry. MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology has created new challenges for packaging that do not exist in standard ICs. However, the fundamental objective of MEMS packaging is the same as traditional ICs, the low cost and reliable presentation of the MEMS chip to the next level interconnect. Inertial MEMS is one of the best examples of the successful commercialization of MEMS technology. The adoption of MEMS accelerometers for automotive airbag applications has created a high volume market that demands the highest reliability at low cost. The suppliers to these markets have responded by exploiting standard semiconductor packaging infrastructures. However, there are special packaging needs for MEMS that cannot be ignored. New applications for inertial MEMS devices are emerging in the consumer space that adds the imperative of small size to the need for reliability and low cost. These trends are not unique to MEMS accelerometers. For any MEMS technology to be successful the packaging must provide the basic reliability and interconnection functions, adding the least possible cost to the product. This paper will discuss the evolution of MEMS packaging in the accelerometer industry and identify the main issues that needed to be addressed to enable the successful commercialization of the technology in the automotive and consumer markets.

  10. Optical sensors with MEMS, slit masks, and micromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesenberg, Rainer; Wuttig, Andreas

    2001-10-01

    Concepts to increase the performance of optical sensors by combination with optical MEMS are discussed. Architectures of subsystems are reviewed, which modulate or switch the amplitude of the light by scanning, multiplexing and selecting interesting signal components (multi-object-mode). Arrangements with MEMS for optical sensors and instruments can decrease the pixel size and increase their number by creating virtual pixels. A number of signal components can be detected with a smaller number of detectors (detector pixels) by scanning. If the scanning is substituted by multiplexing the best efficiency is achieved. The measurement time can be reduced by selecting interesting objects or signal components to be detected. Architectures which combine single sensors, linear sensor arrays or two dimensional detector arrays with MEMS, slit masks, and micro-mechanical devices are discussed. Such devices are micro-mirrors, micro-shutters, the slit positioning system, the fibre positioning system, and other optical switches.

  11. Powering the wireless world with MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaevitz, Samuel B.

    2012-03-01

    Battery life is huge problem for today's CE devices and every year the problem gets worse. That is a painful consequence of the explosion in capability and applications in modern wireless electronics of all types, and is particularly acute in advanced smartphones. Fuel cells have long been touted as the solution to the battery problem, and significant programs have been funded at large companies, start-ups, and within academia. Thus far, none of those efforts have resulted in a commercially successful product for consumer electronics. Lilliputian Systems has taken a unique approach by leveraging MEMS fabrication methods to enable the use of a fuel cell known as a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). SOFCs provide high efficiency and reliable operation in a very compact Silicon Power Cell™, and allow the use of high energy density fuels, such as butane. This combination overcomes the barriers which have prevented other fuel cell efforts from being commercialized. But in order to use SOFCs, the MEMS structure must operate at elevated temperatures, typically above 600°C, must do so very efficiently, and must be effectively integrated into a complete system. By overcoming these unusual challenges, Lilliputian has developed a solution with a run-time 5-10X longer than existing batteries and with instant recharge by inserting a new cartridge. The absolute safety of the approach is supported by world-wide approval for carry-on and use on airplanes. Over the past several years, Lilliputian Systems has created the many innovations required to bring this complex system to high-volume manufacturing. We will discuss the unique challenges in system architecture and high-temperature MEMS design which have been overcome, enabling Lilliputian to provide long-lasting portable power for consumer electronics devices.

  12. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  13. U.S. Army Corrosion Office's storage and quality requirements for military MEMS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III; Skelton, D. R.

    2007-04-01

    As the Army transforms into a more lethal, lighter and agile force, the technologies that support these systems must decrease in size while increasing in intelligence. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are one such technology that the Army and DOD will rely on heavily to accomplish these objectives. Conditions for utilization of MEMS by the military are unique. Operational and storage environments for the military are significantly different than those found in the commercial sector. Issues unique to the military include; high G-forces during gun launch, extreme temperature and humidity ranges, extended periods of inactivity (20 years plus) and interaction with explosives and propellants. The military operational environments in which MEMS will be stored or required to function are extreme and far surpass any commercial operating conditions. Security and encryption are a must for all MEMS communication, tracking, or data reporting devices employed by the military. Current and future military applications of MEMS devices include safety and arming devices, fuzing devices, various guidance systems, sensors/detectors, inertial measurement units, tracking devices, radio frequency devices, wireless Radio Frequency Identifications (RFIDs) and network systems, GPS's, radar systems, mobile base systems and information technology. MEMS embedded into these weapons systems will provide the military with new levels of speed, awareness, lethality, and information dissemination. The system capabilities enhanced by MEMS will translate directly into tactical and strategic military advantages.

  14. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  15. Gamma-ray irradiation of ohmic MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, John J.; Lampen, James L.; Taylor, Edward W.

    2012-10-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) switches are becoming important building blocks for a variety of military and commercial applications including switch matrices, phase shifters, electronically scanned antennas, switched filters, Automatic Test Equipment, instrumentation, cell phones and smart antennas. Low power consumption, large ratio of off-impedance to on-impedance, extreme linearity, low mass, small volume and the ability to be integrated with other electronics makes MEMS switches an attractive alternative to other mechanical and solid-state switches for a variety of space applications. Radant MEMS, Inc. has developed an electrostatically actuated broadband ohmic microswitch that has applications from DC through the microwave region. Despite the extensive earth based testing, little is known about the performance and reliability of these devices in space environments. To help fill this void, we have irradiated our commercial-off-the-shelf SPST, DC to 40 GHz MEMS switches with gamma-rays as an initial step to assessing static impact on RF performance. Results of Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation of the MEMS switches at photon energies ≥ 1.0 MeV to a total dose of ~ 118 krad(Si) did not show a statistically significant post-irradiation change in measured broadband, RF insertion loss, insertion phase, return loss and isolation.

  16. Development of Testing Methodologies for the Mechanical Properties of MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekwaro-Osire, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This effort is to investigate and design testing strategies to determine the mechanical properties of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) as well as investigate the development of a MEMS Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). One item of potential interest is the design of a test for the Weibull size effect in pressure membranes. The Weibull size effect is a consequence of a stochastic strength response predicted from the Weibull distribution. Confirming that MEMS strength is controlled by the Weibull distribution will enable the development of a probabilistic design methodology for MEMS - similar to the GRC developed CARES/Life program for bulk ceramics. However, the primary area of investigation will most likely be analysis and modeling of material interfaces for strength as well as developing a strategy to handle stress singularities at sharp corners, filets, and material interfaces. This will be a continuation of the previous years work. The ultimate objective of this effort is to further develop and verify the ability of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) code to predict the time-dependent reliability of MEMS structures subjected to multiple transient loads.

  17. Electrostatic MEMS devices with high reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Charles L; Auciello, Orlando H; Sumant, Anirudha V; Mancini, Derrick C; Gudeman, Chris; Sampath, Suresh; Carlilse, John A; Carpick, Robert W; Hwang, James

    2015-02-24

    The present invention provides for an electrostatic microelectromechanical (MEMS) device comprising a dielectric layer separating a first conductor and a second conductor. The first conductor is moveable towards the second conductor, when a voltage is applied to the MEMS device. The dielectric layer recovers from dielectric charging failure almost immediately upon removal of the voltage from the MEMS device.

  18. Effects Of Environmental And Operational Stresses On RF MEMS Switch Technologies For Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jah, Muzar; Simon, Eric; Sharma, Ashok

    2003-01-01

    Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) have been heralded for their ability to provide tremendous advantages in electronic systems through increased electrical performance, reduced power consumption, and higher levels of device integration with a reduction of board real estate. RF MEMS switch technology offers advantages such as low insertion loss (0.1- 0.5 dB), wide bandwidth (1 GHz-100 GHz), and compatibility with many different process technologies (quartz, high resistivity Si, GaAs) which can replace the use of traditional electronic switches, such as GaAs FETS and PIN Diodes, in microwave systems for low signal power (x < 500 mW) applications. Although the electrical characteristics of RF MEMS switches far surpass any existing technologies, the unknown reliability, due to the lack of information concerning failure modes and mechanisms inherent to MEMS devices, create an obstacle to insertion of MEMS technology into high reliability applications. All MEMS devices are sensitive to moisture and contaminants, issues easily resolved by hermetic or near-hermetic packaging. Two well-known failure modes of RF MEMS switches are charging in the dielectric layer of capacitive membrane switches and contact interface stiction of metal-metal switches. Determining the integrity of MEMS devices when subjected to the shock, vibration, temperature extremes, and radiation of the space environment is necessary to facilitate integration into space systems. This paper will explore the effects of different environmental stresses, operational life cycling, temperature, mechanical shock, and vibration on the first commercially available RF MEMS switches to identify relevant failure modes and mechanisms inherent to these device and packaging schemes for space applications. This paper will also describe RF MEMS Switch technology under development at NASA GSFC.

  19. Sensing glucose concentrations at GHz frequencies with a fully embedded Biomicro-electromechanical system (BioMEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, M.; Ehwald, K.-E.; Basmer, T.; Kulse, P.; Reich, C.; Drews, J.; Genschow, D.; Haak, U.; Marschmeyer, S.; Matthus, E.; Schulz, K.; Wolansky, D.; Winkler, W.; Guschauski, T.; Ehwald, R.

    2013-01-01

    The progressive scaling in semiconductor technology allows for advanced miniaturization of intelligent systems like implantable biosensors for low-molecular weight analytes. A most relevant application would be the monitoring of glucose in diabetic patients, since no commercial solution is available yet for the continuous and drift-free monitoring of blood sugar levels. We report on a biosensor chip that operates via the binding competition of glucose and dextran to concanavalin A. The sensor is prepared as a fully embedded micro-electromechanical system and operates at GHz frequencies. Glucose concentrations derive from the assay viscosity as determined by the deflection of a 50 nm TiN actuator beam excited by quasi-electrostatic attraction. The GHz detection scheme does not rely on the resonant oscillation of the actuator and safely operates in fluidic environments. This property favorably combines with additional characteristics—(i) measurement times of less than a second, (ii) usage of biocompatible TiN for bio-milieu exposed parts, and (iii) small volume of less than 1 mm3—to qualify the sensor chip as key component in a continuous glucose monitor for the interstitial tissue. PMID:25332510

  20. Sensing glucose concentrations at GHz frequencies with a fully embedded Biomicro-electromechanical system (BioMEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, M.; Ehwald, K.-E.; Basmer, T.; Kulse, P.; Reich, C.; Drews, J.; Genschow, D.; Haak, U.; Marschmeyer, S.; Matthus, E.; Schulz, K.; Wolansky, D.; Winkler, W.; Guschauski, T.; Ehwald, R.

    2013-06-01

    The progressive scaling in semiconductor technology allows for advanced miniaturization of intelligent systems like implantable biosensors for low-molecular weight analytes. A most relevant application would be the monitoring of glucose in diabetic patients, since no commercial solution is available yet for the continuous and drift-free monitoring of blood sugar levels. We report on a biosensor chip that operates via the binding competition of glucose and dextran to concanavalin A. The sensor is prepared as a fully embedded micro-electromechanical system and operates at GHz frequencies. Glucose concentrations derive from the assay viscosity as determined by the deflection of a 50 nm TiN actuator beam excited by quasi-electrostatic attraction. The GHz detection scheme does not rely on the resonant oscillation of the actuator and safely operates in fluidic environments. This property favorably combines with additional characteristics—(i) measurement times of less than a second, (ii) usage of biocompatible TiN for bio-milieu exposed parts, and (iii) small volume of less than 1 mm3—to qualify the sensor chip as key component in a continuous glucose monitor for the interstitial tissue.

  1. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Sasaki, Minoru; Yeh, J. Andrew

    2008-04-01

    This special issue on optical MEMS and nanophotonics features papers presented at the International Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics Conference held in Hualien, Taiwan, 12-16 August 2007, chaired by J Andrew Yeh. Minoru Sasaki and Chennupati Jagadish served as Program Co-Chairs of optical MEMS and nanophotonics, respectively. The conference featured a broad range of technologies in both topical areas with participation from academia, government laboratories and industry. The conference covered the latest technical developments in the fields of optical micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and integrated micro-optics. Integration and miniaturization of photonic and optical MEMS components and systems towards micro- and nanoscale for various applications were discussed. The conference also featured nanophotonics which is expected to provide high-speed, high-bandwidth and compact photonic devices. The interaction of light with nanoscale structures including generation, manipulation and detection was discussed at the conference and covered photonic crystals, quantum dots, nanowires and plasmonics. Integrated systems combining nanostructures and optical MEMS were discussed. We would like to thank Hans Zappe for suggesting the special issue and providing timely advice on various related matters and also to Julia Dickinson and Claire Bedrock for their professionalism and help. Carol Chan of the National Tsing Hua University is gratefully acknowledged for her help with the conference. Administration by staff from the Instrument Technology Research Center is highly appreciated. The assistance of the students of the National Dong Hua University and the National Tsing Hua University made the conference most enjoyable. The next conference will be held in Freiburg, Germany, 11-14 August 2008 and will be chaired by Hans Zappe.

  2. Thermoelectric microdevice fabricated by a MEMS-like electrochemical process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Lim, James R.; Huang, Chen-Kuo; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are the basis of many rapidly growing technologies, because they combine miniature sensors and actuators with communications and electronics at low cost. Commercial MEMS fabrication processes are limited to silicon-based materials or two-dimensional structures. Here we show an inexpensive, electrochemical technique to build MEMS-like structures that contain several different metals and semiconductors with three-dimensional bridging structures. We demonstrate this technique by building a working microthermoelectric device. Using repeated exposure and development of multiple photoresist layers, several different metals and thermoelectric materials are fabricated in a three-dimensional structure. A device containing 126 n-type and p-type (Bi, Sb)2Te3 thermoelectric elements, 20 microm tall and 60 microm in diameter with bridging metal interconnects, was fabricated and cooling demonstrated. Such a device should be of technological importance for precise thermal control when operating as a cooler, and for portable power when operating as a micro power generator.

  3. MEMS inertial sensors for load monitoring of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooperman, Aubryn M.; Martinez, Marcias J.

    2015-03-01

    Structural load monitoring of wind turbines is becoming increasingly important due increasing turbine size and offshore deployment. Rotor blades are key components that can be monitored by continuously measuring their deflection and thereby determining strain and loads on the blades. In this paper, a method is investigated for monitoring blade deformation that utilizes micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) comprising triaxial accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes. This approach is demonstrated using a cantilever beam instrumented with 5 MEMS and 4 strain gauges. The measured changes in angles obtained from the MEMS are used to determine a deformation surface which is used as an input to a finite element model in order to estimate the strain throughout the beam. The results are then verified by comparison with strain gauge measurements.

  4. A Theoretical and Experimental Comparison of 3-3 and 3-1 Mode Piezoelectric Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghwan; Hewa-Kasakarage, Nishshanka; Hall, Neal A.

    2014-01-01

    Two piezoelectric transducer modes applied in microelectromechanical systems are (i) the 3-1 mode with parallel electrodes perpendicular to a vertical polarization vector, and (ii) the 3-3 mode which uses interdigitated (IDT) electrodes to realize an in-plane polarization vector. This study compares the two configurations by deriving a Norton equivalent representation of each approach – including expressions for output charge and device capacitance. The model is verified using a microfabricated device comprised of multiple epitaxial silicon beams with sol-gel deposited lead zirconate titanate at the surface. The beams have identical dimensions and are attached to a common moving element at their tip. The only difference between beams is electrode configuration – enabling a direct comparison. Capacitance and charge measurements verify the presented theory with high accuracy. The Norton equivalent representation is general and enables comparison of any figure of merit, including electromechanical coupling coefficient and signal to noise ratio. With respect to coupling coefficient, the experimentally validated theory in this work suggests that 3-3 mode IDT-electrode configurations offer the potential for modest improvements compared against 3-1 mode devices (less than 2×), and the only geometrical parameter affecting this ratio is the fill factor of the IDT electrode. PMID:25309041

  5. An all-nickel magnetostatic MEMS scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Niklas; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    The design, fabrication and detailed characterization of a fully electroplated, magnetostatic low-cost MEMS scanning mirror are presented. By electroplating bright nickel on a sacrificial substrate, robust soft-magnetic micromirrors may be fabricated. The technology is simpler and cheaper than the standard process using bulk silicon micromachining of silicon-on-insulator wafers for fabricating magnetostatic scanners. The presented Ni mirrors exhibit deflection angles of ±7° at resonance for small external magnetic fields of 0.23 mT. Such magnetic fields are easily generated by miniaturized solenoids, making integration, for instance, into endoscopic systems possible.

  6. Widely tunable telecom MEMS-VCSEL for terahertz photomixing.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Mohammad Tanvir; Preu, Sascha; Paul, Sujoy; Gierl, Christian; Cesar, Julijan; Emsia, Ali; Küppers, Franko

    2015-10-01

    We report frequency-tunable terahertz (THz) generation with a photomixer driven by an ultra-broadband tunable micro-electro-mechanical system vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (MEMS-VCSEL) and a fixed-wavelength VCSEL, as well as a tunable MEMS-VCSEL mixed with a distributed feedback (DFB) diode. A total frequency span of 3.4 THz is covered in direct detection mode and 3.23 THz in the homodyne mode. The tuning range is solely limited by the dynamic range of the photomixers and the Schottky diode/photoconductor used in the experiment.

  7. "Mem's the Word": Examining the Writing of Mem Fox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Carol

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the work of Mem Fox. Explores Fox's life in order to better understand her work; examines books she has written for teachers and for parents; and reviews her children's books, emphasizing children's and teachers comments. Looks at best-loved books, bedtime books, predictable books for early readers, books that play with language, and…

  8. Design, fabrication and applications of MEMS tunable blazed gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology originated from the integrated circuits (IC) industry, and has gradually evolved into a wide range of technologies across multiple disciplines in three decades. With the boom of the IT industry in the late 1990's, micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) or optical MEMS technology, a branch of MEMS, has rapidly been applied to a large variety of fields including optical telecommunications, information display, spectroscopy and medical imaging. In this dissertation, we focus on optical filtering technology based on diffractive optical MEMS, which manipulate the light by modulating its phase through micro-actuation, or sense mechanical and other physical property changes at the microscale based on the principles of diffractive optics. The fundamental trade-off between the average transmission power and complexity of diffractive optical filters leads us to the concept of tunable blazed gratings, which trade spectral complexity for power transmission efficiency. MEMS tunable blazed gratings (TBG) are blazed gratings whose individual elements can be actuated at the micro-level using MEMS actuators. The TBG not only possess the advantages of high transmission and large dispersion of traditional blazed gratings, but also have the potential to enable novel optical filtering functionality beyond the reach of conventional monolithic blazed gratings with a much larger number of degrees of freedom. Starting from the first principles of diffractive optics, we develop the theoretical understanding of tunable blazed gratings, which serves as guidelines to our design and fabrication of TBG. We show different generations of TBG designs and the corresponding fabrication processes and focus on one the ones based on SOI technology which combine anisotropic wet silicon etching that defines mirror surface on crystalline surfaces of silicon, and deep reactive ion etching that can flexibly define electrostatic actuators. We

  9. EDITORIAL: MEMS in biology and medicine MEMS in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Beth L.; Herr, Amy E.

    2011-05-01

    this generation of MEMS researchers encapsulate the mission of JMM to 'cover all aspects of microelectromechanical systems, devices and structures as well as micromechanics, microengineering and microfabrication' as the physics and chemical processes under study match the scales of the MEMS technologies now possible. As evidenced by the articles assembled in this issue, the combined maturation of both our biological model systems and our tools is driving a new paradigm in the formulation of biological hypotheses. The intersection of MEMS with cell biology is evidenced in reviews of both methods for applying microscale forces in biological environments by Zheng and Zhang [9] as well as the manipulation of biology through mechanical interactions by Rajagopalan and Saif [10]. Additionally, the potential for microfluidic platforms to miniaturize and improve for a diverse set of biological measurements and assays for medical diagnostics is further reviewed by Tentori and Herr [11]. We hope that you find, as we do, this special issue to be 'essential reading for all MEMS researchers' and perhaps even of technical interest to your life sciences colleagues. References [1] Yetisen A K et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054018 [2] Morimoto Y et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054031 [3] Inglis D W et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054024 [4] Meyer M T et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054023 [5] Cheung L S-L et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054033 [6] Lee S A et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054006 [7] Hess A E et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054009 [8] Chu J et al 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054030 [9] Zheng X R and Zhang X 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054003 [10] Rajagopalan J and Saif M T A 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054002 [11] Tentori A M and Herr A E 2011 J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 054001

  10. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOEpatents

    Kohler, Stewart M.; Allen, James J.

    2007-05-01

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  11. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOEpatents

    Kohler, Stewart M.; Allen, James J.

    2006-06-27

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator for drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows, for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  12. MEMS for medical technology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisk, Thomas; Roxhed, Niclas; Stemme, Göran

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an in-depth description of two recent projects at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) which utilize MEMS and microsystem technology for realization of components intended for specific applications in medical technology and diagnostic instrumentation. By novel use of the DRIE fabrication technology we have developed side-opened out-of-plane silicon microneedles intended for use in transdermal drug delivery applications. The side opening reduces clogging probability during penetration into the skin and increases the up-take area of the liquid in the tissue. These microneedles offer about 200µm deep and pain-free skin penetration. We have been able to combine the microneedle chip with an electrically and heat controlled liquid actuator device where expandable microspheres are used to push doses of drug liquids into the skin. The entire unit is made of low cost materials in the form of a square one cm-sized patch. Finally, the design, fabrication and evaluation of an integrated miniaturized Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) based "electronic nose" microsystem for detection of narcotics is described. The work integrates a novel environment-to-chip sample interface with the sensor element. The choice of multifunctional materials and the geometric features of a four-component microsystem allow a functional integration of a QCM crystal, electrical contacts, fluidic contacts and a sample interface in a single system with minimal assembly effort, a potential for low-cost manufacturing, and a few orders of magnitude reduced in system size (12*12*4 mm 3) and weight compared to commercially available instruments. The sensor chip was successfully used it for the detection of 200 ng of narcotics sample.

  13. Feasibility of Frequency-Modulated Wireless Transmission for a Multi-Purpose MEMS-Based Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Sabato, Alessandro; Feng, Maria Q.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology have made wireless MEMS accelerometers an attractive tool for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil engineering structures. To date, sensors' low sensitivity and accuracy—especially at very low frequencies—have imposed serious limitations for their application in monitoring large-sized structures. Conventionally, the MEMS sensor's analog signals are converted to digital signals before radio-frequency (RF) wireless transmission. The conversion can cause a low sensitivity to the important low-frequency and low-amplitude signals. To overcome this difficulty, the authors have developed a MEMS accelerometer system, which converts the sensor output voltage to a frequency-modulated signal before RF transmission. This is achieved by using a Voltage to Frequency Conversion (V/F) instead of the conventional Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC). In this paper, a prototype MEMS accelerometer system is presented, which consists of a transmitter and receiver circuit boards. The former is equipped with a MEMS accelerometer, a V/F converter and a wireless RF transmitter, while the latter contains an RF receiver and a F/V converter for demodulating the signal. The efficacy of the MEMS accelerometer system in measuring low-frequency and low-amplitude dynamic responses is demonstrated through extensive laboratory tests and experiments on a flow-loop pipeline. PMID:25198003

  14. Feasibility of frequency-modulated wireless transmission for a multi-purpose MEMS-based accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sabato, Alessandro; Feng, Maria Q

    2014-09-05

    Recent advances in the Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology have made wireless MEMS accelerometers an attractive tool for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil engineering structures. To date, sensors' low sensitivity and accuracy--especially at very low frequencies--have imposed serious limitations for their application in monitoring large-sized structures. Conventionally, the MEMS sensor's analog signals are converted to digital signals before radio-frequency (RF) wireless transmission. The conversion can cause a low sensitivity to the important low-frequency and low-amplitude signals. To overcome this difficulty, the authors have developed a MEMS accelerometer system, which converts the sensor output voltage to a frequency-modulated signal before RF transmission. This is achieved by using a Voltage to Frequency Conversion (V/F) instead of the conventional Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC). In this paper, a prototype MEMS accelerometer system is presented, which consists of a transmitter and receiver circuit boards. The former is equipped with a MEMS accelerometer, a V/F converter and a wireless RF transmitter, while the latter contains an RF receiver and a F/V converter for demodulating the signal. The efficacy of the MEMS accelerometer system in measuring low-frequency and low-amplitude dynamic responses is demonstrated through extensive laboratory tests and experiments on a flow-loop pipeline.

