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Sample records for micro-focus x-ray source

  1. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  2. Versatile atomic force microscopy setup combined with micro-focused X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodskyy, T. Tholapi, R.; Liefeith, L.; Hansen, W.; Zozulya, A. V. Fester, M.; Sprung, M.

    2015-06-15

    Micro-focused X-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron sources offer new perspective of studying strains and processes at nanoscale. Atomic force microscope setup combined with a micro-focused synchrotron beam allows precise positioning and nanomanipulation of nanostructures under illumination. In this paper, we report on integration of a portable commercial atomic force microscope setup into a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline. Details of design, sample alignment procedure, and performance of the setup are presented.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Composites Using Micro-Focused X-Ray CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Sunao; Aoki, Takuya; Iwahori, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2005-04-09

    Micro-Focused X-Ray CT (Micro CT) Scanner has been used for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials at Institute of Space Technology and Aeronautics, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Some successful examples of NDE of composites using Micro CT will be presented in this presentation. One example is debonding of fiber/matrix interface, splitting of fiber bundle and matrix crack in carbon/carbon composite. Another example is NDE of stitched CFRP. It was easy to evaluate state of stitch fiber. It has been demonstrated that Micro CT is a powerful device for detecting small damage/flaw in composites, such as delamination, matrix crack and void.

  4. 3D Medipix2 detector characterization with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Mac Raighne, A.; Parkes, C.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Fleta, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Alianelli, L.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Marchal, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2011-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photodiode detectors offer advantages over standard planar photodiodes in a wide range of applications. The main advantage of these sensors for X-ray imaging is their reduced charge sharing between adjacent pixels, which could improve spatial and spectral resolution. However, a drawback of 3D sensors structures is the loss of detection efficiency due to the presence in the pixel structure of heavily doped electrode columns which are insensitive to X-ray. In this work two types of 3D silicon detectors: n-type wafer with hole collecting readout-columns (N-TYPE) and p-type wafer with electron collecting readout-columns (P-TYPE), bump-bounded to a Medipix2 read-out chip were characterized with a 14.5 keV micro-focused X-ray beam from a synchrotron. Measurements of the detection efficiency and the charge sharing were performed at different bias voltages and Medipix2 energy thresholds and compared with those of a standard planar silicon sensor.

  5. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  6. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  7. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  8. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  9. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  10. Characterisation of edgeless technologies for pixellated and strip silicon detectors with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Christophersen, M.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gimenez, E.; Kachkanov, V.; Kalliopuska, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Maneuski, D.; Phlips, B. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Zain, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced edge or ``edgeless'' detector design offers seamless tileability of sensors for a wide range of applications from particle physics to synchrotron and free election laser (FEL) facilities and medical imaging. Combined with through-silicon-via (TSV) technology, this would allow reduced material trackers for particle physics and an increase in the active area for synchrotron and FEL pixel detector systems. In order to quantify the performance of different edgeless fabrication methods, 2 edgeless detectors were characterized at the Diamond Light Source using an 11 μm FWHM 15 keV micro-focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were: a 150 μm thick silicon active edge pixel sensor fabricated at VTT and bump-bonded to a Medipix2 ROIC; and a 300 μm thick silicon strip sensor fabricated at CIS with edge reduction performed by SCIPP and the NRL and wire bonded to an ALiBaVa readout system. Sub-pixel resolution of the 55 μm active edge pixels was achieved. Further scans showed no drop in charge collection recorded between the centre and edge pixels, with a maximum deviation of 5% in charge collection between scanned edge pixels. Scans across the cleaved and standard guard ring edges of the strip detector also show no reduction in charge collection. These results indicate techniques such as the scribe, cleave and passivate (SCP) and active edge processes offer real potential for reduced edge, tiled sensors for imaging detection applications.

  11. In situ micro-focused X-ray beam characterization with a lensless camera using a hybrid pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Kachatkou, Anton; Marchal, Julien; van Silfhout, Roelof

    2014-03-01

    Results of studies on micro-focused X-ray beam diagnostics using an X-ray beam imaging (XBI) instrument based on the idea of recording radiation scattered from a thin foil of a low-Z material with a lensless camera are reported. The XBI instrument captures magnified images of the scattering region within the foil as illuminated by the incident beam. These images contain information about beam size, beam position and beam intensity that is extracted during dedicated signal processing steps. In this work the use of the device with beams for which the beam size is significantly smaller than that of a single detector pixel is explored. The performance of the XBI device equipped with a state-of-the-art hybrid pixel X-ray imaging sensor is analysed. Compared with traditional methods such as slit edge or wire scanners, the XBI micro-focused beam characterization is significantly faster and does not interfere with on-going experiments. The challenges associated with measuring micrometre-sized beams are described and ways of optimizing the resolution of beam position and size measurements of the XBI instrument are discussed.

  12. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources

  13. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  14. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  15. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  16. X-ray spectra of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the various classes of Galactic X-ray sources are discussed, with particular emphasis on binary sources containing an accreting compact object, where post-emission scattering in an accretion disk often prevents the initially produced X-radiation from being observed directly. Theoretical interpretations and X-ray observations are considered for the cataclysmic variables, binary systems with a white dwarf as the compact object and which suffer relatively less from Thomson scattering, and the similar phenomenological spectral characteristics of the bulge sources, including soft transients, bursters and steady X-ray sources with thermal spectra, thought to represent an accreting neutron star, are pointed out. The spectral characteristics of X-ray pulsars in accreting binary systems (rather than the Crab pulsar, which is losing rotational kinetic energy with time) are then presented and interpreted in terms of accretion in the polar regions, and mechanisms for the newly discovered X-ray emission from late-type RS CVn stars are considered.

  17. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  18. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, Jeanette

    2012-07-01

    The first black hole was observed almost 50 years ago, ˜ 1 year after Sco X-1 (although its nature was not confirmed for ˜ 11 years). Observations of black holes have been ongoing since then, falling in to two distinct categories; stellar-mass (sMBHs; 3 - 80 M_{⊙}) and super-massive black holes (10^6 - 10^9 M_⊙). The missing link between these two types, intermediate mass black holes, has been the target of many searches due to their cosmological implications. Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) have been proposed to harbor such objects, but recent observational evidence has strongly suggested that the majority contain sMBHs. However, a handful of the brightest ULXs are so luminous that they defy this explanation. Here we will discuss the nature of both standard ULXs and this new bright subgroup of this population.

  19. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  20. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  1. Micro-Focus X-Ray Tomography Study of the Microstructure and Morphometry of the Eggshell of Ostriches (Struthio Camerus).

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Bronwyn; Steyn, Lindi; Bam, Lunga; Olivier, Adriaan J; Devey, Richard; Maina, John N

    2016-08-01

    In ostrich husbandry, economic losses have mainly been attributed to low hatchability of eggs, which has mostly been attributed to the structure of the eggshell. The main aim of this study was to investigate the morphology and the morphometry of the ostrich eggshell using micro-focus X-ray computer tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The mean weight and volume of the eggs were 1,312 ± 56SE g and 1,333 ± 44SE cm(3) , respectively. The mean thickness and the mean surface area of the eggshell was 1.83 ± 0.10SE mm and 619 ± 15SE cm(2) respectively and the mean total number of pores in the shell was 40,596 ± 1832SE. No significant correlations were found between the thickness of the shell and the weight of the eggs, the volume of the egg and the thickness of the shell, the diameter of the pores and the number of pores, the volume of the pores and the number of pores or the surface area of the pores and the number of pores. The mean diameters of the pores on the blunt (air cell) - (0.02 ± 0.04SE mm) and the sharp (0.26 ± 0.36SE mm) parts of the eggshell were significantly different (P = 0.0001) while the mean volumes and the surface areas of the pores in these parts were not significantly different (P = 0.203 and P = 0.089, respectively). The sizes of the pores differed in different parts of the eggshell, which consisted mainly of tightly arranged mammillary cones that that fused to the palisade columns. The external surface of the ostrich eggshell was covered by a cuticle. Anat Rec, 299:1015-1026, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 10(33) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  3. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 1033 ergs-1) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  4. X-ray source considerations in operation of digital detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Terrence; Wendt, Scott

    2014-02-18

    Digital Detector Arrays (DDA) are increasingly replacing film in radiography applications. Standards exist for characterizing the performance of these detectors, and for using them in specific inspections. We have observed that the selection of the x-ray source to use with these detectors can also have a significant influence on the performance. We look at differences between standard, and micro-focus x-ray tubes, and end-window vs. side-window micro-focus tubes. We find that for best results, one must calibrate the DDA for the source settings used during an inspection. This is particularly true for variable-focus sources.

  5. Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chuanxiang; Huang, Wenhui; Li, Renkai; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Shi, Jiaru; Du, Qiang; Yu, Peicheng; Chen, Huaibi; Du, Taibin; Cheng, Cheng; Lin, Yuzheng

    2009-09-01

    We proposed the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray (TTX) source as an ultra-fast, high flux source for advanced X-ray imaging studies and applications. A linac system, which consists of an S-band photocathode RF gun, a SLAC type 3 m traveling wave tube and two X-band structures, generates ultra-short, high brightness electron pulses to scatter with tera-watt femto-second laser pulses. A compact low energy electron storage ring is also designed to dramatically enhance the average X-ray flux. In this paper, we present the simulation studies and optimized parameters of the electron and X-ray pulses. The construction and commissioning status of TTX is also reported.

  6. Spectra of cosmic x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-02-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term spectroscopy as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  7. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  8. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  9. Spectra of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term "spectroscopy" as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  10. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  11. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  12. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  13. Improvement of the efficient referencing and sample positioning system for micro focused synchrotron X-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangenberg, T.; Göttlicher, J.; Steininger, R.

    2016-05-01

    An efficient referencing and sample positioning system is a basic tool for a micro focus beamline at a synchrotron. The seven years ago introduced command line based system was upgraded at SUL-X beamline at ANKA [1]. A new combination of current server client techniques offers direct control and facilitates unexperienced users the handling of this frequently used tool.

  14. Design of a carbon-nanotube yarn field emitter for micro-focus X-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2016-08-01

    The field-emission (F-E) characteristics of multi-walled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) yarn and its contribution to X-ray generation have been investigated in the current work. A dry spinning method was used to fabricateMWCNT yarn from superMWCNTs that had been fabricated by using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD). The F-E behavior of the MWCNT yarn followed the Fowler-Nordheim model. Compared to a MWCNT, the MWCNT yarn displayed a significant F-E capability in both the diode and the triode X-ray generation structures. The low-voltage F-E of the MWCNT yarn can be attributed to the field-enhancing effect of the yarn due to its shape and to the contribution of the high-aspect-ratio nanotubes that protrude from the sides of the yarn. The effect of filters on the development of X-ray images has also been demonstrated. The amount of exposure of the samples to X-rays was also manipulated. Results of this study indicate that the MWCNT yarn may be a good candidate for use in low-voltage F-E applications for X-ray imaging.

  15. Bending magnet source: A radiation source for X-ray phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, B. B.; Peele, A. G.; McMahon, P. J.; De Carlo, F.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-11-01

    The rapid development of electronic data processing and phase retrieval technique for image reconstruction leads to new opportunities in X-ray phase tomography. A range of radiographic and tomographic demonstrations have now been made, typically utilizing the coherent flux from an insertion device at a synchrotron or a micro-focus laboratory source. In this paper we demonstrate that useful results may be obtained using a bending magnet source at a synchrotron. In particular we show that the same beamline can be used to make and characterize a sample made by X-ray lithographic methods.

  16. Characterisation of strip silicon detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, L.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Fernandez-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Gallop, B.; Greenall, A.; Gregor, I.-M.; Hara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lohwasser, K.; Maneuski, D.; Nagorski, S.; Pape, I.; Phillips, P. W.; Sperlich, D.; Sawhney, K.; Soldevila, U.; Ullan, M.; Unno, Y.; Warren, M.

    2016-07-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity up to 6·1034 cm‑2s‑1. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb‑1 after ten years of operation, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand fluences to over 1·1016 1 MeV neq/cm2. In order to cope with the consequent increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (end-cap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). A resolution better than the inter strip pitch of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. The effect of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips was investigated in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stop regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch.

  17. Characterisation of strip silicon detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, L.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Fernandez-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Gallop, B.; Greenall, A.; Gregor, I.-M.; Hara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lohwasser, K.; Maneuski, D.; Nagorski, S.; Pape, I.; Phillips, P. W.; Sperlich, D.; Sawhney, K.; Soldevila, U.; Ullan, M.; Unno, Y.; Warren, M.

    2016-07-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity up to 6·1034 cm-2s-1. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb-1 after ten years of operation, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand fluences to over 1·1016 1 MeV neq/cm2. In order to cope with the consequent increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (end-cap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). A resolution better than the inter strip pitch of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. The effect of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips was investigated in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stop regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch.

  18. Mapping the metal uptake in plants from Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Allison

    2015-08-20

    Serpentine soil originates in the Earth’s mantle and contains high concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals. Although serpentine soil limits plant growth, endemic and adapted plants at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, located behind SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, can tolerate these conditions. Serpentine soil and seeds belonging to native California and invasive plants were collected at Jasper Ridge. The seeds were grown hydroponically and on serpentine and potting soil to examine the uptake and distribution of ions in the roots and shoots using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results were used to determine differences between serpentine-tolerant plants. Rye grown on potting soil was enriched in Ni, Fe, Mn, and Cr compared to purple needlegrass grown on serpentine soil. Serpentine vegetation equally suppressed the uptake of Mn, Ni, and Fe in the roots and shoots. The uptake of Ca and Mg affected the uptake of other elements such as K, S, and P.

  19. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  2. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  3. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  4. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  5. Observation of living cells by x-ray microscopy with a laser-plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomie, Toshihisa; Shimizu, Hazime; Majima, Toshikazu; Yamada, Mitsuo; Kanayama, Toshihiko; Yano, M.; Kondo, H.

    1991-12-01

    We studied laser-produced plasma as an x-ray source for x-ray microscopy. Using water- window x rays, contact x-ray images of living sea urchin sperm were taken by a 500 picosecond x-ray pulse. The resist relief was examined by atomic force microscope and informations characteristic of x-ray microscopy were obtained. The finest feature noticed in the x-ray image was 0.1 micrometers .

  6. Hard cosmic X-ray sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    A review of the observational status of X-ray sources detected in the 20 to 500 keV range is presented. Of the approximately 115 sources listed in the March 1972 edition of the UHURU 2-6 keV sky survey catalog, about 15 sources have been studied in hard X rays. Most of the data have been obtained from balloons, although the OSO-3, and more recently the OSO-7, have contributed. With the exception of CEN A, the SMC, and possibly M-87, all the sources detected at higher energies are galactic and heavily concentrated in the galactic plane. The Crab Nebula has been measured to about 500 keV in continuous emission and a component at the 33-msec pulsar period comprising about 20% of the total emission has been detected to 10 MeV. Objects such as SCO-1 and CYG-2 are characterized by an exponential spectrum, which varies over a 10-min time scale about a factor of two, and a flatter spectrum extending to above 40 keV which exhibits independent variability.

  7. Advanced High Brilliance X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Walter M.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility to dramatically increase the efficiency of laboratory based protein structure measurements through the use of polycapillary X-ray optics was investigated. This project initiated April 1, 1993 and concluded December 31, 1996 (including a no cost extension from June 31, 1996). This is a final report of the project. The basis for the project is the ability to collect X-rays from divergent electron bombardment laboratory X-ray sources and redirect them into quasiparallel or convergent (focused) beams. For example, a 0.1 radian (approx. 6 deg) portion of a divergent beam collected by a polycapillary collimator and transformed into a quasiparallel beam of 3 millradian (0.2 deg) could give a gain of 6(exp 2)/0.2(exp 2) x T for the intensity of a diffracted beam from a crystal with a 0.2 deg diffraction width. T is the transmission efficiency of the polycapillary diffraction optic, and for T=0.5, the gain would be 36/0.04 x O.5=45. In practice, the effective collection angle will depend on the source spot size, the input focal length of the optic (usually limited by the source spot-to-window distance on the x-ray tube) and the size of the crystal relative to the output diameter of the optic. The transmission efficiency, T, depends on the characteristics (fractional open area, surface roughness, shape and channel diameter) of the polycapillary optic and is typically in the range 0.2-0.4. These effects could substantially reduce the expected efficiency gain. During the course of this study, the possibility to use a weakly focused beam (0.5 deg convergence) was suggested which could give an additional 10-20 X efficiency gain for small samples . Weakly focused beams from double focusing mirrors are frequently used for macromolecular crystallography studies. Furthermore the crystals are typically oscillated by as much as 2 deg during each X-ray exposure in order to increase the reciprocal space (number of crystal planes) sampled and use of a slightly convergent

  8. The Integrated X-Ray Spectrum of Galactic Populations of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, R.; Becker, C. M.; Fabbiano, G.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the composite X-ray spectrum of a population of unresolved SSS's in a spiral galaxy such as our own or M31. The sources are meant to represent the total underlying population corresponding to all sources which have bolometric luminosities in the range of 10(exp 37) - 10(exp 38) ergs/s and kT on the order of tens of eV. These include close-binary supersoft sources, symbiotic novae, and planetary nebulae, for example. In order to determine whether the associated X-ray signal would be detectable, we also 'seed' the galaxy with other types of X-ray sources, specifically low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB's). We find that the total spectrum due to SSS's, LMXB's, and HMXB's exhibits a soft peak which owes its presence to the SSS population. Preliminary indications are that this soft peak may be observable.

  9. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  10. Ultra Luminous X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, N. A.; Godet, O.

    2015-12-01

    Ultra Luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are X-ray bright objects that are not coincident with the central nucleus of the host galaxy and which have luminosities that exceed the Eddington limit for a stellar mass black hole, typically L > 3 × 10^{39} erg s^{-1} for a black hole of 20 M_⊙. The nature of these objects is still unclear. However, it is possible that these sources do not form a single class of objects. Many ULXs may house stellar mass black holes accreting at super-Eddington rates, even if the physical mechanism for such high accretion rates is still not understood. Some ULXs may contain intermediate mass black holes (˜1 × 10^{2} - ˜1 × 10^{5} M_⊙). These elusive black holes are thought to be the building blocks of the more massive supermassive black holes, observed at the centre of many galaxies. Other ULXs may not be accreting black holes at all. Recent evidence for the different types of ULXs is presented in this paper.

  11. Compact X-ray sources: X-rays from self-reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangles, Stuart P. D.

    2012-05-01

    Laser-based particle acceleration offers a way to reduce the size of hard-X-ray sources. Scientists have now developed a simple scheme that produces a bright flash of hard X-rays by using a single laser pulse both to generate and to scatter an electron beam.

  12. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Parmee, R J; Milne, William I

    2016-02-26

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  13. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew T.; Parmee, R. J.; Milne, William I.

    2016-02-01

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  14. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Parmee, R J; Milne, William I

    2016-02-26

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices. PMID:26807781

  15. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Type 1 X-ray bursts, optical, infrared, and radio properties of the galactic bulge sources, are discussed. It was proven that these burst sources are neutron stars in low mass, close binary stellar systems. Several burst sources are found in globular clusters with high central densities. Optical type 1 X-ray bursts were observed from three sources. Type 2 X-ray bursts, observed from the Rapid Burster, are due to an accretion instability which converts gravitational potential energy into heat and radiation, which makes them of a fundamentally different nature from Type 1 bursts.

  16. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R.

    2014-07-01

    We make a new determination of the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of relative low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources based on a source sample derived from the XMM Slew Survey (XSS). The source population is comprised of coronally-active late-type stars and binaries with hard-band X-ray luminosities in the range 10^{28-32} erg s^{-1} and cataclysmic variables (magnetic and non-magnetic) with X-ray luminosities spanning the range 10^{30-34} erg s^{-1}. We use this new estimate of the XLF, to predict the 2-10 keV X-ray source counts on the Galactic Plane at faint fluxes and show that the result is fully consistent with the available observational constraints. Similarly the predicted surface brightness, both in the full 2-10 keV band and in a restricted 6-10 keV bandpass, due to the integrated emission of faint unresolved Galactic sources, is well matched to the observed intensity of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We find that the coronally-active sources make the dominant contribution to both the faint Galactic X-ray source counts and the GRXE.

  17. X-Ray Scattering Applications Using Pulsed X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B.C.

    1999-05-23

    Pulsed x-ray sources have been used in transient structural phenomena investigations for over fifty years; however, until the advent of synchrotrons sources and the development of table-top picosecond lasers, general access to ligh temporal resolution x-ray diffraction was relatively limited. Advances in diffraction techniques, sample excitation schemes, and detector systems, in addition to IncEased access to pulsed sources, have ld tO what is now a diverse and growing array of pulsed-source measurement applications. A survey of time-resolved investigations using pulsed x-ray sources is presented and research opportunities using both present and planned pulsed x-ray sources are discussed.

  18. X-ray reflectivity imager with 15 W power X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jinxing; Sakurai, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    X-ray reflectivity is usually used for the routine analysis of layered structures of uniform thin films. So far, the technique has some limitations in the application to more practical inhomogeneous/patterned samples. X-ray reflectivity imaging is recently developed technique and can give the reconstructed image from many X-ray reflection projections. The present article gives the instrumental details of the compact X-ray reflectivity imager. Though the power of X-ray source is only 15 W, it works well. The calibration of the system has been discussed, because it is particularly important for the present grazing incidence geometry. We also give a visualization example of the buried interface, physical meaning of the reconstructed image, and discussions about possibilities for improvement.

  19. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Yoshida, Tessei

    2013-03-20

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  20. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Roseanne

    2005-01-01

    One of the key accomplishments of the two preceding years was our development of an algorithm to select SSSs in external galaxies which have been observed by Chandra or XMM-Newton. By applying this algorithm to data from a number of galaxies, we discovered an extension of the class of SSSs to sources that are somewhat harder (100 - 300 eV, instead of tens of eV), but which are nevertheless much softer than canonical X-ray sources. We call these new sources quasisoft sources (QSSs). During this past year, we have built on and extended this work. We have (1) continued to identify SSSs and QSSs in external galaxies, (2) worked on models for the sources and find that black hole models seem promising for a subset of them, and (3) have studied individual systems, especially M101-ULX1. This special system has been observed as an SSS in its high &ate, with a luminosity in excess of 10(exp 41) erg/s. It has also been observed as a QSS when it is less luminous, and as a hard source in its low state. It is one of the best candidates to be an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. We have several papers in preparation. Below we list papers which are complete, including only new work and papers whose status has changed (e.g., been accepted for publication) since our last report. In addition, our work on QSSs has received some publicity. It was the subject of a Chandra press release and was picked up by several media outlets.

  1. Nonlinear X-Ray and Auger Spectroscopy at X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohringer, Nina

    2015-05-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) open the pathway to transfer non-linear spectroscopic techniques to the x-ray domain. A promising all x-ray pump probe technique is based on coherent stimulated electronic x-ray Raman scattering, which was recently demonstrated in atomic neon. By tuning the XFEL pulse to core-excited resonances, a few seed photons in the spectral tail of the XFEL pulse drive an avalanche of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering events, resulting in exponential amplification of the scattering signal by of 6-7 orders of magnitude. Analysis of the line profile of the emitted radiation permits to demonstrate the cross over from amplified spontaneous emission to coherent stimulated resonance scattering. In combination with statistical covariance mapping, a high-resolution spectrum of the resonant inelastic scattering process can be obtained, opening the path to coherent stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy. An extension of these ideas to molecules and a realistic feasibility study of stimulated electronic x-ray Raman scattering in CO will be presented. Challenges to realizing stimulated electronic x-ray Raman scattering at present-day XFEL sources will be discussed, corroborated by results of a recent experiment at the LCLS XFEL. Due to the small gain cross section in molecular targets, other nonlinear spectroscopic techniques such as nonlinear Auger spectroscopy could become a powerful alternative. Theory predictions of a novel pump probe technique based on resonant nonlinear Auger spectroscopic will be discussed and the method will be compared to stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy.

  2. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraenkel, Ben; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, A. Lane; Stodiek, Wolfgang; von Goeler, Schweickhard E.

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  3. Infrared observations of galactic bulge X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, P.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Nine unidentified galactic bulge X-ray sources, the recently identified X-ray burster MXB 1728-34, and two optically identified sources (Sco X-1 and MXB 1735-44) were observed with the NASA 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility. The data constrain both the presence of diffuse infrared sources near the X-ray positions and the flux of possible infrared counterparts. None of the nine unidentified sources lies within obscured globular clusters, although there is marginal evidence for diffuse infrared emission near 4U 1822-00 and 4U 1916-05. This implies that at most two additional luminous galactic bulge X-ray sources lie within undiscovered, obscured globular clusters. No infrared counterparts were detected for unidentified sources; the limits derived are consistent with all of the sources observed being similar to the low mass X-ray binary Sco X-1.

  4. Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

    2007-05-04

    Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

  5. Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Pierce, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS) is an astrophysics mission concept for measuring the polarization of X-ray sources at low energies below the C-K band (less than 277 eV). PLEXAS uses the concept of variations in the reflectivity of a multilayered X-ray telescope as a function of the orientation of an X-rays polarization vector with respect to the reflecting surface of the optic. By selecting an appropriate multilayer, and rotating the X-ray telescope while pointing to a source, there will be a modulation in the source intensity, as measured at the focus of the telescope, which is proportional to the degree of polarization in the source.

  6. Micropinch x-ray source and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurey, Anatoliy E.; Semyonov, Oleg G.; Tikhomirov, Adolf A.

    2000-11-01

    An experimental model of an industrial micropinch x-ray source is described on the basis of a low inductance vacuum spark. It was designed and tested for applications in x-ray lithography, x-ray microscopy, surface processing (micro-relief leveling) and structural modification of thin dielectric layers. The error analysis of proximity method and test results confirmed the adequacy of its application to produce microchips for the microelectronic industry with spatial resolution of < 0.1 (mu) . The x-ray microscopy of human and rabbit blood and tissue cells was performed using the proximity shadow printing method with the sensitive polymer detectors or resists.

  7. Study on the influence of leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) on the remineralization of enamel defects via micro-focus x-ray computed tomography and nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Bagheri G, Hossein; Sadr, Alireza; Espigares, Jorge; Hariri, Ilnaz; Nakashima, Syozi; Hamba, Hidenori; Shafiei, Farhad; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah; Tagami, Junji

    2015-06-04

    Regeneration of severely damaged enamel (e.g. deep demineralized lesions) is currently not possible, because the structural units of enamel crystal construction are removed after its maturation. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of surface impregnation by leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) on the remineralization of eroded enamel using micro-focus x-ray computed tomography (µCT). Fifteen bovine enamel blocks were embedded in resin and three zones (sound, demineralization, and remineralization) were defined on each specimen. Lesions were prepared by immersing the samples in demineralization solution for 7 d. The samples were soaked in distilled water or 60 or 120 µg mL(-1) solution of LRAP in water for 30 min. After the surface treatment, specimens were incubated in artificial saliva for either 5 or 10 d at 37 °C. The amount of mineral gain (dΔZ%) and the relative changes in the lesion depth (dLD%), obtained from µCT, were used to evaluate the effect of LRAP on the remineralization of lesions. The effects of LRAP on cross-sectional integrated hardness ΔINH were studied after 10 d using nanoindentation. ANOVA test was used to determine the effect of time and/or LRAP concentration on dΔZ%, dLD% and ΔINH mean values. Tukey's analysis was used for multiple comparison testing (α = 0.05). Analysis of µCT data showed significant effect of time and LRAP concentration on the dΔZ% (p = 0.013, p = 0.003) and the dLD% (p  <  0.001, p = 0.002) mean values. The nanoindentation hardness was significantly improved by 120 µg mL(-1) LRAP (p = 0.02). Also, the peptide treatment affected the mineral distribution throughout the lesion by inhibiting of superficial deposition. This study showed that the treatment of eroded lesions in enamel by LRAP can improve and regulate the pattern of remineralization in vitro.

