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Sample records for micro-electro-mechanical deformable mirrors

  1. Characterization Of High-Stroke High-Aspect Ratio Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Deformable Mirrors For Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchti, Mohamed Amine

    Adaptive optics MEMS deformable mirror, in conjunction with Shack Hartman wave front sensor and real-time controller, is capable of correcting time-varying aberrations in imaging applications through manipulating its mirror surface. Adaptive optics systems in astronomy for next generation large telescopes (30 meter primary mirrors) require a high stroke of 10microm of mechanical displacement. This required stroke would be achieved by MEMS deformable mirrors fabricated with high aspect ratio techniques. This thesis will review the designs of various types of high aspect actuators consisting of folded springs with rectangular and circular membranes as well as X-beam actuators. Finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of these designs have shown the ability of each design to achieve a stroke of approximately 9.4 microm. Also, FEA simulations proved that the X-beam actuators provide the best spring support while preventing tilting. In addition, this thesis will discuss device characterization and voltage vs. displacement test results for the high aspect ratio gold MEMS 16 x 16 X-beam actuators deformable mirror that has been bonded and packaged. The results have shown that the device is capable of achieving approximately 5.5 microm in individual actuator testing and 7microm in dual actuator testing.

  2. Design, fabrication and characterization of high-stroke high-aspect ratio micro electro mechanical systems deformable mirrors for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Rocha, Bautista

    Adaptive optic (AO) systems for next generation of extremely large telescopes (30--50 meter diameter primary mirrors) require high-stroke (10 microns), high-order (100x100) deformable mirrors at lower-cost than current technology. The required specifications are achievable with Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices fabricated with high-aspect ratio processing techniques. This dissertation will review simulation results compared with displacement measurements of actuators utilizing a white-light interferometer. It will also review different actuator designs, materials and post-processing procedures fabricated in three different high-aspect ratio processes, Microfabrica's Electrochemical Fabrication (EFAB(TM)), HT-Micro's Precision Fabrication Technology (HTPF(TM)), and Innovative Micro Technologies (IMT) fabrication process. These manufacturing processes allow high-precision multilayer fabrication and their sacrificial layer thicknesses can be specified by the designer, rather than by constraints of the fabrication process. Various types of high-stroke gold actuators for AO consisting of folded springs with rectangular and circular membranes as well as X-beam actuators supported diagonally by beams were designed, simulated, fabricated, and tested individually and as part of a continuous facesheet DM system. The design, modeling and simulation of these actuators are compared to experimental measurements of their pull-in voltages, which characterizes their stiffness and maximum stroke. Vertical parallel plate ganged actuators fabricated with the EFAB(TM) process have a calculated pull-in voltage of 95V for a 600mum size device. In contrast, the pull-in voltages for the comb-drive actuators ranged from 55V for the large actuator, to 203V for the smallest actuator. Simulations and interferometer scans of actuator designs fabricated with HT-Micro's Precision Fabrication (HTPF(TM)) two wafer bonded process with different spring supports have shown the ability of

  3. An Investigation into the Response of a Micro Electro Mechanical Compound Pivot Mirror Using Finite Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    GASS, FAWN R.; DOHNER, JEFFREY L.

    2002-01-01

    This report is a presentation of modeling and simulation work for analyzing three designs of Micro Electro Mechanical (MEM) Compound Pivot Mirrors (CPM). These CPMs were made at Sandia National Laboratories using the SUMMiT{trademark} process. At 75 volts and above, initial experimental analysis of fabricated mirrors showed tilt angles of up to 7.5 degrees for one design, and 5 degrees for the other two. Nevertheless, geometric design models predicted higher tilt angles. Therefore, a detailed study was conducted to explain why lower tilt angles occurred and if design modifications could be made to produce higher tilt angles at lower voltages. This study showed that the spring stiffnesses of the CPMs were too great to allow for desired levels of rotation at lower levels of voltage. To produce these lower stiffnesses, a redesign is needed.

  4. Micro electro mechanical system optical switching

    DOEpatents

    Thorson, Kevin J; Stevens, Rick C; Kryzak, Charles J; Leininger, Brian S; Kornrumpf, William P; Forman, Glenn A; Iannotti, Joseph A; Spahn, Olga B; Cowan, William D; Dagel, Daryl J

    2013-12-17

    The present disclosure includes apparatus, system, and method embodiments that provide micro electo mechanical system optical switching and methods of manufacturing switches. For example, one optical switch embodiment includes at least one micro electro mechanical system type pivot mirror structure disposed along a path of an optical signal, the structure having a mirror and an actuator, and the mirror having a pivot axis along a first edge and having a second edge rotatable with respect to the pivot axis, the mirror being capable of and arranged to be actuated to pivot betweeen a position parallel to a plane of an optical signal and a position substantially normal to the plane of the optical signal.

  5. Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) Pressure Sensor for Footwear

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Galambos, Paul C.; Wheeler, Jason W.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Givler, Richard C.

    2008-09-23

    Footwear comprises a sole and a plurality of sealed cavities contained within the sole. The sealed cavities can be incorporated as deformable containers within an elastic medium, comprising the sole. A plurality of micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensors are respectively contained within the sealed cavity plurality, and can be adapted to measure static and dynamic pressure within each of the sealed cavities. The pressure measurements can provide information relating to the contact pressure distribution between the sole of the footwear and the wearer's environment.

  6. Monitoring of slope-instabilities and deformations with Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) in wireless ad-hoc Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnhardt, C.; Fernández-Steeger, T. M.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    In most mountainous regions, landslides represent a major threat to human life, properties and infrastructures. Nowadays existing landslide monitoring systems are often characterized by high efforts in terms of purchase, installation, maintenance, manpower and material. In addition (or because of this) only small areas or selective points of the endangered zone can be observed by the system. Therefore the improvement of existing and the development of new monitoring and warning systems are of high relevance. The joint project "Sensor based Landslide Early Warning Systems" (SLEWS) deals with the development of a prototypic Alarm- and Early Warning system (EWS) for different types of landslides using low-cost micro-sensors (MEMS) integrated in a wireless sensor network (WSN). Modern so called Ad-Hoc, Multi-Hop wireless sensor networks (WSN) are characterized by a self organizing and self-healing capacity of the system (autonomous systems). The network consists of numerous individual and own energy-supply operating sensor nodes, that can send data packages from their measuring devices (here: MEMS) over other nodes (Multi-Hop) to a collection point (gateway). The gateway provides the interface to central processing and data retrieval units (PC, Laptop or server) outside the network. In order to detect and monitor the different landslide processes (like fall, topple, spreading or sliding) 3D MEMS capacitive sensors made from single silicon crystals and glass were chosen to measure acceleration, tilting and altitude changes. Based on the so called MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) technology, the sensors combine very small mechanical and electronic units, sensing elements and transducers on a small microchip. The mass production of such type of sensors allows low cost applications in different areas (like automobile industries, medicine, and automation technology). Apart from the small and so space saving size and the low costs another advantage is the energy

  7. Modeling a MEMS deformable mirror using non-parametric estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Dani; Juez, Francisco Javier de Cos; Myers, Richard; Guesalaga, Andrés; Lasheras, Fernando Sánchez

    2010-09-27

    Using non-parametric estimation techniques, we have modeled an area of 126 actuators of a micro-electro-mechanical deformable mirror with 1024 actuators. These techniques produce models applicable to open-loop adaptive optics, where the turbulent wavefront is measured before it hits the deformable mirror. The model's input is the wavefront correction to apply to the mirror and its output is the set of voltages to shape the mirror. Our experiments have achieved positioning errors of 3.1% rms of the peak-to-peak wavefront excursion.

  8. Integrated micro-electro-mechanical sensor development for inertial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Kinney, R.D.; Sarsfield, J.

    1998-04-01

    Electronic sensing circuitry and micro electro mechanical sense elements can be integrated to produce inertial instruments for applications unheard of a few years ago. This paper will describe the Sandia M3EMS fabrication process, inertial instruments that have been fabricated, and the results of initial characterization tests of micro-machined accelerometers.

  9. Nano/micro-electro mechanical systems: a patent view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangyuan; Liu, Weishu

    2015-12-01

    Combining both bibliometrics and citation network analysis, this research evaluates the global development of micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) research based on the Derwent Innovations Index database. We found that worldwide, the growth trajectory of MEMS patents demonstrates an approximate S shape, with United States, Japan, China, and Korea leading the global MEMS race. Evidenced by Derwent class codes, the technology structure of global MEMS patents remains steady over time. Yet there does exist a national competitiveness component among the top country players. The latecomer China has become the second most prolific country filing MEMS patents, but its patent quality still lags behind the global average.

  10. Micro-electro-mechanically switchable near infrared complementary metamaterial absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Pei Ho, Chong; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Singh, Navab; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Lee, Chengkuo

    2014-05-19

    We experimentally demonstrate a micro-electro-mechanically switchable near infrared complementary metamaterial absorber by integrating the metamaterial layer to be the out of plane movable microactuator. The metamaterial layer is electrostatically actuated by applying voltage across the suspended complementary metamaterial layer and the stationary bottom metallic reflector. Thus, the effective spacing between the metamaterial layer and bottom metal reflector is varied as a function of applied voltage. With the reduction of effective spacing between the metamaterial and reflector layers, a strong spectral blue shift in the peak absorption wavelength can be achieved. With spacing change of 300 nm, the spectral shift of 0.7 μm in peak absorption wavelength was obtained for near infrared spectral region. The electro-optic switching performance of the device was characterized, and a striking switching contrast of 1500% was achieved at 2.1 μm. The reported micro-electro-mechanically tunable complementary metamaterial absorber device can potentially enable a wide range of high performance electro-optical devices, such as continuously tunable filters, modulators, and electro-optic switches that form the key components to facilitate future photonic circuit applications.

  11. Micro-electro-mechanically tunable metamaterial with enhanced electro-optic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Pei Ho, Chong; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Lee, Chengkuo; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Singh, Navab; Huang, Chia-Yi

    2014-04-14

    We experimentally demonstrate a micro-electro-mechanically tunable metamaterial with enhanced electro-optical performance by increasing the number of movable cantilevers in the symmetrical split ring resonator metamaterial unit cell. Simulations were carried out to understand the interaction of the incident terahertz radiation with out-of-plane deforming metamaterial resonator. In order to improve the overall device performance, the number of released cantilever in a unit cell was increased from one to two, and it was seen that the tunable range was doubled and the switching contrast improved by a factor of around five at 0.7 THz. This simple design approach can be adopted for a wide range of high performance electro-optical devices such as continuously tunable filters, modulators, and electro-optic switches to enable future photonic circuit applications.

  12. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  13. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  14. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  15. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  16. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  17. Artificial Cochlea Design Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-21

    for use of your mirrors. To Maj. I1 Dave Bums, thanks for managing not to blind me with your lasers , and for all your help and advice. And thanks to...the processor. The select logic enables one sense/feedback pair at a time under the direction of the control program. The control program decides when...the nerve fibers and the hair cells, when excited release a chemical neurotransmitter generating electrical signals that travel to the brain by way of

  18. Advanced Curvature Deformable Mirrors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    designs using just a glass wafer and a wafer of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ). In both cases minimum bend radius decreases and the resonant... matrix is consequently nearly diagonal. The long actuators at the outer edge of the deformable mirror are largely outside the working pupil so their...formal reconstruction of the wave front either explicitly or implicitly in the control matrix . The WFS-DM combination is acting like an analog computer

  19. Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Micro-Switches for Use in DC, RF, and Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2002-06-01

    Micromachined micro-switches have stimulated the development of the core infrastructure technology for the next generation communication systems because of their superior performance. They are fabricated by similar silicon micromachined processes, but the switch structure and its characteristics depend on each application. Micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology has been applied to micro relays, RF switches, and optical switches; as a result, optical and mechanical performance has been improved.

  20. Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed: High Contrast Measurements with a MEMS Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Morzinski, K; Reza, L; Severson, S; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Dillon, D; Sommargren, G

    2005-08-16

    ''Extreme'' adaptive optics systems are optimized for ultra-high-contrast applications, such as ground-based extrasolar planet detection. The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. We use a simple optical design to minimize wavefront error and maximize the experimentally achievable contrast. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) measures wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy for metrology and wavefront control. Previously, we have demonstrated RMS wavefront errors of <1.5 nm and a contrast of >10{sup 7} over a substantial region using a shaped pupil without a deformable mirror. Current work includes the installation and characterization of a 1024-actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) deformable mirror, manufactured by Boston Micro-Machines for active wavefront control. Using the PSDI as the wavefront sensor we have flattened the deformable mirror to <1 nm within the controllable spatial frequencies and measured a contrast in the far field of >10{sup 6}. Consistent flattening required testing and characterization of the individual actuator response, including the effects of dead and low-response actuators. Stability and repeatability of the MEMS devices was also tested. Ultimately this testbed will be used to test all aspects of the system architecture for an extrasolar planet-finding AO system.

  1. Control of micromachined deformable mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, M. L.; Bartman, R.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Kaiser, W.; Wang, P. K. C.

    1993-01-01

    A micromachined deformable mirror with pixelated electrostatic actuators is proposed. The paper begins with a physical description of the proposed mirror. Then a mathematical model in the form of a nonlinear partial differential equation describing the mirror surface deformations is derived. This model is used to derive the required voltages for the actuators to achieve a specified static deformation of the mirror surface. This is followed by the derivation of a static nonlinear feedback controller for achieving noninteracting actuation. Then the structure for a complete control system for wavefront correction is proposed. The paper concludes with a discussion of the physical implementation of the proposed control system.

  2. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  3. The Korean research & development program on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) in medical applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Song; Kim, Sung June; Chung, Bong Hyun; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa; Park, Seon Hee

    2007-01-01

    Non or minimally invasive approaches for medical applications are very important for the alleviation of patient complaints. The miniaturization of medical devices using micro & nano technologies might be one of the possible solutions. Several national research and development (R&D) programs have been launched by the Korean government to further the development of biological & medical micro/nano devices in this country. This paper gives an overview of the current status of national R&D programs which are related to the development of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)/Nano technology in biological and medical applications and discusses the main activities of each program.

  4. Micro-electro-mechanical systems projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J.A.

    1995-08-04

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) MicroTechnology Center has developed a wide variety of special capabilities used to design, build, and test MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). Our customers are both the LLNL Programs and a variety of external customers. Typical applications include: custom microstructures for scientific experiments; physical sensors; photonics; miniature tools for catheter-based surgery; and microinstruments for chemical analysis for biomedicine, environments and treaty verification. The majority of our prototype MEMS devices are fabricated with bulk silicon micromachining, but we also utilize surface micromachining capabilities.

  5. Real-time characterization of the spatio-temporal dynamics of deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, James; Apostol, Adela; Khizhnya, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir; Beresnev, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Innovative technologies are needed to support and augment the development of various types of deformable mirrors (DM), such as Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), segmented, bimorph and membrane types that are currently used in adaptive-optic (AO) systems. The paper discusses the results of initial studies that, could, potentially, be employed for full characterization of the dynamic behavior of adaptive optics mirrors. The experimental data were obtained from a typical bimorph mirror using both, a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor (SHWFS) and an Imaging Laser Doppler Vibrometer (ILDV) developed exclusively by AS and T Inc. These two sensors were employed for quantitative measurement of both the spatial and temporal dynamics of the DM under broadband excitation via the piezo electric drive elements. The need to characterize the spatial and temporal dynamic response of current and future DM mirror designs is essential for optimizing their performance to a level adequate for high bandwidth AO systems, such as those employed for real-time compensation of wavefront perturbations.

  6. A Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based Cryogenic Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Bierden, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present our first results on the development and evaluation of a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. A MEMS silicon-based DM chip with 32 channels, in which each channel is 300 μm × 300 μm in size, was mounted on a silicon substrate in order to minimize distortion and prevent it from being permanently damaged by thermal stresses introduced by cooling. The silicon substrate was oxidized to obtain electric insulation and had a metal fan-out pattern on the surface. For cryogenic tests, we constructed a measurement system consisting of a Fizeau interferometer, a cryostat cooled by liquid N2, zooming optics, electric drivers. The surface of the mirror at 95 K deformed in response to the application of a voltage, and no significant difference was found between the deformation at 95 K and that at room temperature. The power dissipation by the cryogenic DM was also measured, and we suggest that this is small enough for it to be used in a space cryogenic telescope. The properties of the DM remained unchanged after five cycles of vacuum pumping, cooling, warming, and venting. We conclude that fabricating cryogenic DMs employing MEMS technology is a promising approach. Therefore, we intend to develop a more sophisticated device for actual use, and to look for potential applications including the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology & Astrophysics (SPICA), and other missions.

  7. Hybrid Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems for Highly Reliable and Selective Characterization of Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Panos G. Datskos; Michael J. Sepaniak; Nickolay Lavrik; Pampa Dutta; Mustafa Culha

    2005-12-28

    The main objective of this research program is to develop robust and reliable micro-electro-mechanical sensing systems, based on microcantilevers (MCs), that can operate in liquid environments with high levels of sensitivity and selectivity. The chemical responses of MCs result from analyte-induced differential stress at the cantilever surfaces. We aim to employ various surface nanostructuring strategies that enhance these stresses and hence the degree of static bending of the cantilevers. Receptor phases as self assembled monolayers (SAMs) and thin films are being synthesized and tested to provide selectivity. Selectivity is chemically enhanced by using different phases on individual MCs in arrays and by adding a spectroscopic component, surface enhanced Raman spectrometry (SERS), in hybrid approaches to sensing. Significant progress was made in tasks that were listed in the work plan for DOE EMSP project ''Hybrid Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems for Highly Reliable and Selective Characterization of Tank Waste''. Several project areas are listed below and discussed and referenced to our literature on the topics.

  8. Vibration Damping Materials and Their Applications in Nano/Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems: A Review.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Nitin; Kaur, Davinder

    2015-03-01

    The present review explores an overall view of the vibration damping materials ranging from traditionally used viscoelastic materials for macroscale damping to hybrid thin film heterostructures for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Vibration damping materials like rubbers, polymers, metals, metal-matrix composites and smart materials are reviewed in terms of damping capacity, stiffness, mechanical strength and figure of merit. Nanoscale shape memory alloys, piezoelectric materials, carbon nanotubes, their composites and thin films are promising materials for future nanoscale damping devices. The main focus of this article is on our development of new vibration damping approach for MEMS structures comprising of ferroelastic/ferroelastic thin film heterostructures. For the first time, nanoindentation has been explored as an alternative tool to evaluate the damping capability of actual components (e.g., thin films for MEMS) where production of dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) test samples is not feasible. A comprehensive insight on the existing vibration damping materials and our new approach would definitely trigger some important applications in nano- and micro-electro-mechanical systems.

  9. Development and control of kilo-pixel MEMS deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, Julie Ann

    This dissertation describes the development of kilo-pixel micro-electro-mechanical optical-quality surface-micromachined deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators along with scalable control electronics. These silicon-based deformable mirrors have the potential to modulate spatial and temporal features of an optical wavefront with applications in imaging, beam-forming, and optical communication systems. Techniques to improve the manufacturing, quality, and capability of these mirrors are detailed. The new mirror system was characterized and a scalable control system was developed to coordinate and control a large array of mirrors. Three types of kilo-pixel deformable mirrors were created: continuous membrane, segmented membrane, and a hybrid stress-relieved membrane mirrors. This new class of mirrors, deformed using electrostatically actuated surface-normal actuators, have an aperature of 10 mm, a stroke of 2 mum, position repeatability of 3 nm, surface roughness of 12 nm, reflectivity of 91%, and a bandwidth in air of 7 kHz. A custom fabrication process was developed in tandem with a new mirror design to address design and layout issues including packaging, residual stress, reliability, yield, fill factor, and surface topography. A chemo-mechanical polishing process improved the surface quality of the mirrors by decreasing surface roughness from an RMS value of 46nm to 12nm. A gold coating process increased reflectivity from 42% to greater than 91% without introducing a significant amount of stress in the mirror membrane. An alternative actuator design and layout was also developed that achieved an increased stroke of 6 mum, with the potential for even longer stroke with stress reduction. The long stroke capability was realized through introduction of split electrodes, actuation membrane cuts, and a double stacked anchor architecture. A computer-driven electronic system was developed to aid in the electro-mechanical testing of these deformable mirrors. Quasi

  10. Application of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Sensors Contactless NDT of Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Suyun; Popovics, John S.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of micro-electro-mechanical sensors (MEMS) for application in air-coupled (contactless or noncontact) sensing to concrete nondestructive testing (NDT) is studied in this paper. The fundamental operation and characteristics of MEMS are first described. Then application of MEMS sensors toward established concrete test methods, including vibration resonance, impact-echo, ultrasonic surface wave, and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW), is demonstrated. In each test application, the performance of MEMS is compared with conventional contactless and contact sensing technology. Favorable performance of the MEMS sensors demonstrates the potential of the technology for applied contactless NDT efforts. Objective: To illustrate the utility of air-coupled MEMS sensors for concrete NDT, as compared with conventional sensor technology. PMID:25897497

  11. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Lean Direct Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust approaches for joining silicon carbide (SiC) to silicon carbide sub-elements have been developed for a micro-electro-mechanical systems lean direct injector (MEMS LDI) application. The objective is to join SiC sub-elements to form a leak-free injector that has complex internal passages for the flow and mixing of fuel and air. Previous bonding technology relied upon silicate glass interlayers that were not uniform or leak free. In a newly developed joining approach, titanium foils and physically vapor deposited titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC materials during hot pressing. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. Initial tests show that the bond strength is much higher than required for the component system. Benefits of the joining technology are fabrication of leak free joints with high temperature and mechanical capability.

  12. Fast Simulating High Order Models Application to Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yacine, Z.; Benfdila, A.; Djennoune, S.

    2009-03-05

    The approximation of high order systems by low order models is one of the important problems in system theory. The use of a reduced order model makes it easier to implement analysis, simulations and control system designs. Numerous methods are available in the literature for order reduction of linear continuous systems in time domain as well as in frequency domain. But, this is not the case for non linear systems. The well known Trajectory Piece-Wise Linear approach (TPWL) elaborated to nonlinear model order reduction guarantees a simplification and an accurate representation of the behaviour of strongly non linear systems handling local and global approximation. The present attempt is towards evolving an improvement for the TPWL order reduction technique, which ensures a good quality of approximation combining the advantages of the Krylov subspaces method and the local linearization. We illustrate the technique on a MEMS circuit (Micro Electro-Mechanical System)

  13. Effect of materials for micro-electro-mechanical systems on PCR yield.

    PubMed

    Potrich, Cristina; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Forti, Stefania; Vozzi, Diego; Pasquardini, Laura; Vanzetti, Lia; Panciatichi, Cristina; Anderle, Mariano; Pederzolli, Cecilia

    2010-05-01

    In this study we analyzed the surface properties of different silicon-based materials used for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) production, such as thermally grown silicon oxide, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)-treated silicon oxide, reactive-ion etch (RIE)-treated silicon oxide, and Pyrex. Substrates were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to define the surface chemical and morphological properties, and by fluorescence microscopy to directly assess the absorption of the different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) components. By using microchips fabricated with the same materials we investigated their compatibility with PCR reactions, exploiting the use of different enzymes and reagents or proper surface treatments. We established the best conditions for DNA amplification in silicon/Pyrex microdevices depending on the type of device and fabrication method used and the quality of reagents, rather than on the passivation treatment or increment in standard Taq polymerase concentration.

  14. Demonstration of Vibrational Braille Code Display Using Large Displacement Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Junpei; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Arouette, Xavier; Matsumoto, Yasuaki; Miki, Norihisa

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a vibrational Braille code display with large-displacement micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) actuator arrays. Tactile receptors are more sensitive to vibrational stimuli than to static ones. Therefore, when each cell of the Braille code vibrates at optimal frequencies, subjects can recognize the codes more efficiently. We fabricated a vibrational Braille code display that used actuators consisting of piezoelectric actuators and a hydraulic displacement amplification mechanism (HDAM) as cells. The HDAM that encapsulated incompressible liquids in microchambers with two flexible polymer membranes could amplify the displacement of the MEMS actuator. We investigated the voltage required for subjects to recognize Braille codes when each cell, i.e., the large-displacement MEMS actuator, vibrated at various frequencies. Lower voltages were required at vibration frequencies higher than 50 Hz than at vibration frequencies lower than 50 Hz, which verified that the proposed vibrational Braille code display is efficient by successfully exploiting the characteristics of human tactile receptors.

  15. Multiple internal seal ring micro-electro-mechanical system vacuum packaging method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Peay, Chris S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Multiple Internal Seal Ring (MISR) Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) vacuum packaging method that hermetically seals MEMS devices using MISR. The method bonds a capping plate having metal seal rings to a base plate having metal seal rings by wafer bonding the capping plate wafer to the base plate wafer. Bulk electrodes may be used to provide conductive paths between the seal rings on the base plate and the capping plate. All seals are made using only metal-to-metal seal rings deposited on the polished surfaces of the base plate and capping plate wafers. However, multiple electrical feed-through metal traces are provided by fabricating via holes through the capping plate for electrical connection from the outside of the package through the via-holes to the inside of the package. Each metal seal ring serves the dual purposes of hermetic sealing and providing the electrical feed-through metal trace.

  16. Multiple internal seal right micro-electro-mechanical system vacuum package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Peay, Chris S. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A Multiple Internal Seal Ring (MISR) Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) vacuum package that hermetically seals MEMS devices using MISR. The method bonds a capping plate having metal seal rings to a base plate having metal seal rings by wafer bonding the capping plate wafer to the base plate wafer. Bulk electrodes may be used to provide conductive paths between the seal rings on the base plate and the capping plate. All seals are made using only metal-to-metal seal rings deposited on the polished surfaces of the base plate and capping plate wafers. However, multiple electrical feed-through metal traces are provided by fabricating via holes through the capping plate for electrical connection from the outside of the package through the via-holes to the inside of the package. Each metal seal ring serves the dual purposes of hermetic sealing and providing the electrical feed-through metal trace.

  17. Application of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Sensors Contactless NDT of Concrete Structures.

    PubMed

    Ham, Suyun; Popovics, John S

    2015-04-17

    The utility of micro-electro-mechanical sensors (MEMS) for application in air-coupled (contactless or noncontact) sensing to concrete nondestructive testing (NDT) is studied in this paper. The fundamental operation and characteristics of MEMS are first described. Then application of MEMS sensors toward established concrete test methods, including vibration resonance, impact-echo, ultrasonic surface wave, and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW), is demonstrated. In each test application, the performance of MEMS is compared with conventional contactless and contact sensing technology. Favorable performance of the MEMS sensors demonstrates the potential of the technology for applied contactless NDT efforts. To illustrate the utility of air-coupled MEMS sensors for concrete NDT, as compared with conventional sensor technology.

  18. Fast Simulating High Order Models Application to Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacine, Z.; Djennoune, S.; Benfdila, A.

    2009-03-01

    The approximation of high order systems by low order models is one of the important problems in system theory. The use of a reduced order model makes it easier to implement analysis, simulations and control system designs. Numerous methods are available in the literature for order reduction of linear continuous systems in time domain as well as in frequency domain. But, this is not the case for non linear systems. The well known Trajectory Piece-Wise Linear approach (TPWL) elaborated to nonlinear model order reduction guarantees a simplification and an accurate representation of the behaviour of strongly non linear systems handling local and global approximation. The present attempt is towards evolving an improvement for the TPWL order reduction technique, which ensures a good quality of approximation combining the advantages of the Krylov subspaces method and the local linearization. We illustrate the technique on a MEMS circuit (Micro Electro-Mechanical System).

  19. On-Chip Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Fourier Transform Infrared (MEMS FT-IR) Spectrometer-Based Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M; Sakr, Mohammad; Mortada, Bassem; Medhat, Mostafa; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we study the detection of acetylene (C2H2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) gases in the near-infrared (NIR) range using an on-chip silicon micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer in the wavelength range 1300-2500 nm (4000-7692 cm(-1)). The spectrometer core engine is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using a deep-etching technology producing self-aligned components. The light is free-space propagating in-plane with respect to the silicon chip substrate. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator corresponding to about 30 cm(-1) resolution. Multi-mode optical fibers are used to connect light between the wideband light source, the interferometer, the 10 cm gas cell, and the optical detector. A wide dynamic range of gas concentration down to 2000 parts per million (ppm) in only 10 cm length gas cell is demonstrated. Extending the wavelength range to the mid-infrared (MIR) range up to 4200 nm (2380 cm(-1)) is also experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, using a bulk micro-machined on-chip MEMS FT-IR spectrometer. The obtained results open the door for an on-chip optical gas sensor for many applications including environmental sensing and industrial process control in the NIR/MIR spectral ranges.

  20. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  1. Composite deformable mirror.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Wada, B. K.

    1989-09-01

    The development of a lightweight one meter composite mirror that can be controlled and adjusted on-orbit, is presented. The data in this paper show that long wave distortion errors can be corrected by using embedded piezoelectric ceramic actuators. The proposed concepts were verified by both mathematical simulations and laboratory experiments.

  2. Cryogenic deformable mirror technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvihill, Maureen L.; Roche, Michael E.; Cavaco, Jeffrey L.; Shawgo, Ryan J.; Chaudhry, Zaffir A.; Ealey, Mark A.

    2003-10-01

    Xinetics is working with NASA to develop a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) specific to the needs of future Origins Program missions such as TPF and JWST. Of utmost importance was the development of an electroceramic material that exhibited electrostrictive properties at cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, the actuator developmental tests and subsequent cryogenic deformable mirror design and cryogenic testing performance of the 349-channel discrete actuator deformable mirror demonstrator are discussed. The cofired actuator stroke response was nearly constant from 35 to 65 K such that at 150V the actuator free-stroke was ~3 microns. The 349-ch cryogenic DM was designed and built with as few parts and materials as possible to minimize the CTE mismatch. The polished mirror was cycled twice from 300 to 35 K. The rms surface figure was monitored using a Zygo interferometer on cooling and consistent data was measured during both temperature cycles. The figure changed from 0.5 waves (P-V) at 300 K to 5 waves at 35 K and returned to 0.6 waves at 300K. The actuators were powered and the influence functions were measured between 35 and 65 K. Even though it is not a functional DM at 35 K, it is a substantial step forward in the development of a cryogenic deformable mirror technology.

  3. Controllable objective with deformable mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, V V; Safronov, A G

    2004-03-31

    A new optical device - an objective with deformable mirrors and parameters controlled in the dynamic regime is proposed. The computer simulation of the objective is performed. The dependences of some parameters of the objective on the control voltage are determined. The simulation showed that the ranges of control of the rear focal segment and the focal distance for the objective with the focal distance 602 mm were 1057 and 340 mm, respectively, which is substantially greater than in the control of an equivalent deformable mirror. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Fabrication processes for MEMS deformable mirrors in the next generation telescope instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Alioune

    This dissertation advances three critical technology areas at the frontier of research for micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable minors (DMs) needed for next generation telescopes (NGTs). High actuator-count MEMS deformable minors are needed for future ground-based large astronomical telescopes. Scaling up the current MEMS DMs to unprecedented numbers of independent actuators---up to 10,000 on a single DM---will require new electrical connection architecture for the actuators in order to replace the wire-bonded scheme that has been used to date. A through-wafer via interconnection fabrication process for MEMS DMs is developed to offer a path to transform the frontier of high actuator count MEMS micromirrors. In a class of NGTs instrument known as the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO), the correction made by the DM of the wavefront phase error over the entire telescope field view is not accessible to the sensing unit. To achieve compensation, precise, single step "open-loop" commands must be developed for the DM. Due to the nonlinear relationship between applied voltage and actuation displacement at each actuator, and the mechanical coupling among actuators through the mirror membrane, such open-loop control is a formidable task. A combination of mirror surface modeling and sparse actuator empirical calibration is used to demonstrate open-loop control of MEMS deformable minors to the accuracy of closed-loop control over the entire available DM stroke. Shapes at the limit of achievable minor spatial frequencies with up to 2.5microm amplitudes have been achieved within 20nm RMS error accuracy of closed-loop control. The calibration of a single actuator to be used for predicting shapes results in an additional 14nm RMS surface error compared to parallel calibration of all actuators in the deformable minor. The ubiquitous reflective coatings for MEMS deformable minors are gold and aluminum. Emerging adaptive optics application require broadband optical

  5. Mechatronic Scanning System with Integrated Micro Electro Mechanical System Position Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrov, Vladimir; Chakarov, Dimitar; Shulev, Assen; Tsveov, Mihail

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a study of a mechatronic scanning system for application in the microbiology, microelectronics research, chemistry, etc. is presented. Integrated silicon micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) position sensor is used for monitoring the displacement of the scanning system. The utilized silicon MEMS sensors with sidewall embedded piezoresistors possess a number of key advantages such as high sensitivity, low noise and extremely low temperature dependence. Design of 2D scanning system with a travel range of 22 × 22 μm2 has been presented in present work. This system includes a Compliant Transmission Mechanism, (CTM) designed as a complex elastic mechanism, comprising four parallelograms. Computer aided desigh (CAD) model and finite element analysis (FEA) of the Compliant Transmission Mechanism mechanisms have been carried out. A prototype of the scanning system is fabricated, based on CAD model. An experimental set-up of an optical system and a correlation technique for digital image processing have been used for testing the scanning system prototype. Results of the experimental investigations of the prototyped scanning system are also presented.

  6. Experimental Identification of Smartphones Using Fingerprints of Built-In Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Gianmarco; Steri, Gary; Dimc, Franc; Giuliani, Raimondo; Kamnik, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The correct identification of smartphones has various applications in the field of security or the fight against counterfeiting. As the level of sophistication in counterfeit electronics increases, detection procedures must become more accurate but also not destructive for the smartphone under testing. Some components of the smartphone are more likely to reveal their authenticity even without a physical inspection, since they are characterized by hardware fingerprints detectable by simply examining the data they provide. This is the case of MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems) components like accelerometers and gyroscopes, where tiny differences and imprecisions in the manufacturing process determine unique patterns in the data output. In this paper, we present the experimental evaluation of the identification of smartphones through their built-in MEMS components. In our study, three different phones of the same model are subject to repeatable movements (composing a repeatable scenario) using an high precision robotic arm. The measurements from MEMS for each repeatable scenario are collected and analyzed. The identification algorithm is based on the extraction of the statistical features of the collected data for each scenario. The features are used in a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the smartphone. The results of the evaluation are presented for different combinations of features and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) outputs, which show that detection accuracy of higher than 90% is achievable. PMID:27271630

  7. Fracture properties of polycrystalline silicon - a material for micro-electro-mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.C.; Jones, P.T.

    1995-12-31

    A great deal of research has been performed during the past few years to apply the microfabrication technology used for making integrated circuits to the manufacture of microscopic pressure sensors, accelerometers, and other micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). One result of this work has been the choice of polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) as a primary structural material employed in MEMS devices, particularly when the polysilicon has been doped with such elements as phosphorus for improved electrical and mechanical properties. As MEMS devices become more relied upon for real world applications, it will be necessary to establish design rules to ensure adequate product lifetimes. However, very little work has been done to deter- mine the failure mechanisms of polysilicon. The work presented here offers an experimental evaluation of the ultimate strength and fracture toughness of polysilicon with regard to the effects of exposure to hydrofluoric acid, a commonly used etchant in MEMS fabrication. A series of micromechanical structures have been designed to measure the strain at fracture and fracture toughness of a thin film. These test structures are patterned onto a thin film of polysilicon covering a silicon wafer using standard microfabrication techniques. Since the structures have dimensions on the order of microns, hundreds of multiple test structures are patterned on a single wafer providing a large amount of statistical data. Results using these structures indicate that prolonged exposure to HF can result in a decrease in the fracture strength of polysilicon.

  8. Reliability study of wafer bonding for micro-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasri, Mahmoud; Altemus, Bruce; Gracias, Alison; Clow, Larry; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James; Xu, Bai

    2003-12-01

    Wafer bonding has attracted significant attention in applications that require integration of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) with Integrated Circuits (IC). The integration of monolithic MEMS and electronic devices is difficult because of issues such as material compatibility, process compliance and thermal budget. It is important to establish a wafer bonding process which provides long-term protection for the MEMS devices yet does not affect their performance. The attentions for such integration are at the die level and wafer level. Recently, the trend is toward wafer-level integration as a cost effective solution to combine sensing, logic, actuation and communications on a single platform. This paper describes the development of low temperature bonding techniques for post-CMOS MEMS integration in system-on-chip (SOC) applications. The bonding methods discussed in this paper involve Benzocyclobutene polymer (BCB) as glue layer to joint two 200 mm wafers together. The bonding temperature is lower than 400°C. Four-point bending and stud-pull methods were used to investigate the mechanical properties of the bonding interfaces. These methods can provide critical information such as adhesion energy and bonding strength of the bonded interfaces. Initial test results at room temperature showed that the BCB bond stayed intact up to an average stress of 50 MPa. It was observed that the BCB bond strength decreased with increasing temperatures and the energy release rate decreased with decreasing BCB thickness.

  9. Reliability study of wafer bonding for micro-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasri, Mahmoud; Altemus, Bruce; Gracias, Alison; Clow, Larry; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James; Xu, Bai

    2004-01-01

    Wafer bonding has attracted significant attention in applications that require integration of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) with Integrated Circuits (IC). The integration of monolithic MEMS and electronic devices is difficult because of issues such as material compatibility, process compliance and thermal budget. It is important to establish a wafer bonding process which provides long-term protection for the MEMS devices yet does not affect their performance. The attentions for such integration are at the die level and wafer level. Recently, the trend is toward wafer-level integration as a cost effective solution to combine sensing, logic, actuation and communications on a single platform. This paper describes the development of low temperature bonding techniques for post-CMOS MEMS integration in system-on-chip (SOC) applications. The bonding methods discussed in this paper involve Benzocyclobutene polymer (BCB) as glue layer to joint two 200 mm wafers together. The bonding temperature is lower than 400°C. Four-point bending and stud-pull methods were used to investigate the mechanical properties of the bonding interfaces. These methods can provide critical information such as adhesion energy and bonding strength of the bonded interfaces. Initial test results at room temperature showed that the BCB bond stayed intact up to an average stress of 50 MPa. It was observed that the BCB bond strength decreased with increasing temperatures and the energy release rate decreased with decreasing BCB thickness.

  10. Experimental Identification of Smartphones Using Fingerprints of Built-In Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

    PubMed

    Baldini, Gianmarco; Steri, Gary; Dimc, Franc; Giuliani, Raimondo; Kamnik, Roman

    2016-06-03

    The correct identification of smartphones has various applications in the field of security or the fight against counterfeiting. As the level of sophistication in counterfeit electronics increases, detection procedures must become more accurate but also not destructive for the smartphone under testing. Some components of the smartphone are more likely to reveal their authenticity even without a physical inspection, since they are characterized by hardware fingerprints detectable by simply examining the data they provide. This is the case of MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems) components like accelerometers and gyroscopes, where tiny differences and imprecisions in the manufacturing process determine unique patterns in the data output. In this paper, we present the experimental evaluation of the identification of smartphones through their built-in MEMS components. In our study, three different phones of the same model are subject to repeatable movements (composing a repeatable scenario) using an high precision robotic arm. The measurements from MEMS for each repeatable scenario are collected and analyzed. The identification algorithm is based on the extraction of the statistical features of the collected data for each scenario. The features are used in a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the smartphone. The results of the evaluation are presented for different combinations of features and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) outputs, which show that detection accuracy of higher than 90% is achievable.

  11. A servomechanism for a micro-electro-mechanical-system-based scanning-probe data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantazi, A.; Lantz, M. A.; Cherubini, G.; Pozidis, H.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2004-10-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS)-based scanning-probe data storage devices are emerging as potential ultra-high-density, low-access-time, and low-power alternatives to conventional data storage. One implementation of probe-based storage uses thermomechanical means to store and retrieve information in thin polymer films. One of the challenges in building such devices is the extreme accuracy and the short latency required in the navigation of the probes over the polymer medium. This paper focuses on the design and characterization of a servomechanism to achieve such accurate positioning in a probe-based storage prototype. In our device, the polymer medium is positioned on a MEMS scanner with x/y-motion capabilities of about 100 µm. The device also includes thermal position sensors that provide x/y-position information to the servo controller. Based on a discrete state-space model of the scanner dynamics, a controller is designed using the linear quadratic Gaussian approach with state estimation. The random seek performance of this approach is evaluated and compared with that of the conventional proportional, integrator, and derivative (PID) approach. The results demonstrate the superiority of the state-space approach, which achieves seek times of about 4 ms in a ± 50 µm range. Finally, the experimental results show that closed-loop track following using the thermal position-sensor signals is feasible and yields a position-error standard deviation of approximately 2 nm.

  12. Micro electro-mechanical system piezoelectric cantilever array for a broadband vibration energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Chun, Inwoo; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Limited energy sources of ubiquitous sensor networks (USNs) such as fuel cells and batteries have grave drawbacks such as the need for replacements and re-charging owing to their short durability and environmental pollution. Energy harvesting which is converting environmental mechanical vibration into electrical energy has been researched with some piezoelectric materials and various cantilever designs to increase the efficiency of energy-harvesting devices. In this study, we focused on an energy-harvesting cantilever with a broadband vibration frequency. We fabricated a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) cantilever array with various Si proof masses on small beams (5.5 mm x 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm). We obtained broadband resonant frequencies ranging between 127 Hz and 136 Hz using a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process. In order to obtain broadband resonant characteristics, the cantilever array was comprised of six cantilevers with different resonant frequencies. We obtained an output power of about 2.461 μW at an acceleration of 0.23 g and a resistance of 4 kΩ. The measured bandwidth of the resonant frequency was approximately 9 Hz (127-136 Hz), which is about six times wider than the bandwidth of a single cantilever.

  13. Softening and Hardening of a Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) Oscillator in a Nonlinear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sarah; Edmonds, Terrence

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems or MEMS are used in a variety of today's technology and can be modeled using equations for nonlinear damped harmonic oscillators. Mathematical expressions have been formulated to determine resonance frequency shifts as a result of hardening and softening effects in MEMS devices. In this work we experimentally test the previous theoretical analysis of MEMS resonance frequency shifts in the nonlinear regime. Devices were put under low pressure at room temperature and swept through a range of frequencies with varying AC and DC excitation voltages to detect shifts in the resonant frequency. The MEMS device studied in this work exhibits a dominating spring softening effect due to the device's physical make-up. The softening effect becomes very dominant as the AC excitation is increased and the frequency shift of the resonance peak becomes quite significant at these larger excitations. Hardening effects are heavily dependent on mechanical factors that make up the MEMS devices. But they are not present in these MEMS devices. I will present our results along with the theoretical analysis of the Duffing oscillator model. This work was supported by NSF grant DMR-1461019 (REU) and DMR-1205891 (YL).

  14. Special surface for power delivery to wireless micro-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Sylvain

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports a special surface suitable to distribute power while providing a high-precision surface where wireless micro-electro-mechanical systems must operate. The surface is made of alternate electrically conducting and narrower insulating bands with dimensions that allow power to be delivered to the wireless systems when in contact with at least two electrically conductive bands. In this study, a first implementation using stainless steel 440C and black granite is analyzed in more detail. The dimensions of both the conducting and insulating bands are described by considering the properties of the materials used and the precision of the micro-mechanical systems that may be affected by features on the surface with dimensions down to the nanometer scale. The effects on the dimensions of the bands due to the total mass of each microsystem, the contact surface area between the microsystems and the powering surface, and the accuracy of the positioning system used, are also taken into account. Minimum widths of the insulating bands and the methods to prevent electrical shorts between a pair of successive bands, created through arcing between the conductive bands and a conductive structure of the wireless units when stationary or transiting through an insulating band, are also evaluated and compared when operating in air or helium atmosphere.

  15. Design of acoustic wave biochemical sensors using micro-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Jane E.; Przybycien, Todd M.; Hauan, Steinar

    2007-03-01

    Acoustic wave biochemical sensors work by detecting the frequency shifts resulting from the binding of target molecules to a functionalized resonator. Resonator types currently in use or under development include macroscopic quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) as well as a number of different integrated Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS) structures. Due to an increased resonator surface area to mass ratio, we believe that membrane-based MEMS systems are particularly promising with regard to sensitivity. Prototypes have been developed [S. Hauan et al., U.S. Patent Application (filed 6 Nov. 2003)] and preliminary calculations [M. J. Bartkovsky et al., paper 385e presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting, Nov. 2003; J. E. Valentine et al., paper 197h presented at the AICHE Annual Meeting, Nov. 2003] indicate significant improvements over other methods, both macroscopic and MEMS based. In this article we describe our work on a MEMS-based acoustic wave biochemical sensor using a membrane resonator. We demonstrate the effects of spatial distributions of mass on the membrane on sensitivity and show how to use this spatial sensitivity to detect multiple targets simultaneously. To do so we derive a function approximating the membrane response surface to spatial mass loadings under the applicable range of conditions. We verify the agreement using finite element methods, and present our initial sensitivity calculations demonstrating the advantages of variable mass loadings.

  16. Vapor Hydrofluoric Acid Sacrificial Release Technique for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Using Labware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Yamato; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique of sacrificial layer etching for micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). Our technique uses vapor of hydrofluoric acid (HF) to etch sacrificial silicon oxide and to make freestanding silicon microstructures. The advantages of this technique are: (1) no subsequent water rinse is needed, (2) freestanding silicon microstructures can be successfully released without sticking to the substrate, (3) equipment for our vapor phase HF etching simply consists of Teflon beakers only. Conditions for the technique have been optimized by estimating etching rate with test patterns made of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and by observing water droplets condensation on the sample surface with thermally oxidized silicon chips. By this technique we have successfully obtained freestanding microstructures of SOI wafers. Microcantilevers of as long as 5000 μm (a 5-μm-wide, 10-μm-thick, and 5000-μm-long cantilever over a 0.6-μm-gap) have been successfully released without adhering to the base substrate or contacting the neighboring cantilevers. We have also fabricated and actuated electrostatic comb-drive actuators of 60 and 200 comb pairs to demonstrate high processing yield of our nonstick releasing technique.

  17. The potential of micro-electro-mechanical accelerometers in human vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarabini, Marco; Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego; Moschioni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the advantages and the drawbacks deriving from the use of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) accelerometers for hand-arm and whole-body vibration measurements. Metrological performances of different transducers were assessed through the identification of their frequency response function, linearity, floor noise and sensitivity to thermal and electromagnetic disturbances. Experimental results highlighted a standard instrumental uncertainty (including the nonlinearity) lower than 5% with the single frequency calibration procedure, such a value was reduced to 2%. The temperature effect was negligible and the electromagnetic disturbances sensitivity was comparable to that of the piezoelectric accelerometers. The compatibility of measurements obtained with MEMS accelerometers with those of piezoelectric-based measurement chains was verified for two specific applications. An example of direct transducer fixation on the skin for vibration transmissibility measurements is also presented. Thanks to the MEMS peculiarities - mainly small sizes and low cost - since novel approaches in the vibration monitoring could be pursued. For instance, it is possible to include by design MEMS accelerometers in any hand-held tool at the operator interface, or inside the seats structures of cars, tractors and trucks. This could be a viable solution to easily obtain repeatable exposure measurements and could also provide diagnostic signals for the tools or seats of functional monitoring.

  18. High voltage, high resolution, digital-to-analog converter for driving deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittredge, Jeffrey

    Digital-to-analog converters with a range over 50 volts are required for driving micro-electro mechanical system deformable mirrors used in adaptive optics. An existing tested and deployed DM driver has 1024 channels and resolution of 15mV per Least Significant Bit. DMs used in the search for exoplanets require 3mV per LSB resolution. A technique is presented to employ a secondary high resolution and low voltage DAC which has for it's ground the output of the high voltage DAC. The entire system then has the range of high voltage DAC yet the resolution of the low voltage DAC. A method for providing signal and power to the floating system is given. Rudimentary micro controller firmware and also PC software is presented to achieve complete functionality. The technique uses all off-the-shelf components. Resolution of 1.6mV per LSB, 60V range and 36mW of power per channel is achieved.

  19. MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) for Automotive and Consumer Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Jiri; Gómez, Udo-Martin

    MEMS sensors gained over the last two decades an impressive width of applications: (a) ESP: A car is skidding and stabilizes itself without driver intervention (b) Free-fall detection: A laptop falls to the floor and protects the hard drive by parking the read/write drive head automatically before impact. (c) Airbag: An airbag fires before the driver/occupant involved in an impending automotive crash impacts the steering wheel, thereby significantly reducing physical injury risk. MEMS sensors are sensing the environmental conditions and are giving input to electronic control systems. These crucial MEMS sensors are making system reactions to human needs more intelligent, precise, and at much faster reaction rates than humanly possible. Important prerequisites for the success of sensors are their size, functionality, power consumption, and costs. This technical progress in sensor development is realized by micro-machining. The development of these processes was the breakthrough to industrial mass-production for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Besides leading-edge micromechanical processes, innovative and robust ASIC designs, thorough simulations of the electrical and mechanical behaviour, a deep understanding of the interactions (mainly over temperature and lifetime) of the package and the mechanical structures are needed. This was achieved over the last 20 years by intense and successful development activities combined with the experience of volume production of billions of sensors. This chapter gives an overview of current MEMS technology, its applications and the market share. The MEMS processes are described, and the challenges of MEMS, compared to standard IC fabrication, are discussed. The evolution of MEMS requirements is presented, and a short survey of MEMS applications is shown. Concepts of newest inertial sensors for ESP-systems are given with an emphasis on the design concepts of the sensing element and the evaluation circuit for achieving

  20. Deformable Mirrors Correct Optical Distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    By combining the high sensitivity of space telescopes with revolutionary imaging technologies consisting primarily of adaptive optics, the Terrestrial Planet Finder is slated to have imaging power 100 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope. To this end, Boston Micromachines Corporation, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for space-based adaptive optical technology. The work resulted in a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) called the Kilo-DM. The company now offers a full line of MEMS DMs, which are being used in observatories across the world, in laser communication, and microscopy.

  1. Liquid identification by using a micro-electro-mechanical interdigital transducer.

    PubMed

    Bui, ThuHang; Morana, Bruno; Akhnoukh, Atef; Chu Duc, Trinh; Sarro, Pasqualina M

    2017-02-27

    A surface-acoustic-mode aluminum nitride (AlN) transducer is utilized to determine the type of liquid dropped on the propagation path. It is based on tracking the shrinking droplet radius and observing stagnant liquid molecules during and after the liquid evaporation process. The device configuration is suitable to test small amounts of liquids, in the microliter range. According to both mass loading and physical property mechanisms, eight samples of liquids, isopropanol (IPA), ethanol (ETH), deionized-water (DW), tap water (TW), heptane (HEP), propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA), hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and acetone (ACE), which have different equilibrium vapor pressures, molecular weights and boiling points, are accurately detected. The experimental results show that the rate of the change in the energy loss including a slow and fast attenuation region depends on the change of physical properties, such as density, sound speed in liquids and evaporation rate, during the evaporation process. As the evaporation rate of the DW is rather slow, the slow attenuation region occurs for a longer time than the fast one. Consequently, the whole oscillation duration of the attenuation occurs for a longer time, whereas that of the other liquids studied, like ACE, ETH, and IPA, having a faster evaporation rate is shorter. Sensitivities of the surface-acoustic-mode transducer to the evaporation process of liquids such as DW, TW, PGMEA, HMDS, HEP, IPA, ETH and ACE are -29.39, -29.53, -31.79, -34.12, -33.62, -32.87, -32.67, and -32.82 dB μm(-2), respectively. The concentration of stagnant liquid molecules causes a change in the surface mass of the micro-electro-mechanical transducer, which causes a frequency shift and increases the signal noise at the receiver after the liquid evaporation process. The average frequency shifts of ACE, HEP, HMDS, ETH, IPA, PGMEA, TW and DW are 241, 206, 172, 117, 76, 27.3, 11.6 and 0 kHz, respectively, coherent with the type of

  2. Parametric resonance voltage response of electrostatically actuated Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems cantilever resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruntu, Dumitru I.; Martinez, Israel; W. Knecht, Martin

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the parametric resonance voltage response of nonlinear parametrically actuated Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) cantilever resonators. A soft AC voltage of frequency near natural frequency is applied between the resonator and a parallel ground plate. This produces an electrostatic force that leads the structure into parametric resonance. The model consists of an Euler-Bernoulli thin cantilever under the actuation of electrostatic force to include fringe effect, and damping force. Two methods of investigation are used, namely the Method of Multiple Scales (MMS) and Reduced Order Model (ROM) method. ROM convergence of the voltage response and the limitation of MMS to small to moderate amplitudes with respect to the gap (gap-amplitudes) are reported. MMS predicts accurately both Hopf supercritical and supercritical bifurcation voltages. However, MMS overestimates the large gap-amplitudes of the resonator, and. misses completely or overestimates the saddle-node bifurcation occurring at large gap-amplitudes. ROM produces valid results for small and/or large gap-amplitudes for a sufficient number of terms (vibration modes). As the voltage is swept up at constant frequency, the resonator maintains zero amplitude until reaches the subcritical Hopf bifurcation voltage where it loses stability and jumps up to large gap-amplitudes, next the gap-amplitude decreases until it reaches the supercritical Hopf bifurcation point, and after that the gap-amplitude remains zero, for the voltage range considered in this work. As the voltage is swept down at constant frequency, the zero gap-amplitude of the resonator starts increasing continuously after reaching the supercritical Hopf bifurcation voltage until it reaches the saddle-node bifurcation voltage when a sudden jump to zero gap-amplitude occurs. Effects of frequency, damping and fringe parameters on the voltage response show that (1) the supercritical Hopf bifurcation is shifted to lower voltage

  3. High Performance Microbial Fuel Cells and Supercapacitors Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao

    A Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-inspired carbon-neutral, renewable electrochemical converter to extract electricity from catabolic reaction of micro-organisms. It is a promising technology capable of directly converting the abundant biomass on the planet into electricity and potentially alleviate the emerging global warming and energy crisis. The current and power density of MFCs are low compared with conventional energy conversion techniques. Since its debut in 2002, many studies have been performed by adopting a variety of new configurations and structures to improve the power density. The reported maximum areal and volumetric power densities range from 19 mW/m2 to 1.57 W/m2 and from 6.3 W/m3 to 392 W/m 3, respectively, which are still low compared with conventional energy conversion techniques. In this dissertation, the impact of scaling effect on the performance of MFCs are investigated, and it is found that by scaling down the characteristic length of MFCs, the surface area to volume ratio increases and the current and power density improves. As a result, a miniaturized MFC fabricated by Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology with gold anode is presented in this dissertation, which demonstrate a high power density of 3300 W/m3. The performance of the MEMS MFC is further improved by adopting anodes with higher surface area to volume ratio, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene based anodes, and the maximum power density is further improved to a record high power density of 11220 W/m3. A novel supercapacitor by regulating the respiration of the bacteria is also presented, and a high power density of 531.2 A/m2 (1,060,000 A/m3) and 197.5 W/m2 (395,000 W/m3), respectively, are marked, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than any previously reported microbial electrochemical techniques.