  15. MEMS reliability: coming of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    In today's high-volume semiconductor world, one could easily take reliability for granted. As the MOEMS/MEMS industry continues to establish itself as a viable alternative to conventional manufacturing in the macro world, reliability can be of high concern. Currently, there are several emerging market opportunities in which MOEMS/MEMS is gaining a foothold. Markets such as mobile media, consumer electronics, biomedical devices, and homeland security are all showing great interest in microfabricated products. At the same time, these markets are among the most demanding when it comes to reliability assurance. To be successful, each company developing a MOEMS/MEMS device must consider reliability on an equal footing with cost, performance and manufacturability. What can this maturing industry learn from the successful development of DLP technology, air bag accelerometers and inkjet printheads? This paper discusses some basic reliability principles which any MOEMS/MEMS device development must use. Examples from the commercially successful and highly reliable Digital Micromirror Device complement the discussion.

  16. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  17. Characterization of quartz-based package for RF MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordo, G.; Faes, A.; Resta, G.; Iannacci, J.

    2013-05-01

    In the last decade Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology experienced a significant development in various fields of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). In particular MEMS for Radio Frequency (RF) applications have emerged as a remarkable solution in order to fabricate components with outstanding performances. The encapsulation of such devices is a relevant aspect to be addressed in order to enable wide exploitation of RF-MEMS technology in commercial applications. A MEMS package must not only protect fragile mechanical parts but also provide the interface to the next level of the packaging hierarchy in a cost effective technology. Additionally, in RF applications the electromagnetic impact of the package has to be carefully considered. Given such a scenario, the focus of this work is the characterization of a chip capping solution for RF-MEMS devices. Such solution uses a quartz cap having an epoxy-based dry film sealing ring. Relevant issues affecting RF-MEMS devices once packaged, e.g. the mechanical strain induced by the cap and the hermeticity of the sealing ring, are worth investigating. This work focuses on the study of induced strain, as a function of different bonding parameters. Dimensional features of the sealing ring (i.e. the width), and process parameters, like temperature and pressure, have been considered. The package characterization is performed by using basic test vehicles, such as strain gauges, designed to be integrated inside the internal cavity of the package itself. Polysilicon piezoresistors are used as strain gauges, whereas aluminum resistors are used as thermometers to assess the impact of temperature changes on strain measurements. Experimental data are reported including calibration of the sensors as well as environmental measurements with and without cap. In addition measurements of the shear stress of the proposed packaging solution are also reported.

  18. Noise Reduction for a MEMS-Gyroscope-Based Head Mouse.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiaying; Gerdtman, Christer; Lindén, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, four different signal processing algorithms which can be applied to reduce the noise from a MEMS-gyroscope-based computer head mouse are presented. MEMS-gyroscopes are small, light, cheap and widely used in many electrical products. MultiPos, a MEMS-gyroscope-based computer head mouse system was designed for persons with movement disorders. Noise such as physiological tremor and electrical noise is a common problem for the MultiPos system. In this study four different signal processing algorithms were applied and evaluated by simulation in MATLAB and implementation in a dsPIC, with aim to minimize the noise in MultiPos. The algorithms were low-pass filter, Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm, Kalman filter and Weighted Fourier Linear Combiner (WFLC) algorithm. Comparisons and system tests show that these signal processing algorithms can be used to improve the MultiPos system. The WFLC algorithm was found the best method for noise reduction in the application of a MEMS-gyroscope-based head mouse.

  19. A Packaged Silicon MEMS Vibratory Gyroscope for Microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, T. K.; Gutierrez, R. C.; Stell, C. B.; Vorperian, V.; Arakaki, G. A.; Rice, J. T.; Li, W. J.; Chakraborty, I.; Shceglov, K.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent work on the design, fabrication, and packaging of a silicon MIcro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microgyroscope designed for space applications. A hermetically sealed package that houses the microgyroscope and most of its control electronics has been built and tested.

  20. Nondestructive monitoring of a pipe network using a MEMS-based wireless network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Masanobu; Chou, Pai H.; Kim, Sehwan; Kim, Hong Rok; Yoon, Eunbae; Mustafa, Hadil; Karmakar, Debasis; Pul, Selim

    2010-04-01

    A MEMS-based wireless sensor network (WSN) is developed for nondestructive monitoring of pipeline systems. It incorporates MEMS accelerometers for measuring vibration on the surface of a pipe to determine the change in water pressure caused by rupture and the damage location. This system enables various sensor boards and camera modules to be daisychained underground and to transmit data with a shared radio board for data uplink. Challenges include reliable long-range communication, precise time synchronization, effective bandwidth usage, and power management. The low-cost MEMS technology, saved wiring cost, and simple installation without destructive modification enable large-scale deployment at an affordable cost.

  1. Heat transfer implications in the first MEMS fabricated thermal transiration-driven vacuum pump for gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargo, S. E.; Green, A. A.; Muntz, E. P.

    2000-01-01

    The success of NASA's future space missions and the development of portable, commercial instrument packages will depend greatly on miniaturized components enabled by the use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  2. Design and simulation of microspectrometer based on torsional MEMS grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bin; Yuan, Weizheng; Sun, Ruikang; Qiao, Dayong; Yu, Yiting; Li, Taiping

    2010-10-01

    Micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) has prominent advantages over conventional optical devices, such as smaller, lighter, more stable, lower cost and power consumption. It has been widely applied in the last few years. This paper presents a micro spectrometer based on torsional MEMS grating with micromachining process. As a diffractive component in the micro spectrometer, the torsional MEMS grating is actuated by electrostatic force to scan the spectrum. In contrast to common linear detector arrays with stationary diffraction grating and non-fixed grating rotated by stepper motor to scan spectrum used in most micro spectrometer, MEMS-based spectrometer is dynamically controllable, and has no mechanical moving parts with small size. ZEMAX is used for design, optimization, and simulation analysis of the micro spectrometer with multi-configurations in the cross Czerny-Turner optical system. The results indicate that torsional MEMS grating operates at a torsion angle of +/-3 degree, the spectrometer can scan spectral range of 800-1600nm in NIR (near infrared), spectral resolution is around 10 nm, and the whole spectrometer has a volume of 80mm×55mm×30mm. The study provides an initial theoretical foundation for the further development and design.

  3. MEMS-based satellite micropropulsion via catalyzed hydrogen peroxide decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Thomas, Michael A.

    2001-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques offer great potential in satisfying the mission requirements for the next generation of miniaturized spacecraft being designed by NASA and Department of Defense agencies. More commonly referred to as `nanosats', these spacecraft feature masses in the range of 10-100 kg and therefore have unique propulsion requirements. The propulsion systems must be capable of providing extremely low levels of thrust and impulse while also satisfying stringent demands on size, mass, power consumption and cost. We begin with an overview of micropropulsion requirements and some current MEMS-based strategies being developed to meet these needs. The remainder of the paper focuses on the progress being made at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center toward the development of a prototype monopropellant MEMS thruster which uses the catalyzed chemical decomposition of high-concentration hydrogen peroxide as a propulsion mechanism. The products of decomposition are delivered to a microscale converging/diverging supersonic nozzle, which produces the thrust vector; the targeted thrust level is approximately 500 µN with a specific impulse of 140-180 s. Macroscale hydrogen peroxide thrusters have been used for satellite propulsion for decades; however, the implementation of traditional thruster designs on the MEMS scale has uncovered new challenges in fabrication, materials compatibility, and combustion and hydrodynamic modeling. A summary of the achievements of the project to date is given, as is a discussion of remaining challenges and future prospects.

  4. MEMS-based tunable gratings and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiting; Yuan, Weizheng; Qiao, Dayong

    2015-03-01

    The marriage of optics and MEMS has resulted in a new category of optical devices and systems that have unprecedented advantages compared with their traditional counterparts. As an important spatial light modulating technology, diffractive optical MEMS obtains a wide variety of successful commercial applications, e.g. projection displays, optical communication and spectral analysis, due to its features of highly compact, low-cost, IC-compatible, excellent performance, and providing possibilities for developing totally new, yet smart devices and systems. Three most successful MEMS diffraction gratings (GLVs, Polychromator and DMDs) are briefly introduced and their potential applications are analyzed. Then, three different MEMS tunable gratings developed by our group, named as micro programmable blazed gratings (μPBGs) and micro pitch-tunable gratings (μPTGs) working in either digital or analog mode, are demonstrated. The strategies to largely enhance the maximum blazed angle and grating period are described. Some preliminary application explorations based on the developed grating devices are also shown. For our ongoing research focus, we will further improve the device performance to meet the engineering application requirements.

  5. Characterization of a MEMS Accelerometer for Inertial Navigating Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.D.

    1999-02-12

    Inertial MEMS sensors such as accelerometers and angular rotation sensing devices continue to improve in performance as advances in design and processing are made. Present state-of-the-art accelerometers have achieved performance levels in the laboratory that are consistent with requirements for successful application in tactical weapon navigation systems. However, sensor performance parameters that are of interest to the designer of inertial navigation systems are frequently not adequately addressed by the MEMS manufacturer. This paper addresses the testing and characterization of a MEMS accelerometer from an inertial navigation perspective. The paper discusses test objectives, data reduction techniques and presents results from the test of a three-axis MEMS accelerometer conducted at Sandia National Laboratories during 1997. The test was structured to achieve visibility and characterization of the accelerometer bias and scale factor stability overtime and temperature. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. MEMS-Based Satellite Micropropulsion Via Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Thomas, Michael A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques offer great potential in satisfying the mission requirements for the next generation of "micro-scale" satellites being designed by NASA and Department of Defense agencies. More commonly referred to as "nanosats", these miniature satellites feature masses in the range of 10-100 kg and therefore have unique propulsion requirements. The propulsion systems must be capable of providing extremely low levels of thrust and impulse while also satisfying stringent demands on size, mass, power consumption and cost. We begin with an overview of micropropulsion requirements and some current MEMS-based strategies being developed to meet these needs. The remainder of the article focuses the progress being made at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center towards the development of a prototype monopropellant MEMS thruster which uses the catalyzed chemical decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide as a propulsion mechanism. The products of decomposition are delivered to a micro-scale converging/diverging supersonic nozzle which produces the thrust vector; the targeted thrust level approximately 500 N with a specific impulse of 140-180 seconds. Macro-scale hydrogen peroxide thrusters have been used for satellite propulsion for decades; however, the implementation of traditional thruster designs on a MEMS scale has uncovered new challenges in fabrication, materials compatibility, and combustion and hydrodynamic modeling. A summary of the achievements of the project to date is given, as is a discussion of remaining challenges and future prospects.

  7. Development of a MEMS based dynamic rheometer.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Gordon F; Yoo, Jae Myung; Dagalakis, Nicholas; Hudson, Steven D; Migler, Kalman B

    2010-10-21

    Rheological methods that interrogate nanolitre scale volumes of fluids and solids have advanced considerably over the past decade, yet there remains a need for methods that probe the frequency-dependent complex rheological moduli through application of homogenous strain fields. Here we describe a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) based approach for the measurement of dynamic rheology of soft matter where oscillatory strain is produced in a sample sandwiched between an oscillating MEMS stage and a glass plate. The resulting stress-strain relationships are revealed by measurement and analysis of the stage motion. We present preliminary data on simple viscous fluids and on viscoelastic thin films. In this proof-of-principle device, we measure moduli in the range of 50 Pa to 10 kPa over a range of 3 rad s(-1) to 3000 rad s(-1) using less than 5 nL of sample material. The device's measurement window is limited primarily by our current ability to measure the motion of the stage. This device will provide a new way to characterize dynamic microrheology of an array of novel materials and will prove useful in a number of areas including biorheology, microfluidics and polymer thin films. PMID:20820483

  8. Photonic MEMS for NIR in-situ

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E

    2007-07-03

    We report on a novel sensing technique combining photonics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for the detection and monitoring of gas emissions for critical environmental, medical, and industrial applications. We discuss how MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be exploited for in-situ detection and NIR spectroscopy of several gases, such as O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, CO{sub x}, CH{sub 4}, HF, HCl, etc., with estimated sensitivities between 0.1 and 20 ppm on footprints {approx}10{sup -3} mm{sup 3}. The VCSELs can be electrostatically tuned with a continuous wavelength shift up to 20 nm, allowing for unambiguous NIR signature determination. Selective concentration analysis in heterogeneous gas compositions is enabled, thus paving the way to an integrated optical platform for multiplexed gas identification by bandgap and device engineering. We will discuss here, in particular, our efforts on the development of a 760 nm AlGaAs based tunable VCSEL for O{sub 2} detection.

  9. The use of a high-order MEMS deformable mirror in the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Bauman, B; Cornelissen, S; Jones, S; Macintosh, B; Palmer, D; Isaacs, J

    2010-12-17

    We briefly review the development history of the Gemini Planet Imager's 4K Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror. We discuss essential calibration steps and algorithms to control the MEMS with nanometer precision, including voltage-phase calibration and influence function characterization. We discuss the integration of the MEMS into GPI's Adaptive Optics system at Lawrence Livermore and present experimental results of 1.5 kHz closed-loop control. We detail mitigation strategies in the coronagraph to reduce the impact of abnormal actuators on final image contrast.

  10. Torsion/cantilever-based MEMS bistable mechanisms with different support configurations: structure design and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yibo; Zhang, Congchun; Wang, Hong; Ding, Guifu

    2011-04-01

    Three types of torsion/cantilever-based MEMS bistable mechanisms (BMs) with different support configurations have been constructed, modeled and experimented. For the support configuration, there is a crisscross-shaped, a ring-shaped and a diamond-shaped support beam, respectively. The proposed MEMS BMs consist of a free-free torsion-based cantilever which forms a symmetrical rocker lever. The free-free cantilever is suspended by a support skeleton which in turn is attached to a torsion cantilever. A permanent magnet is attached beside for holding the closed state with a permalloy soft magnetic circuit. The different special support configurations account for a low torsional compliance with the overhanging beams. In order to deduce the equivalent stiffness coefficient of BM systems, mechanical modeling of three types of torsion/cantilever-based MEMS BMs was performed by the classical beam theorem. Meanwhile, the magnetostatic latching force was also deduced by the Maxwell electromagnetism theory. The performances of these MEMS BMs have been compared by the evaluation of static deformation variations, equivalent stiffness coefficients and dynamical switching characterizations. Finally, mechanical performance was characterized by atomic force microscopy, combined with a Nanoindentation Tester. In addition, bistabilities of the MEMS BMs were proved by theoretical analysis as well as experimental results. Among these BMs, the ring-shaped MEMS BM is extremely prone to deflect due to relatively low stiffness compared with other types. The torsion/cantilever-based MEMS BMs have potential application in the field of latching relays with low power consumption.

  11. Laser-assisted advanced assembly for MEMS fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Yuriy Andreev

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently fabricated using methods originally designed for manufacturing semiconductor devices, using minimum if any assembly at all. The inherited limitations of this approach narrow the materials that can be employed and reduce the design complexity, imposing limitations on MEMS functionality. The proposed Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly (LA3) method solves these problems by first fabricating components followed by assembly of a MEMS device. Components are micro-machined using a laser or by photolithography followed by wet/dry etching out of any material available in a thin sheet form. A wide range of materials can be utilized, including biocompatible metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, semiconductors, and materials with special properties such as memory shape alloys, thermoelectric, ferromagnetic, piezoelectric, and more. The approach proposed allows enhancing the structural and mechanical properties of the starting materials through heat treatment, tribological coatings, surface modifications, bio-functionalization, and more, a limited, even unavailable possibility with existing methods. Components are transferred to the substrate for assembly using the thermo-mechanical Selective Laser Assisted Die Transfer (tmSLADT) mechanism for microchips assembly, already demonstrated by our team. Therefore, the mechanical and electronic part of the MEMS can be fabricated using the same equipment/method. The viability of the Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly technique for MEMS is demonstrated by fabricating magnetic switches for embedding in a conductive carbon-fiber metamaterial for use in an Electromagnetic-Responsive Mobile Cyber-Physical System (E-RMCPS), which is expected to improve the wireless communication system efficiency within a battery-powered device.

  12. Bulk-titanium for MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Changsong

    RF-MEMS switches offer great potential benefits such as high isolation, low insertion loss, low power consumption, and excellent linearity characteristics. Most MEMS switches are fabricated using surface micromachining techniques by taking advantage of the IC processing techniques. Little work has been done on bulk micromachining for fabricating MEMS switches. This work contributes to two main areas in the MEMS switch field, (1) a Sacrificial-Layer-Free (SLF) method to fabricate switches using bulk titanium MEMS (BT-MEMS) and multilayer lamination techniques, and (2) development of a novel composite contact material and integration into BT-MEMS switches for testing. This approach for fabricating MEMS switches offers advantages from five aspects to attack the fabrication and reliability issues. Four generations of Bulk-Ti MEMS (BT-MEMS) switches were developed. They were improved through developments of high aspect ratio bulk Ti etching, Titanium-On-Insulator structure, multilayer lamination, mechanical design, and a new contact material. The first generation proved the feasibility of the concept of the BT-MEMS switch. The second generation had a good contact resistance. Development of the novel Nano-Structured-Titania (NST) composite material allowed further improvement of the third generation. We used the BT-MEMS switch as a platform for testing this new, novel contact material. Due to the preferred surface properties of the NST-metal composite material such as roughness and hardness, the third generation switched above 15 billion contact cycles without adhesion failure. Contact resistance was further improved in the fourth generation switch by integrating the NST-metal composite material into the top part as bumps. Above 100 million cycles with good contact resistance values were achieved.

  13. Earthquake Data Recorded by the MEMS Accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Austin Adams

    2003-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operates 26 seismic stations remotely located in southeastern Idaho and 25 strong-motion accelerographs located at critical facilities at the INEEL Site. The INEEL seismic network has upgraded standard analog instrumentation at all of its seismic station to digital recording systems. Seismic data are transmitted to a central recording laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho using 900 MHz wireless modems. The INEEL has also chosen digital recording systems to replace the 25 analog film-recording strong-motion accelerographs. The INEEL chose to field test the Applied MEMS Inc., model SF1500A tri-axial accelerometeri with the digital recording system for suitability in earthquake ground motion recording.

  14. MEMS Stirling Cooler Development Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Wesolek, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    This presentation provides an update on the effort to build and test a prototype unit of the patented MEMS Stirling cooler concept. A micro-scale regenerator has been fabricated by Polar Thermal Technologies and is currently being integrated into a Stirling cycle simulator at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A discussion of the analysis, design, assembly, and test plans for the prototype will be presented.

  15. Prospective MEMS applications at NEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenichiro

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes several silicon micromachined devices that have been developed at NEC from the viewpoint of commercial applications. The author learned it was difficult to continually succeed in business, even if the related technology could be established. It is supposed that the market for micromachined devices will soon become saturated, leading to strong cost competition and declining profitability. On the other hand, the potential wide applications for MEMS will allow many companies to develop their own specialties in the future.

  16. Analysis of the surface effects on adhesion in MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, F.; Pustan, M.; Bîrleanu, C.; Müller, R.; Voicu, R.; Baracu, A.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main failure causes in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is stiction. Stiction is the adhesion of contacting surfaces due to surface forces. Adhesion force depends on the operating conditions and is influenced by the contact area. In this study, the adhesion force between MEMS materials and the AFM tips is analyzed using the spectroscopy in point mode of the AFM. The aim is to predict the stiction failure mode in MEMS. The investigated MEMS materials are silicon, polysilicon, platinum, aluminum, and gold. Three types of investigations were conducted. The first one aimed to determine the variation of the adhesion force with respect to the variation of the roughness. The roughness has a strong influence on the adhesion because the contact area between components increases if the roughness decreases. The second type of investigation aimed to determine the adhesion force in multiple points of each considered sample. The values obtained experimentally for the adhesion force were also validated using the JKR and DMT models. The third type of investigation was conducted with the purpose of determining the influence of the temperature on the adhesion force.

  17. A New MEMS Gyroscope Used for Single-Channel Damping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fuxue; Wang, Biao

    2015-04-30

    The silicon micromechanical gyroscope, which will be introduced in this paper, represents a novel MEMS gyroscope concept. It is used for the damping of a single-channel control system of rotating aircraft. It differs from common MEMS gyroscopes in that does not have a drive structure, itself, and only has a sense structure. It is installed on a rotating aircraft, and utilizes the aircraft spin to make its sensing element obtain angular momentum. When the aircraft is subjected to an angular rotation, a periodic Coriolis force is induced in the direction orthogonal to both the angular momentum and the angular velocity input axis. This novel MEMS gyroscope can thus sense angular velocity inputs. The output sensing signal is exactly an amplitude-modulation signal. Its envelope is proportional to the input angular velocity, and the carrier frequency corresponds to the spin frequency of the rotating aircraft, so the MEMS gyroscope can not only sense the transverse angular rotation of an aircraft, but also automatically change the carrier frequency over the change of spin frequency, making it very suitable for the damping of a single-channel control system of a rotating aircraft. In this paper, the motion equation of the MEMS gyroscope has been derived. Then, an analysis has been carried to solve the motion equation and dynamic parameters. Finally, an experimental validation has been done based on a precision three axis rate table. The correlation coefficients between the tested data and the theoretical values are 0.9969, 0.9872 and 0.9842, respectively. These results demonstrate that both the design and sensing mechanism are correct.