  8. An improved sample preparation method for non-destructive analyses of fine-grained subseafloor sediments using micro-focus X-ray CT and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uramoto, G.; Morono, Y.; Uematsu, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial arrangement of particles in fine-grained marine subsurface sediments is a key factor for the physical property of sediments. The pore space provides micro-niches for chemical, physical, and microbiological components in the subsurface geosphere and biosphere. However, the standard techniques conventionally used for the sample preparation have some critical issues to understand accurate nature of fine-scale particle arrangement because of the possible deformation of micro-structures during the sample fixation. Here we tested the resin-embedding method for ocean drilling core samples, which technique has been applied mainly for biological samples. Using micro-focus X-ray CT-computed tomography and SEM we compared the images with the conventional t-butyl alcohol freeze-drying methods. Using the t-butyl alcohol freeze-dried sediment samples, we observed large number of micrometer-scale cracks in both SEM and X-CT image analyses, indicating the significant disturbance of sediment microstructure during sample processing. On the other hand, when we employed mini-coring, agar infiltration, and related biological sample-processing techniques for the resin-embedding method, no observable cracks were evident, most likely due to the rapid resin impregnation into sediments without sample drying. On SEM images of the flattened sample surface, we compared the porosity assessed with the resin-embedded samples to those measured onboard by the moisture and density method, showing a good agreement of the porosity values. In high-porosity surficial sediments embedded with resin, we observed structures that sediment particles are floating in the space, which may represent the results of physico-chemical interaction among sediment particles. However, almost no such particle arrangements were observed in t-butyl alcohol freeze-dried samples, indicating that drying of interstitial fluids may impact on the physico-chemical forces within particulate compounds. Conclusively, our

  9. Infrared studies of galactic center x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Curtis

    In this dissertation I use a variety of approaches to discover the nature of a subset of the nearly 10,000 X-ray point sources in the 2° x 0.8° region around the Galactic Center. I produced a JHK s source catalog of the 170 x170 region around Sgr A* an area containing 4339 of these X-ray sources, with the ISPI camera on the CTIO 4-m telescope. I cross-correlated the Chandra and ISPI catalogs to find potential near-infrared (NIR) counterparts to the X-ray sources. The extreme NIR source crowding in the field means that it is not possible to establish the authenticity of the matches with astrometry and photometry alone. I found 2137 IR/X-ray astrometrically matched sources; statistically I calculated that my catalog contains 289+/-13 true matches to soft X-ray sources and 154 +/- 39 matches to hard X-ray sources. However, the fraction of matches to hard sources that are spurious is 90%, compared to 40% for soft source matches, making the hard source NIR matches particularly challenging for spectroscopic follow-up. I statistically investigated the parameter space of matched sources and identified a set of 98 NIR matches to hard X-ray sources with reddenings consistent with the GC distance which have a 45% probability of being true counterparts. I created two additional photometric catalogs of the GC region to investigate the variability of X-ray counterparts over a time baseline of several years. I found 48 variable NIR sources matched to X-ray sources, with 2 spectroscopically confirmed to be true counterparts (1 in previous literature and one in this study). I took spectra of 46 of my best candidates for counterparts to X-ray sources toward the GC, and spectroscopically confirmed 4 sources as the authentic physical counterpart on the basis of emission lines in the H and K band spectra. These sources include a Be high mass X-ray binary located 16 pc in projection away from Sgr A*; a hard X-ray symbiotic binary located 22 pc in projection from Sgr A*; an O

  10. Attenuation of supersoft X-ray sources by circumstellar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. T. B.; Gilfanov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested the possibility of significantly obscuring supersoft X-ray sources in relatively modest amounts of local matter lost from the binaries themselves. If correct, then this would have explained the paucity of observed supersoft X-ray sources and would have significance for the search for single-degenerate Type Ia supernova progenitors. We point out that earlier studies of circumbinary obscuration ignored photoionizations of the gas by the emission from the supersoft X-ray source. We revisit the problem using a full, self-consistent calculation of the ionization state of the circumbinary material photoionized by the radiation of the central source. Our results show that the circumstellar mass-loss rates required for obscuration of supersoft X-ray sources is about an order of magnitude larger than those reported in earlier studies, for comparable model parameters. While this does not entirely rule out the possibility of circumstellar material obscuring supersoft X-ray sources, it makes it unlikely that this effect alone can account for the majority of the missing supersoft X-ray sources. We discuss the observational appearance of hypothetical obscured nuclear-burning white dwarfs and show that they have signatures making them distinct from photoionized nebulae around supersoft X-ray sources imbedded in the low-density interstellar medium.

  11. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  12. Modifications of the X-ray source and monitor at the X-ray Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbolt, W. Barlow

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the instruments aboard the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) some modifications will need to be made in the X-ray Calibration Facility at Marshall. Several of these modifications involve the X-ray source and the monitor. The source was redesigned to increase the spectral purity of the beam and decrease its polarization by minimizing the number of bremsstrahlung photons in the beam. This was accomplished by utilizing an annular electron gun which allowed the beam to take off antiparallel to the direction at which electrons are incident on the anode. Two other features of the source are the conical anode which decreases the effective spot size and a rotatable anode and filter wheel which allow the operator to change targets without breaking vacuum. The monitor is an important part of the facility because it is used to determine the X-ray flux at the target. A commercially available solid-state detector, Si(Li), should be used along with appropriate proportional counters for monitoring. This detector will be particularly useful when energy or wavelength dispersive instruments are tested because of its good resolution.

  13. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  14. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-08-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  15. Development of tomographic imaging systems using carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    2005-11-01

    Conventional thermionic x-ray sources use hot filament cathodes to generate electrons for x-ray production. The thermionic technology has several inherent limitations such as high operating temperature, slow response time, and difficulty for miniaturization. On the other hand, field emission provides an alternative to generate electrons without all these limitations. The concept of field emission x-ray source has been proposed and tested in the early 1970s. Unfortunately all of the early field emission x-ray systems failed due primarily to the limitations on the electron field emitters. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently emerged as a promising class of electron emissive materials and field emission x-ray source based on CNTs are expected to have significantly improved properties. We have recently developed a CNT-based field emission micro-focus x-ray source. It shows stable tube current under high operating voltage, extraordinary dynamic imaging capability, and excellent potential for miniaturization. All of these new features make it very attractive for various potential industrial and medical applications. In order to demonstrate its applications, two sets of x-ray imaging systems using this field emission x-ray source were constructed in our lab. One is a micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging system using a single field emission x-ray source for dynamic radiographic and tomographic imaging applications. It shows great potential for the future development of dynamic micro-CT scanner. The other one is a multi-beam field emission x-ray source with multiple addressable focal spots which can provide scanning x-ray beams without mechanical movement. It can lead to fast data acquisition rates for future tomographic imaging systems with a simplified experimental set-up.

  16. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with LX > 3 × 1033 erg s-1 in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  17. Theory of magnetic cataclysmic binary X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Don Q.

    1988-01-01

    The theory of magnetic cataclysmic binary X-ray sources is reviewed. The physics of the accretion torque for disk and for stream accretion is described, and the magnetic field strengths of DQ Her stars inferred from their spin behavior and of AM Her stars from direct measurement are discussed. The implications of disk and stream accretion for the geometry of the emission region and for the X-ray pulse profiles are considered. The physicl properties of the X-ray emission region and the expected infrared, optical, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray spectra are described. The orientations of the magnetic moment in AM Her stars inferred from the circular and linear polarization of the optical light and the optical light curve are commented on.

  18. Miniaturized High-Speed Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C. (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor); Kenyon, Steven J. (Inventor); Spartana, Nick Salvatore (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized high-speed modulated X-ray source (MXS) device and a method for rapidly and arbitrarily varying with time the output X-ray photon intensities and energies. The MXS device includes an ultraviolet emitter that emits ultraviolet light, a photocathode operably coupled to the ultraviolet light-emitting diode that emits electrons, an electron multiplier operably coupled to the photocathode that multiplies incident electrons, and an anode operably coupled to the electron multiplier that is configured to produce X-rays. The method for modulating MXS includes modulating an intensity of an ultraviolet emitter to emit ultraviolet light, generating electrons in response to the ultraviolet light, multiplying the electrons to become more electrons, and producing X-rays by an anode that includes a target material configured to produce X-rays in response to impact of the more electrons.

  19. Automated classification of Chandra X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, Derek; Kargaltsev, O.; Rangelov, B.; Volkov, I.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of the latest generation X-ray telescopes there has been a major influx of data associated with the detection of hundreds of thousands X-ray sources. As one can rarely tell a source type from its X-ray properties alone, the full potential of the X-ray catalogs can only be unlocked by correlating multiwavelength (MW) properties via cross-identification with other surveys. However, one would spend an enormous amount of time classifying these objects by their physical nature if the classification was to be done on a source-by-source basis by humans. Therefore, we are using a supervised learning algorithm to classify sources detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The classifications are based on a training dataset which currently includes about 7,000 X-ray sources of known nature (main sequence stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, young stars, active galactic nuclei, low mass X-ray binaries, high mass x-ray binaries, and neutron stars). For each source, the training dataset includes up to 24 multiwavelength properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the classification is verified by dividing the training dataset in two and performing cross-validation. The results are also inspected by plotting source properties in 2D slices of the parameter space. As an application of our automated procedure we classified unidentified sources in the supernova remnant (SNR) G352.7-0.1, in the field of HESS J1809-193, and in part of the Chandra Source Catalog 1.0. We present the results of the verification tests and the classification results. This research was partially supported by NASA/SAO grant AR3-14017X.

  20. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  1. Synchrotron X-ray Optics Testing at Beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, Albert; Kujala, Naresh

    2014-03-01

    Beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source has been reconfigured, in part for testing of synchrotron optics with both monochromatic and white beams. Monochromatic energies between 6 and 30 keV are available. Primary agendas include both white beam and monochromatic beam topography, Talbot grating interferometry for measurement of coherence lengths and wavefronts, and micro-focusing. Recent examples will include topography of sapphire , tests of Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, and tests of multilayer Laue lenses. Analyzers for Inelastic X-ray Scattering has also been characterized by two user groups. Supported from U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Contract No. DE-AC-02-06CH11357.

  2. ANS hard X-ray experiment development program. [emission from X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsignault, D.; Gursky, H.; Frank, R.; Kubierschky, K.; Austin, G.; Paganetti, R.; Bawdekar, V.

    1974-01-01

    The hard X-ray (HXX) experiment is one of three experiments included in the Dutch Astronomical Netherlands Satellite, which was launched into orbit on 30 August 1974. The overall objective of the HXX experiment is the detailed study of the emission from known X-ray sources over the energy range 1.5-30keV. The instrument is capable of the following measurements: (1) spectral content over the full energy range with an energy resolution of approximately 20% and time resolution down to 4 seconds; (2) source time variability down to 4 milliseconds; (3) silicon emission lines at 1.86 and 2.00keV; (4) source location to a limit of one arc minute in ecliptic latitude; and (5) spatial structure with angular resolution of the arc minutes. Scientific aspects of experiment, engineering design and implementation of the experiment, and program history are included.

  3. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-18

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  4. Self-cleaning rotating anode X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Paulikas, Arvydas P.

    1989-01-01

    A self-cleaning rotating anode x-ray source comprising an evacuable housing, a rotatable cylindrical anode within the housing, a source of electrons within the housing which electrons are caused to impinge upon the anode to produce x-rays, and means for ionizing residual particles within the housing and accelerating such ions so as to impinge upon the anode to sputter impurities from the surface thereof.

  5. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema

    Falcone, Roger

    2016-07-12

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  6. Self-cleaning rotating anode x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Paulikas, A.P.

    1987-06-02

    A self-cleaning rotating anode x-ray source comprising and evacuable housing, a rotatable cylindrical anode within the housing, a source of electrons within the housing which electrons are caused to impinge upon the anode to produce x-rays, and means for ionizing residual particles within the housing and accelerating such ions so as to impinge upon the anode to sputter impurities from the surface thereof. 2 figs.

  7. ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN ARP 147

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, S.; Steinhorn, B.; Levine, A.; Pooley, D. E-mail: aml@space.mit.ed

    2010-10-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory was used to image the collisional ring galaxy Arp 147 for 42 ks. We detect nine X-ray sources with luminosities in the range of (1.4-7) x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} (assuming that the sources emit isotropically) in or near the blue knots of star formation associated with the ring. A source with an X-ray luminosity of 1.4 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} is detected in the nuclear region of the intruder galaxy. X-ray sources associated with a foreground star and a background quasar are used to improve the registration of the X-ray image with respect to Hubble Space Telescope (HST) high-resolution optical images. The intruder galaxy, which apparently contained little gas before the collision, shows no X-ray sources other than the one in the nuclear bulge which may be a poorly fed supermassive black hole. These observations confirm the conventional wisdom that collisions of gas-rich galaxies trigger large rates of star formation which, in turn, generate substantial numbers of X-ray sources, some of which have luminosities above the Eddington limit for accreting stellar-mass black holes (i.e., ultraluminous X-ray sources, 'ULXs'). We also utilize archival Spitzer and Galex data to help constrain the current star formation rate in Arp 147 to {approx}7 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. All of these results, coupled with binary evolution models for ULXs, allow us to tentatively conclude that the most intense star formation may have ended some 15 Myr in the past.

  8. The SWIRE/Chandra Survey: The X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kilgard, Roy; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Minsun; Polletta, Mari; Lonsdale, Carol; Smith, Harding E.; Surace, Jason; Owen, Frazer N.; Franceschini, A.; Siana, Brian; Shupe, David

    2009-12-01

    We report a moderate-depth (70 ks), contiguous 0.7 deg2 Chandra survey in the Lockman Hole Field of the Spitzer/SWIRE Legacy Survey coincident with a completed, ultra-deep VLA survey with deep optical and near-infrared imaging in-hand. The primary motivation is to distinguish starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including the significant, highly obscured (log N H > 23) subset. Chandra has detected 775 X-ray sources to a limiting broadband (0.3-8 keV) flux ~4 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1. We present the X-ray catalog, fluxes, hardness ratios, and multi-wavelength fluxes. The log N versus log S agrees with those of previous surveys covering similar flux ranges. The Chandra and Spitzer flux limits are well matched: 771 (99%) of the X-ray sources have infrared (IR) or optical counterparts, and 333 have MIPS 24 μm detections. There are four optical-only X-ray sources and four with no visible optical/IR counterpart. The very deep (~2.7 μJy rms) VLA data yield 251 (>4σ) radio counterparts, 44% of the X-ray sources in the field. We confirm that the tendency for lower X-ray flux sources to be harder is primarily due to absorption. As expected, there is no correlation between observed IR and X-ray fluxes. Optically bright, type 1, and red AGNs lie in distinct regions of the IR versus X-ray flux plots, demonstrating the wide range of spectral energy distributions in this sample and providing the potential for classification/source selection. Many optically bright sources, which lie outside the AGN region in the optical versus X-ray plots (fr /fx >10), lie inside the region predicted for red AGNs in IR versus X-ray plots, consistent with the presence of an active nucleus. More than 40% of the X-ray sources in the VLA field are radio-loud using the classical definition, RL . The majority of these are red and relatively faint in the optical so that the use of RL to select those AGNs with the strongest radio emission becomes questionable. Using the 24 μm to radio

  9. Miniaturized, High-Speed, Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Kenyon, Steve; Spartana, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A low-cost, miniature x-ray source has been developed that can be modulated in intensity from completely off to full intensity on nanosecond timescales. This modulated x-ray source (MXS) has no filaments and is extremely rugged. The energy level of the MXS is adjustable from 0 to more than 100 keV. It can be used as the core of many new devices, providing the first practical, arbitrarily time-variable source of x-rays. The high-speed switching capability and miniature size make possible many new technologies including x-ray-based communication, compact time-resolved x-ray diffraction, novel x-ray fluorescence instruments, and low- and precise-dose medical x-rays. To make x-rays, the usual method is to accelerate electrons into a target material held at a high potential. When the electrons stop in the target, x-rays are produced with a spectrum that is a function of the target material and the energy to which the electrons are accelerated. Most commonly, the electrons come from a hot filament. In the MXS, the electrons start off as optically driven photoelectrons. The modulation of the x-rays is then tied to the modulation of the light that drives the photoelectron source. Much of the recent development has consisted of creating a photoelectrically-driven electron source that is robust, low in cost, and offers high intensity. For robustness, metal photocathodes were adopted, including aluminum and magnesium. Ultraviolet light from 255- to 350-nm LEDs (light emitting diodes) stimulated the photoemissions from these photocathodes with an efficiency that is maximized at the low-wavelength end (255 nm) to a value of roughly 10(exp -4). The MXS units now have much higher brightness, are much smaller, and are made using a number of commercially available components, making them extremely inexpensive. In the latest MXS design, UV efficiency is addressed by using a high-gain electron multiplier. The photocathode is vapor-deposited onto the input cone of a Burle Magnum

  10. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  11. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Hernandez, Michael

    2013-04-19

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  12. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Hernandez, Michael; Langeveld, Willem G. J.

    2013-04-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  13. Assembling x-ray sources by carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, V.; Lucci, M.; Toschi, F.; Orlanducci, S.; Tamburri, E.; Terranova, M. L.; Ciorba, A.; Rossi, M.; Hampai, D.; Cappuccio, G.

    2007-05-01

    By the use of a chemical vapour deposition technique a series of metal wires (W, Ta, Steel ) with differently shaped tips have been coated by arrays of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The field emission properties of the SWNT deposits have been measured by a home made apparatus working in medium vacuum (10 -6- 10 -7 mbar) and the SWNT-coated wires have been used to fabricate tiny electron sources for X-ray tubes. To check the efficiency of the nanotube coated wires for X-ray generation has, a prototype X-ray tube has been designed and fabricated. The X-ray tube works at pressures about 10 -6 mbar. The target ( Al film) is disposed on a hole in the stainless steel sheath: this configuration makes unnecessary the usual Be window and moreover allows us to use low accelerating potentials (< 6 kV).

  14. Advanced X-Ray Sources Ensure Safe Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded inXitu Inc. (formerly Microwave Power Technology), of Mountain View, California, an SBIR contract to develop a new design of electron optics for forming and focusing electron beams that is applicable to a broad class of vacuum electron devices. This technology offers an inherently rugged and more efficient X-ray source for material analysis; a compact and rugged X-ray source for smaller rovers on future Mars missions; and electron beam sources to reduce undesirable emissions from small, widely distributed pollution sources; and remediation of polluted sites.

  15. Optimized Volumetric Scanning for X-Ray Array Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Foudray, A M; Wang, A; Kallman, J S; Martz, H

    2009-09-29

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is the science and technology of determining non-invasively the internal structure of manufactured parts, objects, and materials. NDE application areas include medicine, industrial manufacturing, military, homeland security, and airport luggage screening. X-ray measurement systems are most widely used because of their ability to image through a wide range of material densities (from human tissue in medical applications to the dense materials of weapon components). Traditional x-ray systems involve a single source and detector system that rotate and/or translate about the object under evaluation. At each angular location, the source projects x-rays through the object. The rays undergo attenuation proportional to the density of the object's constitutive material. The detector records a measure of the attenuation. Mathematical algorithms are used to invert the forward attenuated ray projection process to form images of the object. This is known as computed tomography (CT). In recent years, the single-source x-ray NDE systems have been generalized to arrays of x-ray sources. Array sources permit multiple views of the object with fewer rotations and translations of the source/detector system. The spatially diverse nature of x-ray array sources has the potential of reducing data collection time, reducing imaging artifacts, and increasing the resolution of the resultant images. Most of the existing CT algorithms were not derived from array source models with a spatially diverse set of viewing perspectives. Single-source x-ray CT data collection, processing, and imaging methods and algorithms are not applicable when the source location is expanded from one dimension (a rotating and/or translating point source) to two (a rotating and/or translating array). They must be reformulated. The goal of this project is to determine the applicability of x-ray array sources to problems of interest to LLNL and its customers. It is believed array source

  16. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Dennis; Padmore, Howard; Lessner, Eliane

    2013-03-27

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today’s X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today’s resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting and

  17. Gravitationally Lensed X-Ray Sources at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Rottler, L.

    2012-01-01

    More than two thousand x-ray sources located within 20 pc of the Galactic Center (GC) have been identified by Muno et al. (2003). If an x-ray source is located behind the Galactic Center and offset by a small angle from the GC projected on the sky, then that x-ray source could be gravitationally lensed. The consequences of finding gravitationally lensed sources at the Galactic Center include the ability to independently measure the mass of the GC as well as provide a new probe of the density distribution of the GC (e.g. Wardle & Yusef-Zadeh 1992). Inspecting x-ray images of the GC we were immediately drawn to a set of four x-ray objects. The identified objects are cataloged as CXOJ 174541.0-290014, 174540.1-290005, 174540.0-290031, and 174538.1-290022. These are the brightest and most obvious variable x-ray objects whose positions suggest patterns of images that may either be an inclined quad or two sets of dual gravitational lens patterns. Based on the image patterns, and image brightnesses and relative variations, we modeled possible lens systems using two algorithms. Both of the algorithms describing gravitational lenses are based on the Fermat potential and its time derivatives. For a lens radius of R = 0.01 pc, the total enclosed mass is 2.6 x 107 M⊙ and for R = 0.001 pc, the total enclosed mass is 2.6 x 105 M⊙. These masses are consistent with other measurements of the mass of the GC, such as 4.5 x 106 M⊙ (Ghez et al. 2008). We will present these results and our plans to further study the nature of these x-ray objects.

  18. High intensity line source for x-ray spectrometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1986-06-01

    A high intensity electron-impact x-ray source using a one-dimensional Pierce lens has been built for the purpose of calibrating a bent crystal x-ray spectrometer. This source focuses up to 100 mA of 20-keV electrons to a line on a liquid-cooled anode. The line (which can serve as a virtual slit for the spectrometer) measures approximately 800 ..mu.. x 2 cm. The source is portable and therefore adaptable to numerous types of spectrometer applications. One particular application, the calibration of a high resolution (r = 10/sup 4/) time-resolved cyrstal spectrometer, will be discussed in detail.

  19. X-ray source safety shutter

    DOEpatents

    Robinet, McLouis

    1977-05-31

    An apparatus is provided for controlling the activation of a high energy radiation source having a shutter. The apparatus includes magnets and magnetically responsive switches appropriately placed and interconnected so that only with the shutter and other parts of the source in proper position can safe emission of radiation out an open shutter occur.

  20. On the optical identifications of five X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradt, H. V.; Clark, G. W.; Dower, R.; Doxsey, R.; Hearn, D. R.; Jernigan, J. G.; Mayer, W.; Mcclintock, J.; Apparao, K. M. V.; Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    The data from a recently completed survey of the galactic plane with the SAS-3 modulation collimators provide precise (20 to 60 arcsec) celestial positions of galactic X-ray sources. Preliminary positions of 60-arcsec precision are reported for five sources. One of these led to the identification of the star, Gamma Cas, as an X-ray source, and the others lend substantial confidence to previously proposed optical identifications: 3U 0352+30 = X Per, 3U 1145-61 = HEN 715, GX301-2 = WRA977, and GX304-1 = MMV star. These identifications seem to establish the existence of a previously suggested class of Be-star X-ray emitters.

  1. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, Amanda Elizabeth; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd Joseph; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David C.; Sedillo, Robert; Shurter, Roger P.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Webb, Timothy J

    2015-11-02

    The x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult to measure. The sources measured were Radiographic Integrated Test Stand-6 (370 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse) and Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) (550 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse). Features of the Compton spectrometer are described, and spectra are shown. Additional slides present data on instrumental calibration.

  2. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Dhuga, K.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of X - ray sources in Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy recently observed by XMM-Newton. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with AGN, few of them possess characteristics of LMXBs and CVs. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of a central IMBH in Draco.

  3. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bird, Charles R.; Rockett, Paul D.

    1987-01-01

    An x-ray source having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events.

  4. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The state-of-the-art X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam produced by an X-band RF accelerator and a high-intensity laser pulse generated by chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) has been carried out by our research team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system is called "Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source". The applications include nuclear resonance fluorescence, medical imaging and therapy, and nuclear waste imaging and assay. One of the key factors in this system is how we know the interaction happened in the vacuum chamber, which is the spectrometer of electron beams. The other key factor is the interaction after the spectrometer, which is the outgoing X-ray. In this thesis, the work in the simulation for the result of the interaction between electrons and the laser, the calibration of spectrometer, and laser focus characterization are discussed.

  5. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

    1987-08-04

    An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

  6. X-ray sources for radiography of warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Brambrink, Erik; Barbrel, Benjamin; Koenig, Michel; Gregory, Chris; Loupias, Bérénice; Ravasio, Alessandra; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc; Vinci, Tommaso; Boehly, Tom; Endo, Takashi; Kimura, Tomoaki; Ozaki, Norimasa; Wei, Huigang; Aglitskiy, Yefim; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana

    2008-11-01

    The knowledge of Warm Dense Matter is important in different domains such as inertial confinement fusion, astrophysics and geophysics. The development of techniques for direct probing of this type of matter is of great interest. X-ray radiography is one of the most promising diagnostic to measure density directly. Here we present some results of low-Z material radiography and an experiment devoted to characterize a short pulse laser driven hard x-ray source for the radiography of medium and high Z matter. Experiments have been performed on LULI2000 and TW facilities at the Ecole Polytechnique.

  7. Characterization of X-Ray Diffraction System with a Microfocus X-Ray Source and a Polycapillary Optic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Marshall, Joy K.; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor

    2000-01-01

    We present here an optimized microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary optic system designed for diffraction of small protein crystals. The x-ray beam is formed by a 5.5mm focal length capillary collimator coupled with a 40 micron x-ray source operating at 46Watts. Measurements of the x-ray flux, the divergence and the spectral characteristics of the beam are presented, This optimized system provides a seven fold greater flux than our recently reported configuration [M. Gubarev, et al., J. of Applied Crystallography (2000) 33, in press]. We now make a comparison with a 5kWatts rotating anode generator (Rigaku) coupled with confocal multilayer focusing mirrors (Osmic, CMF12- 38Cu6). The microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary collimator system delivers 60% of the x-ray flux from the rotating anode system. Additional ways to improve our microfocus x-ray system, and thus increase the x-ray flux will be discussed.

  8. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  9. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  10. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  11. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  12. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  13. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  14. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  15. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  16. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  17. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  18. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  19. Transition radiation very soft X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umiastowski, K.; Nguyen, A.

    1994-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the transition radiation (TR), as a soft X-ray source, in the last few years. Many papers have been published on calculations or experiments in the 1-10 keV X-ray energy range using 50-200 MeV electron accelerators. We investigate the possibility to generate very soft X-rays (λ = 12 nm) with low-energy electron accelerator (5-20 MeV). Very little information is available on TR in this range of photon wavelength and electron energy. A stack of 20 foils of beryllium placed in vacuum was used in our computer simulation. Calculation shows that for 1 mA electron beam current, radiation with few mW intensity can be produced. Emitted photons are quasi-monoenergetic (FWHM less than 5%), and well collimated. The aim of our study is to investigate the possibility of fabricate a soft X-ray source, much more compact than synchrotron source and producing an intense and quasi-coherent radiation, for industrial applications.

  20. From incoherent to coherent x-rays with ICS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Graves, William S.; Moncton, David E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the design and performance parameters for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS), which is presently under construction, based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of a high brightness electron bunch on a picosecond laser pulse. The flux and brilliance of this source are orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources. The accelerator operates at a repetition rate of 1 kHz with 100 bunches of 100 pC charge, each separated by 5 ns, in each shot. The entire CXLS is a few meters in length and produces hard x-rays tunable over a wide range of photon energies. The scattering laser is a Yb:YAG solid-state amplifier producing 100 mJ pulses at 1030 nm. The laser pulse is frequency-doubled and coupled into a ringdown cavity to match the linac pulse structure. At a photon energy of 12.4 keV, the predicted x-ray flux is 5×1011 photons/second in a 5% bandwidth and the brilliance is 2×1012 photons/(secmm2mrad20.1%) with a RMS pulse length of 490 fs. Novel concepts for improving the performance of the CXLS with the generation of relativistic electron beams having current modulation at nanometer scale and below are also discussed. This tunable longitudinal modulation enables the production of coherent hard x-rays with ICS.

  1. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources in Nearby Galaxies. II. X-Ray Luminosity Functions and Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Jifeng; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the recently completed Chandra/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library of 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular (α ˜ 1.50 ± 0.07) to elliptical (˜1.21 ± 0.02), to spirals (˜0.80 ± 0.02), to peculiars (˜0.55 ± 0.30), and to irregulars (˜0.26 ± 0.10). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosities for different types of galaxies. A radial dependency is found for ellipticals, with a flatter XLF slope for sources located between D 25 and 2D 25, suggesting the XLF slopes in the outer region of early-type galaxies are dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries in globular clusters. This study shows that the ULX rate in early-type galaxies is 0.24 ± 0.05 ULXs per surveyed galaxy, on a 5σ confidence level. The XLF for ULXs in late-type galaxies extends smoothly until it drops abruptly around 4 × 1040 erg s-1, and this break may suggest a mild boundary between the stellar black hole population possibly including 30 M ⊙ black holes with super-Eddington radiation and intermediate mass black holes.

  2. Galactic X-rays: Variable Sources in Hydromagnetic Waves.

    PubMed

    Lelevier, R E; Libby, L M

    1968-06-28

    Galactic sources of x-rays fluctuating in intensity are explained as being small regions, of enhanced gas density and temperature, emitting thermal Coulomb bremsstrahlung of kiloelectron-volt energies. Hydromagnetic wave motions, of the magnetic fields in the galactic spiral arms, produce the enhanced regions by compressing the clouds of ionized gas to which they are tied by their high electrical conductivity. From the observed periods of fluctuation of a few months, together with the hydromagnetic velocity, it is estimated that the average size of sources does not exceed 10(16) centimeters. By using the formula for Coulomb bremsstrahlung and requiring that the sources shall produce the observed x-ray fluxes, one finds a second estimate of size of sources in agreement at about 1016 centimeters. Such regions are too small to be observable radio sources with current radio telescopes.

  3. High-energy X-ray spectra of five sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Gerassimenko, M.; Lewin , W. H. G.

    1973-01-01

    On October 15-16, 1970, we carried out balloon X-ray observations from Australia at energies above 15 keV. We present the high-energy X-ray spectra of three sources discovered by us, GX 301-2, GX 304-1, and GX 1 + 4. The data suggest that these high-energy sources correspond to the sources 2U 1223-62, 2U 1258-61, and 2U 1728-24 respectively. We also present the spectra for two additional sources, GX 5-1 (2U 1757-25) and GX 3 + 1 (2U 1744-26). The average intensity of the highly variable source GX 301-2 was observed to be as great as Tau X-1 in the energy range 15-50 keV.

  4. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in NGC 6946.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Cruces, Mónica; Rosado, Margarita; Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura L.