  4. Deformable mirrors development program at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Brinkmann, Martin; Jakob, Gerd; Lilley, Paul; Casali, Mark; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Kasper, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decade, adaptive optics has become essential in different fields of research including medicine and industrial applications. With this new need, the market of deformable mirrors has expanded a lot allowing new technologies and actuation principles to be developed. Several E-ELT instruments have identified the need for post focal deformable mirrors but with the increasing size of the telescopes the requirements on the deformable mirrors become more demanding. A simple scaling up of existing technologies from few hundred actuators to thousands of actuators will not be sufficient to satisfy the future needs of ESO. To bridge the gap between available deformable mirrors and the future needs for the E-ELT, ESO started a development program for deformable mirror technologies. The requirements and the path to get the deformable mirrors for post focal adaptive optics systems for the E-ELT is presented.

  5. Optical Spatial Heterodyned Interferometry for Inspection of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Bingham, Philip R; Price, Jeffery R

    2005-01-01

    Interferometric imaging has the potential to extend the usefulness of optical microscopes by encoding small phase shifts that reveal information about topology and materials. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), we have developed an optical Spatial Heterodyne Interferometry (SHI) method that captures reflection images containing both phase and amplitude information at a high rate of speed. By measuring the phase of a wavefront reflected off or transmitted through a surface, the relative surface heights and some materials properties can be measured. In this paper we briefly review our historical application of SHI in the semiconductor industry, but the focus is on new research to adapt this technology to the inspection of MEMS devices, in particular to the characterization of motion elements such as microcantilevers and deformable mirror arrays.

  6. Development and control of a new class of segmented deformable mirrors for advanced astronomical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jason Bernard

    This dissertation describes the design, development, fabrication and control of a new class of segmented micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) deformable mirrors (DMs) with tip, tilt and piston (TTP) degrees of freedom. The TTP DM consists of a close-packed array of hexagonal mirror segments, each controlled by three independent electrostatic actuators. Mirror segment piston motion is achieved through identical actuator deflection, while out-of-plane rotation is achieved via differential deflection. The new DM is an essential wavefront control component for several advanced astronomical imaging applications. These applications place stringent requirements on mirror segment optomechanical behavior and control properties, which are new to MEMS spatial light modulator technology and are the focus of the presented work. Two astronomical imaging applications in particular are addressed by the new TTP DM design. The first is a space-based nulling coronagraph telescope that aims to image extrasolar terrestrial planets. The coronagraph requires a segmented DM with tip-tilt-piston motion to correct for wavefront phase and amplitude aberrations in detected starlight. The second application involves using the DM as a variable focus Fresnel mirror with dynamic refocusing abilities for laser guide star tracking in giant land-based telescopes. Production of a suitable DM for both applications involved overcoming significant microfabrication and control challenges. First, mirror segments are required to maintain better than l/100 RMS surface flatness, irrespective of segment angle or operation frame rate. This is challenging because thin polysilicon mirror components tend to curl as a result of the residual stress gradients embedded in the deposited materials, and bend during actuation due to their low rigidity. Furthermore, the surface micromachining process used to fabricate DMs is prone to print-through effects, which worsens surface quality. To address these problems a new

  7. Characterization of three advanced deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrey, William H.; Wynia, John L.; Ealey, Mark A.

    1998-11-01

    Three advanced deformable mirrors were tested as part of the Air Force Research Laboratory's adaptive optics program. Two of these mirrors were purchased by the Air Force Research Laboratory for use at the Starfire Optical Range (SOR). One of these, a 941-channel mirror, made by Xinetics under subcontract to Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, is currently in use in the adaptive optics system of the SOR 3.5m telescope. The other, a 577-channel mirror, was refurbished by ITEK from the Mid-Scale Deformable Mirror. The third mirror, with 349 actuators, was made by Xinetics as a demonstration of a new actuator bonding technology. For each mirror, the uniformity of the actuator gain was measured using phase-modulating interferometry. These measurements were used to flatten the mirrors and to apply known Zernike modes. Results presented will include actuator performance statistics and mirror figure accuracy for various commanded figures.

  8. Mounting with compliant cylinders for deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Reinlein, Claudia; Goy, Matthias; Lange, Nicolas; Appelfelder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A method is presented to mount large aperture unimorph deformable mirrors by compliant cylinders (CC). The CCs are manufactured from a soft silicone, and shear testing is performed in order to evaluate the Young's modulus. A scale mirror model is assembled to evaluate mount-induced change of piezoelectric deformation, and its applicability for tightly focusing mirrors. Experiments do not show any decrease of piezoelectric stroke. Further it is shown that the changes of surface fidelity by the attachment of the deformable mirror to its mount are neglectable.

  9. High stroke pixel for a deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.

    2005-09-20

    A mirror pixel that can be fabricated using standard MEMS methods for a deformable mirror. The pixel is electrostatically actuated and is capable of the high deflections needed for spaced-based mirror applications. In one embodiment, the mirror comprises three layers, a top or mirror layer, a middle layer which consists of flexures, and a comb drive layer, with the flexures of the middle layer attached to the mirror layer and to the comb drive layer. The comb drives are attached to a frame via spring flexures. A number of these mirror pixels can be used to construct a large mirror assembly. The actuator for the mirror pixel may be configured as a crenellated beam with one end fixedly secured, or configured as a scissor jack. The mirror pixels may be used in various applications requiring high stroke adaptive optics.

  10. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the `explosion of complexity' of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  11. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-15

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  12. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  13. Deformable Mirror Materials Issue Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2008-05-27

    It was a pleasure to speak with you and Dr. Olivier Guyon about your project to develop a coronagraph and in particular about materials science considerations in the development of the deformable mirror (DM) for the coronagraph. The coronagraph application will demand more of a DM than previous applications with regard to precision, and since the characterization and modeling tools are currently under development, you asked me to comment on materials issues that might impact the DM design and testing. I have not conducted research on this question, and my own research on modeling MEMS has not included DM systems. I am only in a position to discuss some general considerations that may help in developing a research plan for the DM system. As I understand it, the relevant points about the DM system are as follows. The DM surface needs to be positioned to less than 1 {angstrom} RMS of the desired shape, and be stable to 0.3 {angstrom} RMS for an hour. In the ultimate application in space the stability requirements may be greater. For example, the DM shape can be set using a bright star and then allow the coronagraph to be turned to a dim star to collect data for several hours, counting on the mirror shape to be stable. The DM is made of a polysilicon membrane coated with one or more metal layers for the reflective surface and actuated by 32x32 or 64x64 electrostatic actuators on the back side. The uncertainty in the position of any one actuator should be at the few-picometer level or less averaged over the 300-{micro}m region of the actuator. Currently, experiments are conducted that can characterize the surface shape to the 1 nm level, and it is anticipated that the experiments will be able to characterize the shape at the sub-Angstrom level but not in the immediate future. Regarding stability, under relatively large deformations (10's of nm), the DM mirror surface shows no hysteresis at the measurable nm level. Let me begin by saying that I am not aware of any

  14. A ferrofluidic deformable mirror for ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, J. B.; Thibault, S.; Borra, E. F.; Ritcey, A. M.; Carufel, N.; Asselin, D.; Jerominek, H.; Campbell, M. C. W.

    2005-09-01

    Optical aberrations reduce the imaging quality of the human eye. In addition to degrading vision, this limits our ability to illuminate small points of the retina for therapeutic, surgical or diagnostic purposes. When viewing the rear of the eye, aberrations cause structures in the fundus to appear blurred, limiting the resolution of ophthalmoscopes (diagnostic instruments used to image the eye). Adaptive optics, such as deformable mirrors may be used to compensate for aberrations, allowing the eye to work as a diffraction-limited optical element. Unfortunately, this type of correction has not been widely available for ophthalmic applications because of the expense and technical limitations of current deformable mirrors. We present preliminary design and characterisation of a deformable mirror suitable for ophthalmology. In this ferrofluidic mirror, wavefronts are reflected from a fluid whose surface shape is controlled by a magnetic field. Challenges in design are outlined, as are advantages over traditional deformable mirrors.

  15. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  16. Compact multichannel high-resolution micro-electro-mechanical systems-based interrogator for Fiber Bragg grating sensing.

    PubMed

    Ganziy, D; Rose, B; Bang, O

    2017-04-20

    We propose a novel type of compact high-resolution multichannel micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based interrogator, where we replace the linear detector with a digital micromirror device (DMD). The DMD is typically cheaper and has better pixel sampling than an InGaAs detector used in the 1550 nm range, which leads to cost reduction and better performance. Moreover, the DMD is a 2D array, which means that multichannel systems can be implemented without any additional optical components in the interrogator. This makes the proposed interrogator highly cost-effective, particularly for multichannel systems. The digital nature of the DMD also provides opportunities for advanced programmable Hadamard spectroscopy, which, without significant penalties, can greatly improve the wavelength fit resolution. Our results show that DMDs can be used in high-resolution spectroscopy and for Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation.

  17. Deformable Mirror Optical Calibration and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Boucarut, Ray

    1999-01-01

    We describe the initial setup, configuration, and component level testing procedures that were used to incorporate a Xinetics 349 channel deformable mirror into the DCATT active optical system. Initial flattening results are presented as well as calibration data on actuator gain and mirror response. The RMS measures of surface quality are also analyzed for drift in the power-up state.

  18. Deformable Mirror Optical Calibration and Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Boucarut, Ray

    We describe the initial setup, configuration, and component level testing procedures used to incorporate a Xinetics 349 channel deformable mirror into the DCATT active optical system. Initial flattening results are presented as well as calibration data on actuator gain and mirror response. The RMS measures of surface quality are also analyzed for drift in the power-up state.

  19. Smart materials fabrication and materials for micro-electro-mechanical systems; Symposium Proceedings, San Francisco, CA, Apr. 28-30, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, A. Peter (Editor); Johnson, George C. (Editor); Crowson, Andrew (Editor); Allen, Mark (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    A conference on the rapidly developing fields of `smart materials' and micro-electro-mechanical systems produced papers in the areas of fabrication and characterization of ferroelectric thin films; polycrystalline silicon; optical, chemical, and biological sensors; thin film shape memory alloys; materials characterization; and alternative materials and applications.

  20. Unimorph piezoelectric deformable mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, P.; Verpoort, S.; Wittrock, U.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed, manufactured and tested a unimorph deformable mirror for space applications based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror was designed for the correction of low-order Zernike modes with a stroke of several tens of micrometers over a clear aperture of 50 mm. It was successfully tested in thermal vacuum, underwent lifetime tests, and was exposed to random vibrations, sinusoidal vibrations, and to ionizing radiation. We report on design considerations, manufacturing of the mirror, and present the test results. Furthermore, we discuss critical design parameters, and how our mirror could be adapted to serve recently proposed space telescopes such as HDST and TALC.

  1. Micromachined deformable mirrors for dynamic wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas; Bierden, Paul; Perreault, Julie

    2004-10-01

    The design, manufacture, and testing of optical quality surface micromachined deformable mirrors (DMs) is described. With such mirrors, the shape of the reflective surface can be modified dynami-cally to compensate for optical aberrations and thereby improve image resolution in telescopes or microscopes. Over several years, we have developed microelectromechanical system (MEMS) processing technologies that allow production of optical quality of surface micromachined mirrors. These process steps have been integrated with a commercial foundry process to produce deformable mirrors of unprecedented quality. The devices employ 140 electrostatic actuators. Measurements of their performance detailed in this paper include 2µm of useful stroke, 3nm position repeatability, >90% reflectivity, and flatness better than 20nm RMS. A chemo-mechanical polishing process has been used to improve surface quality of the mirrors, and a gold coating process has been developed to improve the reflectivity without introducing a significant amount of stress in the mirror mem-brane. An ion bombardment technique has been developed to flatten mirrors. These silicon based deformable mirrors have the potential to modulate spatial and temporal features of an optical wave-front, and have applications in imaging, beam-forming, and optical communication systems. Design considerations and performance evaluation of recently fabricated DMs are presented.

  2. Nanoscale elastic imaging of micro-electro-mechanical system based micromirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, Bruce; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Xu, Bai; Geer, Robert E.; Castracane, James

    2001-10-01

    We present measurements of the nanoscale elastic properties of hinge structures supporting micro-mirror arrays using a new characterization technique called Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM). This technique is based on Atomic Force Microscopy with ultrasonic excitation which provides a means of testing the elastic response at MHz frequencies. The simultaneous recording of topography with elastic imaging allows the elimination of any artifacts. In this report, we demonstrate that UFM can achieve nano-scale elastic resolution to reveal mechanical stress induced changes as well as process induced material fatigue in the micro-mirror devices. The main aim of this study is polysilicon-based hinge structures that support the micro-mirror because they show the highest stress during mirror switching. Our results indicate that no significant structural and mechanical change of the polysilicon-based hinge support structure occurs even after more than 1,000,000,000 switching cycles. This method offers a non-destructive way to perform reliability characterization on MEMS devices. This technique developed will offer new opportunities for the evaluation of structural and mechanical integrity of MEMS devices.

  3. Exploiting Adaptive Optics with Deformable Secondary Mirrors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-08

    progress in tomographic wavefront sensing and altitude conjugated adaptive correction, and is a critical step forward for adaptive optics for future large...geostationary satellites, captured at the 6.5 m MMT telescope, using the deformable secondary adaptive optics system....new technology to the unique development of deformable secondary mirrors pioneered at the University of Arizona’s Center for Astronomical Adaptive

  4. MEMS deformable mirror CubeSat testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, Kerri L.; Marinan, Anne D.; Novak, Benjamin; Kerr, Caitlin; Nguyen, Tam; Webber, Matthew; Falkenburg, Grant; Barg, Andrew; Berry, Kristen; Carlton, Ashley; Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo A.

    2013-09-01

    To meet the high contrast requirement of 1 × 10-10to image an Earth-like planet around a Sun-like star, space telescopes equipped with coronagraphs require wavefront control systems. Deformable mirrors are a key element of these systems that correct for optical imperfections, thermal distortions, and diffraction that would otherwise corrupt the wavefront and ruin the contrast. However, high-actuator-count MEMS deformable mirrors have yet to fly in space long enough to characterize their on-orbit performance and reduce risk by developing and operating their supporting systems. The goal of the MEMS Deformable Mirror CubeSat Testbed is to develop a CubeSat-scale demonstration of MEMS deformable mirror and wavefront sensing technology. In this paper, we consider two approaches for a MEMS deformable mirror technology demonstration payload that will fit within the mass, power, and volume constraints of a CubeSat: 1) a Michelson interferometer and 2) a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. We clarify the constraints on the payload based on the resources required for supporting CubeSat subsystems drawn from subsystems that we have developed for a different CubeSat flight project. We discuss results from payload lab prototypes and their utility in defining mission requirements.

  5. Infrastructure, Technology and Applications of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Jakubczak, J.F.; Krygowski, T.W.; Miller, S.L.; Montague, S.; Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1999-07-09

    A review is made of the infrastructure, technology and capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories for the development of micromechanical systems. By incorporating advanced fabrication processes, such as chemical mechanical polishing, and several mechanical polysilicon levels, the range of micromechanical systems that can be fabricated in these technologies is virtually limitless. Representative applications include a micro-engine driven mirror, and a micromachined lock. Using a novel integrated MEMS/CMOS technology, a six degree-of-freedom accelerometer/gyroscope system has been designed by researchers at U.C. Berkeley and fabricated on the same silicon chip as the CMOS control circuits to produce an integrated micro-navigational unit.

  6. Micro-electro-mechanics of ionic polymeric gels as electrically controllable artificial muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1994-12-31

    A polymer gel is defined as a cross-linked polymer network swollen in a liquid medium. These gels possess an ionic structure in the sense that they are generally composed of a number of fixed ions pertaining to sites of various polymer cross-links and segments and mobile ions (counter ions) due to the presence of a solvent which is electrolytic. Ionic polymeric gels are three-dimensional networks of cross-linked macromolecular polyelectrolytes that swell or shrink in aqueous solutions on addition of alkali or acids, respectively. Linear reversible dilation and contraction of the order of more than 1,000 percent have been observed in the laboratory for polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers. Furthermore, it has been experimentally observed that swelling and shrinking of ionic gels can also be induced electrically. Thus, direct computer control of large expansions and contractions of ionic polymeric gels by means of a voltage gradient appears to be possible. A mechanism is presented for the reversible nonhomogeneous large deformations and in particular bending of strips of ionic polymeric gels in the presence of an electric field. Exact expressions are given relating the deformation characteristics of the gel to the electric field strength or voltage gradient, gel dimensions and other physical parameters such as the resistance and the capacitance of the gel strip. It is concluded that direct voltage control of such nonhomogeneous large deformations in ionic polymeric gels is possible. These electrically controlled deformations may find unique applications in robotics, artificial muscles, large motion actuator designs, drug delivery systems and smart materials, adaptive structures and systems.

  7. Nine toes; Mirror Foot Deformity.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Aleksandar M; Pistignjat, Boris S; Vlahovic, Natasa S

    2015-01-01

    Mirror foot is a very rare congenital anomaly, with only a few papers presenting definitive treatment for this entity. There are limited management recommendations. Most cases are treated before walking age. In our case, there were no associated developmental defects of the leg. The child underwent complex rays resection with medial foot reconstruction. After 7.5 years of followup, definitive surgical treatment was performed with satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcome.

  8. Focused Ion Beam Preparation of Specimens for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System-based Transmission Electron Microscopy Heating Experiments.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Sriram; Jinschek, Joerg R; Kujawa, Stephan; Greiser, Jens; Aindow, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based heating holders offer exceptional control of temperature and heating/cooling rates for transmission electron microscopy experiments. The use of such devices is relatively straightforward for nano-particulate samples, but the preparation of specimens from bulk samples by focused ion beam (FIB) milling presents significant challenges. These include: poor mechanical integrity and site selectivity of the specimen, ion beam damage to the specimen and/or MEMS device during thinning, and difficulties in transferring the specimen onto the MEMS device. Here, we describe a novel FIB protocol for the preparation and transfer of specimens from bulk samples, which involves a specimen geometry that provides mechanical support to the electron-transparent region, while maximizing the area of that region and the contact area with the heater plate on the MEMS chip. The method utilizes an inclined stage block that minimizes exposure of the chip to the ion beam during milling. This block also allows for accurate and gentle placement of the FIB-cut specimen onto the chip by using simultaneous electron and ion beam imaging during transfer. Preliminary data from Si and Ag on Si samples are presented to demonstrate the quality of the specimens that can be obtained and their stability during in situ heating experiments.

  9. An adaptive compensation algorithm for temperature drift of micro-electro-mechanical systems gyroscopes using a strong tracking Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yibo; Li, Xisheng; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-05-13

    We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF), the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to -2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation.

  10. Evaluation of performance of portable respiratory monitoring system based on micro-electro-mechanical-system for respiratory gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sun Young; Sung, Jiwon; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Mijoo; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-08-01

    In respiratory-gated radiotherapy of patients with lung or liver cancer, the patient's respiratory pattern and repeatability are important factors affecting therapy accuracy; it has been reported that these factors can be controlled if patients undergo respiration training. As such, this study evaluates the feasibility of micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) in radiotherapy by investigating the effect of radiation on a miniature portable respiratory monitoring system based on the MEMS system, which is currently under development. Using a patient respiration simulation phantom, the time-acceleration graph measured by a normal sensor according to the phantom's respiratory movement before irradiation and the change in this graph with accumulated dose were compared using the baseline slope and the change in amplitude and period of the sine wave. The results showed that with a 400Gy accumulated dose in the sensor, a baseline shift occurred and both the amplitude and period changed. As a result, if the MEMS is applied in respiratory-gated radiotherapy, the sensor should be replaced after use with roughly 6-10 patients so as to ensure continued therapy accuracy, based on the characteristics of the sensor itself. In the future, a more diverse range of sensors should be similarly evaluated.

  11. An Adaptive Compensation Algorithm for Temperature Drift of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Gyroscopes Using a Strong Tracking Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yibo; Li, Xisheng; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF), the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to −2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation. PMID:25985165

  12. Development of High Precision Metal Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems Column for Portable Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaya, Takamitsu; Akao, Shingo; Sakamoto, Toshihiro; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Nakaso, Noritaka; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2012-07-01

    In the field of environmental measurement and security, a portable gas chromatograph (GC) is required for the on-site analysis of multiple hazardous gases. Although the gas separation column has been downsized using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology, an MEMS column made of silicon and glass still does not have sufficient robustness and a sufficiently low fabrication cost for a portable GC. In this study, we fabricated a robust and inexpensive high-precision metal MEMS column by combining diffusion-bonded etched stainless-steel plates with alignment evaluation using acoustic microscopy. The separation performance was evaluated using a desktop GC with a flame ionization detector and we achieved the high separation performance comparable to the best silicon MEMS column fabricated using a dynamic coating method. As an application, we fabricated a palm-size surface acoustic wave (SAW) GC combining this column with a ball SAW sensor and succeeded in separating and detecting a mixture of volatile organic compounds.

  13. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  14. Evaluation of microfabricated deformable mirror systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Lee, Max K.; Bright, Victor M.; Welsh, Byron M.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents recent result for aberration correction and beam steering experiments using polysilicon surface micromachined piston micromirror arrays. Microfabricated deformable mirrors offer a substantial cost reduction for adaptive optic systems. In addition to the reduced mirror cost, microfabricated mirrors typically require low control voltages, thus eliminating high voltage amplifiers. The greatly reduced cost per channel of adaptive optic systems employing microfabricated deformable mirrors promise high order aberration correction at low cost. Arrays of piston micromirrors with 128 active elements were tested. Mirror elements are on a 203 micrometers 12 by 12 square grid. The overall array size is 2.4 mm square. The arrays were fabricated in the commercially available DARPA supported MUMPs surface micromachining foundry process. The cost per mirror array in this prototyping process is less than 200 dollars. Experimental results are presented for a hybrid correcting element comprised of a lenslet array and piston micromirror array, and for a piston micromirror array only. Also presented is a novel digital deflection micromirror which requires no digital to analog converters, further reducing the cost of adaptive optics system.

  15. Deformable Mirrors Capture Exoplanet Data, Reflect Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To image and characterize exoplanets, Goddard Space Flight Center turned to deformable mirrors (DMs). Berkeley, California-based Iris AO, Inc. worked with Goddard through the SBIR program to improve the company’s microelectromechanical DMs, which are now being evaluated and used for biological research, industrial applications, and could even be used by drug manufacturers.

  16. Large Actuator Count MEMS Deformable Mirror Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-07

    Large-actuator-count deformable mirrors (DM) are essential for high-contrast imaging systems NASA is developing for exoplanet detection. These same...applications: Nulling coronagraphs for exoplanet imaging, Atmospheric turbulence compensation for free-space laser communication, laser guide star

  17. Deformable mirror for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrň; a, Libor; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend in high power laser applications such as welding, cutting and surface hardening lies in the use of solid-state lasers. The output beam of these lasers is characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution. However, the laser beams with different intensity distributions, e.g. top-hat, are preferable in various applications. In this paper we present a new type of deformable mirror suitable for the corresponding laser beam shaping. The deformation of the mirror is achieved by an underlying array of actuators and a pressurized coolant that also provides the necessary cooling. We describe the results of the surface shape measurement using a 3D scanner for different settings of actuators. Further, we show the achieved intensity distributions measured by a beam profiler for a low power laser beam reflected from the mirror.

  18. Lightweight deformable mirrors for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Keith

    This thesis presents a concept for ultra-lightweight deformable mirrors based on a thin substrate of optical surface quality coated with continuous active piezopolymer layers that provide modes of actuation and shape correction. This concept eliminates any kind of stiff backing structure for the mirror surface and exploits micro-fabrication technologies to provide a tight integration of the active materials into the mirror structure, to avoid actuator print-through effects. Proof-of-concept, 10-cm-diameter mirrors with a low areal density of about 0.5 kg/m2 have been designed, built and tested to measure their shape-correction performance and verify the models used for design. The low cost manufacturing scheme uses replication techniques, and strives for minimizing residual stresses that deviate the optical figure from the master mandrel. It does not require precision tolerancing, is lightweight, and is therefore potentially scalable to larger diameters for use in large, modular space telescopes. Other potential applications for such a laminate could include ground-based mirrors for solar energy collection, adaptive optics for atmospheric turbulence, laser communications, and other shape control applications. The immediate application for these mirrors is for the Autonomous Assembly and Reconfiguration of a Space Telescope (AAReST) mission, which is a university mission under development by Caltech, the University of Surrey, and JPL. The design concept, fabrication methodology, material behaviors and measurements, mirror modeling, mounting and control electronics design, shape control experiments, predictive performance analysis, and remaining challenges are presented herein. The experiments have validated numerical models of the mirror, and the mirror models have been used within a model of the telescope in order to predict the optical performance. A demonstration of this mirror concept, along with other new telescope technologies, is planned to take place during

  19. Comparative analysis of deformable mirrors for ocular adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Dalimier, Eugenie; Dainty, Chris

    2005-05-30

    We have evaluated the ability of three commercially available deformable mirrors to compensate the aberrations of the eye using a model for aberrations developed by Thibos, Bradley and Hong. The mirrors evaluated were a 37 actuator membrane mirror and 19 actuator piezo mirror (OKO Technologies) and a 35 actuator bimorph mirror (AOptix Inc). For each mirror, Zernike polynomials and typical ocular aberrated wavefronts were fitted with the mirror modes measured using a Twyman-Green interferometer. The bimorph mirror showed the lowest root mean square error, although the 19 actuator piezo device showed promise if extended to more actuators. The methodology can be used to evaluate new deformable mirrors as they become available.

  20. The micro pulsed-jet as a micro-electro-mechanical systems combustion engine and miniaturization technologies for aerospace engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Hao Adam

    The field of Aerospace Engineering is now considered by some to be a fully developed field with incremental and evolutionary, rather than revolutionary, advances. However, in recent years the emergence of precision, micro-, and nano-engineering will bring about a comprehensive set of enabling miniaturization technologies for aerospace applications. In this dissertation, three separate research efforts with relevance to the advancement of aerospace engineering are detailed: the preliminary development of the micro pulse jet, the application of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) toward the control of a delta wing aircraft, and the microfabrication of soft polymers for sensors and actuators. The main focus on the preliminary development of the micro pulse jet is to demonstrate the feasibility of using microfabrication and microelectronics toward a miniaturized pulse jet engine. Since a pulse jet utilizes minimal moving parts, this has been demonstrated in this dissertation to be suitable candidate with the common miniaturization technology, MEMS. The application of MEMS toward the control of a delta wing focus on the usage of MEMS shear stress sensors and bubble actuators to affect an order of 1 control on a delta wing aircraft. Both wind tunnel models and Remote Piloted Vehicles (RPVs) have been used to demonstrate the concept. The microfabrication of soft polymers section focuses on the development of a fabrication technology that can pattern traditionally hard to pattern materials such as silicone elastomers. The ability to pattern soft polymers has huge implications in aerospace applications due to the ubiquitous usage of elastomers as sealants and joints besides the unique chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties that are applicable toward aerodynamic sensors and actuators.

  1. Load monitoring of aerospace structures utilizing micro-electro-mechanical systems for static and quasi-static loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M.; Rocha, B.; Li, M.; Shi, G.; Beltempo, A.; Rutledge, R.; Yanishevsky, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Research Council Canada (NRC) has worked on the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) test platforms for assessing the performance of sensor systems for load monitoring applications. The first SHM platform consists of a 5.5 m cantilever aluminum beam that provides an optimal scenario for evaluating the ability of a load monitoring system to measure bending, torsion and shear loads. The second SHM platform contains an added level of structural complexity, by consisting of aluminum skins with bonded/riveted stringers, typical of an aircraft lower wing structure. These two load monitoring platforms are well characterized and documented, providing loading conditions similar to those encountered during service. In this study, a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) for acquiring data from triads of gyroscopes, accelerometers and magnetometers is described. The system was used to compute changes in angles at discrete stations along the platforms. The angles obtained from the MEMS were used to compute a second, third or fourth order degree polynomial surface from which displacements at every point could be computed. The use of a new Kalman filter was evaluated for angle estimation, from which displacements in the structure were computed. The outputs of the newly developed algorithms were then compared to the displacements obtained from the linear variable displacement transducers connected to the platforms. The displacement curves were subsequently post-processed either analytically, or with the help of a finite element model of the structure, to estimate strains and loads. The estimated strains were compared with baseline strain gauge instrumentation installed on the platforms. This new approach for load monitoring was able to provide accurate estimates of applied strains and shear loads.

  2. Dual-use bimorph deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, M. S.; Laycock, L. C.; Bagshaw, J. M.; Rowe, D.

    2005-11-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a critical underpinning technology for future optical countermeasures, laser delivery, target illumination and imaging systems. It measures and compensates for optical distortion caused by transmission through the atmosphere, resulting in the ability to deploy smaller lasers and identify targets at greater ranges. AO is also well established in ground based astronomy, and is finding applications in free space optical communications and ophthalmology. One of the key components in an AO system is the wavefront modifier, which acts on the incoming or outgoing beam to counter the effects of the atmosphere. BAE SYSTEMS ATC is developing multi-element Deformable Bimorph Mirrors (DBMs) for such applications. A traditional bimorph deformable mirror uses a set of edge electrodes outside the active area in order to meet the required boundary conditions for the active aperture. This inflicts a significant penalty in terms of bandwidth, which is inversely proportional to the square of the full mirror diameter. We have devised a number of novel mounting arrangements that reduce dead space and thus provide a much improved trade-off between bandwidth and stroke. These schemes include a novel method for providing vertical displacement at the periphery of the aperture, a method for providing a continuous compliant support underneath the bimorph mirror, and a method for providing a three point support underneath the bimorph. In all three cases, there is no requirement for edge electrodes to provide the boundary conditions, resulting in devices of much higher bandwidth. The target is to broaden the use of these types of mirror beyond the current limits of either low order/low bandwidth, to address the high order, high bandwidth systems required by long range, horizontal path applications. This paper will discuss the different mirror designs, and present experimental results for the most recently assembled mirrors.

  3. Deformable mirror technologies at AOA Xinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Allan; Cavaco, Jeffrey; Bruno, Theresa; Ezzo, Kevin M.

    2013-05-01

    AOA Xinetics (AOX) has been at the forefront of Deformable Mirror (DM) technology development for over two decades. In this paper the current state of that technology is reviewed and the particular strengths and weaknesses of the various DM architectures are presented. Emphasis is placed on the requirements for DMs applied to the correction of high-energy and high average power lasers. Mirror designs optimized for the correction of typical thermal lensing effects in diode pumped solid-state lasers will be detailed and their capabilities summarized. Passive thermal management techniques that allow long laser run times to be supported will also be discussed.

  4. Fabrication Methods for Adaptive Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; White, Victor E.; Manohara, Harish; Patterson, Keith D.; Yamamoto, Namiko; Gdoutos, Eleftherios; Steeves, John B.; Daraio, Chiara; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it was difficult to fabricate deformable mirrors made by piezoelectric actuators. This is because numerous actuators need to be precisely assembled to control the surface shape of the mirror. Two approaches have been developed. Both approaches begin by depositing a stack of piezoelectric films and electrodes over a silicon wafer substrate. In the first approach, the silicon wafer is removed initially by plasmabased reactive ion etching (RIE), and non-plasma dry etching with xenon difluoride (XeF2). In the second approach, the actuator film stack is immersed in a liquid such as deionized water. The adhesion between the actuator film stack and the substrate is relatively weak. Simply by seeping liquid between the film and the substrate, the actuator film stack is gently released from the substrate. The deformable mirror contains multiple piezoelectric membrane layers as well as multiple electrode layers (some are patterned and some are unpatterned). At the piezolectric layer, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), or its co-polymer, poly(vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene P(VDF-TrFE) is used. The surface of the mirror is coated with a reflective coating. The actuator film stack is fabricated on silicon, or silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate, by repeatedly spin-coating the PVDF or P(VDFTrFE) solution and patterned metal (electrode) deposition. In the first approach, the actuator film stack is prepared on SOI substrate. Then, the thick silicon (typically 500-micron thick and called handle silicon) of the SOI wafer is etched by a deep reactive ion etching process tool (SF6-based plasma etching). This deep RIE stops at the middle SiO2 layer. The middle SiO2 layer is etched by either HF-based wet etching or dry plasma etch. The thin silicon layer (generally called a device layer) of SOI is removed by XeF2 dry etch. This XeF2 etch is very gentle and extremely selective, so the released mirror membrane is not damaged. It is possible to replace SOI with silicon

  5. Deformation analysis of a lightweight metal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianwei; Lin, Wumei; Liu, Guoqing; Xing, Tingwen

    2005-02-01

    The weight of the optical elements of a system used in the aviation and aerospace industry must be as light as possible, on condition that the imaging performance of the system satisfies user"s demand. However, optical elements will deform easily under internal or external pressure if it becomes thinner, and then influences the imaging performance of the whole optical system. In this paper, the main mirror of the Cassegrain system is studied with finite-element analysis (FEA) to predict its surface deformation through simulating its working conditions. The surface deformation is also tested and analyzed after machining and mounting. The obtained interferometric data, Zernike coefficients, is written into CODE V, an excellent software for designing optical systems, to analyze the imaging performance of the designed optical system. Through analyzing the deformation of the metal mirror it can be found that the maxima RMS change of the whole optical system is 0.0059λ, which is only 1.52 percent of the designed value. In the full field of view, the RMS error is less than 0.07λ, that means the imaging performance of the whole optical system is close to the diffraction limit.

  6. Crack growth phenomena in micro-machined single crystal silicon and design implications for micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Alissa Mirella

    The creation of micron-sized mechanisms using semiconductor processing technology is known collectively as MEMS, or Micro Electro Mechanical Systems. Many MEMS devices, such as accelerometers and switches, have mechanical structures fabricated from single crystal silicon, a brittle material. The reliability and longevity of these devices depends on minimizing the probability of fracture, and therefore requires a thorough understanding of crack growth phenomena in silicon. In this study, a special micro-machined fracture specimen, the compression-loaded double cantilever beam, was developed to study fracture phenomena in single crystal silicon on a size scale relevant to MEMS. The decreasing stress intensity geometry of this sample provided stable, controllable crack propagation in test sections as thin as 100 mum. Several common MEMS fabrication methods (plasma and chemical etch) were used to achieve a range of surface finishes. A 650 A thick titanium crack gage was used to directly measure crack extension as a function of time using the potential drop technique. High speed (100 MHz) data acquisition techniques were employed to capture fracture events on the sub-microsecond time scale. The stability of the sample design and the micron-scale resolution of the crack gage facilitated investigation into the existence of a stress corrosion effect in silicon. No evidence of sub-critical crack growth due to exposure to humid air was found in carefully controlled tests lasting up to 24 hours. Rapid crack propagation velocities (>1 km/s) during quasi-static loading were recorded using high speed data acquisition techniques. Unique evidence was found of reflected stress waves causing multiple, momentary arrests during rapid fracture events. These measurements, along with atomic force microscope scans of the fracture surfaces, offer new insight into the kinetics of the fracture process in silicon. Over 100 micro-machined samples were fractured in this research. Weibull

  7. Novel high-bandwidth bimorph deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Michael S.; Laycock, Leslie C.; Archer, Nick J.

    2004-12-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a critical underpinning technology for future laser delivery (including free-space optical communications), target illumination and imaging systems. It measures and compensates for optical distortion caused by transmission through the atmosphere, resulting in the ability to deploy smaller lasers and identify targets at greater ranges. One of the key components in an AO system is the wavefront modifier, which acts on the incoming or outgoing beam to counter the effects of the atmosphere. BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technology Centre is developing multi-element bimorph deformable mirrors for such an applications. Our initial designs were based on a standard construction and exhibited a resonant frequency of 1kHz with a maximum stroke of +/-20μm for an active aperture of 50mm. These devices were limited by the necessity to have a 'dead space' between the inner active area and the mirror boundary; this ensured that both the requirements for the stroke and the fixed boundary conditions could be met simultaneously. However, there was a significant penalty to pay in terms of bandwidth, which is inversely proportional to the square of the full mirror diameter. In a series of iteration steps, we have created novel mounting arrangements that reduce dead space and thus provide the optimum trade-off between bandwidth and stroke. These schemes include supporting the mirror from underneath, rather than at its edge. As a result, models of 60mm active diameter mirrors predict a resonance in excess of 5kHz, combined with a maximum stroke greater than +/-40μm. This paper will discuss a number of different mirror designs and present experimental results for recently assembled devices.

  8. Next-generation deformable mirror electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, Michael J.; Wagner, Karl

    2004-10-01

    Full-custom electronics have been designed to drive Xinetics deformable mirrors, for use with the PYRAMIR (Calar Alto) and LINC/NIRVANA (Large Binocular Telescope) AO instruments, under contract to the Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie (MPIA). Significant enhancements to the original 1998 design for ALFA (Calar Alto) have been incorporated, including an embedded 2.1 Gb/s fiber link, temperature-controlled bias voltage, and multiple tip-tilt control outputs. Each 7U chassis with integral power supplies can drive mirrors of up to 349 actuators, and may be cascaded to support larger mirrors. A customized 600 MHz 'C6415 DSP module was specified to minimize latency, with frame rates above 7.5 KHz demonstrated for the 349-actuator DM. Power op-amps with 0.38 W/channel quiescent dissipation were chosen to reduce heat load, while supporting full-power (60 Vpp) bandwidth to above 300 Hz. These subsystems were successfully integrated in Heidelberg during November, 2003. The engineering firm responsible for the design, Cambridge Innovations, has since been awarded two additional contracts for DM electronics, including a new full-custom design for AURA (Gemini Observatory) to drive multiple high-voltage CILAS piezo bimorph DMs.

  9. Development of a miniaturized deformable mirror controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Lynch, Dana; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Belikov, Ruslan; Klamm, Benjamin; Hyde, Elizabeth; Mumm, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    High-Performance Adaptive Optics systems are rapidly spreading as useful applications in the fields of astronomy, ophthalmology, and telecommunications. This technology is critical to enable coronagraphic direct imaging of exoplanets utilized in ground-based telescopes and future space missions such as WFIRST, EXO-C, HabEx, and LUVOIR. We have developed a miniaturized Deformable Mirror controller to enable active optics on small space imaging mission. The system is based on the Boston Micromachines Corporation Kilo-DM, which is one of the most widespread DMs on the market. The system has three main components: The Deformable Mirror, the Driving Electronics, and the Mechanical and Heat management. The system is designed to be extremely compact and have lowpower consumption to enable its use not only on exoplanet missions, but also in a wide-range of applications that require precision optical systems, such as direct line-of-sight laser communications, and guidance systems. The controller is capable of handling 1,024 actuators with 220V maximum dynamic range, 16bit resolution, and 14bit accuracy, and operating at up to 1kHz frequency. The system fits in a 10x10x5cm volume, weighs less than 0.5kg, and consumes less than 8W. We have developed a turnkey solution reducing the risk for currently planned as well as future missions, lowering their cost by significantly reducing volume, weight and power consumption of the wavefront control hardware.

  10. Actuators of 3-element unimorph deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tianyang; Ning, Yu; Du, Shaojun

    2016-10-01

    Kinds of wavefront aberrations exist among optical systems because of atmosphere disturbance, device displacement and a variety of thermal effects, which disturb the information of transmitting beam and restrain its energy. Deformable mirror(DM) is designed to adjust these wavefront aberrations. Bimorph DM becomes more popular and more applicable among adaptive optical(AO) systems with advantages in simple structure, low cost and flexible design compared to traditional discrete driving DM. The defocus aberration accounted for a large proportion of all wavefront aberrations, with a simpler surface and larger amplitude than others, so it is very useful to correct the defocus aberration effectively for beam controlling and aberration adjusting of AO system. In this study, we desired on correcting the 3rd and 10th Zernike modes, analyze the characteristic of the 3rd and 10th defocus aberration surface distribution, design 3-element actuators unimorph DM model study on its structure and deformation principle theoretically, design finite element models of different electrode configuration with different ring diameters, analyze and compare effects of different electrode configuration and different fixing mode to DM deformation capacity through COMSOL finite element software, compare fitting efficiency of DM models to the 3rd and 10th Zernike modes. We choose the inhomogeneous electrode distribution model with better result, get the influence function of every electrode and the voltage-PV relationship of the model. This unimorph DM is suitable for the AO system with a mainly defocus aberration.

  11. Method of determining the thermal deformations of astronomical mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khablo-Grossvald, Y. G.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures are given for calculating thermal fields and associated thermal deformations in astronomical mirrors. A technique is described for thermal strain simulation when complex thermal fields develop in astronomical mirrors. Thermal strains in pyroceramic, quartz and pyrex mirrors can be effectively determined at temperatures ranging from -70 to 150 C by this technique.

  12. High-actuator-count MEMS deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Michael A.; He, Min; Kempf, Carl J.

    2013-05-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) technology has enabled dramatic improvement in imaging performance for fields spanning astronomy, defense, microscopy, and retinal imaging. A critical component within the AO systems is the deformable mirror (DM) that implements the actual wavefront correction. This paper introduces the Iris AO segmented MEMS DM technology with an overview of the fabrication process and a description of the DM operation. The paper demonstrates correction capabilities of 111 and 489 actuator DMs and describes recent effort for scaling to 1000-actuator class DMs. Finally, the paper presents laser testing results of dielectric coated DMs and describes the development path for MEMS DMs capable of 2.8 kW/cm2 average laser power.

  13. Deformable mirrors for open-loop adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer, A.; Vidal, F.; Gendron, E.; Hubert, Z.; Perret, D.; Rousset, G.

    2012-07-01

    We characterize the performance of deformable mirrors for use in open-loop regimes. This is especially relevant for Multi Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO), or for closed-loop schemes that require improved accuracies. Deformable mirrors are usually characterized by standard parameters, such as influence functions, linearity, hysteresis, etc. We show that these parameters are insufficient for characterizing open-loop performance and that a deeper analysis of the mirror's behavior is then required. The measurements on the deformable mirrors were performed in 2007 on the AO test bench of the Meudon observatory, SESAME.

  14. Utility transforms of optical fields employing deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feiling

    2011-11-15

    Diffraction optical devices of modest degrees of freedom (DOF), such as deformable mirrors, have not been exploited as general-purpose transformers of optical fields. Described in this Letter is a method that guides deformable mirrors to optimal surfaces allowed by the DOF for various desirable outcomes. The method is based on a modal optimization procedure with the help of Walsh functions in controlling the variables of the mirrors, i.e. the actuators. It is shown that a deformable mirror of modest DOF can provide field transformations for arbitrary beam-splitting, formation of ring-shaped beams, and coherent beam combining.

  15. A large stroke magnetic fluid deformable mirror for focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ling-kun; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Huang, Ming-shuang; Kong, Xiang-hui

    2016-03-01

    A liquid deformable mirror, which can provide a large stroke deflection more than 100 μm, is proposed for focus control. The deformable mirror utilizes the concept of magnetic fluid deformation shaped with electromagnetic fields to achieve concave or convex surface and to change the optical focus depth of the mirrors. The free surface of the magnetic fluid is coated with a thin layer of metal-liquid-like film (MELLF) prepared from densely packed silver nanoparticles to enhance the reflectance of the deformable mirror. The experimental results on the fabricated prototype magnetic fluid deformable mirror (MFDM) show that the desired concave/convex surface shape can be controlled precisely with a closed-loop adaptive optical system.

  16. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based fiber optic sensor and sensor network for improving weapon stabilization and fire control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sean Z.; Xu, Guoda; Qiu, Wei; Lin, Freddie S.; Testa, Robert C.; Mattice, Michael S.

    2000-08-01

    A MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based fiber optic sensor and sensor network for improving weapon stabilization and fire control have been developed. Fabrication involves overwriting two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) onto a polarization-preserving optical fiber core. A MEMS diaphragm is fabricated and integrated with the overlaid FBGs to enhance the performance and reliability of the sensor. A simulation model for the MEMS fiber optic sensor and sensor network has been derived, and simulation results concerning load, angle, strain, and temperature have been obtained. The fabricated MEMS diaphragm and the overlaid FBGs have been packaged together on the basis of simulation results and mounted on a specially designed cantilever system. The combined multifunctional MEMS fiber optic sensor and sensor network is cost-effective, fast, rugged enough to operate in harsh environmental conditions, compact, and highly sensitive.

  17. Xinetics low-cost deformable mirrors with actuator replacement cartridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ealey, Mark A.; Wellman, John A.

    1994-05-01

    The cost of good, reliable deformable mirrors has made them inaccessible to the astronomical community and other would-be commercial users. Historically, the deformable mirror has cost nearly $DOL2500. per channel and comprised about 25% of the cost of an adaptive optics system. Xinetics has created a deformable mirror technology which costs less than $DOL1000. per channel including the electronic driver. In addition, the mirrors feature novel actuator cartridges which contain a simple thermal mechanism to allow simple replacement of damaged actuators. The current mirrors use piezoelectric actuators for broad temperature response and operate at 100 volts. They feature 7-mm interactuator spacing, 4- micrometers displacement, and interactuator coupling tailorable between 5 to 15%. Complete NASTRAN and Weibull analyses has been conducted to insure sufficient safety margin. The results of the 37, 97, and 349 channel mirror manufacturing efforts are reported in this paper.

  18. Overview of deformable mirror technologies for adaptive optics and astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madec, P.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    From the ardent bucklers used during the Syracuse battle to set fire to Romans’ ships to more contemporary piezoelectric deformable mirrors widely used in astronomy, from very large voice coil deformable mirrors considered in future Extremely Large Telescopes to very small and compact ones embedded in Multi Object Adaptive Optics systems, this paper aims at giving an overview of Deformable Mirror technology for Adaptive Optics and Astronomy. First the main drivers for the design of Deformable Mirrors are recalled, not only related to atmospheric aberration compensation but also to environmental conditions or mechanical constraints. Then the different technologies available today for the manufacturing of Deformable Mirrors will be described, pros and cons analyzed. A review of the Companies and Institutes with capabilities in delivering Deformable Mirrors to astronomers will be presented, as well as lessons learned from the past 25 years of technological development and operation on sky. In conclusion, perspective will be tentatively drawn for what regards the future of Deformable Mirror technology for Astronomy.

  19. Optical characterization of the PALM-3000 3388-actuator deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jennifer; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Burruss, Rick S.; Dekany, Richard G.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Troy, Mitchell

    2010-07-01

    We describe the lab characterization of the new 3,388-actuator deformable mirror (DM3388) produced by Xinetics, Inc. for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics (AO) system1 under development by Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Caltech Optical Observatories. This square grid 66-by-66 actuator mirror has the largest number of actuators of any deformable mirror currently available and will enable high-contrast imaging for direct exoplanet imaging science at the Palomar 200" diameter Hale Telescope. We present optical measurements of the powered and unpowered mirror surface, influence functions, linearity of the actuators, and creep of the actuators. We also quantify the effect of changes in humidity.

  20. Global feedforward and glocal feedback control of large deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppel, Thomas; Sawodny, Oliver

    2011-09-01

    With an increasing demand for high spatial resolution and fast temporal response of AO components for ELTs, the need for actively controlled, electronically damped deformable mirrors is evident. With typically more than 1000 actuators and collocated sensors, the evolving multi-input multi-output control task for shaping the deformable mirror requires sophisticated control concepts. Although global position control of the mirror would be the most promising solution, the computational complexity for high order spatial control of the deformable element typically exceeds available computing power. Due to this reason, existing deformable membrane mirrors for large telescopes incorporate local feedback instead of global feedback control and neglect some of the global dynamics of the deformable mirror. As a side effect, coupling of the separately controlled actuators through the deformable membrane can lead to instability of the individually stable loops and draws the need for carefully designing the control parameters of the local feedback loops. In this presentation, the computational demands for global position control of deformable mirrors are revisited and a less demanding model-based modal control concept for large deformable membrane mirrors with distributed force actuators and collocated position sensors is presented. Both global feedforward and glocal feedback control is employed in a two-degree-of-freedom control structure allowing for separately designing tracking performance and disturbance rejection. In order to implement state feedback control, non-measureable state information is reconstructed by using model-based distributed state observers. By taking into account the circular symmetry of the deformable mirror geometry, the computational complexity of the algorithms is discussed and model reduction techniques with quasi-static state approximation are presented. As an example, the geometric layout of required sensor / actuator wiring and computational

  1. Modeling of Intellite 3 Layer Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A

    2002-04-15

    This is a report on modeling of the Intellite three layer membrane mirror design. The goal of this project was to provide Intellite with a model that will allow them to design a mirror with confidence.

  2. Wavefront correction with a 37-actuator ferrofluid deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Denis; Borra, Ermanno F; Thibault, Simon

    2007-12-24

    This paper discusses an innovative low-cost deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid) whose surface is actuated by an hexagonal array of small current carrying coils. Predicted and experimental performances of a 37-actuator ferrofluid deformable mirror are presented along with wavefront correction examples. We show the validity of the model used to compute the actuators currents to obtain a desired wavefront shape. We demonstrate that the ferrofluid deformable mirror can correct a 11 microm low order aberrated wavefront to a residual RMS error of 0.05 microm corresponding to a Strehl ratio of 0.82.

  3. Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control.

    PubMed

    Nam, Saekwang; Park, Suntak; Yun, Sungryul; Park, Bongje; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2016-01-11

    We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

  4. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a gradient approach and an additional deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2015-09-01

    High development cost is a challenge for space telescopes and imaging satellites. One of the primary reasons for this high cost is the development of the primary mirror, which must meet diffraction limit surface figure requirements. Recent efforts to develop lower cost, lightweight, replicable primary mirrors include development of silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors and carbon fiber mirrors. The silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors at the Naval Postgraduate School do not meet the surface quality required for an optical telescope due to high spatial frequency residual surface errors. A technique under investigation at the Naval Postgraduate School is to correct the residual surface figure error using a deformable mirror in the optical path. We present a closed loop feedback gradient controller to actively control a SMT active segment and an additional deformable mirror to reduce residual wavefront error. The simulations and experimental results show that the gradient controller reduces the residual wavefront error more than an integral controller.

  5. Foundry Microfabrication of Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-28

    FOUNDRY MICROFABRICATION OF DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS DISSERTATION William D. Cowan, Major, USAF AFIT/DS/ENG/98-07 The views...Adaptive Optics William D. Cowan, MSEE, BSEE Major, USAF Approved: ^rVC/C-^* •ŕ . ; "Chain ^_ Victor M. Bright, Ph.D., Committee’Ch irman AFIT...DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of

  6. Deformable mirror designs for extreme AO (XAO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaco, Jeffrey; Wirth, Allan

    2014-08-01

    One of the science missions for the next generation of extremely large ground based telescopes (30-42m apertures) is the imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets. To achieve that goal an Adaptive Optics (AO) subsystem with a very large number of corrected modes is required. To provide contrast ratios in the range of 10-9 or better for a 42m telescope an AO system with 25,000 to 60,000 channels will be needed. This is approximately an order of magnitude beyond the current state of the art. Adaptive Optics Associates Xinetics has developed the Photonex Module Deformable Mirror (DM) technology specifically to address the needs of extreme AO for high contrast applications. A Photonex Module is a monolithic block of electrostrictive ceramic in which a high density of individually addressable actuators are formed by screen printing of electrodes and partial wire saw cutting of the ceramic. The printed electrode structures also allow all electrical connections to be made at the back surface of the module via flex circuits. Actuator spacings of 1mm or less have been achieved using this approach. The individual modules can be edge butted and bonded to achieve high actuator count. The largest DMs fabricated to date have 4096 actuators in a 64X64mm array. In this paper the engineering challenges in extending this technology by a factor of ten or more in actuator count will be discussed. A conceptual design for a DM suitable for XAO will be presented. Approaches for a support structure that will maintain the low spatial frequency surface figure of this large (~0.6m) DM and for the electrical interface to the tens of thousands of actuators will be discussed. Finally, performance estimates will be presented.