  18. A New MEMS Gyroscope Used for Single-Channel Damping

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zengping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fuxue; Wang, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The silicon micromechanical gyroscope, which will be introduced in this paper, represents a novel MEMS gyroscope concept. It is used for the damping of a single-channel control system of rotating aircraft. It differs from common MEMS gyroscopes in that does not have a drive structure, itself, and only has a sense structure. It is installed on a rotating aircraft, and utilizes the aircraft spin to make its sensing element obtain angular momentum. When the aircraft is subjected to an angular rotation, a periodic Coriolis force is induced in the direction orthogonal to both the angular momentum and the angular velocity input axis. This novel MEMS gyroscope can thus sense angular velocity inputs. The output sensing signal is exactly an amplitude-modulation signal. Its envelope is proportional to the input angular velocity, and the carrier frequency corresponds to the spin frequency of the rotating aircraft, so the MEMS gyroscope can not only sense the transverse angular rotation of an aircraft, but also automatically change the carrier frequency over the change of spin frequency, making it very suitable for the damping of a single-channel control system of a rotating aircraft. In this paper, the motion equation of the MEMS gyroscope has been derived. Then, an analysis has been carried to solve the motion equation and dynamic parameters. Finally, an experimental validation has been done based on a precision three axis rate table. The correlation coefficients between the tested data and the theoretical values are 0.9969, 0.9872 and 0.9842, respectively. These results demonstrate that both the design and sensing mechanism are correct. PMID:25942638

  19. A New MEMS Gyroscope Used for Single-Channel Damping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fuxue; Wang, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The silicon micromechanical gyroscope, which will be introduced in this paper, represents a novel MEMS gyroscope concept. It is used for the damping of a single-channel control system of rotating aircraft. It differs from common MEMS gyroscopes in that does not have a drive structure, itself, and only has a sense structure. It is installed on a rotating aircraft, and utilizes the aircraft spin to make its sensing element obtain angular momentum. When the aircraft is subjected to an angular rotation, a periodic Coriolis force is induced in the direction orthogonal to both the angular momentum and the angular velocity input axis. This novel MEMS gyroscope can thus sense angular velocity inputs. The output sensing signal is exactly an amplitude-modulation signal. Its envelope is proportional to the input angular velocity, and the carrier frequency corresponds to the spin frequency of the rotating aircraft, so the MEMS gyroscope can not only sense the transverse angular rotation of an aircraft, but also automatically change the carrier frequency over the change of spin frequency, making it very suitable for the damping of a single-channel control system of a rotating aircraft. In this paper, the motion equation of the MEMS gyroscope has been derived. Then, an analysis has been carried to solve the motion equation and dynamic parameters. Finally, an experimental validation has been done based on a precision three axis rate table. The correlation coefficients between the tested data and the theoretical values are 0.9969, 0.9872 and 0.9842, respectively. These results demonstrate that both the design and sensing mechanism are correct. PMID:25942638

  20. Strong Motion Seismograph Based On MEMS Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Y.; Hu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The MEMS strong motion seismograph we developed used the modularization method to design its software and hardware.It can fit various needs in different application situation.The hardware of the instrument is composed of a MEMS accelerometer,a control processor system,a data-storage system,a wired real-time data transmission system by IP network,a wireless data transmission module by 3G broadband,a GPS calibration module and power supply system with a large-volumn lithium battery in it. Among it,the seismograph's sensor adopted a three-axis with 14-bit high resolution and digital output MEMS accelerometer.Its noise level just reach about 99μg/√Hz and ×2g to ×8g dynamically selectable full-scale.Its output data rates from 1.56Hz to 800Hz. Its maximum current consumption is merely 165μA,and the device is so small that it is available in a 3mm×3mm×1mm QFN package. Furthermore,there is access to both low pass filtered data as well as high pass filtered data,which minimizes the data analysis required for earthquake signal detection. So,the data post-processing can be simplified. Controlling process system adopts a 32-bit low power consumption embedded ARM9 processor-S3C2440 and is based on the Linux operation system.The processor's operating clock at 400MHz.The controlling system's main memory is a 64MB SDRAM with a 256MB flash-memory.Besides,an external high-capacity SD card data memory can be easily added.So the system can meet the requirements for data acquisition,data processing,data transmission,data storage,and so on. Both wired and wireless network can satisfy remote real-time monitoring, data transmission,system maintenance,status monitoring or updating software.Linux was embedded and multi-layer designed conception was used.The code, including sensor hardware driver,the data acquisition,earthquake setting out and so on,was written on medium layer.The hardware driver consist of IIC-Bus interface driver, IO driver and asynchronous notification driver. The

  1. Mechanics and tribology of MEMS materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Somuri V.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2004-04-01

    Micromachines have the potential to significantly impact future weapon component designs as well as other defense, industrial, and consumer product applications. For both electroplated (LIGA) and surface micromachined (SMM) structural elements, the influence of processing on structure, and the resultant effects on material properties are not well understood. The behavior of dynamic interfaces in present as-fabricated microsystem materials is inadequate for most applications and the fundamental relationships between processing conditions and tribological behavior in these systems are not clearly defined. We intend to develop a basic understanding of deformation, fracture, and surface interactions responsible for friction and wear of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) materials. This will enable needed design flexibility for these devices, as well as strengthen our understanding of material behavior at the nanoscale. The goal of this project is to develop new capabilities for sub-microscale mechanical and tribological measurements, and to exercise these capabilities to investigate material behavior at this size scale.

  2. Tuning of MEMS Gyroscope using Evolutionary Algorithm and "Switched Drive-Angle" Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Ferguson, Michael I.; Breuer, Luke; Peay, Chris; Oks, Boris; Cheng, Yen; Kim, Dennis; MacDonald, Eric; Foor, David; Terrile, Rich; Yee, Karl

    2006-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation that has the capacity to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning and, furthermore, to find the optimally tuned configuration for this state of increased sensitivity. We present the results of an experiment to determine the speed and efficiency of an evolutionary algorithm applied to electrostatic tuning of MEMS micro gyros. The MEMS gyro used in this experiment is a pyrex post resonator gyro (PRG) in a closed-loop control system. A measure of the quality of tuning is given by the difference in resonant frequencies, or frequency split, for the two orthogonal rocking axes. The current implementation of the closed-loop platform is able to measure and attain a relative stability in the sub-millihertz range, leading to a reduction of the frequency split to less than 100 mHz.

  3. Development of a Compact Optical-MEMS Scanner with Integrated VCSEL Light Source and Diffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, Thomas W.; Reyes, David; Rodgers, M. Steven; Smith, James H.; Warren, Mial; Sweatt, William; Blum-Spahn, Olga; Wendt, Joel R.; Asbill, Randy

    1999-06-30

    In this work the design and initial fabrication results are reported for the components of a compact optical-MEMS laser scanning system. This system integrates a silicon MEMS laser scanner, a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) and passive optical components. The MEMS scanner and VCSEL are mounted onto a fused silica substrate which serves as an optical interconnect between the devices. Two Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are etched into the fused silica substrate to focus the VCSEL beam and increase the scan range. The silicon MEMS scanner consists of an actuator that continuously scans the position of a large polysilicon gold-coated shuttle containing a third DOE. Interferometric measurements show that the residual stress in the 500 {micro}m x 1000 {micro}m shuttle is extremely low, with a maximum deflection of only 0.18{micro}m over an 800 {micro}m span for an unmetallized case and a deflection of 0.56{micro}m for the metallized case. A conservative estimate for the scan range is {approximately}{+-}4{degree}, with a spot size of about 0.5 mm, producing 50 resolvable spots. The basic system architecture, optical and MEMS design is reported in this paper, with an emphasis on the design and fabrication of the silicon MEMS scanner portion of the system.

  4. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  5. Ultrananocrystalline diamond films with optimized dielectric properties for advanced RF MEMS capacitive switches

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Auciello, Orlando H.; Mancini, Derrick C.

    2013-01-15

    An efficient deposition process is provided for fabricating reliable RF MEMS capacitive switches with multilayer ultrananocrystalline (UNCD) films for more rapid recovery, charging and discharging that is effective for more than a billion cycles of operation. Significantly, the deposition process is compatible for integration with CMOS electronics and thereby can provide monolithically integrated RF MEMS capacitive switches for use with CMOS electronic devices, such as for insertion into phase array antennas for radars and other RF communication systems.

  6. MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity SOAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Garrett D.

    Vertical-cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (VCSOAs) are attractive as a low-cost alternative to existing amplifier technologies for use in fiber-optic communication systems such as metro and access networks. In contrast with in-plane SOAs, the surface-normal operation of vertical-cavity SOAs gives rise to a number of advantages including a high coupling efficiency to optical fiber, polarization insensitive gain, the potential to fabricate high fill-factor two-dimensional arrays, and the ability to test devices on wafer. Due to their narrow gain bandwidth, VCSOAs function as amplifying filters. In these devices the inherent spectral filtering of the high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity leads to the elimination of out-of-band noise and results in channel-selective amplification. For multi-wavelength communications systems, it is of great interest to develop widely tunable VCSOAs that can be dynamically adjusted to match the signal wavelength. A promising approach to achieve wide wavelength tuning in VCSOAs is micromechanical, or MEMS-based tuning. Here, mechanical alteration of the effective cavity length gives rise to tuning ranges greater than those that can be achieved via refractive index modulation. This dissertation outlines the development of three generations of MEMS-tunable VCSOAs (MT-VCSOAs), with the initial generation of devices being noteworthy as the first demonstration of a micromechanically-tunable VCSOA. In contrast with temperature tuning, the AlGaAs-based electrostatic actuator used in these devices allows for rapid, low power, and wide wavelength tuning. In the final generation, the MT-VCSOA utilizes a bottom-emitting configuration in which the MEMS-tuning element serves as the high-reflectivity back mirror. By suppressing the variation in reflectance with tuning, this configuration exhibits a two-fold increase in the effective tuning range as compared with the initial generation of devices---with a minimum of 5 dB fiber-to-fiber gain (12 dB on

  7. Integrated electronics and fluidic MEMS for bioengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Ho Him Raymond

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and microelectronics have become enabling technologies for many research areas. This dissertation presents the use of fluidic MEMS and microelectronics for bioengineering applications. In particular, the versatility of MEMS and microelectronics is highlighted by the presentation of two different applications, one for in-vitro study of nano-scale dynamics during cell division and one for in-vivo monitoring of biological activities at the cellular level. The first application of an integrated system discussed in this dissertation is to utilize fluidic MEMS for studying dynamics in the mitotic spindle, which could lead to better chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer patients. Previous work has developed the use of electrokinetic phenomena on the surface of a glass-based platform to assemble microtubules, the building blocks of mitotic spindles. Nevertheless, there are two important limitations of this type of platform. First, an unconventional microfabrication process is necessary for the glass-based platform, which limits the utility of this platform. In order to overcome this limitation, in this dissertation a convenient microfluidic system is fabricated using a negative photoresist called SU-8. The fabrication process for the SU-8-based system is compatible with other fabrication techniques used in developing microelectronics, and this compatibility is essential for integrating electronics for studying dynamics in the mitotic spindle. The second limitation of the previously-developed glass-based platform is its lack of bio-compatibility. For example, microtubules strongly interact with the surface of the glass-based platform, thereby hindering the study of dynamics in the mitotic spindle. This dissertation presents a novel approach for assembling microtubules away from the surface of the platform, and a fabrication process is developed to assemble microtubules between two self-aligned thin film electrodes on thick SU-8

  8. MEMS3DMODELERV1.0

    2001-10-30

    The MEMS 3 D Modeler is a software package that creates 3D CAD solid models from 2D layout masks and a MEMS process definition. The solid models may be generated in either the ACIS SAT or IGES format. The result is an accurate representation that may be used for visualization or FEA analysis

  9. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kotovsky, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D

    2010-03-22

    This thin, MEMS contact-stress (CS) sensor continuously and accurately measures time-varying, solid interface loads in embedded systems over tens of thousands of load cycles. Unlike all other interface load sensors, the CS sensor is extremely thin (< 150 {micro}m), provides accurate, high-speed measurements, and exhibits good stability over time with no loss of calibration with load cycling. The silicon CS sensor, 5 mm{sup 2} and 65 {micro}m thick, has piezoresistive traces doped within a load-sensitive diaphragm. The novel package utilizes several layers of flexible polyimide to mechanically and electrically isolate the sensor from the environment, transmit normal applied loads to the diaphragm, and maintain uniform thickness. The CS sensors have a highly linear output in the load range tested (0-2.4 MPa) with an average accuracy of {+-} 1.5%.

  10. Implantable Wireless MEMS Sensors for Medical Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimbayo, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Sensors designed and fabricated according to the principles of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are being developed for several medical applications in outer space and on Earth. The designs of these sensors are based on a core design family of pressure sensors, small enough to fit into the eye of a needle, that are fabricated by a "dissolved wafer" process. The sensors are expected to be implantable, batteryless, and wireless. They would be both powered and interrogated by hand-held radio transceivers from distances up to about 6 in. (about 15 cm). One type of sensor would be used to measure blood pressure, particularly for congestive heart failure. Another type would be used to monitor fluids in patients who have hydrocephalus (high brain pressure). Still other types would be used to detect errors in delivery of drugs and to help patients having congestive heart failure.

  11. Electrothermal MEMS parallel plate rotation for single-imager stereoscopic endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyung-Won; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Baek, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Min-Suk; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Kim, Min H; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-01

    This work reports electrothermal MEMS parallel plate-rotation (PPR) for a single-imager based stereoscopic endoscope. A thin optical plate was directly connected to an electrothermal MEMS microactuator with bimorph structures of thin silicon and aluminum layers. The fabricated MEMS PPR device precisely rotates an transparent optical plate up to 37° prior to an endoscopic camera and creates the binocular disparities, comparable to those from binocular cameras with a baseline distance over 100 μm. The anaglyph 3D images and disparity maps were successfully achieved by extracting the local binocular disparities from two optical images captured at the relative positions. The physical volume of MEMS PPR is well fit in 3.4 mm x 3.3 mm x 1 mm. This method provides a new direction for compact stereoscopic 3D endoscopic imaging systems.

  12. Electrothermal MEMS parallel plate rotation for single-imager stereoscopic endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyung-Won; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Baek, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Min-Suk; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Kim, Min H; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-01

    This work reports electrothermal MEMS parallel plate-rotation (PPR) for a single-imager based stereoscopic endoscope. A thin optical plate was directly connected to an electrothermal MEMS microactuator with bimorph structures of thin silicon and aluminum layers. The fabricated MEMS PPR device precisely rotates an transparent optical plate up to 37° prior to an endoscopic camera and creates the binocular disparities, comparable to those from binocular cameras with a baseline distance over 100 μm. The anaglyph 3D images and disparity maps were successfully achieved by extracting the local binocular disparities from two optical images captured at the relative positions. The physical volume of MEMS PPR is well fit in 3.4 mm x 3.3 mm x 1 mm. This method provides a new direction for compact stereoscopic 3D endoscopic imaging systems. PMID:27137580

  13. Superhydrophobic Surface Coatings for Microfluidics and MEMs.

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, Eric D.; Singh, Seema; Houston, Jack E.; van Swol, Frank B.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2006-11-01

    Low solid interfacial energy and fractally rough surface topography confer to Lotus plants superhydrophobic (SH) properties like high contact angles, rolling and bouncing of liquid droplets, and self-cleaning of particle contaminants. This project exploits the porous fractal structure of a novel, synthetic SH surface for aerosol collection, its self-cleaning properties for particle concentration, and its slippery nature 3 to enhance the performance of fluidic and MEMS devices. We propose to understand fundamentally the conditions needed to cause liquid droplets to roll rather than flow/slide on a surface and how this %22rolling transition%22 influences the boundary condition describing fluid flow in a pipe or micro-channel. Rolling of droplets is important for aerosol collection strategies because it allows trapped particles to be concentrated and transported in liquid droplets with no need for a pre-defined/micromachined fluidic architecture. The fluid/solid boundary condition is important because it governs flow resistance and rheology and establishes the fluid velocity profile. Although many research groups are exploring SH surfaces, our team is the first to unambiguously determine their effects on fluid flow and rheology. SH surfaces could impact all future SNL designs of collectors, fluidic devices, MEMS, and NEMS. Interfaced with inertial focusing aerosol collectors, SH surfaces would allow size-specific particle populations to be collected, concentrated, and transported to a fluidic interface without loss. In microfluidic systems, we expect to reduce the energy/power required to pump fluids and actuate MEMS. Plug-like (rather than parabolic) velocity profiles can greatly improve resolution of chip-based separations and enable unprecedented control of concentration profiles and residence times in fluidic-based micro-reactors. Patterned SH/hydrophilic channels could induce mixing in microchannels and enable development of microflow control elements

  14. Hardware platforms for MEMS gyroscope tuning based on evolutionary computation using open-loop and closed -loop frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Ferguson, Michael I.; Fink, Wolfgang; Oks, Boris; Peay, Chris; Terrile, Richard; Cheng, Yen; Kim, Dennis; MacDonald, Eric; Foor, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation. We also report on the development of a hardware platform for integrated tuning and closed loop operation of MEMS gyroscopes. The control of this device is implemented through a digital design on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The hardware platform easily transitions to an embedded solution that allows for the miniaturization of the system to a single chip.

  15. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Eichenfield, Matthew S.; Griffin, Benjamin; Harvey, Heidi Alyssa; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Langlois, Eric; Resnick, Paul James; Shaw, Michael J.; Young, Ian; Givler, Richard C.; Reinke, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  16. Integration of optoelectronics and MEMS by free-space micro-optics

    SciTech Connect

    WARREN,MIAL E.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; SHUL,RANDY J.; WENDT,JOEL R.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; KRYGOWSKI,TOM W.; REYES,DAVID NMN; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.

    2000-06-01

    This report represents the completion of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate combining microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with optoelectronic components as a means of realizing compact optomechanical subsystems. Some examples of possible applications are laser beam scanning, switching and routing and active focusing, spectral filtering or shattering of optical sources. The two technologies use dissimilar materials with significant compatibility problems for a common process line. This project emphasized a hybrid approach to integrating optoelectronics and MEMS. Significant progress was made in developing processing capabilities for adding optical function to MEMS components, such as metal mirror coatings and through-vias in the substrate. These processes were used to demonstrate two integration examples, a MEMS discriminator driven by laser illuminated photovoltaic cells and a MEMS shutter or chopper. Another major difficulty with direct integration is providing the optical path for the MEMS components to interact with the light. The authors explored using folded optical paths in a transparent substrate to provide the interconnection route between the components of the system. The components can be surface-mounted by flip-chip bonding to the substrate. Micro-optics can be fabricated into the substrate to reflect and refocus the light so that it can propagate from one device to another and them be directed out of the substrate into free space. The MEMS components do not require the development of transparent optics and can be completely compatible with the current 5-level polysilicon process. They report progress on a MEMS-based laser scanner using these concepts.

  17. Water-Immersible MEMS scanning mirror designed for wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Martel, Catherine; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have sacrificed either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror (MEMS-ORPAM). Made of silicon with a gold coating, the MEMS mirror plate can reflect both optical and acoustic beams. Because it uses an electromagnetic driving force, the whole MEMS scanning system can be submerged in water. In MEMS-ORPAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. A diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 2.4 μm in water and a maximum imaging depth of 1.1 mm in soft tissue have been experimentally determined. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. By using Evans blue dye as the contrast agent, we also imaged the flow dynamics of lymphatic vessels in a mouse tail in vivo. The results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena.

  18. Development of Probabilistic Life Prediction Methodologies and Testing Strategies for MEMS and CMC's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama

    2003-01-01

    This effort is to investigate probabilistic life prediction methodologies for ceramic matrix composites and MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and to analyze designs that determine stochastic properties of MEMS. For CMC's this includes a brief literature survey regarding lifing methodologies. Also of interest for MEMS is the design of a proper test for the Weibull size effect in thin film (bulge test) specimens. The Weibull size effect is a consequence of a stochastic strength response predicted from the Weibull distribution. Confirming that MEMS strength is controlled by the Weibull distribution will enable the development of a probabilistic design methodology for MEMS - similar to the GRC developed CARES/Life program for bulk ceramics. A main objective of this effort is to further develop and verify the ability of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life (CARES/Life) code to predict the time-dependent reliability of MEMS structures subjected to multiple transient loads. A second set of objectives is to determine the applicability/suitability of the CARES/Life methodology for CMC analysis, what changes would be needed to the methodology and software, and if feasible, run a demonstration problem. Also important is an evaluation of CARES/Life coupled to the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) and the potential of coupling transient reliability analysis to the ANSYS PDS.

  19. USB-based controller for generic MEM device deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jonathan; Teare, Scott; Wilcox, Christopher; Restaino, Sergio; Martinez, Ty; Payne, Don

    2006-01-01

    The use of Micro-Electro-Machined (MEM) devices as deformable mirrors (DM) for active and adaptive optics is increasing dramatically. Such increases are due to both the cost and simplicity of use of these devices. Our experience with MEM DMs has been positive, however the controlling protocols of these devices presents some issues. Based on our experience and needs we decided to design a generic controller based on a fast communication protocol. These requirements have pushed us to design a system around a USB 2.0 protocol. In this paper we present our architectural design for such controller. We present also experimental data and analysis on the performance of the controller. We describe the pros and cons of such approach versus other techniques. We will address how general such architecture is and how portable is to other systems.

  20. Robust adaptive control of MEMS triaxial gyroscope using fuzzy compensator.

    PubMed

    Fei, Juntao; Zhou, Jian

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a robust adaptive control strategy using a fuzzy compensator for MEMS triaxial gyroscope, which has system nonlinearities, including model uncertainties and external disturbances, is proposed. A fuzzy logic controller that could compensate for the model uncertainties and external disturbances is incorporated into the adaptive control scheme in the Lyapunov framework. The proposed adaptive fuzzy controller can guarantee the convergence and asymptotical stability of the closed-loop system. The proposed adaptive fuzzy control strategy does not depend on accurate mathematical models, which simplifies the design procedure. The innovative development of intelligent control methods incorporated with conventional control for the MEMS gyroscope is derived with the strict theoretical proof of the Lyapunov stability. Numerical simulations are investigated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive fuzzy control scheme and demonstrate the satisfactory tracking performance and robustness against model uncertainties and external disturbances compared with conventional adaptive control method.

  1. Applications of MEMS-based biochemical analytical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J. D., LLNL

    1997-05-21

    The MicroTechnology Center at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing a variety of MEMS-Based analytical instrumentation systems in support of programmatic needs, along with numerous external customers. Several of the applications of interest are in the area of biochemical identification and analysis. These applications range from DNA fragment analysis and collection in support of the Human Genome Project, to detection of viruses or biological warfare agents. Each of the applications of interest has focused in micro-machined MEMS technology for reduced cost, higher throughput, and faster results. Development of these analytical instrumentation systems will have long term benefits for the medical community as well. The following describes the technologies several specific applications.

  2. NASA NDE Applications for Mobile MEMS Devices and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.; Barclay, R. O.

    2008-01-01

    NASA would like new devices and sensors for performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace vehicles. These devices must be small in size/volume, mass, and power consumption. The devices must be autonomous and mobile so they can access the internal structures of aircraft and spacecraft and adequately monitor the structural health of these craft. The platforms must be mobile in order to transport NDE sensors for evaluating structural integrity and determining whether further investigations will be required. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is crucial to the development of the mobile platforms and sensor systems. This paper presents NASA s needs for micro mobile platforms and MEMS sensors that will enable NDE to be performed on aerospace vehicles.

  3. Manufacturing process and material selection in concurrent collaborative design of MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuan F.; Du, H.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we present knowledge of an intensive approach and system for selecting suitable manufacturing processes and materials for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices in concurrent collaborative design environment. In the paper, fundamental issues on MEMS manufacturing process and material selection such as concurrent design framework, manufacturing process and material hierarchies, and selection strategy are first addressed. Then, a fuzzy decision support scheme for a multi-criteria decision-making problem is proposed for estimating, ranking and selecting possible manufacturing processes, materials and their combinations. A Web-based prototype advisory system for the MEMS manufacturing process and material selection, WebMEMS-MASS, is developed based on the client-knowledge server architecture and framework to help the designer find good processes and materials for MEMS devices. The system, as one of the important parts of an advanced simulation and modeling tool for MEMS design, is a concept level process and material selection tool, which can be used as a standalone application or a Java applet via the Web. The running sessions of the system are inter-linked with webpages of tutorials and reference pages to explain the facets, fabrication processes and material choices, and calculations and reasoning in selection are performed using process capability and material property data from a remote Web-based database and interactive knowledge base that can be maintained and updated via the Internet. The use of the developed system including operation scenario, use support, and integration with an MEMS collaborative design system is presented. Finally, an illustration example is provided.

  4. Modeling of biaxial gimbal-less MEMS scanning mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Wantoch, Thomas; Gu-Stoppel, Shanshan; Senger, Frank; Mallas, Christian; Hofmann, Ulrich; Meurer, Thomas; Benecke, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    One- and two-dimensional MEMS scanning mirrors for resonant or quasi-stationary beam deflection are primarily known as tiny micromirror devices with aperture sizes up to a few Millimeters and usually address low power applications in high volume markets, e.g. laser beam scanning pico-projectors or gesture recognition systems. In contrast, recently reported vacuum packaged MEMS scanners feature mirror diameters up to 20 mm and integrated high-reflectivity dielectric coatings. These mirrors enable MEMS based scanning for applications that require large apertures due to optical constraints like 3D sensing or microscopy as well as for high power laser applications like laser phosphor displays, automotive lighting and displays, 3D printing and general laser material processing. This work presents modelling, control design and experimental characterization of gimbal-less MEMS mirrors with large aperture size. As an example a resonant biaxial Quadpod scanner with 7 mm mirror diameter and four integrated PZT (lead zirconate titanate) actuators is analyzed. The finite element method (FEM) model developed and computed in COMSOL Multiphysics is used for calculating the eigenmodes of the mirror as well as for extracting a high order (n < 10000) state space representation of the mirror dynamics with actuation voltages as system inputs and scanner displacement as system output. By applying model order reduction techniques using MATLABR a compact state space system approximation of order n = 6 is computed. Based on this reduced order model feedforward control inputs for different, properly chosen scanner displacement trajectories are derived and tested using the original FEM model as well as the micromirror.