    2016-07-01

    Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are the most X-ray luminous off-nucleus objects in nearby galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10^{39} - 10^{41} erg s^{-1} in the 0.5-10 keV band. Since these luminosities cannot be explained by the standard accretion of a stellar mass black hole, these sources are often associated with intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs, 10^{2}-10^{4} solar masses). However significantly beamed stellar binary systems could also explain these luminosities. Observational knowledge of the angular distribution of the source emission is essential to decide between these two scenarios. In this work, we present the X-ray analysis of five ULXs in the spiral galaxy NGC 6949, along with the kinematical analysis of the ionized gas surrounding each of these sources. For all sources, X-ray observations reveal a typical ULX spectral shape (with a soft excess below 2 keV and a hard curvature above 2 keV) which can be fit with a power-law + multi-color disk model. However, even if ULXs are classified as point-like objects, one of the sources in this galaxy displays an elongated shape in the Chandra images. Regarding the analysis of the emission lines of the surrounding ˜300 pc around each ULX, scanning Fabry-Perot observations show composite profiles for three of the five ULXs. The main component of these profiles follows the global rotation of the galaxy, while the faint secondary component seems to be associated with asymmetrical gas expansion. These sources have also been located in archive images of NGC 6946 in different wavelengths in order to relate them to different physical processes occurring in this galaxy. Though ULXs are usually located in star formation regions, we find that two of the sources lie a few tenths of parsecs away from different HII regions. Based on the X-ray morphology of each ULX, the velocities and distribution of the surrounding gas, as well as the location of the source in the context of the whole galaxy, we give the most

  5. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Alexander, David M.; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Desai, Meera A.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3–79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg{}2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ˜4× and ˜8 × 10{}32 erg s{}-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3–10 and 10–40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources suggests that magnetic cataclysmic variables constitute a large fraction (>40%–60%). Both spectral analysis and logN–logS distributions of the NuSTAR sources indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Γ = 1.5–2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high plasma temperatures than the field population.

  6. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Kitty K.; Farrell, Sean; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B. M.

    2014-05-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10 fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ∼97% on a 7 class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest derived outlier measure, we identified 12 anomalous sources, of which 2XMM J180658.7–500250 appears to be the most unusual source in the sample. Its X-ray spectra is suggestive of a ultraluminous X-ray source but its variability makes it highly unusual. Machine-learned classification and anomaly detection will facilitate scientific discoveries in the era of all-sky surveys.

  7. AGN content of X-ray, IR and radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a number of surveys and identification works related to X-ray, IR and radio sources and searched for extragalactic ones. Among them, most interesting are Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Starburst (SB) Galaxies. Some 4500 AGN have been revealed from ROSAT BSC and FSC sources, and many more are hidden ones; those showing evidence of activity but with no emission lines in optical wavelengths. We estimated AGN content of X-ray sources as 52.9%. IR sources contain thousands of SBs, and most important are those having signs of interaction and/or merging. We have carried out optical identifications of IRAS point sources, and 1278 IR galaxies have been revealed, including LIRGs and ULIRGs. We have also combined IRAS PSC and FSC catalogs and compiled its extragalactic sample, which allowed to estimate AGN content among IR sources as 23.7%. Extragalactic radio sources contain bright galaxies, AGN and SBs. We have studied the border between AGN and normal galaxies by radio/optical flux ratios to establish which objects may be attributed to AGN based on radio properties. Interestingly, absolute majority of objects associated with both X-ray and radio sources are AGN.

  8. Automatic Classification of Time-variable X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Kitty K.; Farrell, Sean; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B. M.

    2014-05-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10 fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ~97% on a 7 class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest derived outlier measure, we identified 12 anomalous sources, of which 2XMM J180658.7-500250 appears to be the most unusual source in the sample. Its X-ray spectra is suggestive of a ultraluminous X-ray source but its variability makes it highly unusual. Machine-learned classification and anomaly detection will facilitate scientific discoveries in the era of all-sky surveys.

  9. High power bremsstrahlung X-ray source for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsumoto, K.; Sunaga, H.; Tanaka, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Agematsu, T.; Tanaka, R.; Yoshida, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Sakamoto, I.; Tamura, N.

    The high power X-ray irradiation facility designed for the sterilization of medical appliances is described. The X-ray source consists of the 5 MeV, 300 kW Cockcroft Walton type of electron accelerator and the water cooled tantalum target. Conditions necessary for designing the X-ray target are conversion efficiency from electron beam to X-ray, thermal conductivity, readiness for machining and cost of the material. The conversion efficiency was determined through the Monte Carlo type calculation and obtained as 10.8 % for 3.667 g/cm 2 thickness (1 csda range) of tantalum target. In order to obtain the data on the source design, experiments have been carried out at the JAERI TAKASAKI 2 MeV, 60 kW Cockcroft-Walton type of electron accelerator equipped with a tantalum target. The size of package and the speed of conveyor was determined through the calculation of the absorbed dose distribution in the irradiated medium and the utilization efficiency.

  10. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 [times] 10[sup 14]/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-[mu]m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 [times] 10[sup 7] photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 [times]0.5-mm[sup 2] pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  11. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-12-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 {times} 10{sup 14}/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-{mu}m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 {times} 10{sup 7} photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 {times}0.5-mm{sup 2} pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  12. Laboratory soft x-ray source with foil target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Karl-Heinz; Braeuninger, Heinrich W.

    1993-02-01

    We have developed a comparatively small soft x-ray source for application in our test facilities, which are used at present to support the developments of the astrophysical space projects XMM and AXAF. The instrument comprises a commercially available color television tube for generation of the electron beam, which is focused on exchangeable metal films serving as targets. The x rays are taken off after having transversed the foil target and have a sufficient spectral purity with regard to the experimental requirements. The maximum electric operating parameters correspond to an emission current of 100 (mu) A generated by a filament heating power of 6.6 watt at an accelerating voltage of 25 kV. The technical advantages of the instrument are lightweight construction, no water cooling, small size electric supply, cost efficient manufacturing, small sized focus, and quick access to the desired characteristic spectral line by exchange of a complete tube. We describe the measurements on the local x-ray intensity profile of the focus, the spectral features of the beam, and present the resulting performance data. A special development could be used as calibration sources in x-ray telescopes.

  13. X-ray time and spectral variability as probes of ultraluminous x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj Ranga Reddy

    A long-standing debate in the field of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs: luminosities > 3x1039 ergs s-1) is whether these objects are powered by stellar-mass black holes (mass range of 3-25 solar masses) undergoing hyper-accretion/emission or if they host the long-sought after class of intermediate-mass black holes (mass range of a few 100-1000 solar masses) accreting material at sub-Eddington rates. We present X-ray time and energy spectral variability studies of ULXs in order to understand their physical environments and accurately weigh their compact objects. A sample of ULXs exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with centroid frequencies in the range of 10-200 mHz. The nature of the power density spectra (PDS) of these sources is qualitatively similar to stellar-mass black holes when they exhibit the so-called type-C low-frequency QPOs (frequency range of 0.2-15 Hz). However, the crucial difference is that the characteristic frequencies within the PDS of ULXs, viz., the break frequencies and the centroid frequencies of the QPOs, are scaled down by a factor of approximately 10-100 compared to stellar-mass black holes. It has thus been argued that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C low-frequency QPO analogs of stellar-mass black holes and that the observed difference in the frequencies (a fewx0.01 Hz compared with a few Hz) is due to the presence of intermediate-mass black holes ( MULX = (QPOstellar-mass black hole }/QPOULX)xM stellar-mass black hole, where M and QPO are the mass and the QPO frequency, respectively) within these ULXs. We analyzed all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray data of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1 in order to test the hypothesis that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C analogs by searching for a correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the energy spectral power-law index as type-C QPOs show such a dependence. From our multi-epoch timing and spectral analysis of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1, we found that the mHz QPOs of these sources vary

  14. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David C.; Sedillo, Robert; Shurter, Roger P.; Volegov, Petr; Webb, Timothy J.

    2015-08-01

    A Compton spectrometer has been re-commissioned for measurements of flash radiographic sources. The determination of the energy spectrum of these sources is difficult due to the high count rates and short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). The spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. Incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam incident on a converter foil. The ejected Compton electrons are collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the magnet's focal plane is a function of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent measurements of flash sources are presented.

  15. Einstein observations of extended galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Features of the X-ray pictures taken aboard the space observatory are presented. Imaging proportional counter pictures in three broad X-ray energy ranges were obtained. The X-ray spectrum of supernova remnants is described.

  16. X-ray Thomson Scattering using the Hybrid X-pinch X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Cad; Pikuz, Sergei; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, Dave

    2013-10-01

    Stringent photometric and bandwidth requirements have historically relegated X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) probe sources to high energy laser plasma sources or free electron lasers. Standard x-pinch configurations in which two or more fine wires cross and subtend an angle of about 30° forming an ``X'' between the anode and cathode of a pulsed power generatorcan produce extremely bright, subnanosecond bursts of continuum and line radiation from micron-scale sources. The hybrid x-pinch is a new configuration based on conical W-Cu alloy electrodes with a short 1-2 mm gap that is bridged by a fine wire resulting in an easier to load setup with improved performance characteristics. We explore the possibility of utilizing the hybid x-pinch as a novel XRTS probe source by examining certain spectral and temporal attributes of a range of materials in a hybrid x-pinch configuration on the XP (500 kA, 50 ns) and COBRA(1MA, 100ns) pulsed power generators. We find that a Ti hybrid x-pinch produces >1012 photons/sr in Ti He-alpha radiation and satisfies the noncollective scattering bandwidth requirement. Measurements of photon fluence, bandwidth and applicability to the relevant scattering regime and initial scattering results will be presented.

  17. Application of monochromatic keV X-ray source to X-ray drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Taguchi, Hiroki; Mori, Azusa; Yusa, Noritaka; Kato, Takamitsu; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2009-09-01

    X-ray Drug Delivery System (DDS) enhances accumulation of anti-cancer drug or contrast agent by surrounding it with polymer and Enhanced Penetration and Retention (EPR) effect. DDS uses advanced nano-scaled polymers that contain and deliver drug or contrast agent to cancers without side effects. Several X-ray DDSs pose high-Z atoms such as gold to absorb X-rays effectively and used as contrast agent for inspection. Moreover, they have radiation enhancement effect by emission of Auger electron and successive characteristic X-rays. The enhancement factor of gold is more than five. This could be used even for therapy. This new modality must be very important for inspection and therapy of deep cancers. We are making use of our X-band Compton scattering monochromatic keV X-ray source for the inspection. Numerical simulation on monochromatic X-ray CT for possible concentration of gold-colloid DDS considering the X-ray property from the source was done. Enough visibility was confirmed. Furthermore, in vitro experiment analyzed its toxic effect to cells by the Alkaline comet assay and fluorescent immunostaining method for single and double strand breaks of DNA. Availability of clear imaging for the inspection has been confirmed by the numerical simulation and the in-vitro evaluation of the therapy effect is under way.

  18. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  19. 1 kHz tabletop ultrashort hard x-ray source for time-resolved x-ray protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalet, Adeline; Darmon, Adeline; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Jean-Louis; Audebert, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    We describe a compact, reliable, and high-average-power femtosecond x-ray source and its first application to diffraction on protein crystal. The setup relies on a homemade Ti: sapphire system delivering 12 mJ at a 1 kHz repetition rate, associated with a small vacuum chamber especially designed for laser-plasma interaction and x-ray applications. This device allows the generation of 5×109 photons/s/sr at 8 keV and optimized x-ray irradiation of the studied sample, which can be placed close to the source. We present the diffraction pattern of a protein crystal in a divergent beam geometry, which is a first step to a subpicosecond x-ray diffraction experiment.

  20. Analysis of the Central X-ray Source in DG Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. Christian; Schmitt, Jürgen H. M. M.

    As a stellar X-ray source DG Tau shows two rather unusual features: A resolved X-ray jet [2] and an X-ray spectrum best described by two thermal components with different absorbing column densities, a so called "two-absorber X-ray (TAX)" morphology [1, 2]. In an effort to understand the properties of the central X-ray source in DG Tau a detailed position analysis was carried out.

  1. Measuring X-ray Spectra of Flash Radiographic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David; Sedillo, Robert; Volegov, Petr; Webb, Tim

    2015-10-01

    A Compton spectrometer has been re-commissioned for measurements of flash radiographic sources. The determination of the energy spectrum provides information about the x-ray production mechanisms of these sources (ie. reaction history of plasmas, electron-target interactions) and benefits the analysis of images obtained at radiographic facilities. However, the measurements of the spectra are difficult due to the high count rates and short nature of the pulses (~ 50 ns). The spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. Incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam incident on a converter foil. The ejected Compton electrons are collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the focal plane of the magnet is a function of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent measurements of both flash and continuous radiographic sources will be presented.

  2. Continuum and line spectra of degenerate dwarf X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations of X-ray sources are summarized. Unresolved issues concerning these sources are discussed and an outline of the kinds of X-ray observations that would best advance the understanding of these sources is presented.

  3. Ultraluminous X-ray sources - three exciting years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachetti, M.

    2015-09-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are off-nuclear extragalactic sources with (apparent) luminosities exceeding the Eddington limit for a stellar-mass black hole. This naturally suggests an association with the elusive class of intermediate-mass black holes, or with super-Eddington accreting black holes. As it turns out, this peculiar class of sources is actually a variegated zoo, including both classes of accreting black holes mentioned above and, rather unexpectedly, neutron stars. In this talk I will overview the astrophysical properties of these objects, and give an update on the many breakthroughs appeared in the literature in the last three years.

  4. Note: Construction of x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption fine structure beamline at the Pohang Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik-Jae; Yu, Chung-Jong; Yun, Young-Duck; Lee, Chae-Soon; Seo, In Deuk; Kim, Hyo-Yun; Lee, Woul-Woo; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2010-02-15

    A new hard x-ray beamline, 10B KIST-PAL beamline (BL10B), has been designed and constructed at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. The beamline, operated by Pohang Accelerator Laboratory-Korean Institute of Science and Technology consortium, is dedicated to x-ray scattering (XRS) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. X rays with photon energies from 4.0 to 16.0 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a collimating mirror, a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, and a toroidal mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, a high resolution diffractometry, an image plate detector system, and a hot stage have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, it is observed that BL10B beamline can perform XRS and XAFS measurements successfully.

  5. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of the flaring X-ray source, Aquila A-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Charles, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    During the summer of 1978 the recurrent transient X-ray source, Aquila X-1, underwent its first major outburst in two years. The results of extensive observations at X-ray and optical wavelengths throughout this event, which lasted for approximately two months are presented. The peak X-ray luminosity was approximately 1.3 times that of the Crab and exhibited spectral dependent flickering on timescales approximately 5 minutes. The observations are interpreted in terms of a standard accretion disk model withparticular emphasis on the similarities to Sco X-1 and other dward X-ray systems, although the transient nature of the system remains unexplained. It was found that Aquila X-1 can be described adequately by the semi-detached Roche lobe model and yields a mass ratio of less than or approximate to 3.5.

  6. A 6 second periodic X-ray source in Carina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.; Charles, P. A.; Smale, A. P.

    1986-01-01

    A serendipitous source, 1E 1048.1-5937, was discovered during Einstein imaging observations of the Carina nebula. On July 13, 1979, this source had an intensity of 0.14 IPC counts/s, and the signal was 65 percent pulsed with a period of 6.44 s. An earlier observation failed to detect any source with strength greater than 1/10 the above signal. The source is therefore highly variable, perhaps transient. An Exosat observation of this source on June 20, 1985 confirmed the pulse period and refined the source position to an accuracy of 10 arcsec. On the basis of the position, the source is tentatively identified with a V = 19 optical counterpart. The X-ray spectrum is best fitted by a power law with photon index = 2.26 and a column density of 1.6 x 10 to the 22nd atoms/sq cm. The X-ray characteristics are consistent with an accretion-powered Be star binary.

  7. Supersoft X-ray sources: the role of V Sge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Vojtech; Mattei, Janet A.

    2007-07-01

    V Sge is one of a few known super-soft X-ray sources (SSXSs) located in our Galaxy and is the representative of the V Sge class. Here we concentrate on its long-term optical activity (mostly transitions between high and low states, clustering in so-called active segments). We show that cycles are often apparent in such transitions but their length undergoes large, often gradual variations. We give the implications for the accretion wind evolution, modeled by Hachisu & Kato (2003). We also analyze the color indices and absolute magnitudes of V Sge and compare them with those of ´classicaĺ SSXSs with the orbital period shorter than 4 d. This approach helps compare the properties and configuration of the medium, on which soft X-rays are reprocessed in these systems. The specific properties of SSXSs, as regards their optical activity, absolute magnitudes and colors, can be the promising tools for the search for such systems in the optical and near UV passbands. SSXSs yet undetected in the X-ray passband because of absorption thus can be revealed by the photometric method.

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  9. Uhuru observations of 4U 1608-52 - The 'steady' X-ray source associated with the X-ray burst source in Norma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.; Chaisson, L. J.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Matilsky, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented for the X-ray source 4U 1608-52, summarizing its light curve, location, and spectral parameters. Evidence is presented showing that this source is the 'steady' X-ray counterpart of the X-ray burst source in Norma. The spectrum of the 'steady' source is compared with the spectrum observed during two bursts, and it is noted that there is substantially more low-energy absorption during the bursts. The 'steady' source spectral data are used to examine the optical data, and it is concluded that if the X-ray spectrum is thermal, then a globular-cluster counterpart probably would have been detected (whereas none has been). Further X-ray and optical observations are suggested for this source, since an optical identification may be central in determining whether all X-ray bursts have a common origin and if this origin requires a globular-cluster environment.

  10. X-Ray Counterparts of Puzzling Gev-Tev Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    We propose to look for X-ray counterparts of the extended TeV source HESS J1616-508 that may also have been detected with Fermi at GeV energies. The nature of the source and the connection between the TeV source and the nearby GeV sources are unknown. It has been suggested that it may be a relic plerion powered by the offset PSR J1617-5055, but a deep Chandra observation of this pulsar and its wind nebula has not confirmed this hypothesis. To understand the nature of this long-standing "dark accelerator", we propose to observe the GeV sources (which could be young pulsars) and another nearby young pulsar (J1614-5048) to check whether or not they could supply relativistic particles and power the TeV source. We will also explore the nature of the GeV sources.

  11. Properties and Applications of Laser Generated X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Key, M H

    2002-02-25

    The rapid development of laser technology and related progress in research using lasers is shifting the boundaries where laser based sources are preferred over other light sources particularly in the XUV and x-ray spectral region. Laser based sources have exceptional capability for short pulse and high brightness and with improvements in high repetition rate pulsed operation, such sources are also becoming more interesting for their average power capability. This study presents an evaluation of the current capabilities and near term future potential of laser based light sources and summarizes, for the purpose of comparison, the characteristics and near term prospects of sources based on synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers. Conclusions are drawn on areas where the development of laser based sources is most promising and competitive in terms of applications potential.

  12. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Haugh and M. B. Schneider

    2008-10-31

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 μm square pixels, and 15 μm thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE≈10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

  13. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis using special X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.; Ladisich, W.; Rieder, R.; Streli, C.

    1993-02-01

    The parameter variations of exciting radiation, like spectral distribution, intensity, brilliance, polarization and the phenomenon of X-ray total reflection, leads to improved lower limits of detection (LLD) in XRF. Observations and results from experiments performed with different X-ray tubes such as fine focus Cu and Mo anodes, a specially designed Au anode operated with 100 kV and high power rotating anodes are reported. Results from measurements with monochromatic X-rays tuned with a multilayer structure as well as the use of polarized X-rays from the synchrotron will be shown. All developed measuring devices will be described in terms of their recent design features showing the possible geometric arrangements denned by the beam-reflector-detector position. The extrapolated detection limits for the K-shell excitation of rare earth elements are in the region of 0.3 ng, for medium Z elements in the pg range and for optimized conditions, with a rotating Cu anode, 170 fg for Mn are achieved corresponding to the pg g -1 (ppt) concentration level.

  14. The faint X-ray sources in and out of omega Centauri: X-ray observations and optical identifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cool, Adrienne M.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Callanan, Paul J.; Hertz, Paul

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an observation of the globular cluster omega Cen (NGC 5139) with the Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI). Of the five low-luminosity X-ray sources toward omega Cen which were first identified with the Einstein imaging proportional counter (IPC) (Hertz and Grindlay 1983a, b), two are detected in the Einstein HRI observation: IPC sources A and D. These detections provide source positions accurate to 3 sec-4 sec; the positions are confirmed in a ROSAT HRI observation reported here. Using CCD photometry and spectroscopy, we have identified both sources as foreground dwarf M stars with emission lines (dMe). The chance projection of two Mde stars within approximately 13 min of the center of omega Cen is not extraordinary, given the space density of these stellar coronal X-ray sources. We discuss the possible nature of the three as yet unidentified IPC sources toward omega Cen, and consider the constraints that the Einstein observations place on the total population of X-ray sources in this cluster. The integrated luminosity from faint X-ray sources in omega Cen appears to be low relative to both the old open cluster M67 and the post-core-collapse globular, NGC 6397.

  15. Two Eclipsing Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, R.; Soria, R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the discovery, from archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data, of X-ray eclipses in two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), located in the same region of the galaxy M51: CXOM51 J132940.0+471237 (ULX-1, for simplicity) and CXOM51 J132939.5+471244 (ULX-2). Three eclipses were detected for ULX-1 and two for ULX-2. The presence of eclipses puts strong constraints on the viewing angle, suggesting that both ULXs are seen almost edge-on and are certainly not beamed toward us. Despite the similar viewing angles and luminosities ({L}{{X}}≈ 2× {10}39 erg s‑1 in the 0.3–8 keV band for both sources), their X-ray properties are different. ULX-1 has a soft spectrum, well fitted by Comptonization emission from a medium with electron temperature {{kT}}e≈ 1 {keV}. ULX-2 is harder, well fitted by a slim disk with {{kT}}{in}≈ 1.5–1.8 keV and normalization consistent with a ∼10 M ⊙ black hole. ULX-1 has a significant contribution from multi-temperature thermal-plasma emission ({L}{{X},{mekal}}≈ 2× {10}38 erg s‑1). About 10% of this emission remains visible during the eclipses, proving that the emitting gas comes from a region slightly more extended than the size of the donor star. From the sequence and duration of the Chandra observations in and out of eclipse, we constrain the binary period of ULX-1 to be either ≈ 6.3 days, or ≈12.5–13 days. If the donor star fills its Roche lobe (a plausible assumption for ULXs), both cases require an evolved donor, most likely a blue supergiant, given the young age of the stellar population in that Galactic environment.

  16. SPECTRAL STATES AND EVOLUTION OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Hua; Kaaret, Philip

    2009-05-10

    We examined spectral evolution in ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with apparent luminosities of about 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}. Based on new results in this paper, and those reported in the literature, two common spectral behaviors were found. Some ULXs in starburst galaxies have varying luminosity (L) but remain in the hard state with power-law spectra and a constant, hard photon index ({gamma}). Other ULXs, such as NGC 5204 X-1, show a correlation between L and {gamma}. We interpret this L-{gamma} correlated phase as an intermediate state with hybrid properties from the thermal dominant and steep power-law states. When the spectra of NGC 5204 X-1 are fitted with a multicolor disk blackbody plus power-law model, the X-ray luminosity increases with the effective temperature of the accretion disk in a manner similar to that found in stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries, suggesting that the emission arises from an accretion disk. The luminosity, disk size, and temperature suggest that NGC 5204 X-1 harbors a compact object more massive than stellar-mass black holes. In contrast, the disk model in IC 342 X-1 is ruled out because the luminosity decreases as the temperature increases; sources with such behavior may represent a class of objects with super-Eddington accretion. Also, we report a peculiar soft spectral feature from IC 342 X-2 and variability on a timescale of 20 ks from Holmberg II X-1. More observations are needed to test these results.

  17. The Galactic plane at faint X-ray fluxes - I. Properties and characteristics of the X-ray source population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Byckling, K.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the serendipitous X-ray source population revealed in XMM-Newton observations targeted in the Galactic plane within the region 315° < l < 45° and |b| < 2?. Our study focuses on a sample of 2204 X-ray sources at intermediate to faint fluxes, which were detected in a total of 116 XMM-Newton fields and are listed in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog. We characterize each source as spectrally soft or hard on the basis of whether the bulk of the recorded counts have energies below or above 2 keV and find that the sample divides roughly equally (56 per cent:44 per cent) into these soft and hard categories. The X-ray spectral form underlying the soft sources may be represented as either a power-law continuum with Γ˜ 2.5 or a thermal spectrum with kT˜ 0.5 keV, with NH ranging from 1020 to 1022 cm-2. For the hard sources, a significantly harder continuum form is likely, that is, Γ˜ 1, with NH= 1022-1024 cm-2. For ˜50 per cent of the hard sources, the inferred column density is commensurate with the total Galactic line-of-sight value; many of these sources will be located at significant distances across the Galaxy, implying a hard-band luminosity LX > 1032 erg s-1, whereas some will be extragalactic interlopers. A high fraction (≳90 per cent) of the soft sources have potential near-infrared (NIR) (Two-Micron All-Sky Survey and/or United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey) counterparts inside their error circles, consistent with the dominant soft-X-ray-source population being relatively nearby coronally-active stars. These stellar counterparts are generally brighter than J= 16, a brightness cut-off which corresponds to the saturation of the X-ray coronal emission at LX= 10-3 Lbol. In contrast, the success rate in finding likely IR counterparts to the hard X-ray sample is no more than ≈15 per cent down to J= 16 and ≈25 per cent down to J= 20, set against a rapidly rising chance coincidence rate. The make-up of the hard-X-ray-source

  18. Lensless imaging using broadband X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Brian; Whitehead, Lachlan W.; Quiney, Harry M.; Vine, David J.; Cadenazzi, Guido A.; Henderson, Clare A.; Nugent, Keith A.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Putkunz, Corey T.; Peele, Andrew G.; Williams, G. J.; McNulty, I.

    2011-07-01

    High-resolution X-ray imaging techniques using optical elements such as zone plates are widely used for viewing the internal structure of samples in exquisite detail. The resolution attainable is ultimately limited by the manufacturing tolerances for the optics. Combining ideas from crystallography and holography, this limit may be surpassed by the method of coherent diffractive imaging (CDI). Although CDI shows particular promise in applications involving X-ray free-electron lasers, it is also emerging as an important new technique for imaging at third-generation synchrotrons. The limited coherent output of these sources, however, is a significant barrier to obtaining shorter exposure times. A fundamental assumption of coherent diffractive imaging is that the incident light is well-approximated by a single optical frequency. In this Letter, we demonstrate the first experimental realization of `polyCDI', using a broadband source to achieve a factor of 60 reduction in the exposure time over quasi-monochromatic coherent diffractive imaging.

  19. Population of post-nova supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soraisam, Monika D.; Gilfanov, Marat; Wolf, William M.; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Novae undergo a supersoft X-ray phase of varying duration after the optical outburst. Such transient post-nova supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) are the majority of the observed SSSs in M31. In this paper, we use the post-nova evolutionary models of Wolf et al. to compute the expected population of post-nova SSSs in M31. We predict that depending on the assumptions about the white dwarf (WD) mass distribution in novae, at any instant there are about 250-600 post-nova SSSs in M31 with (unabsorbed) 0.2-1.0 keV luminosity Lx ≥ 1036 erg s-1. Their combined unabsorbed luminosity is of the order of ˜1039 erg s-1. Their luminosity distribution shows significant steepening around log (Lx) ˜ 37.7-38 and becomes zero at Lx ≈ 2 × 1038 erg s-1, the maximum Lx achieved in the post-nova evolutionary tracks. Their effective temperature distribution has a roughly power-law shape with differential slope of ≈4-6 up to the maximum temperature of Teff ≈ 1.5 × 106 K. We compare our predictions with the results of the XMM-Newton monitoring of the central field of M31 between 2006 and 2009. The predicted number of post-nova SSSs exceeds the observed number by a factor of ≈2-5, depending on the assumed WD mass distribution in novae. This is good agreement, considering the number and magnitude of uncertainties involved in calculations of the post-nova evolutionary models and their X-ray output. Furthermore, only a moderate circumstellar absorption, with hydrogen column density of the order of ˜1021 cm-2, will remove the discrepancy.

  20. X-ray spectral and optical properties of an ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 4258 (M106)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdan, Hasan; Balman, Solen; Akyuz, Aysun; Avdan, Senay; Aksaker, Nazim; Akkaya Oralhan, İnci

    2016-07-01

    We report the X-ray and optical properties of an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (M106). The XMM-Newton and Chandra archival observations were used to examine the X-ray spectral properties of the source. Throughout the X-ray observations, we discuss that the source appears to exhibit possible spectral changes by considering the hardness ratios and the spectral model parameters. The luminosity of the source varies a factor of two during the observations and has a peak value of ˜2x10^{39} erg s^{-1}. In the optical band, the source seems to belong to a star cluster. The archival HST images were used to search the optical counterpart of the ULX and three possible candidates were found within the 1σ error radius of 0.3". Also the mass for the compact object is estimated in the range of 10-15 M _{sun} which indicates a stellar-mass black hole.

  1. Micro-focus X-ray imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juha, Michael

    1987-01-01

    The acceptance of surface mounting in the electronics industry has been slowed by problems with component availability, electrical testing, and inspection. Industry suppliers and users have been working to solve these problems, and they are easing. Component manufacturers are offering substantially more devices in surface mountable packages. Automated test equipment vendors are offering test fixtures for surface mount circuit boards. And just recently, solder connection inspection has been automated through a partership effort with a major electronics manufacturer. The results achieved in this effort are presented.

  2. LIGHT SOURCE: Spot size diagnostics for flash radiographic X-ray sources at LAPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Gang; Li, Qin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Spot size is one of the parameters to characterize the performance of a radiographic X-ray source. It determines the degree of blurring due to magnification directly. In recent years, a variety of measurement methods have been used to diagnose X-ray spot size at Laboratory of Accelerator Physics and Application (LAPA). Computer simulations and experiments showed that using a rolled-edge to measure the spot size are more accurate, and the intensity distribution of X-ray source was obtained by a device with a square aperture. Experimental and simulation results on a flash X-ray source at our laboratory are presented and discussed in this paper. In addition, a new method for time resolved diagnostics of X-ray spot size is introduced too.

  3. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  4. Soft x-ray contact imaging of biological specimens using a laser-produced plasma as an x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a laser-produced plasma as an x-ray source provides significant advantages over other types of sources for x-ray microradiography of, particularly, living biological specimens. The pulsed nature of the x-rays enables imaging of the specimen in a living state, and the small source size minimizes penumbral blurring. This makes it possible to make an exposure close to the source, thereby increasing the x-ray intensity. In this article, we will demonstrate the applications of x-ray contact microradiography in structural and developmental botany such as the localization of silica deposition and the floral morphologenesis of maize.