  7. Ferroelectric actuator testing for deformable-mirror applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, Thomas P.; Schell, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Low voltage ferroelectric microdisplacement actuators are excellent candidates for use in zonal correction deformable mirrors (DMs) used in adaptive optical systems. Selection/specification is a critical process, however, since the device's electro-mechanical performance largely determines the mirror performance, and its electrical load characteristics strongly influence the cost of drive electronics. Several commercially available low voltage actuator devices were tested to establish a database for new DM designs. Both quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics were investigated. Test results are presented and conclusions are drawn concerning the merits of each device for typical deformable mirror applications.

  8. Correcting Surface Figure Error in Imaging Satellites Using a Deformable Mirror

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    is relayed to the deformable mirror by two 60 mm focal length achromatic doublet relays. From the DM, two 175 mm focal length achromatic doublets...mirror segment on the Naval Postgraduate School Segmented Mirror Telescope to test the ability of a deformable mirror to correct inherent surface figure...deformable mirror to correct surface figure error on the Segmented Mirror Telescope mirror segments to achieve 55% root mean square improvement for

  9. High-density deformable mirrors to enable coronographic planet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ealey, Mark A.; Trauger, John T.

    2004-02-01

    Active wavefront correction of a space telescope provides a technology path for extremely high contrast imaging astronomy at levels well beyond the capabilities of current telescope systems. A precision deformable mirror technology intended specifically for wavefront correction in a visible/near-infrared space telescope has been developed at Xinetics and extensively tested at JPL over the past several years. Active wavefront phase correction has been demonstrated to 1-Angstrom rms over the spatial frequency range accessible to a mirror with an array of actuators on a 1-mm pitch. High density deformable mirror technology is based on a modular actuator arrays that are scalable to 1000s of actuator elements coupled to the surface of a thin mirror facesheet. Precision actuator control is done by using a low-power, vacuum compatible multiplexed driver system. Mirror surface figure, actuator influence function, and dimensional stability will be given in the context of the Eclipse point design for a coronagraphic space telescope.

  10. An Image Stabilization Optical System Using Deformable Freeform Mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qun; Cheng, Xuemin; Kang, Jiqiang; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors is proposed that enables the ray sets to couple dynamically in the object and image space. It aims to correct image blurring and degradation when there is relative movement between the imaging optical axis and the object. In this method, Fermat's principle and matrix methods are used to describe the optical path of the entire optical system with a shift object plane and a fixed corresponding image plane in the carrier coordinate system. A constant optical path length is determined for each ray set, so the correspondence between the object and the shift free image point is used to calculate the solution to the points on the surface profile of the deformable mirrors (DMs). Off-axis three-mirror anastigmats are used to demonstrate the benefits of optical image stabilization with one- and two-deformable mirrors. PMID:25599423

  11. Photocontrolled deformable mirrors as potential technology for astronomical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintavalla, Martino; Bonora, Stefano; Natali, Dario; Bianco, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Deformable mirrors are key optical elements in modern astronomical telescopes and instrumentation both for active and adaptive optical systems. Different technological approaches have been exploited for the realization of the deformable mirrors, especially for adaptive optics devices. A new approach is here presented, namely the photo-controlled deformable mirrors, where the size and density of actuators is set by an illumination pattern projected on the back side of a photoconductor. The working principle and an electric model are presented highlighting the features of the material that affect the performances of the mirror in terms of dynamic range and response time. Based on these results, a prototype exploiting ZnSe as photoconductor is reported together with its characterization.

  12. An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qun; Cheng, Xuemin; Kang, Jiqiang; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-01-15

    An image stabilization optical system using deformable freeform mirrors is proposed that enables the ray sets to couple dynamically in the object and image space. It aims to correct image blurring and degradation when there is relative movement between the imaging optical axis and the object. In this method, Fermat's principle and matrix methods are used to describe the optical path of the entire optical system with a shift object plane and a fixed corresponding image plane in the carrier coordinate system. A constant optical path length is determined for each ray set, so the correspondence between the object and the shift free image point is used to calculate the solution to the points on the surface profile of the deformable mirrors (DMs). Off-axis three-mirror anastigmats are used to demonstrate the benefits of optical image stabilization with one- and two-deformable mirrors.

  13. Study on the micro-heater geometry in In,2O3 micro electro mechanical systems gas sensor platforms and effects on NO2 gas detecting performances.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo-Seok; Kim, Bum-Joon; Lee, Hoi-Jung; Choi, Jung-Woon; Kim, Si-Dong; Min, Nam-Ki

    2012-02-01

    Micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) platforms for gas sensing devices with the co-planar type micro-heaters were designed, fabricated and its effects on the In2O3 gas sensors were investigated. Micro-heaters in MEMS gas sensor platforms were designed in the four-type heater patterns with different geometries. Electro-thermal characterizations showed that the designed platforms had highly thermal efficiency because the micro hot-plate structures were formed in the diaphragm and the thermal efficiencies were analyzed for all of 16 models and compared with each other, respectively. The designed micro-platforms were fabricated by MEMS process, and Indium oxide (In2O3) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel process and dropped on the MEMS platforms for detecting the noxious oxide gas (NO2) Fabricated micro-platforms had a very low power consumption in the fabricated 16-type models, especially, the minimum power consumption was 41 mW at the operating temperature of 250 degrees C. After experiments on gas sensing characteristics to NO2 gases, fabricated In2O3 gas sensors had almost the same gas sensitivity (Rs) at the operation temperature of 250 degrees C. It is concluded that the micro-heater geometries, pattern shapes and sizes, can be influential on the power consumption of the devices and its gas sensing characteristics.

  14. Functional Micro-Dispensers based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) integrated with fabrics as functional materials to protect humans from mosquito feeding.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Ulrich R; Gurman, Pablo; Clark, Gary G; Elman, Noel

    2015-12-28

    Functional Micro-Dispensers (FMDs) based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) were designed to deliver spatial repellents that reduce the ability of mosquitoes to feed on humans. FMDs were integrated with fabrics as functional materials for protection against mosquito bites. The use of MEMS devices provides an unprecedented control over the release kinetics by means of integration with electronics for selective and timely activation of each device to perform controlled release of pesticides in air. In addition, because MEMS manufacturing techniques evolved from the microelectronic industry, FMDs can be mass produced at very low cost. Trials using FMDs that contained transfluthrin improved protection against mosquito feeding in human subjects above that of permethrin-treated uniform fabric worn on the arm of the volunteer. The overall reduction in feeding was approximately 90% compared to the untreated fabric control, and about 50% reduction compared to the permethrin-treated fabric control. The devices were efficacious over course of 32 days. FMDs have the potential for a simple and cost-effective implementation for mass adoption as wearable devices integrated in fabrics as active functional materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Design of a microelectronic circuit to amplify and modulate the signal of a micro-electro-mechanical systems arterial pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela-Peóa, E.; Quiñones-Urióstegui, I.; Martínez-Piñon, F.; Álvarez-Chávez, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    In the article, the design and stimulation is presented of an integrated circuit for the amplification and modulation of an electrical signal proceeding from a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) arterial pressure sensor. The signal consists of voltage ranking from 0-10 mV, 1 mA and frequency of 50- 500 Hz. This simple but effective design consists of an operational amplifier (op-amp) configured as a differential amplifier, which amplifies the signal (up to 1V and 10 mA), originating from a Wheatstone bridge in the MEMS sensor, and then this signal is modulated by Pulse width modulation (PWM). The technology employed in this circuit is MOSIS AMIS 1.5 um. The circuit was designed with a two-state op-amp, which is utilized in diverse stages of the system. The use of a differential amplifier, the op-amp, and PWM simplifies the design and renders this compact due to the employment of few components (40 transistors). The use of the PWM facilitates the signaling process at later stages. Results comprise the design of the circuit and the simulation. This consists of a schematic diagram of the layers of all the rules specified in the MOSIS AMIS 1.5 um. Electric and LTSpice software was employed for the design and simulation of the circuit. We present a complete description of the design philosophy, design criteria, figures, and final results.

  16. Development of an atmospheric turbulence simulator for deformable mirror evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Shin, Sunmi; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Yang, Ho-Soon; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-10-01

    Currently we are developing a 10 cm silicon carbide (SiC) deformable mirror with 37 actuators operating at 500 Hz. The deformable mirror will be applied in a 1.5 m telescope. An adaptive optics system capability for the deformable mirror was simulated and performance was predicted based on the Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence model. However, in order to confirm the predictions, a closed-loop adaptive optics system was constructed with the insertion of an atmospheric turbulence simulator consisting of two point sources, a Boston deformable mirror, and double random phase plates. In order to simulate a binary star, the two point sources are mounted on 3-axis micron meter stages and are optically merged into a single beam path by a beam splitter cube. The light intensity of each source is adjustable to a corresponding stellar magnitude, while the angular separation can be precisely adjusted by moving the 3-axis stages. The atmospheric disturbance is generated by shaping the Boston deformable mirror and also by rotating the double phase plates. The Fried parameter of the generated the atmospheric disturbance corresponds to an area from 7 to 15 cm at 500 nm at the telescope pupil plane, which represents typical seeing conditions at the Bohyun observatory, South Korea.

  17. Evaluation of the thin deformable active optics mirror concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The active optics concept using a thin deformable mirror has been successfully demonstrated using a 30 in. diameter, 1/2 in. thick mirror and a 61 point matrix of forces for alignment. Many of the problems associated with the design, fabrication, and launch of large aperture diffraction-limited astronomical telescopes have been resolved and experimental data created that can provide accurate predictions of performance in orbit.

  18. Optimized actuators for ultrathin deformable primary mirrors.

    PubMed

    Laslandes, Marie; Patterson, Keith; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2015-05-20

    A novel design and selection scheme for surface-parallel actuators for ultrathin, lightweight mirrors is presented. The actuation system consists of electrodes printed on a continuous layer of piezoelectric material bonded to an optical-quality substrate. The electrodes provide almost full coverage of the piezoelectric layer, in order to maximize the amount of active material that is available for actuation, and their shape is optimized to maximize the correctability and stroke of the mirror for a chosen number of independent actuators and for a dominant imperfection mode. The starting point for the design of the electrodes is the observation that the correction of a figure error that has at least two planes of mirror symmetry is optimally done with twin actuators that have the same optimized shape but are rotated through a suitable angle. Additional sets of optimized twin actuators are defined by considering the intersection between the twin actuators, and hence an arbitrarily fine actuation pattern can be generated. It is shown that this approach leads to actuator systems with better performance than simple, geometrically based actuators. Several actuator patterns to correct third-order astigmatism aberrations are presented, and an experimental demonstration of a 41-actuator mirror is also presented.

  19. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2015-07-27

    Large space telescopes made of deployable and lightweight structures suffer from aberrations caused by thermal deformations, gravitational release, and alignment errors which occur during the deployment procedure. An active optics system would allow on-site correction of wave-front errors, and ease the requirements on thermal and mechanical stability of the optical train. In the course of a project funded by the European Space Agency we have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror is able to work in space environment and is designed to correct for large aberrations of low order with high surface fidelity. This paper discusses design, manufacturing and performance results of the deformable mirror.

  20. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: environmental testing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2016-01-25

    We have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror features 44 actuators, has an aperture of 50 mm, and is designed to reproduce low-order Zernike modes with a stroke of several tens of μm. We assessed the space compliance by operating the mirror in thermal vacuum, and exposing it to random and sinusoidal vibrations, as well as to ionizing irradiation. Additionally, the operational life time and the laser power handling capability were tested. The mirror was successfully operated in thermal vacuum at 100 K. We report on the conducted tests and the methods used to evaluate the mirror's performance, and discuss the compliance with the demanded requirements.

  1. Plastic Deformation in Profile-Coated Elliptical KB Mirrors

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Chian; Conley, R.; Qian, J.; ...

    2012-01-01

    Profile coating has been successfully applied to produce elliptical Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors using both cylindrical and flat Si substrates. Previously, focusing widths of 70 nm with 15-keV monochromatic and 80 nm with white beam were achieved using a flat Si substrate. Now, precision elliptical KB mirrors with sub-nm figure errors are produced with both Au and Pt coatings on flat substrates. Recent studies of bare Si-, Au-, and Pt-coated KB mirrors under prolonged synchrotron X-ray radiation and low-temperature vacuum annealing will be discussed in terms of film stress relaxation and Si plastic deformation.

  2. Actuation of Deformable Mirrors Using Laser Controlled Pistons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Current deformable mirrors used for adaptive optics employ many actuators to adjust the mirror in order to compensate for optical irregularities. These mechanical actuators, which can number in the hundreds for a given mirror, require a significant amount of electrical wires in order to be controlled. The objective of this research is to implement a different type of actuator that can be controlled without the use of wires. The actuator developed employs a laser to quickly heat and expand the air in a closed "cell." When the air expands, it pushes a membrane that causes the mirror to move. Creating an array of these cells, and scanning them with a laser can control a deformable mirror. Testing showed that a single cell with a 5-mm diameter and 10-mm length can deflect a membrane of aluminized mylar in excess of our minimum requirement of 20 microns. These cells can now be assembled in a 5x5 matrix and attached to many small Mirrors. An electro-mechanical scanning assembly can be used to aim the laser directly onto individual cells causing the mirror at that location to move.

  3. Actuation of Deformable Mirrors Using Laser Controlled Pistons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Current deformable mirrors used for adaptive optics employ many actuators to adjust the mirror in order to compensate for optical irregularities. These mechanical actuators, which can number in the hundreds for a given mirror, require a significant amount of electrical wires in order to be controlled. The objective of this research is to implement a different type of actuator that can be controlled without the use of wires. The actuator developed employs a laser to quickly heat and expand the air in a closed 'cell'. When the air expands, it pushes a membrane that causes the mirror to move. Creating an array of these cells, and scanning them with a laser can control a deformable mirror. Testing showed that a single cell with a 5 mm diameter and 10 mm in length can deflect a membrane of aluminized Mylar in excess of our minimum requirement of 20 microns. These cells can now be assembled in a 5 x 5 matrix and attached to many small mirrors. An electro-mechanical scanning assembly can be used to aim the laser directly onto individual cells causing the mirror at that location to move.

  4. Adaptive optics ophthalmologic systems using dual deformable mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S; Olivier, S; Chen, D; Sadda, S; Joeres, S; Zawadzki, R; Werner, J S; Miller, D

    2007-02-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) have been increasingly combined with a variety of ophthalmic instruments over the last decade to provide cellular-level, in-vivo images of the eye. The use of MEMS deformable mirrors in these instruments has recently been demonstrated to reduce system size and cost while improving performance. However, currently available MEMS mirrors lack the required range of motion for correcting large ocular aberrations, such as defocus and astigmatism. In order to address this problem, we have developed an AO system architecture that uses two deformable mirrors, in a woofer/tweeter arrangement, with a bimorph mirror as the woofer and a MEMS mirror as the tweeter. This setup provides several advantages, including extended aberration correction range, due to the large stroke of the bimorph mirror, high order aberration correction using the MEMS mirror, and additionally, the ability to ''focus'' through the retina. This AO system architecture is currently being used in four instruments, including an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system and a retinal flood-illuminated imaging system at the UC Davis Medical Center, a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) at the Doheny Eye Institute, and an OCT system at Indiana University. The design, operation and evaluation of this type of AO system architecture will be presented.

  5. Adaptive optics control system for segmented MEMS deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Carl J.; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Besse, Marc

    2010-02-01

    Iris AO has developed a full closed-loop control system for control of segmented MEMS deformable mirrors. It is based on a combination of matched wavefront sensing, modal wavefront estimation, and well-calibrated open-loop characteristics. This assures closed-loop operation free of problems related to co-phasing segments or undetectable waffle patterns. This controller strategy results in relatively simple on-line computations which are suitable for implementation on low cost digital signal processors. It has been successfully implemented on Iris AO's 111 actuator (37 segment) deformable mirrors used in test-beds and research systems.

  6. Ferrofluid based deformable mirrors: a new approach to adaptive optics using liquid mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Phil R.; Bergamasco, R.; Bérubé, Vincent; Borra, Ermanno F.; Gingras, Julie; Ritcey, Anna-Marie R.; Rioux, Myriam; Robitaille, Nathalie; Thibault, Simon; Vieira da Silva, L., Jr.; Yockell-Lelièvre, Helene

    2003-02-01

    The trend towards ever larger telescopes and more advanced adaptive optics systems is driving the need for deformable mirrors with a large number of low cost actuators. Liquid mirrors have long been recognized a potential low cost alternative to conventional solid mirrors. By using a water or oil based ferrofluid we are able to benefit from a stronger magnetic response than is found in magnetic liquid metal amalgams and avoid the difficulty of passing a uniform current through a liquid. Depositing a thin silver colloid known as a metal liquid like film (MELLF) on the ferrofluid surface solves the problem of low reflectivity of pure ferrofluids. This combination provides a liquid optical surface that can be precisely shaped in a magnetic field. We present experimental results obtained with a prototype deformable liquid mirror based on this combination.

  7. Micro-patterning of NdFeB and SmCo magnet films for integration into micro-electro-mechanical-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, A.; Marcoux, C.; Desloges, B.; Grechishkin, R.; Givord, D.; Dempsey, N. M.

    2009-03-01

    The integration of high-performance RE-TM (NdFeB and SmCo) hard magnetic films into micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) requires their patterning at the micron scale. In this paper we report on the applicability of standard micro-fabrication steps (film deposition onto topographically patterned substrates, wet etching and planarization) to the patterning of 5-8 μm thick RE-TM films. While NdFeB comprehensively fills micron-scaled trenches in patterned substrates, SmCo deposits are characterized by poor filling of the trench corners, which poses a problem for further processing by planarization. The magnetic hysteresis loops of both the NdFeB and SmCo patterned films are comparable to those of non-patterned films prepared under the same deposition/annealing conditions. A micron-scaled multipole magnetic field pattern is directly produced by the unidirectional magnetization of the patterned films. NdFeB and SmCo show similar behavior when wet etched in an amorphous state: etch rates of approximately 1.25 μm/min and vertical side walls which may be attributed to a large lateral over-etch of typically 20 μm. Chemical-mechanical-planarization (CMP) produced material removal rates of 0.5-3 μm/min for amorphous NdFeB. Ar ion etching of such films followed by the deposition of a Ta layer prior to film crystallization prevented degradation in magnetic properties compared to non-patterned films.

  8. Precise tumor size measurement under constant pressure by novel real-time micro-electro-mechanical-system hood for proper treatment (with videos).

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirohito; Takao, Hidekuni; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Tumor size determination is subject to the measurement method used by endoscopists and is especially dependent on the air quantity. As the intraluminal pressure must be measured objectively to obtain an accurate tumor size measurement, insufflation can affect the results. Thus, we examined the utility of a micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) pressure sensor hood. Twenty consecutive air insufflation/deflation tests were performed in vivo using a dog's stomach. Correlations between the actual pressure measured and the signal strength of the MEMS hood were measured. We marked 2 points 20 mm on the antrum and another 3 points, with insufflation corresponding to the maximum stable distance of two markings. We performed five insufflation/deflation tests to obtain the relationship between pressure and distances to accurately measure the distance under constant pressure. In the air insufflation/deflation test performed 20 consecutive times, the MEMS hood signal strength (V) and the pressure measurement sensor values (mmHg) showed good correlation. There was good correlation between intraluminal pressures of 2.5-40 mmHg and the two marking distances on the antrum (correlation coefficient 0.952) (P < 0.05). However, once the intraluminal pressure reached a certain level (40 mmHg), expansion of the two marking distances ceased. The same measurements were conducted on the greater curvatures of the lower body and middle body and on the lesser curvature of the lower body. Correct tumor size measurements using a MEMS hood enable a more accurate diagnosis, which can be used to develop suitable treatment strategies.

  9. Ultrabroadband pulse shaping with a push-pull deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Stefano; Brida, Daniele; Villoresi, Paolo; Cerullo, Giulio

    2010-10-25

    We report the programmable pulse shaping of ultrabroadband pulses by the use of a novel design of electrostatic deformable mirror based on push pull technology. We shape few-optical pulses from near-IR and visible optical parametric amplifiers, and demonstrate strong-field control of excited state population transfer in a dye molecule.

  10. Wavefront control in space with MEMS deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, Kerri L.; Marinan, Anne D.; Novak, Benjamin; Kerr, Caitlin; Webber, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    To meet the high contrast requirement of 1 × 10-10 to image an Earth-like planet around a Sun-like star, space telescopes equipped with coronagraphs require wavefront control systems. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are a key element of a wavefront control system, as they correct for imperfections, thermal distortions, and diffraction that would otherwise corrupt the wavefront and ruin the contrast. The goal of the CubeSat Deformable Mirror technology demonstration mission is to test the ability of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) deformable mirror to perform wavefront control on-orbit on a nanosatellite platform. In this paper, we consider two approaches for a MEMS deformable mirror technology demonstration payload that will fit within the mass, power, and volume constraints of a CubeSat: 1) a Michelson interferometer and 2) a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. We clarify the constraints on the payload based on the resources required for supporting CubeSat subsystems drawn from subsystems that we have developed for a different CubeSat flight project. We discuss results from payload lab prototypes and their utility in defining mission requirements.

  11. Finite element analysis to evaluate optical mirror deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izazaga-Pérez, R.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Villalobos-Mendoza, B.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we describe the use of Finite Element Analysis software to simulate the deformations of an optical mirror. We use Finite Element Method software as a tool to simulate the mirror deformations assuming that it is a thin plate that can be mechanically tensed or compressed; the Finite Element Analysis give us information about the displacements of the mirror from an initial position and the tensions that remains in the surface. The information obtained by means of Finite Element Analysis can be easily exported to a coordinate system and processed in a simulation environment. Finally, a ray-tracing subroutine is used in the obtained data giving us information in terms of aberration coefficients. We present some results of the simulations describing the followed procedure.

  12. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony

    2010-01-31

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  13. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, S.; Yashchuk, V.V.; Goldberg, K.A.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; McKinney, W.R.; Morrison, G.; Warwick, T.

    2009-09-18

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situvisible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  14. Simple unimorph deformable mirrors fabricated from piezo buzzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribošek, Jaka; Diaci, Janez; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    This study shows how unimorph deformable mirrors can be effectively fabricated out of commercially available piezo-buzzers without any high-tech equipment. Our design involves a quad-channel mirror with monolithically integrated flexures. The mirror is controlled by a custom quad-channel high-voltage driver unit, capable of 93 Vp-p and 75 kpps performance. The system exhibits 16-bit resolution over the angular working range of  ±1.85 mrad, with 0.04 mrad V-1 angular sensitivity and 14% hysteresis. We demonstrate the mirror performance for focus control in microscopy and high-precision laser beam steering, opening a wide variety of applications in computational imaging, confocal microscopy, optical tweezing and laser lithography.

  15. Micro electro-mechanical heater

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Asif, Syed Amanulla Syed; Cyrankowski, Edward; Warren, Oden Lee

    2016-04-19

    A sub-micron scale property testing apparatus including a test subject holder and heating assembly. The assembly includes a holder base configured to couple with a sub-micron mechanical testing instrument and electro-mechanical transducer assembly. The assembly further includes a test subject stage coupled with the holder base. The test subject stage is thermally isolated from the holder base. The test subject stage includes a stage subject surface configured to receive a test subject, and a stage plate bracing the stage subject surface. The stage plate is under the stage subject surface. The test subject stage further includes a heating element adjacent to the stage subject surface, the heating element is configured to generate heat at the stage subject surface.

  16. Micro electro-mechanical heater

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Asif, Syed Amanulla Syed; Cyrankowski, Edward; Warren, Oden Lee

    2017-09-12

    A sub-micron scale property testing apparatus including a test subject holder and heating assembly. The assembly includes a holder base configured to couple with a sub-micron mechanical testing instrument and electro-mechanical transducer assembly. The assembly further includes a test subject stage coupled with the holder base. The test subject stage is thermally isolated from the holder base. The test subject stage includes a stage subject surface configured to receive a test subject, and a stage plate bracing the stage subject surface. The stage plate is under the stage subject surface. The test subject stage further includes a heating element adjacent to the stage subject surface, the heating element is configured to generate heat at the stage subject surface.

  17. HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING VIA MODAL CONVERGENCE OF DEFORMABLE MIRROR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Feiling

    2012-06-01

    For extremely high contrast imaging, such as direct observation of faint stellar companions, an adaptive optics system is required to produce low-halo and low-speckle regions in the focal plane. A method for deformable mirror control is proposed to achieve this goal. The method relies on a modal convergence of the deformable mirror driven by a focal-plane metric. The modal sets are derived from the Walsh functions. The Walsh-function modes serve two purposes: the expansion of the actuator displacements and the expansion of the phase functions. Taking advantage of the unique properties of the modal functions, a universal control algorithm is devised for the realization of high-contrast focal planes with and without the help of conventional coronagraphy. Numerical modeling is conducted to simulate complete imaging systems under various scenarios. It is shown that the proposed method reliably produces high-contrast focal planes using either a segmented or a membrane mirror. In the presence of random aberration the method is shown to be able to maintain high-contrast focal planes. Requiring neither retrieval of electric fields nor detailed knowledge of the deformable mirrors, this technique may allow high-contrast imaging in real time.

  18. Lightweight in-plane actuated deformable mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Michael J.

    This research focused on lightweight, in-plane actuated, deformable mirrors, with the ultimate goal of developing a 20-meter or larger diameter light gathering aperture for space telescopes. Membrane optics is the study of these structures which may be stowed compactly and unfurled in orbit. This effort comprised four research areas: modelling, analytical solutions, surface control strategy, and scaling. Initially, experimental results were compared to theory using a 0.127 meter diameter deformable mirror testbed. The mirror was modelled using finite elements with MSC.Nastran software, where a boundary tension field was determined using laser vibrometer data. A non-linear solution technique was used to incorporate the membrane stiffening from the applied tension. Statically obtained actuator influence functions were compared to experimentally achieved data, and then a least squares approach was used as the basis for creating a quasi-static control algorithm. Experimental simultaneous tracking of Zernike tip, tilt, and defocus modes was successfully demonstrated. The analytical solutions to plate-membrane and beam-string ordinary differential equation representing the deformable mirror equations were developed. A simplified approach to modelling the axisymmetric cases was also presented. Significantly, it was shown both analytically and through numerical analysis that static actuation for a mirror with a discrete electrode pattern and a high tension-to-stiffness ratio was simply a localized piston displacement in the region of the actuator. Next, a novel static control strategy, the Modal Transformation Method, was developed for membrane mirrors. The method was implemented in finite element simulation, and shows the capability of the in-plane actuated mirror to form Zernike surfaces within an interior, or clear aperture, region using a number of statically-actuated structural modes. Lastly, the scaling problem for membrane optics was addressed. Linear modelling was

  19. "Pocket" Deformable Mirror for an Integrated On-Mirror Adaptive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, L.; Voronstov, M.; Wangsness, P.

    Existing HEL beam control architectures are extremely complicated because they require installation and alignment of a large number of optical elements, resulting in substantial increase of the entire HEL system size, weight and cost. There is a strong interest in designing new robust beam control capabilities integrated directly to a beam director system. The discussed technical effort is focused on development and demonstration of a new adaptive beam director (ABD) consisting of a beam forming telescope with wavefront compensation integrated solely on its ultra-lightweight primary mirror. This on-mirror AO system will be controlled using a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) controller specifically designed for target-in-the-loop (TIL) operation. The key component of the on-mirror AO system is its primary mirror. This mirror contains an array of pockets machined on its backside, called a pocket-mirror. A special dielectric layer deposited on the front surface of the pocket-mirror is highly reflective for the HEL wavelength ???HEL, and semi-transparent for the laser illuminator wavelength ?ILL. Thus the wave ?ILL scattered by the target surface enters inside the mirror pockets, while the outgoing HEL beam with wavelength ?HEL is totally reflected. The pockets of the ABD pocket-mirror include opto-electronic components that can provide local (inside pocket-window) wavefront correction and sensing. Wavefront correction at each pocket aperture is performed using electrically sectioned piezo-ceramic annular rings made from thin (~0.3 mm) bimorph discs glued to the pocket bottoms. Control voltages applied to these electrodes result in mechanical deformation of the pocket-window front surface thus providing compensation of low-order aberrations at each pocket-window. Packaging the pockets with a high fill factor allows high resolution control of the beam director primary mirror shape. Preliminary analysis has shown that surface stroke near 3 microns with

  20. Effects of alloying and local order in AuNi contacts for Ohmic radio frequency micro electro mechanical systems switches via multi-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddy, Benjamin E.; Kingon, Angus I.; Irving, Douglas L.

    2013-05-01

    Ohmic RF-MEMS switches hold much promise for low power wireless communication, but long-term degradation currently plagues their reliable use. Failure in these devices occurs at the contact and is complicated by the fact that the same asperities that bear the mechanical load are also important to the flow of electrical current needed for signal processing. Materials selection holds the key to overcoming the barriers that prevent widespread use. Current efforts in materials selection have been based on the material's (or alloy's) ability to resist oxidation as well as its room-temperature properties, such as hardness and electrical conductivity. No ideal solution has yet been found via this route. This may be due, in part, to the fact that the in-use changes to the local environment of the asperity are not included in the selection criteria. For example, Joule heating would be expected to raise the local temperature of the asperity and impose a non-equilibrium thermal gradient in the same region expected to respond to mechanical actuation. We propose that these conditions should be considered in the selection process, as they would be expected to alter mechanical, electrical, and chemical mechanisms in the vicinity of the surface. To this end, we simulate the actuation of an Ohmic radio frequency micro electro mechanical systems switch by using a multi-scale method to model a current-carrying asperity in contact with a polycrystalline substrate. Our method couples continuum solutions of electrical and thermal transport equations to an underlying molecular dynamics simulation. We present simulations of gold-nickel asperities and substrates in order to evaluate the influence of alloying and local order on the early stages of contact actuation. The room temperature response of these materials is compared to the response of the material when a voltage is applied. Au-Ni interactions are accounted for through modification of the existing Zhou embedded atom method

  1. Integrated multifunctional reprogrammable MEMS deformable mirror and three-dimensional phase retrieval based adaptive optic system implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Stanley

    This research presents a fast three-dimensional phase retrieval approach used to perform optical phase modulation through the use of a segmented Micro-Electro-Mechanical Deformable-Mirror (MEMS-DM). This research demonstrates novel adaptive optic system laser-beam implementations, for beam splitting, beam steering, beam shaping, beam tracking, and aberration correction, using an inherently multifunctional phased array system. Traditional solutions to beam splitting, beam steering, beam shaping (BS3), and beam tracking and aberration correction involve multiple and sometimes costly optical components. For example, beam splitting is normally accomplished with beam splitters, beam steering is normally achieved with gimbaled mechanical devices, and beam shaping is normally done with addressable, polarized, and potentially absorptive devices such as LCDs. In addition, beam tracking and aberration correction techniques require closed loop feedback, which is provided by the closed-loop three-dimensional phase retrieval algorithm implemented in this research. Using the 3D phase retrieval algorithm with a desired far-field amplitude pattern as a constraint, a segmented wavefront control device is shown to simultaneously perform the aforementioned functions through its inherent reconfigurable operation. The MEMS-DM used is a foundry micro-fabricated device that is attractive for optical phase modulation applications primarily because of its inherent low cost and low driving voltages. The MEMS-DM provides the added advantage of "discrete imaging" versus "continuously moving" imaging systems presented by current technology. The MEMS-DM shapes the beam based on the results of a modified Fienup and Roggemann/Lee phase retrieval algorithm implemented within the system. The optical bench setup and the experimental results for BS3 and beam tracking and aberration correction are presented. Simulations have been developed and presented to represent the optical system and the phase

  2. Modal dynamics of magnetic-liquid deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Denis; Thibault, Simon; Borra, Ermanno F; Boivin, Simon F

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic-liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) were introduced by our group in 2004 and numerous developments have been made since then. The usefulness of this type of mirror in various applications has already been shown, but experimental data on their dynamics are still lacking. A complete theoretical modeling of MLDM dynamics is a complex task because it requires an approach based on magnetohydrodynamics. A purpose of this paper is to present and analyze new experimental data of the dynamics of these mirrors from open-loop step response measurements and show that a basic transfer function modeling is adequate to achieve closed-loop control. Also, experimental data on the eigenmodes dynamic is presented and a modal-based control approach is suggested.

  3. Study on machining deformation of the ultra-thin mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    In shape processing of the ultra-thin mirror, deformation will be produced under cutting forces, which is a major cause of quality deterioration. An ultra-thin mirror with diameter-thickness ratio more than 10 is studied in this paper. Rigidity characteristic of the grinding process by diamond wheel is analyzed by FEM. A receptance model of the micro-cutting process and the surface accuracy is established by a self-adaptive multi-scale method according the first strength method. And the effectiveness of the mathematical model is verified by experience. And the dynamic stiffness caused by grinding is optimized. As a result, deformation of the optical surface is reduced to 0.004λ and the acceptable surface accuracy can be achieved.

  4. Flextensional Single Crystal Piezoelectric Actuators for Membrane Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Sahul, Raffi; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2006-01-01

    Large aperture and light weight space telescopes requires adaptive optics with deformable mirrors capable of large amplitude aberration corrections at a broad temperature range for space applications including NASA missions such as SAFIR, TPF, Con-X, etc. The single crystal piezoelectric actuators produced at TRS offer large stroke, low hysteresis, and an excellent cryogenic strain response. Specifically, the recently developed low profile, low voltage flextensional single crystal piezoelectric actuators with dimensions of 18 x 5 x 1 mm showed stroke larger than 95 microns under 300 V. Furthermore, flextensional actuator retained approx. 40-50% of its room temperature strain at liquid Nitrogen environment. In this paper, ATILA FEM design of flextensional actuators, actuator fabrication, and characterization results will be presented for the future work on membrane deformable mirror.

  5. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-03-18

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language.

  6. Smart structures for deformable mirrors actuated by piezocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Di Sanzo, D.; Airoldi, A.; Sala, G.; Zerbi, F. M.

    2010-07-01

    Deformable mirrors actuated by smart structures are promising devices for next generation astronomical instrumentation. The piezo technology and in particular piezoceramics is currently among the most investigated structural materials. Fragility makes Ceramic materials extremely vulnerable to accidental breakage during bonding and embedding processes and limits the ability to comply to curved surfaces (typical of mirrors). Moreover lead-based piezoceramics typically have relevant additional masses. To overcome these limitations, we studied the applicability of composites piezoceramics actuators to smart structures with these purposes. We developed a combined Finite Element and Raytracing analysis devoted to a parametric performance predictions of a smart Piezocomposites based substrate applicable to deformable mirrors. We took in detail into account the possibility to change the focal length of the mirror keeping a satisfactory image quality. In this paper we present a specific type of Piezocomposite actuators and numerical/experimental techniques purposely developed to integrate them into smart structures. We evaluated numerical and experimental results comparing bonding and embedding of these devices.

  7. Miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaylor, Brant M.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Greenfield, Nathan J.; Roos, Peter A.; Seger, Eric M.; Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2012-03-01

    We present a miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors. Bridger Photonics, Inc. (Bridger) in collaboration with Montana State University (MSU), has developed electrostatically actuated deformable MEMS mirrors for use in compact focus control and zoom imaging systems. Applications including microscopy, endomicroscopy, robotic surgery and cell-phone cameras. In comparison to conventional systems, our MEMS-based designs require no mechanically moving parts. Both circular and elliptical membranes are now being manufactured at the wafer level and possess excellent optical surface quality (membrane flatness < λ/4). The mirror diameters range from 1 - 4 mm. For membranes with a 25 μm air gap, the membrane stroke is 10 μm. In terms of the optical design, the mirrors are considered variable power optical elements. A device with 2 mm diameter and 10 μm stroke can vary its optical power over 40 diopters or 0.04mm∧(-1). Equivalently, this corresponds to a focal length ranging from infinity to 25 mm. We have designed and demonstrated a zoom system using two MOEMS elements and exclusively commercial off-the-shelf optical components to achieve an optical zoom of 1.9x with a 15° full field of view. The total optical track length of the system is 36 mm. The design is approximately 30 mm x 30 mm x 20 mm including the optomechanical housing and image sensor. With custom optics, we anticipate achieving form factors that are compatible with incorporation into cell phones.

  8. Lateral shearing interferometry with a deformable mirror for wavefront analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garoi, F.; Apostol, D.; Schiopu, P.

    2010-11-01

    A self-referencing inteferometric method of wavefront sensing based on lateral shearing interferometry, able to measure the local slope of a wavefront is described. For this, a deformable mirror is used to manipulate the testing wavefront and a Murty plane-parallel plate interferometer to analyze this wavefront. We demonstrate the interferometer by measuring a series of different wavefront shapes using coherent light. The principle of operation is presented together with practical implementation and experimental results.

  9. Smart structures for deformable mirrors actuated by shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Bettini, P.; Di Landro, L.; Sala, G.; Zerbi, F. M.

    2010-07-01

    Deformable mirrors actuated by smart structures are promising devices for next generation astronomical instrumentation. Thermal activated Shape Memory Alloys are materials able to recover their original shape, after an external deformation, if heated above a characteristic temperature. If the recovery of the shape is completely or partially prevented by the presence of constraints, the material can generate recovery stress. Thanks to this feature, these materials can be positively exploited in Smart Structures if properly embedded into host materials. This paper will show the technological processes developed for an efficient use of SMA-based actuators embedded in smart structures tailored to astronomical instrumentation. In particular the analysis of the interface with the host material. Some possible modeling approaches to the actuators behavior will be addressed taking into account trade-offs between detailed analysis and overall performance prediction as a function of the computational time. We developed a combined Finite Element and Raytracing analysis devoted to a parametric performance predictions of a SMA based substrate applicable to deformable mirrors. We took in detail into account the possibility to change the focal length of the mirror keeping a satisfactory image quality. Finally a possible approach with some preliminary results for an efficient control system for the strongly non-linear SMA actuators will be presented.

  10. A cryogenic 'set-and-forget' deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trines, Robin; Janssen, Huub; Paalvast, Sander; Teuwen, Maurice; Brandl, Bernhard; Rodenhuis, Michiel

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the development, realization and initial characterization of a demonstrator for a cryogenic 'set and forget' deformable mirror. Many optical and cryogenic infrared instruments on modern very and extremely large telescopes aim at diffraction-limited performance and require total wave front errors in the order of 50 nanometers or less. At the same time, their complex optical functionality requires either a large number of spherical mirrors or several complex free-form mirrors. Due to manufacturing and alignment tolerances, each mirror contributes static aberrations to the wave front. Many of these aberrations are not known in the design phase and can only be measured once the system has been assembled. A 'set-and-forget' deformable mirror can be used to compensate for these aberrations, making it especially interesting for systems with complex free-form mirrors or cryogenic systems where access to iterative realignment is very difficult or time consuming. The mirror with an optical diameter of 200 mm is designed to correct wave front aberrations of up to 2 μm root-mean square (rms). The shape of the wave front is approximated by the first 15 Zernike modes. Finite element analysis of the mirror shows a theoretically possible reduction of the wave front error from 2 μm to 53 nm rms. To produce the desired shapes, the mirror surface is controlled by 19 identical actuator modules at the back of the mirror. The actuator modules use commercially available Piezo-Knob actuators with a high technology readiness level (TRL). These provide nanometer resolution at cryogenic temperatures combined with high positional stability, and allow for the system to be powered off once the desired shape is obtained. The stiff design provides a high resonance frequency (>200 Hz) to suppress external disturbances. A full-size demonstrator of the deformable mirror containing 6 actuators and 13 dummy actuators is realized and characterized. Measurement results show that

  11. Polymer-based micro-deformable mirror for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotard, Arnaud; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Conedera, Veronique; Fabre, Norbert; Lanzoni, Patrick; Camon, Henri; Chazallet, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Highly performing adaptive optical (AO) systems are mandatory for next generation giant telescopes as well as next generation instrumentation for 10m-class telescopes, for studying new fields like circumstellar disks and extra-solar planets. These systems require deformable mirrors with very challenging parameters, including number of actuators up to 250 000 and inter-actuator spacing around 500μm. MOEMS-based devices are promising for future deformable mirrors. We are currently developing a micro-deformable mirror (MDM) based on an array of electrostatic actuators with attachment posts to a continuous mirror on top. In order to reach large stroke for low driving voltage, the originality of our approach lies in the elaboration of a sacrificial layer and of a structural layer made of polymer materials. We have developed the first polymer piston-motion actuator: a 10μm thick mobile plate with four springs attached to the substrate, and with an air gap of 10μm exhibits a piston motion of 2μm for 30V, and measured resonance frequency of 6.5kHz is well suited for AO systems. The electrostatic force provides a non-linear actuation, while AO systems are based on linear matrices operations. We have successfully developed a dedicated 14-bit electronics in order to "linearize" the actuation. Actual location of the actuator versus expected location of the actuator is obtained with a standard deviation of 21 nm. Comparison with FEM models shows very good agreement, and design of a complete polymer-based MDM has been done.

  12. MEMS deformable mirror embedded wavefront sensing and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Donald; Schoen, Michael; Bush, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Electrostatic Membrane Deformable Mirror (MDM) technology developed using silicon bulk micro-machining techniques offers the potential of providing low-cost, compact wavefront control systems for diverse optical system applications. Electrostatic mirror construction using bulk micro-machining allows for custom designs to satisfy wavefront control requirements for most optical systems. An electrostatic MDM consists of a thin membrane, generally with a thin metal or multi-layer high-reflectivity coating, suspended over an actuator pad array that is connected to a high-voltage driver. Voltages applied to the array elements deflect the membrane to provide an optical surface capable of correcting for measured optical aberrations in a given system. Electrostatic membrane DM designs are derived from well-known principles of membrane mechanics and electrostatics, the desired optical wavefront control requirements, and the current limitations of mirror fabrication and actuator drive electronics. MDM performance is strongly dependent on mirror diameter and air damping in meeting desired spatial and temporal frequency requirements. In this paper, we present wavefront control results from an embedded wavefront control system developed around a commercially available high-speed camera and an AgilOptics Unifi MDM driver using USB 2.0 communications and the Linux development environment. This new product, ClariFast TM, combines our previous Clarifi TM product offering into a faster more streamlined version dedicated strictly to Hartmann Wavefront sensing.

  13. Speckle reduction in laser projection using a dynamic deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi-Kim-Trinh; Chen, Xuyuan; Svensen, Øyvind; Akram, Muhammad Nadeem

    2014-05-05

    Despite of much effort and significant progress in recent years, speckle removal is still a challenge for laser projection technology. In this paper, speckle reduction by dynamic deformable mirror was investigated. Time varying independent speckle patterns were generated due to the angle diversity introduced by the dynamic mirror, and these speckle patterns were averaged out by the camera or human eyes, thus reducing speckle contrast in the final image. The speckle reduction by the wavelength diversity of the lasers was also studied. Both broadband lasers and narrowband laser were used for experiment. It is experimentally shown that speckle suppression can be attained by the widening of the spectrum of the lasers. Lower speckle contrast reduction was attained by the wavelength diversity for narrowband laser compared to the broadband lasers. This method of speckle reduction is suitable in laser projectors for wide screen applications where high power laser illumination is needed.

  14. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  15. MOEMS deformable mirror testing in cryo for future optical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frederic; Lanzoni, Patrick; Barette, Rudy; Grassi, Emmanuel; Vors, Patrick; Helmbrecht, Michael; Marchis, Franck; Teichman, Alex

    2017-02-01

    MOEMS Deformable Mirrors (DM) are key components for next generation optical instruments implementing innovative adaptive optics systems, in existing telescopes as well as in the future ELTs. Due to the wide variety of applications, these DMs must perform at room temperature as well as in cryogenic and vacuum environment. Ideally, the MOEMS-DMs must be designed to operate in such environment. This is unfortunately usually not the case. We will present some major rules for designing / operating DMs in cryo and vacuum. Next step is to characterize with high accuracy the different DM candidates. We chose to use interferometry for the full characterization of these devices, including surface quality measurement in static and dynamical modes, at ambient and in vacuum/cryo. Thanks to our previous set-up developments, we are placing a compact cryo-vacuum chamber designed for reaching 10-6 mbar and 160K, in front of our custom Michelson interferometer, able to measure performances of the DM at actuator/segment level as well as whole mirror level, with a lateral resolution of 2μm and a sub-nanometric zresolution. Using this interferometric bench, we tested the PTT 111 DM from Iris AO: this unique and robust design uses an array of single crystalline silicon hexagonal mirrors with a pitch of 606μm, able to move in tip, tilt and piston with strokes from 5 to 7μm, and tilt angle in the range of +/- 5mrad. They exhibit typically an open-loop flat surface figure as good as < 20nm rms. A specific mount including electronic and opto-mechanical interfaces has been designed for fitting in the test chamber. Segment deformation, mirror shaping, open-loop operation are tested at room and cryo temperature and results are compared. The device could be operated successfully at 160K. An additional, mainly focus-like, 500 nm deformation is measured at 160K; we were able to recover the best flat in cryo by correcting the focus and local tip-tilts on some segments. Tests on DM with

  16. MEMS deformable mirrors for space and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, T. G.; Bierden, Paul; Cornelissen, Steven A.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents recent progress in the development of MEMS deformable mirrors for space and defense applications. Two different MEMS DM designs are described, along with their corresponding uses in space and defense systems. The designs build on a conventional surface micromachining technology and feature an electrostatic actuation architecture pioneered at Boston University. Key performance characteristics are presented. The device characteristics make them useful for a range of wavefront control applications that include low-power optical modulation, adaptive optics imaging, and laser communication, on both ground-based and space-based platforms.

  17. Shaping light: MOEMS deformable mirrors for microscopes and telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Micromachined deformable mirrors (DMs) have enabled rapid advances in applications ranging from large telescope astronomy and free space laser communication to biological microscopy and retinal imaging over the past decade. In this talk I describe our efforts at Boston University and at Boston Micromachines Corporation to design, fabricate, and control MOEMS DMs for adaptive optics (AO) applications. Integration of the DMs in AO systems is described, along with results demonstrating unprecedented advances in resolution and contrast in microscopes and telescopes challenged by unavoidable wavefront aberrations. MEMS-DM research offers the rare opportunity to introduce technology that is both more economical and more capable than the state-of-the-art.

  18. Simulation and optimal design for deformable mirror supporting structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fu; Wang, Ping; Gong, Yanjue; Lin, Jianlong; Xiang, Huiyu

    2009-11-01

    This article takes a kind of special supporting structure of deformable mirror as an example to make deeply study on its optimal design and validity simulation based on finite element analysis. The original resonance frequency and modes shape of the supporting structure are obtained with the FEA method and the dynamic theory. Then a group of optimized structure parameters are determined with the BP networks and Genetic Algorithm optimal methods. The simulation analyses including random vibration, harmonic response and fatigue life are carried out to demonstrate that the dynamic stiffness of the optimized supporting structure has been improved greatly by the presented optimization method.

  19. Emulation of dynamic wavefront disturbances using a deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Ross A; Wilcox, Williams E; Williams, Timothy H; Michael, Steven; Roth, Jeffrey M

    2009-03-02

    Boundary-layer turbulence resulting from uneven airflow around window interfaces can impact airborne laser communications (lasercom). In the focal plane, these distortions can produce fast jitter and beam break-up, posing challenges for tracking and communications. We demonstrate an experimental emulator that reproduces aircraft aero-optical distortions using a deformable mirror. This boundary-layer emulator resides in a hardware testbed that experimentally mimics air-to-space lasercom links in a controlled, laboratory environment. The boundary-layer emulator operates in the 1.55-mum band and accurately recreates aero-optical distortions at a rate of 2 kilo-frames per second.

  20. Experimental investigation of the deformable mirror with bidirectional thermal actuators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Ma, Xingkun; Gong, Mali; Bian, Qi

    2015-06-29

    A deformable mirror with actuators of thermoelectric coolers (TECs) is introduced in this paper. Due to the bidirectional thermal actuation property of the TEC, both upward and downward surface control is available for the DM. The response functions of the actuators are investigated. A close-loop wavefront control experiment is performed too, where the defocus and the astigmatism were corrected. The results reveal that there is a promising prospect for the novel design to be used in corrections of static aberrations, such as in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF).

  1. Controlling X-ray deformable mirrors during inspection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Idir, Mourad

    2016-11-01

    The X-ray deformable mirror (XDM) is becoming widely used in the present synchrotron/free-electron laser facilities because of its flexibility in correcting wavefront errors or modification of the beam size at the sample location. Owing to coupling among the N actuators of an XDM, (N + 1) or (2N + 1) scans are required to learn the response of each actuator one by one. When the mirror has an important number of actuators (N) and the actuator response time including stabilization or the necessary metrology time is long, the learning process can be time consuming. In this work, a fast and accurate method is presented to drive an XDM to a target shape usually with only three or four measurements during inspection. The metrology data are used as feedback to calculate the curvature discrepancy between the current and the target shapes. Three different derivative estimation methods are introduced to calculate the curvature from measured data. The mirror shape is becoming close to the target through iterative compensations. The feasibility of this simple and effective approach is demonstrated by a series of experiments.

  2. Controlling X-ray deformable mirrors during inspection

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Idir, Mourad

    2016-10-14

    The X-ray deformable mirror (XDM) is becoming widely used in the present synchrotron/free-electron laser facilities because of its flexibility in correcting wavefront errors or modification of the beam size at the sample location. Owing to coupling among the N actuators of an XDM, (N + 1) or (2N + 1) scans are required to learn the response of each actuator one by one. When the mirror has an important number of actuators (N) and the actuator response time including stabilization or the necessary metrology time is long, the learning process can be time consuming. In this paper, a fast andmore » accurate method is presented to drive an XDM to a target shape usually with only three or four measurements during inspection. The metrology data are used as feedback to calculate the curvature discrepancy between the current and the target shapes. Three different derivative estimation methods are introduced to calculate the curvature from measured data. The mirror shape is becoming close to the target through iterative compensations. Finally, the feasibility of this simple and effective approach is demonstrated by a series of experiments.« less

  3. Controlling X-ray deformable mirrors during inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Idir, Mourad

    2016-10-14

    The X-ray deformable mirror (XDM) is becoming widely used in the present synchrotron/free-electron laser facilities because of its flexibility in correcting wavefront errors or modification of the beam size at the sample location. Owing to coupling among the N actuators of an XDM, (N + 1) or (2N + 1) scans are required to learn the response of each actuator one by one. When the mirror has an important number of actuators (N) and the actuator response time including stabilization or the necessary metrology time is long, the learning process can be time consuming. In this paper, a fast and accurate method is presented to drive an XDM to a target shape usually with only three or four measurements during inspection. The metrology data are used as feedback to calculate the curvature discrepancy between the current and the target shapes. Three different derivative estimation methods are introduced to calculate the curvature from measured data. The mirror shape is becoming close to the target through iterative compensations. Finally, the feasibility of this simple and effective approach is demonstrated by a series of experiments.

  4. Optimal mirror deformation for multi conjugate adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffetseder, S.; Ramlau, R.; Yudytskiy, M.

    2016-02-01

    Multi conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) is a system planned for all future extremely large telescopes to compensate in real-time for the optical distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence over a wide field of view. The principles of MCAO are based on two inverse problems: a stable tomographic reconstruction of the turbulence profile followed by the optimal alignment of multiple deformable mirrors (DMs), conjugated to different altitudes in the atmosphere. We present a novel method to treat the optimal mirror deformation problem for MCAO. Contrary to the standard approach where the problem is formulated over a discrete set of optimization directions we focus on the solution of the continuous optimization problem. In the paper we study the existence and uniqueness of the solution and present a Tikhonov based regularization method. This approach gives us the flexibility to apply quadrature rules for a more sophisticated discretization scheme. Using numerical simulations in the context of the European extremely large telescope we show that our method leads to a significant improvement in the reconstruction quality over the standard approach and allows to reduce the numerical burden on the computer performing the computations.

  5. Tilt displacement range testing for a piezoelectric deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongdong; Hao, Qun; Song, Yong; Cheng, Xuemin; Fan, Fan; Li, Heng

    2016-10-01

    In our previous works, we presented a zoom system and image stabilization design based on deformable mirrors (DMs). According to the high bandwidth and free edge characteristics of the piezoelectric deformable mirror (PDM), we tested the system's image-stable capability. We found the PDM could realize some tilt displacements while keeping a certain stable surface shape, it could obtain higher image stabilizing precision when integrated with the traditional mechanical image stabilization systems. In the design of the image stabilization system, the PDM's tilt displacement range is a key factor for consideration. So in this paper, we carried out a tilt displacement range testing experiment by using the OKO's 37-channel PDM. We measured and analyzed the variation of the tilt displacements in optical image stabilization process, and calculated the maximum tilt angle as the PDM surface shape was stabilized. We built an experimental platform consisting of a fixed target, an imaging system based on PDM, and a CCD camera. We used the ZYGO interferometer as an evaluation instrument to measure the surface shape stability. When the PDM surface had a tilt displacement, the image point of the fixed target on the camera sensor shifted correspondingly. The tilt angle of the PDM could be obtained by calculating this shift. The results showed that the maximum tilt angle of the PDM was 0.2mrad. The paper also analyzed the experiment errors when concerning about the off-axis error of the PDM deflection center.