  5. Optical MEMS at Silex Microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimskog, Magnus; Kaelvesten, Edvard; Svedin, Niklas

    2004-01-01

    Silex Microsystems produces Silicon Optical Benches and Silicon Optical Mirrors for a variety of customers on an international market. The core of the activity is the MEMS chip itself and the related processes. By qualifying processes Silex provides the opportunity for clients to increase the degree of development in the MEMS cores of their products. The designs are customized in order to meet the specifications for a wide customer base with even wider demands. The Silicon Optical Benches can incorporate BCB layers in order to integrate RF-lines and make it possible to design for example coils of high performance. The polysilicon resistors have been qualified to be stable within 3-ppm over 6 months at elevated temperatures. The polysilicon temperature dependence makes it possible to use the resistors in order to measure temperature and excludes thermistors from the designs. Electrical feed through vias can be incorporated to enable backside connection and simplify packaging. The Silicon Optical Mirrors are produced both as large arrays of small mirrors and smaller arrays of larger mirrors depending on applications. Also for the mirrors the incorporations of electrical vias simplify design and process issues. The pads under the mirrors are connected from backside and it is possible to avoid difficult contacting down in cavities.

  6. Novel First-Level Interconnect Techniques for Flip Chip on MEMS Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sutanto, Jemmy; Anand, Sindhu; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    Flip-chip packaging is desirable for microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices because it reduces the overall package size and allows scaling up the number of MEMS chips through 3-D stacks. In this report, we demonstrate three novel techniques to create first-level interconnect (FLI) on MEMS: 1) Dip and attach technology for Ag epoxy; 2) Dispense technology for solder paste; 3) Dispense, pull, and attach technology (DPAT) for solder paste. The above techniques required no additional microfabrication steps, produced no visible surface contamination on the MEMS active structures, and generated high-aspect-ratio interconnects. The developed FLIs were successfully tested on MEMS moveable microelectrodes microfabricated by SUMMiTVTM process producing no apparent detrimental effect due to outgassing. The bumping processes were successfully applied on Al-deposited bond pads of 100 μm × 100 μm with an average bump height of 101.3 μm for Ag and 184.8 μm for solder (63Sn, 37Pb). DPAT for solder paste produced bumps with the aspect ratio of 1.8 or more. The average shear strengths of Ag and solder bumps were 78 MPa and 689 kPa, respectively. The electrical test on Ag bumps at 794 A/cm2 demonstrated reliable electrical interconnects with negligible resistance. These scalable FLI technologies are potentially useful for MEMS flip-chip packaging and 3-D stacking. PMID:24504168

  7. Development of Probabilistic Life Prediction Methodologies and Testing Strategies for MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.

    2003-01-01

    This effort is to investigate probabilistic life prediction methodologies for MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and to analyze designs that determine stochastic properties of MEMS. This includes completion of a literature survey regarding Weibull size effect in MEMS and strength testing techniques. Also of interest is the design of a proper test for the Weibull size effect in tensile specimens. The Weibull size effect is a consequence of a stochastic strength response predicted from the Weibull distribution. Confirming that MEMS strength is controlled by the Weibull distribution will enable the development of a probabilistic design methodology for MEMS - similar to the GRC developed CARES/Life program for bulk ceramics. Another potential item of interest is analysis and modeling of material interfaces for strength as well as developing a strategy to handle stress singularities at sharp corners, filets, and material interfaces. The ultimate objective of this effort is to further develop and verify the ability of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structuredlife (CARES/Life) code to predict the time-dependent reliability of MEMS structures subjected to multiple transient loads. Along these lines work may also be performed on transient fatigue life prediction methodologies.

  8. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  9. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2005-01-01

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  10. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2004-11-01

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  11. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  12. Large-area multiplexed sensing using MEMS and fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michael B.; Clark, Richard L., Jr.; Bell, Clifton R.; Russler, Patrick M.

    2000-06-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) technology offers the ability to implement local and independent sensing and actuation functions through the coordinated response of discrete micro-electro-mechanical 'basis function' elements. The small size of micromechanical components coupled with the ability to reduce costs using volume manufacturing techniques opens up significant potential not only in military applications such as flight and engine monitoring and control, but in autonomous vehicle control, smart munitions, airborne reconnaissance, LADAR, missile guidance, and even in intelligent transportation systems and automotive guidance applications. In this program, Luna Innovations is developing a flexible, programmable interface which can be integrated direction with different types of MEMS sensors, and then used to multiplex many sensors ona single optical fiber to provide a unique combination of functions that will allow larger quantities of sensory input with better resolution than ever before possible.

  13. Integrated microphotonic-MEMS inertial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Kazem

    The objective of this thesis is to design, simulate, fabricate and characterize high sensitive low cost in-plane photonic-band-gap (PBG)-micro electromechanical systems (MEMS)-based miniature accelerometers and rotational rate sensors (gyroscopes) on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate in order to enable the integration of an array of two-axis of these sensors on a single SOI platform. Use of guided-wave optical devices integrated with MEMS on SOI for multichannel/multifunction sensor systems allows the use of multiple sensors to extend the measurement range and accuracy. This provides essential redundancy which makes long-term reliability in the space environment possible therefore reducing the possibility of system failure. The navigator microchip also represents the ability of accommodating diverse attitude and inertial sensors on the same microchip to eliminate the need of many separate sensors. The end product exhibits orders of magnitude reduction in system mass and size. Furthermore, redundancy improves the net performance and precision of the navigation measurement systems. Two classes of optical accelerometers/gyroscopes are considered in this thesis for application in smallsats navigation, one based on tunable Fabry-Perot (FP) filter, where the sensor is actuated by the applied acceleration providing a shift in the operating wavelength that varies linearly with the applied acceleration and the other one based on variable optical attenuator (VOA), where the sensor is actuated by the applied acceleration providing a linear change for small displacements around the waveguide propagation axis in the relative signal intensity with the applied acceleration. In the case of FP-based sensors, the FP microcavity consists of two distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) in which one DBR mirror is attached to the proof mass of the system. As a consequence of acceleration/rotation, the relative displacement of the movable mirror with respect to the fixed mirror changes

  14. Compact Lens-less Digital Holographic Microscope for MEMS Inspection and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Bourgade, Thomas; Jianfei, Sun; Wang, Zhaomin; Elsa, Rosmin; Asundi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    A micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) is a widely used component in many industries, including energy, biotechnology, medical, communications, and automotive. However, effective inspection and characterization metrology systems are needed to ensure the functional reliability of MEMS. This study presents a system based on digital holography as a tool for MEMS metrology. Digital holography has gained increasing attention in the past 20 years. With the fast development and decreasing cost of sensor arrays, resolution of such systems has increased broadening potential applications. Thus, it has attracted attention from both research and industry sides as a potential reliable tool for industrial metrology. Indeed, by recording the interference pattern between an object beam (which contains sample height information) and a reference beam on a CCD camera, one can retrieve the quantitative phase information of an object. However, most of digital holographic systems are bulky and thus not easy to implement on industry production lines. The novelty of the system presented is that it is lens-less and thus very compact. In this study, it is shown that the Compact Digital Holographic Microscope (CDHM) can be used to evaluate several characteristics typically consider as criteria in MEMS inspections. The surface profiles of MEMS in both static and dynamic conditions are presented. Comparison with AFM is investigated to validate the accuracy of the CDHM.

  15. Compact Lens-less Digital Holographic Microscope for MEMS Inspection and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Bourgade, Thomas; Jianfei, Sun; Wang, Zhaomin; Elsa, Rosmin; Asundi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    A micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) is a widely used component in many industries, including energy, biotechnology, medical, communications, and automotive. However, effective inspection and characterization metrology systems are needed to ensure the functional reliability of MEMS. This study presents a system based on digital holography as a tool for MEMS metrology. Digital holography has gained increasing attention in the past 20 years. With the fast development and decreasing cost of sensor arrays, resolution of such systems has increased broadening potential applications. Thus, it has attracted attention from both research and industry sides as a potential reliable tool for industrial metrology. Indeed, by recording the interference pattern between an object beam (which contains sample height information) and a reference beam on a CCD camera, one can retrieve the quantitative phase information of an object. However, most of digital holographic systems are bulky and thus not easy to implement on industry production lines. The novelty of the system presented is that it is lens-less and thus very compact. In this study, it is shown that the Compact Digital Holographic Microscope (CDHM) can be used to evaluate several characteristics typically consider as criteria in MEMS inspections. The surface profiles of MEMS in both static and dynamic conditions are presented. Comparison with AFM is investigated to validate the accuracy of the CDHM. PMID:27404277

  16. MEMS-based power generation techniques for implantable biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  17. MEMS electrostatic vibration energy harvester without switches and inductive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorzhiev, V.; Karami, A.; Basset, P.; Dragunov, V.; Galayko, D.

    2014-11-01

    The paper is devoted to a novel study of monophase MEMS electrostatic Vibration Energy Harvester (e-VEH) with conditioning circuit based on Bennet's doubler. Unlike the majority of conditioning circuits that charge a power supply, the circuit based on Bennet's doubler is characterized by the absence of switches requiring additional control electronics, and is free from hardly compatible with batch fabrication process inductive elements. Our experiment with a 0.042 cm3 batch fabricated MEMS e-VEH shows that a pre-charged capacitor as a power supply causes a voltage increase, followed by a saturation which was not reported before. This saturation is due to the nonlinear dynamics of the system and the electromechanical damping that is typical for MEMS. It has been found that because of that coupled behavior there exists an optimal power supply voltage at which output power is maximum. At 187 Hz / 4 g external vibrations the system is shown to charge a 12 V supply with a output power of 1.8 μW.

  18. Micromachined array-type Mirau interferometer for MEMS metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, C.; Bargiel, S.; Albero, J.; Passilly, N.; Kujawinska, M.; Zeitner, U. D.

    We present the development of an array-type micromachined Mirau interferometers, operating in the regime of low coherence interferometry (LCI) and adapted for massively parallel inspection of MEMS. The system is a combination of free-space microoptical technologies and silicon micromachining, based on the vertical assembly of two glass wafers. The probing wafer is carrying an array of refractive microlenses, diffractive gratings to correct chromatic and spherical aberrations and reference micro-mirrors. The semitransparent beam splitter plate is based on the deposition of a dielectric multilayer, sandwiched between two glass wafers. The interferometer matrix is the key element of a novel inspection system aimed to perform parallel inspection of MEMS. The fabricated demonstrator, including 5x5 channels, allows consequently decreasing the measurement time by a factor of 25. In the following, the details of fabrication processes of the micro-optical components and their assembly are described. The feasibility of the LCI is demonstrated for the measurement of a wafer of MEMS sensors.

  19. Improving planetary rover attitude estimation via MEMS sensor characterization.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Javier; Poulakis, Pantelis; Köhler, Johan; Del-Cerro, Jaime; Barrientos, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently being considered in the space sector due to its suitable level of performance for spacecrafts in terms of mechanical robustness with low power consumption, small mass and size, and significant advantage in system design and accommodation. However, there is still a lack of understanding regarding the performance and testing of these new sensors, especially in planetary robotics. This paper presents what is missing in the field: a complete methodology regarding the characterization and modeling of MEMS sensors with direct application. A reproducible and complete approach including all the intermediate steps, tools and laboratory equipment is described. The process of sensor error characterization and modeling through to the final integration in the sensor fusion scheme is explained with detail. Although the concept of fusion is relatively easy to comprehend, carefully characterizing and filtering sensor information is not an easy task and is essential for good performance. The strength of the approach has been verified with representative tests of novel high-grade MEMS inertia sensors and exemplary planetary rover platforms with promising results.

  20. Design, modeling and simulation of MEMS-based silicon Microneedles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2013-06-01

    The advancement in semiconductor process engineering and nano-scale fabrication technology has made it convenient to transport specific biological fluid into or out of human skin with minimum discomfort. Fluid transdermal delivery systems such as Microneedle arrays are one such emerging and exciting Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) application which could lead to a total painless fluid delivery into skin with controllability and desirable yield. In this study, we aimed to revisit the problem with modeling, design and simulations carried out for MEMS based silicon hollow out of plane microneedle arrays for biomedical applications particularly for transdermal drug delivery. An approximate 200 μm length of microneedle with 40 μm diameter of lumen has been successfully shown formed by isotropic and anisotropic etching techniques using MEMS Pro design tool. These microneedles are arranged in size of 2 × 4 matrix array with center to center spacing of 750 μm. Furthermore, comparisons for fluid flow characteristics through these microneedle channels have been modeled with and without the contribution of the gravitational forces using mathematical models derived from Bernoulli Equation. Physical Process simulations have also been performed on TCAD SILVACO to optimize the design of these microneedles aligned with the standard Si-Fabrication lines.

  1. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A.

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient. PMID:22319362

  2. Improving planetary rover attitude estimation via MEMS sensor characterization.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Javier; Poulakis, Pantelis; Köhler, Johan; Del-Cerro, Jaime; Barrientos, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently being considered in the space sector due to its suitable level of performance for spacecrafts in terms of mechanical robustness with low power consumption, small mass and size, and significant advantage in system design and accommodation. However, there is still a lack of understanding regarding the performance and testing of these new sensors, especially in planetary robotics. This paper presents what is missing in the field: a complete methodology regarding the characterization and modeling of MEMS sensors with direct application. A reproducible and complete approach including all the intermediate steps, tools and laboratory equipment is described. The process of sensor error characterization and modeling through to the final integration in the sensor fusion scheme is explained with detail. Although the concept of fusion is relatively easy to comprehend, carefully characterizing and filtering sensor information is not an easy task and is essential for good performance. The strength of the approach has been verified with representative tests of novel high-grade MEMS inertia sensors and exemplary planetary rover platforms with promising results. PMID:22438761

  3. Improving Planetary Rover Attitude Estimation via MEMS Sensor Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Javier; Poulakis, Pantelis; Köhler, Johan; Del-Cerro, Jaime; Barrientos, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently being considered in the space sector due to its suitable level of performance for spacecrafts in terms of mechanical robustness with low power consumption, small mass and size, and significant advantage in system design and accommodation. However, there is still a lack of understanding regarding the performance and testing of these new sensors, especially in planetary robotics. This paper presents what is missing in the field: a complete methodology regarding the characterization and modeling of MEMS sensors with direct application. A reproducible and complete approach including all the intermediate steps, tools and laboratory equipment is described. The process of sensor error characterization and modeling through to the final integration in the sensor fusion scheme is explained with detail. Although the concept of fusion is relatively easy to comprehend, carefully characterizing and filtering sensor information is not an easy task and is essential for good performance. The strength of the approach has been verified with representative tests of novel high-grade MEMS inertia sensors and exemplary planetary rover platforms with promising results. PMID:22438761

  4. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  5. Qualification and Reliability for MEMS and IC Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2004-01-01

    Advanced IC electronic packages are moving toward miniaturization from two key different approaches, front and back-end processes, each with their own challenges. Successful use of more of the back-end process front-end, e.g. microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Wafer Level Package (WLP), enable reducing size and cost. Use of direct flip chip die is the most efficient approach if and when the issues of know good die and board/assembly are resolved. Wafer level package solve the issue of known good die by enabling package test, but it has its own limitation, e.g., the I/O limitation, additional cost, and reliability. From the back-end approach, system-in-a-package (SIAP/SIP) development is a response to an increasing demand for package and die integration of different functions into one unit to reduce size and cost and improve functionality. MEMS add another challenging dimension to electronic packaging since they include moving mechanical elements. Conventional qualification and reliability need to be modified and expanded in most cases in order to detect new unknown failures. This paper will review four standards that already released or being developed that specifically address the issues on qualification and reliability of assembled packages. Exposures to thermal cycles, monotonic bend test, mechanical shock and drop are covered in these specifications. Finally, mechanical and thermal cycle qualification data generated for MEMS accelerometer will be presented. The MEMS was an element of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) qualified for NASA Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs), Spirit and Opportunity that successfully is currently roaring the Martian surface

  6. Concepts using optical MEMS array for ladar scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. Lynn

    2003-09-01

    Scene projection for HITL testing of LADAR seekers is unique because the 3rd dimension is time delay. Advancement in AFRL for electronic delay and pulse shaping circuits, VCSEL emitters, fiber optic and associated scene generation is underway, and technology hand-off to test facilities is expected eventually. However, size and cost currently projected behooves cost mitigation through further innovation in system design, incorporating new developments, cooperation, and leveraging of dual-purpose technology. Therefore a concept is offered which greatly reduces the number (thus cost) of pulse shaping circuits and enables the projector to be installed on the mobile arm of a flight motion simulator table without fiber optic cables. The concept calls for an optical MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) steerable micro-mirror array. IFOV"s are a cluster of four micro-mirrors, each of which steers through a unique angle to a selected light source with the appropriate delay and waveform basis. An array of such sources promotes angle-to-delay mapping. Separate pulse waveform basis circuits for each scene IFOV are not required because a single set of basis functions is broadcast to all MEMS elements simultaneously. Waveform delivery to spatial filtering and collimation optics is addressed by angular selection at the MEMS array. Emphasis is on technology in existence or under development by the government, its contractors and the telecommunications industry. Values for components are first assumed as those that are easily available. Concept adequacy and upgrades are then discussed. In conclusion an opto-mechanical scan option ranks as the best light source for near-term MEMS-based projector testing of both flash and scan LADAR seekers.

  7. Development of electroplated magnetic materials for MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, N. V.; Sumadjo, P. T. A.; Park, D. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Soft ferromagnetic materials have thus far found the most utility in magnetic-MEMS, because the technologies necessary for depositing and micromachining them have been well developed previously by the data storage industry.

  8. Chapter 9: MEMS Applications in Spacecraft Thermal Control and Chapter 13: Handling and Contamination Control Considerations for Critical Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osiander, Robert; Darin, Ann; Chen, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Thermal control systems (TCS) are an integral part of all spacecraft and instruments. To operate properly all spacecraft components must be maintained within a specified temperature band, which in some instances can be quite tight (less than 1 degree C). Traditionally this is accomplished by "passive" designs, but with modem spacecraft and instruments it is increasingly necessary to use active thermal control technologies. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) can be useful in developing an active TCS, and may be especially useful for small spacecraft. As the MEMS knowledge matures, the applications of MEMS in spacecraft thermal control emerges as a viable technology for thermal engineers. Potential applications include specialized thermal control coatings, thermal switches, and specialized filters for instruments. Although MEMS technology demonstrates benefits, it also poses challenges for thermal en,oineers due to the lack of in-flight MEMS data. As a consequence, in order to design a MEMS thermal control device and receive the full advantage, it is important to understand the potential impact of the space environment on MEMS devices and the design/operational constraints imposed in their use. An entire chapter is devoted to handling and contamination controls for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) in space applications due to the importance of the topic area to final mission success. Handling and contamination control is discussed relative to the full life cycle from the very basic wafer level processing up through on orbit deployment. MEMS packaging will drive the need to tailor the Handling and Contamination Control Plan in order to assure adequacy of the overall program on a program by program basis. Plan elements are discussed at length to assist the user in preparing and implementing effective plans for both handling and contamination control to prevent deleterious effects.

  9. Optical MEMS and Its Future Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Renshi

    The sequence of optical MEMS development is described, wherein research reached its climax in 2000, during the tumultuous crescendo of the telecommunication industry boom in USA and slowed down thereafter. However, recently in Japan, there are indications that efforts to fabricate stable high-performed devices are on-going, although not on a large-scale. The problems to be solved to facilitate the research of optical MEMS are also mentioned.

  10. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  11. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  12. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, R P; Samarelli, A; Paul, D J; Hough, J; Rowan, S; Hammond, G D

    2016-03-31

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz(1/2)): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth's crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz(1/2) only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers--found in most smart phones--can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays. PMID:27029276

  13. Simulation of MEMS for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, Brent; Kuhn, Jonathan; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing optical micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) components for potential application in Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) science instruments. In this work, we present an overview of the electro-mechanical simulation of three MEMS components for NGST, which include a reflective micro-mirror array and transmissive microshutter array for aperture control for a near infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrometer and a large aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot tunable filter for a NIR wide field camera. In all cases the device must operate at cryogenic temperatures with low power consumption and low, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible, voltages. The goal of our simulation efforts is to adequately predict both the performance and the reliability of the devices during ground handling, launch, and operation to prevent failures late in the development process and during flight. This goal requires detailed modeling and validation of complex electro-thermal-mechanical interactions and very large non-linear deformations, often involving surface contact. Various parameters such as spatial dimensions and device response are often difficult to measure reliably at these small scales. In addition, these devices are fabricated from a wide variety of materials including surface micro-machined aluminum, reactive ion etched (RIE) silicon nitride, and deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) bulk single crystal silicon. The above broad set of conditions combine to be a formidable challenge for space flight qualification analysis. These simulations represent NASA/GSFC's first attempts at implementing a comprehensive strategy to address complex MEMS structures.

  14. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemiss, R. P.; Samarelli, A.; Paul, D. J.; Hough, J.; Rowan, S.; Hammond, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz1/2): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth’s crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz1/2 only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers—found in most smart phones—can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  15. Robust MEMS gyroscope for oil and gas exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, David; Miller, Todd

    2014-06-01

    To satisfy the performance and reliability requirement of a MEMS based harsh environment sensor, the sensor development needs to depart from the classic method of single-discipline technology improvement. In this paper, the authors will describe a Microsystem-based design methodology which considers simultaneous multiple technology domain interaction and achieves performance optimization at the system level to address the harsh environment sensing challenge. This is demonstrated through specific examples of investigating a robust MEMS gyroscope suitable for high temperature and high vibration environments such as down-hole drilling for Oil and Gas applications. In particular, the different mechanisms of temperature-induced errors in MEMS gyroscope are discussed. The error sources include both the direct impact of the gyroscope dynamics by temperature and the indirect perturbation by temperature-induced package stress. For vibration and shock induced failure, the error contributions from the low frequency and high frequency contents are discussed. Different transducer designs with equivalent rate sensitivity can vary with several orders of magnitude in terms of the susceptibility to mechanical vibration. Also shown are the complex interactions among the gyroscopic transducer, packaging and the control electronics, resulting from these temperature and vibration error sources. The microsystem-based design methodology is able to capture such complex interactions and improve the gyroscope temperature and vibration performance. In contrast to other efforts in harsh environment sensing which focus on specific technology domains, the authors strive to demonstrate the need and advantage of addressing MEMS performance and reliability in harsh environment from a microsystem perspective.

  16. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, R P; Samarelli, A; Paul, D J; Hough, J; Rowan, S; Hammond, G D

    2016-03-31

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz(1/2)): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth's crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz(1/2) only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers--found in most smart phones--can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  17. Surface chemical modification for exceptional wear life of MEMS materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. Arvind; Satyanarayana, N.; Sinha, Sujeet Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) are built at micro/nano-scales. At these scales, the interfacial forces are extremely strong. These forces adversely affect the smooth operation and cause wear resulting in the drastic reduction in wear life (useful operating lifetime) of actuator-based devices. In this paper, we present a surface chemical modification method that reduces friction and significantly extends the wear life of the two most popular MEMS structural materials namely, silicon and SU-8 polymer. The method includes surface chemical treatment using ethanolamine-sodium phosphate buffer, followed by coating of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) nanolubricant on (i) silicon coated with SU-8 thin films (500 nm) and (ii) MEMS process treated SU-8 thick films (50 μm). After the surface chemical modification, it was observed that the steady-state coefficient of friction of the materials reduced by 4 to 5 times and simultaneously their wear durability increased by more than three orders of magnitude (> 1000 times). The significant reduction in the friction coefficients is due to the lubrication effect of PFPE nanolubricant, while the exceptional increase in their wear life is attributed to the bonding between the -OH functional group of ethanolamine treated SU-8 thin/thick films and the -OH functional group of PFPE. The surface chemical modification method acts as a common route to enhance the performance of both silicon and SU-8 polymer. It is time-effective (process time ≤ 11 min), cost-effective and can be readily integrated into MEMS fabrication/assembly processes. It can also work for any kind of structural material from which the miniaturized devices are/can be made.

  18. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology.