  5. Novae as a Class of Transient X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Orio, M.; Valle, M. Della

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the recently discovered class of faint (10(exp 34)-10(exp 35) ergs/s) X-ray transients in the Galactic Center region, we investigate the 2-10 keV properties of classical and recurrent novae. Existing data are consistent with the idea that all classical novae are transient X-ray sources with durations of months to years and peak luminosities in the 10(exp 34)-10(exp 35)ergs/s range. This makes classical novae a viable candidate class for the faint Galactic Center transients. We estimate the rate of classical novae within a 15 arcmin radius region centered on the Galactic Center (roughly the field of view of XMM-Newton observations centered on Sgr A*) to be approx.0.1 per year. Therefore, it is plausible that some of the Galactic Center transients that have been announced to date are unrecognized classical novae. The continuing monitoring of the Galactic Center region carried out by Chandra and XMM-Newton may therefore provide a new method to detect classical novae in this crowded and obscured region, an

  6. Chilled disks in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Kuncic, Zdenka; Gonçalves, Anabela C.

    2007-04-01

    The "soft-excess" component fitted to the X-ray spectra of many ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) remains a controversial finding, which may reveal fundamental information either on the black hole (BH) mass or on the state of the accretion flow. In the simplest model, it was explained as thermal emission from a cool accretion disk around an intermediate-mass BH (about 1000 solar masses). We argue that this scenario is highly implausible, and discuss and compare the two most likely alternatives. 1) The soft-excess does come from a cool disk; however, the temperature is low not because of a high BH mass but because most of the accretion power is drained from the inner disk via magnetic torques, and channelled into jets and outflows ("chilled disk" scenario). Using a phenomenological model, we infer that ULXs contain BHs of about 50 solar masses accreting gas at about 10 times their Eddington rate. 2) The soft excess is in fact a soft deficit, if the power-law continuum is properly fitted. Such broad absorption features are caused by smeared absorption lines in fast, highly ionized outflows. This scenario has already been successfully applied to the soft excess in AGN. If so, this spectral feature reveals details of disk outflows,but is unrelated to the BH mass.

  7. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  8. X-ray lasers - the ultimate radiation source?

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    I will review the development of the x-ray laser from its first demonstration in 1984 to today`s systems which operate from 45 to 3.5 nm with output power levels up to GW and linewidths less than 10{sup -4}. At first, these sources required large pump laser facility in order to be produced, but just now new systems are appearing which are much more efficient and are near table-top in size. I will also discuss the future development of this source which should lead to wavelengths as short as 1 nm with a near-diffraction-limited output characteristics and considerable average output power, up to 10{sup 15} ph/sec. Finally, I will discuss some of the interesting applications such as in vitro biological imaging, microsurgery on microorganisms, construction of nanomachines, probing of semiconductors and plasmas, lithographic printing of semiconductor circuits and numerous other potential uses.

  9. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced. PMID:25931071

  10. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; et al

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a newmore » generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.« less

  11. Development of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source for phase-contrast imaging of DT fuel ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Dewald, E.; Kozioziemski, B.; Koch, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    Because beryllium capsules for NIF experiments are not transparent to visible light, optical microscopy is not applicable for metrology of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. X-ray absorption radiography cannot be used either because absorption in DT ice is negligible, so to quantify the quality of the DT ice surface, x-ray phase-contrast imaging is used in order to enhance contrast of surface imperfections. Phase contrast imaging of ice layers typically utilizes micro-focus x-ray tube sources, but available x-ray fluxes are limited, and these sources cannot be used to quantify changes in the ice surface quality over the second timescales appropriate for rapidly-cooled layers. We have therefore explored the use of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source in order to determine if it has sufficient brightness to produce high-quality phase-contrast flash radiographs of DT ice layers. We irradiated Ti, Fe, Cu, and Au targets with 5-ns, 300-J, 527-nm laser light at the Janus laser facility, and measured absolute x-ray conversion efficiency and x-ray spot size. We will discuss this data as well as phase-contrast radiographs we obtained of non-cryogenic shells.

  12. An active M star with X-ray double flares disguised as an ultra-luminous X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Cheng; Liu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Song; Wu, Yue; Qin, Yu-Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Here we present research on an ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate 2XMM J140229.91+542118.8. The X-ray light curves of this ULX candidate in M101 exhibit features of a flare star. More importantly, the Chandra light curve displays unusual X-ray double flares, which is comprised of two close peaks. The X-ray (0.3-11.0 keV) flux of the first peak was derived from the two-temperature APEC model as ˜ 1.1 ± 0.1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. The observed flux at its first peak increased by about two orders of magnitude in X-ray as compared to quiescence. The slope of the second fast decay phase is steeper than the slope of the first fast decay phase, indicating that the appearance of a second flare accelerated the cooling of the first flare in a way we do not understand yet. We also observed its optical counterpart using a 2.16 m telescope administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. By optical spectral fitting, it is confirmed to be a late type dMe2.5 star. According to the spectral type and apparent magnitude of its optical counterpart, we estimate the photometric distance to be ˜ 133.4 ± 14.2 pc. According to the X-ray spectral fitting, a possible explanation is provided. However, more similar close double flares are needed to confirm whether this accelerated cooling event is a unique coincidence or a common physical process during double flaring.

  13. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, D. ); Anderson, S. ); Mattigod, S. )

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

  14. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, A.; Curtis, R.; Flath, D.; Gray, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Srinivasan, V.; Stefanescu, D.

    2013-03-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument (XCS) at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a dedicated instrument using coherent x-ray scattering techniques to investigate dynamics in condensed matter systems. XCS can probe both slow and ultrafast dynamics on lengthscales of interest. It employs an extensive suite of X-ray instrumentation to tailor the LCLS X-ray beam properties to experimental requirements. Results demonstrating the full transverse coherence of the LCLS beam are presented.

  15. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter

  16. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  17. Accretion states of ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Swartz, Doug

    2009-09-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) have extended our knowledge of accretion onto black holes, and in particular of their different ``states'' as a function of accretion rate. At moderate luminosities (˜ 1E39-1E40 erg/s), the X-ray spectra of most ULXs are either fitted by non-standard accretion disks (eg, slim disks) or by a power-law, consistent with inverse-Compton emission (probably an extension of the ``steep-power-law'' state of Galactic black holes). At the highest luminosities (>˜ 1E40 erg/s), most ULXs have a power-law dominated spectrum; in particular, about half of them have hard photon indices (high/hard state, Gamma <˜ 1.7). In addition, two more elements are often found: a thermal ``soft excess'' is the signature of the standard thin disk at large radii, which constrains the radial size of the inner Comptonizing/outflow region; and a break or downturn of the power-law at ˜ 5 keV provides a characteristic temperature of the electrons in the inner region. Thus, the physics of super-Eddington accretion states correlates with that of the low states, with different systems dominated either by energy advection, or mechanical output, or Comptonizing coronae. Another intriguing issue we will discuss is whether there is a cutoff in the luminosity distribution at ˜ a few E40 erg/s, which would still be consistent with stellar black holes formed from direct collapse in metal-poor environments (maximum mass ˜ 70 Msun). If the power-law distribution extends to higher luminosities, it requires more massive black holes, perhaps formed from mergers in dense stellar/protostellar cluster environments

  18. OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF THE NEAREST ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, Jeanette C.; Heinke, Craig O.; Cartwright, Taylor F.; Copperwheat, Chris; Roberts, Timothy P.; Levan, Andrew J.; Goad, Mike R.

    2013-06-01

    We present a photometric survey of the optical counterparts of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in nearby ({approx}<5 Mpc) galaxies. Of the 33 ULXs with HST and Chandra data, 9 have no visible counterpart, placing limits on their M{sub V} of {approx} -4 to -9, enabling us to rule out O-type companions in 4 cases. The refined positions of two ULXs place them in the nucleus of their host galaxy. They are removed from our sample. Of the 22 remaining ULXs, 13 have one possible optical counterpart, while multiple are visible within the error regions of other ULXs. By calculating the number of chance coincidences, we estimate that 13 {+-} 5 are the true counterparts. We attempt to constrain the nature of the companions by fitting the spectral energy distribution and M{sub V} to obtain candidate spectral types. We can rule out O-type companions in 20 cases, while we find that one ULX (NGC 253 ULX2) excludes all OB-type companions. Fitting with X-ray irradiated models provides constraints on the donor star mass and radius. For seven ULXs, we are able to impose inclination-dependent upper and/or lower limits on the black holes' mass, if the extinction to the assumed companion star is not larger than the Galactic column. These are NGC 55 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX2, NGC 253 XMM6, Ho IX X-1, IC342 X-1, and NGC 5204 X-1. This suggests that 10 ULXs do not have O companions, while none of the 18 fitted rule out B-type companions.

  19. The light curve of a transient X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-5 satellite has monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on Dec. 4, 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of about 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable preflare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-5 operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37-th power ergs/sec, a frequency of occurrence which may be as high as 100/yr, and a median decay time which is less than 1 month.

  20. Radio search for the pulsing X-ray source in Hercules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxsey, R.; Rappaport, S.; Spencer, J.; Zaumen, W.; Murthy, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The region of the celestial sphere near the pulsing X-ray source in Hercules (2U 1705+34) has been searched for radio emission with the NRAO three-element interferometer. The search was conducted during a period when the Hercules source was in its 27-day state of low X-ray luminosity. Four weak radio sources, which may be considered as candidates for the radio counterpart of this X-ray source, were detected.

  1. Combined optic system based on polycapillary X-ray optics and single-bounce monocapillary optics for focusing X-rays from a conventional laboratory X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuepeng; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Yi, Longtao; Sun, Weiyuan; Li, Fangzuo; Jiang, Bowen; Ma, Yongzhong; Ding, Xunliang

    2015-12-01

    Two combined optic systems based on polycapillary X-ray optics and single-bounce monocapillary optics (SBMO) were designed for focusing the X-rays from a conventional laboratory X-ray source. One was based on a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens (PFXRL) and a single-bounce ellipsoidal capillary (SBEC), in which the output focal spot with the size of tens of micrometers of the PFXRL was used as the "virtual" X-ray source for the SBEC. The other system was based on a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) and a single-bounce parabolic capillary (SBPC), in which the PPXRL transformed the divergent X-ray beam from an X-ray source into a quasi-parallel X-ray beam with the divergence of sever milliradians as the incident illumination of the SBPC. The experiment results showed that the combined optic systems based on PFXRL and SBEC with a Mo rotating anode X-ray generator with the focal spot with a diameter of 300 μm could obtain a focal spot with the total gain of 14,300 and focal spot size of 37.4 μm, and the combined optic systems based on PPXRL and SBPC with the same X-ray source mentioned above could acquire a focal spot with the total gain of 580 and focal spot size of 58.3 μm, respectively. The two combined optic systems have potential applications in micro X-ray diffraction, micro X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray absorption near edge structure, full field X-ray microscopes and so on.

  2. King's College laser plasma x-ray source design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnaimi, Radhwan; Adjei, Daniel; Alatabi, Saleh; Appuhamilage, Indika Arachchi; Michette, Alan

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to design and build a source for a range of applications, with optimized multilayer structures in order to use the source output as efficiently as possible. The source is built around a Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength 1064 nm, frequency doubled 532 nm (green) and tripled 355 nm, with a pulse length of about 800 ps and a repetition rate up to 50 Hz. The target material is Mylar (C10H8O4) tape, which is cheap, readily available and has many benefits as explained in this article. A versatile cubic target chamber and a set of computer controlled stage motors are used to allow positioning of the X-ray emission point. A range of measures is used to protect delicate components and optics, including a glass slide between the focusing lens and the target to prevent the lens being coated with debris. A low pressure gas (typically 3-6 mbar) is used inside the chamber as collision of atomic size debris particles with gas molecules reduces their kinetic energy and consequently their adhesion to the surrounding surfaces. The gas used is typically helium or nitrogen, the latter also acting as a spectral filter. Finally, the chamber is continually pumped to ensure that more than 70% of the debris particles are pumped out of the chamber.

  3. A proposal for a collecting mirror assembly for large divergence x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Ichimaru, Satoshi; Hatayama, Masatoshi; Ohchi, Tadayuki; Oku, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new type of collecting mirror assembly (CMA) for x rays, which will enable us to build a powerful optical system for collecting x rays from large divergence sources. The CMA consists of several mirror sections connected in series. The angle of each section is designed so that the x rays reflected from it are parallel to the x rays directly incident on the following sections. A simplified CMA structure is designed and applied to the Al-Kα emission line. It is estimated that by using the CMA the number of x rays detected could be increased by a factor of about 2.5.

  4. Observation of soft X-rays from extended sources. [such as Perseus star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts were directed toward surveying several supernova remnants for the emission of soft X-rays. Rather than attempt to detect such faint X-ray emission, the program was redirected to observe the spectrum and angular structure of the extended X-ray source in the Perseus cluster of galaxies and the super-nova remnant Puppis A. An attempt was made to detect X-ray line emission from Puppis A with a Bragg crystal spectrometer. Observations provide evidence for the presence of X-ray line emission in the spectrum of Puppis A near .65 keV.

  5. X-ray QPOs from the Ultra-luminous X-ray Source in M82: Evidence Against Beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) CCD cameras onboard XMM-Newton of a 54 mHz quasiperiodic oscillation (QPO) in the greater than 2 keV X-ray flux from the ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) X41.4+60 in the starburst galaxy M82. This is the first detection of a QPO in the X-ray flux from an extra-Galactic ULX, and confirms that the source is a compact object. The QPO is detected in the combined PN and MOS data at the approx. 6sigma level, and separately at lower significances in both the PN and MOS instruments. It had a centroid frequency of 54.3 +/- 0.9 mHz, a coherence Q is identical with nu(sub 0)/Delta nu(sub fwhm) is approx. 5, and an amplitude (rms) in the 2 - 10 keV band of 8.5%. Below about 0.2 Hz the power spectrum can be described by a power-law with index approx. 1, and integrated amplitude (rms) of 13.5%. The X-ray spectrum requires a curving continuum, with a disk-blackbody (diskbb) at T = 3.1 keV providing an acceptable, but not unique, fit. A broad Fe line centered at 6.55 keV is required in all fits, but the equivalent width (EW) of the line is sensitive to the choice of continuum model. There is no evidence of a reflection component. The implied bolometric luminosity is approx. 4 - 5 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. Data from several archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) pointings at M82 also show evidence for QPOs in the 50 - 100 mHz frequency range. Several Galactic black hole candidates (BHCs), including GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE 1550-564, show QPOs in the same frequency range as the 50 - 100 mHz QPOs in X41.4+60, which at first glance suggests a possible connection with such objects. However, strong, narrow QPOs provide solid evidence for disk emission, and thus present enormous theoretical difficulties for models which rely on either geometrically or relativistically beamed emission to account for the high X-ray luminosities. We discuss the implications of our findings for models of the ULX sources.

  6. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on compact x-ray sources, to appear in the winter of 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. The potential for high-brilliance x- and gamma-ray sources driven by advanced, compact accelerators has gained increasing attention in recent years. These novel sources—sometimes dubbed 'fifth generation sources'—will build on the revolutionary advance of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). New radiation sources of this type have widespread applications, including in ultra-fast imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, and studies of matter under extreme conditions. Rapid advances in compact accelerators and in FEL techniques make this an opportune moment to consider the opportunities which could be realized by bringing these two fields together. Further, the successful development of compact radiation sources driven by compact accelerators will be a significant milestone on the road to the development of high-gradient colliders able to operate at the frontiers of particle physics. Thus the time is right to publish a peer-reviewed collection of contributions concerning the state-of-the-art in: advanced and novel acceleration techniques; sophisticated physics at the frontier of FELs; and the underlying and enabling techniques of high brightness electron beam physics. Interdisciplinary research connecting two or more of these fields is also increasingly represented, as exemplified by entirely new concepts such as plasma based electron beam sources, and coherent imaging with fs-class electron beams. We hope that in producing this special edition of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (iopscience.iop.org/0953-4075/) we may help further a challenging mission and ongoing intellectual adventure: the harnessing of newly emergent, compact advanced accelerators to the creation of new, agile light sources with unprecedented capabilities

  7. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  8. A Chandra X-Ray Study of NGC 1068 IL the Luminous X-Ray Source Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Wilson, Andrew S.

    2003-01-01

    We present an analysis of the compact X-ray source population in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, imaged with a approx. 50 ks Chandra observation. We find a total of 84 compact sources on the S3 chip, of which 66 are located within the 25.0 B-mag/arcsec isophote of the galactic disk of NGC 1068. Spectra have been obtained for the 21 sources with at least 50 counts and modeled with both multicolor disk blackbody and power-law models. The power-law model provides the better description of the spectrum for 18 of these sources. For fainter sources, the spectral index has been estimated from the hardness ratio. Five sources have 0.4 - 8 keV intrinsic luminosities greater than 10(exp 39)ergs/ s, assuming that their emission is isotropic and that they are associated with NGC 1068. We refer to these sources as intermediate-luminosity X-ray objects (ISOs). If these five sources are X-ray binaries accreting with luminosities that are both sub-Eddington and isotropic, then the implied source masses are approx greater than 7 solar mass, and so they are inferred to be black holes. Most of the spectrally modeled sources have spectral shapes similar to Galactic black hole candidates. However, the brightest compact source in NGC 1068 has a spectrum that is much harder than that found in Galactic black hole candidates and other ISOs. The brightest source also shows large amplitude variability on both short-term and long-term timescales, with the count rate possibly decreasing by a factor of 2 in approx. 2 ks during our Chundra observation, and the source flux decreasing by a factor of 5 between our observation and the grating observations taken just over 9 months later. The ratio of the number of sources with luminosities greater than 2.1 x 10(exp 38) ergs/s in the 0.4 - 8 keV band to the rate of massive (greater than 5 solar mass) star formation is the same, to within a factor of 2, for NGC 1068, the Antennae, NGC 5194 (the main galaxy in M51), and the Circinus galaxy. This suggests

  9. Optical characteristics of young quasars as sources of the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E.; Leiter, D.

    1983-01-01

    The sources which dominate the thermal cosmic X-ray background cannot have X-ray spectra similar to the power laws measured for bright active galactic nuclei. The optical consequences of this disparity are pursued by considering a standard model for the photoexcitation and heating of the line emitting gas surrounding a central source (e.g., such as a quasar). The optical line emission to be associated with compact young quasar sources having the same X-ray spectrum as the X-ray background is found to be substantially different from that characteristic of typical quasars. Implications on quasar source counts and the identification of such new objects are discussed.

  10. Directional properties of hard x-ray sources generated by tightly focused ultrafast laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Mordovanakis, Aghapi; Easter, James; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John A.

    2008-11-17

    Directional properties of ultrafast laser-based hard x-ray sources are experimentally studied using tightly focused approximately millijoule laser pulses incident on a bulk Mo target. Energy distributions of K{alpha} and total x rays, as well as source-size distributions are directionally resolved in vacuum and in flowing helium, respectively. Directional distributions of x-ray emission is more isotropic for p-polarized pump than for s-polarized. Based on source-size measurements, a simple two-location model, with expanded plasma and bulk material, is employed to represent the x-ray source profile.

  11. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  12. Acceleration of binary X-ray sources by their radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal'Shin, V. D.; Tsygan, A. I.

    1998-03-01

    We consider a case where the magnetic field of a neutron star in an X-ray binary system differs from a dipole field. This difference gives rise to an asymmetry in the X-ray radiation from the system and, consequently, to an accelerating force. After averaging over the rotation period of the neutron star, the component of the force along its spin axis remains. Its magnitude, F = Xi L_X/c (where L_X is the total X-ray luminosity of the neutron star, and Xi is the radiation asymmetry coefficient), can exceed the force of gravitational attraction of the binary system to the Galaxy. This effect is most important for low-mass X-ray binary systems at the stage of intense accretion of matter onto the neutron stars. Such systems form the Galactic halo, while some of them go away into intergalactic space.

  13. Spectroscopic follow-up of NIR candidate counterparts to Galactic Center X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Sellgren, Kris; Bauer, Franz E.

    2010-08-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered 4339 X-ray point sources within the 17 arcmin^2 field centered on Sgr A^*. Nearly a dozen of the brighter near-IR (NIR) counterparts in this region have been spectroscopically identified as Wolf-Rayet/O supergiants, possibly in colliding wind binaries or high mass X-ray binaries. However, the nature of the X-ray sources whose candidate counterparts have IR magnitudes of K_s > 12 mag is almost completely unknown. We utilized our JHK ISPI imaging of this 17 arcmin^2 region to create a catalog of NIR/X-ray astrometric matches with 2205 X-ray/IR sources. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we identified 88 IR sources that have a high probability of being true counterparts to Galactic Center (GC) X-ray sources. We propose to obtain JHK spectra of 28 potential IR counterparts with K_s=12-14 mag. Our analysis suggests that half of these objects will be true physical counterparts. Definitive identification of the X-ray source counterparts will help probe a previously unknown segment of the GC X-ray source population, and will have important implications for our understanding of XRBs in the Galaxy, including their formation, evolutionary history, and physical characteristics.

  14. Observation of the X-ray source Sco X-1 from Skylab. [radiant flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt to observe the discrete X-ray source Sco X-1 on 20 September 1973 between 0856 and 0920 UT is reported. Data obtained with the ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer, in particular the flux observed with the 1.71 to 4.96 KeV counter, is analyzed. No photographic image of the source was obtained because Sco X-1 was outside the field of view of the X-ray telescope.

  15. The associated X-ray spectra of Amersham caesium-137 afterloading sources.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D A; Chong, C S

    1987-02-01

    Low-energy X rays are clearly observed in the energy spectra of Amersham 137Cs afterloading sources. Examination is made of the effects of encapsulation and source train attenuation on the source spectra. Estimates of the resulting X-ray intensities are also made.

  16. On the maximum accretion luminosity of magnetized neutron stars: connecting X-ray pulsars and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-12-01

    We study properties of luminous X-ray pulsars using a simplified model of the accretion column. The maximal possible luminosity is calculated as a function of the neutron star (NS) magnetic field and spin period. It is shown that the luminosity can reach values of the order of 1040 erg s-1 for the magnetar-like magnetic field (B ≳ 1014 G) and long spin periods (P ≳ 1.5 s). The relative narrowness of an area of feasible NS parameters which are able to provide higher luminosities leads to the conclusion that L ≃ 1040 erg s-1 is a good estimate for the limiting accretion luminosity of an NS. Because this luminosity coincides with the cut-off observed in the high-mass X-ray binaries luminosity function which otherwise does not show any features at lower luminosities, we can conclude that a substantial part of ultraluminous X-ray sources are accreting neutron stars in binary systems.

  17. The X-ray eclipse geometry of the super-soft X-ray source CAL 87

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, T.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.

    2014-09-01

    We explore XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing super-soft X-ray source CAL 87 in order to map the accretion structures of the system. Indirect imaging techniques were applied in X-ray light curves to provide eclipse maps. The surface brightness distribution exhibits an extended and symmetric emission, and a feature is revealed from the hardest X-rays that is likely due to a bright spot. A rate of P-dot =(+6±2)×10{sup −10} for changes in the orbital period of the system was derived from the eclipses. There is no significant variation of the emission lines even during eclipses, arguing that the lines are formed in an extended region. The continuum emission dominates the decrease in flux that is observed during eclipses. The O VIII Lyα line reveals a broadening velocity that is estimated to be 365{sub −69}{sup +65} km s{sup –1} (at 1σ), marginal evidence for asymmetry in its profile, and sometimes shows evidence of double-peaked emission. Together, the results support that the wind-driven mass transfer scenario is running in CAL 87.

  18. A Search for Hyperluminous X-Ray Sources in the XMM-Newton Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, I.; Webb, N. A.; Godet, O.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new method to identify luminous off-nuclear X-ray sources in the outskirts of galaxies from large public redshift surveys, distinguishing them from foreground and background interlopers. Using the 3XMM-DR5 catalog of X-ray sources and the SDSS DR12 spectroscopic sample of galaxies, with the help of this off-nuclear cross-matching technique, we selected 98 sources with inferred X-ray luminosities in the range 1041 < LX < 1044 erg s-1, compatible with hyperluminous X-ray objects (HLX). To validate the method, we verify that it allowed us to recover known HLX candidates such as ESO 243-49 HLX-1 and M82 X-1. From a statistical study, we conservatively estimate that up to 71 ± 11 of these sources may be foreground- or background sources, statistically leaving at least 16 that are likely to be HLXs, thus providing support for the existence of the HLX population. We identify two good HLX candidates and using other publicly available data sets, in particular the VLA FIRST in radio, UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey in the near-infrared, GALEX in the ultraviolet and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Megacam archive in the optical, we present evidence that these objects are unlikely to be foreground or background X-ray objects of conventional types, e.g., active galactic nuclei, BL Lac objects, Galactic X-ray binaries, or nearby stars. However, additional dedicated X-ray and optical observations are needed to confirm their association with the assumed host galaxies and thus secure their HLX classification.

  19. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  20. Infrared identification of hard X-ray sources in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Motch, C.; Pineau, F.-X.; Carrera, F. J.; Pakull, M. W.; Riddick, F.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of the low- to intermediate-luminosity (LX ˜ 1032-34 erg s-1) source population revealed in hard band (2-10 keV) X-ray surveys of the Galactic plane is poorly understood. To overcome such problem, we cross-correlated the XMM-Newton 3XMM-DR4 survey with the infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey and Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire catalogues. We identified reliable X-ray-infrared associations for 690 sources. We selected 173 sources having hard X-ray spectra, typical of hard X-ray high-mass stars (kT > 5 keV), and 517 sources having soft X-ray spectra, typical of active coronae. About 18 per cent of the soft sources are classified in the literature: ˜91 per cent as stars, with a minor fraction of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Roughly 15 per cent of the hard sources are classified in the literature: ˜68 per cent as high-mass X-ray stars single or in binary systems (WR, Be and high-mass X-ray binaries - HMXBs), with a small fraction of G and B stars. We carried out infrared spectroscopic pilot observations at the William Herschel Telescope for five hard X-ray sources. Three of them are high-mass stars with spectral types WN7-8h, Ofpe/WN9 and Be, and LX ˜ 1032-1033erg s-1. One source is a colliding-wind binary, while another source is a colliding-wind binary or a supergiant fast X-ray transient in quiescence. The Be star is a likely γ-Cas system. The nature of the other two X-ray sources is uncertain. The distribution of hard X-ray sources in the parameter space made of X-ray hardness ratio, infrared colours and X-ray-to-infrared flux ratio suggests that many of the unidentified sources are new γ-Cas analogues, WRs and low LX HMXBs. However, the nature of the X-ray population with Ks ≥ 11 and average X-ray-to-infrared flux ratio remains unconstrained.

  1. Phase-contrast imaging with a novel X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yumiko; Kuwada, Takao; Sakai, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Nogami, Kyoko; Imagaki, Manabu; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Ken; Sato, Isamu

    2010-04-06

    A novel X-ray source based on Parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) has been employed for phase-contrast imaging at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA), Nihon University, Japan. The PXR X-rays were generated by the 100 MeV electron beam passing through a Si single crystal. The X-rays in the 16approx34 keV range were chosen for imaging of biological samples. The quasi-monochromatic, tunable, and coherent X-ray source is appropriate for this application. In addition, the large X-ray beam irradiation field of approximately 100 mm in diameter, which was achieved without special optics, suggests that the PXR is applicable to imaging for medical diagnostics.

  2. A soft X-ray spectrometer for diffuse cosmic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borken, R. J.; Kraushaar, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a Bragg crystal spectrometer for the diffuse soft X-ray background is described. The instrument has no moving parts; a 6 degree x 20 degree FWHM field of view; resolution in the range 20-100; and spans wavelength ranges 44-80 A or 13-23 A when lead stearate or KAP crystals are used. If placed on a small spacecraft, integration times of approximately 1000 s will be required to detect the existence of the stronger lines expected in the X-ray background.

  3. Dynamic radiography using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Dike, S.; Lin, W.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2004-10-01

    We report a dynamic radiography system with a carbon nanotube based field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution as short as nanoseconds. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging are demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for noninvasive imaging in biomedical research and industrial inspection.

  4. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  5. Determination of the mass of globular cluster X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.; Steiner, J. E.; Murray, S. S.; Lightman, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    The precise positions of the luminous X-ray sources in eight globular clusters have been measured with the Einstein X-Ray Observatory. When combined with similarly precise measurements of the dynamical centers and core radii of the globular clusters, the distribution of the X-ray source mass is determined to be in the range 0.9-1.9 solar mass. The X-ray source positions and the detailed optical studies indicate that (1) the sources are probably all of similar mass, (2) the gravitational potentials in these high-central density clusters are relatively smooth and isothermal, and (3) the X-ray sources are compact binaries and are probably formed by tidal capture.

  6. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18-20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  7. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  8. The electron spectro-microscopy beamline at National Synchrotron Light Source II: A wide photon energy range, micro-focusing beamlinefor photoelectron spectro-microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger R.; Hulbert L.; Johnson P.D.; Sadowski, J.T.; Starr, D.E.; Chubar, O.; Valla, T.; Vescovo, E.

    2012-02-13

    A comprehensive optical design for a high-resolution, high-flux, wide-energy range, micro-focused beamline working in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energy range is proposed. The beamline is to provide monochromatic radiation to three photoelectron microscopes: a full-field x-ray photoelectron emission microscope and two scanning instruments, one dedicated to angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy ({micro}-ARPES) and one for ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning photoelectron microscopy (AP-XPS/SPEM). Microfocusing is achieved with state of the art elliptical cylinders, obtaining a spot size of 1 {micro}m for ARPES and 0.5 {micro}m for AP-XPS/SPEM. A detailed ray tracing analysis quantitatively evaluates the overall beamline performances.