  6. The DeMi CubeSat: Wavefront Control with a MEMS Deformable Mirror in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Bendek, Eduardo; Marinan, Anne; Belikov, Ruslan; Merck, John; Cahoy, Kerri Lynn

    2017-01-01

    High-contrast imaging instruments on future space telescopes will require precise wavefront correction to detect small exoplanets near their host stars. High-actuator count microelectromechanical system (MEMS) deformable mirrors provide a compact form of wavefront control. The 6U DeMi CubeSat will demonstrate wavefront control with a MEMS deformable mirror over a yearlong mission. The payload includes both an internal laser source and a small telescope, with both focal plane and pupil plane sensing, for deformable mirror characterization. We detail the DeMi payload design, and describe future astrophysics enabled by high-actuator count deformable mirrors and small satellites.

  7. A new deformable mirror architecture for coronagraphic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Lemmer, Aaron; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronagraphs are a promising solution for the next generation of exoplanet imaging instrumentation. While a coronagraph can have very good contrast and inner working angle performance, it is highly sensitive to optical aberrations. This necessitates a wavefront control system to correct aberrations within the telescope. The wavefront requirements and desired search area in a deformable mirror (DM) demand control of the electric field out to relatively high spatial frequencies. Conventional wisdom leads us to high stroke, high actuator density DMs that are capable of reaching these spatial frequencies on a single surface. Here we model a different architecture, where nearly every optical surface, powered or unpowered, is a controllable element. Rather than relying on one or two controllable surfaces for the success of the entire instrument the modeled instrument consists of a series of lower actuator count deformable mirrors to achieve the same result by leveraging the conjugate planes that exist in a coronagraphic instrument. To make such an instrument concept effective the imaging optics themselves must become precision deformable elements, akin to the deformable secondary mirrors at major telescope facilities. Such a DM does not exist commercially; all current DMs, while not necessarily incapable of carrying optical power, are manufactured with flat nominal surfaces. This simplifies control and manufacturing, but complicates their integration into an optical system because there is oftentimes a need to pack several into collimated space. Furthermore, high actuator count DMs cannot approximate low order shapes such as focus or tip-tilt without significant mid-spatial frequency residuals, which is not acceptable for a coronagraphic high-contrast imager. The ability to integrate the wavefront control system into the nominal coronagraphic optical train simplifies packaging, reduces cost and complexity, and increases optical throughput of any coronagraphic instrument

  8. Adaptive x-ray optics with a deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamoto, Shunji; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Suga, Kazuharu; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Jun'ichi; Sudo, Keisuke; Watanabe, Takeshi; Ohkubo, Youhei; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro

    2005-08-01

    We are developing a soft x-ray telescope with an adaptive optics system for future astronomical observation with very fine angular resolution of an order of milli-arc-second. From a technical point of view, we are trying to develop a normal incident telescope with multi layers. Thus the wave length is limited to be around 13.5 nm with a band pass of roughly 1nm. Since the x-ray telescope must be installed on a satellite, a stable conditions of temperature, gravity etc, can not be expected. Therefore, we investigate to use an adaptive optics system using an optical light source attached in the telescope. In this paper, we report our present status of the development. The primary mirror is an off-axis paraboloid with 80 mm effective diameter and 2 m focal length. This mirror has been coated with Mo/Si multi-layers. The reflectivity of the 13.5 nm x rays is ranging from 35% to 55%. We use a deformable mirror for the secondary mirror, which has also been coated with Mo/Si multi-layers. This mirror consists of 31 element-bimorph-piezo electrodes. The surface roughness of the mirror is ~6 nm rms. The reflectivity of the 13.5 nm x rays is roughly 65%. The adaptive optics system using an optical laser and a wave front sensor has been performed. We are using a shack-hartmann sensor (HASO 32) with a micro-lens array and a CCD. A pin hole with one micron diameter is used for the optical light source. The precision of the measurement of the wave front shape is a few nm. X-ray exposure test is now conducting, although the optical adaptive optics system is not yet installed. The x-ray detector is a back illumination CCD. The quantum efficiency for 13.5 nm x ray is ~50%. The pixel size is 24 micron square. X-ray source is an electron impact source with an Al/Si alloy target. We confirmed that the x-ray intensity around 13.55 nm is bright enough for our experiment. The imaging performance is now trying to improve and the adaptive optics system will be installed in this year.

  9. Computation of Static Shapes and Voltages for Micromachined Deformable Mirrors with Nonlinear Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In modeling micromachined deformable mirrors with electrostatic actuators whose gap spacings are of the same order of magnitude as those of the surface deformations, it is necessary to use nonlinear models for the actuators. In this paper, we consider micromachined deformable mirrors modeled by a membrane or plate equation with nonlinear electrostatic actuator characteristics. Numerical methods for computing the mirror deformation due to given actuator voltages and the actuator voltages required for producing the desired deformations at the actuator locations are presented. The application of the proposed methods to circular deformable mirrors whose surfaces are modeled by elastic membranes is discussed in detail. Numerical results are obtained for a typical circular micromachined mirror with electrostatic actuators.

  10. Optical joint correlation using the deformable mirror device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knopp, Jerome

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the Deformable Mirror Device (DMD) developed by Texas Instruments at Dallas for use in object identification was completed. The DMD was tested as a joint correlator. The DMD was used as a spatial light modulator on which the squared modulus of the Fourier transform of test object pairs was written. The squared modulus was phase encoded on the DMD after it had been thresholded and rewritten as a binary phase function. The thresholding was found to produce a sharp peak in the autocorrelation when the test objects were matched and no significant peak in the case of distinct objects. It was concluded that the use of the DMD as a joint correlator looks promising and further studies should be carried out.

  11. Control of deformable mirrors in MOAO using H∞ optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesalaga, Andrés; Guzman, Dani; Myers, Richard; Morris, Tim; Dipper, Nigel; Basden, Alastair

    2009-08-01

    We present a new approach for the control of a deformable mirror (DM), part of a Multi Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) on-sky demonstrator. The control is based on H∞ synthesis methods, achieving better performance than classical Proportional-Integral methods, while offering other appealing advantages such as an optimized design based on the temporal spectra of the wavefront and vibration rejection capabilities. We describe laboratory results obtained with a 97 actuator Xinetics DM, using a high-resolution Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for measuring DM surface. A connection between the turbulence dynamics represented in a Zernike basis and the controller requirements is studied, showing that the controller parameters and structure can be easily optimized for each Zernike mode according to their particular temporal spectra.

  12. Deformable mirrors for x-ray astronomy and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Graham, M. E.; Vaynman, S.; Cao, J.; Takacs, P. Z.

    2011-05-01

    We discuss a technique of shape modification that can be applied to thin walled (~; 100-400 micron thickness) electroformed replicated optics or slumped glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the mid-frequency ripple. The process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto a permanently magnetic material. The MSM material exhibits strains about 400 times stronger than ordinary ferromagnetic materials. The deformation process involves a magnetic write head which traverses the surface, and under the guidance of active metrology feedback,locally magnetizes the surface to impart strain where needed. Designs and basic concepts as applied to space borne X-ray optics will be described.

  13. Hysteresis Compensation for a Piezo Deformable Mirror - Poster Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H.; Fraanje, R.; Schitter, G.; Verhaegen, M.; Vdovin, G.

    2008-01-01

    The field of adaptive optics (AO) has received rapidly increasing attention in recent years, the intrinsic hysteresis of the piezo deformable mirror (DM) imposes a limit in the accuracy when the stroke of the piezo-actuator is on the order of micrometers. This contribution discusses the hysteresis compensation of a piezo DM by an inverse Preisach hysteresis model. The inverse Preisach hysteresis model is identified from the measured input-output data with a neural network and with a hinging hyperplane based approach. Experimental results demonstrate that hysteresis of the piezo-actuator can be reduced from 20% to about 6% and 9% by the neural network and by the hinging hyperplanes, respectively.

  14. Control x-ray deformable mirrors with few measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Idir, Mourad

    2016-09-01

    After years of development from a concept to early experimental stage, X-ray Deformable Mirrors (XDMs) are used in many synchrotron/free-electron laser facilities as a standard x-ray optics tool. XDM is becoming an integral part of the present and future large x-ray and EUV projects and will be essential in exploiting the full potential of the new sources currently under construction. The main objective of using XDMs is to correct wavefront errors or to enable variable focus beam sizes at the sample. Due to the coupling among the N actuators of a DM, it is usually necessary to perform a calibration or training process to drive the DM into the target shape. Commonly, in order to optimize the actuators settings to minimize slope/height errors, an initial measurement need to be collected, with all actuators set to 0, and then either N or 2N measurements are necessary learn each actuator behavior sequentially. In total, it means that N+1 or 2N+1 scans are required to perform this learning process. When the actuators number N is important and the actuator response or the necessary metrology is slow then this learning process can be time consuming. In this work, we present a fast and accurate method to drive an x-ray active bimorph mirror to a target shape with only 3 or 4 measurements. Instead of sequentially measuring and calculating the influence functions of all actuators and then predicting the voltages needed for any desired shape, the metrology data are directly used to "guide" the mirror from its current status towards the particular target slope/height via iterative compensations. The feedback for the iteration process is the discrepancy in curvature calculated by using B-spline fitting of the measured height/slope data. In this paper, the feasibility of this simple and effective approach is demonstrated with experiments.

  15. Path Length Control in a Nulling Coronagraph with a MEMS Deformable Mirror and a Calibration Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti R.; Wallacea, J. Kent; Samuele, Rocco; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; Jung, Paul; Lane, Benjamin; Levine, B. Martin; Mendillo, Chris; hide

    2008-01-01

    We report progress on a nulling coronagraph intended for direct imaging of extrasolar planets. White light is suppressed in an interferometer, and phase errors are measured by a second interferometer. A 1020-pixel MEMS deformable mirror in the first interferometer adjusts the path length across the pupil. A feedback control system reduces deflections of the deformable mirror to order of 1 nm rms.

  16. Distributed control in adaptive optics: deformable mirror and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Rogier; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek; Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2006-06-01

    Future large optical telescopes require adaptive optics (AO) systems whose deformable mirrors (DM) have ever more degrees of freedom. This paper describes advances that are made in a project aimed to design a new AO system that is extendible to meet tomorrow's specifications. Advances on the mechanical design are reported in a companion paper [6272-75], whereas this paper discusses the controller design aspects. The numerical complexity of controller designs often used for AO scales with the fourth power in the diameter of the telescope's primary mirror. For future large telescopes this will undoubtedly become a critical aspect. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of solving this issue with a distributed controller design. A distributed framework will be introduced in which each actuator has a separate processor that can communicate with a few direct neighbors. First, the DM will be modeled and shown to be compatible with the framework. Then, adaptive turbulence models that fit the framework will be shown to adequately capture the spatio-temporal behavior of the atmospheric disturbance, constituting a first step towards a distributed optimal control. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction step is fitted into the distributed framework such that the computational complexity for each processor increases only linearly with the telescope diameter.

  17. A large adaptive deformable membrane mirror with highactuator density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Kappelhof, Pieter; Snijders, Bart; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2004-10-01

    With the future growing size of telescopes, new, high-resolution, affordable wavefront corrector technology with low power dissipation is needed. A new adaptive deformable mirror concept is presented, to meet such requirements. The adaptive mirror consists of a thin (30-50 μm), highly reflective, deformable membrane. An actuator grid with thousands of actuators is designed which push and pull at the membrane"s surface, free from pinning and piston effects. The membrane and the actuator grid are supported by an optimized light and stiff honeycomb sandwich structure. This mechanically stable and thermally insensitive support structure provides a stiff reference plane for the actuators. The design is extendable up to several hundreds of mm's. Low-voltage electro-magnetic actuators have been designed. These highly linear actuators can provide a stroke of 15 micrometers. The design allows for a stroke difference between adjacent actuators larger than 1 micron. The actuator grid has a layer-based design; these layers extend over a large numbers of actuators. The current actuator design allows for actuator pitches of 3 mm or more. Actuation is free from play, friction and mechanical hysteresis and therefore has a high positioning resolution and is highly repeatable. The lowest mechanical resonance frequency is in the range of kHz so a high control bandwidth can be achieved. The power dissipation in the actuator grid is in the order of milliwatts per actuator. Because of this low power dissipation active cooling is not required. A first prototype is currently being developed. Prototypes will be developed with increasing number of actuators.

  18. Method of Analysis for Determining and Correcting Mirror Deformation due to Gravity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    obtainable. 1.3 Description of As-Built Beam Compressor Assembly The as-built beam compressor assembly consists of primary and secondary Zerodur ® mirrors held...Method of analysis for determining and correcting mirror deformation due to gravity James H. Clark, III F. Ernesto, Penado Downloaded From: http...00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Method of analysis for determining and correcting mirror deformation due to gravity 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  19. Optical Design of Adaptive Optics Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope with Two Deformable Mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinsheng; Wang, Yuanyuan; Rao, Xuejun; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    We describe the optical design of a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope with two deformable mirrors. Spherical mirrors are used for pupil relay. Defocus aberration of the human eye is corrected by a Badal focusing structure and astigmatism aberration is corrected by a deformable mirror. The main optical system achieves a diffraction-limited performance through the entire scanning field (6 mm pupil, 3 degrees on pupil plane). The performance of the optical system, with correction of defocus and astigmatism, is also evaluated.

  20. Optical Correction Of Space-Based Telescopes Using A Deformable Mirror System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    CORRECTION OF SPACE -BASED TELESCOPES USING A DEFORMABLE MIRROR SYSTEM by Mark C. Mueller December 2016 Co-Advisors: Brij Agrawal Jae Jun Kim...Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE OPTICAL CORRECTION OF SPACE -BASED TELESCOPES USING A DEFORMABLE MIRROR SYSTEM 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...with manufacturing mirrors for spaced -based telescopes by allowing lighter materials to be substituted. These lighter materials lack the optical

  1. Closed-loop control of magnetic fluid deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Azhar; Wu, Zhizheng; Ben Amara, Foued

    2009-10-12

    This paper presents the first-ever experimental evaluation of a closed-loop adaptive optics system based on a magnetic fluid deformable mirror (MFDM). MFDMs are a new type of wavefront correctors used in adaptive optics systems to compensate for complex optical aberrations. They have been found particularly suitable for ophthalmic imaging systems where they can be used to compensate for the aberrations in the eye that lead to blurry retinal images. However, their practical implementation in clinical devices requires effective methods to control the shape of their deformable surface. This paper presents one such control method which is based on an innovative technique used to linearize the response of the MFDM surface shape. The design of the controller is based on a DC-decoupled model of the multi-input multi-output system and on considering a decentralized PI controller. Experimental results showing the performance of the closed-loop system comprising the developed controller and a 19-channel prototype MFDM are presented.

  2. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope with Dual Deformable Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D C; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2006-08-11

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO SLO) has demonstrated superior optical quality of non-invasive view of the living retina, but with limited capability of aberration compensation. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina. We used a bimorph mirror to correct large-stroke, low-order aberrations and a MEMS mirror to correct low-stroke, high-order aberration. The measured ocular RMS wavefront error of a test subject was 240 nm without AO compensation. We were able to reduce the RMS wavefront error to 90 nm in clinical settings using one deformable mirror for the phase compensation and further reduced the wavefront error to 48 nm using two deformable mirrors. Compared with that of a single-deformable-mirror SLO system, dual AO SLO offers much improved dynamic range and better correction of the wavefront aberrations. The use of large-stroke deformable mirrors provided the system with the capability of axial sectioning different layers of the retina. We have achieved diffraction-limited in-vivo retinal images of targeted retinal layers such as photoreceptor layer, blood vessel layer and nerve fiber layers with the combined phase compensation of the two deformable mirrors in the AO SLO.

  3. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones; Steven M.

    2010-02-23

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  4. Double-deformable-mirror adaptive optics system for laser beam cleanup using blind optimization.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiang; Wang, Shuai; Yan, Hu; Liu, Wenjin; Dong, Lizhi; Yang, Ping; Xu, Bing

    2012-09-24

    An optimization-based correction method is developed to control simultaneously two deformable mirrors in a wavefront-sensor-less adaptive beam cleanup system, where the wave-front aberrations could not be compensated by a single deformable mirror. Stochastic parallel gradient decent algorithm is chosen as the optimization algorithm. In this control method, different aberrations are assigned to each deformable mirror according to their different correction quality. The method is proved to be effective by numerical simulations as well as experiments. Experimental results showed that the area containing 84% energy of the laser beam in the far-field can reach 3.0 times diffraction limited.

  5. An RF Therapy System for Breast Cancer Using Dual Deformable Mirrors — Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Udpa, Satish S.; Udpa, Lalita

    2007-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths amongst women in the United States. In the past two decades, the potential of non-ionizing high power RF waves to destroy cancerous biological tissues is actively investigated for cancer therapy. This paper presents the computational feasibility study of an alternative mode of electromagnetic radiation therapy that employs dual source and deformable mirror. The adaptive focusing capability of the deformable mirror is exploited for preferential energy deposition at the tumor site in the breast irradiated by electromagnetic radiation. The outcome of the computational study for the proposed deformable mirror-based thermal therapy for breast cancer is presented in this paper.

  6. Deformable mirror models for open-loop adaptive optics using non-parametric estimation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Dani; De Cos Juez, Francisco Javier; Myers, Richard; Sánchez Lasheras, Fernando; Young, Laura K.; Guesalaga, Andrés

    2010-07-01

    Open-loop adaptive optics is a technique in which the turbulent wavefront is measured before it hits the deformable mirror for correction; therefore the correct control of the mirror in open-loop is key in achieving the expected level of correction. In this paper, we present non-parametric estimation techniques to model deformable mirrors working in open-loop. We have results with mirrors characterized by non-linear behavior: a Xinetics electrostrictive mirror and a Boston Micromachines MEMS mirror. The inputs for these models are the wavefront corrections to apply to the mirror and the outputs are the set of voltages to shape the mirror. We have performed experiments on both mirrors, achieving Go-To errors relative to peak-to-peak wavefront excursion in the order of 1 % RMS for the Xinetics mirror and 3 % RMS for the Boston mirror . These techniques are trained with interferometric data from the mirror under control; therefore they do not depend on the physical parameters of the device.

  7. Prototype Small Footprint Amplifier for Piezoelectric Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputa, Kris; Herriot, Glen; Niebergal, Joel; Zielinski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    AO subsystems of the ELT observatories will incorporate deformable mirrors with an order of magnitude larger number of piezoelectric actuators than the AO systems currently deployed. Simply scaling up the drive electronics that are presently available commercially would substantially drive up the AO cost, pose unacceptably high demands for the supply power and heat dissipation, and occupy large physical volume. We have set out to prototype a high voltage amplifier that is compact enough to allow packaging 100 amplifier channels on a single 6U Eurocard with the goal to have a DM drive channel density of 1200 per 6U VME crate. Individual amplifier circuits should be driven by a multichannel A/D converter, consume no more than 0.5W from the +/-400V power supply, be slew rate limited in hardware, and be short-circuit protected. The component cost should be an order of magnitude less than the integrated circuit high voltage amplifiers currently on the market. We started out with modeling candidate circuits in SPICE, then built physical prototypes using inexpensive off the shelf components. In this paper we present experimental results of exposing several prototype circuits to both normal operating conditions and foreseeable fault conditions. The performance is evaluated against the AO requirements for the output range and bandwidth and the DM actuator safety requirements.

  8. VLT deformable secondary mirror: integration and electromechanical tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, R.; Andrighettoni, M.; Angerer, G.; Mair, C.; Pescoller, D.; Lazzarini, P.; Anaclerio, E.; Mantegazza, M.; Gallieni, D.; Vernet, E.; Arsenault, R.; Madec, P.-Y.; Duhoux, P.; Riccardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Manetti, M.; Morandini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The VLT Deformable secondary is planned to be installed on the VLT UT#4 as part of the telescope conversion into the Adaptive Optics test Facility (AOF). The adaptive unit is based on the well proven contactless, voice coil motor technology that has been already successfully implemented in the MMT, LBT and Magellan adaptive secondaries, and is considered a promising technical choice for the forthcoming ELT-generation adaptive correctors, like the E-ELT M4 and the GMT ASM. The VLT adaptive unit has been recently assembled after the completion of the manufacturing and modular test phases. In this paper, we present the most relevant aspects of the system integration and report the preliminary results of the electromechanical tests performed on the unit. This test campaign is a typical major step foreseen in all similar systems built so far: thanks to the metrology embedded in the system, that allows generating time-dependent stimuli and recording in real time the position of the controlled mirror on all actuators, typical dynamic response quality parameters like modal settling time, overshoot and following error can be acquired without employing optical measurements. In this way the system dynamic and some aspect of its thermal and long term stability can be fully characterized before starting the optical tests and calibrations.

  9. Imaging performance of elliptical-boundary varifocal mirrors in active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, Sarah Jane

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems deformable-membrane mirrors provide a means of focus control and attendant spherical aberration correction for miniaturized imaging systems. The technology has greatly advanced in the last decade, thereby extending their focal range capabilities. This dissertation describes a novel SU-8 2002 silicon-on-insulator wafer deformable mirror. A 4.000 mm x 5.657 mm mirror for 45o incident light rays achieves 22 mum stroke or 65 diopters, limited by snapdown. The mirrors show excellent optical quality while flat. Most have peak-to-valley difference of less than 150 nm and root-mean-square less than 25 nm. The process proves simple, only requiring a silicon-on-insulator wafer, SU-8 2002, and a metal layer. Xenon difluoride etches the silicon to release the mirrors. Greater than 90% of the devices survive fabrication and release. While current literature includes several aberration analyses on static mirrors, analyses that incorporate the dynamic nature of these mirrors do not exist. Optical designers may have a choice between deformable mirrors and other types of varifocal mirrors or lenses. Furthermore, a dynamic mirror at an incidence angle other than normal may be desired due to space limitations or for higher throughput (normal incidence requires a beam splitter). This dissertation presents an analysis based on the characteristic function of the system. It provides 2nd and 3rd order aberration coefficients in terms of dynamic focus range and base ray incidence angle. These afford an understanding of the significance of different types of aberrations. Root-mean-square and Strehl calculations provide insight into overall imaging performance for various conditions. I present general guidelines for maximum incidence angle and field of fiew that provide near diffraction-limited performance. Experimental verification of the MEMS mirrors at 5o and 45o incidence angles validates the analytical results. A Blu-ray optical pick-up imaging

  10. Gravity and thermal deformation of large primary mirror in space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Jiang, Shouwang; Wan, Jinlong; Shu, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The technology of integrating mechanical FEA analysis with optical estimation is essential to simulate the gravity deformation of large main mirror and the thermal deformation such as static or temperature gradient of optical structure. We present the simulation results of FEA analysis, data processing, and image performance. Three kinds of support structure for large primary mirror which have the center holding structure, the edge glue fixation and back support, are designed and compared to get the optimal gravity deformation. Variable mirror materials Zerodur/SiC are chosen and analyzed to obtain the small thermal gradient distortion. The simulation accuracy is dependent on FEA mesh quality, the load definition of structure, the fitting error from discrete data to smooth surface. A main mirror with 1m diameter is designed as an example. The appropriate structure material to match mirror, the central supporting structure, and the key aspects of FEA simulation are optimized for space application.

  11. A monolithic deformable mirror with latchable mechanical actuation (LATCHAMAN) for space-borne telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, Keigo; Kataza, Hirokazu; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Kenji; Okada, Norio; Iwashita, Hikaru; Haze, Kanae; Takahashi, Aoi; Kotani, Takayuki; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu; Kobayashi, Hitomi

    2014-09-01

    We present the concept, design, fabrication, and evaluation of a new deformable mirror (DM), which is latchable, compact, and designed to be applicable for cryogenic environments. The main body of a prototype DM was fabricated from a monolithic cuboid of aluminum using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). A flexible structure was constructed inside the block by 3-dimensionally crossed hollowing using the EDM. The prototype has 6 × 6 channels, and its volume is 27 mm × 27 mm × 30 mm. The mirror was formed on the surface of the aluminum block using a highprecision NC lathe. The surface figure of the mirror was evaluated and 34 nm rms was obtained. The evaluated surface roughness for the center and off-center areas of the mirror was 9.2 nm rms and 7.6 nm rms, respectively Screws set at the back of the block deform the mirror via springs and the internal flexible structure. We present our first demonstration of deformation of the mirror carried out at ambient temperature. The relationship between the displacement of the screws and the deformation of the mirror was evaluated. Consequently, a linear relationship was confirmed, and no significant hysteresis was found. The application of such mirrors to telescopes used for various different objectives is discussed. We conclude that a DM based on our concept can be used for wavefront correction of space-borne telescopes, especially in the infrared wavelength region.

  12. New approach for laser beam formation by means of deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldakova, Julia; Kudryashov, Alexis; Lylova, Anna; Samarkin, Vadim; Byalko, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Sometimes to improve the performance of industrial or scientific laser technology it is desired to transform an intensity distribution from Gaussian to the flattop. The adjusting of the intensity profile can be implemented by means of adaptive optics. In this paper we present laser beam control with bimorph deformable mirrors. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is used to determine the control signal for the bimorph deformable mirror while focal spot is observed with CCD camera to check the result of beam shaping.

  13. Synthesis of non-uniformly correlated partially coherent sources using a deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, M. W.; Bose-Pillai, S. R.; Wood, R. A.

    2017-09-01

    The near real-time synthesis of a non-uniformly correlated partially coherent source using a low-actuator-count deformable mirror is demonstrated. The statistical optics theory underpinning the synthesis method is reviewed. The experimental results of a non-uniformly correlated source are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. A discussion on how deformable mirror characteristics such as actuator count and pitch affect source generation is also included.

  14. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with dual deformable mirrors for large aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2007-01-25

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes with adaptive optics (AOSLO) have been shown previously to provide a noninvasive, cellular-scale view of the living human retina. However, the clinical utility of these systems has been limited by the available deformable mirror technology. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina, making the AOSLO system a viable, non-invasive, high-resolution imaging tool for clinical diagnostics. We used a bimorph deformable mirror to correct low-order aberrations with relatively large amplitudes. The bimorph mirror is manufactured by Aoptix, Inc. with 37 elements and 18 {micro}m stroke in a 10 mm aperture. We used a MEMS deformable mirror to correct high-order aberrations with lower amplitudes. The MEMS mirror is manufactured by Boston Micromachine, Inc with 144 elements and 1.5 {micro}m stroke in a 3 mm aperture. We have achieved near diffraction-limited retina images using the dual deformable mirrors to correct large aberrations up to {+-} 3D of defocus and {+-} 3D of cylindrical aberrations with test subjects. This increases the range of spectacle corrections by the AO systems by a factor of 10, which is crucial for use in the clinical environment. This ability for large phase compensation can eliminate accurate refractive error fitting for the patients, which greatly improves the system ease of use and efficiency in the clinical environment.

  15. The Development and Optimisation of High Bandwidth Bimorph Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D.; Laycock, L.; Griffith, M.; Archer, N.

    Our first mirror designs were based on a standard bimorph construction and exhibited a resonant frequency of 1 kHz with a maximum stroke of ±5 μm. These devices were limited by the requirement to have a "dead space" between the inner active area and the mirror boundary. This was necessary to ensure that the requirements for both the stroke and the static boundary conditions at the edge of the mirror could be met simultaneously, but there was a significant penalty to pay in terms of bandwidth, which is inversely proportional to the square of the full mirror diameter. In a series of design iteration steps, we have created mounting arrangements that seek not only to reduce dead space, but also to improve ruggedness and temperature stability through the use of a repeatable and reliable assembly procedure. As a result, the most recently modeled mirrors display a resonance in excess of 5 kHz, combined with a maximum stroke in excess of ±10 μm. This has been achieved by virtually eliminating the "dead space" around the mirror. By careful thermal matching of the mirror and piezoelectric substrates, operation over a wide temperature range is possible. This paper will discuss the outcomes from the design study and present our initial experimental results for the most recently assembled mirror.

  16. Temperature deformations of the mirror of a radio telescope antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avdeyev, V. I.; Grach, S. A.; Kozhakhmetov, K. K.; Kostenko, F. I.

    1979-01-01

    The stress informed state of the mirror of an antenna, with a diameter of 3 m, for a radio interferometer used in space, and located in a temperature field is examined. The mirror represents a parabolic shell, consisting of 19 identical parts. The problem is based on representations of the thermoelasticity of thin shells.

  17. Northop Grumman/Xinetics Deformable Mirrors: Enabling Reliable Advanced Imaging for 20 Years and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevich, Russ; Jeff Cavaco, Northrop Grumman Xinetics

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Optics Xinetics (AOX), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Northrop Grumman, has manufactured and delivered more than 300 deformable mirrors (DMs) since 1995. With more than 32 gigacycles of use, these mirrors have significantly increased the scientific return of ground based astronomical telescopes by removing atmospheric distortion from the image plane. AOX deformable mirrors exhibit little or no hysteresis, aging or creep, making them highly reliable and predictable. A range of space -based applications are currently in development or under consideration as key enablers for future astronomical missions. We will review a variety of AOX DMs and discuss a number of their real world applications and results.

  18. Characterization and training of a piezoelectric deformable mirror for operation at 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Carlos O.; Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Bajramaj, Blerta; Kim, David S.; Santiago, Freddie; Martinez, Ty; Restaino, Sergio R.

    2009-05-01

    Characterizing the fundamental response and operational parameters of a deformable mirror is a critical first step in the design of an adaptive optics system. This paper describes the characterization of the influence function and training of a piezoelectric deformable mirror (PDM) at 632 nm. We scale the results to 1550 nm for low to mid order aberration correction for free space laser communications applications in the Short Wave Infrared (SWIR). A modified Twyman-Green interferometer was used to measure the influence functions and to characterize the mirror. The data was analyzed using commercial and customized software.

  19. Hard X-ray nanofocusing using adaptive focusing optics based on piezoelectric deformable mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Takumi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Kimura, Takashi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2015-04-15

    An adaptive Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror focusing optics based on piezoelectric deformable mirrors was constructed at SPring-8 and its focusing performance characteristics were demonstrated. By adjusting the voltages applied to the deformable mirrors, the shape errors (compared to a target elliptical shape) were finely corrected on the basis of the mirror shape determined using the pencil-beam method, which is a type of at-wavelength figure metrology in the X-ray region. The mirror shapes were controlled with a peak-to-valley height accuracy of 2.5 nm. A focused beam with an intensity profile having a full width at half maximum of 110 × 65 nm (V × H) was achieved at an X-ray energy of 10 keV.

  20. Deformable mirrors for intra-cavity use in high-power thin-disk lasers.

    PubMed

    Piehler, Stefan; Dietrich, Tom; Wittmüss, Philipp; Sawodny, Oliver; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Graf, Thomas

    2017-02-20

    We present deformable mirrors for the intra-cavity use in high-power thin-disk laser resonators. The refractive power of these mirrors is continuously adaptable from -0.7 m-1 to 0.3 m-1, corresponding to radii of curvature ranging between 2.86 m (convex) and 6.67 m (concave). The optimized shape of the mirror membrane enables a very low peak-to-valley deviation from a paraboloid deformation over a large area. With the optical performance of our mirrors being equal to that of standard HR mirrors, we were able to demonstrate the tuning of the beam quality of a thin-disk laser in a range of M2 = 3 to M2 = 1 during laser operation at output powers as high as 1.1 kW.

  1. Hard X-ray nanofocusing using adaptive focusing optics based on piezoelectric deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takumi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Kimura, Takashi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Matsuyama, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    An adaptive Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror focusing optics based on piezoelectric deformable mirrors was constructed at SPring-8 and its focusing performance characteristics were demonstrated. By adjusting the voltages applied to the deformable mirrors, the shape errors (compared to a target elliptical shape) were finely corrected on the basis of the mirror shape determined using the pencil-beam method, which is a type of at-wavelength figure metrology in the X-ray region. The mirror shapes were controlled with a peak-to-valley height accuracy of 2.5 nm. A focused beam with an intensity profile having a full width at half maximum of 110 × 65 nm (V × H) was achieved at an X-ray energy of 10 keV.

  2. Micro drilling using deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, Marco; Strube, Anja; Dickmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for micro structuring or drilling applications reduces the thermal influence to the surrounding material. The best achievable beam profile equals a Gaussian beam. Drilling with this beam profile results in cylindrical holes. To vary the shape of the holes, the beam can either be scanned or - for single pulse and percussion drilling - manipulated by masks or lenses. A high flexible method for beam shaping can be realized by using a deformable mirror. This mirror contains a piezo-electric ceramic, which can be deformed by an electric potential. By separating the ceramic into independent controllable segments, the shape of the surface can be varied individually. Due to the closed surface of the mirror, there is no loss of intensity due to diffraction. The mirror deformation is controlled by Zernike polynomials and results e.g. in a lens behavior. In this study a deformable mirror was used to generate e.g. slits in thin steel foils by percussion drilling using ultra-short laser pulses. The influence of the cylindrical deformation to the laser beam and the resulting geometry of the generated holes was studied. It was demonstrated that due to the high update rate up to 150 Hz the mirror surface can be varied in each scan cycle, which results in a high flexible drilling process.

  3. Ion-assisted coating for large-scale Bimorph deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Takuya; Okamoto, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kunio; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Motokoshi, Shinji; Samarkin, Vadim V.; Kudryashov, Alexis V.; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2016-07-01

    We have fabricated a 410 x 468 mm size deformable mirror with 100 Bimorph piezoceramic actuators for the LFEX laser system at Osaka University. In the case of Bimorph-type deformable mirrors, the mirror surface had to be polished and coated after bonding the piezoceramic actuators to the rear side of the thin mirror substrate. This provides a good surface figure, but the coating temperature for the high-reflection mirror was strictly limited because of the thermal fragility of piezoceramic actuators. The mirror substrate with the actuators was polished, and an ion-assisted multilayer dielectric coating was produced at 60 degrees Celsius with our 80-inch coating chamber. The flatness of the mirror just after coating was 7 μm, and reduced by aging to 3.2 μm when the mirror was assembled. The surface figure of the assembled mirror with 20 piezostack bonded actuators is demonstrated and a laser-induced damage threshold tested with a witness sample is also reported.

  4. Static and dynamic micro deformable mirror characterization by phase-shifting and time-averaged interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotard, Arnaud; Zamkotsian, Frédéric

    2004-06-01

    The micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS), based on mature technologies of micro-electronics, are essential in the design of future astronomical instruments. One of these key-components is the micro-deformable mirror for wave-front correction. Very challenging topics like search of exo-planets could greatly benefit from this technology. Design, realization and characterization of micro-Deformable Mirrors are under way at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) in collaboration with Laboratoire d'Analyse et d'Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS). In order to measure the surface shape and the deformation parameters during operation of these devices, a high-resolution Twyman-Green interferometer has been developed. Measurements have been done on a tiltable micro-mirror (170×100μm2) designed by LAM-LAAS and realized by an American foundry, and also on an OKO deformable mirror (15mm diameter). Static characterization is made by phase shifting interferometry and dynamic measurements have been made by quantitative time-averaged interferometry. The OKO mirror has an actuator stroke of 370+/-10nm for 150V applied and its resonant frequency is 1170+/-50 Hz, and the tiltable mirror has a rotation cut-off frequency of 31±3kHz.

  5. Demonstration Of A Robust Composite Deformable Secondary Mirror With Low Surface Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, Stephen; Coughenour, B.; Hart, M.; Romeo, R.; Martin, R.

    2011-01-01

    I discuss recent improvements in the development of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) as a lightweight substrate for primary and deformable secondary mirrors on ground- and space-based telescopes. Weight reductions for ground-based primary mirrors can significantly affect cost: The weight and material cost of a large ground-based telescope go roughly as the primary mirror mass. CFRP composites provide several advantages as a substrate for thin-shell adaptive secondary mirrors as well, including high stiffness-to-weight ratio, low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and robustness. We use an 8 cm prototype CFRP thin-shell deformable mirror to show that spatial CTE variation may be addressed with mounted actuators. I present measurements of surface quality at a range of temperatures characteristic of mountaintop observatories. The figure error of the Al-coated reflective surface under best actuator correction is 43 nm RMS, placing it into consideration for use in near-IR astronomy. The low surface error internal to the outer ring of actuators (17 nm RMS at 15 C and 33 nm RMS at -5 C) suggests that larger mirrors will have a similar figure quality under actuator correction on ground-based Adaptive Optics systems. Surface roughness is low (< 3 nm P-V) at a variety of temperatures. These experiments demonstrate CFRP's potential as a lightweight, robust substrate for thin-shell deformable secondary mirrors.

  6. Integrated optical design for highly dynamic laser beam shaping with membrane deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2017-02-01

    The utilization of membrane deformable mirrors has raised its importance in laser materials processing since they enable the generation of highly spatial and temporal dynamic intensity distributions for a wide field of applications. To take full advantage of these devices for beam shaping, the huge amount of degrees of freedom has to be considered and optimized already within the early stage of the optical design. Since the functionality of commercial available ray-tracing software has been mainly specialized on geometric dependencies and their optimization within constraints, the complex system characteristics of deformable mirrors cannot be sufficiently taken into account yet. The main reasons are the electromechanical interdependencies of electrostatic membrane deformable mirrors, namely saturation and mechanical clamping, that result in non-linear deformation. This motivates the development of an integrative design methodology. The functionality of the ray-tracing program ZEMAX is extended with a model of an electrostatic membrane mirror. This model is based on experimentally determined influence functions. Furthermore, software routines are derived and integrated that allow for the compilation of optimization criteria for the most relevant analytically describable beam shaping problems. In this way, internal optimization routines can be applied for computing the appropriate membrane deflection of the deformable mirror as well as for the parametrization of static optical components. The experimental verification of simulated intensity distributions demonstrates that the beam shaping properties can be predicted with a high degree of reliability and precision.

  7. Deformable MEMS mirrors in secure optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Bifano, Thomas; Cornelissen, Steven; Stewart, Jason; Bleier, Zvi

    2009-05-01

    An optical communication system suitable for voice communication, data retrieval from remote sensors and identification had been designed, built and tested. The system design allows operation at ranges of several hundred meters. The heart of the system is a modulated MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated and changes between a flat reflective state and a corrugated diffractive state. A process for mass producing these mirrors at low cost was developed and implemented. The mirror was incorporated as a facet in a hollow retro-reflector, allowing temporal modulation of an interrogating beam and the return of the modulated beam to the interrogator. This modulator unit thus consists of a low power, small and light communication node with large (about 60°) angular extent. The system's range and pointing are determined by the interrogator /detector / demodulator unit (the transceiver), whereas the communicating node remains small, low power and low cost. This transceiver is comprised of a magnified optical channel to establish line of sight communication, an interrogating laser at 1550nm, an avalanche photo diode to detect the return signal and electronics to drive the laser and demodulate the returned signal and convert it to an audio signal. Voice communication in free space was demonstrated at ranges larger than 200 meters. A new retro-reflector design, incorporating more modulated mirrors had been constructed. This configuration was built and tested. Its performance and advantages as compared to the single mirror retro-reflector are discussed. An alternative system design that allows higher bandwidth data transmission is described

  8. Design, fabrication and characterization of MEMS deformable mirrors for ocular adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunkyu

    This dissertation describes the design and modeling of MEMS-based bimorph deformable mirrors for adaptive optics as well as the characterization of fabricated devices. The objective of this research is to create a compact and low-cost deformable mirror that can be used as a phase corrector particularly for vision science applications. A fundamental theory of adaptive optics is reviewed, paying attention to the phase corrector which is a key component of the adaptive optics system. Several types of phase corrector are presented and the minimization of their size and cost using micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is also discussed. Since this research is targeted towards the ophthalmic applications of adaptive optics, aberrations of the human eye are illustrated and the benefits of corrections by adaptive optics are explained. A couple of actuator types of the phase corrector that can be used in vision science are introduced and discussed their suitability for the purpose. The requirements to be an ideal deformable mirror for ocular adaptive optics are presented. The characteristics of bimorph deformable mirrors originally developed for laser communications are investigated in an effort to understand their suitability for ophthalmological adaptive optics applications. A Phase shifting interferometer setup is developed for optical characterization and fundamental theory of interferogram analysis is described along with wavefront reconstruction. The theoretical analysis of the bimorph deformable mirror begins with developing an analytical model of the laminated structure. The finite element models are also developed using COMSOL Multiphysics. Using the FEM results, the performance of deformable mirrors under various structure dimensions and operating conditions is analyzed for optimization. A basic theory of piezoelectricity is explained, followed by introduction of applications to MEMS devices. The material properties of single crystal PMN-PT adopted in

  9. Characterization of deformable mirrors for high-order adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuik, Remko; Hippler, Stefan; Feldt, Markus; Aceituno, Jesus; Egner, Sebastian E.

    2004-10-01

    Deformable mirrors with more than 1000 actuators are currently being developed for eXtreme AO applications, either for ELTs, high order Adaptive Optics correction in the visible light, or combination of both. The large number of actuators, the high frequency at which these DMs are to be used and further advancement in schemes for AO control, requiring a growing degree of knowledge of the AO system for efficient correction, sets special requirements on the characterization of the static and dynamic behavior of the DM. In the light of CHEOPS, an extreme-AO Planet Finder project, we have characterized a Xinetics deformable mirrors with 349 actuators. This mirror serves as a proxy for the characterization of a >1200 actuator DM of a similar type, which will be implemented in CHEOPS. In this paper we present the results of this characterization. Special attention was paid to mirror properties like hysteresis, non-linearity, temperature dependence and influence function.

  10. An innovative and efficient method to control the shape of push-pull membrane deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Polo, A; Haber, A; Pereira, S F; Verhaegen, M; Urbach, H P

    2012-12-03

    We carry out performance characterisation of a commercial push and pull deformable mirror with 48 actuators (Adaptica Srl). We present a detailed description of the system as well as a statistical approach on the identification of the mirror influence function. A new efficient control algorithm to induce the desired wavefront shape is also developed and comparison with other control algorithms present in literature has been made to prove the efficiency of the new approach.

  11. High Actuator Count MEMS Deformable Mirrors for Space Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-07

    Astronomy – Direct Planet Detection • High Contrast Imaging – Astronomy/Reconnaissance • Correction of surface figure errors in Light weight primary mirrors...NASA’s TPF Coronagraphic Imaging Observatory EPIC PECO Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph Pupil-mapping Exoplanet Coronagraphic Observer Why

  12. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models.

  13. Payload characterization for CubeSat demonstration of MEMS deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinan, Anne; Cahoy, Kerri; Webber, Matthew; Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Coronagraphic space telescopes require wavefront control systems for high-contrast imaging applications such as exoplanet direct imaging. High-actuator-count MEMS deformable mirrors (DM) are a key element of these wavefront control systems yet have not been flown in space long enough to characterize their on-orbit performance. The MEMS Deformable Mirror CubeSat Testbed is a conceptual nanosatellite demonstration of MEMS DM and wavefront sensing technology. The testbed platform is a 3U CubeSat bus. Of the 10 x 10 x 34.05 cm (3U) available volume, a 10 x 10 x 15 cm space is reserved for the optical payload. The main purpose of the payload is to characterize and calibrate the onorbit performance of a MEMS deformable mirror over an extended period of time (months). Its design incorporates both a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (internal laser illumination), and a focal plane sensor (used with an external aperture to image bright stars). We baseline a 32-actuator Boston Micromachines Mini deformable mirror for this mission, though the design is flexible and can be applied to mirrors from other vendors. We present the mission design and payload architecture and discuss experiment design, requirements, and performance simulations.

  14. Finite element analysis of low-cost membrane deformable mirrors for high-order adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, Robert S.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Makidon, Russell B.

    1999-10-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of glass membrane deformable mirror (DM) support structures intended for very high order low-stroke adaptive optics systems. We investigated commercially available piezoelectric ceramics. Piezoelectric tubes were determined to offer the largest amount of stroke for a given amount of space on the mirror surface that each actuator controls. We estimated the minimum spacing and the maximum expected stroke of such actuators. We developed a quantitative understanding of the response of a membrane mirror surface by performing a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) study. The results of the FEA analysis were used to develop a design and fabrication process for membrane deformable mirrors of 200 - 500 micron thicknesses. Several different values for glass thickness and actuator spacing were analyzed to determine the best combination of actuator stoke and surface deformation quality. We considered two deformable mirror configurations. The first configuration uses a vacuum membrane attachment system where the actuator tubes' central holes connect to an evacuated plenum, and atmospheric pressure holds the membrane against the actuators. This configuration allows the membrane to be removed from the actuators, facilitating easy replacement of the glass. The other configuration uses precision bearing balls epoxied to the ends of the actuator tubes, with the glass membrane epoxied to the ends of the ball bearings. While this kind of DM is not serviceable, it allows actuator spacings of 4 mm, in addition to large stroke. Fabrication of a prototype of the latter kind of DM was started.

  15. Research on the optimization of a bimorph piezoelectric deformable mirror based on zeroth-order method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hairen; Hu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    The deformable mirror adjusts the mirror surface shape to compensate the wavefront error in the adaptive optics system. Recently, the adaptive optics has been widely used in many applications, such as astronomical telescopes, high power laser systems, etc. These applications require large diameter deformable mirrors with large stroke, high speed and low cost. Thus, the bimorph piezoelectric deformable mirror, which is a good match for the applications, has attracted more and more attentions. In this paper, we use zeroth-order optimization method to optimize the physical parameters of a bimorph piezoelectric deformable mirror that consists of a metal reflective layer deposited on the top of a slim piezoelectric ceramic surface layer. The electrodes are deposited on the bottom of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The physical parameters to be optimized include the optimal thickness ratio between the piezoelectric layer and reflective layer, inter-electrode distance, and so on. A few reasonable designs are obtained by a comparative study presented for three geometries of electrodes, which are circular, square and hexagon, respectively.

  16. Linearization of the response of a 91-actuator magnetic liquid deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Denis; Borra, Ermanno F; Rochette, Maxime; Landry, Daniel Bouffard

    2010-04-12

    We present the experimental performance of a 91-actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid) using a new technique that linearizes the response of the mirror by superposing a uniform magnetic field to the one produced by the actuators. We demonstrate linear driving of the mirror using influence functions, measured with a Fizeau interferometer, by producing the first 36 Zernikes polynomials. Based on our measurements, we predict achievable mean PV wavefront amplitudes of up to 30 microm having RMS residuals of lambda/10 at 632.8 nm. Linear combination of Zernikes and over-time repeatability are also demonstrated.

  17. Hybrid Micro-Electro-Mechanical Tunable Filter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Turn on (button switches to ’off’): Gas (fast rise), Skip Purge , Helium (if necessary, click up/down arrow to converge), Pressure, Magnets (dummy...inconclusive, multi-layer stripe etch study results: 30-min citric-acid/tripotassium-citrate/ hydrogen -peroxide etch at 25 ◦C, stripe oriented parallel to ...tripotassium- citrate/ hydrogen -peroxide etch at 25 ◦C, deep and irregular anisotropic etching of the GaAs substrate was observed as indi- cated on left side

  18. Reliability of MEMS deformable mirror technology used in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzell, Allyson L.; Cornelissen, Steven A.; Bierden, Paul A.; Lam, Charlie V.; Davis, Daniel F.

    2010-02-01

    Deformable mirror (DM) technology based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology produced by Boston Micromachines Corporation has been demonstrated to be an enabling component in a variety of adaptive optics applications such as high contrast imaging in astronomy, multi object adaptive optics, free-space laser communication, and microscopy. Many of these applications require DMs with thousands of actuators operating at frame rates up to 10 kHz for many years requiring sufficient device reliability to avoid device failures. In this paper we present improvements in MEMS deformable mirrors for reliability along with test data and device lifetime prediction that show trillions of actuator-cycles can be achieved without failures.

  19. Using the deformable mirror as a spatial filter: application to circular beams.

    PubMed

    Tyson, R K

    1982-03-01

    Adaptive optics correction of a wave front by a deformable mirror that acts as a lossless spatial filter is studied. The decomposition of the wave front into Zernike polynomials provides a means for deriving the rms error of a corrected wave front in analytic form. The spatial filter is given in a functional form related to deformable mirror characteristics. A step filter approximation is derived and the conditions where the approximation holds are examined. An example is provided to demonstrate the utility of the spatial filtering concept for adaptive optics systems analysis.

  20. Zinc selenide-based large aperture photo-controlled deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Quintavalla, Martino; Bonora, Stefano; Natali, Dario; Bianco, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Realization of large aperture deformable mirrors with a large density of actuators is important in many applications, and photo-controlled deformable mirrors (PCDMs) represent an innovation. Herein we show that PCDMs are scalable realizing a 2-inch aperture device based on a polycrystalline zinc selenide (ZnSe) as the photoconductive substrate and a thin polymeric reflective membrane. ZnSe is electrically characterized and analyzed through a model that we previously introduced. The PCDM is then optically tested, demonstrating its capabilities in adaptive optics.

  1. A Novel Concept for a Deformable Membrane Mirror for Correction of Large Amplitude Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jim; Patrick, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Very large, light weight mirrors are being developed for applications in space. Due to launch mass and volume restrictions these mirrors will need to be much more flexible than traditional optics. The use of primary mirrors with these characteristics will lead to requirements for adaptive optics capable of correcting wave front errors with large amplitude relatively low spatial frequency aberrations. The use of low modulus membrane mirrors actuated with electrostatic attraction forces is a potential solution for this application. Several different electrostatic membrane mirrors are now available commercially. However, as the dynamic range requirement of the adaptive mirror is increased the separation distance between the membrane and the electrodes must increase to accommodate the required face sheet deformations. The actuation force applied to the mirror decreases inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance; thus for large dynamic ranges the voltage requirement can rapidly increase into the high voltage regime. Experimentation with mirrors operating in the KV range has shown that at the higher voltages a serious problem with electrostatic field cross coupling between actuators can occur. Voltage changes on individual actuators affect the voltage of other actuators making the system very difficult to control. A novel solution has been proposed that combines high voltage electrodes with mechanical actuation to overcome this problem. In this design an array of electrodes are mounted to a backing structure via light weight large dynamic range flextensional actuators. With this design the control input becomes the separation distance between the electrode and the mirror. The voltage on each of the actuators is set to a uniform relatively high voltage, thus the problem of cross talk between actuators is avoided and the favorable distributed load characteristic of electrostatic actuation is retained. Initial testing and modeling of this concept

  2. A Novel Concept for a Deformable Membrane Mirror for Correction of Large Amplitude Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jim; Patrick, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Very large, light weight mirrors are being developed for applications in space. Due to launch mass and volume restrictions these mirrors will need to be much more flexible than traditional optics. The use of primary mirrors with these characteristics will lead to requirements for adaptive optics capable of correcting wave front errors with large amplitude relatively low spatial frequency aberrations. The use of low modulus membrane mirrors actuated with electrostatic attraction forces is a potential solution for this application. Several different electrostatic membrane mirrors are now available commercially. However, as the dynamic range requirement of the adaptive mirror is increased the separation distance between the membrane and the electrodes must increase to accommodate the required face sheet deformations. The actuation force applied to the mirror decreases inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance; thus for large dynamic ranges the voltage requirement can rapidly increase into the high voltage regime. Experimentation with mirrors operating in the KV range has shown that at the higher voltages a serious problem with electrostatic field cross coupling between actuators can occur. Voltage changes on individual actuators affect the voltage of other actuators making the system very difficult to control. A novel solution has been proposed that combines high voltage electrodes with mechanical actuation to overcome this problem. In this design an array of electrodes are mounted to a backing structure via light weight large dynamic range flextensional actuators. With this design the control input becomes the separation distance between the electrode and the mirror. The voltage on each of the actuators is set to a uniform relatively high voltage, thus the problem of cross talk between actuators is avoided and the favorable distributed load characteristic of electrostatic actuation is retained. Initial testing and modeling of this concept

  3. Test results for an AOA-Xinetics grazing incidence x-ray deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, Charles; Egan, Richard; Landers, Franklin; Cavaco, Jeffrey; Ezzo, Kevin; Khounsary, Ali

    2014-09-01

    X-ray telescopes use grazing incidence mirrors to focus X-ray photons from celestial objects. To achieve the large collecting areas required to image faint sources, thousands of thin, doubly curved mirrors are arranged in nested cylindrical shells to approximate a filled aperture. These mirrors require extremely smooth surfaces with precise figures to provide well-focused beams and small image spot sizes. The Generation-X telescope proposed by SAO would have a 12-meter aperture, a 50 m2 collecting area and 0.1 arc-second spatial resolution. This resolution would be obtained by actively controlling the mirror figure with piezoelectric actuators deposited on the back of each 0.4 mm thick mirror segment. To support SAO's Generation-X study, Northrop Grumman used internal funds to look at the feasibility of using Xinetics deformable mirror technologies to meet the Generation-X requirements. We designed and fabricated two 10 x 30 cm Platinum-coated silicon mirrors with 108 surface-parallel electrostrictive Lead Magnesium Niobate (PMN) actuators bonded to the mirror substrates. These mirrors were tested at optical wavelengths by Xinetics to assess the actuator's performance, but no funds were available for X-ray tests. In 2013, after receiving an invitation to evaluate the mirror's performance at Argonne National Laboratory, the mirrors were taken out of storage, refurbished, retested at Xinetics and transported to ANL for metrology measurements with a Long Trace Profilometer, a Fizeau laser interferometer, and X-ray tests. This paper describes the development and testing of the adaptive x-ray mirrors at AOAXinetics. Marathe, et al, will present the results of the tests at Argonne.