    PubMed

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A; García-Ramírez, Pedro J; Manjarrez, Elías

    2009-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration. PMID:22408480

  19. Faster sensitivity and non-antimonite permanent photoresist for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Koichi; Saito, Koji; Yamanouchi, Atsushi; Senzaki, Takahiro; Okui, Toshiki; Honma, Hideo

    2006-03-01

    Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is a three-dimensional micro-fabrication technology based on photolithography. The fields of application are extensive and wide-ranging. Among the applications, those that have already acquired a large market include acceleration sensors for airbags of automobiles, pressure sensors for engine control, inkjet printer heads and thin film magnetic heads. The market is expected to further expand in the optic and biology-related fields in the future. In the MEMS field, the packaging accounts for the cost, and it is difficult to standardize due to the low production volume of highly specific technology application. A typical application in the MEMS process would be to conduct plating and etching (Deep RIE) through an intermediate layer of photoresist patterns, but there are cases where the photoresist itself is left therein as a permanent film. A photoresist composed of epoxy resin as the main component can form the permanent film through a catalyst of the optical cationic polymerizating initiator. In general, the optical cationic polymerizating initiator is of onium salt with antimonite as the anion group due to the nature of the hardening rate or the exposure energy. This paper presents the development status of a high sensitivity permanent photoresist made of epoxy resin as the main component with non-antimonite optical cationic polymerizating initiator with concerns to the impact to the environment and material for packaging.

  20. On electrostatically actuated NEMS/MEMS circular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruntu, Dumitru I.; Alvarado, Iris

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with electrostatically actuated micro and nano-electromechanical (MEMS/NEMS) circular plates. The system under investigation consists of two bodies, a deformable and conductive circular plate placed above a fixed, rigid and conductive ground plate. The deformable circular plate is electrostatically actuated by applying an AC voltage between the two plates. Nonlinear parametric resonance and pull-in occur at certain frequencies and relatively large AC voltage, respectively. Such phenomena are useful for applications such as sensors, actuators, switches, micro-pumps, micro-tweezers, chemical and mass sensing, and micro-mirrors. A mathematical model of clamped circular MEMS/NEMS electrostatically actuated plates has been developed. Since the model is in the micro- and nano-scale, surface forces, van der Waals and/or Casimir, acting on the plate are included. A perturbation method, the Method of Multiple Scales (MMS), is used for investigating the case of weakly nonlinear MEMS/NEMS circular plates. Two time scales, fast and slow, are considered in this work. The amplitude-frequency and phase-frequency response of the plate in the case of primary resonance are obtained and discussed.

  1. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; García-Ramírez, Pedro J.; Manjarrez, Elías

    2009-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration. PMID:22408480

  2. MEMS-based thin-film fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Jankowksi, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2003-10-28

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

  3. Long-term lifetime prediction for RF-MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulloni, V.; Barbato, M.; Meneghesso, G.

    2016-07-01

    Time to failure estimations of RF-MEMS (radio-frequency microelectromechanical system) switches under prolonged actuation is particularly interesting for satellite applications, where the devices have to retain their functionality for years. At present, a well-assessed methodology to predict RF-MEMS lifetime is still lacking, probably because, in the case of MEMS, failure may originate from either electrical or mechanical sources. Temperature is the most common failure accelerating factor, but it accelerates all failure mechanisms at the same time. In this paper, we take into account the effect of temperature on three different failure mechanisms, namely charge trapping, mechanical creep, and contact degradation. Short-term and long-term continuous actuation measurements for an ohmic clamped-clamped switch are reported and analyzed, showing that failure is strongly accelerated by temperature in the range of temperatures investigated. The maximum temperature exploitable is, however, quite low, around 75 °C, because of structural modifications due to internal stress variations and buckling. Based on the experimental data, a prediction model is presented and discussed. While failure at 55 °C has been measured after a few days, the extrapolated lifetimes at 25 °C are around five years. Contact deterioration has been found to be the reason of failure, but the switch fails only when the spring constant has been sufficiently lowered by mechanical creep.

  4. Vacuum Packaging of MEMS With Multiple Internal Seal Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken; Yee, Karl; Shcheglov, Kirill; Bae, Youngsam; Wiberg, Dean; Peay, Chris; Challoner, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    A proposed method of design and fabrication of vacuum-packaged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and of individual microelectromechanical devices involves the use of multiple internal seal rings (MISRs) in conjunction with vias (through holes plated with metal for electrical contacts). The proposed method is compatible with mass production in a wafer-level fabrication process, in which the dozens of MEMS or individual microelectromechanical devices on a typical wafer are simultaneously vacuum packaged by bonding a capping wafer before the devices are singulated (cut apart by use of a dicing saw). In addition to being compatible with mass production, the proposed method would eliminate the need for some complex and expensive production steps and would yield more reliable vacuum seals. Conventionally, each MEMS or individual microelectromechanical device is fabricated as one of many identical units on a device wafer. Vacuum packaging is accomplished by bonding the device wafer to a capping wafer with metal seal rings (one ring surrounding each unit) that have been formed on the capping wafer. The electrical leads of each unit are laid out on what would otherwise be a flat surface of the device wafer, against which the seal ring is to be pressed for sealing. The resulting pattern of metal lines and their insulating oxide coverings presents a very rough and uneven surface, upon which it is difficult to pattern the sealing metal. Consequently, the seal is prone to leakage unless additional costly and complex planarization steps are performed before patterning the seal ring and bonding the wafers.

  5. In situ characterization of PDMS in SOI-MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerratt, Aaron P.; Penskiy, Ivan; Bergbreiter, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the in situ characterization of microscale poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) springs using silicon-on-insulator-microelectromechanical systems (SOI-MEMS). PDMS samples that were 30 μm long, 20 μm thick, and 6 μm wide were fabricated on-chip along with a test mechanism that included electrostatic comb drive actuators and silicon flexures. The test mechanism allowed for applying strains up to 65%. The in situ test results were compared with results of tests on macroscale samples performed using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. The results imply that the process steps during fabrication initially led to increased crosslinking of the PDMS but that the final release of the structure in buffered hydrofluoric acid decreased the crosslink density, thereby decreasing the stiffness of the PDMS. Several implications of the results on processing PDMS in MEMS are presented. The results of this work are important for the design of MEMS devices which incorporate PDMS as a mechanical material.

  6. Long-term lifetime prediction for RF-MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulloni, V.; Barbato, M.; Meneghesso, G.

    2016-07-01

    Time to failure estimations of RF-MEMS (radio-frequency microelectromechanical system) switches under prolonged actuation is particularly interesting for satellite applications, where the devices have to retain their functionality for years. At present, a well-assessed methodology to predict RF-MEMS lifetime is still lacking, probably because, in the case of MEMS, failure may originate from either electrical or mechanical sources. Temperature is the most common failure accelerating factor, but it accelerates all failure mechanisms at the same time. In this paper, we take into account the effect of temperature on three different failure mechanisms, namely charge trapping, mechanical creep, and contact degradation. Short-term and long-term continuous actuation measurements for an ohmic clamped–clamped switch are reported and analyzed, showing that failure is strongly accelerated by temperature in the range of temperatures investigated. The maximum temperature exploitable is, however, quite low, around 75 °C, because of structural modifications due to internal stress variations and buckling. Based on the experimental data, a prediction model is presented and discussed. While failure at 55 °C has been measured after a few days, the extrapolated lifetimes at 25 °C are around five years. Contact deterioration has been found to be the reason of failure, but the switch fails only when the spring constant has been sufficiently lowered by mechanical creep.

  7. Selective W for coating and releasing MEMS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, S.S.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Boer, M.P. de; Irwin, L.W.; Walraven, J.A.; Tanner, D.M.; Lavan, D.A.

    2000-01-04

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process that selectively coats MEMS devices with tungsten and significantly enhances device durability. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable. This selective deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially address both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through the silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}. The self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. The tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize stress and process integration problems. Tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. The wear resistance of selectively coated W parts has been shown to be significantly improved on microengine test structures.

  8. Controlling Variable Emittance (MEMS) Coatings for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrar, D.; Schneider, W.; Osiander, R.; Champion, J. L.; Darrin, A. G.; Douglas, Donya; Swanson, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    Small spacecraft, including micro and nanosats, as they are envisioned for future missions, will require an alternative means to achieve thermal control due to their small power and mass budgets. One of the proposed alternatives is Variable Emittance (Vari-E) Coatings for spacecraft radiators. Space Technology-5 (ST-5) is a technology demonstration mission through NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) that will utilize Vari-E Coatings. This mission involves a constellation of three (3) satellites in a highly elliptical orbit with a perigee altitude of approximately 200 kilometers and an apogee of approximately 38,000 kilometers. Such an environment will expose the spacecraft to a wide swing in the thermal and radiation environment of the earth's atmosphere. There are three (3) different technologies associated with this mission. The three technologies are electrophoretic, electrochromic, and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The ultimate goal is to make use of Van-E coatings, in order to achieve various levels of thermal control. The focus of this paper is to highlight the Vari-E Coating MEMS instrument, with an emphasis on the Electronic Control Unit responsible for operating the MEMS device. The Test & Evaluation approach, along with the results, is specific for application on ST-5, yet the information provides a guideline for future experiments and/or thermal applications on the exterior structure of a spacecraft.

  9. Resonant biaxial 7-mm MEMS mirror for omnidirectional scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Aikio, M.; Janes, J.; Senger, F.; Stenchly, V.; Weiss, M.; Quenzer, H.-J.; Wagner, B.; Benecke, W.

    2013-03-01

    Low-cost automotive laser scanners for environment perception are needed to enable the integration of advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) into all automotive vehicle segments, a key to reducing the number of traffic accidents on roads. An omnidirectional 360 degree laser scanning concept has been developed based on combination of an omnidirectional lens and a biaxial large aperture MEMS mirror. This omnidirectional scanning concept is the core of a small sized low-cost time-of-flight based range sensor development. This paper describes concept, design, fabrication and first measurement results of a resonant biaxial 7mm gimbal-less MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated by stacked vertical comb drives. Identical frequencies of the two resonant axes are necessary to enable the required circle scanning capability. A tripod suspension was chosen since it allows minimizing the frequency splitting of the two resonant axes. Low mirror curvature is achieved by a thickness of the mirror of more than 500 μm. Hermetic wafer level vacuum packaging of such large mirrors based on multiple wafer bonding has been developed to enable to achieve a large mechanical tilt angle of +/- 6.5 degrees in each axis. The 7mm-MEMS mirror demonstrates large angle circular scanning at 1.5kHz.

  10. BioMEMS for mitochondria medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmaraj, Divya

    A BioMEMS device to study cell-mitochondrial physiological functionalities was developed. The pathogenesis of many diseases including obesity, diabetes and heart failure as well as aging has been linked to functional defects of mitochondria. The synthesis of Adenosine Tri Phosphate (ATP) is determined by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. Therefore, electrical characterization by E-fields with complementary chemical testing was used here. The BioMEMS device was fabricated as an SU-8 based microfluidic system with gold electrodes on SiO2/Si wafers for electromagnetic interrogation. Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) were incorporated for proton studies important in the electron transport chain, together with monitoring Na+, K+ and Ca++ ions for ion channel studies. ISFETs are chemically sensitive Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices and their threshold voltage is directly proportional to the electrolytic H+ ion variation. These ISFETs (sensitivity ˜55 mV/pH for H+) were further realized as specific ion sensitive Chemical Field Effect Transistors (CHEMFETs) by depositing a specific ion sensitive membrane on the gate. Electrodes for dielectric spectroscopy studies of mitochondria were designed as 2- and 4-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range. In addition, to limit polarization effects, a 4-electrode set-up with unique meshed pickup electrodes (7.5x7.5 mum2 loops with 4 mum wires) was fabricated. Sensitivity of impedance spectroscopy to membrane potential changes was confirmed by studying the influence of uncouplers and glucose on mitochondria. An electrical model was developed for the mitochondrial sample, and its frequency response correlated with impedance spectroscopy experiments of sarcolemmal mitochondria. Using the mesh electrode structure, we obtained a reduction of 83.28% in impedance at 200 Hz. COMSOL

  11. New Research on MEMS Acoustic Vector Sensors Used in Pipeline Ground Markers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaopeng; Jian, Zeming; Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Mengran; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    According to the demands of current pipeline detection systems, the above-ground marker (AGM) system based on sound detection principle has been a major development trend in pipeline technology. A novel MEMS acoustic vector sensor for AGM systems which has advantages of high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and good low frequency performance has been put forward. Firstly, it is presented that the frequency of the detected sound signal is concentrated in a lower frequency range, and the sound attenuation is relatively low in soil. Secondly, the MEMS acoustic vector sensor structure and basic principles are introduced. Finally, experimental tests are conducted and the results show that in the range of 0°∼90°, when r = 5 m, the proposed MEMS acoustic vector sensor can effectively detect sound signals in soil. The measurement errors of all angles are less than 5°. PMID:25609046

  12. A Novel Digital Closed Loop MEMS Accelerometer Utilizing a Charge Pump.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yixing; Dong, Jingxin; Chi, Baoyong; Liu, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel digital closed loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer with the architecture and experimental evaluation. The complicated timing diagram or complex power supply in published articles are circumvented by using a charge pump system of adjustable output voltage fabricated in a 2P4M 0.35 µm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, therefore making it possible for interface circuits of MEMS accelerometers to be integrated on a single die on a large scale. The output bitstream of the sigma delta modulator is boosted by the charge pump system and then applied on the feedback comb fingers to form electrostatic forces so that the MEMS accelerometer can operate in a closed loop state. Test results agree with the theoretical formula nicely. The nonlinearity of the accelerometer within ±1 g is 0.222% and the long-term stability is about 774 µg.

  13. RF MEMS Phase Shifters and their Application in Phase Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian; Ponchak, George E.; Zaman, Afroz J.; Lee, Richard Q.

    2005-01-01

    Electronically scanned arrays are required for space based radars that are capable of tracking multiple robots, rovers, or other assets simultaneously and for beam-hopping communication systems between the various assets. ^Traditionally, these phased array antennas used GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters, power amplifiers, and low noise amplifiers to amplify and steer the beam, but the development of RF MEMS switches over the past ten years has enabled system designers to consider replacing the GaAs MMIC phase shifters with RF Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) phase shifters. In this paper, the implication of replacing the relatively high loss GaAs MMICs with low loss MEMS phase shifters is investigated.

  14. New research on MEMS acoustic vector sensors used in pipeline ground markers.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaopeng; Jian, Zeming; Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Mengran; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    According to the demands of current pipeline detection systems, the above-ground marker (AGM) system based on sound detection principle has been a major development trend in pipeline technology. A novel MEMS acoustic vector sensor for AGM systems which has advantages of high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and good low frequency performance has been put forward. Firstly, it is presented that the frequency of the detected sound signal is concentrated in a lower frequency range, and the sound attenuation is relatively low in soil. Secondly, the MEMS acoustic vector sensor structure and basic principles are introduced. Finally, experimental tests are conducted and the results show that in the range of 0°~90°, when r = 5 m, the proposed MEMS acoustic vector sensor can effectively detect sound signals in soil. The measurement errors of all angles are less than 5°.

  15. A Novel Digital Closed Loop MEMS Accelerometer Utilizing a Charge Pump

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yixing; Dong, Jingxin; Chi, Baoyong; Liu, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel digital closed loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer with the architecture and experimental evaluation. The complicated timing diagram or complex power supply in published articles are circumvented by using a charge pump system of adjustable output voltage fabricated in a 2P4M 0.35 µm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, therefore making it possible for interface circuits of MEMS accelerometers to be integrated on a single die on a large scale. The output bitstream of the sigma delta modulator is boosted by the charge pump system and then applied on the feedback comb fingers to form electrostatic forces so that the MEMS accelerometer can operate in a closed loop state. Test results agree with the theoretical formula nicely. The nonlinearity of the accelerometer within ±1 g is 0.222% and the long-term stability is about 774 µg. PMID:26999157

  16. Smartphone MEMS accelerometers and earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.; Schreier, L.; Kwon, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    The low cost MEMS accelerometers in the smartphones are attracting more and more attentions from the science community due to the vast number and potential applications in various areas. We are using the accelerometers inside the smartphones to detect the earthquakes. We did shake table tests to show these accelerometers are also suitable to record large shakings caused by earthquakes. We developed an android app - MyShake, which can even distinguish earthquake movements from daily human activities from the recordings recorded by the accelerometers in personal smartphones and upload trigger information/waveform to our server for further analysis. The data from these smartphones forms a unique datasets for seismological applications, such as earthquake early warning. In this talk I will layout the method we used to recognize earthquake-like movement from single smartphone, and the overview of the whole system that harness the information from a network of smartphones for rapid earthquake detection. This type of system can be easily deployed and scaled up around the global and provides additional insights of the earthquake hazards.

  17. Development of MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Hyun

    The research of powering devices in a microwatt range has been activated and developed by the emergence of low-power Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technology in the past few years. The powering devices require a size that is compatible with the application, sufficient power, and extended lifetime using permanent and ubiquitous energy sources. The piezoelectric energy harvester using vibration sources is attractive due to its high conversion efficiency, simple design for miniaturizing, and lack of external voltage source. While bulk piezoelectric energy harvesters produce enough power for a few tens of mW, the insufficient power is still a major issue during miniaturizing into micro size. The piezoelectric energy harvester was fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and developed to enhance its output power. It was designed to be resonated at the frequency range of ambient vibration source (50˜300 Hz) and convert the mechanical stress to electricity by piezoelectric thin film. The cantilever structure was chosen in this study due to its large strain, and a big proof mass at the end of tip was integrated for the same reason. This study focuses on three specific issues related to the robust fabrication process, including the integration of piezoelectric thin film, structure design for high power density, and the reliability of device. The Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) thin films were prepared by a sol-gel process and were used to fabricate energy harvesters by an optimized MEMS process. The properties of PZT thin film were studied considering the substrate effect, heat treatment, and thickness effects. The fabricated energy harvester produced 769 mVpk-pk, and 6.72 muW with the optimal resistive load of 11 kO at 127 Hz of resonant frequency. The device had dimensions of about 4 mm(L) x 2 mm(w) x 0.021 mm(H), and the Si proof mass had dimensions of 3 mm(L) x 2 mm(W) x 0.5 mm(H). Beyond this result, the technical platform for the robust fabrication

  18. The MEMS Knudsen Compressor as a Vacuum Pump for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargo, S. E.; Muntz, E. P.; Tang, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    Several lander, probe and rover missions currently under study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and especially in the Microdevices Laboratory (MDL) Center for Space Microelectronics Technology, focus on utilizing microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based instruments for science data gathering. These small instruments and NASA's commitment to "faster, better, cheaper" type missions has brought about the need for novel approaches to satisfying mission requirements. Existing in-situ instrument systems clearly lack novel and integrated methods for satisfying their vacuum needs. One attractive candidate for a MEMS vacuum pump is the Knudsen Compressor, which operates based on thermal transpiration. Thermal transpiration describes gas flows induced by temperature differences maintained across orifices, porous membranes or capillary tubes under rarefied conditions. This device has two overwhelmingly attractive features as a MEMS vacuum pump - no moving parts and no fluids. An initial estimate of a Knudsen Compressor's pumping power requirements for a surface atmospheric sampling task on Mars is less than 80 mW, significantly below than alternative pumps. Due to the relatively low energy use for this task and the applicability of the Knudsen Compressor to other applications, the development of a Knudsen Compressor utilizing MEMS fabrication techniques has been initiated. This paper discusses the initial fabrication of a single-stage MEMS Knudsen Compressor vacuum pump, provides performance criteria such as pumping speed, size, energy use and ultimate pressure and details vacuum pump applications in several MDL related in-situ instruments.

  19. Biocompatible Optically Transparent MEMS for Micromechanical Stimulation and Multimodal Imaging of Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Fior, Raffaella; Kwok, Jeanie; Malfatti, Francesca; Sbaizero, Orfeo; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-08-01

    Cells and tissues in our body are continuously subjected to mechanical stress. Mechanical stimuli, such as tensile and contractile forces, and shear stress, elicit cellular responses, including gene and protein alterations that determine key behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion. Several tools and techniques have been developed to study these mechanobiological phenomena, including micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). MEMS provide a platform for nano-to-microscale mechanical stimulation of biological samples and quantitative analysis of their biomechanical responses. However, current devices are limited in their capability to perform single cell micromechanical stimulations as well as correlating their structural phenotype by imaging techniques simultaneously. In this study, a biocompatible and optically transparent MEMS for single cell mechanobiological studies is reported. A silicon nitride microfabricated device is designed to perform uniaxial tensile deformation of single cells and tissue. Optical transparency and open architecture of the device allows coupling of the MEMS to structural and biophysical assays, including optical microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate the design, fabrication, testing, biocompatibility and multimodal imaging with optical and AFM techniques, providing a proof-of-concept for a multimodal MEMS. The integrated multimodal system would allow simultaneous controlled mechanical stimulation of single cells and correlate cellular response.

  20. Fabrication and integration of permanent magnet materials into MEMS transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Naigang

    Microscale permanent magnets (PM) are a key building block for magnetically based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), such as sensors, actuators, and energy converters. However, the inability to concurrently achieve good magnetic properties and an integrated magnet fabrication process hinders the development of magnetic MEMS. To address this need, this dissertation develops methods for wafer-level microfabrication of thick (10--500+ microm), high-performance, permanent magnets using low-temperature (<180 °C) process steps. These methods and materials are then used to demonstrate fully batch-fabricated magnetic MEMS transducers. Two methods to fabricate micromagnets are developed: electroplating of Co-rich Co-Pt magnets into photoresist-defined molds and micro-packing of rare-earth magnetic powders to form wax-bonded magnets embedded in silicon. Patterned micromagnets with excellent magnetic properties and process-flow compatibility are demonstrated. Electroplated Co-Pt micromagnets with thickness up to 10 microm exhibit out-of-plane anisotropy with coercivities and energy products of 330 kA/m and 69 kJ/m3, respectively. Wax-bonded Nd-Fe-B micromagnets (500 x 500 x 320 microm3) exhibit a coercivity of 737 kA/m and a maximum energy product of 17 kJ/m3 with isotopic behavior. The wax-bonded powder magnets are then integrated into MEMS fabrication processes to batch-fabricate various electrodynamic transducer prototypes. A cantilever-type microtransducer achieves a 2.7 microm vertical deflection at a driving current of 5.5 mArms at 100 Hz. A piston-type transducer with elastomeric membrane obtains a 2.2 microm vertical displacement at a driving current of 670 mArms at 200 Hz. These devices demonstrate the integrability of wax-bonded Nd-Fe-B powder magnets into microscale electromechanical transducers. Electromechanical lumped element models are then developed for the piston-type electrodynamic actuators. The models enable prediction of the device performance as an

  1. Some MEMS Activities at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, F. T.

    1996-01-01

    None given. Describes connection between spacecraft design and the MEMS industry.They are connected in that spacecraft are designed to withstand severe environments, and so serve as models for MEMS packaging design.

  2. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  3. A novel method of fabricating integrated FETs for MEMS applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Bennett, Reid Stuart; Draper, Bruce Leroy; Mani, Seethambal S.

    2003-07-01

    This paper demonstrates a simple technique for building n-channel MOSFETs and complex micromechanical systems simultaneously instead of serially, allowing a more straightforward integration of complete systems. The fabrication sequence uses few additional process steps and only one additional masking layer compared to a MEMS-only technology. The process flow forms the MOSFET gate electrode using the first level of mechanical polycrystalline silicon, while the MOSFET source and drain regions are formed by dopant diffusions into the substrate from subsequent levels of heavily doped poly that is used for mechanical elements. The process yields devices with good, repeatable electrical characteristics suitable for a wide range of digital and analog applications.

  4. MEMS fabricated chip for an implantable drug delivery device.

    PubMed

    Sbiaa, Z

    2006-01-01

    We present a silicon-based implantable drug delivery system (IDDS) for the administration of compounds in vivo. The implanted device contains the drug-filled silicon microchip, control circuitry, telemetry capability, and a battery. At the heart of the IDDS is the drug-containing microchip, a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems)-based device. A process was developed for the fabrication of the silicon chip. MicroCHIPS' drug release technology has been successfully demonstrated in vitro and in vivo using the therapeutic peptide leuprolide as a model compound.

  5. CARES/Life Used for Probabilistic Characterization of MEMS Pressure Sensor Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2002-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices are typically made from brittle materials such as silicon using traditional semiconductor manufacturing techniques. They can be etched (or micromachined) from larger structures or can be built up with material deposition processes. Maintaining dimensional control and consistent mechanical properties is considerably more difficult for MEMS because feature size is on the micrometer scale. Therefore, the application of probabilistic design methodology becomes necessary for MEMS. This was demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center and Case Western Reserve University in an investigation that used the NASA-developed CARES/Life brittle material design program to study the probabilistic fracture strength behavior of single-crystal SiC, polycrystalline SiC, and amorphous Si3N4 pressurized 1-mm-square thin-film diaphragms. These materials are of interest because of their superior high-temperature characteristics, which are desirable for harsh environment applications such as turbine engine and rocket propulsion system hot sections.