  9. The electron spectro-microscopy beamline at National Synchrotron Light Source II: A wide photon energy range, micro-focusing beamline for photoelectron spectro-microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; Hulbert, S. L.; Chubar, O.; Vescovo, E.; Johnson, P. D.; Valla, T.; Sadowski, J. T.; Starr, D. E.

    2012-02-15

    A comprehensive optical design for a high-resolution, high-flux, wide-energy range, micro-focused beamline working in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energy range is proposed. The beamline is to provide monochromatic radiation to three photoelectron microscopes: a full-field x-ray photoelectron emission microscope and two scanning instruments, one dedicated to angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy ({mu}-ARPES) and one for ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning photoelectron microscopy (AP-XPS/SPEM). Microfocusing is achieved with state of the art elliptical cylinders, obtaining a spot size of 1 {mu}m for ARPES and 0.5 {mu}m for AP-XPS/SPEM. A detailed ray tracing analysis quantitatively evaluates the overall beamline performances.

  10. Spectral unfolds of PITHON Flash X-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Riordan, John C.

    2007-11-01

    Using a differential absorption spectrometer we obtained experimental spectral information for the PITHON Flash X-ray Machine located in San Leandro, California at L-3 Communications. Spectral information we obtained pertained to the 200 keV to 800 keV endpoint operation of PITHON. We also obtained data on the temporal behavior of high energy and low energy spectral content.

  11. Course Manual for Machine Sources of X Rays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Radiological Health.

    This is the first of a series of three instructor manuals in x-ray science and engineering and is produced as part of a project of Oregon State University's Bureau of Radiological Health. This manual, and the two companion manuals, have been tested in courses at Oregon State. These materials have been designed to serve as models for teaching and…

  12. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  13. THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata; Sellgren, Kris; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Bauer, Franz E.

    2013-11-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a γ Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/γ Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

  14. X-Ray Point Sources in the Sombrero Galaxy: Very Soft Sources, the Globular Cluster/Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Connection, and an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.; Kong, A. K. H.; VanDalfsen, M. L.; Harris, W. E.; Murray, S. S.; Delain, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    We report on the population of point sources discovered during an 18.5 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the Sombrero galaxy. We present the luminosity function and the spectra of the six brightest sources, consider correlations with globular clusters (GCs) and with planetary nebulae, and study the galaxy's population of very soft sources. We detected 122 sources. Twenty-two sources are identified as very soft; of these, five appear to be classical luminous supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs), while 17 may belong to the slightly harder class referred to as quasi-soft (QSSs). There is an overdensity of very soft sources within 2 kpc of the nucleus, which is itself the brightest X-ray source. Very soft sources are also found in the disk and halo, with one QSS in a globular cluster (GC). This source is somewhat harder than most SSSs; the energy distribution of its photons is consistent with what is expected from an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. Several sources in the Sombrero's halo are good candidates for SSS models in which the accretor is a nuclear-burning white dwarf. In total, 32 X-ray sources are associated with GCs. The majority of sources with luminosity greater than 1038 ergs s-1 are in GCs. These results for M104, an Sa galaxy, are similar to what has been found for elliptical galaxies and for the late-type spiral M31. We find that those optically bright GCs with X-ray sources house only the brightest X-ray sources. We find that, in common with other galaxies, there appears to be a positive connection between young (metal-rich) GCs and X-ray sources but that the brightest X-ray sources are equally likely to be in metal-poor GCs. The luminosity function of X-ray sources in GCs has a cut-off near the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 Msolar object. We propose a model that can explain the trends seen in the data sets from the Sombrero and other galaxies. Thermal timescale mass transfer can occur in some of the younger clusters in which the turnoff mass is

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  16. X-ray source brightness comparison: Rigaku rotating anode source vs. Kevex microfocus tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B

    2010-03-17

    In 2007, we began to explore alternative x-ray sources for application to refraction-enhanced (phase contrast) x-ray radiography of cryogenic NIF ignition capsules containing frozen deuterium-tritium (D-T) ice layers. These radiographs are currently obtained using Kevex microfocus tubes as backlights, and for these sources the x-ray source size is approximately 5 {micro}m. As part of this exploration, we obtained refraction-enhanced radiographs of empty plastic capsules using the Janus laser facility at LLNL, demonstrating that even large ({approx} 100 {micro}m) sources can be utilized in refraction-enhanced radiography provided the source/sample distance is sufficiently large, and provided the final x-ray detector has sufficient spatial resolution. Essentially, in the current geometry, we rely on a small source to provide spatial resolution and on the source/sample distance to provide refraction contrast, but an equally useful alternative geometry is to use a large source and rely on fine detector spatial resolution to provide spatial resolution and on the sample/detector distance to provide refraction contrast.

  17. Development of a multilayer mirror for high-intensity monochromatic x-ray using lab-based x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-hai; Song, Seonggeun; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jeon, Insu

    2012-09-15

    A parabolic, multilayer x-ray mirror, which can be used with a general lab-based x-ray source, was designed and fabricated. A glass substrate for the mirror was fabricated. Its surface was determined by following the rotation of a parabolic curve and was polished precisely. On the substrate surface, six W/Al bilayers were deposited to form the multilayer mirror. The effects of the mirror on x-ray images were investigated based on the calculated modulation transfer function (MTF) and image intensity values. Higher MTF and intensity values of an x-ray image were obtained using the mirror.

  18. S-band linac-based X-ray source with π/2-mode electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Abhay; Araki, Sakae; Dixit, Tanuja; Fukuda, Masafumi; Krishnan, R.; Pethe, Sanjay; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Washio, Masakazu

    2011-05-01

    The activities with the compact X-ray source are attracting more attention, particularly for the applications of the source in medical fields. We propose the fabrication of a compact X-ray source using the SAMEER electron linear accelerator and the KEK laser undulator X-ray source (LUCX) technologies. The linac developed at SAMEER is a standing wave side-coupled S-band linac operating in the π/2 mode. In the proposed system, a photocathode RF gun will inject bunches of electrons in the linac to accelerate and achieve a high-energy, low-emittance beam. This beam will then interact with the laser in the laser cavity to produce X-rays of a type well suited for various applications. The side-coupled structure will make the system more compact, and the π/2 mode of operation will enable a high repetition rate operation, which will help to increase the X-ray yield.

  19. A simulation of X-ray shielding for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-15

    It is generally assumed that large amounts of x-rays are emitted from the ion source of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) instrument. The total amount of x-rays should be strictly limited to avoid the extra heat load to the cryostat of the superconducting ECR ion source, since they are partly absorbed by the cold mass into the cryostat. A simulation of x-ray shielding was carried out to determine the effective thickness of the x-ray shield needed via the use of Geant4. X-ray spectra of the 10 GHz Nanogan ECR ion source were measured as a function of the thickness variation in the x-ray shield. The experimental results were compared with Geant4 results to verify the effectiveness of the x-ray shield. Based on the validity in the case of the 10 GHz ECR ion source, the x-ray shielding results are presented by assuming the spectral temperature of the 28 GHz ECR ion source.

  20. CHANDRA ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources: The Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Qiu, Yanli; Bai, Yu; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Jincheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Chandra archival data is a valuable resource for various studies on different X-ray astronomy topics. In this paper, we utilize this wealth of information and present a uniformly processed data set, which can be used to address a wide range of scientific questions. The data analysis procedures are applied to 10,029 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, which produces 363,530 source detections belonging to 217,828 distinct X-ray sources. This number is twice the size of the Chandra Source Catalog (Version 1.1). The catalogs in this paper provide abundant estimates of the detected X-ray source properties, including source positions, counts, colors, fluxes, luminosities, variability statistics, etc. Cross-correlation of these objects with galaxies shows that 17,828 sources are located within the D 25 isophotes of 1110 galaxies, and 7504 sources are located between the D 25 and 2D 25 isophotes of 910 galaxies. Contamination analysis with the log N-log S relation indicates that 51.3% of objects within 2D 25 isophotes are truly relevant to galaxies, and the “net” source fraction increases to 58.9%, 67.3%, and 69.1% for sources with luminosities above 1037, 1038, and 1039 erg s-1, respectively. Among the possible scientific uses of this catalog, we discuss the possibility of studying intra-observation variability, inter-observation variability, and supersoft sources (SSSs). About 17,092 detected sources above 10 counts are classified as variable in individual observation with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) criterion (P K-S < 0.01). There are 99,647 sources observed more than once and 11,843 sources observed 10 times or more, offering us a wealth of data with which to explore the long-term variability. There are 1638 individual objects (˜2350 detections) classified as SSSs. As a quite interesting subclass, detailed studies on X-ray spectra and optical spectroscopic follow-up are needed to categorize these SSSs and pinpoint their properties. In addition

  1. CHANDRA ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources: The Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Qiu, Yanli; Bai, Yu; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Jincheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Chandra archival data is a valuable resource for various studies on different X-ray astronomy topics. In this paper, we utilize this wealth of information and present a uniformly processed data set, which can be used to address a wide range of scientific questions. The data analysis procedures are applied to 10,029 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, which produces 363,530 source detections belonging to 217,828 distinct X-ray sources. This number is twice the size of the Chandra Source Catalog (Version 1.1). The catalogs in this paper provide abundant estimates of the detected X-ray source properties, including source positions, counts, colors, fluxes, luminosities, variability statistics, etc. Cross-correlation of these objects with galaxies shows that 17,828 sources are located within the D 25 isophotes of 1110 galaxies, and 7504 sources are located between the D 25 and 2D 25 isophotes of 910 galaxies. Contamination analysis with the log N–log S relation indicates that 51.3% of objects within 2D 25 isophotes are truly relevant to galaxies, and the “net” source fraction increases to 58.9%, 67.3%, and 69.1% for sources with luminosities above 1037, 1038, and 1039 erg s‑1, respectively. Among the possible scientific uses of this catalog, we discuss the possibility of studying intra-observation variability, inter-observation variability, and supersoft sources (SSSs). About 17,092 detected sources above 10 counts are classified as variable in individual observation with the Kolmogorov–Smirnov (K–S) criterion (P K–S < 0.01). There are 99,647 sources observed more than once and 11,843 sources observed 10 times or more, offering us a wealth of data with which to explore the long-term variability. There are 1638 individual objects (˜2350 detections) classified as SSSs. As a quite interesting subclass, detailed studies on X-ray spectra and optical spectroscopic follow-up are needed to categorize these SSSs and pinpoint their properties. In

  2. Carbon nanotube based microfocus field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zejian; Yang Guang; Lee, Yueh Z.; Bordelon, David; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2006-09-04

    Microcomputed tomography is now widely used for in vivo small animal imaging for cancer studies. Achieving high imaging quality of live objects requires the x-ray source to have both high spatial and temporal resolutions. Preliminary studies have shown that carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source has significant intrinsic advantages over the conventional thermionic x-ray tube including better temporal resolution and programmability. Here we report the design and characterization of a CNT based field emission x-ray source that also affords a high spatial resolution. The device uses modified asymmetric Einzel lenses for electron focusing and an elliptical shaped CNT cathode patterned by photolithography. Stable and small isotropic x-ray focal spot sizes were obtained.

  3. Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

    2011-03-28

    In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

  4. A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S.; Ohara, T.

    2010-08-01

    A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J ˜5×109 A/m2, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E =10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately Dx=0.5 μm.

  5. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, David M.; Gibson, Walter M.; Huang, Huapeng

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  6. THE CHANDRA LOCAL VOLUME SURVEY: THE X-RAY POINT-SOURCE CATALOG OF NGC 300

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, B.; Williams, B. F.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Anderson, S. F.; Weisz, D. R.; Eracleous, M.; Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Skillman, E. D.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2012-10-10

    We present the source catalog of a new Chandra ACIS-I observation of NGC 300 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. Our 63 ks exposure covers {approx}88% of the D{sub 25} isophote (R Almost-Equal-To 6.3 kpc) and yields a catalog of 95 X-ray point sources detected at high significance to a limiting unabsorbed 0.35-8 keV luminosity of {approx}10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Sources were cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalog, and we find 75 'X-ray transient candidate' sources that were detected by one observatory, but not the other. We derive an X-ray scale length of 1.7 {+-} 0.2 kpc and a recent star formation rate of 0.12 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} in excellent agreement with optical observations. Deep, multi-color imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, covering {approx}32% of our Chandra field, was used to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources, and we have developed a new source classification scheme to determine which sources are likely X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and background active galactic nucleus candidates. Finally, we present the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) at different X-ray energies, and we find the total NGC 300 X-ray point-source population to be consistent with other late-type galaxies hosting young stellar populations ({approx}< 50 Myr). We find that XLF of sources associated with older stellar populations has a steeper slope than the XLF of X-ray sources coinciding with young stellar populations, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  7. NEAR-INFRARED COUNTERPARTS OF CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, Curtis; Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Sellgren, Kris

    2010-10-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has now discovered nearly 10,000 X-ray point sources in the 2{sup 0} x 0.{sup 0}8 region around the Galactic Center. The sources are likely to be a population of accreting binaries in the Galactic Center, but little else is known of their nature. We obtained JHK{sub s} imaging of the 17' x 17' region around Sgr A*, an area containing 4339 of these X-ray sources, with the ISPI camera on the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 4 m telescope. We cross-correlate the Chandra and ISPI catalogs to find potential IR counterparts to the X-ray sources. The extreme IR source crowding in the field means that it is not possible to establish the authenticity of the matches with astrometry and photometry alone. We find 2137 IR/X-ray astrometrically matched sources: statistically, we estimate that our catalog contains 289 {+-} 13 true matches to soft X-ray sources and 154 {+-} 39 matches to hard X-ray sources. However, the fraction of true counterparts to candidate counterparts for hard sources is just 11%, compared to 60% for soft sources, making hard source NIR matches particularly challenging for spectroscopic follow-up. We calculate a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the matches to hard X-ray sources, and find regions where significant numbers of the IR matches are real. We use their CMD positions to place limits on the absolute K{sub s} -band magnitudes of the potential NIR counterparts to hard X-ray sources. We find regions of the counterpart CMD with 9 {+-} 3 likely Wolf-Rayet/supergiant binaries (with four spectroscopically confirmed in the literature) as well as 44 {+-} 13 candidates that could consist of either main-sequence high mass X-ray binaries or red giants with an accreting compact companion. In order to aid spectroscopic follow-up, we sort the candidate counterpart catalog on the basis of IR and X-ray properties to determine which source characteristics increase the probability of a true match. We find a set of 98 IR

  8. X-ray microscopy and imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans nematode using a laser-plasma-pulsed x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Giulio; Orsini, Franceasco; Ullschmied, Jiri; Skala, Jiri; Kralikova, Bozena; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Kadlec, Christelle; Mocek, Tomas; Prag, A. R.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia, C.; Batani, Dimitri; Bernardinello, A.; Desai, Tara; Zullini, A.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on Soft X-ray Contact Microscopy (SXCM) performed on Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes is discussed. This sample has been selected since it is a well studied case used as model in many biological contexts. The experiment has been performed using the iodine PALS laser source to generate pulsed soft X-rays from laser-plasma interaction, using molybdenum and gold as targets. Typical intensities on the targets exceeded 1014 W/cm2. The SXCM imprints have been recorded on Polymethilmetacrylate (PMMA) photo resists which have been chemically developed and analyzed with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) operating in constant force mode. The use of error signal AFM images together with topography AFM images, did allow an easier recognition of biological patterns, and the identification of observed structures with internal organs. Several organs were identified in the SXCM images, including cuticle annuli, alae, pharynx, and three different types of cell nuclei. These are the first SXCM images of multi-cellular complex organisms.

  9. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  10. VLA observations of a complete sample of extragalactic X-ray sources. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R.; Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Maccacaro, T.

    1983-01-01

    A complete sample of 35 X-ray selected sources found with the Einstein Observatory has been observed with the Very Large Array at 6 cm to investigate the relationship between radio and X-ray emission in extragalactic objects. Detections include three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), two clusters or groups of galaxies, two individual galaxies, and two BL Lac objects. The frequency of radio emission in X-ray selected AGNs is compared with that of optically selected quasars using the integral radio-optical luminosity function. The result suggests that the probability for X-ray selected quasars to be radio sources is higher than for those optically selected. No obvious correlation is found in the sample between the richness of X-ray luminosity of the cluster and the presence of a galaxy with radio luminosity at 5 GHz larger than 10 to the 30th ergs/s/Hz.

  11. Numerical simulation for all-optical Thomson scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fang; Zhu, Bin; Han, Dan; Xin, Jian-Ting; Zhao, Zong-Qing; Cao, Lei-Feng; Gu, Yu-Qiu; Zhang, Bao-Han

    2014-03-01

    Energy spectra, angular distributions, and temporal profiles of the photons produced by an all-optical Thomson scattering X-ray source are explored through numerical simulations based on the parameters of the SILEX-I laser system (800 nm, 30 fs, 300 TW) and the previous wakefield acceleration experimental results. The simulation results show that X-ray pulses with a duration of 30 fs and an emission angle of 50 mrad can be produced from such a source. Using the optimized electron parameters, X-ray pulses with better directivity and narrower energy spectra can be obtained. Besides the electron parameters, the laser parameters such as the wavelength, pulse duration, and spot size also affect the X-ray yield, the angular distribution, and the maximum photon energy, except the X-ray pulse duration which is slightly changed for the case of ultrafast laser—electron interaction.

  12. Tomography of human trabecular bone with a laser-wakefield driven x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Parker, S.; Symes, D. R.; Sandholzer, M. A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A laser-wakefield driven x-ray source is used for the radiography of human bone. The betatron motion of accelerated electrons generates x-rays which are hard (critical energy {{E}\\text{crit}}>30 keV), have small source size (<3 μm) and high average brightness. The x-rays are generated from a helium gas cell which is near-instantly replenishable, and thus the average photon flux is limited by the repetition rate of the driving laser rather than the breakdown of the x-ray source. A tomograph of a human bone sample was recorded with a resolution down to 50 μm. The photon flux was sufficiently high that a radiograph could be taken with each laser shot, and the fact that x-ray beams were produced on 97% of shots minimised failed shots and facilitated full micro-computed tomography in a reasonable time scale of several hours, limited only by the laser repetition rate. The x-ray imaging beamline length (not including the laser) is shorter than that of a synchrotron source due to the high accelerating fields and small source size. Hence this interesting laboratory-based source may one day bridge the gap between small microfocus x-ray tubes and large synchrotron facilities.

  13. X-ray Spectral Measurements of the JMAR High-Power Laser-plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Gaeta, Celestino J.; Cassidy, Kelly L.; Powers, Michael F.; Kleindolph, Thomas; Morris, James H.; Forber, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    X-ray spectra of Cu plasmas at the focus of a four-beam, solid-state diode-pumped laser have been recorded. This laser-plasma X-ray source is being developed for JMAR's lithography systems aimed at high- performance semiconductor integrated circuits. The unique simultaneous overlay of the four sub-nanosecond laser beams at 300 Hertz produces a bright, point-plasma X-ray source. PIN diode measurements of the X-ray output indicate that the conversion efficiency (ratio of X-ray emission energy into 2π steradians to incident laser energy) was approximately 9 percent with average X-ray power yields of greater than 10 Watts. Spectra were recorded on calibrated Kodak DEF film in a curved-crystal spectrograph. A KAP crystal (2d = 26.6 Angstroms) was used to disperse the 900 eV to 3000 eV spectral energies onto the film. Preliminary examination of the films indicated the existence of Cu and Cu XX ionization states. Additional spectra as a function of laser input power were also recorded to investigate potential changes in X-ray yields. These films are currently being analyzed. The analysis of the spectra provide absolute line and continuum intensities, and total X-ray output in the measured spectral range.

  14. Diagnosing the accretion flow in ultraluminous X-ray sources using soft X-ray atomic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; Walton, Dominic J.; Fabian, Andrew; Roberts, Timothy P.; Heil, Lucy; Pinto, Ciro; Anderson, Gemma; Sutton, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The lack of unambiguous detections of atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has proven a hindrance in diagnosing the nature of the accretion flow. The possible association of spectral residuals at soft energies with atomic features seen in absorption and/or emission and potentially broadened by velocity dispersion could therefore hold the key to understanding much about these enigmatic sources. Here we show for the first time that such residuals are seen in several sources and appear extremely similar in shape, implying a common origin. Via simple arguments we assert that emission from extreme colliding winds, absorption in a shell of material associated with the ULX nebula and thermal plasma emission associated with star formation are all highly unlikely to provide an origin. Whilst CCD spectra lack the energy resolution necessary to directly determine the nature of the features (i.e. formed of a complex of narrow lines or intrinsically broad lines), studying the evolution of the residuals with underlying spectral shape allows for an important, indirect test for their origin. The ULX NGC 1313 X-1 provides the best opportunity to perform such a test due to the dynamic range in spectral hardness provided by archival observations. We show through highly simplified spectral modelling that the strength of the features (in either absorption or emission) appears to anticorrelate with spectral hardness, which would rule out an origin via reflection of a primary continuum and instead supports a picture of atomic transitions in a wind or nearby material associated with such an outflow.

  15. Infrared Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Brandl, B. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Carson, J. C.; Henderson, C. P.; Hayward, T. L.; Barry, D. J.; Ptak, A. F.; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2007-03-01

    We use deep J (1.25 μm) and Ks (2.15 μm) images of the Antennae (NGC 4038/4039) obtained with the Wide-field InfraRed Camera on the Palomar 200 inch (5 m) telescope, together with the Chandra X-ray source list of Zezas and coworkers to search for infrared counterparts to X-ray point sources. We establish an X-ray/IR astrometric frame tie with ~0.5" rms residuals over a ~4.3' field. We find 13 ``strong'' IR counterparts brighter than Ks=17.8 mag and <1.0" from X-ray sources, and an additional 6 ``possible'' IR counterparts between 1.0'' and 1.5'' from X-ray sources. Based on a detailed study of the surface density of IR sources near the X-ray sources, we expect only ~2 of the ``strong'' counterparts and ~3 of the ``possible'' counterparts to be chance superpositions of unrelated objects. Comparing both strong and possible IR counterparts to our photometric study of ~220 IR clusters in the Antennae, we find with a >99.9% confidence level that IR counterparts to X-ray sources are ΔMKs~1.2 mag more luminous than average non-X-ray clusters. We also note that the X-ray/IR matches are concentrated in the spiral arms and ``overlap'' regions of the Antennae. This implies that these X-ray sources lie in the most ``super'' of the Antennae's super star clusters, and thus trace the recent massive star formation history here. Based on the NH inferred from the X-ray sources without IR counterparts, we determine that the absence of most of the ``missing'' IR counterparts is not due to extinction, but that these sources are intrinsically less luminous in the IR, implying that they trace a different (possibly older) stellar population. We find no clear correlation between X-ray luminosity classes and IR properties of the sources, although small-number statistics hamper this analysis.

  16. Evidence For Quasi-Periodic X-ray Dips From An Ultraluminous X-ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from long-term (approx.1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination > or approx.70deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  17. Probing cluster potentials through gravitational lensing of background X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refregier, A.; Loeb, A.

    1996-01-01

    The gravitational lensing effect of a foreground galaxy cluster, on the number count statistics of background X-ray sources, was examined. The lensing produces a deficit in the number of resolved sources in a ring close to the critical radius of the cluster. The cluster lens can be used as a natural telescope to study the faint end of the (log N)-(log S) relation for the sources which account for the X-ray background.

  18. Tailoring a plasma focus as hard x-ray source for imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2010-01-18

    An investigation on temporal and spatial properties of hard x-rays (15-88 keV) emitted in a 5.3 kJ plasma focus using Si pin diodes and a pinhole camera is reported. The maximum yield of hard x-rays of 15-88 keV range is estimated about 4.7 J and corresponding efficiency for x-ray generation is 0.09%. The x-rays with energy >15 keV have 15-20 ns pulse duration and approx1 mm source size. This radiation is used for contact x-ray imaging of biological and compound objects and spatial resolution of approx50 mum is demonstrated.

  19. Motionless phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a compact source

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Chen, Lei; Bennett, Eric E.; Adamo, Nick M.; Gomella, Andrew A.; DeLuca, Alexa M.; Patel, Ajay; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han

    2013-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging offers a way to visualize the internal structures of an object without the need to deposit significant radiation, and thereby alleviate the main concern in X-ray diagnostic imaging procedures today. Grating-based differential phase contrast imaging techniques are compatible with compact X-ray sources, which is a key requirement for the majority of clinical X-ray modalities. However, these methods are substantially limited by the need for mechanical phase stepping. We describe an electromagnetic phase-stepping method that eliminates mechanical motion, thus removing the constraints in speed, accuracy, and flexibility. The method is broadly applicable to both projection and tomography imaging modes. The transition from mechanical to electromagnetic scanning should greatly facilitate the translation of X-ray phase contrast techniques into mainstream applications. PMID:24218599

  20. Tailoring a plasma focus as hard x-ray source for imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2010-01-01

    An investigation on temporal and spatial properties of hard x-rays (15-88 keV) emitted in a 5.3 kJ plasma focus using Si pin diodes and a pinhole camera is reported. The maximum yield of hard x-rays of 15-88 keV range is estimated about 4.7 J and corresponding efficiency for x-ray generation is 0.09%. The x-rays with energy >15 keV have 15-20 ns pulse duration and ˜1 mm source size. This radiation is used for contact x-ray imaging of biological and compound objects and spatial resolution of ˜50 μm is demonstrated.

  1. The X-ray spectral evolution of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangtip, Wasutep; Roberts, Timothy P.; Done, Chris

    2016-08-01

    We present a new analysis of X-ray spectra of the archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 obtained by the Swift, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observatories. This ULX is a persistent source, with a typical luminosity of ˜1040 erg s-1, that varied by a factor of 4-5 over eight years. We find that its spectra tend to evolve from relatively flat or two-component spectra in the medium energy band (1-6 keV), at lower luminosities, to a spectrum that is distinctly curved and disc-like at the highest luminosities, with the peak energy in the curved spectrum tending to decrease with increased luminosity. We argue that the spectral evolution of the ULX can be explained by super-Eddington accretion models, where in this case we view the ULX down the evacuated funnel along its rotation axis, bounded by its massive radiatively driven wind. The spectral changes then originate in enhanced geometric beaming as the accretion rate increases and wind funnel narrows, causing the scattered flux from the central regions of the supercritical flow to brighten faster than the isotropic thermal emission from the wind, and so the curved hard spectral component to dominate at the highest luminosities. The wind also Compton down-scatters photons at the edge of the funnel, resulting in the peak energy of the spectrum decreasing. We also confirm that Holmberg IX X-1 displays spectral degeneracy with luminosity, and suggest that the observed differences are naturally explained by precession of the black hole rotation axis for the suggested wind geometry.

  2. Catalytic action of β source on x-ray emission from plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Sadiq, Mehboob; Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Waheed, A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of preionization around the insulator sleeve by a mesh-type β source (Ni6328) for the x-ray emission from a (2.3-3.9 kJ) plasma focus device is investigated. Quantrad Si p-i-n diodes along with suitable filters are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors and a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray emission in 4π geometry is measured as a function of argon and hydrogen gas filling pressures with and without β source at different charging voltages. It is found that the pressure range for the x-ray emission is broadened, x-ray emission is enhanced, and shot to shot reproducibility is improved with the β source. With argon, the CuKα emission is estimated to be 27.14 J with an efficiency of 0.7% for β source and 21.5 J with an efficiency of 0.55% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be about 68.90 J with an efficiency of 1.8% for β source and 54.58 J with an efficiency of 1.4% without β source. With hydrogen, CuKα emission is 11.82 J with an efficiency of 0.32% for β source and 10.07 J with an efficiency of 0.27% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be 30.20 J with an efficiency of 0.77% for β source and 25.58 J with an efficiency of 0.6% without β source. The x-ray emission with Pb insert at the anode tip without β source is also investigated and found to be reproducible and significantly high. The maximum x-ray yield is estimated to be 46.6 J in 4π geometry with an efficiency of 1.4% at 23 kV charging voltage. However, degradation of x-ray yield is observed when charging voltage exceeds 23 kV for Pb insert. From pinhole images it is observed that the x-ray emission due to the bombardment of electrons at the anode tip is dominant in both with and without β source.

  3. On the large scale structure of X-ray background sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bi, H. G.; Meszaros, A.; Meszaros, P.

    1991-01-01

    The large scale clustering of the sources responsible for the X-ray background is discussed, under the assumption of a discrete origin. The formalism necessary for calculating the X-ray spatial fluctuations in the most general case where the source density contrast in structures varies with redshift is developed. A comparison of this with observational limits is useful for obtaining information concerning various galaxy formation scenarios. The calculations presented show that a varying density contrast has a small impact on the expected X-ray fluctuations. This strengthens and extends previous conclusions concerning the size and comoving density of large scale structures at redshifts 0.5 between 4.0.

  4. Omega Dante soft x-ray power diagnostic component calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, K. M.; Weber, F. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Turner, R. E.; Waide, P. A.

    2004-10-01

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, is a 12-channel filter-edge defined soft x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the spectrally resolved, absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Dante component calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50 eV-1 keV) and X8A (1-6 keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source have been implemented to improve the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated metallic vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  5. Highly charged ion X-rays from Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indelicato, P.; Boucard, S.; Covita, D. S.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Fuhrmann, H.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Schlesser, S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simons, L. M.; Stingelin, L.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J.; Wasser, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2007-09-01

    Radiation from the highly charged ions contained in the plasma of Electron-Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) constitutes a very bright source of X-rays. Because the ions have a relatively low kinetic energy (≈1 eV) transitions can be very narrow, containing only a small Doppler broadening. We describe preliminary accurate measurements of two and three-electron ions with Z=16-18. We show how these measurement can test sensitively many-body relativistic calculations or can be used as X-ray standards for precise measurements of X-ray transitions in exotic atoms.