  4. Secure optical communication system utilizing deformable MEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Bifano, Thomas; Cornelissen, Steven; Stewart, Jason; Bleier, Zvi

    2009-02-01

    An optical communication system suitable for voice, data retrieval from remote sensors and identification is described. The system design allows operation at ranges of several hundred meters. The heart of the system is a modulated MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated and changes between a flat reflective state and a corrugated diffractive state. A process for mass producing these mirrors at low cost was developed and is described. The mirror was incorporated as a facet in a hollow retro-reflector, allowing temporal modulation of an interrogating beam and the return of the modulated beam to the interrogator. This system thus consists of a low power, small and light communication node with large (about 60°) angular extent. The system's range and pointing are determined by the interrogator /detector/demodulator (Transceiver) unit. The transceiver is comprised of an optical channel to establish line of sight communication, an interrogating laser at 1550nm, an avalanche photo diode to detect the return signal and electronics to drive the laser and demodulate the detected signal and convert it to an audio signal. A functional prototype system was built using a modified compact optical sight as the transceiver. Voice communication in free space was demonstrated. The design and test of major components and the complete system are discussed.

  5. Structural design and mitigation of mirror deformations in lunar-based telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Luz, P.L.

    1994-11-01

    Structural design and analysis of the optical systems for lunar-based telescopes is a challenging task. A driving concern of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) preliminary design study was the degradation of the LUTE optical figure due to thermal deformations, during a temperature cycle of 65 to 265 K at the reference 40 deg latitude, 0 deg longitude landing site. In addressing this task, temperature effects were characterized, and primary-mirror thermal deformations calculated for use in the optical analyses. Trade studies evaluated the qualitative performance of various design schemes. Results indicated that statically determinate mirror supports with bottom-mounted flexures created less optical disturbance under thermal loading than mirror supports at the inner or outer periphery. Another trade indicated that a telescope`s baseplate must be athermalized with respect to the mirrors by matching thermal distortion coefficients. A comparison of three materials for the primary mirror predicted that silicon carbide would be the best material for resisting thermally induced figure deformations on the moon. 15 refs.

  6. Computational feasibility of deformable mirror microwave hyperthermia technique for localized breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Udpa, Satish S; Udpa, Lalita

    2007-11-01

    Computational feasibility of a new non-invasive microwave hyperthermia technique that employs dual deformable mirror is investigated using simplified computational tools and anatomically realistic breast models. The proposed technique employs two pairs of electromagnetic sources and continuously deformable mirrors to focus the electromagnetic radiation at the target site for hyperthermia. The mirror functions like a continuum of radiating elements that offer effective scan coverage inside the breast with efficient field focusing at the target location. The electric field focusing and temperature mapping in the two-dimensional numerical simulations are investigated using wave propagation and bio-heat transfer models respectively. The method of moments, a popular numerical simulation tool, is used to model the electric field maintained by the deformable mirrors for continuous wave excitation. The electromagnetic (EM) energy deposited by the mirrors is used in the steady state bio-heat transfer equation to quantify the temperature distribution inside two-dimensional anatomically realistic breast models. Feasibility of the proposed technique is evaluated using numerical breast models derived from magnetic resonance images of patients with variation in breast density, age and pathology. The computational study indicates preferential EM energy deposition and temperature elevation inside tumor tissue with minimum collateral damage to the neighboring normal tissues. Simulation results obtained for the magnetic resonance (MR) breast data appear promising and indicate the merit in pursuing the investigation using 3D computational models.

  7. Static and dynamic micro deformable mirror characterization by phase-shifting and time-averaged interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotard, Arnaud; Zamkotsian, Frederic

    2004-09-01

    Since micro deformable mirrors based on Micro-Opto-Electronico-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) technology would be essential in next generation adaptive optics system, we are designing, realizing and characterizing blocks of this key-component. An in-house designed tiltable mirror (170*100 μm2) has been processed by surface micromachining in the Cronos foundry, and a dedicated characterization bench has been developed for the complete analysis of building blocks as well as operational deformable mirrors. This modular Twyman-Green interferometer allows high in-plane resolution (4μm) or large field of view (40mm). Out-of-plane measurements are performed with phase-shifting interferometry showing highly repeatable results (standard deviation<5nm). Features such as optical quality or electro-mechanical behavior are extracted from these high precision three-dimensional component maps. Range is increased without loosing accuracy by using two-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry authorizing large steps measurements such as 590 nm print-through steps caused by the Cronos process. Dynamic analysis like vibration mode and cut-off frequency is realized with time-averaged interferometry. Rotation mode frequency of 31-3kHz of the micro tiltable mirror, and a resonance with a tuned damping at 1.1kHz of the commercial OKO deformable mirror are revealed.

  8. Adaptive optics with a magnetic deformable mirror: applications in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Enrique J.; Vabre, Laurent; Hermann, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Povazay, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    A novel deformable mirror using 52 independent magnetic actuators (MIRAO 52, Imagine Eyes) is presented and characterized for ophthalmic applications. The capabilities of the device to reproduce different surfaces, in particular Zernike polynomials up to the fifth order, are investigated in detail. The study of the influence functions of the deformable mirror reveals a significant linear response with the applied voltage. The correcting device also presents a high fidelity in the generation of surfaces. The ranges of production of Zernike polynomials fully cover those typically found in the human eye, even for the cases of highly aberrated eyes. Data from keratoconic eyes are confronted with the obtained ranges, showing that the deformable mirror is able to compensate for these strong aberrations. Ocular aberration correction with polychromatic light, using a near Gaussian spectrum of 130 nm full width at half maximum centered at 800 nm, in five subjects is accomplished by simultaneously using the deformable mirror and an achromatizing lens, in order to compensate for the monochromatic and chromatic aberrations, respectively. Results from living eyes, including one exhibiting 4.66 D of myopia and a near pathologic cornea with notable high order aberrations, show a practically perfect aberration correction. Benefits and applications of simultaneous monochromatic and chromatic aberration correction are finally discussed in the context of retinal imaging and vision.

  9. Development of In-Plane Surface Deformation Sensing for Thin Film PVDF Actuated Membrane Mirrors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Method (1) This method places the deformable mirror in one arm of a Twyman -Green interferometer . The data from the interferometer is then analyzed...9 Figure 5: Setup of the Interferometer Method (1) ........................................................................ 10 Figure 6: Design of a... interferometer and fringe pattern analysis. Figure 5 shows the setup of the optical train of this method. 10 Figure 5: Setup of the Interferometer

  10. Characterization of deformable mirrors for spherical aberration correction in optical sectioning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Michael; Hall, Simon; Knox, Steven; Stevens, Richard; Paterson, Carl

    2010-03-29

    In this paper we describe the wavefront aberrations that arise when imaging biological specimens using an optical sectioning microscope and generate simulated wavefronts for a planar refractive index mismatch. We then investigate the capability of two deformable mirrors for correcting spherical aberration at different focusing depths for three different microscope objective lenses. Along with measurement and analysis of the mirror influence functions we determine the optimum mirror pupil size and number of spatial modes included in the wavefront expansion and we present measurements of actuator linearity and hysteresis. We find that both mirrors are capable of correcting the wavefront aberration to improve imaging and greatly extend the depth at which diffraction limited imaging is possible.

  11. Concept and modeling analysis of a high fidelity multimode deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Li, Yun; Wang, Anding; Xing, Tingwen

    2015-06-10

    Conventional deformable mirrors (DM) cannot meet the requirement of aberration controlling for advanced lithography tools. This paper illustrates an approach using the property that deformation of a thin plate is similar to optical modes to realize a high fidelity multimode deformable mirror whose deformation has characteristics of optical aberration modes. The way to arrange actuators is also examined. In this paper, a 36-actuator deformable mirror is taken as an example to generate low-order Zernike modes. The result shows that this DM generates the fourth fringe Zernike mode (Z4) defocus, and primary aberration Z5-Z8 with an error less than 0.5%, generates the fifth-order aberration Z10-Z14, and generates the seventh-order aberration Z17-Z20 with an error less than 1.1%. The high fidelity replication of the Zernike mode indicates that the DM satisfies the demand of controlling aberrations corresponding to the first 20 Zernike modes in an advanced lithography tool.

  12. Solderjet Bumping as a Versatile Tool for the Integration of Piezoelectric Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Thomas; Goy, Matthias; Hornaff, Marcel; Appelfelder, Michael; Reinlein, Claudia

    A deformable mirror (DM) is a device that aims to compensate laser-induced mirror deformation and thermal lensing in the optical system. The mounting of membrane based DM with screen-printed actuators is crucial, as stress may deform the membrane and change their characteristics (shape, piezoelectric deflection, natural frequency). We present the laser-based Solderjet Bumping (SJB) technique to assemble mounts for piezoelectric-activated DM. The discussed polymer-free joining offers advantages, such as improved temporal stability and low outgassing, over adhesive bonding. We evaluate the optimum number of solder joints with respect to resonance behavior by finite elements analysis and experimental measurements. Long-term evaluation over a period of more than four years shows no significant change of resonance behavior. Thus, we prove the SJB bonding technique to be stable for dynamic applications over several years, and consider it a versatile tool for integration of DM.

  13. Adaptive Optics: Arroyo Simulation Tool and Deformable Mirror Actuation Using Golay Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lint, Adam S.

    2005-01-01

    The Arroyo C++ libraries, written by Caltech post-doc student Matthew Britton, have the ability to simulate optical systems and atmospheric signal interference. This program was chosen for use in an end-to-end simulation model of a laser communication system because it is freely distributed and has the ability to be controlled by a remote system or "smart agent." Proposed operation of this program by a smart agent has been demonstrated, and the results show it to be a suitable simulation tool. Deformable mirrors, as a part of modern adaptive optics systems, may contain thousands of tiny, independently controlled actuators used to modify the shape of the mirror. Each actuator is connected to two wires, creating a cumbersome and expensive device. Recently, an alternative actuation method that uses gas-filled tubes known as Golay cells has been explored. Golay cells, operated by infrared lasers instead of electricity, would replace the actuator system thereby creating a more compact deformable mirror. The operation of Golay cells and their ability to move a deformable mirror in excess of the required 20 microns has been demonstrated. Experimentation has shown them to be extremely sensitive to pressure and temperature, making them ideal for use in a controlled environment.

  14. Adaptive Optics: Arroyo Simulation Tool and Deformable Mirror Actuation Using Golay Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lint, Adam S.

    2005-01-01

    The Arroyo C++ libraries, written by Caltech post-doc student Matthew Britton, have the ability to simulate optical systems and atmospheric signal interference. This program was chosen for use in an end-to-end simulation model of a laser communication system because it is freely distributed and has the ability to be controlled by a remote system or "smart agent." Proposed operation of this program by a smart agent has been demonstrated, and the results show it to be a suitable simulation tool. Deformable mirrors, as a part of modern adaptive optics systems, may contain thousands of tiny, independently controlled actuators used to modify the shape of the mirror. Each actuator is connected to two wires, creating a cumbersome and expensive device. Recently, an alternative actuation method that uses gas-filled tubes known as Golay cells has been explored. Golay cells, operated by infrared lasers instead of electricity, would replace the actuator system thereby creating a more compact deformable mirror. The operation of Golay cells and their ability to move a deformable mirror in excess of the required 20 microns has been demonstrated. Experimentation has shown them to be extremely sensitive to pressure and temperature, making them ideal for use in a controlled environment.

  15. Magnetic fluid based deformable mirror for aberration correction of liquid telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun-qiu; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Kong, Xiang-hui; Zhang, Zhu; Liu, Mei

    2017-03-01

    A magnetic fluid based deformable mirror (MFDM) that could produce a large stroke more than 100 μm is designed and demonstrated experimentally with respect to the characteristics of the aberration of the liquid telescope. Its aberration correction performance is verified by the co-simulation using COMSOL and MATLAB. Furthermore, the stroke performance of the MFDM and the decentralized linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) mirror surface control approach are experimentally evaluated with a prototype of MFDM in an adaptive optics system to show its potential application for the large aberration correction of liquid telescopes.

  16. Control of deformable mirrors including a nonlinear modal model for air gap damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present nonlinear pressure dynamics as an extension to a linear distributed parameters model of a deformable mirror. The original, undamped model is recalled and measurement results are shown supporting the need for a damping model which includes the pressure dynamics of the air gap behind the mirror membrane. We will derive the damping coefficients to match our measurement results. Based on the mew model, we will derive a modal feedforward and feedback control law for 88 actuators based on only 3 position sensors and show simulation results to support the algorithm's effectiveness.

  17. Demonstration of a 17 cm robust carbon fiber deformable mirror for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ammons, S M; Hart, M; Coughenour, B; Romeo, R; Martin, R; Rademacher, M

    2011-09-12

    Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite is an attractive material for fabrication of optics due to its high stiffness-to-weight ratio, robustness, zero coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and the ability to replicate multiple optics from the same mandrel. We use 8 and 17 cm prototype CFRP thin-shell deformable mirrors to show that residual CTE variation may be addressed with mounted actuators for a variety of mirror sizes. We present measurements of surface quality at a range of temperatures characteristic of mountaintop observatories. For the 8 cm piece, the figure error of the Al-coated reflective surface under best actuator correction is {approx}43 nm RMS. The 8 cm mirror has a low surface error internal to the outer ring of actuators (17 nm RMS at 20 C and 33 nm RMS at -5 C). Surface roughness is low (< 3 nm P-V) at a variety of temperatures. We present new figure quality measurements of the larger 17 cm mirror, showing that the intra-actuator figure error internal to the outer ring of actuators (38 nm RMS surface with one-third the actuator density of the 8 cm mirror) does not scale sharply with mirror diameter.

  18. Study of a wide-aperture combined deformable mirror for high-power pulsed phosphate glass lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samarkin, V V; Aleksandrov, A G; Romanov, P N; Rukosuev, A L; Kudryashov, A V; Jitsuno, T

    2015-12-31

    A deformable mirror with the size of 410 × 468 mm controlled by bimorph piezoceramic plates and multilayer piezo stacks is developed. The response functions of individual actuators and the measurements of the flatness of the deformable mirror surface are presented. The study of mirrors with an interferometer and a wavefront sensor has shown that it is possible to improve the surface flatness down to a residual roughness of 0.033 μm (RMS). The possibility of correction of beam aberrations in an ultra-high-power laser using the created bimorph mirror is demonstrated. (letters)

  19. Reducing the Surface Performance Requirements of a Primary Mirror by Adding a Deformable Mirror in its Optical Path

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) mirrors been proposed for use in future imaging satellites . Compared to traditional glass-based mirrors, CFRP...Reducing the surface performance requirements of CFRP mirrors is a critical step toward employing these mirrors in future imaging satellites . 14...polymer (CFRP) mirrors been proposed for use in future imaging satellites . Compared to traditional glass-based mirrors, CFRP mirrors offer reduced

  20. Scanning micromechanical mirror for fine-pointing units of intersatellite optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhonen, Mika; Graeffe, Jussi; Sillanpää, Teuvo; Sipola, Hannu; Eiden, Michael

    2001-12-01

    A light and fast two-axial fine-pointing mirror has a number of space applications, especially in intersatellite optical links. The fine pointing of laser beams in optical links is currently realized with electromagnetic or piezoelectric actuators, which are relatively large and heavy. Micro-electro-mechanical system technology bears a high potential in space applications, offering a reduction in device size, mass and power consumption. Microtechnology facilitates batch mode fabrication, yielding a low cost per unit. VTT Automation has designed and partially tested a silicon micromachined electrostatically actuated two-axial mirror, which can be controlled with microradian resolution and large bandwidth over the angular range of +/-3 mrad.

  1. Scalable stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror for astronomy and laser processing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L. Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Bryce, Emma; Hutson, David; Kirk, Katherine; Schwartz, Noah; Atkinson, David; Beard, Steven; Baillie, Tom; Parr-Burman, Phil; Strachan, Mel

    2014-02-15

    A prototype of a scalable and potentially low-cost stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror (SA-PDM) with 35 active elements is presented in this paper. This prototype is characterized by a 2 μm maximum actuator stroke, a 1.4 μm mirror sag (measured for a 14 mm × 14 mm area of the unpowered SA-PDM), and a ±200 nm hysteresis error. The initial proof of concept experiments described here show that this mirror can be successfully used for shaping a high power laser beam in order to improve laser machining performance. Various beam shapes have been obtained with the SA-PDM and examples of laser machining with the shaped beams are presented.

  2. Scalable stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror for astronomy and laser processing applications.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L; Bryce, Emma; Schwartz, Noah; Strachan, Mel; Hutson, David; Maier, Robert R J; Atkinson, David; Beard, Steven; Baillie, Tom; Parr-Burman, Phil; Kirk, Katherine; Hand, Duncan P

    2014-02-01

    A prototype of a scalable and potentially low-cost stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror (SA-PDM) with 35 active elements is presented in this paper. This prototype is characterized by a 2 μm maximum actuator stroke, a 1.4 μm mirror sag (measured for a 14 mm × 14 mm area of the unpowered SA-PDM), and a ±200 nm hysteresis error. The initial proof of concept experiments described here show that this mirror can be successfully used for shaping a high power laser beam in order to improve laser machining performance. Various beam shapes have been obtained with the SA-PDM and examples of laser machining with the shaped beams are presented.

  3. Telescope Wavefront Aberration Compensation with a Deformable Mirror in an Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yijiang; Crossfield, Ian

    2005-01-01

    With the goal of reducing the surface wavefront error of low-cost multi-meter-diameter mirrors from about 10 waves peak-to-valley (P-V), at lpm wavelength, to approximately 1-wave or less, we describe a method to compensate for slowly varying wavefront aberrations of telescope mirrors. A deformable mirror is utilized in an active optical compensation system. The kMS wavefront error of a 0.3m telescope improved to 0.05 waves (0.26 waves P-V) from the original value of 1.4 waves RMS (6.5 waves P-V), measured at 633nm, and the Strehl ratio improved to 89% from the original value of 0.08%.

  4. Beam quality active control of a slab MOPA solid state laser with combined deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Rujian; Xu, Honglai; Li, Guohui; Wu, Jing; Du, Yinglei; Zhang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    A novel phase aberration correcting method based on combined deformable mirrors (DMs) in a slab MOPA (master oscillator and power amplifier) solid state laser system is proposed and validated experimentally. The adaptive optics(AO) system with combined deformable mirrors composed of a one-dimension (1D) DM with 11 actuators and a two-dimension (2D) DM with 67 valid actuators, has been designed to correct the phase aberrations, which doesn't need the high voltage drivers and has an excellent correcting efficiency of the high order phase aberrations. The experimental results show that the wave front of the slab laser beam is compensated well and the residual wave front is less than 0.08 λ rms. The beam quality of the slab laser in the far field is improved to1.67x DL.

  5. Continuous optical zoom module based on two deformable mirrors for mobile device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Hung; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, optical zoom function of the mobile camera phones has been studied. However, traditional systems use motors to change separation of lenses to achieve zoom function, suffering from long total length and high power consumption, which is not suitable for mobile phones use. Adopting MEMS polymer deformable mirrors in zoom systems has the potential to reduce thickness and have the advantage of low chromatic aberration. In this paper, we presented a 2X continuous optical zoom systems for mobile phones, using two deformable mirrors, suitable for 5-Mega-pixel image sensors. In our design, the thickness of the zoom system is about 11 mm. The smallest EFL (effective focal length) is 4.7 mm at full field angle of 52° and the f/# is 4.4. The longest EFL of the module is 9.4 mm and the f/# is 6.4.

  6. Effect of the influence function of deformable mirrors on laser beam shaping.

    PubMed

    González-Núñez, Héctor; Béchet, Clémentine; Ayancán, Boris; Neichel, Benoit; Guesalaga, Andrés

    2017-02-20

    The continuous membrane stiffness of a deformable mirror propagates the deformation of the actuators beyond their neighbors. When phase-retrieval algorithms are used to determine the desired shape of these mirrors, this cross-coupling-also known as influence function (IF)-is generally disregarded. We study this problem via simulations and bench tests for different target shapes to gain further insight into the phenomenon. Sound modeling of the IF effect is achieved as highlighted by the concurrence between the modeled and experimental results. In addition, we observe that the actuators IF is a key parameter that determines the accuracy of the output light pattern. Finally, it is shown that in some cases it is possible to achieve better shaping by modifying the input irradiance of the phase-retrieval algorithm. The results obtained from this analysis open the door to further improvements in this type of beam-shaping systems.

  7. Optical zoom module based on two deformable mirrors for mobile device applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hung; Liu, Yen-Liang; Su, Guo-Dung J

    2012-04-10

    In recent years, optical zoom functionality in mobile devices has been studied. Traditional zoom systems use motors to change separation of lenses to achieve the zoom function, but these systems result in long total length and high power consumption, which are not suitable for mobile devices. Adopting micromachined polymer deformable mirrors in zoom systems has the potential to reduce thickness and chromatic aberration. In this paper, we propose a 2× continuous optical zoom system with five-megapixel image sensors by using two deformable mirrors. In our design, the thickness of the zoom system is about 11 mm. The effective focal length ranges from 4.7 mm at a field angle of 52° to 9.4 mm. The f-number is 4.4 and 6.4 at the wide-angle and telephoto end, respectively.

  8. Woofer-tweeter deformable mirror control for closed-loop adaptive optics: theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald; Norton, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Deformable mirrors with very high order correction generally have smaller dynamic range of motion than what is required to correct seeing over large aperture telescopes. As a result, systems will need to have an architecture that employs two deformable mirrors in series, one for the low-order but large excursion parts of the wavefront and one for the finer and smaller excursion components. The closed-loop control challenge is to a) keep the overall system stable, b) avoid the two mirrors using control energy to cancel each others correction, c) resolve actuator saturations stably, d) assure that on average the mirrors are each correcting their assigned region of spatial frequency space. We present the control architecture and techniques for assuring that it is linear and stable according to the above criteria. We derived the analytic forms for stability and performance and show results from simulations and on-sky testing using the new ShaneAO system on the Lick 3-meter telescope.

  9. Thumb reconstruction without formal pollicization in mirror hand deformity: a series of four cases.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M; Al-Kahtani, A R; Al-Sharif, E M; Al-Otaibi, N J

    2013-11-01

    Thumb reconstruction in mirror hands is usually done by pollicization. However, objective pinch strength and power grip data in mirror hands following pollicization are lacking. Alternative thumb reconstruction techniques include doing nothing, rotation osteotomy or syndactylization of the radial digits. In this article, we report a series of four cases of mirror hand deformity where the thumb was not reconstructed by formal pollicization. Two cases had non-classic mirror hand deformity (the forearm contained a radius and an ulna) and the other two had classic ulnar dimelia. In all cases, thumb reconstruction was done by keeping one of the radial fingers in place (without pollicization) as the new thumb; and then (if required) performing a secondary osteotomy procedure to rotate the new thumb into pronation. The four cases were recalled back to the clinic for functional assessment at ages 20 years, 5 years, 4 years and 2 years, respectively. The overall hand function was considered 'fair' in the case with concurrent unique features, and was considered 'excellent' in the other three cases. It was concluded that the technique of thumb reconstruction used in the current series is an acceptable option. However, objective measurements, especially with regards to pinch strength and power grip, need to be compared with the pollicization technique.

  10. Wavefront correction performed by a deformable mirror of arbitrary actuator pattern within a multireflection waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingkun; Huang, Lei; Bian, Qi; Gong, Mali

    2014-09-10

    The wavefront correction ability of a deformable mirror with a multireflection waveguide was investigated and compared via simulations. By dividing a conventional actuator array into a multireflection waveguide that consisted of single-actuator units, an arbitrary actuator pattern could be achieved. A stochastic parallel perturbation algorithm was proposed to find the optimal actuator pattern for a particular aberration. Compared with conventional an actuator array, the multireflection waveguide showed significant advantages in correction of higher order aberrations.

  11. Influence Function Measurement of Continuous Membrane Deformable Mirror Actuators Using Shack Hartmann Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopashree, M. B.; Vyas, Akondi; Prasad, B. Raghavendra

    2011-10-01

    The characterization of a continuous membrane deformable mirror (CDM) involves the measurement of influence function, which quantifies the response of individual actuators to application of different voltages. In this paper, we present the results of influence function measurement for a 140-actuator CDM using a Shack Hartmann sensor (SHS). The measured influence function was fitted using a Gaussian function and also decomposed into Zernike moments. The SHS-CDM interaction matrix was also computed.

  12. Control of focusing in high resolution eye imaging and microscopy using a deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Christopher; Rogers, John; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    We use a deformable mirror (DM) in an adaptive optics dual channel optical coherence tomography/en-face eye fundus setup to control focus on the sample by adding aberrations to the wavefront. A program was created to sweep the equivalent focus created by the DM. Using this device we are able to sweep the focus between two extremes. This system is also used to measure and monitor any existing aberrations in the system, caused by the optical elements or the target object.

  13. Extended depth-of-field microscopy with a high-speed deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Shain, William J; Vickers, Nicholas A; Goldberg, Bennett B; Bifano, Thomas; Mertz, Jerome

    2017-03-01

    We present a wide-field fluorescence microscopy add-on that provides a fast, light-efficient extended depth-of-field (EDOF) using a deformable mirror with an update rate of 20 kHz. Out-of-focus contributions in the raw EDOF images are suppressed with a deconvolution algorithm derived directly from the microscope 3D optical transfer function. Demonstrations of the benefits of EDOF microscopy are shown with GCaMP-labeled mouse brain tissue.

  14. Pulse shaping in the mid-infrared by a deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Cartella, Andrea; Bonora, Stefano; Först, Michael; Cerullo, Giulio; Cavalleri, Andrea; Manzoni, Cristian

    2014-03-15

    We present a pulse-shaping scheme operating in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength range up to 20 μm. The spectral phase is controlled by a specially designed large stroke 32-actuator deformable mirror in a grating-based 4f configuration. We demonstrate the shaper capability of compressing the MIR pulses, imparting parabolic and third-order spectral phases and splitting the spectral content to create two independent pulses.

  15. Image based deformable mirror control for adaptive optics in satellite telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamura, Norihide

    2012-07-01

    We are developing an adaptive optics system for earth observing remote sensing sensor. In this system, high spatial resolution has to be achieved by a lightweight sensor system due to the launcher’s requirements. Moreover, simple hardware architecture has to be selected to achieve high reliability. Image based AOS realize these requirements without wavefront sensor. In remote sensing, it is difficult to use a reference point source unless the satellite controls its attitude toward a star or it has a reference point source in itself. We propose the control algorithm of the deformable mirror on the basis of the extended scene instead of the point source. In our AOS, a cost function is defined using acquired images on the basis of the contrast in spatial or Fourier domain. The cost function is optimized varying the input signal of each actuator of the deformable mirror. In our system, the deformable mirror has 140 actuators. We use basis functions to reduce the number of the input parameters to realize real-time control. We constructed the AOS for laboratory test, and proved that the modulated wavefront by DM almost consists with the ideal one by directly measured using a Shack- Hartmann wavefront sensor as a reference.

  16. Analysis on the misalignment errors between Hartmann-Shack sensor and 45-element deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihui; Zhang, Yi; Tao, Jianjun; Cao, Fen; Long, Yin; Tian, Pingchuan; Chen, Shangwu

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at 45-element adaptive optics system, the model of 45-element deformable mirror is truly built by COMSOL Multiphysics, and every actuator's influence function is acquired by finite element method. The process of this system correcting optical aberration is simulated by making use of procedure, and aiming for Strehl ratio of corrected diffraction facula, in the condition of existing different translation and rotation error between Hartmann-Shack sensor and deformable mirror, the system's correction ability for 3-20 Zernike polynomial wave aberration is analyzed. The computed result shows: the system's correction ability for 3-9 Zernike polynomial wave aberration is higher than that of 10-20 Zernike polynomial wave aberration. The correction ability for 3-20 Zernike polynomial wave aberration does not change with misalignment error changing. With rotation error between Hartmann-Shack sensor and deformable mirror increasing, the correction ability for 3-20 Zernike polynomial wave aberration gradually goes down, and with translation error increasing, the correction ability for 3-9 Zernike polynomial wave aberration gradually goes down, but the correction ability for 10-20 Zernike polynomial wave aberration behave up-and-down depression.

  17. Swept source optical coherence tomography Gabor fusion splicing technique for microscopy of thick samples using a deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Costa, Christopher; Bradu, Adrian; Rogers, John; Phelan, Pauline; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    We present a swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system at 1060 nm equipped with a wavefront sensor at 830 nm and a deformable mirror in a closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) system. Due to the AO correction, the confocal profile of the interface optics becomes narrower than the OCT axial range, restricting the part of the B-scan (cross section) with good contrast. By actuating on the deformable mirror, the depth of the focus is changed and the system is used to demonstrate Gabor filtering in order to produce B-scan OCT images with enhanced sensitivity throughout the axial range from a Drosophila larvae. The focus adjustment is achieved by manipulating the curvature of the deformable mirror between two user-defined limits. Particularities of controlling the focus for Gabor filtering using the deformable mirror are presented.

  18. Swept source optical coherence tomography Gabor fusion splicing technique for microscopy of thick samples using a deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Christopher; Bradu, Adrian; Rogers, John; Phelan, Pauline; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    We present a swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system at 1060 nm equipped with a wavefront sensor at 830 nm and a deformable mirror in a closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) system. Due to the AO correction, the confocal profile of the interface optics becomes narrower than the OCT axial range, restricting the part of the B-scan (cross section) with good contrast. By actuating on the deformable mirror, the depth of the focus is changed and the system is used to demonstrate Gabor filtering in order to produce B-scan OCT images with enhanced sensitivity throughout the axial range from a Drosophila larvae. The focus adjustment is achieved by manipulating the curvature of the deformable mirror between two user-defined limits. Particularities of controlling the focus for Gabor filtering using the deformable mirror are presented.

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Compensation of dynamic thermal deformations of mirrors in high-power slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, A. Yu; Sergeev, V. V.; Smirnov, A. A.; Starovoitov, A. V.; Sherstobitov, V. E.

    2004-11-01

    A system of compensation of thermal deformations of resonator mirrors in high-power CO2 slab lasers based on profiled heating of the mirror back surface is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that such a heating of a resonator mirror makes it possible to minimise dynamic distortions of the output-beam wave front in the case when the lasing power can be varied.

  20. Characterizing the potential of MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Evans, Julia W.; Severson, Scott; Macintosh, Bruce; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Don; Max, Claire; Palmer, Dave

    2006-06-01

    Current high-contrast "extreme" adaptive optics (ExAO) systems are partially limited by deformable mirror technology. Mirror requirements specify thousands of actuators, all of which must be functional within the clear aperture, and which give nanometer flatness yet micron stroke when operated in closed loop.1 Micro-electrical mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors have been shown to meet ExAO actuator yield, wavefront error, and cost considerations. This study presents the performance of Boston Micromachines' 1024-actuator continuous-facesheet MEMS deformable mirrors under tests for actuator stability, position repeatability, and practical operating stroke. To explore whether MEMS actuators are susceptible to temporal variation, a series of long-term stability experiments were conducted. Each actuator was held fixed and the motion over 40 minutes was measured. The median displacement of all the actuators tested was 0.08 nm surface, inclusive of system error. MEMS devices are also appealing for adaptive optics architectures based on open-loop correction. In experiments of actuator position repeatability, 100% of the tested actuators returned repeatedly to their starting point with a precision of < 1 nm surface. Finally, MEMS devices were tested for maximum stroke achieved under application of spatially varying one-dimensional sinusoids. Given a specified amplitude in voltage, the measured stroke was 1 μm surface at the low spatial frequencies, decreasing to 0.2 μm surface for the highest spatial frequency. Stroke varied somewhat linearly as inverse spatial frequency, with a flattening in the relation at the high spatial frequency end.

  1. Method of analysis for determining and correcting mirror deformation due to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Ernesto Penado, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer, located near Flagstaff, Arizona, is a ground-based interferometer that collects, transports, and modulates stellar radiation from up to six primary flat collectors, known as siderostats, through a common vacuum relay system to a combiner. In the combiner, the modulated beams are superimposed, fringes obtained, and data recorded for further analysis to produce precise star positions or stellar details. The current number of observable stellar objects for the astrometric interferometer can increase from 6000 to at least 47,000 with the addition of full-aperture 20-deg down-tilting beam compressors in each optical train. Such an aperture increase, from the current 12.5 to 35 cm, opens the sky to many additional and fainter stars. Engineering analysis of our beam compressor primary mirror shows that the maximum allowable sag, 21 nm, occurs prematurely at 2.8-deg down-tilt angle. Furthermore, at the operational down-tilt angle of 20 deg, the wavefront deformation increases to 155 nm. We present a finite element analysis technique and design modification concept to reduce tilt-induced deformation on the mirror surface. This work is a first pass to determine the feasibility for a mechanical solution path forward. From this analysis, we found that four outwardly applied 17.8-N forces on the rear surface of the mirror could reduce sag from 155 to 32 nm at 20-deg down-tilt angle.

  2. Characterization of a bimorph deformable mirror using stroboscopic phase-shifting interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Horsley, David A.; Park, Hyunkyu; Laut, Sophie P.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of a bimorph deformable mirror (DM) for use in an adaptive optics system are described. The DM is a 35-actuator device composed of two disks of lead magnesium niobate (PMN), an electrostrictive ceramic that produces a mechanical strain in response to an imposed electric field. A custom stroboscopic phase-shifting interferometer was developed to measure the deformation of the mirror in response to applied voltage. The ability of the mirror to replicate optical aberrations described by the Zernike polynomials was tested as a measure of the mirror’s static performance. The natural frequencies of the DM were measured up to 20 kHz using both stroboscopic interferometry as well as a commercial laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Interferometric measurements of the DM surface profile were analyzed by fitting the surface with mode-shapes predicted using classical plate theory for an elastically supported disk. The measured natural frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the predictions of the theoretical model. PMID:19122798

  3. Magnetic Liquid Deformable Mirrors for Astronomical Applications: Active Correction of Optical Aberrations from Lower-grade Optics and Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  4. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  5. Evaluation of control laws and actuator locations for control systems applicable to deformable astronomical telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the major difficulties associated with large orbiting astronomical telescopes are the cost of manufacturing the primary mirror to precise tolerances and the maintaining of diffraction-limited tolerances while in orbit. One successfully demonstrated approach for minimizing these problem areas is the technique of actively deforming the primary mirror by applying discrete forces to the rear of the mirror. A modal control technique, as applied to active optics, has previously been developed and analyzed. The modal control technique represents the plant to be controlled in terms of its eigenvalues and eigenfunctions which are estimated via numerical approximation techniques. The report includes an extension of previous work using the modal control technique and also describes an optimal feedback controller. The equations for both control laws are developed in state-space differential form and include such considerations as stability, controllability, and observability. These equations are general and allow the incorporation of various mode-analyzer designs; two design approaches are presented. The report also includes a technique for placing actuator and sensor locations at points on the mirror based upon the flexibility matrix of the uncontrolled or unobserved modes of the structure. The locations selected by this technique are used in the computer runs which are described. The results are based upon three different initial error distributions, two mode-analyzer designs, and both the modal and optimal control laws.

  6. High-power visible-laser effect on a 37-segment Iris AO deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Andrew; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren

    2010-02-01

    We have tested an aluminum-coated Iris AO Micro-Electrical Mechanical System (MEMS) segmented Deformable Mirror (DM) for its behavior in the presence of high energy 532 nm laser light. The DM was subject to several tests in which the laser power and the duration of its incidence was varied. The DM experienced an irradiance of 94.5 W cm-2 at the maximum laser power of 2 W. A slight permanent reduction in the amount of bow in each segment was observed. This is most likely due to annealing. The mirror remained fully functional during and after the tests. Measurements of the mirror's temporal stability and position repeatability were performed before the laser test. We found a 1.28 nm rms variation in the bow of segments that is highly correlated over the 16 minute test. The mirror's ability to return to its initial position was within the 1.34 nm rms instrument noise. These results are encouraging for applications such as the laser uplink correction of the Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiment (Villages) and future multi-Laser Guidestar systems (LGS).

  7. X-ray beam expansion by the application of re-entrant surface profiles to deformable bimorph mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, John P.; Alcock, Simon G.; Kashyap, Yogesh; Nistea, Ioana; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-09-01

    Deformable, piezo bimorph mirrors are often used to expand X-ray beams to a continuous range of sizes. However, optical polishing errors present on all X-ray mirrors introduce striations into the reflected beam. To counteract them, reentrant surface modifications with alternating concave and convex curvature have been proposed and applied to mirrors of fixed shape or bimorph mirrors. For the latter, a new method of constructing re-entrant surface modifications on segments of unequal length is described. This allows the re-entrant modification required for a desired beam size at the focal point to be matched to the bimorph mirror's polishing errors, thus reducing the voltage variations. Optical profilometry using the Diamond-NOM showed that a 5-segment and a 7-segment modification could be suitably applied to a deformable bimorph mirror. X-ray tests showed that striations caused by the 5-segment modification in the beam at the focus are concentrated at the beam edges, while the beam center is left clear. This is in contrast to simple defocusing, in which a strong side shoulder appears. The 7-segment modification produces a pattern of evenly spaced striations. The intensity spikes seen with the re-entrant modifications are caused chiefly by the finite curvature of the mirror at the turning points. The question of whether deformable bimorph mirrors with different piezo response functions could sharpen the curvature changes will be investigated. Optimal modifications of continuous curvature, which could more realistically be applied, will be sought.

  8. Deformable mirror with controlled air damping for fast focus tracking and scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Chattergoon, Krishna; Wilson, Chris; Dickensheets, David L.

    2012-03-01

    Air flow is the dominant damping mechanism for deformable membrane mirrors that are actuated with electrostatic pressure from a counter electrode in close proximity to the flexible membrane. We use cryogenic deep silicon etching to create through-wafer perforations in the backplate in order to control air damping and achieve high-speed focus control. This paper describes both our design approach and device fabrication details. We show that damping can be controlled by selecting the proper hole pattern, and we present experimental and simulated frequency response measurements for small membrane displacements. Also we measured the 95% settling time of a 4 mm diameter mirror subjected to a 10 μm step deflection to be less than 200 μs.

  9. Calibration strategy of the pyramid wavefront sensor module of ERIS with the VLT deformable secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Briguglio, R.; Pinna, E.; Agapito, G.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.

    2012-07-01

    ERIS is a new Adaptive Optics Instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility of the VLT that foresees, in its design phase, a Pyramid Wavefront Sensor Module (PWM) to be used with the VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror (VLT-DSM) as corrector. As opposite to the concave secondary mirrors currently in use (e.g. at LBT), VLT-DSM is convex and calibration of the interaction matrix (IM) between the PWM and the DSM is not foreseen on-telescope during day-time. In this paper different options of calibration are evaluated and compared with particular attention on the synthetic evaluation and on-sky calibration of the IM. A trade-off of the calibration options, the optimization techniques and the related validation with numerical simulations are also provided.

  10. Effect of the particular temperature field on a National Ignition Facility deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Qi; Huang, Lei; Ma, Xingkun; Xue, Qiao; Gong, Mali

    2016-09-01

    The changes caused by temperature in the surface shape of a deformable mirror used at the National Ignition Facility has been investigated previously. In this paper the temperature induced surface shape under different temperature fields is further studied. We find that the changes of the peak and valley (PV) or root-mean-square (RMS) value rely on the temperature gradient as well as the difference between the mirror and the environment with a certain rule. This work analyzes these quantitative relationship, using the finite element method. Some experiments were carried out to verify the analysis results. The conclusion provides guidance to minimize the effect of the temperature field on the surface shape. Considerations about how to improve the temperature induced faceplate in actual work are suggested finally.

  11. Optical zoom camera module using two poly-dimethylsiloxane deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Wei, Hsiang-Chun; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Su, Guo-Dung John

    2014-10-10

    Miniaturization is an essential trend in the design of portable devices. Motor-driven lens technology is a traditional way to achieve autofocus and optical zoom functions. This approach usually requires considerable space and consumes significant power. Reflective optics is a methodology that not only can fold the optical path, but it has the advantage of low chromatic aberration. In this paper, we use a deformable mirror as a reflecting element in an optical zoom system. For its low Young's modulus and residual stress, we choose polydimethylsiloxane as a deformable membrane that can provide a large stroke. The optical zoom module consists of a pair of micromachined deformable mirrors. The thickness of this module is 10 mm, which enables 2× optical zoom. The smallest effective focal length is 4.7 mm at a full field angle of 52°, and the f-number is 4.4. The largest effective focal length of the module is 9.4 mm, and the f-number is 6.4.

  12. Nonlinear plate equation analysis for the design of large stroke deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azucena, Oscar A.; Fernandez, Bautista; Kubby, Joel A.

    2008-02-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) improves the quality of astronomical imaging systems by using real time measurement of the turbulent medium in the optical path. The measurements are then taken and applied to a deformable mirror (DM) that is in the conjugate position of the aberrations in the optical path. The quality of the reconstructed wavefront directly affects the images obtained. One of the limiting factors in current DM technology is the amount of stroke available to correct the wavefront distortions which can be as high as 20 microns of optical path difference. We have developed a simulation analysis using Galerkin's method to solve the nonlinear plate equation. The analysis uses a set of orthogonal equations that satisfied the boundary condition to solve for the linear deformation on the mirror surface. This deformation is used to iteratively converge to the final solution by applying the nonlinear plate equation and the nonlinear actuator forces. This simulation was used to design a microelectromechanical DM with 10 μm of stroke.

  13. Compensation of Gravity-Induced Structural Deformations on a Beam- Waveguide Antenna Using a Deformable Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Moore, M.; Rochblatt, D. J.; Veruttipong, W.

    1995-01-01

    At the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) Goldstone Complex, a 34-meter- diameter beam-waveguide antenna, DSS-13, was constructed in 1988-1990 and has become an integral part of an advanced systems program and a test bed for technologies being developed to introduce Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies into the DSN. A method for compensating the gravity- induced structural deformations in this large antenna is presented.

  14. Mathematical and computational modeling of a ferrofluid deformable mirror for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Aaron J.; Griffiths, Ian M.; Groff, Tyler D.; Rousing, Andreas W.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2016-07-01

    Deformable mirrors (DMs) are an enabling and mission-critical technology in any coronagraphic instrument designed to directly image exoplanets. A new ferro fluid deformable mirror technology for high-contrast imaging is currently under development at Princeton, featuring a flexible optical surface manipulated by the local electromagnetic and global hydraulic actuation of a reservoir of ferro fluid. The ferro fluid DM is designed to prioritize high optical surface quality, high-precision/low-stroke actuation, and excellent low-spatial-frequency performance - capabilities that meet the unique demands of high-contrast coronagraphy in a space-based platform. To this end, the ferro-fluid medium continuously supports the DM face sheet, a configuration that eliminates actuator print-through (or, quilting) by decoupling the nominal surface figure from the geometry of the actuator array. The global pressure control allows independent focus actuation. In this paper we describe an analytical model for the quasi-static deformation response of the DM face sheet to both magnetic and pressure actuation. These modeling efforts serve to identify the key design parameters and quantify their contributions to the DM response, model the relationship between actuation commands and DM surface-profile response, and predict performance metrics such as achievable spatial resolution and stroke precision for specific actuator configurations. Our theoretical approach addresses the complexity of the boundary conditions associated with mechanical mounting of the face sheet, and makes use of asymptotic approximations by leveraging the three distinct length scales in the problem - namely, the low-stroke ( nm) actuation, face sheet thickness ( mm), and mirror diameter (cm). In addition to describing the theoretical treatment, we report the progress of computational multi physics simulations which will be useful in improving the model fidelity and in drawing conclusions to improve the design.

  15. The use of a high-order MEMS deformable mirror in the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Bauman, B; Cornelissen, S; Jones, S; Macintosh, B; Palmer, D; Isaacs, J

    2010-12-17

    We briefly review the development history of the Gemini Planet Imager's 4K Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror. We discuss essential calibration steps and algorithms to control the MEMS with nanometer precision, including voltage-phase calibration and influence function characterization. We discuss the integration of the MEMS into GPI's Adaptive Optics system at Lawrence Livermore and present experimental results of 1.5 kHz closed-loop control. We detail mitigation strategies in the coronagraph to reduce the impact of abnormal actuators on final image contrast.

  16. High-precision system identification method for a deformable mirror in wavefront control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Ma, Xingkun; Bian, Qi; Li, Tenghao; Zhou, Chenlu; Gong, Mali

    2015-05-10

    Based on a mathematic model, the relation between the accuracy of the influence matrix and the performance of the wavefront correction is established. Based on the least squares method, a two-step system identification is proposed to improve the accuracy of the influence matrix, where the measurement noise can be suppressed and the nonlinearity of the deformable mirror can be compensated. The validity of the two-step system identification method is tested in the experiment, where improvements in wavefront correction precision as well as closed-loop control efficiency were observed.

  17. Focal-plane irradiance tailoring using the concept of Woofer-Tweeter deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zexin; Huang, Lei; Gong, Mali

    2014-04-21

    Deformable mirror (DM) is a common-used active freeform optical element. We introduce the concept of Woofer-Tweeter DM system for controlling focal-plane irradiance profiles. We firstly determine a freeform reflective surface for transforming a given incident laser beam into the desired focal-plane irradiance distribution by numerically solving a standard Monge-Ampère equation. Then, we use a low-bandwidth Woofer DM to approximate the required freeform reflective surface and a high-bandwidth Tweeter DM to compensate the residual error. Simulation results show that, compared with single DMs, the Woofer-Tweeter DM system brings the best focal-plane irradiance performances.

  18. Sub-nanometer flattening of 45 cm long, 45 actuator x-ray deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Poyneer, Lisa A; McCarville, Thomas; Pardini, Tommaso; Palmer, David; Brooks, Audrey; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Macintosh, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    We have built a 45 cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) of super-polished single-crystal silicon that has 45 actuators along the tangential axis. After assembly, the surface height error was 19 nm rms. With use of high-precision visible-light metrology and precise control algorithms, we have actuated the XDM and flattened its entire surface to 0.7 nm rms controllable figure error. This is, to our knowledge, the first sub-nanometer active flattening of a substrate longer than 15 cm.

  19. Optimization of electrode configuration in surface-parallel actuated deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Pellegrino, Sergio; Steeves, John; Patterson, Keith

    2014-07-01

    Thin, lightweight and low-cost deformable mirrors have been recently proposed, providing a pertinent device for wavefront error correction. We present different approaches to optimize actuator arrangement. The design is optimized according to a given correction requirement, through the number of electrodes, their shape and location. A first method focuses on the compensation of a given optical aberration (astigmatism). A second method directly optimizes the correction of a set of optical modes, taking into account the voltage limitation. We will describe the optimization techniques and give some examples of applications and design performance.

  20. Restraint deformation and corrosion protection of gold deposited aluminum mirrors for cold optics of mid-infrared instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Mizuho; Miyata, Takashi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Asano, Kentaro; Okada, Kazushi; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Kataza, Hirokazu; Sarugaku, Yuki; Kirino, Okiharu; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Okada, Norio; Mitsui, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    We report the restraint deformation and the corrosion protection of gold deposited aluminum mirrors for mid-infrared instruments. To evaluate the deformation of the aluminum mirrors by thermal shrinkage, monitoring measurement of the surface of a mirror has been carried out in the cooling cycles from the room temperature to 100 K. The result showed that the effect of the deformation was reduced to one fourth if the mirror was screwed with spring washers. We have explored an effective way to prevent the mirror from being galvanically corroded. A number of samples have been prepared by changing the coating conditions, such as inserting an insulation layer, making a multi-layer and overcoating water blocking layer, or carrying out precision cleaning before coating. Precision cleaning before the deposition and protecting coat with SiO over the gold layer seemed to be effective in blocking corrosion of the aluminum. The SiO over-coated mirror has survived the cooling test for the mid-infrared use and approximately 1 percent decrease in the reflectance has been detected at 6-25 microns compared to gold deposited mirror without coating.

  1. Characterization of a 61-element bulk-PZT thick film deformable mirror and generation of Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Li, Baoqing; Chu, Jiaru

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a 61 element piezoelectric deformable mirror (DM) based on bulk-PZT thick film and the generation of Zernike polynomials. This device consists of a continue silicon mirror supported by 61 element piezoelectric unimorph actuators which are arranged in a hexagonal grid with spacing of 5mm. Measurements of the displacement using a laser Doppler vibrometer demonstrated that the stroke of DM was 3.8μm at 100 volt with a displacement hysteresis of approximately 9% and the operating bandwidth was greater than 10KHz. A custom phasing-shifting interferometer based on Twyman-Green interferometer was developed to measure the mirror surface shape in response to the applied voltage. The influence function of the mirror measured accorded with Gaussian function with inter-actuator coupling of approximately 5%, which was similar to the traditional piezoelectric DM with stacked actuators. To examine the ability of the mirror to replicate optical aberrations described by the Zernike polynomials, low-order Zernike modes were reproduced by calculating the voltage on each actuator using an influence function matrix. The measurement demonstrated that the deformable mirror could produce the Zernike modes up to the ninth term. Considering the low-voltage actuation as well as the capability for miniaturization of the actuator size, deformable mirror actuated by bulk-PZT thick film has a potential application for low-cost adaptive optics.

  2. Size-changeable x-ray beam collimation using an adaptive x-ray optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, T.; Matsuyama, S.; Nakamori, H.; Hayashi, H.; Sano, Y.; Kohmura, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K.

    2016-09-01

    A two-stage adaptive optical system using four piezoelectric deformable mirrors was constructed at SPring-8 to form collimated X-ray beams. The deformable mirrors were finely deformed to target shapes (elliptical for the upstream mirrors and parabolic for the downstream mirrors) based on shape data measured with the X-ray pencil beam scanning method. Ultraprecise control of the mirror shapes enables us to obtain various collimated beams with different beam sizes of 314 μm (358 μm) and 127 μm (65 μm) in the horizontal (vertical) directions, respectively, with parallelism accuracy of 1 μrad rms.

  3. Adaptive Optics System with Deformable Composite Mirror and High Speed, Ultra-Compact Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Knowles, G. J.; Shea, B. G.

    2006-06-01

    We report development of a novel adaptive optics system for optical astronomy. Key components are very thin Deformable Mirrors (DM) made of fiber reinforced polymer resins, subminiature PMN-PT actuators, and low power, high bandwidth electronics drive system with compact packaging and minimal wiring. By using specific formulations of fibers, resins, and laminate construction, we are able to fabricate mirror face sheets that are thin (< 2mm), have smooth surfaces and excellent optical shape. The mirrors are not astigmatic and do not develop surface irregularities when cooled. The actuators are small footprint multilayer PMN-PT ceramic devices with large stroke (2- 20 microns), high linearity, low hysteresis, low power, and flat frequency response to >2 KHz. By utilizing QorTek’s proprietary synthetic impendence power supply technology, all the power, control, and signal extraction for many hundreds to 1000s of actuators and sensors can be implemented on a single matrix controller printed circuit board co-mounted with the DM. The matrix controller, in turn requires only a single serial bus interface, thereby obviating the need for massive wiring harnesses. The technology can be scaled up to multi-meter aperture DMs with >100K actuators.

  4. Development of Robust, Light-weight, Agile Deformable Mirrors in Carbon Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M.; Ammons, S. M.; Coughenour, B.; Richardson, L.,; Romeo, R.; Martin, R.

    2012-09-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) has recently been developed to the point that surfaces of high optical quality can be routinely replicated. Building on this advance, we are developing a new generation of deformable mirrors (DMs) for adaptive optics application that extends long-standing expertise at the University of Arizona in large, optically powered DMs for astronomy. Our existing mirrors, up to 90 cm in diameter and with aspheric deformable facesheets, are deployed on a number of large astronomical telescopes. With actuator stroke of up to 50 microns and no hysteresis, they are delivering the best imaging ever seen from an astronomical AO system. Their Zerodur glass ceramic facesheets though are not well suited to non-astronomical applications. In this paper, we describe developmental work to replace the glass components of the DMs with CFRP, an attractive material for optics fabrication because of its high stiffness-to-weight ratio, strength, and very low coefficient of thermal expansion. Surface roughness arising from fiber print-through in the CFRP facesheets is low, < 3 nm PTV across a range of temperature, and the optical figure after correction of static terms by the DM actuators is on the order of 20 nm rms. After initial investment in an optical quality mandrel, replication costs of identical units in CFRP are very low, making the technology ideal for rapid mass production.