  6. SmallSat Precision Navigation with Low-Cost MEMS IMU Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John; Bishop, Robert; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The continued advancement of small satellite-based science missions requires the solution to a number of important technical challenges. Of particular note is that small satellite missions are characterized by tight constraints on cost, mass, power, and volume that make them unable to fly the high-quality Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) required for orbital missions demanding precise orientation and positioning. Instead, small satellite missions typically fly low-cost Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) IMUs. Unfortunately, the performance characteristics of these MEMS IMUs make them ineffectual in many spaceflight applications when employed in a single IMU system configuration.

  7. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) optical beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurvick, Tod; Starman, LaVern; Coutu, Ronald, Jr.

    2009-08-01

    This experiment explores the manufacturability of controllable Micro-electromechanical (MEMS) mirrors to direct optical signals. Design includes four separate mirrors which independently control vertical displacement, horizontal displacement, vertical pitch and horizontal pitch. Such devices could be used for a variety of applications but were specifically intended for future use in communications between optical based circuits residing on separate chips. Prototype devices were built in PolyMUMPs to test the feasibility of this process for applications such as this, including a full outgoing beam path with mirror orientations and actuation designs to accomplish this. Several elements of this outgoing beam path were successful and those which needed improvement indicate a high probability of success with limited trials needed. Improvement recommendations on currently successful design elements which could still be improved within the scope of PolyMUMPs have been identified. Originally intended only to direct the outgoing beam, this design could be used on the incoming path as well. Such a design would ensure that the receiving device only requires a target location and not that a specific incoming vector be obtained. This would thus comprise all the elements needed for a prototype proof of concept device to be built. More sophisticated fabrication processes could provide drastic improvements to both transmission and reception beam paths and potentially allow for a variety of more sophisticated designs to improve compactness, controllability, tighten tolerances on moving parts, increase mirror quality, and improved productivity of large quantities of devices.

  8. Mid infrared MEMS FTIR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M.; Mortada, Bassem; Sharaf, Khaled; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    In this work we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a bulk-micromachined wideband MEMS-based spectrometer covering both the NIR and the MIR ranges and working from 1200 nm to 4800 nm. The core engine of the spectrometer is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. The spectrum is obtained using the Fourier Transform techniques that allows covering a very wide spectral range limited by the detector responsivity. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator. Zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) multimode optical fibers are used to connect light between the white light source and the interferometer input, as well as the interferometer output to a PbSe photoconductive detector. The recorded signal-to-noise ratio is 25 dB at the wavelength of 3350 nm. The spectrometer is successfully used in measuring the absorption spectra of methylene chloride, quartz glass and polystyrene film. The presented solution provides a low cost method for producing miniaturized spectrometers in the near-/mid-infrared.

  9. MEMS/MOEMS foundry services at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Blanco, Sonia; Ilias, Samir; Williamson, Fraser; Généreux, Francis; Le Noc, Loïc; Poirier, Michel; Proulx, Christian; Tremblay, Bruno; Provençal, Francis; Desroches, Yan; Caron, Jean-Sol; Larouche, Carl; Beaupré, Patrick; Fortin, Benoit; Topart, Patrice; Picard, Francis; Alain, Christine; Pope, Timothy; Jerominek, Hubert

    2010-06-01

    In the MEMS manufacturing world, the "fabless" model is getting increasing importance in recent years as a way for MEMS manufactures and startups to minimize equipment costs and initial capital investment. In order for this model to be successful, the fabless company needs to work closely with a MEMS foundry service provider. Due to the lack of standardization in MEMS processes, as opposed to CMOS microfabrication, the experience in MEMS development processes and the flexibility of the MEMS foundry are of vital importance. A multidisciplinary team together with a complete microfabrication toolset allows INO to offer unique MEMS foundry services to fabless companies looking for low to mid-volume production. Companies that benefit from their own microfabrication facilities can also be interested in INO's assistance in conducting their research and development work during periods where production runs keep their whole staff busy. Services include design, prototyping, fabrication, packaging, and testing of various MEMS and MOEMS devices on wafers fully compatible with CMOS integration. Wafer diameters ranging typically from 1 inch to 6 inches can be accepted while 8-inch wafers can be processed in some instances. Standard microfabrication techniques such as metal, dielectric, and semiconductor film deposition and etching as well as photolithographic pattern transfer are available. A stepper permits reduction of the critical dimension to around 0.4 μm. Metals deposited by vacuum deposition methods include Au, Ag, Al, Al alloys, Ti, Cr, Cu, Mo, MoCr, Ni, Pt, and V with thickness varying from 5 nm to 2 μm. Electroplating of several materials including Ni, Au and In is also available. In addition, INO has developed and built a gold black deposition facility to answer customer's needs for broadband microbolometric detectors. The gold black deposited presents specular reflectance of less than 10% in the wavelength range from 0.2 μm to 100 μm with thickness ranging from

  10. Evolutionary Computation Applied to the Tuning of MEMS Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Fink, Wolfgang; Ferguson, Michael I.; Peay, Chris; Oks, Boris; Terrile, Richard; Yee, Karl

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning and, furthermore, to find the optimally tuned configuration for this state of increased sensitivity. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation.

  11. MEMS DM development at Iris AO, Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Michael A.; He, Min; Kempf, Carl J.; Besse, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Iris AO is actively developing piston-tip-tilt (PTT) segmented MEMS deformable mirrors (DM) and adaptive optics (AO) controllers for these DMs. This paper discusses ongoing research at Iris AO that has advanced the state-of-the-art of these devices and systems over the past year. Improvements made to open-loop operation and mirror fabrication enables mirrors to open-loop flatten to 4 nm rms. Additional testing of an anti snap-in technology was conducted and demonstrates that the technology can withstand 100 million snap-in events without failure. Deformable mirrors with dielectric coatings are shown that are capable of handling 630 W/cm2 of incident laser power. Over a localized region on the segment, the dielectric coatings can withstand 100kW/cm2 incident laser power for 30 minutes. Results from the first-ever batch of PTT489 DMs that were shipped to pilot customers are reported. Optimizations made to the open-loop PTT controller are shown to have latencies of 157.5 μs and synchronous array update rates of nearly 6.5 kHz. Finally, plans for the design and fabrication of the next-generation PTT939 DM are presented.

  12. MEMS-based biosensors for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Morita, Yasutaka; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-03-01

    Biosensors in connection with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can be applied in many fields of research. In this paper, the reduction in the size of ELISA utilizing micro-chemical reaction is described in a microchamber array chip, and also a micro-flow antibody chip. The chips were fabricated by micro electromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The quantitative determination of dioxins was performed by using the chips. Glass or polystyrene beads were used for immobilization of an antibody at these chips. The antibody-immobilized beads were introduced into micro-flow channel or microchamber. As a competitive ELISA, sample solution mixed with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated antigen, and non-HRP conjugated antigen was allowed to react in the microchamber or flow channel. As a sandwich assay, sample solution and HRP-conjugated antibody were sequentially added to the chamber. After the antigen-antibody reaction, addition of PBS buffer, hydrogen peroxide, and fluorogenic substrate produced the fluorescent dye. The resulting change in the fluorescence intensity was monitored by a fluorescence microscope.

  13. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  14. Feasibility of tunable MEMS photonic crystal devices.

    PubMed

    Rajic, S; Corbeil, J L; Datskos, P G

    2003-01-01

    Periodic photonic crystal structures channel electromagnetic waves much as semiconductors/quantum wells channel electrons. Photonic bandgap crystals (PBC) are fabricated by arranging sub-wavelength alternating materials with high and low dielectric constants to produce a desired effective bandgap. Photons with energy within this bandgap cannot propagate through the structure. This property has made these structures useful for microwave applications such as frequency-selective surfaces, narrowband filters, and antenna substrates when the dimensions are on the order of millimeters. They are also potentially very useful, albeit much more difficult to fabricate, in the visible/near-infrared region for various applications when the smallest dimensions are at the edge of current micro-lithography fabrication tools. We micro-fabricated suspended free standing micro-structure bridge waveguides to serve as substrates for PBC features. These micro-bridges were fabricated onto commercial silicon-on-insulator wafers. Nanoscale periodic features were fabricated onto these micro-structure bridges to form a tunable system. When this combined structure is perturbed, such as mechanical deflection of the suspended composite structure at resonance, there can be a realtime shift in the material effective bandgap due to slight geometric alterations due to the induced mechanical stress. Extremely high resonance frequencies/device speeds are possible with these very small dimension MEMS.

  15. A Nuclear Microbattery for MEMS Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, James; Henderson, Douglass; Lal, Amit

    2002-08-20

    This project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of producing on-board power for MEMS devices using radioisotopes. MEMS is a fast growing field, with hopes for producing a wide variety of revolutionary applications, including ''labs on a chip,'' micromachined scanning tunneling microscopes, microscopic detectors for biological agents, microsystems for DNA identification, etc. Currently, these applications are limited by the lack of an on-board power source. Research is ongoing to study approaches such as fuel cells, fossil fuels, and chemical batteries, but all these concepts have limitations. For long-lived, high energy density applications, on-board radioisotope power offers the best choice. We have succeeded in producing such devices using a variety of isotopes, incorporation methods, and device geometries. These experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of using radioisotope power and that there are a variety of options available for MEMS designers. As an example of an integrated, self-powered application, we have created an oscillating cantilever beam that is capable of consistent, periodic oscillations over very long time periods without the need for refueling. Ongoing work will demonstrate that this cantilever is capable of radio frequency transmission, allowing MEMS devices to communicate with one another wirelessly. Thus, this will be the first self-powered wireless transmitter available for use in MEMS devices, permitting such applications as sensors embedded in buildings for continuous monitoring of the building performance and integrity.

  16. Reliability Analysis of Brittle Material Structures - Including MEMS(?) - With the CARES/Life Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2002-01-01

    Brittle materials are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts. thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The CARES/Life code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. For this presentation an interview of the CARES/Life program will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on describing the latest enhancements to the code for reliability analysis with time varying loads and temperatures (fully transient reliability analysis). Also, early efforts in investigating the validity of using Weibull statistics, the basis of the CARES/Life program, to characterize the strength of MEMS structures will be described as as well as the version of CARES/Life for MEMS (CARES/MEMS) being prepared which incorporates single crystal and edge flaw reliability analysis capability. It is hoped this talk will open a dialog for potential collaboration in the area of MEMS testing and life prediction.

  17. A Compact and Low-Cost MEMS Loudspeaker for Digital Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Sang-Soo Je; Rivas, F; Diaz, R E; Jiuk Kwon; Jeonghwan Kim; Bakkaloglu, B; Kiaei, S; Junseok Chae

    2009-10-01

    A microelectromechanical-systems (MEMS)-based electromagnetically actuated loudspeaker to reduce form factor, cost, and power consumption, and increase energy efficiency in hearing-aid applications is presented. The MEMS loudspeaker has multilayer copper coils, an NiFe soft magnet on a thin polyimide diaphragm, and an NdFeB permanent magnet on the perimeter. The coil impedance is measured at 1.5 Omega, and the resonant frequency of the diaphragm is located far from the audio frequency range. The device is driven by a power-scalable, 0.25-mum complementary metal-oxide semiconductor class-D SigmaDelta amplifier stage. The class-D amplifier is formed by a differential H-bridge driven by a single bit, pulse-density-modulated SigmaDelta bitstream at a 1.2-MHz clock rate. The fabricated MEMS loudspeaker generates more than 0.8-mum displacement, equivalent to 106-dB sound pressure level (SPL), with 0.13-mW power consumption. Driven by the SigmaDelta class-D amplifier, the MEMS loudspeaker achieves measured 65-dB total harmonic distortion (THD) with a measurement uncertainty of less than 10%. Energy-efficient and cost-effective advanced hearing aids would benefit from further miniaturization via MEMS technology. The results from this study appear very promising for developing a compact, mass-producible, low-power loudspeaker with sufficient sound generation for hearing-aid applications.

  18. Ultrananocrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond thin films for NEMS/MEMS applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.; Carpick, R. W.; Srinivasan, S.; Butler, J. E.

    2010-04-01

    There has been a tireless quest by the designers of micro- and nanoelectro mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) to find a suitable material alternative to conventional silicon. This is needed to develop robust, reliable, and long-endurance MEMS/NEMS with capabilities for working under demanding conditions, including harsh environments, high stresses, or with contacting and sliding surfaces. Diamond is one of the most promising candidates for this because of its superior physical, chemical, and tribomechanical properties. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films, the two most studied forms of diamond films in the last decade, have distinct growth processes and nanostructures but complementary properties. This article reviews the fundamental and applied science performed to understand key aspects of UNCD and NCD films, including the nucleation and growth, tribomechanical properties, electronic properties, and applied studies on integration with piezoelectric materials and CMOS technology. Several emerging diamond-based MEMS/NEMS applications, including high-frequency resonators, radio frequency MEMS and photonic switches, and the first commercial diamond MEMS product - monolithic diamond atomic force microscopy probes - are discussed.

  19. A Compact and Low-Cost MEMS Loudspeaker for Digital Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Sang-Soo Je; Rivas, F; Diaz, R E; Jiuk Kwon; Jeonghwan Kim; Bakkaloglu, B; Kiaei, S; Junseok Chae

    2009-10-01

    A microelectromechanical-systems (MEMS)-based electromagnetically actuated loudspeaker to reduce form factor, cost, and power consumption, and increase energy efficiency in hearing-aid applications is presented. The MEMS loudspeaker has multilayer copper coils, an NiFe soft magnet on a thin polyimide diaphragm, and an NdFeB permanent magnet on the perimeter. The coil impedance is measured at 1.5 Omega, and the resonant frequency of the diaphragm is located far from the audio frequency range. The device is driven by a power-scalable, 0.25-mum complementary metal-oxide semiconductor class-D SigmaDelta amplifier stage. The class-D amplifier is formed by a differential H-bridge driven by a single bit, pulse-density-modulated SigmaDelta bitstream at a 1.2-MHz clock rate. The fabricated MEMS loudspeaker generates more than 0.8-mum displacement, equivalent to 106-dB sound pressure level (SPL), with 0.13-mW power consumption. Driven by the SigmaDelta class-D amplifier, the MEMS loudspeaker achieves measured 65-dB total harmonic distortion (THD) with a measurement uncertainty of less than 10%. Energy-efficient and cost-effective advanced hearing aids would benefit from further miniaturization via MEMS technology. The results from this study appear very promising for developing a compact, mass-producible, low-power loudspeaker with sufficient sound generation for hearing-aid applications. PMID:23853273

  20. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo.

    PubMed

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable.

  1. A brief test of the Hewlett-Packard MEMS seismic accelerometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homeijer, Brian D.; Milligan, Donald J.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Testing was performed on a prototype of Hewlett-Packard (HP) Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) seismic accelerometer at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This prototype was built using discrete electronic components. The self-noise level was measured during low seismic background conditions and found to be 9.8 ng/√Hz at periods below 0.2 s (frequencies above 5 Hz). The six-second microseism noise was also discernible. The HP MEMS accelerometer was compared to a Geotech Model GS-13 reference seismometer during seismic noise and signal levels well above the self-noise of the accelerometer. Matching power spectral densities (corrected for accelerometer and seismometer responses to represent true ground motion) indicated that the HP MEMS accelerometer has a flat (constant) response to acceleration from 0.0125 Hz to at least 62.5 Hz. Tilt calibrations of the HP MEMS accelerometer verified that the flat response to acceleration extends to 0 Hz. Future development of the HP MEMS accelerometer includes replacing the discreet electronic boards with a low power application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and increasing the dynamic range of the sensor to detect strong motion signals above one gravitational acceleration, while maintaining the self-noise observed during these tests.

  2. Micro/nano-mechanical sensors and actuators based on SOI-MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viet Dao, Dzung; Nakamura, Koichi; Thanh Bui, Tung; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2010-03-01

    MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology has undergone almost 40 years of development, with significant technology advancement and successful commercialization of single-functional MEMS devices, such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, gyroscopes, microphones, micro-mirrors, etc. In this context of MEMS technology, this paper introduces our studies and developments of novel micro/nano-mechanical sensors and actuators based on silicon- on-insulator (SOI)-MEMS technology, as well as fundamental research on piezoresistive effects in single-crystal silicon nanowires (SiNWs). In the first area, novel mechanical sensors, such as 6-DOF micro-force moment sensors, multi-axis inertial sensors and micro-electrostatic actuators developed with SOI-MEMS technology will be presented. In the second area, we have combined atomic-level simulation and experimental evaluation methods to explain the giant piezoresistive effect in single crystalline SiNWs along different crystallographic orientations. This discovery is significant for developing more highly sensitive and miniaturized mechanical sensors in the near future.

  3. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo

    PubMed Central

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U.

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable. PMID:26121610

  4. Tribological challenges in MEMS and their mitigation via vapor phase lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, Michael T.

    2011-06-01

    MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) have become commercially successful in a number of niche applications. However, commercial success has only been possible where design, operating conditions, and materials result in devices that are not very sensitive to tribological effects. The use of MEMS in defense and national security applications will typically involve more challenging environments, with higher reliability and more complex functionality than required of commercial applications. This in turn will necessitate solutions to the challenges that have plagued MEMS since their inception - namely, adhesion, friction and wear. Adhesion during fabrication and immediately post-release has largely been resolved using hydrophobic coatings, but these coatings are not mechanically durable and do not inhibit surface degradation during extended operation. Tribological challenges in MEMS and approaches to mitigate the effects of adhesion, friction and wear are discussed. A new concept for lubrication of silicon MEMS using gas phase species is introduced. This "vapor phase lubrication" process has resulted in remarkable operating life of devices that rely on mechanical contact. VPL is also an effective lubrication approach for materials other than silicon, where traditional lubrication approaches are not feasible. The current status and remaining challenges for maturation of VPL are highlighted.

  5. Benefits of combined GPS/GLONASS with low-cost MEMS IMUs for vehicular urban navigation.

    PubMed

    Angrisano, Antonio; Petovello, Mark; Pugliano, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) has been very actively researched for many years due to the complementary nature of the two systems. In particular, during the last few years the integration with micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs) has been investigated. In fact, recent advances in MEMS technology have made possible the development of a new generation of low cost inertial sensors characterized by small size and light weight, which represents an attractive option for mass-market applications such as vehicular and pedestrian navigation. However, whereas there has been much interest in the integration of GPS with a MEMS-based INS, few research studies have been conducted on expanding this application to the revitalized GLONASS system. This paper looks at the benefits of adding GLONASS to existing GPS/INS(MEMS) systems using loose and tight integration strategies. The relative benefits of various constraints are also assessed. Results show that when satellite visibility is poor (approximately 50% solution availability) the benefits of GLONASS are only seen with tight integration algorithms. For more benign environments, a loosely coupled GPS/GLONASS/INS system offers performance comparable to that of a tightly coupled GPS/INS system, but with reduced complexity and development time. PMID:22666079

  6. Benefits of Combined GPS/GLONASS with Low-Cost MEMS IMUs for Vehicular Urban Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Antonio; Petovello, Mark; Pugliano, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) has been very actively researched for many years due to the complementary nature of the two systems. In particular, during the last few years the integration with micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs) has been investigated. In fact, recent advances in MEMS technology have made possible the development of a new generation of low cost inertial sensors characterized by small size and light weight, which represents an attractive option for mass-market applications such as vehicular and pedestrian navigation. However, whereas there has been much interest in the integration of GPS with a MEMS-based INS, few research studies have been conducted on expanding this application to the revitalized GLONASS system. This paper looks at the benefits of adding GLONASS to existing GPS/INS(MEMS) systems using loose and tight integration strategies. The relative benefits of various constraints are also assessed. Results show that when satellite visibility is poor (approximately 50% solution availability) the benefits of GLONASS are only seen with tight integration algorithms. For more benign environments, a loosely coupled GPS/GLONASS/INS system offers performance comparable to that of a tightly coupled GPS/INS system, but with reduced complexity and development time. PMID:22666079

  7. Benefits of combined GPS/GLONASS with low-cost MEMS IMUs for vehicular urban navigation.

    PubMed

    Angrisano, Antonio; Petovello, Mark; Pugliano, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) has been very actively researched for many years due to the complementary nature of the two systems. In particular, during the last few years the integration with micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs) has been investigated. In fact, recent advances in MEMS technology have made possible the development of a new generation of low cost inertial sensors characterized by small size and light weight, which represents an attractive option for mass-market applications such as vehicular and pedestrian navigation. However, whereas there has been much interest in the integration of GPS with a MEMS-based INS, few research studies have been conducted on expanding this application to the revitalized GLONASS system. This paper looks at the benefits of adding GLONASS to existing GPS/INS(MEMS) systems using loose and tight integration strategies. The relative benefits of various constraints are also assessed. Results show that when satellite visibility is poor (approximately 50% solution availability) the benefits of GLONASS are only seen with tight integration algorithms. For more benign environments, a loosely coupled GPS/GLONASS/INS system offers performance comparable to that of a tightly coupled GPS/INS system, but with reduced complexity and development time.

  8. Progress on MEMS-scanned ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stann, Barry L.; Dammann, John F.; Giza, Mark M.

    2016-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has continued to research a short-range ladar imager for use on small unmanned ground vehicles (UGV) and recently small unmanned air vehicles (UAV). The current ladar brassboard is based on a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) mirror coupled to a low-cost pulsed erbium fiber laser. It has a 5-6 Hz frame rate, an image size of 256 (h) x 128 (v) pixels, a 42º x 21º field of regard, 35 m range, eyesafe operation, and 40 cm range resolution with provisions for super-resolution. Experience with driving experiments on small ground robots and efforts to extend the use of the ladar to UAV applications has encouraged work to improve the ladar's performance. The data acquisition system can now capture range data from the three return pulses in a pixel (that is first, last, and largest return), and information such as elapsed time, operating parameters, and data from an inertial navigation system. We will mention the addition and performance of subsystems to obtain eye-safety certification. To meet the enhanced range requirement for the UAV application, we describe a new receiver circuit that improves the signal-to-noise (SNR) several-fold over the existing design. Complementing this work, we discuss research to build a low-capacitance large area detector that may enable even further improvement in receiver SNR. Finally, we outline progress to build a breadboard ladar to demonstrate increased range to 160 m. If successful, this ladar will be integrated with a color camera and inertial navigation system to build a data collection package to determine imaging performance for a small UAV.

  9. Release Resistant Electrical Interconnections For Mems Devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Reber, Cathleen A.

    2005-02-22

    A release resistant electrical interconnection comprising a gold-based electrical conductor compression bonded directly to a highly-doped polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS, IMEMS, or MOEMS device, without using any intermediate layers of aluminum, titanium, solder, or conductive adhesive disposed in-between the conductor and polysilicon pad. After the initial compression bond has been formed, subsequent heat treatment of the joint above 363 C creates a liquid eutectic phase at the bondline comprising gold plus approximately 3 wt % silicon, which, upon re-solidification, significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial bond. This type of electrical interconnection is resistant to chemical attack from acids used for releasing MEMS elements (HF, HCL), thereby enabling the use of a "package-first, release-second" sequence for fabricating MEMS devices. Likewise, the bond strength of an Au--Ge compression bond may be increased by forming a transient liquid eutectic phase comprising Au-12 wt % Ge.

  10. Improved detection of magnetic signals by a MEMS sensor using stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Tapia, Jesus A; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon.

  11. MEMS flexible thermal flow sensor for measurement of boundary layer separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jui-Ming; Leu, Tzong-Shyng; Miau, Jiun-Jih; Chen, Shih-Jiun

    2016-05-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) thermal flow sensors featured with high spatial resolutions, fast frequency response and minimal interference with fluid flow have been applied widely in boundary-layer studies and aerodynamic flow sensing and control due to the inherent outstanding performances. In this study, MEMS thermal flow sensors were designed and fabricated on a flexible skin using the MEMS technology. The dimension of a single sensing element was 200 μm × 260 μm, which had a resistance of about 200 Ω after annealing. By configuring thermal flow sensors in either a single thermal flow sensor and a thermal tuft sensor, separation points of a two-dimensional (2D) LS(1) 0417 airfoil at various angles of attack could be precisely detected. The experimental results show good agreement with the hot wire sensor and particle traced flow visualization in detecting the separation point on the suction surface of the airfoil.