  6. Fresnel zone plates for Achromatic Imaging Survey of X-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Debnath, D.; Yadav, Vipin; Nandi, Anuj

    2008-10-08

    A telescope with Fresnel Zone Plates has been contemplated to be an excellent imaging mask in X-rays and gamma-rays for quite some time. With a proper choice of zone plate material, spacing and an appropriate readout system it is possible to achieve any theoretical angular resolution. We provide the results of numerical simulations of how a large number of X-ray sources could be imaged at a high resolution. We believe that such an imager would be an excellent tool for a future survey mission for X-ray and gamma-ray sources which we propose.

  7. Is the DA white dwarf 1910 + 047 a soft X-ray source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that the recently discovered DA white dwarf WD 1910 + 047 might be an Einstein soft X-ray source is studied, applying a complete model atmosphere analyis to both the optical and the soft X-ray data. It is found that the X-ray source in question is at least one order of magnitude too strong to be compatible with the estimated atmospheric parameters of the possible optical counterpart. The spatial coincidence between the two, however, remains extremely intriguing and has left us with the dilemma of accepting the relatively improbable coincidence of two unrelated objects or rejoicing over the discovery of a highly unusual one.

  8. Omega Dante Soft X-Ray Power Diagnostic Component Calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K; Weber, F; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Landen, O; Turner, R; Waide, P

    2004-04-15

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester is a twelve-channel filter-edge defined x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50eV-1keV) and X8A (1keV-6keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been implemented to insure the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  9. Design and characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blankespoor, S.C. |

    1993-12-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the author and his colleagues have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 HA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 {times} 10{sup 7} photons at 650 nm per {approximately}100 ps pulse, with up to 10{sup 7} pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray photon energy, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. They measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 6} and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} photons/sec/steradian at tube biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  10. RF photoinjector development for a short-pulse, hard x-ray Thomson scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, G. P.; Anderson, S. G.; Cowan, T. E.; Crane, J. K.; Ditmire, T.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2001-05-01

    An important motivation in the development of the next generation x-ray light sources is to achieve picosecond and sub-ps pulses of hard x-rays for dynamic studies of a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. Present hard x-ray sources are either pulse-width or intensity limited, which allows ps-scale temporal resolution only for signal averaging of highly repetitive processes. A much faster and brighter hard x-ray source is being developed at LLNL, based on Thomson scattering of fs-laser pulses by a relativistic electron beam, which will enable x-ray characterization of the transient structure of a sample in a single shot. Experimental and diagnostic techniques relevant to the development of next generation sources including the Linac Coherent Light Source can be tested with the Thomson scattering hard x-ray source. This source will combine an RF photoinjector with a 100 MeV S-band linac. The photoinjector and linac also provide an ideal test-bed for examining space-charge induced emittance growth effects. A program of beam dynamics and diagnostic experiments are planned in parallel with Thomson source development. Our experimental progress and future plans will be discussed.

  11. Prospects for using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Farrell, W.; Ma, Q.

    1997-09-01

    Third-generation, high-intensity, x-ray synchrotron radiation sources are capable of producing high heat-flux x-ray beams. In many applications finding ways to handle these powers is viewed as a burden. However, there are some technological applications where the deep penetration length of the x-rays may find beneficial uses as a volumetric heat source. In this paper the authors discuss the prospects for using high power x-rays for volumetric heating and report some recent experimental results. The particular applications they focus on are welding and surface heat treatment. The radiation source is an undulator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Results of preliminary tests on aluminum, aluminum metal matrix composites, and steel will be presented.

  12. X-rays beware: the deepest Chandra catalogue of point sources in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulic, N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Barmby, P.

    2016-10-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ˜1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, north-east, and south-west fields of M31, covering an area of ≈0.6 deg2, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of ˜1034 erg s-1. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's D25 isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49 per cent) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44 per cent unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to previous Chandra X-ray sources we detected 259. new sources in our catalogue. We created X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in the soft (0.5-2.0 keV) and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands that are the most sensitive for any large galaxy based on our detection limits. Completeness-corrected XLFs show a break around ≈1.3 × 1037 erg s-1, consistent with previous work. As in past surveys, we find that the bulge XLFs are flatter than the disc, indicating a lack of bright high-mass X-ray binaries in the disc and an aging population of low-mass X-ray binaries in the bulge.

  13. 77 FR 12226 - Sadex Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of... use of electron beam and x- ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed...

  14. Long Duration Multi-hohlraum X-ray Sources for Eagle Nebula Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Heeter, Robert; Martinez, David; Casner, Alexis; Villette, Bruno; Mancini, Roberto; Pound, Marc

    2013-10-01

    A novel foam-filled multi-hohlraum long-duration x-ray source has been demonstrated at the Omega EP laser and used to obtain L-band spectra of photoionized Ti. A larger scale version of the source will be used in the Science on NIF Eagle Nebula experiments studying dynamic evolution of distinctive pillar and cometary structures in star-forming clouds, where the long duration and directionality of photoionizing radiation from nearby stars generates new classes of flows and instabilities. At NIF, a target representing an astrophysical molecular cloud will be placed several mm from an x-ray source lasting 40-100 ns. At EP, three hohlraums were illuminated in sequence with 3.3 kJ pulses lasting 6 ns, or 4.3 kJ pulses lasting 10 ns, generating 18 or 30 ns of x-ray output at 90-100 eV color temperature. Performance of the source was validated using the μ DMX and VSG spectrometers, ASBO VISAR, and x-ray pinhole imagery. The HYDRA code suggests the EP-scale source can also be shot at NIF with at least 10 kJ per hohlraum. The multi-hohlraum source concept has potential further application to hard x-ray sources, soft x-ray backlighters, and nonlinear ablative hydrodynamics. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. J. Kane supported by DOE OFES grant HEDLP LAB 11-583.

  15. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-15

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  16. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Falcone, Roger

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  17. Convertible source system of thermal neutron and X-ray at Hokkaido University electron linac facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, T.; Hara, K. Y.; Taira, H.; Sato, H.

    2016-11-01

    The convertible source system for the neutron and the X-ray imagings was installed in the 45MeV electron linear accelerator facility at Hokkaido University. The source system is very useful for a complementary imaging. The imaging measurements for a sample were performed with both beams by using a vacuum tube type image intensifier. The enhanced contrast was obtained from the dataset of the radiograms measured with the neutron and X-ray beams.

  18. Quasiperiodic oscillations in bright galactic-bulge X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Shibazaki, N.; Alpar, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    Quasiperiodic oscillations with frequencies in the range 5-50 Hz have recently been discovered in X-rays from two bright galactic-bulge sources and Sco X-1. These sources are weakly magnetic neutron stars accreting from disks which the plasma is clumped. The interaction of the magnetosphere with clumps in the inner disk causes oscillations in the X-ray flux with many of the properties observed.

  19. Transient X-Ray Source Population in the Magellanic-type Galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jithesh, V.; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral and temporal properties of 15 candidate transient X-ray sources detected in archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the nearby Magellanic-type, SB(s)m galaxy NGC 55. Based on an X-ray color classification scheme, the majority of the sources may be identified as X-ray binaries (XRBs), and six sources are soft, including a likely supernova remnant. We perform a detailed spectral and variability analysis of the data for two bright candidate XRBs. Both sources displayed strong short-term X-ray variability, and their X-ray spectra and hardness ratios are consistent with those of XRBs. These results, combined with their high X-ray luminosities (˜1038 erg s-1), strongly suggest that they are black hole (BH) binaries. Seven less luminous sources have spectral properties consistent with those of neutron star or BH XRBs in both normal and high-rate accretion modes, but one of them is the likely counterpart to a background galaxy (because of positional coincidence). From our spectral analysis, we find that the six soft sources are candidate super soft sources (SSSs) with dominant emission in the soft (0.3-2 keV) X-ray band. Archival Hubble Space Telescope optical images for seven sources are available, and the data suggest that most of them are likely to be high-mass XRBs. Our analysis has revealed the heterogeneous nature of the transient population in NGC 55 (six high-mass XRBs, one low-mass XRBs, six SSSs, one active galactic nucleus), helping establish the similarity of the X-ray properties of this galaxy to those of other Magellanic-type galaxies.

  20. Optical synchronization system for femtosecond X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.; Holzwarth, Ronald

    2011-12-13

    Femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses require precise synchronization between 100 meter-10 km separated lasers in a various experiments. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1-10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with various implementations. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range two single-frequency lasers separated by several teraHertz will be lock to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes.

  1. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    PubMed

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  2. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  3. The luminosity function of galactic X-ray sources - A cutoff and a 'standard candle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of the 2- to 10-kev luminosity distribution of 36 X-ray sources in the Local Group having known or estimated distances, showing that there exists a luminosity cutoff of approximately 10 to the 37.7th ergs/sec in agreement with the theoretical (Eddington) limit for the luminosity of an approximately 1 solar mass star. Furthermore, among the complete sample of high-luminosity sources, there appears to be a statistically significant group of X-ray 'standard candles' at (within less than 0.8 mag) the critical luminosity. This finding (which is in agreement with the self-consistent mass flow accretion models) presents the possibility that X-ray sources may be used as extragalactic distance indicators in the next generation of X-ray astronomy experiments.

  4. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy∕min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result. PMID:21691440

  5. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-23

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  6. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  7. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the X-Ray Sources in the NGC 5018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Saripalli, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    The E3 giant elliptical galaxy NGC-5018 was observed with the cxo X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer for 30-h on 14 April 2001. Results of analysis of these X-ray data as well as of complementary optical, infrared, and radio data are reported. Seven X-ray point sources, including the nucleus, were detected. If they are intrinsic to NGC-5018, then all six non-nuclear sources have luminosities exceeding 10(exp 39)-ergl in the 0.5-8.0-keV energy band; placing them in the class of Ultra- luminous X-ray sources. Comparison of X-ray source positions to archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (hst/WFPC2) images reveal four of the six non-nuclear sources are spatially--coincident with bright, M$(sub V)LA -8.6 mag, objects. These four objects have optical magnitudes and (V-I) colors consistent with globular clusters in NGC-5018. However, one of these objects was observed to vary by siml mag in both V and I between observations taken 28 July 1997 and 04 Feb 1999 indicating this source is a background active galactic nucleus (AGN). The nature of the other three optically-bright objects cannot be determined from the available optical data but all have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios consistent with background AGNs. Strong, unpolarized, radio emission has been detected from another of the optically-bright counterparts. It displays an inverted radio spectrum and is the most absorbed of the seven sources in the X-ray band. It, too, is most readily explained as a background AGN, though alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. Extended X-ray emission is detected within a siml5 arcsec radius of the galaxy center at a luminosity of sim lO(exp 40)-ergl in the X-ray band. Its thermal X-ray spectrum (kT sim0.4-keV) and its spatial coincidence with strong H(alpha) emission are consistent with a hot gas origin. The nucleus itself is a weak X-ray source, LA-5 times 10(exp 39)-ergl, but displays a radio spectrum typical of AGN.

  8. Large aperture micro-focus KB mirrors for spectroscopy experiments at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Andresen, N.; Comins, J.; Franck, A.; Gilles, M.; Tonnessen, T.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2004-06-04

    General purpose refocus mirrors using Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry have been designed, built and installed at a new undulator beam-line facility to provide spot sizes smaller than 10 microns for specialized spectroscopy experiments at the Advanced Light Source. All the available flux is focused and the focal length is adjustable. The mirrors are fully computer controlled and can be detuned to create a spot as big as 500 microns.

  9. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G.; Heimann, P.; Krupin, O.; Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Kelez, N.; Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W.; and others

    2012-04-15

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  10. X-ray sources and high-throughput data collection methods.

    PubMed

    Snell, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction experiments on protein crystals are at the core of the structure determination process. An overview of X-ray sources and data collection methods to support structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts is presented in this chapter. First, methods of generating and manipulating X-rays for the purpose of protein crystallography, as well as the components of the diffraction experiment setup are discussed. SBDD requires the determination of numerous protein-ligand complex structures in a timely manner, and the second part of this chapter describes how to perform diffraction experiments efficiently on a large number of crystals, including crystal screening and data collection.

  11. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays. II. Faint Sources Detected with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, N. E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I.; Mukai, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection from four symbiotic stars that were not known to be X-ray sources. These four object show a ß-type X-ray spectrum, that is, their spectra can be modeled with an absorbed optically thin thermal emission with temperatures of a few million degrees. Photometric series obtained with the Optical Monitor on board XMM-Newton from V2416 Sgr and NSV 25735 support the proposed scenario where the X-ray emission is produced in a shock-heated region inside the symbiotic nebulae.

  12. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  13. X-Ray Sources and High-Throughput Data Collection Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Gyorgy

    2012-03-15

    X-ray diffraction experiments on protein crystals are at the core of the structure determination process. An overview of X-ray sources and data collection methods to support structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts is presented in this chapter. First, methods of generating and manipulating X-rays for the purpose of protein crystallography, as well as the components of the diffraction experiment setup are discussed. SBDD requires the determination of numerous protein-ligand complex structures in a timely manner, and the second part of this chapter describes how to perform diffraction experiments efficiently on a large number of crystals, including crystal screening and data collection.

  14. Development of a Novel Tunable X-Ray Source for the RPI-LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Danon; R.C. Block

    2004-11-30

    This document summarizes the results of a three year effort to develop a parametric x-ray (PXR) source. The emphasis of this research was to demonstrate production of high yield monoenergetic x-rays. Production of PXR is accomplished by placing a crystal in a relativistic electron beam. The process was first demonstrated in 1985 in Russia. Numerous papers were written about the characteristics of PXR from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. The advantage of PXR over other monoenergetic x-ray sources is that it is produced at large angle relative to the electron beam and at high intensity. None of the previous work described in the literature capitalized on this effect to study what is required in order to generate an effective monoenergetic x-ray source that can be used for practical applications. The work summarized here describes the process done in order to optimize the PXR production process by selecting an appropriate crystal and the optimal conditions. The research focused on production of 18 keV x-rays which are suitable for mammography however the results are not limited to this application or energy range. We are the first group to demonstrate x-ray imaging using PXR. Such sources can improve current medical imaging modalities. More research is required in order to design a prototype of a compact source.

  15. Chandra Resolves Cosmic X-ray Glow and Finds Mysterious New Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    While taking a giant leap towards solving one of the greatest mysteries of X-ray astronomy, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory also may have revealed the most distant objects ever seen in the universe and discovered two puzzling new types of cosmic objects. Not bad for being on the job only five months. Chandra has resolved most of the X-ray background, a pervasive glow of X-rays throughout the universe, first discovered in the early days of space exploration. Before now, scientists have not been able to discern the background's origin, because no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. "This is a major discovery," said Dr. Alan Bunner, Director of NASA's Structure andEvolution of the universe science theme. "Since it was first observed thirty-seven years ago, understanding the source of the X-ray background has been aHoly Grail of X-ray astronomy. Now, it is within reach." The results of the observation will be discussed today at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Georgia. An article describing this work has been submitted to the journal Nature by Dr. Richard Mushotzky, of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., Drs. Lennox Cowie and Amy Barger at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, and Dr. Keith Arnaud of the University of Maryland, College Park. "We are all very excited by this finding," said Mushotzky. "The resolution of most of the hard X-ray background during the first few months of the Chandra mission is a tribute to the power of this observatory and bodes extremely well for its scientific future," Scientists have known about the X-ray glow, called the X-ray background, since the dawn of X-ray astronomy in the early 1960s. They have been unable to discern its origin, however, for no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. The German-led ROSAT mission, now completed, resolved much of the lower

  16. Derivation of total filtration thickness for diagnostic x-ray source assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Michiharu; Katoh, Yoh

    2016-08-01

    The method defined by the IEC 60522 for determining the inherent filtration of an x-ray source device is applicable only for a limited range of tube voltage. Because the users cannot legally remove the x-ray movable diaphragm of the x-ray source device, total filtration, which is the sum of the additional filtration diaphragm movable for specific filtration and x-ray, cannot be measured. We develop a method for simply obtaining the total filtration for different tube voltage values. Total filtration can be estimated from a ratio R‧ of the air kerma Kx+T\\prime , which is measured with an Al plate with thickness T, and Kx\\prime measured without an Al plate. The conditions of the target material of the x-ray source device are then entered into the Report 78 Spectrum Processor to calculate the air kerma K x and K x+T for Al thicknesses x and (x  +  T), respectively, to obtain R. The minimum value of x, which is the difference between the R and R‧, is the total filtration of the x-ray source device. The total filtration calculated using the industrial x-ray source device was within  ±1% in the 40–120 kV range. This method can calculate the total filtration using air kerma measurements with and without the Al plate. Therefore, the load on the x-ray tube can be reduced, and preparation of multiple Al plates is not necessary. Furthermore, for the 40–120 kV tube voltage range, the user can easily measure the total filtration.

  17. Derivation of total filtration thickness for diagnostic x-ray source assembly.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Michiharu; Katoh, Yoh

    2016-08-21

    The method defined by the IEC 60522 for determining the inherent filtration of an x-ray source device is applicable only for a limited range of tube voltage. Because the users cannot legally remove the x-ray movable diaphragm of the x-ray source device, total filtration, which is the sum of the additional filtration diaphragm movable for specific filtration and x-ray, cannot be measured. We develop a method for simply obtaining the total filtration for different tube voltage values. Total filtration can be estimated from a ratio R' of the air kerma [Formula: see text], which is measured with an Al plate with thickness T, and [Formula: see text] measured without an Al plate. The conditions of the target material of the x-ray source device are then entered into the Report 78 Spectrum Processor to calculate the air kerma K x and K x+T for Al thicknesses x and (x  +  T), respectively, to obtain R. The minimum value of x, which is the difference between the R and R', is the total filtration of the x-ray source device. The total filtration calculated using the industrial x-ray source device was within  ±1% in the 40-120 kV range. This method can calculate the total filtration using air kerma measurements with and without the Al plate. Therefore, the load on the x-ray tube can be reduced, and preparation of multiple Al plates is not necessary. Furthermore, for the 40-120 kV tube voltage range, the user can easily measure the total filtration.

  18. Impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilmer, N.; Trotter, G.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reports recent observations of a relatively large hard X-ray burst with well developed impulsive and gradual components, that was associated with a relatively modest optical flare on Aug. 14, 1979. The impulsive X-ray source has a much higher ion density and the electron injection in the phase is shorter in duration consisting of fewer energetic electrons than in the gradual phase. The gradual X-ray source seems to consist of a lower density region, probably bounded by a magnetic arch in which the energetic electrons are perfectly trapped. The different temporal development of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray components suggest large differences in the physical parameters of the ambient plasma.

  19. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I - The naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but 'naked' T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope.

  20. Beyond crystallography: Diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jianwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Robinson, Ian K.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    2015-05-01

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  1. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fella, C.; Balles, A.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results.

  2. Persistent X-ray emission from a gamma-ray burst source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Cline, T.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Laros, J. G.; Hurley, K. C.; Niel, M.; Klebesadel, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A quiescent X-ray source detected with the Einstein X-ray Observatory in a location consistent with that of an intense gamma ray burst is shown to be also consistent with the location of the 1928 optical transient, the likely optical counterpart of the gamma ray burst source GBS0117-29. The system appears to be underluminous in X-rays by a factor of 10; possible reasons for this are discussed. The observed X-ray flux would require an accretion rate of about 10 to the -14th (d/1 kpc/)-squared solar masses per year, which is probably too low to be consistent with published nuclear flash models for gamma bursts, unless the distance is substantially greater than about 1 kpc or the burst recurrence time is greater than about 50 yrs, or the accretion rate is highly variable. Such a long recurrence time appears to be inconsistent with the detection of the optical burst.

  3. Fourth-generation X-ray sources: some possible applications to biology.

    PubMed

    Doniach, S

    2000-05-01

    The term 'fourth generation X-ray sources' has come to mean X-ray free-electron lasers which use multi-GeV electron beams from linear accelerators to generate X-rays by self-amplified stimulated emission when fired into long undulators. Properties of the radiation expected from such sources are reviewed briefly and two possible applications of the resulting pulsed highly collimated X-radiation to problems in biology are discussed: use of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy to measure time correlations of atoms in protein crystals, and use of Mössbauer radiation extracted from the photon beams by resonant Bragg diffraction from (57)Fe-containing crystals, for MAD phasing of very large unit-cell biomolecular crystals and possibly for photon echo measurements.

  4. A 9 keV electron-impact liquid-gallium-jet x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Otendal, M.; Tuohimaa, T.; Vogt, U.; Hertz, H. M.

    2008-01-15

    We demonstrate a high-brightness compact 9 keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on a liquid-gallium-jet anode. A {approx}30 W, 50 kV electron gun is focused onto the {approx}20 m/s, 30 {mu}m diameter liquid-gallium-jet anode to produce an {approx}10 {mu}m full width at half maximum x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is >2x10{sup 10} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2}x0.1% BW). Calculation and experiments show potential for increasing this brightness by approximately three orders of magnitude, making the source suitable for laboratory-scale x-ray crystallography and hard x-ray microscopy.

  5. X-ray phase contrast tomography with a bending magnet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, A. G.; De Carlo, F.; McMahon, P. J.; Dhal, B. B.; Nugent, K. A.

    2005-08-01

    X-ray radiography and x-ray tomography are important tools for noninvasive characterization of materials. Historically, the contrast mechanism used with these techniques has been absorption. However, for any given sample there are x-ray energies for which absorption contrast is poor. Alternatively, when good contrast can be obtained, radiation damage from an excessive dose may become an issue. Consequently, phase-contrast methods have in recent years been implemented at both synchrotron and laboratory facilities. A range of radiographic and tomographic demonstrations have now been made, typically utilizing the coherent flux from an insertion device at a synchrotron or a microfocus laboratory source. In this paper we demonstrate that useful results may be obtained using a bending magnet source at a synchrotron. In particular we show that the same beamline can be used to make and characterize a sample made by x-ray lithographic methods.

  6. Ultrafast Materials Probing with the LLNL Thomson X-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, P; Anderson, S; Brown, W; Barty, C; Cauble, R; Crane, J; Cynn, H; Ebbers, C; Fittinghoff, D; Gibson, D; Hartemann, F; Javanovich, I; Kuba, J; LeSage, G; McMahan, A; Minich, R; Moriarty, J; Remington, B; Slaughter, D; Steitz, F H; Tremaine, A; Yoo, C-s; Rosenzweig, J; Ditmire, T

    2002-09-03

    The use of short laser pulses to generate very high brightness, ultra short (fs to ps) x-ray pulses is a topic of great interest. In principle, fantosecond-scale pump-probe experiments can be used to temporally resolve structural dynamics of materials on the time scale of atomic motion. The development of sub-ps x-ray pulses will make possible a wide range of materials and plasma physics studies with unprecedented time resolution. The Thomson scattering project at LLNL will provide such a novel x-ray source of high power using short laser pulses and a high brightness, relativistic electron bunch. The system is based on a 5mm-mrad normalized emittance photoinjector, 100 MeV electron RF linac, and a 300 mJ, 35 fs solid-state laser system. The Thomson source will produce ultra fast pulses with x-ray energies (60 kev) capable of probing into high-Z metals.

  7. Beyond crystallography: diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Robinson, Ian K; Murnane, Margaret M

    2015-05-01

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  8. Beyond crystallography: Diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Robinson, I. K.; Murnane, M. M.

    2015-04-30

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  9. Time-resolved materials science opportunities using synchrotron x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1995-06-01

    The high brightness, high intensity, and pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources provide new opportunities for time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. With third generation synchrotron sources coming on line, high brilliance and high brightness are now available in x-ray beams with the highest flux. In addition to the high average flux, the instantaneous flux available in synchrotron beams is greatly enhanced by the pulsed time structure, which consists of short bursts of x-rays that are separated by {approximately}tens to hundreds of nanoseconds. Time-resolved one- and two-dimensional position sensitive detection techniques that take advantage of synchrotron radiation for materials science x-ray diffraction investigations are presented, and time resolved materials science applications are discussed in terms of recent diffraction and spectroscopy results and materials research opportunities.

  10. Quantitative phase retrieval with picosecond X-ray pulses from the ATF Inverse Compton Scattering source

    SciTech Connect

    Endrizzi, M.; Pogorelsky, I.; Gureyev, T.E.; Delogu, P.; Oliva, P.; Golosio, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Yakimenko, Y.; Bottigli, U.

    2011-01-28

    Quantitative phase retrieval is experimentally demonstrated using the Inverse Compton Scattering X-ray source available at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Phase-contrast images are collected using in-line geometry, with a single X-ray pulse of approximate duration of one picosecond. The projected thickness of homogeneous samples of various polymers is recovered quantitatively from the time-averaged intensity of transmitted X-rays. The data are in good agreement with the expectations showing that ATF Inverse Compton Scattering source is suitable for performing phase-sensitive quantitative X-ray imaging on the picosecond scale. The method shows promise for quantitative imaging of fast dynamic phenomena.

  11. The deep census of the X-ray source populations in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; SMC XVP Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We present the first results from the Chandra Deep Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The goal of this project is to characterize the X-ray sources detected in the 1.1 Ms Chandra survey of the SMC, which provides a census of their populations down to a luminosity of 10^32 erg/s in 11 fields sampling young (10-100 Myr) stellar populations of different ages. We detect between 50-90 X-ray sources in each field, for which we measure their photometric and spectroscopic parameters. Analysis of their light-curves is used to identify accreting pulsars and flaring objects. The initial X-ray source lists have been cross-correlated with optical and IR photometric and spectroscopic catalogs (such as the OGLE and SAGE). We have determined the most likely optical counterpart for those sources, and based on the combination of their X-ray and multiwavelength properties, we identify candidate Be-XRBs and interlopers (foreground stars and AGN). The X-ray luminosity function of the Be-XRBs shows clear evidence for a break at low luminosities that is consistent with the onset of the propeller effect. Finally we present the first results from an analysis of the clustering of the X-ray binaries in the SMC with stellar populations of different ages.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ultraluminous X-ray sources in nearby galaxies (Liu+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-F.; Bregman, J. N.

    2005-08-01

    X-ray observations have revealed in other galaxies a class of extranuclear X-ray point sources with X-ray luminosities of 1039-1041ergs/s, exceeding the Eddington luminosity for stellar mass X-ray binaries. These ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) may be powered by intermediate-mass black holes of a few thousand MSun or stellar mass black holes with special radiation processes. In this paper, we present a survey of ULXs in 313 nearby galaxies with D25>1 within 40Mpc with 467 ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) archival observations. The HRI observations are reduced with uniform procedures, refined by simulations that help define the point source detection algorithm employed in this survey. A sample of 562 extragalactic X-ray point sources with LX=1038-1043ergs/s is extracted from 173 survey galaxies, including 106 ULX candidates within the D25 isophotes of 63 galaxies and 110 ULX candidates between 1D25 and 2D25 of 64 galaxies, from which a clean sample of 109 ULXs is constructed to minimize the contamination from foreground or background objects. (3 data files).

  13. Optical Synchronization Systems for Femtosecond X-raySources

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Russell; Staples, John W.; Holzwarth, Ronald

    2004-05-09

    In femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses, precise synchronization must be maintained between widely separated lasers in a synchrotron or FEL facility. We are developing synchronization systems using optical signals for applications requiring different ranges of timing error over 100 meter of glass fiber. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1 10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with a piezoelectric phase modulator. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range we will lock two single-frequency lasers separated by several tera Hertz to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes.

  14. Studies of a prototype linear stationary x-ray source for tomosynthesis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoebel, P. R.; Boone, John M.; Shao, Joe

    2014-05-01

    A prototype linear x-ray source to implement stationary source-stationary detector tomosynthesis (TS) imaging has been studied. Potential applications include human breast and small animal imaging. The source is comprised of ten x-ray source elements each consisting of a field emission cathode, electrostatic lens, and target. The electrostatic lens and target are common to all elements. The source elements form x-ray focal spots with minimum diameters of 0.3-0.4 mm at electron beam currents of up to 40 mA with a beam voltage of 40 kV. The x-ray flux versus time was quantified from each source. X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra from tungsten targets were produced using electron beam energies from 35 to 50 keV. The half-value layer was measured to be 0.8, 0.9, and 1.0 mm, respectively, for the 35, 40, and 45 kV tube potentials using the tungsten target. The suppression of voltage breakdown events, particularly during source operation, and the use of a modified form of the standard cold-cathode geometry, enhanced source reliability. The prototype linear source was used to collect tomographic data sets of a mouse phantom using digital TS reconstruction methods and demonstrated a slice-sensitivity profile with a full-width-half-maximum of 1.3 mm. Lastly, preliminary studies of tomographic imaging of flow through the mouse phantom were performed.

  15. Development of grating-based x-ray Talbot interferometry at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao Xianghui; Wojcik, Michael J.; Divan, Ralu; Butler, Leslie G.; Ham, Kyungmin; Fezzaa, Kamel; Erdmann, Mark; Wen, Han H.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Macrander, Albert T.; De Carlo, Francesco; Mancini, Derrick C.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2012-07-31

    We report on the ongoing effort to develop hard x-ray Talbot interferometry at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory, USA. We describe the design of the interferometer and preliminary results obtained at 25 keV using a feather and a phantom sample lithographically fabricated of gold. We mention the future developmental goals and applications of this technique as a metrology tool for x-ray optics and beam wavefront characterization.

  16. X-ray phase imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2013-04-22

    A novel approach for hard x-ray phase contrast imaging with a laboratory source is reported. The technique is based on total external reflection from the edge of a mirror, aligned to intercept only half of the incident beam. The mirror edge thus produces two beams. The refraction x-rays undergo when interacting with a sample placed before the mirror, causes relative intensity variations between direct and reflected beams. Quantitative phase contrast and pure absorption imaging are demonstrated using this method.

  17. The SPARX Project: R & D Activity Towards X-Rays FEL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; /Frascati /ENEA, Frascati /INFN, Milan /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome2 /Milan Polytechnic /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    SPARX is an evolutionary project proposed by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata aiming at the construction of a FELSASE X-ray source in the Tor Vergata Campus. The first phase of the SPARX project, funded by Government Agencies, will be focused on R&D activity on critical components and techniques for future X-ray facilities as described in this paper.