  5. Stable flexure mounting of a MEMS deformable mirror for the GPI Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alexis; Erickson, Darren; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff; Bierden, Paul; Cornelissen, Steven; Palmer, Dave

    2008-07-01

    Small deformable mirrors (DMs) produced using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques have been used in thermally stable, bench-top laboratory environments. With advances in MEMS DM technology, a variety of field applications are becoming more common, such as the Gemini Planet Imager's (GPI) adaptive optics system. Instruments at the Gemini Observatory operate in conditions where fluctuating ambient temperature, varying gravity orientations and humidity and dust can have a significant affect on DM performance. As such, it is crucial that the mechanical design of the MEMS DM be tailored to the environment. GPI's approach has been to mount the MEMS DM using high performance optical mounting techniques rather than a typical laboratory set-up. This paper discusses the design of the opto-mechanical mounting scheme for a 4096 actuator MEMS DM, developed by Boston Micromachines Corporation for use in the GPI adaptive optics system. Flexures have been incorporated into the DM mount to reduce deformations on the optical surface due to thermal fluctuations. These flexures have also been sized to maintain alignment under varying gravity vector orientations. Finally, a system for environmentally sealing the mirror has been designed to prevent degradation due to humidity effects. A plan for testing the mechanical mount to ensure that it meets GPI's performance and environmental requirements is also presented.

  6. Speckle reduction using deformable mirrors with diffusers in a laser pico-projector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-An; Pan, Jui-Wen; Yang, Zu-Po

    2017-07-24

    We propose a design for speckle reduction in a laser pico-projector adopting diffusers and deformable mirrors. This research focuses on speckle noise suppression by changing the angle of divergence of the diffuser. Moreover, the speckle contrast value can be further reduced by the addition of a deformable mirror. The speckle reduction ability obtained using diffusers with different divergence angles is compared. Three types of diffuser designs are compared in the experiments. For Type 1 which uses a circular symmetric diffuser the speckle contrast value can be decreased to 0.0264. For Type 2, the speckle contrast value can be reduced to 0.0267 because of the inclusion of an elliptical distribution diffuser. With Type 3 which includes a combination of the circular distribution diffuser and elliptical distribution diffuser, the speckle contrast value can be reduced to 0.0236. For all three types, the speckle contrast value is lower than 0.05. Under this speckle value, the speckle phenomenon is invisible to the human eye.

  7. Thin zoom camera module by large-stroke micromachined deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Lin, Yu-Hung; Su, Guo-Dong J.

    2012-10-01

    Miniaturization is the key point to design image system for portable devices. Motor-driven lens technique is the traditional way to achieve auto-focus and zoom functions, this method usually requires a larger space and causes greater power consumption. Reflective optics is a technology not only can make the space application become more efficient and flexible, but also has the advantage that it induces low chromatic aberrations. In this paper, we use organic deformable mirror (DM) as reflective element of the system. PDMS used as an actuated membrane of DM has lower young's modulus and residual stress. The maximum stoke is 90 um and corresponding diopter is 39.964m(-1) . The system we designed with MEMS deformable mirror is a 5M pixel zoom image system which is only 10mm in thickness before packaging and 16mm in thickness after packaging. The smallest EFL (effective focal length) is 4.7 mm at full field angle of 52° and the f/# is 4.4. The longest EFL of the module is 9.4 mm and the f/# is 6.4.

  8. A novel design of membrane mirror with small deformation and imaging performance analysis in infrared system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuqing; Wang, Yongquan; Zhi, Xiyang

    2017-05-01

    A method of diminishing the shape error of membrane mirror is proposed in this paper. The inner inflating pressure is considerably decreased by adopting the pre-shaped membrane. Small deformation of the membrane mirror with greatly reduced shape error is sequentially achieved. Primarily a finite element model of the above pre-shaped membrane is built on the basis of its mechanical properties. Then accurate shape data under different pressures can be acquired by iteratively calculating the node displacements of the model. Shape data are applicable to build up deformed reflecting surfaces for the simulative analysis in ZEMAX. Finally, ground-based imaging experiments of 4-bar targets and nature scene are conducted. Experiment results indicate that the MTF of the infrared system can reach to 0.3 at a high spatial resolution of 10l p/mm, and texture details of the nature scene are well-presented. The method can provide theoretical basis and technical support for the applications in lightweight optical components with ultra-large apertures.

  9. Digital holographic interferometry for characterizing deformable mirrors in aero-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Hess, Cecil F.; Razavi, Payam; Furlong, Cosme

    2016-08-01

    Measuring and understanding the transient behavior of a surface with high spatial and temporal resolution are required in many areas of science. This paper describes the development and application of a high-speed, high-dynamic range, digital holographic interferometer for high-speed surface contouring with fractional wavelength precision and high-spatial resolution. The specific application under investigation here is to characterize deformable mirrors (DM) employed in aero-optics. The developed instrument was shown capable of contouring a deformable mirror with extremely high-resolution at frequencies exceeding 40 kHz. We demonstrated two different procedures for characterizing the mechanical response of a surface to a wide variety of input forces, one that employs a high-speed digital camera and a second that employs a low-speed, low-cost digital camera. The latter is achieved by cycling the DM actuators with a step input, producing a transient that typically lasts up to a millisecond before reaching equilibrium. Recordings are made at increasing times after the DM initiation from zero to equilibrium to analyze the transient. Because the wave functions are stored and reconstructable, they can be compared with each other to produce contours including absolute, difference, and velocity. High-speed digital cameras recorded the wave functions during a single transient at rates exceeding 40 kHz. We concluded that either method is fully capable of characterizing a typical DM to the extent required by aero-optical engineers.

  10. GMTIFS: deformable mirror environmental testing for the on-instrument wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, M.; Price, I.; Rigaut, F.; Bloxham, G.; Boz, R.; Bundy, D.; Espeland, B.; Sharp, R.

    2016-07-01

    GMTIFS requires a deformable mirror (DM) as part of its on-instrument wavefront sensor (OIWFS). The DM facilitates wavefront correction for the off-axis natural guide star, with the objective being to maximize the energy in the diffraction core and improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the guide star position measurement. It is essential that the OIWFS be positionally stable with respect to the science field. The use of J-K to observe the guide star, and thus the need to limit thermal background, essentially requires the DM in the OIWFS to be operated at or below -40°C. This is below the standard operating temperature range of currently available DMs. In cooperation with the manufacturers we are testing the performance of three DMs at temperatures from ambient to -45°C, or cooler. In the context of the OIWFS adequate stroke, open-loop positioning stability, hysteresis, interactuator surface figure and dynamic response are key performance criteria. A test system based around high spatial sampling of the DM aperture with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor has been built. The opto-mechanical design permits a DM to be contained in a cryostat so that it may be cooled in isolation. We describe this test system and the test cases that are applied to the ALPAO DM-69, Boston MicroMachines 492DM and the IrisAO PTT111 deformable mirrors. Preliminary results at ambient temperatures are presented.

  11. FEM analysis of bonding process used for minimization of deformation of optical surface under Metis coronagraph mirrors manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procháska, F.; Vít, T.; Matoušek, O.; Melich, R.

    2016-11-01

    High demands on the final surfaces micro-roughness as well as great shape accuracy have to be achieved under the manufacturing process of the precise mirrors for Metis orbital coronagraph. It is challenging engineering task with respect to lightweight design of the mirrors and resulting objectionable optical surface shape stability. Manufacturing of such optical elements is usually affected by number of various effects. Most of them are caused by instability of temperature field. It is necessary to explore, comprehend and consequently minimize all thermo - mechanical processes which take place during mirror cementing, grinding and polishing processes to minimize the optical surface deformation. Application of FEM simulation was proved as a useful tool to help to solve this task. FEM simulations were used to develop and virtually compare different mirror holders to minimize the residual stress generated by temperature changes and to suppress the shape deformation of the optical surface below the critical limit of about 100 nm.

  12. Large adaptive deformable membrane mirror with high actuator density: design and first prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten; Doelman, Niek

    2005-12-01

    A large adaptive deformable mirror with high actuator density is presented. The DM consists of a thin continuous membrane which acts as the correcting element. A grid of low voltage electro-magnetical push-pull actuators, - located in an actuator plate -, impose out-of-plane displacements in the mirror's membrane. To provide a stable and stiff reference plane for the actuators, a mechanically stable and thermally decoupled honeycomb support structure is added. The design is suited for mirrors up to several hundred mm with an actuator pitch of a few mm. One of the key elements in the design is the actuator grid. Each actuator consists of a closed magnetic circuit in which a strong permanent magnet (PM) attracts a ferromagnetic core. Movement of this core is provided by a low stiffness elastic guiding. A coil surrounds the PM. Both the coil and the PM are connected to the fixed world. By applying a current through the coil, the magnetic force acting on the core can be influenced. This force variation will lead to translation of the ferromagnetic core. This movement is transferred to the reflective mirror surface in a piston-free manner. The design allows for a long total stroke and a large inter actuator stroke. The actuators are produced in arrays which make the design modular and easily extendable. The first actuators and an actuator grid are produced and tested in a dedicated test set-up. This paper describes how relevant actuator properties, such as stiffness and efficiency, can be influenced by the design. The power dissipation in the actuator grid is optimized to a few milliwatts per actuator, thereby avoiding active cooling.

  13. Control of the unilluminated deformable mirror actuators in an altitude-conjugated adaptive optics system

    PubMed

    Veran

    2000-07-01

    Off-axis observations made with adaptive optics are severely limited by anisoplanatism errors. However, conjugating the deformable mirror to an optimal altitude can reduce these errors; it is then necessary to control, through extrapolation, actuators that are not measured by the wave-front sensor (unilluminated actuators). In this study various common extrapolation schemes are investigated, and an optimal method that achieves a significantly better performance is proposed. This extrapolation method involves a simple matrix multiplication and will be implemented in ALTAIR, the Gemini North Telescope adaptive optics system located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. With this optimal method, the relative H-band Strehl reduction due to extrapolation errors is only 5%, 16%, and 30% when the angular distance between the guide source and the science target is 20, 40 and 60 arc sec, respectively. For a site such as Mauna Kea, these errors are largely outweighed by the increase in the size of the isoplanatic field.

  14. Genetic-algorithm-based method to optimize spatial profile utilizing characteristics of electrostatic actuator deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Futoshi; Goriki, Shin'ichi; Shimizu, Yukio; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu; Kawato, Sakae; Kobayashi, Takao

    2008-05-01

    Arbitrary spatial beam shaping was demonstrated with a membrane electrostatic actuator type deformable mirror (DM). An automatic closed loop system must optimize such beam shapes as flattop. Well-characterized short pulse laser beam is widely required for a photocathode RF gun or for microscopic processing, etc. We propose a new sophisticated optimizing method based on a genetic algorithm (GA) for spatial shaping. A membrane type DM is driven by electrostatic attraction power, and applied electrode voltages vs displacement of membrane surface have a square function relationship. We prepare discrete electrode voltages to linearly change displacement as a utilized gene of the initial population in GA. Using uniform crossover without mutation in this method, we can make an arbitrary spatial beam shape quasi-flattop.

  15. Adaptive optics vision simulator based on 35 element bimorph deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lina; Dai, Yun; Xiao, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zhao, Haoxin; Bao, Hua; Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-09-01

    A novel adaptive optics vision simulator (AOVS) is presented and characterized for several design features, including automated measuring and compensating eye's aberrations up to the fifth order, which fully cover aberrations typically found in the human eye, even for the cases of highly aberrated eyes. Especially, it is equipped with 35 elements bimorph deformable mirror with bigger stroke and smaller size, which could help establish near-diffraction-limited ocular optics condition. To investigate the validity of this apparatus, pilot data under different aberration correction pattern from one subjects are collected, and contrast sensitivity function (CSF), an important psychophysical function in vision, is obtained also. Results from living eyes show a practically perfect aberration correction and demonstrate the utility of this system.

  16. X-ray metrology and performance of a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Brejnholt, Nicolai F; Hill, Randall; Jackson, Jessie; Hagler, Lisle; Celestre, Richard; Feng, Jun

    2016-05-01

    We describe experiments with a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) that have been conducted in End Station 2, Beamline 5.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source. A detailed description of the hardware implementation is provided. We explain our one-dimensional Fresnel propagation code that correctly handles grazing incidence and includes a model of the XDM. This code is used to simulate and verify experimental results. Initial long trace profiler metrology of the XDM at 7.5 keV is presented. The ability to measure a large (150-nm amplitude) height change on the XDM is demonstrated. The results agree well with the simulated experiment at an error level of 1 μrad RMS. Direct imaging of the x-ray beam also shows the expected change in intensity profile at the detector.

  17. X-ray metrology and performance of a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Hill, Randall; Jackson, Jessie; Hagler, Lisle; Celestre, Richard; Feng, Jun

    2016-05-20

    We describe experiments with a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) that have been conducted in End Station 2, Beamline 5.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source. A detailed description of the hardware implementation is provided. We explain our one-dimensional Fresnel propagation code that correctly handles grazing incidence and includes a model of the XDM. This code is used to simulate and verify experimental results. Initial long trace profiler metrology of the XDM at 7.5 keV is presented. The ability to measure a large (150-nm amplitude) height change on the XDM is demonstrated. The results agree well with the simulated experiment at an error level of 1 μrad RMS. Lastly, direct imaging of the x-ray beam also shows the expected change in intensity profile at the detector.

  18. Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed: Performance and Characterization of a 1024 Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Morzinski, K; Severson, S; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Dillon, D; REza, L; Gavel, D; Palmer, D

    2005-10-30

    We have demonstrated that a microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror can be flattened to < 1 nm RMS within controllable spatial frequencies over a 9.2-mm aperture making it a viable option for high-contrast adaptive optics systems (also known as Extreme Adaptive Optics). The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) measures wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy for metrology and wavefront control. Consistent flattening, required testing and characterization of the individual actuator response, including the effects of dead and low-response actuators. Stability and repeatability of the MEMS devices was also tested. An error budget for MEMS closed loop performance will summarize MEMS characterization.

  19. X-ray metrology and performance of a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, Lisa A. Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Hill, Randall; Jackson, Jessie; Hagler, Lisle; Celestre, Richard; Feng, Jun

    2016-05-15

    We describe experiments with a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) that have been conducted in End Station 2, Beamline 5.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source. A detailed description of the hardware implementation is provided. We explain our one-dimensional Fresnel propagation code that correctly handles grazing incidence and includes a model of the XDM. This code is used to simulate and verify experimental results. Initial long trace profiler metrology of the XDM at 7.5 keV is presented. The ability to measure a large (150-nm amplitude) height change on the XDM is demonstrated. The results agree well with the simulated experiment at an error level of 1 μrad RMS. Direct imaging of the x-ray beam also shows the expected change in intensity profile at the detector.

  20. Large-Aperture Deformable Mirror Correction of Tiled-Grating Wavefront Error

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, B.E.; Jungquist, R.; Qiao, J.; Abbey, S.; Dean, S.E.; Maywar, D.N.; Moore, M.D.; Waxer, L.J.; Wilson, M. E.

    2006-07-13

    When tiling three gratings, with each individually exhibiting astigmatism and power due to holographic errors and coating stress, the resulting wavefront aberrations contain high-frequency components as well as the fundamental frequency, which is nearly three cycles across the aperture in the tiling direction. A deformable mirror (DM) that was designed to compensate for much slower errors (e.g., those arising from distortion in amplifier disks) is being used to compensate for this tiling-induced error. This investigation studies the effectiveness of compensating only the fundamental frequency of the tiled aberration, and shows that this provides a significant improvement that is adequate for a range of expected aberrations. Limitations of the DM correction technique are also studied.

  1. Adaptive optics vision simulation and perceptual learning system based on a 35-element bimorph deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yun; Zhao, Lina; Xiao, Fei; Zhao, Haoxin; Bao, Hua; Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-02-10

    An adaptive optics visual simulation combined with a perceptual learning (PL) system based on a 35-element bimorph deformable mirror (DM) was established. The larger stroke and smaller size of the bimorph DM made the system have larger aberration correction or superposition ability and be more compact. By simply modifying the control matrix or the reference matrix, select correction or superposition of aberrations was realized in real time similar to a conventional adaptive optics closed-loop correction. PL function was first integrated in addition to conventional adaptive optics visual simulation. PL training undertaken with high-order aberrations correction obviously improved the visual function of adult anisometropic amblyopia. The preliminary application of high-order aberrations correction with PL training on amblyopia treatment was being validated with a large scale population, which might have great potential in amblyopia treatment and visual performance maintenance.

  2. X-ray metrology and performance of a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror

    DOE PAGES

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Hill, Randall; ...

    2016-05-20

    We describe experiments with a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) that have been conducted in End Station 2, Beamline 5.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source. A detailed description of the hardware implementation is provided. We explain our one-dimensional Fresnel propagation code that correctly handles grazing incidence and includes a model of the XDM. This code is used to simulate and verify experimental results. Initial long trace profiler metrology of the XDM at 7.5 keV is presented. The ability to measure a large (150-nm amplitude) height change on the XDM is demonstrated. The results agree well with the simulated experimentmore » at an error level of 1 μrad RMS. Lastly, direct imaging of the x-ray beam also shows the expected change in intensity profile at the detector.« less

  3. X-ray metrology and performance of a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Hill, Randall; Jackson, Jessie; Hagler, Lisle; Celestre, Richard; Feng, Jun

    2016-05-20

    We describe experiments with a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) that have been conducted in End Station 2, Beamline 5.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source. A detailed description of the hardware implementation is provided. We explain our one-dimensional Fresnel propagation code that correctly handles grazing incidence and includes a model of the XDM. This code is used to simulate and verify experimental results. Initial long trace profiler metrology of the XDM at 7.5 keV is presented. The ability to measure a large (150-nm amplitude) height change on the XDM is demonstrated. The results agree well with the simulated experiment at an error level of 1 μrad RMS. Lastly, direct imaging of the x-ray beam also shows the expected change in intensity profile at the detector.

  4. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  5. Full complex spatial filtering with a phase mostly DMD. [Deformable Mirror Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florence, James M.; Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for implementing fully complex spatial filters with a phase mostly deformable mirror device (DMD) light modulator is described. The technique combines two or more phase-modulating flexure-beam mirror elements into a single macro-pixel. By manipulating the relative phases of the individual sub-pixels within the macro-pixel, the amplitude and the phase can be independently set for this filtering element. The combination of DMD sub-pixels into a macro-pixel is accomplished by adjusting the optical system resolution, thereby trading off system space bandwidth product for increased filtering flexibility. Volume in the larger dimensioned space, space bandwidth-complex axes count, is conserved. Experimental results are presented mapping out the coupled amplitude and phase characteristics of the individual flexure-beam DMD elements and demonstrating the independent control of amplitude and phase in a combined macro-pixel. This technique is generally applicable for implementation with any type of phase modulating light modulator.

  6. Full complex spatial filtering with a phase mostly DMD. [Deformable Mirror Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florence, James M.; Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for implementing fully complex spatial filters with a phase mostly deformable mirror device (DMD) light modulator is described. The technique combines two or more phase-modulating flexure-beam mirror elements into a single macro-pixel. By manipulating the relative phases of the individual sub-pixels within the macro-pixel, the amplitude and the phase can be independently set for this filtering element. The combination of DMD sub-pixels into a macro-pixel is accomplished by adjusting the optical system resolution, thereby trading off system space bandwidth product for increased filtering flexibility. Volume in the larger dimensioned space, space bandwidth-complex axes count, is conserved. Experimental results are presented mapping out the coupled amplitude and phase characteristics of the individual flexure-beam DMD elements and demonstrating the independent control of amplitude and phase in a combined macro-pixel. This technique is generally applicable for implementation with any type of phase modulating light modulator.

  7. Assessing the stability of an ALPAO deformable mirror for feed-forward operation.

    PubMed

    Bitenc, Urban; Bharmal, Nazim A; Morris, Timothy J; Myers, Richard M

    2014-05-19

    A deformable mirror (DM) is a mirror whose surface can be deformed in order to correct for optical aberrations. If a DM is used in a feed-forward operation (i.e. without feed-back, also known as open-loop) it is, among other requirements, crucial that a set of actuator commands repeatedly results in the same surface shape. We have tested an ALPAO DM against this criterion, by repeatedly applying a set of actuator commands over hours and monitoring the DM shape with an interferometer. We found that if the surface shape was held to shape A for several hours, then changed to a second shape, ℬ, the DM surface will drift from this new shape over the course of several hours. During this period the root-mean-square (RMS) of the deviation from shape ℬ can exceed 30% of the RMS of the difference between shapes A and ℬ. This can correspond to a surface deviation with RMS of several hundred nanometers, and would severely impact the resulting performance of an AO system using such a DM in a feed-forward operation. We have developed a model to correct for the time-varying surface shape in software by continuously adapting the actuator commands over the stabilization period. Application of the stabilisation procedure allows the surface to remain stable to within 4 nm RMS after a period of 6 minutes. We also provide a suggestion on how to improve the repeatability of surface response to different sets of actuator commands, which can be affected by the surface drift.

  8. Experimental study and analytical model of deformation of magnetostrictive films as applied to mirrors for x-ray space telescopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Knapp, Peter; Vaynman, S; Graham, M E; Cao, Jian; Ulmer, M P

    2014-09-20

    The desire for continuously gaining new knowledge in astronomy has pushed the frontier of engineering methods to deliver lighter, thinner, higher quality mirrors at an affordable cost for use in an x-ray observatory. To address these needs, we have been investigating the application of magnetic smart materials (MSMs) deposited as a thin film on mirror substrates. MSMs have some interesting properties that make the application of MSMs to mirror substrates a promising solution for making the next generation of x-ray telescopes. Due to the ability to hold a shape with an impressed permanent magnetic field, MSMs have the potential to be the method used to make light weight, affordable x-ray telescope mirrors. This paper presents the experimental setup for measuring the deformation of the magnetostrictive bimorph specimens under an applied magnetic field, and the analytical and numerical analysis of the deformation. As a first step in the development of tools to predict deflections, we deposited Terfenol-D on the glass substrates. We then made measurements that were compared with the results from the analytical and numerical analysis. The surface profiles of thin-film specimens were measured under an external magnetic field with white light interferometry (WLI). The analytical model provides good predictions of film deformation behavior under various magnetic field strengths. This work establishes a solid foundation for further research to analyze the full three-dimensional deformation behavior of magnetostrictive thin films.

  9. Long-term stability and temperature variability of Iris AO segmented MEMS deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, M. A.; He, M.; Kempf, C. J.; Marchis, F.

    2016-07-01

    Long-term stability of deformable mirrors (DM) is a critical performance requirement for instruments requiring open-loop corrections. The effects of temperature changes in the DM performance are equally critical for such instruments. This paper investigates the long-term stability of three different Iris AO PTT111 DMs that were calibrated at different times ranging from 13 months to nearly 29 months prior to subsequent testing. Performance testing showed that only a small increase in positioning errors occurred from the initial calibration date to the test dates. The increases in errors ranged from as little as 1.38 nm rms after 18 months to 5.68 nm rms after 29 months. The paper also studies the effects of small temperature changes, up to 6.2°C around room temperature. For three different arrays, the errors ranged from 0.62-1.42 nm rms/°C. Removing the effects of packaging shows that errors are <=0.50 nm rms/°C. Finally, measured data showed that individual segments deformed <=0.11 nm rms/°C when heated.

  10. Stroke saturation on a MEMS deformable mirror for woofer-tweeter adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Morzinski, Katie; Macintosh, Bruce; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren

    2009-03-30

    High-contrast imaging of extrasolar planet candidates around a main-sequence star has recently been realized from the ground using current adaptive optics (AO) systems. Advancing such observations will be a task for the Gemini Planet Imager, an upcoming "extreme" AO instrument. High-order "tweeter" and low-order "woofer" deformable mirrors (DMs) will supply a >90%-Strehl correction, a specialized coronagraph will suppress the stellar flux, and any planets can then be imaged in the "dark hole" region. Residual wavefront error scatters light into the DM-controlled dark hole, making planets difficult to image above the noise. It is crucial in this regard that the high-density tweeter, a micro-electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) DM, have sufficient stroke to deform to the shapes required by atmospheric turbulence. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the rate and circumstance of saturation, i.e. stroke insufficiency. A 1024-actuator 1.5-microm-stroke MEMS device was empirically tested with software Kolmogorov-turbulence screens of r(0) =10-15 cm. The MEMS when solitary suffered saturation approximately 4% of the time. Simulating a woofer DM with approximately 5-10 actuators across a 5-m primary mitigated MEMS saturation occurrence to a fraction of a percent. While no adjacent actuators were saturated at opposing positions, mid-to-high-spatial-frequency stroke did saturate more frequently than expected, implying that correlations through the influence functions are important. Analytical models underpredict the stroke requirements, so empirical studies are important.

  11. Modified deformable mirror stroke minimization control for direct imaging of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, He; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert; Groff, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    For direct imaging of faint exoplanets, coronagraphs are widely used to suppress light and achieve a high contrast. Wavefront correction algorithms based on adaptive optics are introduced simultaneously to mitigate aberrations in the optical system. Stroke minimization is one of the primary control algorithms used for high-contrast wavefront control. This technique calculates the minimum deformation across the deformable mirrors' surface under the constraint that a targeted average contrast level in the search areas, namely the dark holes, is achieved. In this paper we present a modified linear constraint stroke minimization algorithm. Instead of using a single constraint on intensity averaged over all pixels, we constrain the electric field's real and imaginary part of each pixel in the dark holes. The new control algorithm can be written into a linear programming problem. Model reduction methods, including pixel binning and singular value decomposition (SVD), are further employed to avoid over-constraining the problem and to speed up computation. In numerical simulation, we find that the revised algorithm leads to more uniform dark holes and faster convergence.

  12. A new driving method for piezo deformable mirrors: open loop control and MOAO made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouattara, Issa; Gach, Jean-Luc; Amram, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the design and the realisation of a technique to attenuate the hysteresis nonlinear phenomenon of piezoelectric actuators. Piezoelectric actuator are widely utilised for deformable mirrors used for MOAO and power laser beam shaping techniques. The nonlinearities of piezo are usually iteratively compensa- ted using closed-loop set-ups. In open-loop control, the hysteresis and the creep of the piezo cannot be corrected, thus this nonlinearities must be removed or at least minimised. The concept has been demonstrated on high displacement Amplified Piezoelectric Actuators (APA) mounted in a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hysteresis attenuation technique aims to assist the Fabry-Perots nano-positioning control system to attain its main scientific specification. In such system, each APA has a maximum stroke of 270 μm within a 170 V (-20 V to +150 V) range and is used to position a high reflective mirror plate. The Fabry-Perots nano-positioning control system is specified to limit the APAs positioning steady-state noise to 3nm rms, but the hysteresis limits the positioning accuracy. In order to attenuate hysteresis, a hybrid amplifier circuit built with a high power operational amplifier has been designed and applied for each APA. The experiments results show that the hysteresis effect has almost been eliminated, and consequently the positioning steady-state noise can significantly been reduced. Because of the excellent results of this hybrid amplifier, a patent application has been introduced in June 12, 2015 under number No.1555381 and is being reviewed now.

  13. Application of a new high-speed magnetic deformable mirror for in-vivo retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-Mata, Sandra E.; Jones, Steven M.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.

    2011-08-01

    Nowadays in ophthalmologic practice several commercial instruments are available to image patient retinas in vivo. Many modern fundus cameras and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopes allow acquisition of two dimensional en face images of the retina with both back reflected as well as fluorescent light. Additionally, optical coherence tomography systems allow non-invasive probing of three-dimensional retinal morphology. For all of these instruments the available lateral resolution is limited by optical quality of the human eye used as the imaging objective. To improve lateral resolution and achieve diffraction-limited imaging, adaptive optics (AO) can be implemented with any of these imaging systems to correct both static and dynamic aberrations inherent in human eyes. Most of the wavefront correctors used previously in AO systems have limited dynamic range and an insufficient number of actuators to achieve diffraction-limited correction of most human eyes. Thus, additional corrections were necessary, either by trial lenses or additional deformable mirrors (DMs). The UC Davis AO flood-illuminated fundus camera system described in this paper has been previously used to acquire in vivo images of the photoreceptor mosaic and for psychophysical studies on normal and diseased retinas. These results were acquired using a DM manufactured by Litton ITEK (DM109), which has 109 actuators arranged in a hexagonal array below a continuous front-surface mirror. It has an approximate surface actuator stroke of +/-2μm. Here we present results with a new hi-speed magnetic DM manufactured by ALPAO (DM97, voice coil technology), which has 97 actuators and similar inter-actuator stroke (>3μm, mirror surface) but much higher low-order aberration correction (defocus stroke of at least +/-30μm) than the previous one. In this paper we report results of testing performance of the ALPAO DM for the correction of human eye aberrations. Additionally changes made to our AO flood

  14. Electrostatic shape control of single crystal silicon (SCS), free standing, thin plate deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, Terry L.

    This research involved the creation and investigation of a low cost design for a MEMS platform capable of controlled shape morphing using very simple mechanical design and manufacturing processes. The platform is made of single crystal silicon and loaded with multiple in-plane forces and moments from three fixed positions on the plate boundary, and with distributed electrostatic forces across the platform surface. This work is important because such a platform could be used as a deformable mirror for adaptive optics systems used in laser communications, vision science, precision beam shaping, and many other important applications. The work involved the development and experimental validation of analytical models that can map the displacement field of a thin flat SCS plate subject to complex loading on the boundary and distributed electrostatic forces. The achievement of these goals included experimentally mapping the platform surface after deformation into three-dimensional geometries defined by the Zernike polynomials. These are relatively large elastic deflections requiring a highly nonlinear analysis. The current analysis applies to circular plates supported on buckled flexures, which have been designed based an model results, fabricated using common microelectronic fabrication processes, and characterized using optical and interference microscopy. Of special interest is the investigation of post-buckling behavior which enhances the range and robustness of operation of the device by providing local upward motion for some modes. The prototypes have been tested and the results compared well with the theoretical results. The first 15 Zernike modes were examined with successful mode shape generation of 13, and fitting errors less than unity were achieved for all 15. From continued analysis of the experimental results the models can be further enhanced to create a commercially viable real time control algorithm for the device.

  15. Demonstration of symmetric dark holes using two deformable mirrors at the high-contrast imaging testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Groff, Tyler D.; Carlotti, Alexis; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Cady, Eric J.; Kern, Brian D.; Kuhnert, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The High Contrast Imaging Laboratory (HCIL) at Princeton has developed several important algorithms and technologies for space-based coronagraphy missions to detect earth-like exoplanets. Before June 2013 the HCIL was the only facility with two deformable mirrors (DMs) in series for focal plane wavefront control, which allows for quasi-static speckle correction on both sides of the image plane. From June through August 2013, the High- Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at JPL had a second DM installed. In this paper we report on the results of our Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions project to achieve high contrast in two symmetric dark holes using a shaped pupil (SP) coronagraph at the HCIT. Our previous experiment with a similar SP at the HCIT in 2007 yielded single-sided dark holes. That experiment utilized an iterative, batch-process wavefront estimator and Electric Field Conjugation for wavefront control. Our current tests use the faster Kalman filter estimator and the stroke minimization control algorithm. We use the same ripple-style SPs as in the previous HCIT experiment because that mask manufacturing technique proved successful. Our tests of symmetric dark holes in monochromatic light at the HCIT demonstrate Princeton's steady improvements in wavefront control and estimation techniques for a space-based coronagraphy mission.

  16. Wide Field Of View Varifocal Near-Eye Display Using See-Through Deformable Membrane Mirrors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David; Tippets, Cary; Torell, Kent; Kellnhofer, Petr; Aksit, Kaan; Didyk, Piotr; Myszkowski, Karol; Luebke, David; Fuchs, Henry

    2017-04-01

    Accommodative depth cues, a wide field of view, and ever-higher resolutions all present major hardware design challenges for near-eye displays. Optimizing a design to overcome one of these challenges typically leads to a trade-off in the others. We tackle this problem by introducing an all-in-one solution - a new wide field of view, gaze-tracked near-eye display for augmented reality applications. The key component of our solution is the use of a single see-through, varifocal deformable membrane mirror for each eye reflecting a display. They are controlled by airtight cavities and change the effective focal power to present a virtual image at a target depth plane which is determined by the gaze tracker. The benefits of using the membranes include wide field of view (100° diagonal) and fast depth switching (from 20 cm to infinity within 300 ms). Our subjective experiment verifies the prototype and demonstrates its potential benefits for near-eye see-through displays.

  17. Characterization of a MEMS deformable mirror by far field intensity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Cherry; Finn, Susanna; Choi, Stacey; Doble, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    The performance of an adaptive optics (AO) system is typically measured using the wavefront sensor (WFS). However, another method is to use the point spread function (PSF), which is sensitive to scatter, does not act as a low pass filter and is not dependent on the WFS calibration. We decided to examine the performance of an AO system built for vision science that employed a micromechanical systems (MEMS) based deformable mirror (DM). Specifically, the MEMS DM consists of 489 actuators, resulting in 163 segments each with individual piston/tip/tilt control. Initial evaluation of the DM with a model eye included determining the ability of the DM to generate individual Zernike polynomials and evaluating the far field PSF to measure wavefront correction performance. For individual Zernike polynomial terms, the DM was found to be capable of correcting the aberration magnitudes expected from previously published human population studies.1, 2 Finally, the DM was used in an AO fundus camera to successfully acquire images of cone photoreceptors in a living human eye. This is part of ongoing work which will incorporate the MEMS DM into both an AO scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) and an AO optical coherence tomography (OCT) system where the form of the PSF at the confocal pinhole/optical fiber is important for optimal imaging.

  18. Optical zoom lens module using MEMS deformable mirrors for portable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jia-Shiun; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2012-10-01

    The thickness of the smart phones in today's market is usually below than 10 mm, and with the shrinking of the phone volume, the difficulty of its production of the camera lens has been increasing. Therefore, how to give the imaging device more functionality in the smaller space is one of the interesting research topics for today's mobile phone companies. In this paper, we proposed a thin optical zoom system which is combined of micro-electromechanical components and reflective optical architecture. By the adopting of the MEMS deformable mirrors, we can change their radius of curvature to reach the optical zoom in and zoom out. And because we used the all-reflective architecture, so this system has eliminated the considerable chromatic aberrations in the absence of lenses. In our system, the thickness of the zoom system is about 11 mm. The smallest EFL (effective focal length) is 4.61 mm at a diagonal field angle of 52° and f/# of 5.24. The longest EFL of the module is 9.22 mm at a diagonal field angle of 27.4 with f/# of 5.03.°

  19. A High-Performance Deformable Mirror with Integrated Driver ASIC for Space Based Active Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Chris

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is key to fully understanding these systems through spectroscopy and astrometry. The primary impediment to direct imaging of exoplanets is the extremely high brightness ratio between the planet and its parent star. Direct imaging requires a technique for contrast suppression, which include coronagraphs, and nulling interferometers. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are essential to both of these techniques. With space missions in mind, Microscale is developing a novel DM with direct integration of DM and its electronic control functions in a single small envelope. The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) is key to the shrinking of the electronic control functions to a size compatible with direct integration with the DM. Through a NASA SBIR project, Microscale, with JPL oversight, has successfully demonstrated a unique deformable mirror (DM) driver ASIC prototype based on an ultra-low power switch architecture. Microscale calls this the Switch-Mode ASIC, or SM-ASIC, and has characterized it for a key set of performance parameters, and has tested its operation with a variety of actuator loads, such as piezo stack and unimorph, and over a wide temperature range. These tests show the SM-ASIC's capability of supporting active optics in correcting aberrations of a telescope in space. Microscale has also developed DMs to go with the SM-ASIC driver. The latest DM version produced uses small piezo stack elements in an 8x8 array, bonded to a novel silicon facesheet structure fabricated monolithically into a polished mirror on one side and mechanical linkage posts that connect to the piezoelectric stack actuators on the other. In this Supporting Technology proposal we propose to further develop the ASIC-DM and have assembled a very capable team to do so. It will be led by JPL, which has considerable expertise with DMs used in Adaptive Optics systems, with high-contrast imaging systems for exoplanet missions, and with designing DM driver

  20. Performance of a precision high-density deformable mirror for extremely high contrast imaging astronomy from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Moody, Dwight; Gordon, Brian; Gürsel, Yekta; Ealey, Mark A.; Bagwell, Roger B.

    2003-02-01

    Active wavefront correction of a space telescope provides a technology path for extremely high contrast imaging astronomy at levels well beyond the capabilities of current telescope systems. A precision deformable mirror technology intended specifically for wavefront correction in a visible/near-infrared space telescope has been developed at Xinetics and extensively tested at JPL over the past several years. Active wavefront phase correction has been demonstrated to 1 Angstrom rms over the spatial frequency range accessible to a mirror with an array of actuators on a 1 mm pitch. It is based on a modular electroceramic design that is scalable to 1000s of actuator elements coupled to the surface of a thin mirror facesheet. It is controlled by a low-power multiplexed driver system. Demonstrated surface figure control, high actuator density, and low power dissipation are described. Performance specifications are discussed in the context of the Eclipse point design for a coronagraphic space telescope.

  1. A novel deformable mirror with curvature and tip/tilt control based on the spider actuator concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Button, Tim; Meggs, Carl; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; James, Ady; Willis, Graham; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William

    2012-06-01

    The Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) project comprises a UK-based consortium developing active/adaptive micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs). MOA devices are designed to focus X-rays using grazing incidence reflection through consecutive aligned arrays of microscopic channels. Adaptability is achieved using a combination of piezoelectric actuators, which bend the edges of the silicon chip, and a spider structure, which forms a series of levers connecting the edges of the chip with the active area at the centre, effectively amplifying the bend radius. The spider actuation concept, in combination with deep silicon etching stopped close to the surface, can also be used to create deformable mirrors where the curvature and tip/tilt angles of the mirror can be controlled. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling, carried out for the optimization of the spider MOA device, indicates that deformable mirrors with curvature varying from flat to 5cm ROC and control over the tip/tilt angles of the mirror of +/-3mrad could be achieved. Test spider structures, manufactured using a Viscous Plastic Processing Process for the PZT piezoelectric actuators and a single wet etch step using <111> planes in a (110) silicon wafer for both the silicon channels and the spider structure, have been bent to a radius of curvature smaller than 5 cm. This paper evaluates the spider MOA's concept as a means to achieve deformable mirrors with controllable ROC and control over the tip/tilt angles. FEA modelling results are compared with obtained characterization data of prototype structures. Finally, manufacturing and integration methods and design characteristics of the device, such its scalability, are also discussed.

  2. Active optics and the non-axisymmetric case: multimode deformable mirrors aspherized from vase and meniscus forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Gerard R.

    2004-09-01

    The realizations of non-axisymmetric aspherical surfaces is of rapid growing interest for the development of segmented ELTs and astronomical instrumentation. Active Optics methods have already proved useful for the aspherization of off-axis segments of a paraboloid. The analogy between optical aberration modes and elastic deformation modes leads to consider Clebsch-Zernike modes that belongs to a subclass of aberration modes and are available up to high-order optical corrections. The meniscus form as well as the vase form allow the coaddition of these modes. Several loading configurations associated to bending moments are presented including interferometric results for coadditions with multimode deformable mirrors -- MDMs -- and for some monomode mirrors with bending moments geenrated by a single force distribution. Active Optics methods are also under development for the Axisymmetric Case with vases and meniscuses (cf. this Conference).

  3. Long-Wavelength Beam Steerer Based on a Micro-Electromechanical Mirror.

    PubMed

    Kos, Anthony B; Gerecht, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available mirrors for scanning long-wavelength beams are too large for high-speed imaging. There is a need for a smaller, more agile pointing apparatus to provide images in seconds, not minutes or hours. A fast long-wavelength beam steerer uses a commercial micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) mirror controlled by a high-performance digital signal processor (DSP). The DSP allows high-speed raster scanning of the incident radiation, which is focused to a small waist onto the 9mm(2), gold-coated, MEMS mirror surface, while simultaneously acquiring an undistorted, high spatial-resolution image of an object. The beam steerer hardware, software and performance are described. The system can also serve as a miniaturized, high-performance long-wavelength beam chopper for lock-in detection.

  4. Enhancing ablation efficiency in micro structuring using a deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, M.; Dickmann, K.

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for the generation of microstructures results in a high flexible tool for free form geometries in the micro range. Increasing laser power and repetition rates increase as well the demand of high flexible and efficient process strategies. To increase the ablation efficiency the optimal fluency can be determined, which is a material specific value. By varying the beam shape, the ablation efficiency can be enhanced. In this study a deformable mirror was used to vary the beam shape. This mirror is built by combining a piezo-electric ceramic and a mirror substrate. The ceramic is divided into several segments, which can be controlled independently. This results in a high flexible deformable mirror which influences the beam shape and can be used to vary the spot size or generate line geometries. The ablation efficiency and roughness of small generated cavities were analyzed in this study as well as the dimensions of the cavity. This can be used to optimize process strategies to combine high volume ablation and fine detail generation.

  5. A correction algorithm to simultaneously control dual deformable mirrors in a woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaohong; Sredar, Nripun; Ivers, Kevin M.; Queener, Hope; Porter, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We present a direct slope-based correction algorithm to simultaneously control two deformable mirrors (DMs) in a woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system. A global response matrix was derived from the response matrices of each deformable mirror and the voltages for both deformable mirrors were calculated simultaneously. This control algorithm was tested and compared with a 2-step sequential control method in five normal human eyes using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The mean residual total root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront errors across subjects after adaptive optics (AO) correction were 0.128 ± 0.025 μm and 0.107 ± 0.033 μm for simultaneous and 2-step control, respectively (7.75-mm pupil). The mean intensity of reflectance images acquired after AO convergence was slightly higher for 2-step control. Radially-averaged power spectra calculated from registered reflectance images were nearly identical for all subjects using simultaneous or 2-step control. The correction performance of our new simultaneous dual DM control algorithm is comparable to 2-step control, but is more efficient. This method can be applied to any woofer-tweeter AO system. PMID:20721058

  6. Study on fatigue damage characteristics of deformable mirrors under thermal-mechanical coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixia; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Nianchun

    2016-11-01

    In a wavefront correction process, both the mechanical effect and the irradiation of a high-power continuous-wave laser distort the deformable mirror (DM) surface, which inevitably speeds up the fatigue damage of the DM. By utilizing the stress analysis model for the fatigue damage of the DM, the fatigue damage effects are analyzed quantitatively on the consideration of thermal-mechanical coupling effects, and the fatigue life prediction model has further been proposed based on the S-N curve and Miner cumulative damage theory. On this basis, thermal-mechanical conditions have been analyzed, and the influence of laser parameters on the fatigue life of the DM has also been discussed in detail. The results indicate that the increasing of maximum temperature rise of the DM leads to the increasing of stress, and further brings about the decreasing of the fatigue life. Meanwhile, the position at the rear surface of the DM subjected to the maximum stress always presents the minimum fatigue life. Furthermore, the laser irradiation makes the DM more easily damaged when the DM is correcting a distorted wavefront, and the fatigue life decreases with the increasing of irradiation time and power density for a given peak and valley (PV) value of the corrected wavefront. Additionally, the fatigue life also decreases with the increasing of power density and the decreasing of spot radius for a certain total irradiation. On the other hand, for the given laser parameters, the influence of the mechanical effect on fatigue life is gradually apparent with increasing PV value of the corrected wavefront, and when the PV value is more than 2λ, the mechanical effect instead of the thermal effect becomes the key factor for fatigue damage of the DM.

  7. Dynamic performance of MEMS deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Christian C.; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Active optics can facilitate two-photon microscopic imaging deep in tissue. We are investigating fast focus control mirrors used in concert with an aberration correction mirror to control the axial position of focus and system aberrations dynamically during scanning. With an adaptive training step, sample-induced aberrations may be compensated as well. If sufficiently fast and precise, active optics may be able to compensate under-corrected imaging optics as well as sample aberrations to maintain diffraction-limited performance throughout the field of view. Toward this end we have measured a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element deformable mirror, and a Revibro Optics electrostatic 4-zone focus control mirror to characterize dynamic performance. Tests for the Multi-DM included both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes. For the step response we measured 10%-90% rise times for the target Zernike amplitude, and wavefront rms error settling times. Frequency sweeps identified the 3dB bandwidth of the mirror when attempting to follow a sinusoidal amplitude trajectory for a specific Zernike mode. For five tested Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism and trefoil) we find error settling times for mode amplitudes up to 400nm to be less than 52 us, and 3 dB frequencies range from 6.5 kHz to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with error settling time of 80 μs for a large 3 um defocus step, and settling time of only 18 μs for a 400nm spherical aberration step. These response speeds are sufficient for intra-scan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  8. Comparative assessment of three algorithms to control a deformable mirror for an adaptive optics system with no wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri-Avanaki, M. R.; Sarmadi, H.; Meadway, A.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.; Hojjatoleslami, S. A.

    2011-03-01

    The images obtained from confocal imaging systems present less resolution than the theoretical limit due to imperfection of the optical components and their arrangement. This imperfection deteriorates the wavefront and introduces aberrations to the optical system. Adaptive optics (AO) systems composed of a wavefront sensor (WFS) and a deformable mirror represent the most used solution to this problem. Such adaptive optics systems are expensive. In addition, in microscopy, WFSs cannot be used due to stray reflections in the system and high aberrations introduced by the specimen. For these reasons, sensor-less AO systems have been developed to control the deformable mirror (DM) using an optimization algorithm in an iterative manner. At each iteration, the algorithm produces a new set of voltage and sends it to the mirror so as to optimize its shape, in such a way, as to maximize the strength of the photodetector current in the imaging system. In this paper the results of the application of three optimization techniques in the sensor-less AO are compared. The three optimization techniques are simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO). SA and GA have been previously implemented and PSO is explained in this paper.

  9. Dynamic performance of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Archer-Zhang, Christian Chunzi; Foster, Warren B; Downey, Ryan D; Arrasmith, Christopher L; Dickensheets, David L

    2016-12-01

    Active optics such as deformable mirrors can be used to control both focal depth and aberrations during scanning laser microscopy. If the focal depth can be changed dynamically during scanning, then imaging of oblique surfaces becomes possible. If aberrations can be corrected dynamically during scanning, an image can be optimized throughout the field of view. Here, we characterize the speed and dynamic precision of a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element aberration correction mirror and a Revibro Optics 4-zone focus control mirror to assess suitability for use in an active and adaptive two-photon microscope. Tests for the multi-DM include both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and trefoil). We find wavefront error settling times for mode amplitude steps as large as 400 nm to be less than 52???s, with 3 dB frequencies ranging from 6.5 to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with wavefront error settling time less than 80???s for defocus steps up to 3000 nm, and less than 45???s for spherical aberration steps up to 600 nm. These response speeds are sufficient for intrascan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  10. Dynamic performance of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Zhang, Christian Chunzi; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-12-01

    Active optics such as deformable mirrors can be used to control both focal depth and aberrations during scanning laser microscopy. If the focal depth can be changed dynamically during scanning, then imaging of oblique surfaces becomes possible. If aberrations can be corrected dynamically during scanning, an image can be optimized throughout the field of view. Here, we characterize the speed and dynamic precision of a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element aberration correction mirror and a Revibro Optics 4-zone focus control mirror to assess suitability for use in an active and adaptive two-photon microscope. Tests for the multi-DM include both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and trefoil). We find wavefront error settling times for mode amplitude steps as large as 400 nm to be less than 52 μs, with 3 dB frequencies ranging from 6.5 to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with wavefront error settling time less than 80 μs for defocus steps up to 3000 nm, and less than 45 μs for spherical aberration steps up to 600 nm. These response speeds are sufficient for intrascan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  11. Characterising x-ray mirror deformations with a phase measuring deflectometry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, E.; Friedrich, P.; Proserpio, L.; Winter, A.

    2014-07-01

    MPE is developing modular x-ray mirrors for the next generation of high-energy astronomy missions. The mirror segments are based on thermally formed (a.k.a. slumped) glass sheets, with a typical thickness of 400µm. One of the major challenges is the alignment and integration of the mirror segments and the associated metrology. The optical performance of the mirror can be significantly compromised by adhesive shrinkage, gravity sag or residual stresses influenced by the properties of the mirror mounting and the integration procedure. In parallel with classic coordinate measurement techniques we utilize a deflectometry based metrology system to characterization shape errors of the mirror surfaces. A typical deflectometry setup uses a TFT display to project a sinusoidal pattern onto a specular test surface (SUT) and a camera that observes the reflected image. This reflected image contains slope information of the SUT in the form of distortions of the original displayed pattern. A phase shifting technique can be used to recover this slope information with only very few exposures and reasonable computational effort. The deflectometry system enables us to characterize bonding interfaces of slumped glass mirrors, as well as influence of temporary mounting points, handling and thermal distortions. It is also well suited to measure transient effects.

  12. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Kotovsky, Jack [Oakland, CA; Graff, Robert T [Modesto, CA

    2010-08-17

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  13. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) for enzymatic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeetender, Amritsar; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Stiharu, Ion G.; Balagopal, Ganesharam

    2004-08-01

    Early enzymatic identification and confirmation is essential for diagnosis and prevention as in the case of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Biochemical markers continue to be an important clinical tool for the enzymatic detection. The advent of MEMS devices can enable the use of various microstructures for the detection of enzymes. In this study, the concept of MEMS is applied for the detection of enzyme reaction, in which microcantilevers undergo changes in mechanical behavior that can be optically detected when enzyme molecules adsorb on their surface. This paper presents the static behavior of microcantilevers under Horse Radish Peroxide (HRP) enzyme reaction. The reported experimental results provide valuable information that will be useful in the development of MEMS sensors for enzymatic detection. The surface stress produced due to enzyme reactions results in the bending of cantilevers as similar to the influencing of thermal stress in the cantilevers. This paper also reports the influence of thermal gradient on the microcantilevers.

  14. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  15. Large aperture deformable mirror with a transferred single-crystal silicon membrane actuated using large-stroke PZT Unimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hishinumat, Yoshikazu; Yang, Eui - Hyeok (EH)

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a large aperture (50 mm x 50 mm) continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) with a large-stroke piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. The DM consists of a continuous, large aperture, silicon membrane 'transferred' in its entirety onto a 20 x 20 piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. A PZT unimorph actuator, 2.5 mm in diameter with optimized PZT/Si thickness and design showed a deflection of 5.7 [m at 20V. An assembled DM showed an operating frequency bandwidth of 30 kHz and influence function of approximately 30%.

  16. Large aperture deformable mirror with a transferred single-crystal silicon membrane actuated using large-stroke PZT Unimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hishinumat, Yoshikazu; Yang, Eui - Hyeok (EH)

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a large aperture (50 mm x 50 mm) continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) with a large-stroke piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. The DM consists of a continuous, large aperture, silicon membrane 'transferred' in its entirety onto a 20 x 20 piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. A PZT unimorph actuator, 2.5 mm in diameter with optimized PZT/Si thickness and design showed a deflection of 5.7 [m at 20V. An assembled DM showed an operating frequency bandwidth of 30 kHz and influence function of approximately 30%.

  17. Creating flat-top X-ray beams by applying surface profiles of alternating curvature to deformable piezo bimorph mirrors.

    PubMed

    Sutter, John P; Alcock, Simon G; Kashyap, Yogesh; Nistea, Ioana; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-11-01

    Beam shaping is becoming increasingly important for synchrotron X-ray applications. Although routine for visible light lasers, this is challenging for X-rays due to the limited source coherence and extreme optical tolerances required for the shaping mirrors. In deliberate defocusing, even surface errors <5 nm r.m.s. introduce damagingly large striations into the reflected beam. To counteract such problems, surface modifications with alternating concave and convex curvature on equal segments were polished onto the surface of non-active mirrors of fixed curvature. Such optics are useful for providing a fixed size of X-ray beam, but do not provide the adaptability required by many experiments. In contrast, deformable piezo bimorph mirrors permit a continuous range of X-ray beam sizes and shapes. A new theory is developed for applying non-periodic modifications of alternating curvature to optical surfaces. The position and length of the segments may be freely chosen. For the first time, surface modifications of alternating curvature are applied to bimorph mirrors to generate non-Gaussian X-ray beam profiles of specified width. The new theory's freedom is exploited to choose the segments to match the polishing errors of medium wavelength (>10 mm) and the piezos' influence on the mirror's figure. Five- and seven-segment modifications of alternating curvature are calculated and verified by visible light and X-ray metrology. The latter yields beam profiles with less striation than those made by defocusing. Remaining beam striations are explained by applying geometrical optics to the deviations from the ideal surface modifications of alternating curvature.

  18. Stress polishing of thin shells for adaptive secondary mirrors. Application to the Very Large Telescope deformable secondary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, E.; Ferrari, M.; Riccardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Lemaître, G. R.; Arsenault, R.; Hubin, N.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Adaptive secondary mirrors (ASM) are, or will be, key components on all modern telescopes, providing improved seeing conditions or diffraction limited images, thanks to the high-order atmospheric turbulence correction obtained by controlling the shape of a thin mirror. Their development is a key milestone towards future extremely large telescopes (ELT) where this technology is mandatory for successful observations. Aims: The key point of actual adaptive secondaries technology is the thin glass mirror that acts as a deformable membrane, often aspheric. On 6 m - 8 m class telescopes, these are typically 1 m-class with a 2 mm thickness. The optical quality of this shell must be sufficiently good not to degrade the correction, meaning that high spatial frequency errors must be avoided. The innovative method presented here aims at generating aspherical shapes by elastic bending to reach high optical qualities. Methods: This method is called stress polishing and allows generating aspherical optics of a large amplitude with a simple spherical polishing with a full sized lap applied on a warped blank. The main advantage of this technique is the smooth optical quality obtained, free of high spatial frequency ripples as they are classically caused by subaperture toolmarks. After describing the manufacturing process we developed, our analytical calculations lead to a preliminary definition of the geometry of the blank, which allows a precise bending of the substrate. The finite element analysis (FEA) can be performed to refine this geometry by using an iterative method with a criterion based on the power spectral density of the displacement map of the optical surface. Results: Considering the specific case of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) deformable secondary mirror (DSM), extensive FEA were performed for the optimisation of the geometry. Results are showing that the warping will not introduce surface errors higher than 0.3 nm rms on the minimal spatial scale

  19. High-contrast imaging at small separations: impact of the optical configuration of two deformable mirrors on dark holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, M.; Abe, L.; Martinez, P.; Baudoz, P.; Gouvret, C.; Vakili, F.