  12. MEMS flexible thermal flow sensor for measurement of boundary layer separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jui-Ming; Leu, Tzong-Shyng; Miau, Jiun-Jih; Chen, Shih-Jiun

    2016-05-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) thermal flow sensors featured with high spatial resolutions, fast frequency response and minimal interference with fluid flow have been applied widely in boundary-layer studies and aerodynamic flow sensing and control due to the inherent outstanding performances. In this study, MEMS thermal flow sensors were designed and fabricated on a flexible skin using the MEMS technology. The dimension of a single sensing element was 200 μm × 260 μm, which had a resistance of about 200 Ω after annealing. By configuring thermal flow sensors in either a single thermal flow sensor and a thermal tuft sensor, separation points of a two-dimensional (2D) LS(1) 0417 airfoil at various angles of attack could be precisely detected. The experimental results show good agreement with the hot wire sensor and particle traced flow visualization in detecting the separation point on the suction surface of the airfoil.

  13. Design and analysis of a high Q MEMS passive RF filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathee, Vishal; Pande, Rajesh

    2016-04-01

    Over the past few years, significant growth has been observed in using MEMS based passive components in the RF microelectronics domain, especially in transceiver system. This is due to some excellent properties of the MEMS devices like low loss, low cost and excellent isolation. This paper presents a design of high performance MEMS passive band pass filter, consisting of L and C with improved quality factor and insertion loss less than the reported filters. In this paper we have presented a design of 2nd order band pass filter with 2.4GHz centre frequency and 83MHz bandwidth for Bluetooth application. The simulation results showed improved Q-factor of 34 and Insertion loss of 1.7dB to 1.9dB. The simulation results needs to be validated by fabricating the device, fabrication flow of which is also presented in the paper.

  14. In situ TEM/SEM electronic/mechanical characterization of nano material with MEMS chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuelin, Wang; Tie, Li; Xiao, Zhang; Hongjiang, Zeng; Qinhua, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Our investigation of in situ observations on electronic and mechanical properties of nano materials using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the help of traditional micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology has been reviewed. Thanks to the stability, continuity and controllability of the loading force from the electrostatic actuator and the sensitivity of the sensor beam, a MEMS tensile testing chip for accurate tensile testing in the nano scale is obtained. Based on the MEMS chips, the scale effect of Young's modulus in silicon has been studied and confirmed directly in a tensile experiment using a transmission electron microscope. Employing the nanomanipulation technology and FIB technology, Cu and SiC nanowires have been integrated into the tensile testing device and their mechanical, electronic properties under different stress have been achieved, simultaneously. All these will aid in better understanding the nano effects and contribute to the designation and application in nano devices.

  15. Significance of the Casimir force and surface roughness for actuation dynamics of MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Wijnand; Palasantzas, George; Knoester, Jasper; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.

    2013-03-01

    Using the measured optical response and surface roughness topography as inputs, we perform realistic calculations of the combined effect of Casimir and electrostatic forces on the actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In contrast with the expectations, roughness can influence MEMS dynamics, even at distances between bodies significantly larger than the root-mean-square roughness. This effect is associated with statistically rare high asperities that can be locally close to the point of contact. It is found that even though surface roughness appears to have a detrimental effect on the availability of stable equilibria, it ensures that those equilibria can be reached more easily than in the case of flat surfaces. Hence our findings play a principal role for the stability of microdevices such as vibration sensors, switches, and other related MEM architectures operating at distances below 100 nm.

  16. Improved detection of magnetic signals by a MEMS sensor using stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Tapia, Jesus A; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon. PMID:25329563

  17. Localized heating/bonding techniques in MEMS packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabesa, J. R., Jr.; Scott, A. J.; Wu, X.; Auner, G. W.

    2005-05-01

    Packaging is used to protect and enable intelligent sensor systems utilized in manned/unmanned ground vehicle systems/subsystems. Because Micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) are used often in these sensor or actuation products, it must interact with the surrounding environment, which may be in direct conflict with the desire to isolate the electronics for improved reliability/durability performance. For some very simple devices, performance requirements may allow a high degree of isolation from the environment (e.g., stints and accelerometers). Other more complex devices (i.e. chemical and biological analysis systems, particularly in vivo systems) present extremely complex packaging requirements. Power and communications to MEMS device arrays are also extremely problematic. The following describes the research being performed at the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Tank and Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC), in collaboration with Wayne State University, in Detroit, MI. The focus of the packaging research is limited to six main categories: a) provision for feed-through for electrical, optical, thermal, and fluidic interfaces; b) environmental management including atmosphere, hermiticity, and temperature; c) control of stress and mechanical durability; d) management of thermal properties to minimize absorption and/or emission; e) durability and structural integrity; and f) management of RF/magnetic/electrical and optical interference and/or radiation properties and exposure.

  18. Design and simulation of MEMS capacitive magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti, Aditi, Tripathi, C. C.; Gopal, Ram

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of a MEMS Capacitive Magnetometer using FEM (Finite Element Method) tool COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b and results from this simulation are closely matched with analytically calculated results. A comb drive structure is used for actuation purpose which operates at resonant frequency of device is 11.791 kHz to achieve maximum displacement. A magnetic field in z-axis can be detected by this comb drive structure. Quality factor of MEMS capacitive magnetometer obtained is 18 and it has good linear response in the magnetic field range of 100 µT.

  19. Thermo-optical characterization of fluorescent rhodamine B based temperature-sensitive nanosensors using a CMOS MEMS micro-hotplate☆

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Veeren M.; Hopper, Richard H.; Ali, Syed Z.; King, Emma M.; Udrea, Florin; Oxley, Chris H.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    A custom designed microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micro-hotplate, capable of operating at high temperatures (up to 700 °C), was used to thermo-optically characterize fluorescent temperature-sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors, 550 nm in diameter, are composed of temperature-sensitive rhodamine B (RhB) fluorophore which was conjugated to an inert silica sol–gel matrix. Temperature-sensitive nanosensors were dispersed and dried across the surface of the MEMS micro-hotplate, which was mounted in the slide holder of a fluorescence confocal microscope. Through electrical control of the MEMS micro-hotplate, temperature induced changes in fluorescence intensity of the nanosensors was measured over a wide temperature range. The fluorescence response of all nanosensors dispersed across the surface of the MEMS device was found to decrease in an exponential manner by 94%, when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 145 °C. The fluorescence response of all dispersed nanosensors across the whole surface of the MEMS device and individual nanosensors, using line profile analysis, were not statistically different (p < 0.05). The MEMS device used for this study could prove to be a reliable, low cost, low power and high temperature micro-hotplate for the thermo-optical characterisation of sub-micron sized particles. The temperature-sensitive nanosensors could find potential application in the measurement of temperature in biological and micro-electrical systems. PMID:25844025

  20. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    PubMed

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  1. A Comparison Simulation of Fixed-fixed Type MEMS Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezazadeh, G.; Sadeghian, H.; Malekpour, E.

    2006-04-01

    In the present work pull-in voltage of fixed-fixed end type MEMS switches with variative electrostatic area has been calculated using a distributed model and applying a full nonlinear finite difference discretizing method. The governing nonlinear differential equation has been derived using of the variational principle for multi domain electromechanical coupled system. The numerical results of the beam with variative electrostatic area with the results of Coupled-Domain Finite Element method have been compared and very good agreement has been achieved.

  2. Micromechanical properties of hydrogels measured with MEMS resonant sensors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Elise A; Millet, Larry J; Pikul, James H; Johnson, Curtis L; Georgiadis, John G; King, William P; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogels have gained wide usage in a range of biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility and the ability to finely tune their properties, including viscoelasticity. The use of hydrogels on the microscale is increasingly important for the development of drug delivery techniques and cellular microenvironments, though the ability to accurately characterize their micromechanical properties is limited. Here we demonstrate the use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors to estimate the properties of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) microstructures over a range of concentrations. These microstructures are integrated on the sensors by deposition using electrohydrodynamic jet printing. Estimated properties agree well with independent measurements made using indentation with atomic force microscopy.

  3. Wavelength-selective orbital-angular-momentum beam generation using MEMS tunable Fabry-Perot filter.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sujoy; Lyubopytov, Vladimir S; Schumann, Martin F; Cesar, Julijan; Chipouline, Arkadi; Wegener, Martin; Küppers, Franko

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate an on-chip device capable of wavelength-selective generation of vortex beams, which is realized by a spiral phase plate integrated onto a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tunable filter. This vortex MEMS filter, being capable of functioning simultaneously in both wavelength and orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) domains at the 1550 nm wavelength regime, is considered as a compact, robust, and cost-effective solution for simultaneous OAM- and wavelength-division multiplexed optical communications. The experimental OAM spectra for azimuthal orders 1, 2, and 3 show an OAM state purity >92% across a wavelength range of more than 30 nm. PMID:27420507

  4. A Hardware Platform for Tuning of MEMS Devices Using Closed-Loop Frequency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Michael I.; MacDonald, Eric; Foor, David

    2005-01-01

    We report on the development of a hardware platform for integrated tuning and closed-loop operation of MEMS gyroscopes. The platform was developed and tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-Resonator MEMS gyroscope. The control of this device is implemented through a digital design on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). A software interface allows the user to configure, calibrate, and tune the bias voltages on the micro-gyro. The interface easily transitions to an embedded solution that allows for the miniaturization of the system to a single chip.

  5. Wavelength-selective orbital-angular-momentum beam generation using MEMS tunable Fabry-Perot filter.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sujoy; Lyubopytov, Vladimir S; Schumann, Martin F; Cesar, Julijan; Chipouline, Arkadi; Wegener, Martin; Küppers, Franko

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate an on-chip device capable of wavelength-selective generation of vortex beams, which is realized by a spiral phase plate integrated onto a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tunable filter. This vortex MEMS filter, being capable of functioning simultaneously in both wavelength and orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) domains at the 1550 nm wavelength regime, is considered as a compact, robust, and cost-effective solution for simultaneous OAM- and wavelength-division multiplexed optical communications. The experimental OAM spectra for azimuthal orders 1, 2, and 3 show an OAM state purity >92% across a wavelength range of more than 30 nm.

  6. Release of multi-layer metal structure in MEMS devices by dry etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. C.

    2002-04-01

    Reactive ion etching technique was used to remove interleave photoresist layer for free standing metal structure in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. Mixture of oxygen and CF 4 gas was used to get isotropic etching profile. Etching process was optimized to get large metal structure of 100×100 μm 2 without any surface bending. The etching rate of 0.7 μm/min at 60 W of RIE plasma power is found to be optimum process for the particular application. The reported dry release technique is fully compatible with standard silicon IC processing and hence can be used for hybridize process used in MEMS array application.

  7. [The principle and analysis of micro-Fourier transform spectrometer based on MEMS micro-mirror].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Yong; Liu, Bo; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ning

    2012-11-01

    The present paper puts forward a novel micro-Fourier transform infrared spectrometer based on programmable MEMS micro-mirror. This design uses a MEMS micro-mirror and a slantwise reflector to replace the moving mirror system on traditional spectrometer. This paper analyzes the operating principle of this spectrometer and gives the simulation result to prove the feasibility of this method. The results show that the spectral resolution is less than 5 nm in near-infrared wave band, the wave-length accuracy is approximately 1 nm and the sampling period of this spectrometer is approximately 50 ms. This method can use Hadamard transform to improve the SNR.

  8. Integrated MEMS-based variable optical attenuator and 10Gb/s receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aberson, James; Cusin, Pierre; Fettig, H.; Hickey, Ryan; Wylde, James

    2005-03-01

    MEMS devices can be successfully commercialized in favour of competing technologies only if they offer an advantage to the customer in terms of lower cost or increased functionality. There are limited markets where MEMS can be manufactured cheaper than similar technologies due to large volumes: automotive, printing technology, wireless communications, etc. However, success in the marketplace can also be realized by adding significant value to a system at minimal cost or leverging MEMS technology when other solutions simply will not work. This paper describes a thermally actuated, MEMS based, variable optical attenuator that is co-packaged with existing opto-electronic devices to develop an integrated 10Gb/s SONET/SDH receiver. The configuration of the receiver opto-electronics and relatively low voltage availability (12V max) in optical systems bar the use of LCD, EO, and electro-chromic style attenuators. The device was designed and fabricated using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) starting material. The design and performance of the device (displacement, power consumption, reliability, physical geometry) was defined by the receiver parameters geometry. This paper will describe how these design parameters (hence final device geometry) were determined in light of both the MEMS device fabrication process and the receiver performance. Reference will be made to the design tools used and the design flow which was a joint effort between the MEMS vendor and the end customer. The SOI technology offered a robust, manufacturable solution that gave the required performance in a cost-effective process. However, the singulation of the devices required the development of a new singulation technique that allowed large volumes of silicon to be removed during fabrication yet still offer high singulation yields.

  9. A 2-axis Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based electromagnetic MEMS scanning mirror for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sehui; Lee, Changho; Kim, Jin Young; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging tool for visualizing cross-sectional images of biological tissues on a microscale. Various microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques have been applied to OCT for endoscopic catheters and handheld probes. Despite having several advantages such as compact sizes and high speeds for real-time imaging, the complexities of the fabrication processes and relatively high costs were bottlenecks for fast clinical translation and commercialization of the earlier MEMS scanners. To overcome these issues, we developed a 2-axis polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based electromagnetic MEMS scanning mirror based on flexible, cost-effective, and handleable PDMS. The size of this MEMS scanner was 15 × 15 × 15 mm3. To realize the characteristics of the scanner, we obtained the DC/AC responses and scanning patterns. The measured maximum scanning angles were 16.6° and 11.6° along the X and Y axes, respectively. The resonance frequencies were 82 and 57 Hz along the X and Y axes, respectively. The scanning patterns (raster and Lissajous scan patterns) are also demonstrated by controlling the frequency and amplitude. Finally, we showed the in vivo 2D-OCT images of human fingers by using a spectral domain OCT system with a PDMSbased MEMS scanning mirror. We then reconstructed the 3D images of human fingers. The obtained field of view was 8 × 8 mm2. The PDMS-based MEMS scanning mirror has the potential to combine other optical modalities and be widely used in preclinical and clinical translation research.

  10. A MEMS vibration energy harvester for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schaijk, R.; Elfrink, R.; Oudenhoven, J.; Pop, V.; Wang, Z.; Renaud, M.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop MEMS vibration energy harvesters for tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS), they can be located on the rim or on the inner-liner of the car tire. Nowadays TPMS modules are powered by batteries with a limited lifetime. A large effort is ongoing to replace batteries with small and long lasting power sources like energy harvesters [1]. The operation principle of vibration harvesters is mechanical resonance of a seismic mass, where mechanical energy is converted into electrical energy. In general, vibration energy harvesters are of specific interest for machine environments where random noise or repetitive shock vibrations are present. In this work we present the results for MEMS based vibration energy harvesting for applying on the rim or inner-liner. The vibrations on the rim correspond to random noise. A vibration energy harvester can be described as an under damped mass-spring system acting like a mechanical band-pass filter, and will resonate at its natural frequency [2]. At 0.01 g2/Hz noise amplitude the average power can reach the level that is required to power a simple wireless sensor node, approximately 10 μW [3]. The dominant vibrations on the inner-liner consist mainly of repetitive high amplitude shocks. With a shock, the seismic mass is displaced, after which the mass will "ring-down" at its natural resonance frequency. During the ring-down period, part of the mechanical energy is harvested. On the inner-liner of the tire repetitive (one per rotation) high amplitude (few hundred g) shocks occur. The harvester enables an average power of a few tens of μW [4], sufficient to power a more sophisticated wireless sensor node that can measure additional tire-parameters besides pressure. In this work we characterized MEMS vibration energy harvesters for noise and shock excitation. We validated their potential for TPMS modules by measurements and simulation.

  11. A miniaturized reconfigurable broadband attenuator based on RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Gong, Zhuhao; Zhong, Qi; Liang, Xiaotong; Liu, Zewen

    2016-07-01

    Reconfigurable attenuators are widely used in microwave measurement instruments. Development of miniaturized attenuation devices with high precision and broadband performance is required for state-of-the-art applications. In this paper, a compact 3-bit microwave attenuator based on radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF MEMS) switches and polysilicon attenuation modules is presented. The device comprises 12 ohmic contact MEMS switches, π-type polysilicon resistive attenuation modules and microwave compensate structures. Special attention was paid to the design of the resistive network, compensate structures and system simulation. The device was fabricated using micromachining processes compatible with traditional integrated circuit fabrication processes. The reconfigurable attenuator integrated with RF MEMS switches and resistive attenuation modules was successfully fabricated with dimensions of 2.45  ×  4.34  ×  0.5 mm3, which is 1/1000th of the size of a conventional step attenuator. The measured RF performance revealed that the attenuator provides 10-70 dB attenuation at 10 dB intervals from 0.1-20 GHz with an accuracy better than  ±1.88 dB at 60 dB and an error of less than 2.22 dB at 10 dB. The return loss of each state of the 3-bit attenuator was better than 11.95 dB (VSWR  <  1.71) over the entire operating band.

  12. A miniaturized reconfigurable broadband attenuator based on RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Gong, Zhuhao; Zhong, Qi; Liang, Xiaotong; Liu, Zewen

    2016-07-01

    Reconfigurable attenuators are widely used in microwave measurement instruments. Development of miniaturized attenuation devices with high precision and broadband performance is required for state-of-the-art applications. In this paper, a compact 3-bit microwave attenuator based on radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF MEMS) switches and polysilicon attenuation modules is presented. The device comprises 12 ohmic contact MEMS switches, π-type polysilicon resistive attenuation modules and microwave compensate structures. Special attention was paid to the design of the resistive network, compensate structures and system simulation. The device was fabricated using micromachining processes compatible with traditional integrated circuit fabrication processes. The reconfigurable attenuator integrated with RF MEMS switches and resistive attenuation modules was successfully fabricated with dimensions of 2.45  ×  4.34  ×  0.5 mm3, which is 1/1000th of the size of a conventional step attenuator. The measured RF performance revealed that the attenuator provides 10–70 dB attenuation at 10 dB intervals from 0.1–20 GHz with an accuracy better than  ±1.88 dB at 60 dB and an error of less than 2.22 dB at 10 dB. The return loss of each state of the 3-bit attenuator was better than 11.95 dB (VSWR  <  1.71) over the entire operating band.

  13. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography imaging probe using a MEMS actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zara, Jason M.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Oberhardt, Bruce J.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2004-07-01

    Endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) is a medical imaging technique that uses infrared light delivered via an endoscope to produce high-resolution images of tissue microstructure of the gastrointestinal tract. A key component of an EOCT system is the method used to scan the infrared beam across the tissue surface. We have begun developing electrostatic MEMS micromirror devices for use in EOCT. These devices consist of 1 mm square gold-plated silicon mirrors on polyimide tables that tilt on 3 micron thick torsion hinges. The MEMS actuator used to tilt the mirror, the integrated forces array (IFA) is a thin (2.2 μm) polyimide membrane consisting of hundreds of thousands of deformable capacitors that can produce strains up to 20% and forces equivalent to 13 mg with applied voltages from 30-120 V. Measurements of optical deflections of these devices range from 18° at low frequencies to more than 120° near the resonant frequencies of the structures (30-60 Hz). The support structures, hinges, and actuators are fabricated from polyimide on silicon using photolithography. These electrostatic MEMS micromirrors were inserted into the scanning arm of an OCT imaging system to take in vitro images of porcine tissue and in vivo images of human skin at frame rates from 4-8 Hz. SLA probe tips were designed and fabricated to align the optics of the device and to protect the fragile polyimide devices during endoscopic imaging. In addition, devices are being fabricated that combine the IFA and mirror structures onto a single silicon wafer, reducing fabrication difficulty.

  14. Low power MEMS modulating retroreflectors for optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jason B.; Freedman, David; Cornelissen, Steven; Horenstein, Mark N.; Woskov, Peter; Tang, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    We report on the design, development and testing of a new low-power, light-weight and low-cost modulating retroreflector system for free-space covert optical communication and remote sensor interrogation. The central component of the system is a MEMS modulator mirror, which is physically similar to a very low modulation reflective diffraction grating that has actively controlled groove depth and can operate at frequencies up to 1MHz. One facet of the hollow corner cube retroreflector consists of the MEMS mirror, providing intensity modulation of a reflected interrogating beam by switching from an unpowered flat mirror state to a powered diffractive state. The system is optimized for performance at 1550nm and has a field of view of 60 degrees. For covert operation it uses "wake-up" circuitry to control a low-power shutter that remains closed between data transfers. The system's compact driver electronics employs power scavenging and resonant properties for minimal power consumption and extended autonomous operational life. Interrogation field test results for the modulating retroreflector will be presented.

  15. Recent Progress in Silicon-Based MEMS Field Emission Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tajmar, Martin

    2005-02-01

    The Indium Field Emission Thruster (In-FET) is a highly characterized and space-proven device based on space-qualified liquid metal ion sources. There is also extensive experience with liquid metal ion sources for high-brightness semiconductor fabrications and inspection Like gridded ion engines, In-FETs efficiently accelerate ions through a series of high voltage electrodes. Instead of a plasma discharge to generate ions, which generates a mixture of singly and doubly charged ions as well as neutrals, indium metal is melted (157°C) and fed to the tip of a capillary tube where very high local electric fields perform more-efficient field emission ionization, providing nearly 100% singly charged species. In-FETs do not have the associated losses or lifetime concerns of a magnetically confined discharge and hollow cathode in ion thrusters. For In-FETs, propellant efficiencies ˜100% stipulate single-emitter currents ⩽10μA, perhaps as low as 5μA of current. This low emitter current results in ⩽0.5 W/emitter. Consequently, if the In-FET is to be used for future Human and Robotic missions under President Bush's Exploration plan, a mechanism to generate very high power levels is necessary. Efficient high-power operation requires many emitter/extractor pairs. Conventional fabrication techniques allow 1-10 emitters in a single module, with pain-staking precision required. Properly designed and fabricated In-FETs possess electric-to-jet efficiency >90% and a specific mass <0.25 kg/kWe. MEMS techniques allow reliable batch processing with ˜160,000 emitters in a 10×10-cm array. Developing a 1.5kW 10×10-cm module is a necessary stepping-stone for >500 kWe systems where groups of 9 or 16 modules, with a single PPU/feed system, form the building blocks for even higher-power exploration systems. In 2003, SNL and ARCS produced a MEMS-based In-FET 5×5 emitter module with individually addressable emitter/extractor pairs on a 15×15mm wafer. The first MEMS thruster

  16. EDITORIAL: Special issue for papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008) Special issue for papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji

    2009-09-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008) with the 2nd Symposium on Micro Environmental Machine SystemsMEMS 2008). The workshop was held in Sendai, Japan on 9-12 November 2008 by Tohoku University. This is the second time that the PowerMEMS workshop has been held in Sendai, following the first workshop in 2000. Power MEMS is one of the newest categories of MEMS, which encompasses microdevices and microsystems for power generation, energy conversion and propulsion. The first concept of Power MEMS was born in the late 1990's from a MEMS-based gas turbine project at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After that, the research and development of Power MEMS have been promoted by the strong need for compact power sources with high energy and/or power density. Since its inception, Power MEMS has expanded to include not only various MEMS-based power generators but also small energy machines and microdevices for macro power generators. Previously, the main topics of the PowerMEMS workshop were miniaturized gas turbines and micro fuel cells, but recently, energy harvesting has been the hottest topic. In 2008, energy harvesting had a 41% share in the 118 accepted regular papers. This special issue includes 19 papers on various topics. Finally, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, the Local Organizing Committee and financial supporters. This special issue was edited in collaboration with the staff of IOP Publishing.

  17. Fundamentals and application of materials integration for low-power piezoelectrically actuated ultra-nanocrystalline diamond MEMS/NEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Srinivasan, S.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B.