  18. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF X-RAY SOURCES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, A. H.; Primini, F.; McDowell, J. C.; Zezas, A.; Kilgard, R. E.

    2009-11-10

    X-ray sources in spiral galaxies can be approximately classified into bulge and disk populations. The bulge (or hard) sources have X-ray colors which are consistent with low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) but the disk sources have softer colors suggesting a different type of source. In this paper, we further study the properties of hard and soft sources by constructing color-segregated X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for these two populations. Since the number of sources in any given galaxy is small, we co-added sources from a sample of nearby, face-on spiral galaxies observed by Chandra as a Large Project in Cycle 2. We use simulations to carefully correct the XLF for completeness. The composite hard source XLF is not consistent with a single-power-law fit. At luminosities L{sub x} > 3 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, it is well fitted by a power law with a slope that is consistent with that found for sources in elliptical galaxies by Kim and Fabbiano. This supports the suggestion that the hard sources are dominated by LMXBs. In contrast, the high-luminosity XLF of soft sources has a slope similar to the 'universal' high-mass X-ray binary XLF. Some of these sources are stellar-mass black hole binaries accreting at high rates in a thermal/steep power-law state. The softest sources have inferred disk temperatures that are considerably lower than found in galactic black holes binaries. These sources are not well understood, but some may be super-soft ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a quiescent state as suggested by Soria and Ghosh.

  19. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5-9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ˜460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  20. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-15

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5–9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ∼460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  1. Phase Contrast Imaging with Coded Apertures Using Laboratory-Based X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatyev, K.; Munro, P. R. T.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2011-09-09

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a powerful technique that allows detection of changes in the phase of x-ray wavefronts as they pass through a sample. As a result, details not visible in conventional x-ray absorption imaging can be detected. Until recently the majority of applications of phase contrast imaging were at synchrotron facilities due to the availability of their high flux and coherence; however, a number of techniques have appeared recently that allow phase contrast imaging to be performed using laboratory sources. Here we describe a phase contrast imaging technique, developed at University College London, that uses two coded apertures. The x-ray beam is shaped by the pre-sample aperture, and small deviations in the x-ray propagation direction are detected with the help of the detector aperture. In contrast with other methods, it has a much more relaxed requirement for the source size (it works with source sizes up to 100 {mu}m). A working prototype coded-aperture system has been built. An x-ray detector with directly deposited columnar CsI has been used to minimize signal spill-over into neighboring pixels. Phase contrast images obtained with the system have demonstrated its effectiveness for imaging low-absorption materials.

  2. 600 eV falcon-linac thomson x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K; LeSage, G P; Ditmire, T; Cross, R; Wharton, K; Moffitt, K; Cowan, T E; Hays, G; Tsai, V; Anderson, G; Shuttlesworth, R; Springer, P

    2000-12-15

    The advent of 3rd generation light sources such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBL, and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, have produced a revolution in x-ray probing of dense matter during the past decade. These machines use electron-synchrotrons in conjunction with undulator stages to produce 100 psec x-ray pulses with photon energies of several kiloelectronvolts (keV). The applications for x-ray probing of matter are numerous and diverse with experiments in medicine and biology, semiconductors and materials science, and plasma and solid state physics. In spite of the success of the 3rd generation light sources there is strong motivation to push the capabilities of x-ray probing into new realms, requiring shorter pulses, higher brightness and harder x-rays. A 4th generation light source, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is being considered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator [1]. The LCLS will produce multi-kilovolt x-rays of subpicosecond duration that are 10 orders of magnitude brighter than today's 3rd generation light sources.[1] Although the LCLS will provide unprecedented capability for performing time-resolved x-ray probing of ultrafast phenomena at solid densities, this machine will not be completed for many years. In the meantime there is a serious need for an ultrashort-pulse, high-brightness, hard x-ray source that is capable of probing deep into high-Z solid materials to measure dynamic effects that occur on picosecond time scales. Such an instrument would be ideal for probing the effects of shock propagation in solids using Bragg and Laue diffraction. These techniques can be used to look at phase transitions, melting and recrystallization, and the propagation of defects and dislocations well below the surface in solid materials. [2] These types of dynamic phenomena undermine the mechanical properties of metals and are of general interest in solid state physics, materials science, metallurgy, and have specific relevance to stockpile

  3. ROSAT X-ray sources embedded in the rho Ophiuchi cloud core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Sophie; Montmerle, Thierry; Feigelson, Eric D.; Andre, Philippe

    1995-02-01

    We present a deep ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image of the central region of the rho Oph star-forming region. The selected area, about 35 x 35 arcmins in size, is rich with dense molecular cores and young stellar objects (YSOs). Fifty-five reliable X-ray sources are detected (and up to 50 more candidates may be present) above approximately 1 keV,, doubling the number of Einstein sources in this area. These sources are cross-identified with an updated list of 88 YSOs associated with the rho Oph cloud core. A third of the reliable X-ray sources do not have optical counterparts on photographic plates. Most can be cross-identified wth Class II and Class III infrared (IR) sources, which are embedded T Tauri stars, but three reliable X-ray sources and up to seven candidate sources are tentatively identified with Class I protostars. Eighteen reliable, and up to 20 candidate, X-ray sources are probably new cloud members. The overall detection rate of the bona fide cloud population is very high (73% for the Class II and Class III objects). The spatial distribution of the X-ray sources closely follows that of the moleclar gas. The visual extinctions Av estimated from near-IR data) of the ROSAT sources can be as high as 50 or more, confirming that most are embedded in the cloud core and are presumably very young. Using bolometric luminosities Lbol estimated from J-magnitudes a tight correlation between Lx and Lbol is found, similar to that seen for older T Tauri stars in the Cha I cloud: Lx approximately 10-4 Lbol. A general relation Lxproportional to LbolLj seems to apply to all T Tauri-like YSOs. The near equality of the extintion in the IR J band and in the keV X-ray rage implies that this relation is valid for the detected fluxes as well as for the dereddened fluxes. The X-ray luminosity function of the embedded sourced in rho Oph spans a range of Lx approximately 1028.5 to approximately equal to or greater than 1031.5 ergs/s and is statistically

  4. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  5. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  6. A compact soft X-ray microscope using an electrode-less Z-pinch source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, S. F.; Silterra, J.; Holber, W.

    2009-09-01

    Soft X-rays (< 1Kev) are of medical interest both for imaging and microdosimetry applications. X-ray sources at this low energy present a technological challenge. Synchrotrons, while very powerful and flexible, are enormously expensive national research facilities. Conventional X-ray sources based on electron bombardment can be compact and inexpensive, but low x-ray production efficiencies at low electron energies restrict this approach to very low power applications. Laser-based sources tend to be expensive and unreliable. Energetiq Technology, Inc. (Woburn, MA, USA) markets a 92 eV, 10W(2pi sr) electrode-less Z-pinch source developed for advanced semiconductor lithography. A modified version of this commercial product has produced 400 mW at 430 eV (2pi sr), appropriate for water window soft X-ray microscopy. The US NIH has funded Energetiq to design and construct a demonstration microscope using this source, coupled to a condenser optic, as the illumination system. The design of the condenser optic matches the unique characteristics of the source to the illumination requirements of the microscope, which is otherwise a conventional design. A separate program is underway to develop a microbeam system, in conjunction with the RARAF facility at Columbia University, NY, USA. The objective is to develop a focused, sub-micron beam capable of delivering > 1 Gy/second to the nucleus of a living cell. While most facilities of this type are coupled to a large and expensive particle accelerator, the Z-pinch X-ray source enables a compact, stand-alone design suitable to a small laboratory. The major technical issues in this system involve development of suitable focusing X-ray optics. Current status of these programs will be reported. (Supported by NIH grants 5R44RR022488-03 and 5R44RR023753-03)

  7. Characteristics of a molybdenum X-pinch X-ray source as a probe source for X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zucchini, F.; Chauvin, C.; Combes, P.; Sol, D.; Loyen, A.; Roques, B.; Grunenwald, J.; Bland, S. N.

    2015-03-15

    X-ray emission from a molybdenum X-pinch has been investigated as a potential probe for the high pressure states made in dynamic compression experiments. Studies were performed on a novel 300 kA, 400 ns generator which coupled the load directly to a low inductance capacitor and switch combination. The X-pinch load consisted of 4 crossed molybdenum wires of 13 μm diameter, crossed at an angle of 62°. The load height was 10 mm. An initial x-ray burst generated at the wire crossing point, radiated in the soft x-ray range (hυ < 10 keV). This was followed, 2–5 ns later, by at least one harder x-ray burst (hυ > 10 keV) whose power ranged from 1 to 7 MW. Time integrated spectral measurements showed that the harder bursts were dominated by K-alpha emission; though, a lower level, wide band continuum up to at least 30 keV was also present. Initial tests demonstrated that the source was capable of driving Laue diffraction experiments, probing uncompressed samples of LiF and aluminium.

  8. Characteristics of a molybdenum X-pinch X-ray source as a probe source for X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, F; Bland, S N; Chauvin, C; Combes, P; Sol, D; Loyen, A; Roques, B; Grunenwald, J

    2015-03-01

    X-ray emission from a molybdenum X-pinch has been investigated as a potential probe for the high pressure states made in dynamic compression experiments. Studies were performed on a novel 300 kA, 400 ns generator which coupled the load directly to a low inductance capacitor and switch combination. The X-pinch load consisted of 4 crossed molybdenum wires of 13 μm diameter, crossed at an angle of 62°. The load height was 10 mm. An initial x-ray burst generated at the wire crossing point, radiated in the soft x-ray range (hυ < 10 keV). This was followed, 2-5 ns later, by at least one harder x-ray burst (hυ > 10 keV) whose power ranged from 1 to 7 MW. Time integrated spectral measurements showed that the harder bursts were dominated by K-alpha emission; though, a lower level, wide band continuum up to at least 30 keV was also present. Initial tests demonstrated that the source was capable of driving Laue diffraction experiments, probing uncompressed samples of LiF and aluminium. PMID:25832229

  9. Characteristics of a molybdenum X-pinch X-ray source as a probe source for X-ray diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, F.; Bland, S. N.; Chauvin, C.; Combes, P.; Sol, D.; Loyen, A.; Roques, B.; Grunenwald, J.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray emission from a molybdenum X-pinch has been investigated as a potential probe for the high pressure states made in dynamic compression experiments. Studies were performed on a novel 300 kA, 400 ns generator which coupled the load directly to a low inductance capacitor and switch combination. The X-pinch load consisted of 4 crossed molybdenum wires of 13 μm diameter, crossed at an angle of 62°. The load height was 10 mm. An initial x-ray burst generated at the wire crossing point, radiated in the soft x-ray range (hυ < 10 keV). This was followed, 2-5 ns later, by at least one harder x-ray burst (hυ > 10 keV) whose power ranged from 1 to 7 MW. Time integrated spectral measurements showed that the harder bursts were dominated by K-alpha emission; though, a lower level, wide band continuum up to at least 30 keV was also present. Initial tests demonstrated that the source was capable of driving Laue diffraction experiments, probing uncompressed samples of LiF and aluminium.

  10. Characteristics of a molybdenum X-pinch X-ray source as a probe source for X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, F; Bland, S N; Chauvin, C; Combes, P; Sol, D; Loyen, A; Roques, B; Grunenwald, J

    2015-03-01

    X-ray emission from a molybdenum X-pinch has been investigated as a potential probe for the high pressure states made in dynamic compression experiments. Studies were performed on a novel 300 kA, 400 ns generator which coupled the load directly to a low inductance capacitor and switch combination. The X-pinch load consisted of 4 crossed molybdenum wires of 13 μm diameter, crossed at an angle of 62°. The load height was 10 mm. An initial x-ray burst generated at the wire crossing point, radiated in the soft x-ray range (hυ < 10 keV). This was followed, 2-5 ns later, by at least one harder x-ray burst (hυ > 10 keV) whose power ranged from 1 to 7 MW. Time integrated spectral measurements showed that the harder bursts were dominated by K-alpha emission; though, a lower level, wide band continuum up to at least 30 keV was also present. Initial tests demonstrated that the source was capable of driving Laue diffraction experiments, probing uncompressed samples of LiF and aluminium.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) for Homeland Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D.; Schonberg, Russell G.

    2009-03-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband require high x-ray energy and high x-ray intensity to penetrate dense cargo. On the other hand, low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint. A collaboration between HESCO/PTSE Inc., Schonberg Research Corporation and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc. has been formed in order to design and build an Intensity-Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS). Such a source would allow cargo inspection systems to achieve up to two inches greater imaging penetration capability, while retaining the same average radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the same penetration capability can be obtained as with conventional sources with a reduction of the average radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to change the intensity of the source for each x-ray pulse based on the signal strengths in the inspection system detector array during the previous pulse. In this paper we describe methods to accomplish pulse-to-pulse intensity modulation in both S-band (2998 MHz) and X-band (9303 MHz) linac sources, with diode or triode (gridded) electron guns. The feasibility of these methods has been demonstrated. Additionally, we describe a study of a shielding design that would allow a 6 MV X-band source to be used in mobile applications.

  12. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-15

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  13. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  14. A microfocus x-ray source based on a nonmetal liquid-jet anode

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohimaa, T.; Ewald, J.; Schlie, M.; Hertz, H. M.; Vogt, U.

    2008-06-09

    We demonstrate stable operation of a nonmetallic anode in an electron-impact x-ray source. A high-brightness electron beam is focused on a {approx}70 m/s speed, {approx}10 {mu}m diameter methanol jet producing stable x-ray emission with peak spectral brightness at {approx}5.4x10{sup 5} photons/(sx{mu}m{sup 2}xsrx0.1%BW). The jet is fully evaporated in the interaction point. The shape of a simulated spectrum using Monte Carlo methods shows good agreement with experimental data, and the theoretical brightness values give an upper limit for the achievable x-ray emission from jets with very high velocities. Using this anode concept, all compounds and elements found in liquid form are potentially usable for x-ray generation.

  15. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; DeSantis, S.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; LaFever, R.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.; Rimmer, R.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Tanabe, J.; Wang, S.; Zholents, A.; Kairan, D.

    2001-10-26

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed.

  16. Multilayer-Based Optics for High-Brightness X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Chapman, H. N.; Aquila, A.; Krzywinski, J.; Nelson, A. J.

    2011-09-09

    High-brightness x-ray sources, such as next-generation synchrotrons and free-electron lasers (FELs), pose unique challenges for the development of x-ray optics. The peak intensities of FEL pulses can be high enough to convert any material placed in a focused beam into plasma. X-ray optics, which are used close to the focal spot, are likely to be partially or completely damaged in a single shot. Such optics would need to be replenished after each shot. Optics that are used in the unfocused or indirect beam may survive much longer, perhaps indefinitely, if care is used to limit the energy absorbed in the optics. Here we present different types of multilayer-based optics, which were used successfully in FEL experiments for reflecting, focusing, and filtering high-intensity, pulsed x-rays in a variety of novel science applications.

  17. Calibration Of A KrF Laser-Plasma Source For X-Ray Microscopy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, I. C. E.; O'Neill, F.; Zammit, U.; Al-Hadithi, Y.; Eason, R. W.; Rogayski, A. M.; Hills, C. P. B.; Michette, A. G.

    1988-02-01

    Plasma X-ray sources for biological microscopy in the water-window have been produced by focusing tige 200 3, 50 ns Sprit q KrF laser onto carbon targets at irradiance between 2.2 x 10" W/cm4 and 3.7 x 10i3W/cm. Absolute measurements of X-ray production have been made using a calibrated, vacuum X-ray diode detector. A peak conversion efficiency . 10% is measured from KrF laseri)Tight tcto wate-window X-rays at 280 eV < hv < 530 eV for a target irradiance . 1 x x 10 W/cm'. Some measurements with gold and tungsten targets give conversion efficiencies 2$25% at a similar laser irradiance.

  18. Chandra Studies of Unidentified X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideyuki

    2013-09-01

    We propose to study a complete X-ray sample in the luminosity range of > 10^34 erg s^-1 in the Galactic bulge, including 5 unidentified sources detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Our goal is to obtain a clear picture about X-ray populations in the bulge, by utilizing the excellent Chandra position accuracy leading to unique optical identification together with the X-ray spectral properties. This is a new step toward understanding the formation history of the bulge. Furthermore, because the luminosity range we observe corresponds to a ``missing link'' region ever studied for a neutron star or blackhole X-ray binary, our results are also unique to test accretion disk theories at intermediate mass accretion rates.

  19. Chandra Studies of Unidentified X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    We propose to study a complete X-ray sample in the luminosity range of > 10^34 erg s^-1 in the Galactic bulge, consisting of 11 unidentified sources detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Our goal is to obtain a clear picture about X-ray populations in the bulge, by utilizing the excellent Chandra position accuracy leading to unique optical identification together with the X-ray spectral properties. This is a new step toward understanding the formation history of the bulge. Furthermore, because the luminosity range we observe corresponds to a ``missing link'' region ever studied for a neutron star or blackhole X-ray binary, our results are also unique to test accretion disk theories at intermediate mass accretion rates.

  20. A Compton X-ray source based on a SC linac at KAERI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, A. V.; Han, Y. H.; Jeong, Y. U.; Lee, B. C.; Miginsky, S. V.; Park, S. H.

    2007-05-01

    A quasi-monochromatic X-ray source based on a KAERI SC linac system has been designed and is being manufactured now. 10 MeV 10 mA electron beam together with 20 W 1.06 μm laser beam will be used for 1.8 keV Compton X-ray generation with a few percentage of energy spread and 10 7 photons /s flux. A simple straight beamline was designed to deliver the electron beam with no degradation of its emittance and energy spread and to focus it to a proper size to produce the desired X-rays. We expect the first demonstration of 1.8 keV Compton X-ray generation in autumn 2006.

  1. Chandra Observations of Diffuse Gas and Luminous X-Ray Sources around the X-Ray-bright Elliptical Galaxy NGC 1600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Carlin, Jeffrey L.

    2004-12-01

    We observed the X-ray-bright E3 galaxy NGC 1600 and nearby members of the NGC 1600 group with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S3 to study their X-ray properties. Unresolved emission dominates the observation; however, we resolved some of the emission into 71 sources, most of which are low-mass X-ray binaries associated with NGC 1600. Twenty-one of the sources have LX>2×1039 ergs s-1 (0.3-10.0 keV; assuming they are at the distance of NGC 1600), marking them as ultraluminous X-ray point source (ULX) candidates; we expect that only 11+/-2 are unrelated foreground/background sources. NGC 1600 may have the largest number of ULX candidates in an early-type galaxy to date; however, cosmic variance in the number of background active galactic nuclei cannot be ruled out. The spectrum and luminosity function (LF) of the resolved sources are more consistent with sources found in other early-type galaxies than with sources found in star-forming regions of galaxies. The source LF and the spectrum of the unresolved emission both indicate that there are a large number of unresolved point sources. We propose that these sources are associated with globular clusters (GCs) and that NGC 1600 has a large GC specific frequency. Observations of the GC population in NGC 1600 would be very useful for testing this prediction. Approximately 50%-75% of the unresolved flux comes from diffuse gaseous emission. The spectral fits, hardness ratios, and X-ray surface brightness profile all point to two gas components. We interpret the soft inner component (a<~25'', kT~0.85 keV) as the interstellar medium of NGC 1600 and the hotter outer component (a>~25'', kT~1.5 keV) as the intragroup medium of the NGC 1600 group. The X-ray image shows several interesting structures. First, there is a central region of excess emission that is roughly cospatial with Hα and dust filaments immediately west of the center of NGC 1600. There appear to be holes in the X-ray emission to the north and south of the

  2. Development of a Sub-Picosecond Tunable X-Ray Source at the LLNL Electron Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D; Springer, P; Le Sage, G; Crane, J; Ditmire, T; Cowan, T; Anderson, S G; Rosenzweig, J B

    2001-08-31

    The use of ultrafast laser pulses to generate very high brightness, ultra short (fs to ps) pulses of x-rays is a topic of great interest to the x-ray user community. In principle, femtosecond-scale pump-probe experiments can be used to temporally resolve structural dynamics of materials on the time scale of atomic motion. The development of sub-ps x-ray pulses will make possible a wide range of materials and plasma physics studies with unprecedented time resolution. A current project at LLNL will provide such a novel x-ray source based on Thomson scattering of high power, short laser pulses with a high peak brightness, relativistic electron bunch. The system is based on a 5 mm-mrad normalized emittance photoinjector, a 100 MeV electron RF linac, and a 300 mJ, 35 fs solid-state laser system. The Thomson x-ray source produces ultra fast pulses with x-ray energies capable of probing into high-Z metals, and a high flux per pulse enabling single shot experiments. The system will also operate at a high repetition rate ({approx} 10 Hz).

  3. Observation of X-ray sources with XRS onboard HAYABUSA spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Kato, M.

    The HAYABUSA (MUSES-C) spacecraft was launched in Japan by the fifth M-V launch vehicle on May 9, 2003 will carry out rendezvous with near-Earth asteroid Itokawa (1998SF36), and return the samples to the Earth. An X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRS) onboard HAYABUSA has high-energy resolution (FWHM: 160eV@5.9keV) by using X-ray CCD, will allow for quantitative measurement of the surface elementals of asteroid, such as Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Addition, the XRS has large effective area (25cm2) and suitable field of view for asteroid observation (3.5x3.5degrees). During the transfer and return phase, the HAYABUSA spacecraft will turn off the Ion propulsion thruster and point a high-gain antenna to the Earth station every week. Then, the XRS will observe X-ray sources such as super nova remnant, X-ray binaries and cosmic X-ray back ground for in-flight calibration and scientific observation. In this study, we report results of resent observations. The XRS observed Scorpius X-1 (May 28-30, 2003), Kepler's SNR (Jun. 16-18, 2003), Crab Nebula (Jan. 11-12, 2004), IC443 (Jan. 26, 2004). The XRS separated line X-ray spectra from Kepler's SNR and IC443 such as Si and S, clearly. These X-ray sources have been observed the X-ray astronomy satellite ASCA. We fitted power-law model or non-equilibrium ionization model (Borkowski, 2000) to the XRS observed spectra. However, the intensities were inconsistent with the best-fit models to ASCA observed spectra. Charge traps due to the space radiation may cause characteristic changes of the XRS. We will monitor the performance of the XRS and update the response function by in-flight calibration.

  4. Chandra Observation of the X-ray Source Population of NGC 6946

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Schlegel, E. M.; Hwang, U.; Petre, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a study of discrete X-ray sources in NGC 6946 using a deep Chandra ACIS observation. Based on the slope of the log N-log S distribution and the general correlation of sources with the spiral arms, we infer that the overall discrete source sample in NGC 6946 is dominated by high mass X-ray binaries, in contrast to the source distributions in M31 and the Milky Way. This is consistent with the higher star formation rate in NGC 6946 than in those galaxies. We find that the strong X-ray sources in the region of the galactic center do not correlate in detail with images of the region in the near-IR, although one of them may be coincident with the galactic center. The non-central ultra-luminous X-ray source in NGC 6946, previously identified with a supernova remnant, has an X-ray spectrum and luminosity that is inconsistent with either a traditional pulsar wind nebula or a blast wave remnant.

  5. ASCA Observation of Bright X-Ray Sources in the Nearby Spiral Galaxy IC 342

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Kyoko; Dotani, Tadayasu; Makishima, Kazuo; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mihara, Tatehiro

    1998-02-01

    X-ray observations of the nearby starburst galaxy IC 342 with ASCA led to the detection of three bright X-ray sources, whose positions are consistent with those from the Einstein and ROSAT observations. The X-ray luminosities of the two sources exceed the Eddington limit of a 1.4MO object by two orders of magnitude for an assumed distance of 4.5 Mpc. The brightest one (source 1) among the three exhibited significant time variations on a time scale of a few hours during the ASCA observation. Thus, the size of the emission region must be smaller than about 10(14) cm. The energy spectrum of the source can be represented either by a power-law with an exponential roll-over, or by an optically thick accretion disk model with a maximum color temperature of 1.77 keV. Although the large luminosity of source 1 may be explained by a ~ 100MO black hole at 4.5 Mpc, the observed energy spectrum is too hard to be accounted for by an optically thick accretion disk around the black hole. Ifsource1 is a relativistic jet source with strong X-ray beaming, both the large luminosity and the hard X-ray spectrum can be explained.

  6. Simultaneous observations of hard X-ray and microwave burst sources in a limb flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takakura, T.; Kundu, M. R.; Mcconnell, D.; Ohki, K.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of a flare which occurred just behind the west solar limb on 1981 August 3 are reported. A hard X-ray source (20-30 keV) and a microwave source at 5 GHz were observed simultaneously using the Very Large Array and the hard X-ray telescope aboard the Hinotori spacecraft. Both sources were located in the corona, apparently near the tops of two independent coronal arcades or loops. The source may be composed of many thin filaments unresolved by the VLA observations.

  7. Compact source of narrowband and tunable X-rays for radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sudeep; Chen, Shouyuan; Powers, Nathan; Haden, Daniel; Liu, Cheng; Golovin, G.; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Clarke, S.; Pozzi, S.; Silano, J.; Karwowski, H.; Umstadter, Donald

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the development of a compact X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering with a laser-driven electron beam. This source produces a beam of high-energy X-rays in a narrow cone angle (5-10 mrad), at a rate of 108 photons-s-1. Tunable operation of the source over a large energy range, with energy spread of ∼50%, has also been demonstrated. Photon energies >10 MeV have been obtained. The narrowband nature of the source is advantageous for radiography with low dose, low noise, and minimal shielding.

  8. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the supersoft X-ray source RX J0439.8-6809

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Teeseling, Andre

    1997-07-01

    Observationally, supersoft X-ray sources are classified as near-Eddington stellar objects with almost all emission at energies < 0.5 keV. Only 13 supersoft X-ray sources have been optically identified, and of these 11 turn out to be binaries, probably with a shell-burning accreting white dwarf. We have recently identified RX J0439.8-6809 with a V=21.63, very blue star in the LMC. A 3sigma upper limit to the peak-to-peak optical variability is 0.07 mag. Of all optically identified supersoft X-ray sources, RX J0439.8-6809 has the lowest optical-to-X-ray flux ratio. The nature of RX J0439.8-6809 is still unknown. It might be the hottest known pre-white dwarf, suffering a late helium shell flash. Alternatively, RX J0439.8-6809 could be an accreting binary, in which case it might be the first known double-degenerate supersoft X-ray source with a predicted orbital period of only a few minutes. An ultraviolet spectrum is essential to distinguish between these two spectacular possibilities, and to bridge the gap between the X-ray and optical observations. Such a spectrum can only be obtained with the HST STIS. Therefore, we propose to obtain two ultraviolet spectra, which will test the assumption that the optical spectrum is the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the soft X-ray component, which will determine the spectral energy distribution, and which may provide the first direct evidence for accretion in this source by detecting an excess in the ultraviolet or ultraviolet emission lines like N V Lambda 1240.

  9. X-ray Studies of Unidentified Galactic TeV Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2009-05-11

    Many of the recently discovered Galactic TeV sources remain unidentified to date. A large fraction of the sources is possibly associated with relic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) systems. One key question here is the maximum energy (beyond TeV) attained in the compact PWNe. Hard X-ray emission can trace those particles, but current non-focussing X-ray instruments above 10 keV have difficulties to deconvolve the hard pulsar spectrum from its surrounding nebula.Some of the new TeV sources are also expected to originate from middle-aged and possibly even from old supernova remnants (SNR). But no compelling case for such an identification has been found yet. In established young TeV-emitting SNRs, X-ray imaging above 10 keV could help to disentangle the leptonic from the hadronic emission component in the TeV shells, if secondary electrons produced in hadronic collisions can be effectively detected. As SNRs get older, the high energy electron component is expected to fade away. This may allow to verify the picture through X-ray spectral evolution of the source population.Starting from the lessons we have learned so far from X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified TeV sources, prospects for Simbol-X to resolve open questions in this field will be discussed.

  10. XMM-Newton reveals extreme winds in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, C.; Middleton, M.; Fabian, A.

    2016-06-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are extragalactic, off-nucleus, point sources with X-ray luminosities above 10^{39} erg/s, thought to be powered by accretion onto compact objects. Viable solutions include accretion onto neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, stellar-mass black holes at or in excess of the Eddington limit or intermediate-mass black holes. The lack of sufficient energy resolution in previous analyses has prevented an unambiguous identification of any emission or absorption lines in the X-ray band, thereby precluding a detailed analysis of the accretion flow. In this talk, I will show the discovery of rest-frame emission and blueshifted (˜0.2c) absorption lines arising from highly ionized gas in the deep high-resolution XMM-Newton spectra of two ultraluminous X-ray sources. The blueshifted absorption lines occurs in a fast outflowing gas, whereas the emission lines originate in slow-moving gas around the source. The compact object is therefore surrounded by powerful winds with an outflow velocity of about 0.2c as predicted by models of hyper-accreting black holes. Further, deep, XMM-Newton observations will reveal powerful winds in many other ultraluminous X-ray sources and provide important hints to estimate the energetics of the wind, the geometry of the system, and the black hole masses.

  11. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  12. MULTIBAND DIAGNOSTICS OF UNIDENTIFIED 1FGL SOURCES WITH SUZAKU AND SWIFT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Maeda, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Tahara, M.; Nakamori, T.