    2017-07-01

    The direct detection and characterization of exoplanets will be a major scientific driver over the next decade, involving the development of very large telescopes that require high-contrast imaging close to the optical axis. Some complex techniques have been developed to improve the performance at small separations (coronagraphy, wavefront shaping, etc.). In this paper, we study some of the fundamental limitations of high contrast at the instrument design level, for cases that use a combination of a coronagraph and two deformable mirrors for wavefront shaping. In particular, we focus on small-separation point-source imaging (around 1 λ/D). First, we analytically or semi-analytically analyse the impact of several instrument design parameters: actuator number, deformable mirror locations and optic aberrations (level and frequency distribution). Second, we develop an in-depth Monte Carlo simulation to compare the performance of dark hole correction using a generic test-bed model to test the Fresnel propagation of multiple randomly generated optic static phase errors. We demonstrate that imaging at small separations requires a large setup and small dark hole size. The performance is sensitive to the amount of optic aberration and the spatial frequency distribution but shows a weak dependence on the actuator number or setup architecture when the dark hole is sufficiently small (from 1 to ≲ 5 λ/D).

  20. Robust Wave-front Correction in a Small Scale Adaptive Optics System Using a Membrane Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Park, S.; Baik, S.; Jung, J.; Lee, S.; Yoo, J.

    A small scale laboratory adaptive optics system using a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS) and a membrane deformable mirror (DM) has been built for robust image acquisition. In this study, an adaptive limited control technique is adopted to maintain the long-term correction stability of an adaptive optics system. To prevent the waste of dynamic correction range for correcting small residual wave-front distortions which are inefficient to correct, the built system tries to limit wave-front correction when a similar small difference wave-front pattern is repeatedly generated. Also, the effect of mechanical distortion in an adaptive optics system is studied and a pre-recognition method for the distortion is devised to prevent low-performance system operation. A confirmation process for a balanced work assignment among deformable mirror (DM) actuators is adopted for the pre-recognition. The corrected experimental results obtained by using a built small scale adaptive optics system are described in this paper.

  1. Resonator with a back deformable mirror for the formation of a beam with a given intensity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyko, V V; Kislov, V I; Ofitserov, Evgenii N

    2011-10-31

    We present the results of a numerical-analytical study of formation of an output beam with a given intensity distribution for a resonator with a back deformable mirror (DM) and semitransparent spherical front mirror. Using the theory of inverse optical problems in the diffraction approximation, the basic characteristics of a laser resonator with a DM are considered as functions of the reference resonator configuration and the form of the distribution function, describing the given intensity. The laser beam formation in the reference resonator with plane-parallel and concentric configurations is compared. In the investigated resonators, the given intensity distribution is a fundamental mode; the selectivity (determined by the power losses of transverse modes) of the resonator with a DM is comparable with that of the reference resonator. It is shown that the formation of the given intensity distributions (uniform, super-Gaussian, or having several maxima) requires a DM with the amplitude of deformations of the optical surface of the order of {lambda} and the number of control channels from 1 to nearly 10.

  2. Micromachined mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, Robert Alan

    This dissertation discusses the fundamental limits of scanning mirror design, focusing on the limitations due to the interaction between mechanical properties (mirror flatness and dynamic deformation), and optical properties (beam divergence and optical resolution). The performance criteria for both resonant-scanning mirrors and steady-state, beam-positioning mirrors are related to the mirror geometries, desired optical resolution, material properties, and mechanical resonant frequencies. The optical resolution of the scanning mirror is linearly dependent on the mirror length, so longer mirrors should provide higher-resolution scanners. However, when undergoing an angular acceleration mirrors exhibit dynamic deformation, which is shown to be proportional to the fifth power of the length. Two different implementations of MEMS scanning mirrors are presented: polysilicon surface-micromachined mirrors and a new design we call the Staggered Torsional Electrostatic Combdrive (STEC) micromirror. The surface-micromachined mirrors are shown to be capable of reliable operation, but they have significant performance limitations caused by the limited thickness obtainable with the LPCVD-polysilicon structures. Calculations show that surface-micromachined mirrors of thickness 1.5 mum and diameter 550 mum are only capable of scanning +/-10 degrees at 251 Hz while retaining diffraction-limited optical performance. The STEC micromirrors, designed to overcome the limitations of the surface-micromachined mirrors, are capable of much higher-speed scanning (up to 61 kHz) without performance-limiting dynamic deformation of the mirror surface. The STEC micromirror fabrication process is extended to create Tensile Optical Surface (TOS) micromirrors---mirrors with thick silicon rib support structures and thin membranes that provide the reflective surface. An application of scanning mirrors is presented: a raster-scanning video display. This demonstration uses two surface

  3. Creating flat-top X-ray beams by applying surface profiles of alternating curvature to deformable piezo bimorph mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, John P.; Alcock, Simon G.; Kashyap, Yogesh; Nistea, Ioana; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    Beam shaping is becoming increasingly important for synchrotron X-ray applications. Although routine for visible light lasers, this is challenging for X-rays due to the limited source coherence and extreme optical tolerances required for the shaping mirrors. In deliberate defocusing, even surface errors <5 nm r.m.s. introduce damagingly large striations into the reflected beam. To counteract such problems, surface modifications with alternating concave and convex curvature on equal segments were polished onto the surface of non-active mirrors of fixed curvature. Such optics are useful for providing a fixed size of X-ray beam, but do not provide the adaptability required by many experiments. In contrast, deformable piezo bimorph mirrors permit a continuous range of X-ray beam sizes and shapes. A new theory is developed for applying non-periodic modifications of alternating curvature to optical surfaces. The position and length of the segments may be freely chosen. For the first time, surface modifications of alternating curvature are applied to bimorph mirrors to generate non-Gaussian X-ray beam profiles of specified width. The new theory’s freedom is exploited to choose the segments to match the polishing errors of medium wavelength (>10 mm) and the piezos’ influence on the mirror’s figure. Five- and seven-segment modifications of alternating curvature are calculated and verified by visible light and X-ray metrology. The latter yields beam profiles with less striation than those made by defocusing. Remaining beam striations are explained by applying geometrical optics to the deviations from the ideal surface modifications of alternating curvature. PMID:27787239

  4. Adaptive MOEMS mirrors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayek, Reda; Ibrahim, Hany

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) optical elements with high angular deflection arranged in arrays to perform dynamic laser beam focusing and scanning. Each element selectively addresses a portion of the laser beam. These devices are useful in medical and research applications including laser-scanning microscopy, confocal microscopes, and laser capture micro-dissection. Such laser-based imaging and diagnostic instruments involve complex laser beam manipulations. These often require compound lenses and mirrors that introduce misalignment, attenuation, distortion and light scatter. Instead of using expensive spherical and aspherical lenses and/or mirrors for sophisticated laser beam manipulations, we propose scalable adaptive micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS) arrays to recapture optical performance and compensate for aberrations, distortions and imperfections introduced by inexpensive optics. A high-density array of small, individually addressable, MOEMS elements is similar to a Fresnel mirror. A scalable 2D array of micro-mirrors approximates spherical or arbitrary surface mirrors of different apertures. A proof of concept prototype was built using PolyMUMP TM due to its reliability, low cost and limited post processing requirements. Low-density arrays (2x2 arrays of square elements, 250x250μm each) were designed, fabricated, and tested. Electrostatic comb fingers actuate the edges of the square mirrors with a low actuation voltage of 20 V - 50 V. CoventorWare TM was used for the design, 3D modeling and motion simulations. Initial results are encouraging. The array is adaptive, configurable and scalable with low actuation voltage and a large tuning range. Individual element addressability would allow versatile uses. Future research will increase deflection angles and maximize reflective area.

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Application of deformable mirrors in industrial CO2 lasers. II. Intracavity power control and repetitively pulsed modulation of output radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinevich, B. S.; Evdokimovich, L. N.; Safronov, A. G.; Smirnov, S. N.

    2004-04-01

    Industrial CO2 lasers of various types with stable cavities, which contain deformable mirrors with a controllable curvature of the reflecting surface, are studied experimentally. Stable and reproducible control of the output power of industrial CO2 lasers is achieved in both single-mode and multimode regimes until the complete lasing quenching. Stable repetitively pulsed lasing regimes with a pulse repetition rate varied from a few to several hundred hertz are obtained in cw CO2 lasers. The shapes of the output laser pulses and the dependence of the mean output power on the frequency — time parameters of the control voltage applied to the intracavity deformable mirror are studied.

  6. Design of a Compact, Bimorph Deformable Mirror-Based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Deng, Guohua; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Yang, Jinsheng; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) using a bimorph mirror. The simulated AOSLO system achieves diffraction-limited criterion through all the raster scanning fields (6.4 mm pupil, 3° × 3° on pupil). The bimorph mirror-based AOSLO corrected ocular aberrations in model eyes to less than 0.1 μm RMS wavefront error with a closed-loop bandwidth of a few Hz. Facilitated with a bimorph mirror at a stroke of ±15 μm with 35 elements and an aperture of 20 mm, the new AOSLO system has a size only half that of the first-generation AOSLO system. The significant increase in stroke allows for large ocular aberrations such as defocus in the range of ±600° and astigmatism in the range of ±200°, thereby fully exploiting the AO correcting capabilities for diseased human eyes in the future.

  7. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  8. Design and implementation of precise x-ray metrology to control a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Ruz Armendariz, Jaime; Feng, Jun; Chao, Weilun; Jackson, Jessie; Nasiatka, James; Decker, Todd

    2016-09-01

    Our experiments at beamline 5.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source feature a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM). We describe the experiment and present recent results in two areas. First, we directly image the 3 keV x-ray beam and demonstrate customized shaping of its intensity in the near field. Detailed physics simulations of the experiment agree very well with actual measurements. Second, we use a grating interferometer to measure known figure errors applied to the surface of the XDM. A relative height change on the XDM of 2.5 nm RMS is measured at an SNR of eight in single measurement. A provisional error budget analysis indicates that uncalibrated errors in the system are by far the largest component.

  9. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  10. Optical tests of an intelligently deformable mirror for space telescope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po

    1994-03-01

    The concept of an actively deformable composite reflector is demonstrated and test verified. The objective of developing such a concept is to correct the low-order long-wavelength distortions in a space reflector. This is achieved by bonding a limited number of piezoelectric ceramic strips to the back face sheet of the reflector. A cryointerferometric test of a 0.5-m reflector with six groups of actuators was performed to verify the concept experimentally. Analysis of and test results for the development of an active deformable composite reflector panel are summarized.

  11. A two deformable-mirror concept to improve the laser efficiency of Gemini South MCAO (GeMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchet, Clémentine; Guesalaga, Andrés; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; Guzman, Dani

    2013-12-01

    Gem's is the first laser-based multi-conjugate adaptive optics offeredto the astronomical community. Its asterism of 5 laser guide stars hasrecently proved to provide very uniform turbulence correction over the85''x85'' observation field, opening the new era of wide-field highangular resolution studies from the ground. Good AO performance requireshowever good wavefront sensing measurements from the laser guide stars,which directly depends on the quality of the laser spot image. Theoptimization of the lasers launched out of the telescope requires tofollow frequent and constraining calibrations and alignments procedures(quasi-static aberrations), in order to guarantee satisfying amplitudeand phase of the beam. These complex and time-consuming procedures willstrongly penalize the availability of Gem's.A laser beam shaping concept has been recently suggested to overcomesuch issues. It consists in applying, in the beam transfer optics, afield-conjugation thanks to 2 deformable mirrors. We review thisconcept. In particular, we discuss the criterion to be optimized and thedesired amplitude and phase shapes at the output of the Gemini beamtransfer optics. We deduce the control to be applied to the mirrors fromthe optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio of the wavefront sensingin Gem's. An iterative algorithm is used to estimate the phases, with aweighted least-squares unwrapper to avoid branch points. This algorithmefficiency is demonstrated with adequate beam shaping simulations.Discussion is made about how to implement such concept at Gemini.

  12. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: On the possibility of high-frequency modulation of laser radiation by using a deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyko, V. V.; Safronov, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of a cooled deformable mirror with a controllable curvature of the reflecting surface in the frequency range from 0 to 40 kHz are presented. The original method is used for measuring the amplitude- and phase-frequency characteristics of the mirror. The dependences of the reflecting surface deformation on the control voltage are obtained at different fixed frequencies near resonances. It is found that the nonlinearity of these dependences is caused by the shift of the resonance frequencies of the mirror with increasing the control voltage amplitude. The parameters of the mirror such as the linewidth, Q and damping factors, and peak sensitivity are studied at the 4.69-kHz fundamental and 37.2-KHz high-frequency resonances. It is found that upon the shift of resonance frequencies, the mirror Q factor and its peak sensitivity are independent of the control voltage amplitude. The high-frequency modulation depth of laser radiation that can be obtained with such intracavity mirrors is estimated from the results obtained.

  13. Illustration of the use of multimode deformable plane mirrors to record high-resolution concave gratings: results for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph gratings of the Hubble Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Duban, M; Dohlen, K; Lemaitre, G R

    1998-11-01

    To illustrate the efficiency of using a deformable plane mirror to record holographic gratings, we have computed the three gratings for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Their working conditions are severe, since they have to correct the residual spherical aberration of the Hubble Space Telescope. Nevertheless, all images obtained are largely diffraction limited with regard to the resolution.

  14. Fault-tolerant drive electronics for a Xinetics deformable mirror at GeMS DM0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    Gemini South is replacing one of the (3) CILAS DMs with a 349-actuator Xinetics DM in its GeMS MCAO system. Xinetics mirrors operate over a 40-100V dynamic range and require that inter-actuator stroke differences are limited to half-scale; each actuator must be within 30V of its neighbor to prevent mechanical stress and possible face sheet separation. A robust way to implement this protection is to use high power transient voltage suppressors (TVSs) as a 2D-mesh between the amplifiers and mirror, but this has system implications. A sustained clamp condition dissipates significant power in the devices, and if an actuator fails as short (which occurred once with the DM in a thermal chamber), the system is subject to a cascade failure event as multiple outputs drive the shorted actuator through the TVS network. This latter risk is readily resolved by using series fuses to the DM. In this third-generation driver, current sensing and logic inhibit amplifier outputs after a sustained TVS clamp condition or shorted output, and LED indicators show the location. Redundant thermal sensing is used on modular TVS row and column boards. A second 2D-mesh of high impedance resistors after the fuses will hold an unpowered channel to the average voltage of its neighbors, with a negligible influence function. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis shows significant fault tolerance.

  15. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-21

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  16. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  17. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  18. Development of an ELT XAO testbed using a Mach-Zehnder wavefront sensor: calibration of the deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacroix, Christian; Langlois, Maud P.; Loupias, Magali; Thiébaut, Eric; Adjali, Louisa; Leger, Jonathan; Tallon, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Extreme adaptive optics (XAO) encounters severe difficulties to cope with the high speed (<1kHz), high accuracy and high order requirements for future extremely large telescopes. An innovative high order adaptive optics system using a self-referenced Mach-Zehnder wavefront sensor (MZWFS) allows counteracting these limitations. This sensor estimates very accurately the wavefront phase at small spatial scale by measuring intensity differences between two outputs, with a λ/4 path length difference between its two legs, but is limited in dynamic range due to phase ambiguity. During the past few years, such an XAO system has been studied by our team in the framework of 8-meter class telescopes. In this work, we report on our latest results with the XAO testbed recently installed in our lab, and dedicated to high contrast imaging with 30m-class telescopes (such as the E-ELT or the TMT). After reminding the principle of a MZWFS and describing the optical layout of our experiment, we will show the results of the assessment of the woofer-tweeter phase correctors, i.e., a Boston Micromachine continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) and a Boulder Nonlinear Systems liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). In particular, we will detail the calibration of the DM using Zygo interferometer metrology. Our method consists in the precise measurement of the membrane deformation while applying a constant deformation to 9 out of 140 actuators at the same time. By varying the poke voltage across the DM operating range, we propose a simple but efficient way of modeling the DM influence function using a Gaussian model. Finally, we show the DM flattening on the MZWFS allowing to compensate for low order aberrations. This work is carried out in synergy with the validation of fast iterative wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and the optimal treatment of phase ambiguities in order to mitigate the dynamical range limitation of such an MZWFS.

  19. Analytical analysis of a beam flexural-mode piezoelectric actuator for deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hairen

    2015-10-01

    A beam flexural-mode piezoelectric bimorph actuator is analyzed based on linear piezoelectricity, and the performance of the actuator is studied. The beam bimorph piezoelectric actuator (BBPA), which is a sandwich compound consisting of a lower and an upper piezoelectric ceramic surface layer and a middle layer made of metal, is driven to flexural deformation. The statistical analytical solution and dynamical solutions from the three-dimensional equations of linear piezoelectricity are derived, and the dependence of the performance upon the physical parameters of the BBPA is evaluated. Numerical results illustrate the strengthened performance achieved by adjusting the geometrical and material parameters of the BBPA.

  20. A general method of holographic grating recording with a null-powered multimode deformable mirror. The case of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph for HST 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Duban, Michel

    1998-11-01

    A new general method for recording high resolution holographic gratings by using a null-powered multimode deformable mirror is described. Up to now, the principle of this active method has been applied only to make gratings correcting a single aberration mode. The extension of the method to gratings correcting several aberration modes is proposed. An analogy between Clebsch modes (\\cite{cl61}, \\cite{ba:fl87}) in elasticity, and Zernike modes in optics, allows generation and coaddition of aspherical surfaces up to a high order in aberration compensation. To illustrate the efficiency of the method in a difficult case, the three gratings for the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph have been computed. Their working conditions take into account the compensation of the HST residual spherical aberration. The image quality obtained are nearly diffraction limited in the direction of the dispersion and also in the other direction for the third, less dispersive, grating. The three grating substrates are aspherical but retain rotational symmetry, thus being easily achievable by an active ``vase form'' and by spherical polishing. Only three optical modes have to be coadded onto the multimode deformable mirror. We propose to call such an active mirror form a ``multimode mirror'' or a ``Clebsch-Zernike mirror''. This general method will greatly simplify grating manufacturers' holographic recording mountings.

  1. Technological progress of a ferrofluid deformable mirror with tunable nominal optical power for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Aaron J.; Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Echeverri, Daniel; Cleff, Isabel R.

    2015-09-01

    The success of a space-borne direct-imaging mission pursuing earth-sized exoplanets in the habitable zone hinges on the ability to achieve high contrast over a maximum field of view. Coronagraphic instruments designed to address this challenge suffer from optical aberrations and rely on focal-plane wavefront control to suppress the resulting speckles and widen the search area. Even small-featured quasi-static speckles--which may obscure or be confused with a planet--must be suppressed to the order of 10-10 over the search region, placing extreme demands on the deformable mirrors (DMs) used to implement the closed-loop control, both in wavefront requirements and actuation resolution. The ideal DM for focal-plane wavefront control has high surface quality and is capable of high-precision, low-stroke actuation. Conventional mirror technologies such as MEMS DMs, with heritage in ground-based adaptive optics instruments that correct for dynamic atmosphere-induced aberrations, are nominally at and provide high-stroke, high-resolution control but at a cost of precision and surface quality. We present a new technology currently under development at Princeton, which features a ferrofluid-supported optical surface with local magnetic actuation. The actuation is transferred to the optical surface through a liquid medium which continuously supports it, decoupling the nominal surface profile from the actuator configuration and eliminating quilting. Additionally, the device carries tunable nominal optical power via regulation of the ferrofluid pressure, permitting a degree of high-fidelity low-order wavefront control impossible with current instrumentation. We report on the continuing technological growth of the prototype device, including progress with actuation, metrology, and modeling of the DM response.

  2. Enantiomeric switching of chiral metamaterial for terahertz polarization modulation employing vertically deformable MEMS spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Tetsuo; Isozaki, Akihiro; Kanda, Natsuki; Nemoto, Natsuki; Konishi, Kuniaki; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2015-10-01

    Active modulation of the polarization states of terahertz light is indispensable for polarization-sensitive spectroscopy, having important applications such as non-contact Hall measurements, vibrational circular dichroism measurements and anisotropy imaging. In the terahertz region, the lack of a polarization modulator similar to a photoelastic modulator in the visible range hampers expansion of such spectroscopy. A terahertz chiral metamaterial has a huge optical activity unavailable in nature; nevertheless, its modulation is still challenging. Here we demonstrate a handedness-switchable chiral metamaterial for polarization modulation employing vertically deformable Micro Electro Mechanical Systems. Vertical deformation of a planar spiral by a pneumatic force creates a three-dimensional spiral. Enantiomeric switching is realized by selecting the deformation direction, where the polarity of the optical activity is altered while maintaining the spectral shape. A polarization rotation as high as 28° is experimentally observed, thus providing a practical and compact polarization modulator for the terahertz range.

  3. Enantiomeric switching of chiral metamaterial for terahertz polarization modulation employing vertically deformable MEMS spirals

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Tetsuo; Isozaki, Akihiro; Kanda, Natsuki; Nemoto, Natsuki; Konishi, Kuniaki; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Active modulation of the polarization states of terahertz light is indispensable for polarization-sensitive spectroscopy, having important applications such as non-contact Hall measurements, vibrational circular dichroism measurements and anisotropy imaging. In the terahertz region, the lack of a polarization modulator similar to a photoelastic modulator in the visible range hampers expansion of such spectroscopy. A terahertz chiral metamaterial has a huge optical activity unavailable in nature; nevertheless, its modulation is still challenging. Here we demonstrate a handedness-switchable chiral metamaterial for polarization modulation employing vertically deformable Micro Electro Mechanical Systems. Vertical deformation of a planar spiral by a pneumatic force creates a three-dimensional spiral. Enantiomeric switching is realized by selecting the deformation direction, where the polarity of the optical activity is altered while maintaining the spectral shape. A polarization rotation as high as 28° is experimentally observed, thus providing a practical and compact polarization modulator for the terahertz range. PMID:26423346

  4. Adaptive non-collinear autocorrelation of few-cycle pulses with an angular tunable bi-mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Treffer, A. Bock, M.; König, S.; Grunwald, R.; Brunne, J.; Wallrabe, U.

    2016-02-01

    Adaptive autocorrelation with an angular tunable micro-electro-mechanical system is reported. A piezo-actuated Fresnel bi-mirror structure was applied to measure the second order autocorrelation of near-infrared few-cycle laser pulses in a non-collinear setup at tunable superposition angles. Because of enabling measurements with variable scaling and minimizing the influence of distortions by adaptive self-reconstruction, the approach extends the capability of autocorrelators. Flexible scaling and robustness against localized amplitude obscurations are demonstrated. The adaptive reconstruction of temporal frequency information by the Fourier analysis of autocorrelation data is shown. Experimental results and numerical simulations of the beam propagation and interference are compared for variable angles.

  5. First light of the deformable secondary mirror-based adaptive optics system on 1.8m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youming; Zhang, Ang; Fan, Xinlong; Rao, Changhui; Wei, Ling; Xian, Hao; Wei, Kai; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Chunlin; Li, Min; Zhou, Luchun; Jin, Kai; Zhang, Junbo; Zhou, Longfeng; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    An adaptive optics system (AOS), which consists of a 73-element piezoelectric deformable secondary mirror (DSM), a 9x9 Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a real time controller has been integrated on the 1.8m telescope at the Gaomeigu site of Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Compared to the traditional AOS on Coude focus, the DSM AOS adopts much less reflections and consequently restrains the thermal noise and increases the energy transmitting to the system. Before the first on-sky test, this system has been demonstrated in the laboratory by compensating the simulated atmospheric turbulence generated by a rotating phase screen. A new multichannel-modulation calibration method which is used to measure the DSM based AOS interaction matrix is proposed. After integration on the 1.8m telescope, the closed-loop compensation of the atmospheric turbulence with the DSM based AOS is achieved, and the first light results from the on-sky experiment are reported.

  6. High-resolution miniature FTIR spectrometer enabled by a large linear travel MEMS pop-up mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Erik R.; Reyes, David; Schildkraut, Elliot R.; Kim, Jinhong

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a millimeter diameter, surface micromachined Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) mirror, which is assembled perpendicular to the substrate and can be linearly and repeatedly traversed through 600 μm. The moving mirror, when combined with a fixed mirror and beamsplitter, make up a monolithic MEMS Michelson interferometer; all are made on the same substrate and in the same surface micromachined fabrication process. The beamsplitter has been specifically designed such that the motion of the mirror enables modulation of light over the 2-14 μm spectral region. The rapid scan MEMS Michelson interferometer is the engine behind a miniaturized, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectrometer. The FTIR measures the absorption of infrared (IR) radiation by a target material, which can be used for the detection and identification of gases, liquids, or solids. The fabrication of the mirror with the ability to displace 600 μm along the optical axis enables the miniaturized system to have species identification resolution, while leveraging wafer scale batch fabrication to enable extremely low system cost. The successful fabrication of the millimeter diameter mirrors and beamsplitter with interferometric alignment over the range of travel of the moving mirror promises unprecedented sensitivity relative to the size of the FTIR spectrometer system.

  7. Design of the Apache-Point Observatory 3.5-METER Telescope - Part Two - Deformation Analysis of the Primary Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, W. A.; Mannery, E. J.; Radochia, J.; Gillett, P. E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have calculated the deflection of the surface of a 3.5 meter diameter borosilicate mirror using the finite element method. The mirror is a 0.46 m thick honeycomb structure with 25 mm thick face plates and 13 mm ribs. The cell spacing is 0.192 m and is regular except near the inner and outer perimeters. Axial support for the mirror will be provided by 48 air pistons. The effects of thickness variations in fabrication of the mirror are presented and are small for the magnitudes of the variations expected. Several thermal load cases are described.

  8. Effects of mirror distortion by thermal deformation in an interferometry beam size monitor system at PLS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Kim, Eun-San; Kim, Changbum; Huang, Jung-Yun; Kim, Dotae

    2016-10-01

    Extraction mirrors installed at the most upstream position of interferometry beam size monitor are frequently used for measuring the beam size in storage rings. These mirrors receive the high power synchrotron radiation and are distorted owing to the heat distribution that depends on the position on the mirror surface. The distortion of the mirror changes the effective separation of the slit in the interferometry beam size monitor. Estimation of the effects of the front-end mirror distortion is important for measuring the beam size accurately. In this paper, we present the result of the numerical simulation of the temperature distribution and thermal expansion of the front-end mirror using ANSYS code, the theoretical basis of the effects of mirror distortion and compare with experimental results from Pohang Light Source II (PLS-II) at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The equipment in the beam diagnosis line in PLS-II and experimental set-up for measuring the distortion of the front-end mirror using a multi-hole square array Hartmann screen are described.

  9. a Bragg Fresnel Focusing Mirror with AN Integrated Micro-Electromechanical Bender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youli; Yasa, Mario; Abu Samah, Zuruzi; MacDonald, Noel; Safinya, Cyrus

    2004-03-01

    We present a Bragg Fresnel focusing mirror optic with an integrated micro-bender fabricated using Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The optics module of the device consists of Au linear Fresnel lenses deposited on an x-ray reflective multilayer substrate. The Fresnel zones are designed to diffractively focus x-rays sagitally whereas the substrate can be bent to focus x-rays in the meridional direction. The MEMS bender consists of a linear array of electrodes deposited in a trench etched on a silicon substrate. The optics module is bonded to the bender module to form an array of parallel plate capacitors with an air gap of order 20 micron. A DC bias on the capacitive actuator generates an electrostatic force which bends the Bragg Fresnel mirror. The capacitance between the mirror and the bender can be monitored in-situ for feedback control of the bias voltage on the capacitor array. This dynamic process permits precise control of the geometric shape of the mirror for optimal focusing. This high efficiency optic can be used in wide-ranging x-ray microscopy and micro-diffraction applications. (Work supported by NSF-DMR-0076357, DOE W-7405-ENG-34 and ONR N00014-00-1-0214)

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW Elasto-capillarity: deforming an elastic structure with a liquid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, B.; Bico, J.

    2010-12-01

    Although negligible at macroscopic scales, capillary forces become dominant as the sub-millimetric scales of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) are considered. We review various situations, not limited to micro-technologies, where capillary forces are able to deform elastic structures. In particular, we define the different length scales that are relevant for 'elasto-capillary' problems. We focus on the case of slender structures (lamellae, rods and sheets) and describe the size of a bundle of wet hair, the condition for a flexible rod to pierce a liquid interface or the fate of a liquid droplet deposited on a flexible thin sheet. These results can be generalized to similar situations involving adhesion or fracture energy, which widens the scope of possible applications from biological systems, to stiction issues in micro-fabrication processes, the manufacturing of 3D microstructures or the formation of blisters in thin film coatings.

  11. Investigation of Closed Loop Adaptive Optics with the Deformable Mirror not in Pupil- Part 2: Theory (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    adaptive secondary minimizes surfaces thereby maximizing sensitivity making it particularly suitable for thermal infrared astronomy . For infrared astronomy ...to be 40 % of the diffraction limited peak. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona has two 8.4m primary mirrors and two 0.91m

  12. Deformation verification and surface improvement of active stressed lap for 4  m-class primary mirror fabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshen; Li, Xiaojin; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige

    2015-04-01

    The surface shape accuracy of the active stressed lap impacts the performance of grinding and polishing in the fabrication of large mirrors. We introduce a model of active stressed lap for the fabrication of a 4 m f/1.5 mirror based on finite element analysis (FEA), and the lap surface accuracy achieves RMS<1.8  μm in the FEA method. Using the lap surface measurement system, experimental verification is put forward, and the RMS of the measured lap surface is within 2 μm in practice. A general improvement in lap surface accuracy using the Zernike polynomial is shown. After compensating the calculation errors, the lap surface accuracy is improved by 8%-23%, and achieves RMS<1.5  μm, which is appropriate for practical grinding and polishing.

  13. Close-loop performance of a high precision deflectometry controlled deformable mirror (DCDM) unit for wavefront correction in adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Zhou, Chenlu; Zhao, Wenchuan; Choi, Heejoo; Graves, Logan; Kim, Daewook

    2017-06-01

    We present a high precision deflectometry system (DS) controlled deformable mirror (DM) solution for optical system. Different from wavefront and non-wavefront system, the DS and the DM are set to be an individual integrated DCDM unit and can be installed in one base plate. In the DCDM unit, the DS can directly provide the influence functions and surface shape of the DM to the industrial computer in any adaptive optics system. As an integrated adaptive unit, the DCDM unit could be put into various optical systems to realize aberration compensation. In this paper, the configuration and principle of the DCDM unit is introduced first. Theoretical simulation on the close-loop performance of the DCDM unit is carried out. Finally, a verification experiment is proposed to verify the compensation capability of the DCDM unit.

  14. The actuator design and the experimental tests of a new technology large deformable mirror for visible wavelengths adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Ciro; Agapito, Guido; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Carbonaro, Luca; Marignetti, Fabrizio; De Santis, Enzo; Biliotti, Valdemaro; Riccardi, Armando

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Adaptive Secondary Mirrors showed excellent on-sky results in the Near Infrared wavelengths. They currently provide 30mm inter-actuator spacing and about 1 kHz bandwidth. Pushing these devices to be operated at visible wavelengths is a challenging task. Compared to the current systems, working in the infrared, the more demanding requirements are the higher spatial resolution and the greater correction bandwidth. In fact, the turbulence scale is shorter and the parameter variation is faster. Typically, the former is not larger than 25 mm (projected on the secondary mirror) and the latter is 2 kHz, therefore the actuator has to be more slender and faster than the current ones. With a soft magnetic composite core, a dual-stator and a single-mover, VRALA, the actuator discussed in this paper, attains unprecedented performances with a negligible thermal impact. Pre-shaping the current required to deliver a given stroke greatly simplifies the control system, whose output supplies the current generator. As the inductance depends on the mover position, the electronics of this generator, provided with an inductance measure circuit, works also as a displacement sensor, supplying the control system with an accurate feed-back signal. A preliminary prototype, built according to the several FEA thermo-magnetic analyses, has undergone some preliminary laboratory tests. The results of these checks, matching the design results in terms of power and force, show that the the magnetic design addresses the severe specifications.

  15. Controllable Mirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A deformable Mirror Device (DMD) is a type of spatial light modulator in which mirrors fabricated monolithically on a silicon chip are deformed, or tilted, under electronic control to change the direction of light that falls upon the mirror. NASA and Texas Instruments (TI) have worked to develop this technology, which has subsequently been commercialized by TI. Initial application is the DMD 2000 Travel Information Printer for high speed, high volume printing of airline tickets and boarding passes. Other possible applications range from real-time object tracking to advanced industrial machine vision systems.

  16. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  17. Application of Inkjet-Printing Technology to Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering”. In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences...the ‘area function’. Assuming the area function Ac (d) can be obtained by calibration measurement from a standard sample experimentally, the contact...area A is given as: A = Ac (hc) (2.19) The hardness can be obtained from the contact area: H = Pmax A (2.20) The elastic modulus E is related to the

  18. Fabrication and Characteristics of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System-Based Tilt Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ju Chan; Kong, Seong Ho

    2009-06-01

    A miniaturized tilt sensor using air medium, which is measurable on a two-axis inclination angle, is fabricated and its output characteristics are evaluated. The proposed tilt sensor consists of a central microheater surrounded by four temperature sensors. Without an inclination, the microheater creates a symmetric temperature profile in an encapsulated microchamber filled with air medium. When the device is tilted, the temperature sensors formed around the central heater measure the asymmetric temperature profile, caused by the effect of convection. The proposed tilt sensor covers a measurement range of ±90° on two axes with excellent linearity and symmetric sensitivity. Furthermore, the structure and fabrication sequence of the proposed sensor are quite simple; that is, the microheater and temperature sensors can be simultaneously formed because they are made of the same material. Several issues, confronting the previously reported electrolytic tilt sensor, such as metal electrode corrosion, electrolyte deterioration, surface tension of the electrolyte, and difficulty in packaging, were avoided.

  19. Surface Micro-Machining: Progress Towards Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doscher, James

    1995-01-01

    Surface micromachining is a technique for building electromechanical systems in silicon. A number of electromechanical systems have been implemented in miniature using the fundamental structural building blocks of tensile and non-tensile springs, differential capacitance sensing cells, and electrostatic drive. The integration of complicated mechanical structures and electrical circuits onto a single chip is expected to improve reliability and testability of systems. Reduction in interconnect wiring, the increased use of automation, and the inherent reliability of integrated circuits will all contribute to increased reliability of systems.

  20. Design, Fabrication, Processing, and Testing of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Chemical Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    destroyed the released devices. 5.6.1.3 Physical Masking. Masks were made by cutting holes in heavy paper and covering wafers. This method was used both to...Recommendations. 8.5.2.1 Data Acquisition Software. A comment for AFIT in general is to train an individual on data acquisition techniques using common...move(b8); move(blO)]; devb = std(sb); [minsda, isda ] = min(deva) ; % find min. deviation [minsdb,isdb] = min(devb); snra0 = daO( isda )/minsda

  1. CNT coated thread micro-electro-mechanical system for finger proprioception sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, A. A.; Wicaksono, D. H. B.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we aim to fabricate cotton thread based sensor for proprioceptive application. Cotton threads are utilized as the structural component of flexible sensors. The thread is coated with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) dispersion by using facile conventional dipping-drying method. The electrical characterization of the coated thread found that the resistance per meter of the coated thread decreased with increasing the number of dipping. The CNT coated thread sensor works based on piezoresistive theory in which the resistance of the coated thread changes when force is applied. This thread sensor is sewed on glove at the index finger between middle and proximal phalanx parts and the resistance change is measured upon grasping mechanism. The thread based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) enables the flexible sensor to easily fit perfectly on the finger joint and gives reliable response as proprioceptive sensing.

  2. Noise reduction and estimation in multiple micro-electro-mechanical inertial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waegli, Adrian; Skaloud, Jan; Guerrier, Stéphane; Eulàlia Parés, Maria; Colomina, Ismael

    2010-06-01

    This research studies the reduction and the estimation of the noise level within a redundant configuration of low-cost (MEMS-type) inertial measurement units (IMUs). Firstly, independent observations between units and sensors are assumed and the theoretical decrease in the system noise level is analyzed in an experiment with four MEMS-IMU triads. Then, more complex scenarios are presented in which the noise level can vary in time and for each sensor. A statistical method employed for studying the volatility of financial markets (GARCH) is adapted and tested for the usage with inertial data. This paper demonstrates experimentally and through simulations the benefit of direct noise estimation in redundant IMU setups.

  3. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) component research and development for army missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Tracy D.; McMillen, Deanna K.; Ashley, Paul R.; Ruffin, Paul B.; Baeder, Janet

    1999-07-01

    The US Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center has identified MEMS as an emerging technology with high potential for fulfilling the mission of future missiles. The technology holds the promise of reducing the size, weight, cost, and power requirements for performing existing functions in Army missile systems, as well las providing opportunities for new computing, sensing, and actuation functions that cannot be achieved with conventional electromechanical technology. MEMS will enable the Army's next generation of smaller and lighter missiles. The military market drives the thrust for development of miniature sensor with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control system, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, missile and ground-based radar, radio frequency seekers, aerodynamic flow control, IR imagers, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Current efforts at AMCOM include the development of MEMS-based inertial components to include accelerometers with wide dynamic range, tactical grade gyros with high rate range, and miniature three-axis inertial measurement unit with common interface electronics. Performance requirements of such components will be presented in terms of current and future Army missile systems. Additional MEMS based efforts under investigation at AMCOM include missile storage health monitoring, RF MEMS components, encoders for actuators, and aerodynamic flow control will also be discussed.

  4. A Novel MicroElectroMechanical System (MEMS) Device for Passive Sampling of Hydrophobic Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    ETC, 21:229 SPME fibers can be used to predict bioaccumulation Application in Risk Assessment  Anniston Alabama Site  Using passive samplers to... Anniston Site to compare to SPME data; for the purpose of supporting bioaccumulation and toxicity assessment Conclusions  Develop samplers for in situ

  5. Of magnetic imaging system experiments and micro electro-mechanical systems "of mise and MEMS"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, William C.

    Magnetic fields can occur over an extremely broad range of amplitudes, and spatial and temporal scales. Practical scientific and engineering systems have fields ranging in strength from pico-tesla to hundreds of tesla. Furthermore, spatial variations can range in scale from nanometers to tens of meters, and temporal variations can range from picoseconds to hours. Due to these large variations, many different devices and methods have been previously designed for measuring and mapping magnetic fields. The primary application area for the systems developed here is magnetic microsystems. Such systems make use of one or more microscale electromagnets, soft magnets, and/or permanent magnets for sensors, actuators, inductors, electronics, biomedical devices, etc. A single magnet dimension may range from one mum to hundreds of mum, and the overall area of interest may span over distances of millimeters to centimeters. To map the stray fields from such structures, a field measurement tool must be capable of measuring fields ranging from mT to T, while mapping over distances of millimeters with a spatial resolution of approximately one mum. This current study is focused only on static fields, but time-varying fields are of great interest and could be addressed in further research. This research focuses on the development of two tools that meet the requirements of microscale magnetic measurements. The first tool is based on an optical method and excels at extremely rapid measurements of large spatial regions. The second tool is a raster based system that focuses on high magnetic and spatial accuracy. The optical system quantitatively maps the stray magnetic fields of microscale magnetic structures with field resolution down to 50 muT and spatial resolution down to 4 mum. The system uses a magneto-optical indicator film (MOIF) in conjunction with an upright reflective polarizing light microscope to generate optical images of the magnetic field perpendicular to the image plane. A novel single-light-path construction and discrete multi-image polarimetry processing method are used to extract quantitative areal field measurements from the optical images. The integrated system, including the equipment, image analysis software, and experimental methods are described. MOIFs with three different magnetic field ranges are calibrated, and the entire system is validated by measurement of the field patterns from two calibration samples. The final specifications for the MOIF system are: a spacial resolution of 4.2, 6.2, 20.1 mum for each respective MOIF type, a magnetic range of +/-230 mT with the use of the largest saturation MOIF film, magnetic resolution of +/-0.05, +/-0.5, +/-1 mT for each respective MOIF type, and quantification of a 2660 x 2128 mum area within tens of seconds. The raster system, or scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM), also quantitatively maps the stray magnetic fields of microscale magnetic structures, with field range of +/-1 T and spatial resolution down to 1.6+/-0.1 mum. The system uses a micro Hall sensor to accurately measure the magnetic field perpendicular to the sample surface. The micro Hall sensor is integrated onto the edge of a quartz tuning fork to accurately detect sensor-to-sample contact, allowing precise control of the measurement height. The sample is raster scanned beneath the sensor with a 3-axis stage system for measurement of a spatial magnetic map. The SHPM components completed during the design and construction are: a raster scan system and enclosure, a Novel AC spinning Gaussmeter, a micro Hall probe integrated on a distance-sensing quartz tuning fork, and a self-oscillating excitation circuit for height control. The final specifications for the SHPM system are: raster scan spatial resolution of 0.3 mum, an average sampling speed of one sample per 0.7 seconds, magnetic active area spacial resolution for the smallest active area Hall sensor (nominally one mum) of 1.6+/-0.1 mum, magnetic sensitivity of the 5, 10 mum Hall probes were 0.47+/-0.006, and 0.420+/-009 VT-1A-1 , respectively, although the current revisions of Hall sensors resistances are too high preventing their integration in the system.

  6. Design and Fabrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Structures for Tunable Micro-Optical Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    In0.2Ga0.8As) quantum well active gain lay- ers, a short (p)AlxGa1−xAs DBR section, an Al0.85Ga0.15As sacrificial layer, and a top quarter-wave p...Si-doped AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflector ( DBR ) centered around 970 nm. The p-i-n region consists of tw 6 nm In0.2G 0.8As quantum wells ...modeling of optical devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 3.2. Three 80 Å quantum wells centered at an antinode in

  7. Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Fabrication Course Projects Review for FY15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    for Method 1  Clean wafer with solvents (acetone, isopropanol, water)  Clean wafer with O2 plasma etch  Coat/cure Durimide 7510 (photo...from both sides with O2 and then O2/CF4 plasma etches  Pattern frontside with photoresist using etched through-holes as alignment marks...top Silicon layer, using CF4 plasma ; may etch partway through lower SiO2 layer ▼ Etch SiO2 around and under waveguides and supports ▼ Examine in

  8. Designing an Electronic Readout for a Directional Micro Electro-Mechanical (MEMS) Sound Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Pins CHPRST, V2P25, TESTSEL, SDATA & SCLK are required for data comunications from the computer to the MS3110 IC/die and pins VDD & GND are...LIST OF REFERENCES [1] Irvine Sensors Corporation , “MS3110 universal capacitive readoutTM IC data sheet,” May 2004. [2] K. Simsek, “Developing a

  9. Sensor modeling for virtual reality micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) software design tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udono, Ken; Sitte, Renate

    2001-11-01

    As MEMS devices are finding more application areas and new devices are developed, the designs of MEMS are becoming more complex. Without computer aid, designers have to rely on experiment and it becomes time consuming. There are a few commercial MEMS design tools are available currently, however these design tools have their limitations. This paper presents the work towards a user friendly MEMS Virtual Reality MEMS CAD tools that models, simulates, and provides the behavior characteristics and virtual reality visualization of MEMS devices. In this part of the project - the sensor component, we analyze the requirements for modeling MEMS sensors by investigating several types of MEMS, their operating characteristics and their corresponding design parameters. An application example serves to illustrate the analysis and applicability of the models in the sensors component, and to investigate its interaction with other components such as user interface, VR animation, and manufacturing module.

  10. Applications of ferrofluids in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, V. K.; Pant, R. P.; Vinod Kumar, .

    2008-12-01

    The micro-pump is one of the most promising micro-flow devices. At micro-level electronically controlled pumping of any fluid by a mechanical pump is not so easy and reliable. In the realm of nano-tech materials, ferrofluids have unique properties in both liquids and solids and have potential applications for MEMS/NEMS devices. This paper presents two new types of concepts, a micro-flowmeter based on a micro-turbine made using MEMS technology and the other is a micro-pump based on ferrofluidic actuation. In our first device an optical photovoltaic sensor has also been integrated with this device, and the micro-turbine rotates with a speed of 50000 rpm. We have fabricated a ferrofluid-based glass micro-pump of size 20 × 20 × 10 mm^{3}, in which micro actuation is electrically controlled by NdFeB (N50) permanent magnets (diameter 5 × 3 mm, B_{r} = 1400 mT, coercive field H_c=840 ,kA/m) with a ferrofluid bearing. The device is able to pump the fluid at the rate of 10 μ L/actuation. Figs 3, Refs 19.

  11. Magnetic energy coupling system based on micro-electro-mechanical system coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiuhan; Yuan, Quan; Yang, Tianyang; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Haixia

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, a high efficiency wireless energy transfer system based on MEMS coils is first developed. The permanent magnetic core used in the transmitting coil can not only enhance the magnetic flux but also applies a strong and uniform magnetic field distribution around the core. Ansoft hfss is then used to analyze the performance of two coupling coils designed to be resonated at the same frequency. The distribution of magnetic field strength and coupling efficiency is modeled and characterized. High-performance bio-compatible MEMS coils were fabricated on a glass wafer by thick glue photolithography and electroplating technique. We measured a peak value of energy transfer at the resonant frequency of 23 MHz, and the coupling efficiency is higher than 10% within the distance of 10-20 cm by sweeping frequencies from 1 MHz to 200 MHz. Experiments also show that the resonant coupling efficiency is not much affected by the relative position of the two coils in a large range.

  12. Development of characterization tools for reliability testing of micro-electro-mechanical system actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Norman F.; Eaton, William P.; Tanner, Danelle M.; Allen, James J.

    1999-08-01

    Characterization tools have been developed to study the performance characteristics and reliability of surface micromachined actuators. These tools include: (1) the ability to electrically stimulate or stress the actuator, (2) the capability to visually inspect the devices in operation, (3) a method for capturing operational information, and (4) a method to extract performance characteristics from the operational information. Additionally, a novel test structure has been developed to measure electrostatic forces developed by a comb drive actuator.

  13. Miniaturization Science for Space: Lubrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) for Space Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-15

    this study , the vapor phase lubrication of interacting gold surfaces has been investigated on the atomic and molecular level using the quartz crystal...LIMITATION 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON UNCLASSIFIED OF ABSTRACT OF PAGES Scott Perry, PhD a, REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE UTUT 11 19b...Accomplishments/New Findings (09/01/04-8/31/05) 4.1 Overview of Contact Current and Adhesion Studies SAMs of five different thiol molecules have been

  14. Failure analysis of radio frequency (rf) micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walraven, Jeremy A.; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Sloan, Lynn R.; Hietala, Susan L.; Tigges, Chris P.; Dyck, Christopher W.

    2001-10-01

    MEMS are rapidly emerging as critical components in the telecommunications industry. This enabling technology is currently being implemented in a variety of product and engineering applications. MEMS are currently being used as optical switches to reroute light, tunable filters, and mechanical resonators. Radio frequency (RF) MEMS must be compatible with current Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) processing technologies for maximum integration levels. The RF MEMS switch discussed in this paper was fabricated using various layers of polyimide, silicon oxynitride (SiON), gold, and aluminum monolithically fabricated on a GaAs substrate. Fig. 1 shows a metal contacting series switch. This switch consists of gold signal lines (transmission lines), and contact metallization. SiON was deposited to form the fixed-fixed beam, and aluminum was deposited to form the top actuation electrode. To ensure product performance and reliability, RF MEMS switches are tested at both the wafer and package levels. Various processing irregularities may pass the visual inspection but fail electrical testing. This paper will focus on the failure mechanisms found in the first generation of RF MEMS developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Various tools and techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), resistive contrast imaging (RCI), focused ion beam (FIB), and thermally-induced voltage alteration (TIVA) have been employed to diagnose the failure mechanisms. The analysis performed using these tools and techniques led to corrective actions implemented in the next generation of RF MEMS metal contacting series switches.

  15. Novel Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) Packaging for the Skin of the Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrin, M. Ann; Osiander, Robert; Lehtonen, John; Farrar, Dawnielle; Douglas, Donya; Swanson, Ted

    2004-01-01

    This paper includes a discussion of the novel packaging techniques that are needed to place MEMS based thermal control devices on the skin of various satellites, eliminating the concern associated with potential particulates &om integration and test or the launch environment. Protection of this MEMS based thermal device is achieved using a novel polymer that is both IR transmissive and electrically conductive. This polymer was originally developed and qualified for space flight application by NASA at the Langley Research Center. The polymer material, commercially known as CPI, is coated with a thin layer of ITO and sandwiched between two window-like frames. The packaging of the MEMS based radiator assembly offers the benefits of micro-scale devices in a chip on board fashion, with the level of protection generally found in packaged parts.

  16. The Potential of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems and Nanotechnology for the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship ( QSAR ) model . The QSAR model calculates the proper composition of the polymer-carbon black matrix...example, the BEI Gyrochip Model QRS11 from Systron Donner Inertial Division has a startup time of less than 1 second, a Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF... modeling from many equations per atom to a few lines of code. This approach is amenable to parallel processing. Nevertheless, their programs require

  17. Virtual Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple-reflection photograph in Fig. 1 was taken in an elevator on board the cruise ship Norwegian Jade in March 2008. Three of the four walls of the elevator were mirrored, allowing me to see the combination of two standard arrangements of plane mirrors: two mirrors set at 90 degrees to each other and two parallel mirrors. Optical phenomena…

  18. Virtual Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple-reflection photograph in Fig. 1 was taken in an elevator on board the cruise ship Norwegian Jade in March 2008. Three of the four walls of the elevator were mirrored, allowing me to see the combination of two standard arrangements of plane mirrors: two mirrors set at 90 degrees to each other and two parallel mirrors. Optical phenomena…

  19. MEMS Inertial Sensors-Based Multi-Loop Control Enhanced by Disturbance Observation and Compensation for Fast Steering Mirror System.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Mao, Yao; Ren, Ge

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, an approach to improve the disturbance suppression performance of a fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors is proposed. The disturbance observation and compensation (DOC) control method is recommended to enhance the classical multi-loop feedback control (MFC) for line-of-sight (LOS) stabilization in the FSM system. MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes have been used in the FSM system tentatively to implement MFC instead of fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOG) because of its smaller, lighter, cheaper features and gradually improved performance. However, the stabilization performance of FSM is still suffering a large number of mechanical resonances and time delay induced by a low CCD sampling rate, which causes insufficient error attenuation when suffering uncertain disturbances. Thus, in order to make further improvements on the stabilization performance, a cascaded MFC enhanced by DOC method is proposed. The sensitivity of this method shows the significant improvement of the conventional MFC system. Simultaneously, the analysis of stabilization accuracy is also presented. A series of comparative experimental results demonstrate the disturbance suppression performance of the FSM control system based on the MEMS inertial sensors can be effectively improved by the proposed approach.

  20. MEMS Inertial Sensors-Based Multi-Loop Control Enhanced by Disturbance Observation and Compensation for Fast Steering Mirror System

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chao; Mao, Yao; Ren, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to improve the disturbance suppression performance of a fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors is proposed. The disturbance observation and compensation (DOC) control method is recommended to enhance the classical multi-loop feedback control (MFC) for line-of-sight (LOS) stabilization in the FSM system. MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes have been used in the FSM system tentatively to implement MFC instead of fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOG) because of its smaller, lighter, cheaper features and gradually improved performance. However, the stabilization performance of FSM is still suffering a large number of mechanical resonances and time delay induced by a low CCD sampling rate, which causes insufficient error attenuation when suffering uncertain disturbances. Thus, in order to make further improvements on the stabilization performance, a cascaded MFC enhanced by DOC method is proposed. The sensitivity of this method shows the significant improvement of the conventional MFC system. Simultaneously, the analysis of stabilization accuracy is also presented. A series of comparative experimental results demonstrate the disturbance suppression performance of the FSM control system based on the MEMS inertial sensors can be effectively improved by the proposed approach. PMID:27854293

  1. A nano-scale mirror-like surface of Ti-6Al-4V attained by chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenliang, Liang; Weili, Liu; Shasha, Li; Hui, Kong; Zefang, Zhang; Zhitang, Song

    2016-05-01

    Metal Ti and its alloys have been widely utilized in the fields of aviation, medical science, and micro-electro-mechanical systems, for its excellent specific strength, resistance to corrosion, and biological compatibility. As the application of Ti moves to the micro or nano scale, however, traditional methods of planarization have shown their short slabs. Thus, we introduce the method of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to provide a new way for the nano-scale planarization method of Ti alloys. We obtain a mirror-like surface, whose flatness is of nano-scale, via the CMP method. We test the basic mechanical behavior of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) in the CMP process, and optimize the composition of CMP slurry. Furthermore, the possible reactions that may take place in the CMP process have been studied by electrochemical methods combined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An equivalent circuit has been built to interpret the dynamic of oxidation. Finally, a model has been established to explain the synergy of chemical and mechanical effects in the CMP of Ti-6Al-4V. Project supported by the National Major Scientific and Technological Special Project during the Twelfth Five-year Plan Period of China (Grant No. 2009ZX02030-1), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51205387), the Support by Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 11nm0500300), and the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 14XD1425300).