    2009-01-01

    Most current micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) are based on silicon. However, silicon exhibits relatively poor mechanical/tribological properties, compromising applications to several projected MEMS/NEMS devices, particularly those that require materials with high Young's modulus for MEMS resonators or low surface adhesion forces for MEMS/NEMS working in conditions with extensive surface contact. Diamond films with superior mechanical/tribological properties provide an excellent alternative platform material. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{cflx W}) in film form with 2-5 nm grains exhibits excellent properties for high-performance MEMS/NEMS devices. Concurrently, piezoelectric Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x})O{sub 3} (PZT) films provide high sensitivity/low electrical noise for sensing/high-force actuation at relatively low voltages. Therefore, integration of PZT and UNCD films provides a high-performance platform for advanced MEMS/NEMS devices. This paper describes the bases of such integration and demonstration of low voltage piezoactuated hybrid PZT/UNCD cantilevers.

  18. Acoustic resonance in MEMS scale cylindrical tubes with side branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Marcus, Logan S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design. One of the central issues related to sensor miniaturization is optimization of the photoacoustic cell geometry, especially in relationship to high acoustical amplification and reduced system noise. Previous work relied on a multiphysics approach to analyze the resonance structures of the MEMS scale photo acoustic cell. This technique was unable to provide an accurate model of the acoustic structure. In this paper we describe a method that relies on techniques developed from musical instrument theory and electronic transmission line matrix methods to describe cylindrical acoustic resonant cells with side branches of various configurations. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ease and accuracy of this method. All experimental results were within 2% of those predicted by this theory.

  19. Application of MEMS Microphone Array Technology to Airframe Noise Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Shams, Qamar A.; Graves, Sharon S.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Bartram, Scott M.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    Current generation microphone directional array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity data on a variety of aircraft components, resulting in significant gains in test productivity. However, with this gain in productivity has come the desire to install larger and more complex arrays in a variety of ground test facilities, creating new challenges for the designers of array systems. To overcome these challenges, a research study was initiated to identify and develop hardware and fabrication technologies which could be used to construct an array system exhibiting acceptable measurement performance but at much lower cost and with much simpler installation requirements. This paper describes an effort to fabricate a 128-sensor array using commercially available Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones. The MEMS array was used to acquire noise data for an isolated 26%-scale high-fidelity Boeing 777 landing gear in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Stability Tunnel across a range of Mach numbers. The overall performance of the array was excellent, and major noise sources were successfully identified from the measurements.

  20. GPS/MEMS IMU/Microprocessor Board for Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James; Ott, William E.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  1. High performance MEMS micro-gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, S. Y.; Hayworth, K. J.; Yee, K. Y.; Shcheglov, K.; Challoner, A. D.; Wiberg, D. V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on JPL's on-going research into MEMS gyroscopes. This paper will describe the gyroscope's fabrication-methods, a new 8-electrode layout developed to improve performance, and performance statistics of a batch of six gyroscopes recently rate tested.

  2. MEMS FPI-based smartphone hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Anna; Saari, Heikki; Rainio, Kari; Stuns, Ingmar; Viherkanto, Kai; Holmlund, Christer; Näkki, Ismo; Ojanen, Harri

    2016-05-01

    This paper demonstrates a mobile phone- compatible hyperspectral imager based on a tunable MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometer. The realized iPhone 5s hyperspectral imager (HSI) demonstrator utilizes MEMS FPI tunable filter for visible-range, which consist of atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3/TiO2-thin film Bragg reflectors. Characterization results for the mobile phone hyperspectral imager utilizing MEMS FPI chip optimized for 500 nm is presented; the operation range is λ = 450 - 550 nm with FWHM between 8 - 15 nm. Also a configuration of two cascaded FPIs (λ = 500 nm and λ = 650 nm) combined with an RGB colour camera is presented. With this tandem configuration, the overall wavelength tuning range of MEMS hyperspectral imagers can be extended to cover a larger range than with a single FPI chip. The potential applications of mobile hyperspectral imagers in the vis-NIR range include authentication, counterfeit detection and potential health/wellness and food sensing applications.

  3. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kotovksy, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D

    2010-05-28

    This thin, MEMS contact-stress sensor continuously and accurately measures time-varying, solid interface loads over tens of thousands of load cycles. The contact-stress sensor is extremely thin (150 {mu}m) and has a linear output with an accuracy of {+-} 1.5% FSO.

  4. MEMS-based IR-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Sebastian; Steinbach, Bastian; Biermann, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    The series JSIR350 sources are MEMS based infrared emitters. These IR sources are characterized by a high radiation output. Thus, they are excellent for NDIR gas analysis and are ideally suited for using with our pyro-electric or thermopile detectors. The MEMS chips used in Micro-Hybrid's infrared emitters consist of nano-amorphous carbon (NAC). The MEMS chips are produced in the USA. All Micro-Hybrid Emitter are designed and specified to operate up to 850°C. The improvements we have made in the source's packaging enable us to provide IR sources with the best performance on the market. This new technology enables us to seal the housings of infrared radiation sources with soldered infrared filters or windows and thus cause the parts to be impenetrable to gases. Micro-Hybrid provide various ways of adapting our MEMS based infrared emitter JSIR350 to customer specifications, like specific burn-in parameters/characteristic, different industrial standard housings, producible with customized cap, reflector or pin-out.

  5. Evolving MEMS Resonator Designs for Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Kraus, William F.; Lohn, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    Because of their small size and high reliability, microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices have the potential to revolution many areas of engineering. As with conventionally-sized engineering design, there is likely to be a demand for the automated design of MEMS devices. This paper describes our current status as we progress toward our ultimate goal of using an evolutionary algorithm and a generative representation to produce designs of a MEMS device and successfully demonstrate its transfer to an actual chip. To produce designs that are likely to transfer to reality, we present two ways to modify evaluation of designs. The first is to add location noise, differences between the actual dimensions of the design and the design blueprint, which is a technique we have used for our work in evolving antennas and robots. The second method is to add prestress to model the warping that occurs during the extreme heat of fabrication. In future we expect to fabricate and test some MEMS resonators that are evolved in this way.

  6. UAV-borne lidar with MEMS mirror-based scanning capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasturi, Abhishek; Milanovic, Veljko; Atwood, Bryan H.; Yang, James

    2016-05-01

    Firstly, we demonstrated a wirelessly controlled MEMS scan module with imaging and laser tracking capability which can be mounted and flown on a small UAV quadcopter. The MEMS scan module was reduced down to a small volume of <90mm x 60mm x 40mm, weighing less than 40g and consuming less than 750mW of power using a ~5mW laser. This MEMS scan module was controlled by a smartphone via Bluetooth while flying on a drone, and could project vector content, text, and perform laser based tracking. Also, a "point-and-range" LiDAR module was developed for UAV applications based on low SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) gimbal-less MEMS mirror beam-steering technology and off-the-shelf OEM LRF modules. For demonstration purposes of an integrated laser range finder module, we used a simple off-the-shelf OEM laser range finder (LRF) with a 100m range, +/-1.5mm accuracy, and 4Hz ranging capability. The LRFs receiver optics were modified to accept 20° of angle, matching the transmitter's FoR. A relatively large (5.0mm) diameter MEMS mirror with +/-10° optical scanning angle was utilized in the demonstration to maintain the small beam divergence of the module. The complete LiDAR prototype can fit into a small volume of <70mm x 60mm x 60mm, and weigh <50g when powered by the UAV's battery. The MEMS mirror based LiDAR system allows for ondemand ranging of points or areas within the FoR without altering the UAV's position. Increasing the LRF ranging frequency and stabilizing the pointing of the laser beam by utilizing the onboard inertial sensors and the camera are additional goals of the next design.

  7. MEMS capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Zurcher, Mark A; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff A; Ko, Wen H

    2012-12-01

    The design, implementation, and characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone are presented in this paper. The microphone is intended for middle ear hearing aids as well as future fully implantable cochlear prosthesis. Human temporal bones acoustic response characterization results are used to derive the accelerometer design requirements. The prototype accelerometer is fabricated in a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MEMS process. The sensor occupies a sensing area of 1 mm × 1 mm with a chip area of 2 mm × 2.4 mm and is interfaced with a custom-designed low-noise electronic IC chip over a flexible substrate. The packaged sensor unit occupies an area of 2.5 mm × 6.2 mm with a weight of 25 mg. The sensor unit attached to umbo can detect a sound pressure level (SPL) of 60 dB at 500 Hz, 35 dB at 2 kHz, and 57 dB at 8 kHz. An improved sound detection limit of 34-dB SPL at 150 Hz and 24-dB SPL at 500 Hz can be expected by employing start-of-the-art MEMS fabrication technology, which results in an articulation index of approximately 0.76. Further micro/nanofabrication technology advancement is needed to enhance the microphone sensitivity for improved understanding of normal conversational speech.

  8. Path Length Control in a Nulling Coronagraph with a MEMS Deformable Mirror and a Calibration Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti R.; Wallacea, J. Kent; Samuele, Rocco; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; Jung, Paul; Lane, Benjamin; Levine, B. Martin; Mendillo, Chris; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Shao, Mike; Stewart, Jason B.

    2008-01-01

    We report progress on a nulling coronagraph intended for direct imaging of extrasolar planets. White light is suppressed in an interferometer, and phase errors are measured by a second interferometer. A 1020-pixel MEMS deformable mirror in the first interferometer adjusts the path length across the pupil. A feedback control system reduces deflections of the deformable mirror to order of 1 nm rms.

  9. PolyMUMPs MEMS device to measure mechanical stiffness of single cells in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Forbrigger, C.; Hubbard, T.

    2015-02-01

    A method of experimentally determining the mechanical stiffness of single cells by using differential displacement measurements in a two stage spring system is presented. The spring system consists of a known MEMS reference spring and an unknown cellular stiffness: the ratio of displacements is related to the ratio of stiffness. A polyMUMPs implementation for aqueous media is presented and displacement measurements made from optical microphotographs using a FFT based displacement method with a repeatability of ~20 nm. The approach was first validated on a MEMS two stage spring system of known stiffness. The measured stiffness ratios of control structures (i) MEMS spring systems and (ii) polystyrene microspheres were found to agree with theoretical values. Mechanical tests were then performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) in aqueous media. Cells were placed (using a micropipette) inside MEMS measuring structures and compressed between two jaws using an electrostatic actuator and displacements measured. Tested cells showed stiffness values between 5.4 and 8.4 N m-1 with an uncertainty of 11%. In addition, non-viable cells were tested by exposing viable cells to methanol. The resultant mean cell stiffness dropped by factor of 3 × and an explicit discrimination between viable and non-viable cells based on mechanical stiffness was seen.

  10. Amplitude variations on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Dillon, D; Gavel, D; Phillion, D; Macintosh, B

    2007-08-14

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. At the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed, we have already demonstrated wavefront control of better than 1 nm rms within controllable spatial frequencies. Corresponding contrast measurements, however, are limited by amplitude variations, including those introduced by the micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror. Results from experimental measurements and wave optic simulations of amplitude variations on the ExAO testbed are presented. We find systematic intensity variations of about 2% rms, and intensity variations with the MEMS to be 6%. Some errors are introduced by phase and amplitude mixing because the MEMS is not conjugate to the pupil, but independent measurements of MEMS reflectivity suggest that some error is introduced by small non-uniformities in the reflectivity.

  11. Integrated superhard and metallic coatings for MEMS : LDRD 57300 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Maboudian, Roya

    2004-12-01

    Two major research areas pertinent to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials and material surfaces were explored and developed in this 5-year PECASE LDRD project carried out by Professor Roya Maboudian and her collaborators at the University of California at Berkeley. In the first research area, polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC) was developed as a structural material for MEMS. This material is potentially interesting for MEMS because compared to polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon), the structural material in Sandia National Laboratories' SUMMiTV process, it may exhibit high wear resistance, high temperature operation and a high Young's modulus to density ratio. Each of these characteristics may extend the usefulness of MEMS in Sandia National Laboratories' applications. For example, using polycrystalline silicon, wear is an important issue in microengines, temperature degradation is of concern in thermal actuators and the characteristics of resonators can be extended with the same lithography technology. Two methods of depositing poly-SiC from a 1,3-disilabutane source at 650 C to 800 C by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) were demonstrated. These include a blanket method in which the material is made entirely out of poly-SiC and a method to coat previously released and fabricated polysilicon MEMS. This deposition method is much simpler to use than previous methods such as high temperature LPCVD and atmospheric CVD. Other major processing issues that were surmounted in this LDRD with the poly-SiC film include etching, doping, and residual strain control. SiC is inert and as such is notoriously difficult to etch. Here, an HBr-based chemistry was demonstrated for the first time to make highly selective etching of SiC at high etch rates. Nitrogen was incorporated from an NH3 gas source, resulting in high conductivity films. Residual strain and strain gradient were shown to depend on deposition parameters, and can be made negative or

  12. Piezoelectric cantilevers energy harvesting in MEMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yingqi; Qiu, Chengjun; Liu, Hongmei; Chen, Xiaojie; Qu, Wei; Dou, Yanwei

    2011-11-01

    Piezoelectric cantilevers energy harvesting made by micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology can scavenge power from low-level ambient vibration sources. The developed cantilevers energy harvesting are featured with resonate frequency and power output in microwatt level, which is sufficient to the self-supportive sensors for in-service integrity monitoring of large social and environmental infrastructures at remote locations. In this paper, piezoelectric energy harvesting based on thick-film piezoelectric cantilevers is investigated to resonate at specific frequencies of an external vibration energy source, which creating electrical energy via the piezoelectric effect. Our cantilever device has a multiple structure with a proof mass added to the end. The thick film lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) coated on the top of Au/Cr/SiO2/Si substrates by sol-gel-spin method. The thickness of the PZT membrane was up to 2μm and the cantilevers substrates thickness 50μm, wideness 1.5mm, length 4mm. The Au/Ti top electrode is patterned on top of the sol-gel-spin coated PZT thick film in order to employ the d31 mode. The prototype energy generator has a measured performance of 0.74μW effective electrical power, and 4.93 DC output voltages to resistance load. The effect of proof mass, beam shape and damping on the power generating performance are modeled to provide a design guideline for maximum power harvesting from environmentally available low frequency vibrations. A multiple structure cantilever is designed to achieve compactness, low resonant frequency and minimum damping coefficient, simultaneously. This device is promising to support networks of ultra-low-power sensor.

  13. Piezoelectric cantilevers energy harvesting in MEMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yingqi; Qiu, Chengjun; Liu, Hongmei; Chen, Xiaojie; Qu, Wei; Dou, Yanwei

    2012-04-01

    Piezoelectric cantilevers energy harvesting made by micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology can scavenge power from low-level ambient vibration sources. The developed cantilevers energy harvesting are featured with resonate frequency and power output in microwatt level, which is sufficient to the self-supportive sensors for in-service integrity monitoring of large social and environmental infrastructures at remote locations. In this paper, piezoelectric energy harvesting based on thick-film piezoelectric cantilevers is investigated to resonate at specific frequencies of an external vibration energy source, which creating electrical energy via the piezoelectric effect. Our cantilever device has a multiple structure with a proof mass added to the end. The thick film lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) coated on the top of Au/Cr/SiO2/Si substrates by sol-gel-spin method. The thickness of the PZT membrane was up to 2μm and the cantilevers substrates thickness 50μm, wideness 1.5mm, length 4mm. The Au/Ti top electrode is patterned on top of the sol-gel-spin coated PZT thick film in order to employ the d31 mode. The prototype energy generator has a measured performance of 0.74μW effective electrical power, and 4.93 DC output voltages to resistance load. The effect of proof mass, beam shape and damping on the power generating performance are modeled to provide a design guideline for maximum power harvesting from environmentally available low frequency vibrations. A multiple structure cantilever is designed to achieve compactness, low resonant frequency and minimum damping coefficient, simultaneously. This device is promising to support networks of ultra-low-power sensor.

  14. Optical MEMS: boom, bust, and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    Optical Telecommunications bandwidth, spurred by the growth of the internet, experienced unprecedented growth in the late 1990's. The creation of new enterprises was vast and the expansion of established component, system and services companies was also breathtaking. This period of speculative growth was followed in 2001-2004 by one of the most significant market crashes in history. While $20B of venture capital was invested in optical telecom in the last 10 years, the vast majority of that has been written off in the last 4. Countless start-ups inaugurated with great fanfare at the end of the 20th century were unceremoniously shut down at the start of the 21st century.(1) As in all speculative bubbles innovative technologies were born and were buried. Nonetheless, new capabilities emerge from the chaos and disruption; one such example is the advent of Optical MEMS (MOEMS). Its development was vigorously pursued in both academic and corporate laboratories during the boom and, in the author's view; MOEMS constitutes a powerful and versatile tool set that will be an invaluable residual of the last few years. In Telecommunications, MOEMS have been proven to be the technology of choice for many optical switching and wavelength management applications.(2) Variable Optical Attenuators (VOA), Wavelength Blockers (WB), Dynamic Gain Equalizers (DGE), and most recently Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) are being used in the numerous recent network deployments. Moreover, agile networks of the future will have MOEMS at every node. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of MOEMS in Telecommunications, discuss their byproducts and project the future of the technology.

  15. Optical MEMS: boom, bust and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Chandra Mouli

    2005-10-01

    Optical Telecommunications bandwidth, spurred by the growth of the internet, experienced unprecedented growth in the late 1990's. The creation of new enterprises was vast and the expansion of established component, system and services companies was also breathtaking. This period of speculative growth was followed in 2001-2004 by one of the most significant market crashes in history. While $20B of venture capital was invested in optical telecom in the last 10 years, the vast majority of that has been written off in the last four. Countless start-ups inaugurated with great fanfare at the end of the 20th century were unceremoniously shut down at the start of the 21st. (1) As in all speculative bubbles, innovative technologies were born and buried. Nonetheless, new capabilities emerge from the chaos and disruption; one such example is the advent of Optical MEMS (MOEMS). Its development was vigorously pursued in both academic and corporate laboratories during the boom and, in the author's view; MOEMS constitutes a powerful and versatile tool set that is an invaluable residual of the last few years. In Telecommunications, MOEMS has proven to be the technology of choice for many optical switching and wavelength management applications. (2) Variable Optical Attenuators (VOA), Wavelength Blockers (WB), Dynamic Gain Equalizers (DGE), and most recently Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) are being used in the numerous recent network deployments. Moreover, agile networks of the future will have MOEMS at every node. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of MOEMS in Telecommunications, discuss its byproducts and project the future of the technology.

  16. Optical MEMS: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Chandra Mouli

    2005-09-01

    Spurred by the growth of the internet, Optical Telecommunications bandwidth, experienced unprecedented growth during late 1990's. During this time of great economic expansion, the creation of new enterprises was vast and the expansion of established component, system and services companies was breathtaking. Unfortunately, this positive economic state was short-lived. This period was followed in 2001-2004 by one of the most significant market crashes in history. During those 10 years of economic growth, about $20B in venture capital was invested in the optical telecom industry, most of this investment was lost in recent years. Many start-up industries which experienced unprecedented growth at the end of the 20th century were lost at the start of the 21st. (1) During this time many, innovative technologies were born and buried. However, many new capabilities emerged from this period of unrest; one such example is the advent of Optical MEMS (MOEMS). Many academics and corporate laboratories pursued the development of MOEMS during the economic boom and, in the author's view; MOEMS surfaced as a powerful and versatile tool set that has proved invaluable and in the last few years during economic downturn, stood the test of time. In the Telecommunications industry, for optical switching and wavelength management applications MOEMS has proven to be the technology of choice. (2) Variable Optical Attenuators (VOA), Wavelength Blockers (WB), Dynamic Gain Equalizers (DGE), and most recently Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) are being used in the numerous recent network deployments. Moreover, agile networks of the future will have MOEMS at every node. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of MOEMS in Telecommunications, discuss its byproducts and offer a window into the future of the technology.

  17. Fabrication processes for MEMS deformable mirrors in the next generation telescope instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Alioune

    This dissertation advances three critical technology areas at the frontier of research for micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable minors (DMs) needed for next generation telescopes (NGTs). High actuator-count MEMS deformable minors are needed for future ground-based large astronomical telescopes. Scaling up the current MEMS DMs to unprecedented numbers of independent actuators---up to 10,000 on a single DM---will require new electrical connection architecture for the actuators in order to replace the wire-bonded scheme that has been used to date. A through-wafer via interconnection fabrication process for MEMS DMs is developed to offer a path to transform the frontier of high actuator count MEMS micromirrors. In a class of NGTs instrument known as the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO), the correction made by the DM of the wavefront phase error over the entire telescope field view is not accessible to the sensing unit. To achieve compensation, precise, single step "open-loop" commands must be developed for the DM. Due to the nonlinear relationship between applied voltage and actuation displacement at each actuator, and the mechanical coupling among actuators through the mirror membrane, such open-loop control is a formidable task. A combination of mirror surface modeling and sparse actuator empirical calibration is used to demonstrate open-loop control of MEMS deformable minors to the accuracy of closed-loop control over the entire available DM stroke. Shapes at the limit of achievable minor spatial frequencies with up to 2.5microm amplitudes have been achieved within 20nm RMS error accuracy of closed-loop control. The calibration of a single actuator to be used for predicting shapes results in an additional 14nm RMS surface error compared to parallel calibration of all actuators in the deformable minor. The ubiquitous reflective coatings for MEMS deformable minors are gold and aluminum. Emerging adaptive optics application require broadband optical

  18. MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO project will further develop a multi-functional small satellite technology for low-power attitude control, or orientation, of picosatellites beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept initially developed in 2013, is a thermal valving system which utilizes capillary forces in a microchannel to offset internal pressures in a bulk fluid. The local vapor pressure is increased by resistive film heating until it exceeds meniscus strength in a nozzle which induces vacuum boiling and provides a stagnation pressure equal to vapor pressure at that point which is used for propulsion. Interplanetary CubeSats can utilize FEMTA for high slew rate attitude corrections in addition to desaturating reaction wheels. The FEMTA in cooling mode can be used for thermal control during high-power communication events, which are likely to accompany the attitude correction. Current small satellite propulsion options are limited to orbit correction whereas picosatellites are lacking attitude control thrusters. The available attitude control systems are either quickly saturated reaction wheels or movable high drag surfaces with long response times.

  19. A MEMS torsion magnetic sensor with reflective blazed grating integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Liang; Zhong, Shaolong

    2016-07-01

    A novel magnetic sensor based on a permanent magnet and blazed grating is presented in this paper. The magnetic field is detected by measuring the diffracted wavelength of the blazed grating which is changed by the torsion motion of a torsion sensitive micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) structure with a permanent magnet attached. A V-shape grating structure is obtained by wet etching on a (1 0 0) SOI substrate. When the magnet is magnetized in different directions, the in-plane or out-of-plane magnetic field is detected by a sensor. The MEMS magnetic sensor with a permanent magnet is fabricated after analytical design and bulk micromachining processes. The magnetic-sensing capability of the sensor is tested by fiber-optic detection system. The result shows the sensitivities of the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic fields are 3.6 pm μT‑1 and 5.7 pm μT‑1, respectively. Due to utilization of the permanent magnet and fiber-optic detection, the sensor shows excellent capability of covering the high-resolution detection of low-frequency signals. In addition, the sensitive direction of the magnetic sensor can be easily switched by varying the magnetized direction of the permanent magnet, which offers a simple way to achieve tri-axis magnetic sensor application.

  20. Shock margin testing of a one-axis MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, Ted Blair; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2008-07-01

    Shock testing was performed on a selected commercial-off-the-shelf - MicroElectroMechanical System (COTS-MEMS) accelerometer to determine the margin between the published absolute maximum rating for shock and the 'measured' level where failures are observed. The purpose of this testing is to provide baseline data for isolating failure mechanisms under shock and environmental loading in a representative device used or under consideration for use within systems and assemblies of the DOD/DOE weapons complex. The specific device chosen for this study was the AD22280 model of the ADXL78 MEMS Accelerometer manufactured by Analog Devices Inc. This study focuses only on the shock loading response of the device and provides the necessary data for adding influence of environmental exposure to the reliability of this class of devices. The published absolute maximum rating for acceleration in any axis was 4000 G for this device powered or unpowered. Results from this study showed first failures at 8000 G indicating a margin of error of two. Higher shock level testing indicated that an in-plane, but off-axis acceleration was more damaging than one in the sense direction.