  2. Virtual Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple-reflection photograph in Fig. 1 was taken in an elevator on board the cruise ship Norwegian Jade in March 2008. Three of the four walls of the elevator were mirrored, allowing me to see the combination of two standard arrangements of plane mirrors: two mirrors set at 90° to each other and two parallel mirrors. Optical phenomena of this complexity are most easily approached by the Method of Virtual Mirrors.

  3. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.; Bender, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for "X" and "Y" tilts of the mirror only. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time.

  4. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  5. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  6. Discrete control of linear distributed systems with application to the deformable primary mirror of a large orbiting telescope. Ph.D. Thesis - Rhode Island Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creedon, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    The results are presented of a detailed study of the discrete control of linear distributed systems with specific application to the design of a practical controller for a plant representative of a telescope primary mirror for an orbiting astronomical observatory. The problem of controlling the distributed plant is treated by employing modal techniques to represent variations in the optical figure. Distortion of the mirror surface, which arises primarily from thermal gradients, is countered by actuators working against a backing structure to apply a corrective force distribution to the controlled surface. Each displacement actuator is in series with a spring attached to the mirror by means of a pad intentionally introduced to restrict the excitation of high-order modes. Control is exerted over a finite number of the most significant modes.

  7. Chiral mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-06-01

    Mirrors are used in telescopes, microscopes, photo cameras, lasers, satellite dishes, and everywhere else, where redirection of electromagnetic radiation is required making them arguably the most important optical component. While conventional isotropic mirrors will reflect linear polarizations without change, the handedness of circularly polarized waves is reversed upon reflection. Here, we demonstrate a type of mirror reflecting one circular polarization without changing its handedness, while absorbing the other. The polarization-preserving mirror consists of a planar metasurface with a subwavelength pattern that cannot be superimposed with its mirror image without being lifted out of its plane, and a conventional mirror spaced by a fraction of the wavelength from the metasurface. Such mirrors enable circularly polarized lasers and Fabry-Pérot cavities with enhanced tunability, gyroscopic applications, polarization-sensitive detectors of electromagnetic waves, and can be used to enhance spectroscopies of chiral media.

  8. Design of optical mirror structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.

    1971-01-01

    The structural requirements for large optical telescope mirrors was studied with a particular emphasis placed on the three-meter Large Space Telescope primary mirror. Analysis approaches through finite element methods were evaluated with the testing and verification of a number of element types suitable for particular mirror loadings and configurations. The environmental conditions that a mirror will experience were defined and a candidate list of suitable mirror materials with their properties compiled. The relation of the mirror mechanical behavior to the optical performance is discussed and a number of suitable design criteria are proposed and implemented. A general outline of a systematic method to obtain the best structure for the three-meter diffraction-limited system is outlined. Finite element programs, using the STRUDL 2 analysis system, were written for specific mirror structures encompassing all types of active and passive mirror designs. Parametric studies on support locations, effects of shear deformation, diameter to thickness ratios, lightweight and sandwich mirror configurations, and thin shell active mirror needs were performed.

  9. Mirror agnosia.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; Altschuler, E L; Hillyer, S

    1997-05-22

    Normal people rarely confuse the mirror image of an object with a real object so long as they realize they are looking into a mirror. We report a new neurological sign, 'mirror agnosia', following right parietal lesions in which this ability is severely compromised. We studied four right hemisphere stroke patients who had left visual field 'neglect'. i.e. they were indifferent to objects in their left visual field even though they were not blind. We then placed a vertical parasagittal mirror on each patients' right so that they could clearly see the reflection of objects placed in the (neglected) visual field. When shown a candy or pen on their left, the patients kept banging their hand into the mirror or groped behind it attempting to grab the reflection; they did not reach for the real object on the left, even though they were mentally quite lucid and knew they were looking into a mirror. Remarkably, all four patients kept complaining that the object was 'in the mirror', 'outside my reach' or 'behind the mirror'. Thus, even the patients' ability to make simple logical inferences about mirrors has been selectively warped to accommodate the strange new sensory world that they now inhabit. The finding may have implications for understanding how the brain creates representations of mirror reflections.

  10. Mirror agnosia.

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, V S; Altschuler, E L; Hillyer, S

    1997-01-01

    Normal people rarely confuse the mirror image of an object with a real object so long as they realize they are looking into a mirror. We report a new neurological sign, 'mirror agnosia', following right parietal lesions in which this ability is severely compromised. We studied four right hemisphere stroke patients who had left visual field 'neglect'. i.e. they were indifferent to objects in their left visual field even though they were not blind. We then placed a vertical parasagittal mirror on each patients' right so that they could clearly see the reflection of objects placed in the (neglected) visual field. When shown a candy or pen on their left, the patients kept banging their hand into the mirror or groped behind it attempting to grab the reflection; they did not reach for the real object on the left, even though they were mentally quite lucid and knew they were looking into a mirror. Remarkably, all four patients kept complaining that the object was 'in the mirror', 'outside my reach' or 'behind the mirror'. Thus, even the patients' ability to make simple logical inferences about mirrors has been selectively warped to accommodate the strange new sensory world that they now inhabit. The finding may have implications for understanding how the brain creates representations of mirror reflections. PMID:9178535

  11. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.; Bender, D.A.

    1994-10-04

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for ''X'' and ''Y'' tilts of the mirror only is disclosed. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time. 4 figs.

  12. The design and simulation of single detector MIR spectrometer based on MEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhong-wei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Zeng, Tian-ling; Wei, Kang-lin

    2011-08-01

    Infrared (IR) spectrometers are very important optical equipments that can be used in industry, science, medicine, agriculture, biology and food safety etc., and the market is growing. However, most traditional IR spectrometers, such as Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) that based on Michelson interferometer principle and scanning monochromator that based on grating scanning, are expensive, relative large volume, and stationary, which can't meet the requirements of specific application such as rapidity, special environment and some special samples. To overcome these drawbacks, innovatory technology-micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology was used in micro IR spectrometers in the past few years. And several prototypes and products that based on several operational principles have been emerged. In this paper, a novel IR micro spectrometer which based on MEMS technology and used single element detector was presented over a wide spectral range (from 2500nm to 5000nm) in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength regime, and the optical system of it was designed on the basis of traditional scanning monochromator principle. In the optical system, there is a highlighted characteristic that dual spherical focus mirror was used to focus the diffraction light of the diffraction grating, which improved the spectral resolution of the optical system. Finally, using Zemax optical software, three torsion angle locations were selected to simulate the optical system of the spectrometer with the slit's size 0.1mm×1mm. The simulation result indicated that in the whole wavelength range the spectral resolution of the optical system was less than 30nm, and a high accuracy MIR spectrometer with compact volume will be realized in future hopefully.

  13. Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Deformable mirrors of a proposed type would be equipped with relatively-large-stroke microscopic piezoelectric actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes. These mirrors would be members of the class of MEMS-DM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror) devices, which offer potential for a precise optical control in adaptive-optics applications in such diverse fields as astronomy and vision science. The proposed mirror would be fabricated, in part, by use of a membrane-transfer technique. The actuator design would contain bimorph-type piezoelectric actuators.

  14. Slumped mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteancu, Mircea; Dragan, Dorin; Dragan, Olivier; Miron, Andrei; Stanescu, Octavian

    2008-02-01

    The authors discusse the construction of slumped mirrors, their fabrication and testing (polishing and lapping). An important topic of the discussion is thermal fabrication of mirrors by using of matrixes. One of the authors of the entry is combining astronomy and aquariums construction.

  15. Magic Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    "Magic mirrors" were so named because, when they were positioned to throw a reflected patch of sunlight on a nearby wall, this area contained an outline of a design cast on the back of the (bronze) mirror. Investigations begun in the 19th century showed that this was a response to heavy localized pressures exerted on the face of the thin mirror…

  16. Magic Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    "Magic mirrors" were so named because, when they were positioned to throw a reflected patch of sunlight on a nearby wall, this area contained an outline of a design cast on the back of the (bronze) mirror. Investigations begun in the 19th century showed that this was a response to heavy localized pressures exerted on the face of the thin mirror…

  17. Shell Separation for Mirror Replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century - including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. To reduce the cost of mirror fabrication, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed replication techniques, the machinery, and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors. Optics replication uses reusable forms, called mandrels, to make telescope mirrors ready for final finishing. MSFC optical physicist Bill Jones monitors a device used to chill a mandrel, causing it to shrink and separate from the telescope mirror without deforming the mirror's precisely curved surface.

  18. Large deformation of uniaxially loaded slender microbeams on the basis of modified couple stress theory: Analytical solution and Galerkin-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2017-09-01

    Large deformation regime of micro-scale slender beam-like structures subjected to axially pointed loads is of high interest to nanotechnologists and applied mechanics community. Herein, size-dependent nonlinear governing equations are derived by employing modified couple stress theory. Under various boundary conditions, analytical relations between axially applied loads and deformations are presented. Additionally, a novel Galerkin-based assumed mode method (AMM) is established to solve the highly nonlinear equations. In some particular cases, the predicted results by the analytical approach are also checked with those of AMM and a reasonably good agreement is reported. Subsequently, the key role of the material length scale on the load-deformation of microbeams is discussed and the deficiencies of the classical elasticity theory in predicting such a crucial mechanical behavior are explained in some detail. The influences of slenderness ratio and thickness of the microbeam on the obtained results are also examined. The present work could be considered as a pivotal step in better realizing the postbuckling behavior of nano-/micro- electro-mechanical systems consist of microbeams.

  19. Einstein's Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-10-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity.1-4 The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a constant velocity.5 Einstein showed an intriguing fact that the usual law of reflection would not hold in the case of a uniformly moving mirror, that is, the angles of incidence and reflection of the light would not equal each other. Later on, it has been shown that the law of reflection at a moving mirror can be obtained in various alternative ways,6-10 but none of them seems suitable for bringing this interesting subject into the high school classroom.

  20. Mirror, Mirror on the Wall...?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaster, Gail

    1979-01-01

    The study determined the value of using a mirror for speech teaching by recording manner, place, voicing, and blend errors produced by 27 hearing-impaired children (5-13 years old) while imitating consonant-vowel syllables under three conditions (audition alone, audition plus direct vision, and audition plus vision using a mirror). (Author)

  1. Optical properties of relativistic plasma mirrors.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, H; Monchocé, S; Kahaly, S; Bonnaud, G; Martin, Ph; Quéré, F

    2014-03-11

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for an entirely new class of optical components based on plasmas. The most promising of these are known as plasma mirrors, formed when an intense femtosecond laser ionizes a solid surface. These mirrors specularly reflect the main part of a laser pulse and can be used as active optical elements to manipulate its temporal and spatial properties. Unfortunately, the considerable pressures exerted by the laser can deform the mirror surface, unfavourably affecting the reflected beam and complicating, or even preventing, the use of plasma mirrors at ultrahigh intensities. Here we derive a simple analytical model of the basic physics involved in laser-induced deformation of a plasma mirror. We validate this model numerically and experimentally, and use it to show how such deformation might be mitigated by appropriate control of the laser phase.

  2. Optical properties of relativistic plasma mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, H.; Monchocé, S.; Kahaly, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Martin, Ph.; Quéré, F.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for an entirely new class of optical components based on plasmas. The most promising of these are known as plasma mirrors, formed when an intense femtosecond laser ionizes a solid surface. These mirrors specularly reflect the main part of a laser pulse and can be used as active optical elements to manipulate its temporal and spatial properties. Unfortunately, the considerable pressures exerted by the laser can deform the mirror surface, unfavourably affecting the reflected beam and complicating, or even preventing, the use of plasma mirrors at ultrahigh intensities. Here we derive a simple analytical model of the basic physics involved in laser-induced deformation of a plasma mirror. We validate this model numerically and experimentally, and use it to show how such deformation might be mitigated by appropriate control of the laser phase. PMID:24614748

  3. Mirror masturbation.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, P A; Coen, S J

    1984-04-01

    A case is presented of an analytic patient who reported adolescent and adult mirror masturbation in the context of a struggle for psychic differentiation and separation from his mother. A model is elaborated in which magical manipulation and transformation of the self- and object images are facilitated by masturbatory mirror play. The role of impersonation and transformation as another man or woman is explored. Visual hunger, traumatic overstimulation, incestuous games, and fear of actually committing incest with a seductive parent are proposed as genetic contributants . Mirror masturbation is understood as a dramatic play which defends against castration anxiety and attempts to master childhood sexual overstimulation by active repetition and re-creation.

  4. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1987-11-10

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors. 5 figs.

  5. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1986-03-21

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors.

  6. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    A mirror mount (10) is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror (28) while keeping the location of a point (56) on the surface of the mirror (28) fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount (10). Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders (30,32) that are bearing (52) mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell (42) that is air bearing (72,74) mounted to move between a clamp (60) and an upper pedestal bearing (44). The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell (42) lie upon the point (56). Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror (28) by a pair of pitch paddles (34) and a pair of roll paddles (36) that are independently and separately moved by control rods (76,80) driven by motors (78,82).

  7. Robust control of the Multiple Mirror Telescope adaptive secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.; Grocott, Simon C.

    1999-08-01

    For force-actuated, thin facesheet mirrors, structural flexibility within the control bandwidth calls for a new approach to adaptive optics. Dynamic influence functions are used to characterize the influence of each actuator on the entire surface of a deformable mirror. A linearized model of atmospheric distortion is combined with these dynamic influence functions to produce a dynamic reconstructor for providing actuator inputs in response to wavefront sensor measurements. This dynamic reconstructor is recognized as an optimal-control problem. A hierarchic control scheme that seeks to emulate the quasistatic control approach that is generally used in adaptive optics is compared with the dynamic reconstruction technique. Although dynamic reconstruction requires somewhat more computational power to implement, it achieves better performance with less power usage, and is less sensitive to errors than the hierarchic technique because it incorporates a dynamic model of the deformable mirror.

  8. Optical characterization of MEMS micro-mirror arrays using digital holographic Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor: a new technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Igor; Dooley, Sarah B.

    2011-05-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Micro-Mirror Arrays (MMAs) are widely used in advanced laser beam steering systems and as adaptive optical elements. The new generation of MEMS MMAs are fabricated by bulk micromachining of a single Silicon-On-Insulator wafer. Optical characterization of MEMS MMAs can be done by direct detection of the reflected beams or by using more advanced wavefront measuring techniques, such as a phase-shifting interferometer or Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. In the case of an interferometer, the geometry of the tested MMA can be calculated after performing the phase unwrapping procedure, which can be quite complex. In the latter case of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, careful selection of a highquality array of microlenses is required in order to match the capabilities of the wavefront sensor to the measured wavefront produced by the MMA. The presented digital Shack-Hartmann technique is a modified approach for wavefront characterization based on digital processing of the interferometer data. The optical wavefront from the tested MMA is mixed with the reference wavefront. Then the recorded interference intensity image is Fourier transformed producing digitally synthesized images of the optical beams in the far field. Therefore, the digital version of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor does not require the use of an array of microlenses and is primarily limited by the detector array geometry. One can digitally generate any configuration of subapertures corresponding to various geometries of microlenses. However, this new technique does require coherent optical mixing of the two wavefronts in order to produce the interference pattern.

  9. Morphing of Segmented Bimorph Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Bastaits, Renaud; Preumont, André

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric turbulence compensation for the next generation of terrestrial telescopes (30-40 m diameter) will require deformable mirrors of increasing size and a number of actuators reaching several thousands. However, the mere extrapolation of existing designs leads to complicated and extremely expensive mirrors. This article discusses an alternative solution based on the use of segmented identical hexagonal bimorph mirrors. This allows to indefinitely increase the degree of correction while maintaining the first mechanical resonance at the level of a single segment, and shows an increase in price only proportional to the number of segments. Extensive simulations using random turbulent screens show that the segmentation produces only moderate reductions of the Strehl number, compared to a monolithic bimorph mirror with the same number of actuators (S = 0.86 instead of S = 0.89 in this study).

  10. Mirror Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Under a NASA contract, MI-CVD developed a process for producing bulk silicon carbide by means of a chemical vapor deposition process. The technology allows growth of a high purity material with superior mechanical/thermal properties and high polishability - ideal for mirror applications. The company employed the technology to develop three research mirrors for NASA Langley and is now marketing it as CVD SILICON CARBIDE. Its advantages include light weight, thermal stability and high reflectivity. The material has nuclear research facility applications and is of interest to industrial users of high power lasers.

  11. Control of solid-state lasers using an intra-cavity MEMS micromirror.

    PubMed

    Lubeigt, Walter; Gomes, Joao; Brown, Gordon; Kelly, Andrew; Savitski, Vasili; Uttamchandani, Deepak; Burns, David

    2011-01-31

    High reflectivity, electrothermal and electrostatic MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) micromirrors were used as a control element within a Nd-doped laser cavity. Stable continuous-wave oscillation of a 3-mirror Nd:YLF laser at a maximum output power of 200 mW was limited by thermally-induced surface deformation of the micromirror. An electrostatic micromirror was used to induce Q-switching, resulting in pulse durations of 220 ns - 2 μs over a repetition frequency range of 6 kHz - 40 kHz.

  12. Mirror Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of making a mirror support comprising a composite, the composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes, wherein at least two of the plurality of carbon nanotubes are bonded to each other through a bridging moiety bound to each of the two carbon nanotubes, and a laminate comprising the composite.

  13. Conicoid Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castano, Diego J.; Hawkins, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The first-order equation relating object and image location for a mirror of arbitrary conic-sectional shape is derived. It is also shown that the parabolic reflecting surface is the only one free of aberration and only in the limiting case of distant sources. (Contains 3 figures.)

  14. Topology optimization design of a space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiazhen; Jiang, Bo

    2015-11-01

    As key components of the optical system of the space optical remote sensor, Space mirrors' surface accuracy had a direct impact that couldn't be ignored of the imaging quality of the remote sensor. In the future, large-diameter mirror would become an important trend in the development of space optical technology. However, a sharp increase in the mirror diameter would cause the deformation of the mirror and increase the thermal deformation caused by temperature variations. A reasonable lightweight structure designed to ensure the optical performance of the system to meet the requirements was required. As a new type of lightweight approach, topology optimization technology was an important direction of the current space optical remote sensing technology research. The lightweight design of rectangular mirror was studied. the variable density method of topology optimization was used. The mirror type precision of the mirror assemblies was obtained in different conditions. PV value was less than λ/10 and RMS value was less than λ/50(λ = 632.8nm). The results show that the entire The mirror assemblies can achieve a sufficiently high static rigidity, dynamic stiffness and thermal stability and has the capability of sufficient resistance to external environmental interference . Key words: topology optimization, space mirror, lightweight, space optical remote sensor

  15. Focus tunable mirrors made by ionic polymer-metal composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chung-Min; Su, Guo-Dung

    2014-09-01

    In order to meet modern requirement, electronic products are made smaller and thinner. We used deformable mirrors (DMs) in optical systems that can make camera modules thinner and lighter in electronic products. An Ionic-Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) plays the critical role in our design of deformable mirrors. It has good bending feature and can be driven by low voltage (usually less than 5 volts). Other technologies such as liquid lenses, MEMS deformable mirrors, and liquid crystal lens, all need higher voltage to reach similar optical power of IPMC. After fabrication of IPMC deformable mirrors, we used PDMS on one surface to improve the surface roughness before reflective metal is deposited. Key characteristics of IPMC deformable mirror are demonstrated in the paper. By coating a silver layer on the smoothed IPMC surface, the reflection is up to 90%. From simulation results, the zoom ratio of this module can be expected 1.8 times. Experimentally, the deformable mirror can be changed from flat to 65 diopters (m-1) by only 3 volts. In this paper, we demonstrated a reflective optical zoom module with three mirrors and two deformable mirrors.

  16. Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim; Rose, M. Annette

    1998-01-01

    Students use tables of anthropometric data, their own measurements, underlying principles of physics, and math to solve a problem. The problem is to determine the height of a wall mirror, and where to mount it, so that 90% of the clientele can view their entire length without stretching or bending. (Author)

  17. Haltere Mechanics and Mechanical Logic for Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Scale Bio-inspired Navigation Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    world’s smallest angular rate sensor. 2. Approach Proprioceptive sensors enable mobility control for mm-scale robotics and are essential to achieving...scale flapping wing platforms requires three types of proprioceptive control. These include a means of orientation control, three-axis relative...The MEMS ARS are designed to be capable of being monolithically integrated with piezoelectric mobility actuators, thus enabling direct proprioceptive

  18. Applicability of time-averaged holography for micro-electro-mechanical system performing non-linear oscillations.

    PubMed

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas; Palevicius, Arvydas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas

    2014-01-21

    Optical investigation of movable microsystem components using time-averaged holography is investigated in this paper. It is shown that even a harmonic excitation of a non-linear microsystem may result in an unpredictable chaotic motion. Analytical results between parameters of the chaotic oscillations and the formation of time-averaged fringes provide a deeper insight into computational and experimental interpretation of time-averaged MEMS holograms.

  19. Activation of microcomponents with light for micro-electro-mechanical systems and micro-optical-electro-mechanical systems applications.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Robert C; Tait, R Niall; Ubriaco, Mike

    2002-04-20

    We examine the light-activation properties of micrometer-sized gear structures fabricated with polysilicon surface micromachining techniques. The gears are held in place on a substrate through a capped anchor post and are free to rotate about the post. The light-activation technique is modeled on photon radiation pressure, and the equation of motion of the gear is solved for this activation technique. Experimental measurements of torque and damping are found to be consistent with expected results for micrometer-scale devices. Design optimization for optically actuated microstructures is discussed.

  20. Applicability of Time-Averaged Holography for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Performing Non-Linear Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas; Palevicius, Arvydas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas

    2014-01-01

    Optical investigation of movable microsystem components using time-averaged holography is investigated in this paper. It is shown that even a harmonic excitation of a non-linear microsystem may result in an unpredictable chaotic motion. Analytical results between parameters of the chaotic oscillations and the formation of time-averaged fringes provide a deeper insight into computational and experimental interpretation of time-averaged MEMS holograms. PMID:24451467

  1. Detection of sub-ppm traces of aqueous heavy-metal ions using micro-electro-mechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahafrooz, Amir; Pourkamali, Siavash

    2009-11-01

    Capacitive silicon micro-mechanical resonators have been utilized in this work as ultra-sensitive mass sensors for the detection of trace amounts of copper ions in water samples. The approach is based on the reduction of aqueous metal ions by the silicon in a resonant structure and consequently deposition of a very thin metal layer on the resonator surface changing its resonant frequency. Measurements demonstrate successful detection of sub-ppm concentrations of copper(II) ions in water. Relatively large frequency shifts (hundreds of ppm) have been measured for resonators exposed to copper concentrations as low as 4 µM (0.26 ppm). An analytical model for the resonant frequency of the resulting complex beams has been derived and used to calculate the thickness of the deposited copper layer based on the measured frequency shifts. The model shows that the measured frequency shifts correspond to only a few atomic layers of copper (as thin as ~7 Å) deposited on the resonator surfaces. This corresponds to a mass sensitivity of more than 4000 Hz µg-1 cm-2 which is much larger than the highest mass sensitivities measured for quartz crystal microbalances.

  2. Acceleration of dormant storage effects to address the reliability of silicon surface micromachined Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Candelaria, Sam A.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Duesterhaus, Michelle Ann; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Timpe, Shannon J.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Skousen, Troy J.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Parson, Ted Blair

    2006-06-01

    Qualification of microsystems for weapon applications is critically dependent on our ability to build confidence in their performance, by predicting the evolution of their behavior over time in the stockpile. The objective of this work was to accelerate aging mechanisms operative in surface micromachined silicon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting surfaces that are stored for many years prior to use, to determine the effects of aging on reliability, and relate those effects to changes in the behavior of interfaces. Hence the main focus was on 'dormant' storage effects on the reliability of devices having mechanical contacts, the first time they must move. A large number ({approx}1000) of modules containing prototype devices and diagnostic structures were packaged using the best available processes for simple electromechanical devices. The packaging processes evolved during the project to better protect surfaces from exposure to contaminants and water vapor. Packages were subjected to accelerated aging and stress tests to explore dormancy and operational environment effects on reliability and performance. Functional tests and quantitative measurements of adhesion and friction demonstrated that the main failure mechanism during dormant storage is change in adhesion and friction, precipitated by loss of the fluorinated monolayer applied after fabrication. The data indicate that damage to the monolayer can occur at water vapor concentrations as low as 500 ppm inside the package. The most common type of failure was attributed to surfaces that were in direct contact during aging. The application of quantitative methods for monolayer lubricant analysis showed that even though the coverage of vapor-deposited monolayers is generally very uniform, even on hidden surfaces, locations of intimate contact can be significantly depleted in initial concentration of lubricating molecules. These areas represent defects in the film prone to adsorption of water or contaminants that can cause movable structures to adhere. These analysis methods also indicated significant variability in the coverage of lubricating molecules from one coating process to another, even for identical processing conditions. The variability was due to residual molecules left in the deposition chamber after incomplete cleaning. The coating process was modified to result in improved uniformity and total coverage. Still, a direct correlation was found between the resulting static friction behavior of MEMS interfaces, and the absolute monolayer coverage. While experimental results indicated that many devices would fail to start after aging, the modeling approach used here predicted that all the devices should start. Adhesion modeling based upon values of adhesion energy from cantilever beams is therefore inadequate. Material deposition that bridged gaps was observed in some devices, and potentially inhibits start-up more than the adhesion model indicates. Advances were made in our ability to model MEMS devices, but additional combined experimental-modeling studies will be needed to advance the work to a point of providing predictive capability. The methodology developed here should prove useful in future assessments of device aging, however. Namely, it consisted of measuring interface properties, determining how they change with time, developing a model of device behavior incorporating interface behavior, and then using the age-aware interface behavior model to predict device function.

  3. Toward a large lightweight mirror for AO: development of a 1m Ni coated CFRP mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. J.; Doel, A. P.; Brooks, D.; Strangwood, M.

    2008-07-01

    We present our recent developments towards the construction of a large, thin, single-piece mirror for adaptive optics (AO). Our current research program aims to have completed fabrication and testing of a 1m diameter, nickel coated carbon-fibre reinforced cyanate ester resin mirror by the last quarter of 2009. This composite mirror material is being developed to provide a lightweight and robust alternative to thin glass shell mirrors, with the challenge of future large deformable mirrors such as the 2.5m M4 on the E-ELT in mind. A detailed analysis of the material properties of test mirror samples is being performed at the University of Birmingham (UK), the first results of which are discussed and presented here. We discuss the project progress achieved so far, including fabrication of the 1m flat moulds for the replication process, manufacturing and testing methods for 20 cm diameter sample mirrors and system simulations.

  4. Micromachined, Electrostatically Deformable Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Randall K.; Wang, Paul K. C.; Miller, Linda M.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Agronin, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachined, closed-loop, electrostatically actuated reflectors (microCLEARs) provide relatively simple and inexpensive alternatives to large, complex, expensive adaptive optics used to control wavefronts of beams of light in astronomy and in experimental laser weapons. Micromachining used to make deformable mirror, supporting structure, and actuation circuitry. Development of microCLEARs may not only overcome some of disadvantages and limitations of older adaptive optics but may also satisfy demands of potential market for small, inexpensive deformable mirrors in electronically controlled film cameras, video cameras, and other commercial optoelectronic instruments.

  5. Mirror monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2014-12-02

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing a mirror electron monochromator (MirrorChrom) attachment to new and retrofitted electron microscopes (EMs) for improving the energy resolution of the EM from the characteristic range of 0.2-0.5 eV to the range of 10-50 meV. This improvement will enhance the characterization of materials by imaging and spectroscopy. In particular, the monochromator will refine the energy spectra characterizing materials, as obtained from transmission EMs [TEMs] fitted with electron spectrometers, and it will increase the spatial resolution of the images of materials taken with scanning EMs (SEMs) operated at low voltages. EOI’s MirrorChrom technology utilizes a magnetic prism to simultaneously deflect the electron beam off the axis of the microscope column by 90° and disperse the electrons in proportional to their energies into a module with an electron mirror and a knife-edge. The knife-edge cuts off the tails of the energy distribution to reduce the energy spread of the electrons that are reflected, and subsequently deflected, back into the microscope column. The knife-edge is less prone to contamination, and thereby charging, than the conventional slits used in existing monochromators, which improves the reliability and stability of the module. The overall design of the MirrorChrom exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in order to maintain the beam brightness – a parameter that impacts how well the electron beam can be focused downstream onto a sample. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate monochromator architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between energy resolution and beam current to achieve the optimum design for three particular applications with market potential: increasing the spatial resolution of low voltage SEMs, increasing the energy resolution of low voltage TEMs (beam energy of 5-20 keV), and increasing the energy resolution of conventional TEMs (beam

  6. Mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    The physics of VUV and x-ray reflection is reviewed. The main functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are stated briefly and include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image of the source, focusing, and collimation. Methods of fabrication of optical surfaces are described. Types of imperfections are discussed, including, aberrations, surface figure inaccuracy, roughness, and degradation due to use. Calculation of the photon beam thermal load, including computer modelling, is considered. 50 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  7. The opto-mechanical performance prediction of thin mirror segments for E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijenhuis, Jan; Braam, Ben; Hamelinck, Roger

    2016-07-01

    The mirror segments for the E-ELT and TLT are nearly equal in size and shape (hexagonal, 1.2 m over flat sides). They are very thin (about 50 mm) compared to their size. Supporting these mirrors and obtaining high optical performance is a challenge from design and manufacturing point of view. TNO has designed and build (together with VDL-ETG) three identical prototypes for supporting the mirror segments of the E-ELT. These mirror segments vary in size. Hence the gravity induced deformation of the mirror segments will vary from mirror to mirror segment when no measures are taken. The paper will concentrate on the design and analysis of the design features within the support structure to minimize the mirror deformation due to gravity. These features concern passive and active means to influence the mirror segment shape and to compensate for deformation differences.

  8. Design Considerations for a Highly Segmented Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    Design issues for a 30-m highly segmented mirror are explored, with emphasis on parametric models of simple, inexpensive segments. A mirror with many small segments offers cost savings through quantity production and permits high-order active and adaptive wave-front corrections. For a 30-m f/1 .5 paraboloidal mirror made of spherical, hexagonal glass segments, with simple warping harnesses and three-point supports, the maximum segment diameter is ~100 mm, and the minimum segment thickness is ~5 mm. Large-amplitude, low-order gravitational deformations in the mirror cell can be compensated if the segments are mounted on a plate floating on astatic supports. Because gravitational deformations in the plate are small, the segment actuators require a stroke of only a few tens of micrometers, and the segment positions can be measured by a wave-front sensor.

  9. The influence of the secondary mirror position and the lightweight primary mirror on optical performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. J.; Sim, S. H.; Chung, C. S.; Kang, E. C.; Kim, J. K.

    2006-01-01

    To design a laser beam director (LBD), we considered the ritchey chretien system with a hyperbolic mirror surface. The aperture sizes of the designed primary mirror and secondary mirror were 800 mm and 120 mm, respectively, and the obstruction ratio was 0.3. Energy distribution on the target surface was studied in terms of a spot diagram and encircled energy in order to investigate the optical performance of the LBD system. As the LBD system was designed to focus on the various positions of target by varying the position of the secondary mirror, we developed the computer program called LOSA (Large Optical System Assessment) to investigate the influence of the position of the secondary mirror on optical performance. To reduce weight of the primary mirror of the LBD, we also considered the primary mirror of a double arch shape with parabolic contours. Deformation of the primary mirror caused by gravity was not rotationally symmetrical about the mirror axis. We also used the LOSA program to analyze the influence of the light weight primary mirror on optical performance, and finally determined the optimum structure of the primary mirror.

  10. Chinese "Magic" Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinson, Derek B.

    1992-01-01

    Chinese "magic" mirrors are made from bronze with the front side a mirror and the reverse side a molded image. When light is reflected from the mirror,the image on the reverse side appears. Discusses reflections of conventional mirrors, possible explanations for the magic mirror phenomenon, and applications of the phenomenon to…

  11. Chinese "Magic" Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinson, Derek B.

    1992-01-01

    Chinese "magic" mirrors are made from bronze with the front side a mirror and the reverse side a molded image. When light is reflected from the mirror,the image on the reverse side appears. Discusses reflections of conventional mirrors, possible explanations for the magic mirror phenomenon, and applications of the phenomenon to…

  12. Large thin adaptive x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Thompson, Samantha; Brooks, David; Yao, Jun; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the progress made in a proof of concept study and recent results of a research program into large active x-ray mirrors that is part of the UK Smart X-ray Optics project. The ultimate aim is to apply the techniques of active/adaptive optics to the next generation of nested shell astronomical X-ray space telescopes. A variety of deformable mirror technologies are currently available, the most promising of which for active X-ray mirrors are probably unimorph and bimorph piezoelectric mirrors. In this type of mirror one or more sheets of piezoelectric material are bonded to or coated with a passive reflective layer. On the back or between the piezoceramic layer/layers are series of electrodes. Application of an electric field causes the piezoelectric material to undergo local deformation thus changing the mirror shape. Starting in 2005 a proof of concept active mirror research program has been undertaken. This work included modelling and development of actively controlled thin shell mirrors. Finite element models of piezo-electric actuated mirrors have been developed and verified against experimental test systems. This has included the modelling and test of piezo-electric hexagonal unimorph segments. Various actuator types and low shrinkage conductive bonding methods have been investigated and laboratory tests of the use of piezo-electric actuators to adjust the form of an XMM-Newton space telescope engineering model mirror shell have been conducted and show that movement of the optics at the required level is achievable. Promising technological approaches have been identified including moulded piezo-ceramics and piezo-electrics fibre bundles.

  13. Investigations and experiments of a new multi-layer complex liquid-cooled mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuling; Cheng, Zuhai; Zhang, Yaoning; Sun, Feng; Yu, Wenfeng

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a new multi-layer complex liquid-cooled Si mirror with 3 cooling ducts in Archimedes spirals. Utilizing the ANSYS program, the structure of the mirror is optimized and the thermal deformation model of the mirror is simulated. The simulation results show that the mirror has the following advantages: very small amount of surface deformation, uniform distribution of temperature and surface deformation, and fast surface shape restoration. The results of the experiments of thermal deformation and the surface restoration are accurately mapped to the simulation results.

  14. Communication Applications for Deformable Mirror Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    identical hexagonal micromirrors [after Michalicek. et al.. 1995] 4.7 (a) Optical system design for micromirror array (or DMD ) interfacing...4.7. (a) Optical system design for micromirror array (or DMD ) interfacing [after Gustafson. et al.. August 1993], (b) experimental arrangement used...modulators", Proc. SPIE, Vol. 1150, pp. 86-103, 1989. 6. L.J. Hornbeck, "Current status of the digital micromirror device ( DMD ) for projection

  15. Dynamic Characterization of Thin Deformable PVDF Mirror

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    r3cos(3θ) Z19 = (5r2 − 4)r3sin(3θ) Z20 = (15r4 − 20r2 + 6)r2cos(2θ) 132 Z21 = (15r4 − 20r2 + 6)r2sin(2θ) Z22 = (35r6 − 60r4 + 30r2 − 4)rcos(θ) Z23...35r6 − 60r4 + 30r2 − 4)rsin(θ) Z24 = 70r8 − 140r6 + 90r4 − 20r2 + 1 Z25 = r5cos(5θ) Z26 = r5sin(5θ) Z27 = (6r2 − 5)r4cos(4θ) Z28 = (6r2 − 5)r4sin(4θ...135 Vita Eric M. Trad was raised in the suburbs of Chicago, IL . He graduated from Plainfield High School, Plainfield, IL , in 1999. Upon graduation

  16. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  17. Multilayer Active Shell Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, John

    This thesis presents a novel active mirror technology based on carbon fiber composites and replication manufacturing processes. Multiple additional layers are implemented into the structure in order to provide the reflective layer, actuation capabilities and electrode routing. The mirror is thin, lightweight, and has large actuation capabilities. These features, along with the associated manufacturing processes, represent a significant change in design compared to traditional optics. Structural redundancy in the form of added material or support structures is replaced by thin, unsupported lightweight substrates with large actuation capabilities. Several studies motivated by the desire to improve as-manufactured figure quality are performed. Firstly, imperfections in thin CFRP laminates and their effect on post-cure shape errors are studied. Numerical models are developed and compared to experimental measurements on flat laminates. Techniques to mitigate figure errors for thicker laminates are also identified. A method of properly integrating the reflective facesheet onto the front surface of the CFRP substrate is also presented. Finally, the effect of bonding multiple initially flat active plates to the backside of a curved CFRP substrate is studied. Figure deformations along with local surface defects are predicted and characterized experimentally. By understanding the mechanics behind these processes, significant improvements to the overall figure quality have been made. Studies related to the actuation response of the mirror are also performed. The active properties of two materials are characterized and compared. Optimal active layer thicknesses for thin surface-parallel schemes are determined. Finite element simulations are used to make predictions on shape correction capabilities, demonstrating high correctabiliity and stroke over low-order modes. The effect of actuator saturation is studied and shown to significantly degrade shape correction performance. The

  18. Lightweight ZERODUR: Validation of Mirror Performance and Mirror Modeling Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Tony; Stahl, H. Philip; Westerhoff, Thomas; Valente, Martin; Brooks, Thomas; Eng, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming spaceborne missions, both moderate and large in scale, require extreme dimensional stability while relying both upon established lightweight mirror materials, and also upon accurate modeling methods to predict performance under varying boundary conditions. We describe tests, recently performed at NASA's XRCF chambers and laboratories in Huntsville Alabama, during which a 1.2 m diameter, f/1.2988% lightweighted SCHOTT lightweighted ZERODUR(TradeMark) mirror was tested for thermal stability under static loads in steps down to 230K. Test results are compared to model predictions, based upon recently published data on ZERODUR(TradeMark). In addition to monitoring the mirror surface for thermal perturbations in XRCF Thermal Vacuum tests, static load gravity deformations have been measured and compared to model predictions. Also the Modal Response(dynamic disturbance) was measured and compared to model. We will discuss the fabrication approach and optomechanical design of the ZERODUR(TradeMark) mirror substrate by SCHOTT, its optical preparation for test by Arizona Optical Systems (AOS). Summarize the outcome of NASA's XRCF tests and model validations

  19. Lightweight ZERODUR®: Validation of mirror performance and mirror modeling predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Anthony B.; Stahl, H. Philip; Westerhoff, Thomas; Valente, Martin; Brooks, Thomas; Eng, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming spaceborne missions, both moderate and large in scale, require extreme dimensional stability while relying both upon established lightweight mirror materials, and also upon accurate modeling methods to predict performance under varying boundary conditions. We describe tests, recently performed at NASA’s XRCF chambers and laboratories in Huntsville Alabama, during which a 1.2m diameter, f/1.29 88% lightweighted SCHOTT lightweighted ZERODUR® mirror was tested for thermal stability under static loads in steps down to 230K. Test results are compared to model predictions, based upon recently published data on ZERODUR®. In addition to monitoring the mirror surface for thermal perturbations in XRCF Thermal Vacuum tests, static load gravity deformations have been measured and compared to model predictions. Also the Modal Response (dynamic disturbance) was measured and compared to model. We will discuss the fabrication approach and optomechanical design of the ZERODUR® mirror substrate by SCHOTT, its optical preparation for test by Arizona Optical Systems (AOS), and summarize the outcome of NASA’s XRCF tests and model validations.

  20. Solar simulator mirror refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leverton, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Solar simulator mirrors were refurbished. Two different refurbishment methods were employed. In the first, the electroformed mirror replica was removed from the casting and replaced with a new mirror replica. In the second, only the aluminized surface, with its protective overcoat, was removed from the mirror and replaced after cleaning of the nickel surface.

  1. Electrodes patterning on ionic polymer metal composite for making smooth surface on tunable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2012-10-01

    Deformable mirror is a very important reflective component in optical system, which can vary the focal length while the surface deform. Nowadays several type of material were used as deformable mirror, such as liquid lens and MEMS deformable mirror. MEMS deformable mirror have been developed in our group and shows the potential. However, the problem of high actuation voltage is not easy to solve. In this thesis, we proposed using low voltage applied material, which is called Ioic-Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) with the advantage of low applied voltage but high actuation performance. Arbitrary-shaped electrode IPMC was successfully fabricated by simply covering a shadow mask during electroless plating. Maximum central displacement of ellipsoid-shaped electrode IPMC can be achieved up to 350 μm under 2.5 volts applied. We believe this technique can be used in optical system as a deformable mirror in the future.

  2. Mirror symmetry in emergent gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2017-09-01

    Given a six-dimensional symplectic manifold (M , B), a nondegenerate, co-closed four-form C introduces a dual symplectic structure B ˜ = * C independent of B via the Hodge duality *. We show that the doubling of symplectic structures due to the Hodge duality results in two independent classes of noncommutative U (1) gauge fields by considering the Seiberg-Witten map for each symplectic structure. As a result, emergent gravity suggests a beautiful picture that the variety of six-dimensional manifolds emergent from noncommutative U (1) gauge fields is doubled. In particular, the doubling for the variety of emergent Calabi-Yau manifolds allows us to arrange a pair of Calabi-Yau manifolds such that they are mirror to each other. Therefore, we argue that the mirror symmetry of Calabi-Yau manifolds is the Hodge theory for the deformation of symplectic and dual symplectic structures.

  3. Quality evaluation of spaceborne SiC mirrors (I): analytical examination of the effects on mirror accuracy by variation in the thermal expansion property of the mirror surface.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Masaki; Imai, Tadashi; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Yui, Yukari; Tange, Yoshio; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakagawa, Takao; Enya, Keigo

    2013-07-10

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency has studied a large-scale lightweight mirror constructed of reaction-bonded silicon carbide-based material as a key technology in future astronomical and earth observation missions. The authors selected silicon carbide as the promising candidate due to excellent characteristics of specific stiffness and thermal stability. One of the most important technical issues for large-scale ceramic components is the uniformity of the material's property, depending on part and processing. It might influence mirror accuracy due to uneven thermal deformation. The authors conducted systematic case studies for the conditions of CTE by finite element analysis to know the typical influence of material property nonuniformity on mirror accuracy and consequently derived a comprehensive empirical equation for the series of CTE's main factors. In addition, the authors computationally reproduced the mirror accuracy profile of a small prototype mirror shown in cryogenic testing and hereby verified wide-range practical computational evaluation technology of mirror accuracy.

  4. Thermal deformation of concentrators in an axisymmetric temperature field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bairamov, R.; Machuev, Y. I.; Nazarov, A.; Sokolov, Y. V.; Solodovnikova, L. A.; Fokin, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    Axisymmetric thermal deformations of paraboloid mirrors, due to heating, are examined for a mirror with a optical axis oriented toward the Sun. A governing differential equation is derived using Mushtari-Donnel-Vlasov simplifications, and a solution is presented which makes it possible to determine the principal deformation characteristics.

  5. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis.

  6. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1995-03-21

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis. 7 figures.

  7. Fast tip-tilt segment alignment for segmented mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvarč, Jure

    2016-07-01

    A method for fast identification of segments and alignment of the segmented mirrors has been developed and applied for the deformable mirror of the WHT AO system (NAOMI) and for the GTC 36-segment primary mirror. By moving each segment by a known but different amount and in a different direction it is possible to identify many segments simultaneously using a pattern-matching algorithm which finds spots that have moved by a segment-specific vector from one image to another. The method does not need any special optical setup. The applicability of the method for the segmented primary mirrors of future telescopes is discussed.

  8. More Toda-like (0,2) mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Guo, Jirui; Sharpe, Eric; Wu, Ruoxu

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we extend our previous work to construct (0 , 2) Toda-like mirrors to A/2-twisted theories on more general spaces, as part of a program of understanding (0,2) mirror symmetry. Specifically, we propose (0 , 2) mirrors to GLSMs on toric del Pezzo surfaces and Hirzebruch surfaces with deformations of the tangent bundle. We check the results by comparing correlation functions, global symmetries, as well as geometric blowdowns with the corresponding (0 , 2) Toda-like mirrors. We also briefly discuss Grassmannian manifolds.

  9. Bimorph mirrors for adaptive optics in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaluf, D.; Bastaits, R.; Wang, K.; Horodinca, M.; Burda, I.; Martic, G.; Preumont, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses a concept of bimorph deformable mirror used in adaptive optics to compensate for manufacturing errors, gravity release and thermal distortion affecting large lightweight mirrors in space telescopes. The mirror consists of a single-crystal Silicon wafer (D=75 mm t=500μm) covered with an optical coating on the front side and an array of 25 independent PZT actuators acting in d31 mode on the back side. The mirror is mounted on an isostatic support with three linear PZT actuators controlling the rigid-body motion. The paper presents the experimental results obtained with this design and a new, more compact alternative.

  10. Performance analysis of a mirror by numerical iterative method.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwijong; Cho, Myung; Lee, Dae-Hee; Moon, Bongkon

    2014-12-29

    Zernike polynomials are generally used to predict the optical performance of a mirror. However, it can also be done by a numerical iterative method. As piston, tip, tilt, and defocus (P.T.T.F) aberrations can be easily removed by optical alignment, we iteratively used a rotation transformation and a paraboloid graph subtraction for removal of the aberrations from a raw deformation of the optical surface through a Finite Element Method (FEM). The results of a 30 cm concave circular mirror corrected by the iterative method were almost the same as those yielded by Zernike polynomial fitting, and the computational time was fast. In addition, a concave square mirror whose surface area is π was analyzed in order to visualize the deformation maps of a general mirror aperture shape. The iterative method can be applicable efficiently because it does not depend on the mirror aperture shape.

  11. Mirror Neurons and Mirror-Touch Synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Linkovski, Omer; Katzin, Naama; Salti, Moti

    2016-05-30

    Since mirror neurons were introduced to the neuroscientific community more than 20 years ago, they have become an elegant and intuitive account for different cognitive mechanisms (e.g., empathy, goal understanding) and conditions (e.g., autism spectrum disorders). Recently, mirror neurons were suggested to be the mechanism underlying a specific type of synesthesia. Mirror-touch synesthesia is a phenomenon in which individuals experience somatosensory sensations when seeing someone else being touched. Appealing as it is, careful delineation is required when applying this mechanism. Using the mirror-touch synesthesia case, we put forward theoretical and methodological issues that should be addressed before relying on the mirror-neurons account. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Light, Color, and Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiburzi, Brian; Tamborino, Laurie; Parker, Gordon A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which students can use flashlights, mirrors, and colored paper to discover scientific principles regarding optics. Addresses the concepts of angles of incidence and reflection, colored vs. white light, and mirror images. (WRM)

  13. Lightweight Mirror Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell; Aurigema, Andrew; Badger, Steve; Bartels, Mel; Brodhacker, K. Lisa; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Chen, Peter; Connelley, Mike; Davis, David; Ghigo, Mauro; Jones, Greg; Liu, Tong; Mendex, Eric; Pareschi, Giovanni; Richardson, Terry; Rowe, David; Schmidt, Josh; Shah, Kiran; Villasenor, Efrain

    2009-05-01

    One goal of the Alt-Az Initiative is the development of transportable 1.5 meter class research telescopes. To this end, several Initiative members are developing lightweight, low cost, primary mirrors. Both multiple and single mirror telescope configurations are being considered. Thin meniscus mirrors are being slumped, and approaches for actively correcting these thin mirrors are being investigated. Sandwich mirrors with glass spacers and others with Foamglas cores are under development. Nanocomposite, polyurethane, and glass replica mirrors, which do not require optical grinding or figuring during production, are being evaluated. Finally, spin-cast polymer mirrors are being explored. Although several of these mirror developments are still very experimental, and some may only be useful in optically undemanding applications such as on-axis aperture near IR photometry or low resolution spectroscopy, it is our hope that these efforts will enable the development of transportable, low cost, lightweight, 1.5 meter class telescopes.

  14. Lightweight Zerodur Mirror Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    17 September 1981 Contract Expiration Date: 15 May 1982 Short Title of Work: Lightweight Zerodur Mirror Technology Program Code Number: 1LIO Period of...iepRA LIGHTWEIGHT ZERODUR MIRROR TECHNOLOGY 21 Sep 81 - 21 May 82 1. PERFORMING 0,10. REPORT NUMWERn 15512 7: AUTHOR(*J S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMSER[JlII...1S. KIEV WORDS (Continue on reverse aide If necesery 1nd Identify b? block nwi nhm ) Zerodur Lightweight Mirrors Mirror Blank Fabrication Frit

  15. Durable solar mirror films

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Mark B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Hebrink, Timothy J.; Katare, Rajesh K.; Jing, Naiyong; North, Diane; Peterson, Eric M.

    2017-02-14

    The present disclosure generally relates to durable solar mirror films, methods of making durable solar mirror films, and constructions including durable solar mirror films. In one embodiment, the present disclosure relates to a solar mirror film comprising: a multilayer optical film layer including having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion of less than about 30 ppm per percent relative humidity; and a reflective layer having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion.

  16. Rollable Thin-Shell Nanolaminate Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Barbee, Troy, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A class of lightweight, deployable, thin-shell, curved mirrors with built-in precise-shape-control actuators is being developed for high-resolution scientific imaging. This technology incorporates a combination of advanced design concepts in actuation and membrane optics that, heretofore, have been considered as separate innovations. These mirrors are conceived to be stowed compactly in a launch shroud and transported aboard spacecraft, then deployed in outer space to required precise shapes at much larger dimensions (diameters of the order of meters or tens of meters). A typical shell rollable mirror structure would include: (1) a flexible single- or multiple-layer face sheet that would include an integrated reflective surface layer that would constitute the mirror; (2) structural supports in the form of stiffeners made of a shape-memory alloy (SMA); and (3) piezoelectric actuators. The actuators, together with an electronic control subsystem, would implement a concept of hierarchical distributed control, in which (1) the SMA actuators would be used for global shape control and would generate the large deformations needed for the deployment process and (2) the piezoelectric actuators would generate smaller deformations and would be used primarily to effect fine local control of the shape of the mirror.

  17. Anastigmatic three-mirror telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D. G. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A three-mirror telescope for extraterrestrial observations is described. An ellipsoidal primary mirror, a hyperbolic secondary mirror, and an ellipsoidal tertiary mirror, produce an image in a conveniently located finite plane for viewing.

  18. Lightweight active controlled primary mirror technology demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzinghi, P.; Bratina, V.; Ferruzzi, D.; Gambicorti, L.; Simonetti, F.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.; Salinari, P.; Lisi, F.; Olivier, M.; Bursi, A.; Gallieni, D.; Biasi, R.; Pereira, J.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacturing and test of a ground demonstrator of an innovative technology able to realize lightweight active controlled space-borne telescope mirror. This analysis is particularly devoted to applications for a large aperture space telescope for advanced LIDAR, but it can be used for any lightweight mirror. For a space-borne telescope the mirror weight is a fundamental parameter to be minimized (less than 15 Kg/m2), while maximizing the optical performances (optical quality better than λ/3). In order to guarantee these results, the best selected solution is a thin glass primary mirror coupled to a stiff CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) panel with a surface active control system. A preliminary design of this lightweight structure highlighted the critical areas that were deeply analyzed by the ground demonstrator: the 1 mm thick mirror survivability on launch and the actuator functional performances with low power consumption. To preserve the mirror glass the Electrostatic Locking technique was developed and is here described. The active optics technique, already widely used for ground based telescopes, consists of a metrology system (wave front sensor, WFS), a control algorithm and a system of actuators to slightly deform the primary mirror and/or displace the secondary, in a closed-loop control system that applies the computed corrections to the mirror's optical errors via actuators. These actuators types are properly designed and tested in order to guarantee satisfactory performances in terms of stroke, force and power consumption. The realized and tested ground demonstrator is a square CFRP structure with a flat mirror on the upper face and an active actuator beneath it. The test campaign demonstrated the technology feasibility and robustness, supporting the next step toward the large and flat surface with several actuators.

  19. Stress analysis of spherical-mirror panels

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, V J; Sanford, R J

    1982-04-01

    An experimental analysis is reported of the stresses that occur in elastically deformed, spherically curved glass mirrors for solar energy applications. Bending and membrance stresses generated in forming the glass and the effects of springback are analyzed. In addition, thermal stresses caused by focusing the sun's rays on a small region of the mirrors are analyzed. Methods used in the analysis included the use of grids, photoelasticity, and strain gages. Results of the analysis are compared with a theoretical analysis performed by Shelltech Associates in a parallel effort.

  20. Final Results of the Ball AMSD Beryllium Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaney, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The 1.4-meter semi-rigid, beryllium Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) mirror completed initial cryogenic testing at Marshall's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) in August of 2003. Results of this testing show the mirror to have very low cryogenic surface deformation and possess exceptional figure stability. Subsequent to this cryogenic testing beryllium was selected as the material of choice for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) multi-segment primary mirror. Therefore, the AMSD mirror was sent back to SSG-Tinsley for additional ambient polishing to JWST requirements. The mirror was successfully polished to less than 22nm rms of low frequency error. Those additional results are presented with comparisons to the JWST requirements.