    2013-10-01

    We have analyzed all the archival X-ray data of 134 unidentified (unID) gamma-ray sources listed in the first Fermi/LAT (1FGL) catalog and subsequently followed up by the Swift/XRT. We constructed the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from radio to gamma-rays for each X-ray source detected, and tried to pick up unique objects that display anomalous spectral signatures. In these analyses, we target all the 1FGL unID sources, using updated data from the second Fermi/LAT (2FGL) catalog on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) position and spectra. We found several potentially interesting objects, particularly three sources, 1FGL J0022.2–1850, 1FGL J0038.0+1236, and 1FGL J0157.0–5259, which were then more deeply observed with Suzaku as a part of an AO-7 program in 2012. We successfully detected an X-ray counterpart for each source whose X-ray spectra were well fitted by a single power-law function. The positional coincidence with a bright radio counterpart (currently identified as an active galactic nucleus, AGN) in the 2FGL error circles suggests these sources are definitely the X-ray emission from the same AGN, but their SEDs show a wide variety of behavior. In particular, the SED of 1FGL J0038.0+1236 is not easily explained by conventional emission models of blazars. The source 1FGL J0022.2–1850 may be in a transition state between a low-frequency peaked and a high-frequency peaked BL Lac object, and 1FGL J0157.0–5259 could be a rare kind of extreme blazar. We discuss the possible nature of these three sources observed with Suzaku, together with the X-ray identification results and SEDs of all 134 sources observed with the Swift/XRT.

  13. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging with a liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohimaa, T.; Otendal, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2007-08-13

    Phase-contrast methods increase contrast, detail, and selectivity in x-ray imaging. Present compact x-ray sources do not provide the necessary spatial coherence with sufficient power to allow the laboratory-scale high-resolution phase-contrast imaging with adequate exposure times. In this letter, the authors demonstrate phase-contrast imaging with few-micron detail employing a compact {approx}6.5 {mu}m spot liquid-metal-jet-anode high-brightness microfocus source. The 40 W source is operated at more than ten times higher electron-beam power density than present microfocus sources and is shown to provide sufficient spatial coherence as well as scalability to high power, thereby enabling the application of phase-contrast x-ray imaging with short exposure times in clinics and laboratories.

  14. A POPULATION OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES WITH AN ACCRETING NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are believed to be X-ray binary systems, but previous observational and theoretical studies tend to prefer a black hole rather than a neutron star (NS) accretor. The recent discovery of 1.37 s pulsations from the ULX M82 X-2 has established its nature as a magnetized NS. In this work we model the formation history of NS ULXs in an M82- or Milky Way (MW)-like Galaxy, by use of both binary population synthesis and detailed binary evolution calculations. We find that the birth rate is around 10{sup −4} yr{sup −1} for the incipient X-ray binaries in both cases. We demonstrate the distribution of the ULX population in the donor mass–orbital period plane. Our results suggest that, compared with black hole X-ray binaries, NS X-ray binaries may significantly contribute to the ULX population, and high-mass and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries dominate the NS ULX population in M82- and MW-like Galaxies, respectively.

  15. Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Comley, A.; Back, C. A.; Szabo, C.; Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Seltzer, S.; Haugh, M. J.; Ali, Z.

    2011-05-15

    Line emission and broadband x-ray sources with x-ray energies above 10 keV have been investigated using a range of calibrated x-ray detectors for use as x-ray backlighters in high energy density (HED) experiments. The conversion efficiency of short- and long-pulse driven Mo and Ag line-emission backlighters at 17 and 22 keV was measured to investigate the crossover region between short- and long-pulse conversion efficiency. It was found that significant 17 and 22 keV line emissions were observed using a 3 {omega}, 1 ns long-pulse drive for Mo and Ag targets and a comparison between the measured Mo x-ray spectrum and calculations using an atomic physics code suggests that the line emission is due to thermal emission from N-like Mo atoms. Electron temperatures derived from fits to the continuum region of the x-ray spectra agree well with the T{sub hot} scaling as 100x(I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}. The continuum emissions from empty and 1 atm Kr-filled imploded CH shell targets were also measured for the use as broadband backlighters.

  16. Suzaku X-Ray Study of an Anomalous Source XSS J12270-4859

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Kei; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Ishida, Manabu

    2009-08-01

    We report on the results of a Suzaku X-ray observation of XSSJ12270-4859, one of the hard X-ray sources in the INTEGRAL catalogue. This object has been classified as an intermediate polar (IP) by its optical spectra, and a putative X-ray period of ˜860s. With a 30ks exposure by Suzaku, we obtained a well-exposed spectrum in the 0.2--70keV band. We conclude against a previous IP classification based on a lack of Fe Kα emission features in the spectrum and a failure to confirm the previously reported X-ray period. Instead, the X-ray light curve is filled with exotic phenomena, including repetitive flares lasting for ˜100s, occasional dips with no apparent periodicities, spectral hardening after some flares, and bimodal changes pivoting between quiet and active phases. The rapid flux changes, the dips, and the power-law spectrum point toward an interpretation that this is a low-mass X-ray binary. Some temporal characteristics are similar to those in the Rapid Burster and GRO J1744-28, making XSS J12270-4859 a very rare object.

  17. Development of a microfocus x-ray tube with multiple excitation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Maeo, Shuji; Kraemer, Markus; Taniguchi, Kazuo

    2009-03-15

    A microfocus x-ray tube with multiple targets and an electron gun with a focal spot size of 10 {mu}m in diameter has been developed. The electron gun contains a LaB{sub 6} cathode and an Einzel lens. The x-ray tube can be operated at 50 W (50 kV, 1 mA) and has three targets, namely, Cr, W, and Rh on the anode that can be selected completely by moving the anode position. A focal spot size of 10 {mu}m in diameter can be achieved at 0.5 mA current. As demonstration of the usability of a multiexcitation x-ray tube, the fluorescence x-rays have been measured using a powder specimen mixed of TiO{sub 2}, Co, and Zr of the same quantity. The differences of excitation efficiency have clearly appeared according to the change in excitation source. From the results discussed here, it can be expected that the presented x-ray tube will be a powerful tool in microx-ray fluorescence spectrometers and various x-ray instruments.

  18. Development of a microfocus x-ray tube with multiple excitation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeo, Shuji; Krämer, Markus; Taniguchi, Kazuo

    2009-03-01

    A microfocus x-ray tube with multiple targets and an electron gun with a focal spot size of 10 μm in diameter has been developed. The electron gun contains a LaB6 cathode and an Einzel lens. The x-ray tube can be operated at 50 W (50 kV, 1 mA) and has three targets, namely, Cr, W, and Rh on the anode that can be selected completely by moving the anode position. A focal spot size of 10 μm in diameter can be achieved at 0.5 mA current. As demonstration of the usability of a multiexcitation x-ray tube, the fluorescence x-rays have been measured using a powder specimen mixed of TiO2, Co, and Zr of the same quantity. The differences of excitation efficiency have clearly appeared according to the change in excitation source. From the results discussed here, it can be expected that the presented x-ray tube will be a powerful tool in microx-ray fluorescence spectrometers and various x-ray instruments.

  19. On the Thermal Line Emission from the Outflows in Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ya-Di; Cao, Xinwu

    2016-08-01

    The atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) may be associated with the outflow, which may provide a way to explore the physics of the ULXs. We construct a conical outflow model and calculate the thermal X-ray Fe emission lines from the outflows. Our results show that thermal line luminosity decreases with increasing outflow velocity and/or opening angle of the outflow for a fixed kinetic power of the outflows. Assuming the kinetic power of the outflows to be comparable with the accretion power in the ULXs, we find that the equivalent width can be several eV for the thermal X-ray Fe emission line from the outflows in the ULXs with stellar-mass black holes. The thermal line luminosity is proportional to 1/M bh (M bh is the black hole mass of the ULX). The equivalent width decreases with the black hole mass, which implies that the Fe line emission from the outflows can hardly be detected if the ULXs contain intermediate-mass black holes. Our results suggest that the thermal X-ray Fe line emission should be preferentially be detected in the ULXs with high kinetic power slowly moving outflows from the accretion disks surrounding stellar-mass black holes/neutron stars. The recently observed X-ray atomic features of the outflows in a ULX may imply that it contains a stellar-mass black hole.

  20. Chandra Observations of the X-Ray Point Source Population in NGC 4636

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posson-Brown, Jennifer; Raychaudhury, Somak; Forman, William; Donnelly, R. Hank; Jones, Christine

    2009-04-01

    We present the X-ray point-source population in the nearby Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4636 from three Chandra X-ray observations. These observations, totaling ~193 ks after time filtering, were taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Camera (ACIS) over a three-year period. Using a wavelet decomposition detection algorithm, we detect 318 individual point sources. For our analysis, we use a subset of 277 detections with >= net 10 counts (a limiting luminosity of approximately 1.2 × 1037 erg s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band, outside the central 1farcm5 bright galaxy core). We present a radial distribution of the point sources. Between 1farcm5 and 6' from the center, 25% of our sources are likely to be background sources (active galactic nuclei (AGNs)) and 75% are low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) within the galaxy, while at radial distances greater than 6', background sources (AGN) will dominate the point sources. We explore short and long-term variability (over timescales of 1 day to three years) for X-ray point sources in this elliptical galaxy. 54 sources (24%) in the common ACIS fields of view show significant variability between observations. Of these, 37 are detected with at least 10 net counts in only one observation and thus may be "transient." In addition, ~10% of the sources in each observation show significant short-term variability; we present an example light curve for a variable bright source. The cumulative luminosity function (LF) for the point sources in NGC 4636 can be represented as a power law of slope α = 1.14 ± 0.03. We do not detect, but estimate an upper limit of ~4.5 × 1037 erg s-1 to the current X-ray luminosity of the historical supernova SN1939A. We find 77 matches between X-ray point sources and globular cluster (GC) candidates found in deep optical images of NGC 4636. In the annulus from 1farcm5 to 6' of the galaxy center, 48 of the 129 X-ray point sources (37%) with >=10 net counts are matched with GC candidates. Since we expect 25% of these

  1. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd; Karami, Mohammad

    2012-10-15

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper K{alpha} and K{beta} lines by using a flat {alpha}-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

  2. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Karami, Mohammad; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2012-10-01

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper Kα and Kβ lines by using a flat α-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer. PMID:23126754

  3. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Thüring, T.; Rutishauser, S.; Stampanoni, M.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.; David, C.

    2013-08-26

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ∼10{sup 12} photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Analysis of Off-Nuclear X-Ray Sources in Galaxy NGC 4945

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah M.; /MIT /SLAC

    2006-09-11

    Recently, X-ray astronomy has been used to investigate objects such as galaxies, clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), quasars, starburst superbubbles of hot gas, X-ray binary systems, stars, supernova remnants, and interstellar and intergalactic material. By studying the x-ray emission patterns of these objects, we can gain a greater understanding of their structure and evolution. We analyze X-ray emission from the galaxy NGC 4945 using data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software package was used to extract and fit energy spectra and to extract light curves for the brightest off-nuclear sources in two different observations of NGC 4945 (January, 2000 and May, 2004). A majority of sources were closely fit by both absorbed power law and absorbed bremsstrahlung models, with a significantly poorer {chi}{sup 2}/dof for the absorbed blackbody model, and most sources had little variability. This indicates that the sources are accreting binary systems with either a neutron star or black hole as the compact object. The calculated luminosities were about 10{sup 38} erg/s, which implies that the mass of the accreting object is close to 10 solar masses and must be a black hole.

  5. Microfocus x-ray imaging of traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, T.; Oda, K.; Sato, Y.; Ito, H.; Masuda, S.; Yamada, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Murayama, H.; Takei, H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to propose a microfocus x-ray imaging technique for observing the internal structure of small radioactive sources and evaluating geometrical errors quantitatively, and to apply this technique to traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources, which were designed for positron emission tomography calibration, for the purpose of quality control of the pointlike sources. Methods: A microfocus x-ray imaging system with a focus size of 0.001 mm was used to obtain projection x-ray images and x-ray CT images of five pointlike source samples, which were manufactured during 2009-2012. The obtained projection and tomographic images were used to observe the internal structure and evaluate geometrical errors quantitatively. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the effect of possible geometrical errors on the intensity and uniformity of 0.511 MeV annihilation photon pairs emitted from the sources. Results: Geometrical errors were evaluated with sufficient precision using projection x-ray images. CT images were used for observing the internal structure intuitively. As a result, four of the five examined samples were within the tolerance to maintain the total uncertainty below {+-}0.5%, given the source radioactivity; however, one sample was found to be defective. Conclusions: This quality control procedure is crucial and offers an important basis for using the pointlike {sup 22}Na source as a basic calibration tool. The microfocus x-ray imaging approach is a promising technique for visual and quantitative evaluation of the internal geometry of small radioactive sources.

  6. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: Study of Red Quasars and Blank X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A major paper describing the technique and providing a list of 'blanks' was published in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below). The results revealed a fascinating trove of novel X-ray sources: high redshift clusters of galaxies found efficiently; X-ray absorbed, optically clean AGN, which may be the bright prototypes of Chandra Deep Survey sources; and several with a still unknown nature. Recent XMM-Newton results confirm the existence of this class of X-ray source with much refined positions. During the first year of this project we have made a major discovery. The second 'blanks' X-ray source observed with Chandra was found to be extended. Using Chandra data and ground-based R and K band imaging we estimated this to be a high redshift cluster of galaxies with z approx. 0.85. Spectroscopy agrees with this estimate (z=0.89). This success shows that our method of hunting down 'blank' field X-ray sources is a highly efficient method of finding the otherwise elusive high redshift clusters. With extensive follow-up we should be able to use 'blanks' to make cosmological tests. The paper is now in press in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below.) The other Chandra source is point-like, showing that there are a variety of 'blank' source types. Other follow-up observations with XMM-Newton, and (newly approved in cycle 2) with Chandra are eagerly awaited. A follow-up paper uses a large amount of supporting data for the remaining blanks. A combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data convincingly identified one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy (abstract below). This program resulted in 3 refereed papers in major journals, 4 conference proceedings and a significant fraction of the PhD thesis of Dr. Ilaria Cagnoni. Details of the publications are given.

  7. Predicting the coherent X-ray wavefront focal properties at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Barty, Anton; Soufli, Regina; McCarville, Tom; Baker, Sherry L; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Stefan, Peter; Bionta, Richard

    2009-08-31

    The first X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) at keV energies will be the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Scheduled to begin operation in 2009, this first-of-a-kind X-ray source will produce ultra-short X-ray pulses of unprecedented brightness in the 0.8 to 8 keV first harmonic photon energy regime. Much effort has been invested in predicting and modeling the XFEL photon source properties at the undulator exit; however, as most LCLS experiments are ultimately dependent on the beam focal spot properties it is equally as important to understand the XFEL beam at the endstations where the experiments are performed. Here, we use newly available precision surface metrology data from actual LCLS mirrors combined with a scalar diffraction model to predict the LCLS beam properties in the experiment chambers.

  8. Predicting the coherent X-ray wavefront focal properties at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Barty, Anton; Soufli, Regina; McCarville, Tom; Baker, Sherry L; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Stefan, Peter; Bionta, Richard

    2009-08-31

    The first X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) at keV energies will be the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Scheduled to begin operation in 2009, this first-of-a-kind X-ray source will produce ultra-short X-ray pulses of unprecedented brightness in the 0.8 to 8 keV first harmonic photon energy regime. Much effort has been invested in predicting and modeling the XFEL photon source properties at the undulator exit; however, as most LCLS experiments are ultimately dependent on the beam focal spot properties it is equally as important to understand the XFEL beam at the endstations where the experiments are performed. Here, we use newly available precision surface metrology data from actual LCLS mirrors combined with a scalar diffraction model to predict the LCLS beam properties in the experiment chambers. PMID:19724548

  9. Multiwavelength Study of the Bright X-ray Source Population in the Interacting Galaxies NGC 5774/NGC 5775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Gutierrez, Carlos M.; Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray source population in the field of the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 5774/5775 is reported. A total of 49 discrete sources are detected, including 12 ultraluminous X-ray source candidates with lum inosities above 10(exp 39)erg/s in the 0.5 - 8.0 keV X-ray band. Several of these latter are transient X-ray sources that fall below detect ion levels in one of two X-ray observations spaced 15 months apart. X-ray source positions are mapped onto optical and radio images to sear ch for potential counterparts. Eleven sources have optically-bright c ounterparts. Optical colors are used to differentiate these sources, which are mostly located outside the optical extent of the interacting galaxies, as potential globular clusters (3 sources) and quasars (5) . Follow-up optical spectroscopy confirms two of the latter are background quasars.

  10. Observations of the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Doty, J.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray bursts have been observed from MXB 1636-53, almost certainly associated with the strong steady X-ray source 2S 1636-536 (Norma X-1, 3U 1636-53). The steady source was observed in January 1977 at roughly half the intensity reported in the 3U catalog and showed about 15% variability on a time scale of hours. The spectra of the X-ray bursts are well fitted by blackbody radiation whose temperature rises rapidly to a maximum of approximately 28 million K and then cools slowly. If the source is at a distance of 10 kpc, the radius of the projected burst emission region is about 10 km, similar to the size of a neutron star.

  11. X-ray Sources in the RCrA Dark Cloud Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon; Garmire, Audrey

    2002-04-01

    The RCrA Dark Cloud Complex was observed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory on 7 October 2000 for 19706 s using the ACIS-I array in faint mode. The image covers 286 sq. arc min centered on the Coronet Cluster, the thckest part of the Dark Cloud. A total of 102 X-ray point sources were detected above a threshold of 7x10**(-16) ergs/cm^2/s in the 0.4 - 8.0 keV band assuming a Raymond and Smith plasma with a temperature of 6.7 M deg and Solar abundance. About one third are identified with cataloged optical and infrared sources with 14% detected only in the infrared. X-ray Spectra of the brightest 10 sources will be presented. A comparison with other young stellar complexes will be made.

  12. Influence of Bernstein modes on the efficiency of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, V. V.; Nikitin, G.V.; Savanovich, V.Yu.; Umnov, A.M.; Elizarov, L.I.; Serebrennikov, K.S.; Vostrikova, E.A.

    2006-03-15

    The article considers the factors influencing the temperature of hot electron component in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. In such sources the electron heating occurs often due to extraordinary electromagnetic wave propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field. In this case the possibility of the absorption of Bernstein modes is regarded as an additional mechanism of electron heating. The Bernstein modes in an ECR x-ray source can arise due to either linear transformation or parametric instability of external transversal wave. The article briefly reviews also the further experiments which will be carried out to study the influence of Bernstein modes on the increase of hot electron temperature and consequently of x-ray emission.

  13. Positions of galactic X-ray sources - Galactic longitude between 20 and 55 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxsey, R. E.; Bradt, H. V.; Dower, R. G.; Jernigan, J. G.; Apparao, K. M. V.

    1977-01-01

    Precise positions, determined with data from the SAS-3 X-ray observatory, are presented for eight galactic plane X-ray sources (Aql X-1, Ser X-1, 3U 1956+11, 3U 1822-00, 3U 1915-05, A 1845-02, A 1850-08, A 1905+00). Error radii for the positions range from 20 to 50 arc s. Previously proposed optical identifications of three of the sources (Ser X-1, 3U 1956+11, A 1850-08) are supported by these results. Three (Ser X-1, A 1905+00, 3U 1915-05) have been identified as X-ray burst sources.

  14. On the origin of two unidentified radio/X-ray sources discovered with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Federico; Combi, Jorge A.; Medina, María C.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We aim at clarifying the nature of the emission of two spatially related unidentified X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton telescope at intermediate-low Galactic latitude Methods: We use the imaging and spectral capabilities of XMM-Newton to study the X-ray properties of these two sources. In addition, we complement our study with radio data obtained at different frequencies to analyze a possible physical association between the sources. Results: Observations reveal a point-like source aligned with elongated diffuse emission. The X-ray spectra of these sources is best-fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index Γ ~ 1.7 for the point-like source and ~2.0 for the extended source. Both sources show nonthermal radio-continuum counterparts that might indicate a physical association. In addition, from the available data, we did not detect variability on the point-like source in several timescales. Two possible scenarios are analyzed: one Galactic and one extra-Galactic. First, based on HI line absorption, assuming a Galactic origin, we infer a distance upper bound of ≲2 kpc, which poses a constraint on the height over the Galactic plane of ≲200 pc and on the linear size of the system of ≲2.3 pc. In this case, the X-ray luminosities are ≳1032 erg s-1 and ≳7.5 × 1032 erg s-1, for the point-like and extended sources, respectively. Second, an extra-Galactic nature is discussed, where the point-like source might be the core of a radio galaxy and the extended source its lobe. In this case, we compare derived fluxes, spectral indices, and spatial correlation with those typical from the radio galaxy population, showing the feasibility of this alternative astrophysical scenario. Conclusions: From the available observational evidence, we suggest that the most promising scenario to explain the nature of these sources is a system consisting of a one-sided radio galaxy, where the point-like source is an active galactic nucleus and the extended source

  15. Development of a stationary chest tomosynthesis system using carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jing

    X-ray imaging system has shown its usefulness for providing quick and easy access of imaging in both clinic settings and emergency situations. It greatly improves the workflow in hospitals. However, the conventional radiography systems, lacks 3D information in the images. The tissue overlapping issue in the 2D projection image result in low sensitivity and specificity. Both computed tomography and digital tomosynthesis, the two conventional 3D imaging modalities, requires a complex gantry to mechanically translate the x-ray source to various positions. Over the past decade, our research group has developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) based x-ray source technology. The CNT x-ray sources allows compacting multiple x-ray sources into a single x-ray tube. Each individual x-ray source in the source array can be electronically switched. This technology allows development of stationary tomographic imaging modalities without any complex mechanical gantries. The goal of this work is to develop a stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) system, and implement it for a clinical trial. The feasibility of s-DCT was investigated. It is found that the CNT source array can provide sufficient x-ray output for chest imaging. Phantom images have shown comparable image qualities as conventional DCT. The s-DBT system was then used to study the effects of source array configurations and tomosynthesis image quality, and the feasibility of a physiological gated s-DCT. Using physical measures for spatial resolution, the 2D source configuration was shown to have improved depth resolution and comparable in-plane resolution. The prospective gated tomosynthesis images have shown substantially reduction of image blur associated with lung motions. The system was also used to investigate the feasibility of using s-DCT as a diagnosis and monitoring tools for cystic fibrosis patients. A new scatter reduction methods for s-DCT was also studied. Finally, a s-DCT system was constructed by

  16. Observations of transient and anomalous x-ray pulsars with the burst and transient source experiment and the Rossi x-ray timing explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen Anne

    1999-11-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) allow unprecedented studies of X- ray pulsars. The first part of this dissertation describes the capabilities for X-ray observations with BATSE and RXTE and X-ray timing and source detection techniques, which are applied to five transient X-ray pulsars in the second part of this dissertation. Observations of the 12.3-s pulsar GS 0834- 430 discovered that it is in a 105.8 +/- 0.4-day orbit with a small, but non-zero, eccentricity. GS 0834- 430 underwent nine normal (LX ~ 3 × 1037 erg s-1) periodic X-ray outbursts, spaced at the orbital period; however, the last two outbursts were unevenly spaced. No other known systems exhibit these shifted outbursts. The 198-s pulsar GRO J2058+42, which was discovered with BATSE during a giant ( LX ~ 3 × 1038 erg s-1 ) outburst in 1995, underwent a series of nine outbursts alternating in 20-50 keV pulsed intensity every ~55 days, suggesting a ~110-day outburst cycle, however, the 2-10 keV intensities did not show this alternating behavior. If the outburst cycle corresponds to the orbital period, two outbursts are occurring each orbit, near periastron and apastron. Cep X-4, a 66.3-s Be/X-ray pulsar, was detected in two normal outbursts in 1993 and 1997. If all outbursts of Cep X-4 are assumed to occur at the same orbital phase, the orbital period is 23 days <~ Porb <~ 147.3 days. A 1118-616, a 405-s Be/X- ray pulsar, underwent a 65-day giant outburst comprising three peaks, spaced by ~22 days. The 293-s Be/X-ray pulsar, 4U 1145-619, underwent 12 outbursts occurring every 186.68 +/- 0.05 days, which varied widely in intensity and duration, with no clear distinction between giant and normal outbursts. The third part of this dissertation presents results on an 8.7-s anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP), 4U 0142+61. An orbital period search yielded an upper limit on the semi-major axis a x sin i <~ 0.26 lt-s for

  17. Time Resolved X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, W.; Higley, D.; Jal, E.; Dakovski, G.; Yuan, E.; MacArthur, J.; Lutman, A.; Hirsch, K.; Granitzka, P.; Chen, Z.; Coslovich, G.; Hoffman, M.; Mitra, A.; Reid, A.; Hart, P.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Duerr, H.; Arenholz, E.; Shafer, P.; Dennes, P.; Joseph, J.; Guyader, L.; Tsukamoto, A.

    We demonstrate ultrafast time resolved X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism on optically switchable GdFeCo thin film samples. This method extends the element specificity of time resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize the evolution of electron spin and orbital angular momenta. These measurements were enabled by a recent upgrade at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to generate circularly polarized x-rays. Additionally these measurements were enhanced by new detection systems that benefit all x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments performed in transmission. Consequently static XMCD data are in excellent agreement with similar measurements at synchrotron light sources. The LCLS is an x-ray free electron laser user facility accessible via a peer-reviewed proposal process. Acknowledgement: The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  18. ON THE NATURE OF HARD X-RAY EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES OBSERVED WITH XMM-NEWTON

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Chavushyan, V.; Schartel, N.; Santos-Lleo, M.

    2012-03-15

    Over the last decade, X-ray surveys have provided outstanding new results due to the lack of the common selection effects present at other wavelengths. Here, we have selected a sample of unidentified sources from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey Catalog, likely to be extragalactic. Five of them were observed with the XMM-Newton observatory. In this work, we present the results of the spectral analysis of these objects in the X-ray and optical bands. Only three of them had useful spectroscopic X-ray data, and follow up observations were carried out in the optical range to determine their coordinates, classification, and redshift. The sources are different types of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with redshifts ranging from 0.059 to 0.386. The properties at both spectral ranges (X-rays and optical) are compatible with the common properties of their types of AGNs. Although the sources were selected by their hard X-ray properties, none of the three detected objects turned out to be an obscured AGN.

  19. The Galactic plane at faint X-ray fluxes - II. Stacked X-ray spectra of a sample of serendipitous XMM-Newton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.; Byckling, K.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the X-ray spectral properties of a sample of 138 X-ray sources detected serendipitously in XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic plane, at an intermediate to faint flux level. We divide our sample into five subgroups according to the spectral hardness of the sources, and stack (i.e. co-add) the individual source spectra within each subgroup. As expected these stacked spectra show a softening trend from the hardest to the softest subgroups, which is reflected in the inferred line-of-sight column density. The spectra of the three hardest subgroups are characterized by a hard continuum plus superimposed Fe-line emission in the 6-7 keV bandpass. The average equivalent width (EW) of the 6.7-keV He-like Fe Kα line is 170^{+35}_{-32} eV, whereas the 6.4-keV Fe K fluorescence line from neutral iron and the 6.9-keV H-like Fe Lyα line have EWs of 89^{+26}_{-25} and 81^{+30}_{-29} eV, respectively, i.e. roughly half that of the 6.7-keV line. The remaining subgroups exhibit soft thermal spectra. Virtually all of the spectrally soft X-ray sources can be associated with relatively nearby coronally active late-type stars, which are evident as bright near-infrared (NIR) objects within the X-ray error circles. On a similar basis only a minority of the spectrally hard X-ray sources have likely NIR identifications. The average continuum and Fe-line properties of the spectrally hard sources are consistent with those of magnetic cataclysmic variables but the direct identification of large numbers of such systems in Galactic X-ray surveys, probing intermediate to faint flux levels, remains challenging.

  20. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source (HTPD 08 paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M; Schneider, M B

    2008-04-28

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 {micro}m square pixels, and 15 {micro}m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/{Delta}E {approx} 10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within {+-}1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

  1. THE EFFECT OF SATELLITE LINES FROM THE X-RAY SOURCE ON X-RAY DIFFRACTION PEAKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the development of a method for relating reactivity to crystallite size and strain parameters obtained by the Warren-Averbach technique. EPA has been using crystallite size and strain data obtained from x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak profile analysis to predic...

  2. X-ray micro-Tomography at the Advanced Light Source

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A...

  3. X-ray spectra from the Cornell Electron-Beam Ion Source (CEBIS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Janson, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation emitted from the Cornell electron beam ion source (CEBIS I) has been surveyed with a Si(Li) x-ray detector. These spectra can be used to estimate backgrounds from electron bremsstrahlung and to evaluate the feasibility of atomic physics experiments using the CEBIS I source in this configuration. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  4. Integral field spectroscopy of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg II X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, I.; Becker, T.; Fabrika, S.; Roth, M.; Miyaji, T.; Afanasiev, V.; Sholukhova, O.; Sánchez, S. F.; Greiner, J.; Hasinger, G.; Costantini, E.; Surkov, A.; Burenkov, A.

    2005-03-01

    We present optical integral field observations of the H II region containing the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg II X-1. We confirm the existence of an X-ray ionized nebula as the counterpart of the source owing to the detection of an extended He II λ4686 region (21× 47 pc) at the Chandra ACIS-S position. An extended blue object with a size of 11× 14 pc is coincident with the X-ray/He II λ4686 region, which could indicate that it is either a young stellar complex or a cluster. We have derived an X-ray to optical luminosity ratio of L_X/LB≥170, and presumable it is L_X/LB˜300{-}400 using the recent HST ACS data. We find a complex velocity dispersion at the position of the ULX. In addition, there is a radial velocity variation in the X-ray ionized region found in the He II emission of ±50 km s-1 on spatial scales of 2 3primeprime. We believe that the putative black hole not only ionizes the surrounding HII gas, but also perturbs it dynamically (via jets or the accretion disk wind). The spatial analysis of the public Chandra ACIS-S data reveals a point-like X-ray source and gives marginal indication of an extended component (ll15% of the total flux). The XMM-Newton EPIC-PN spectrum of HoII X-1 is best fitted with an absorbed power law in addition to either a thermal thick plasma or a thermal thin plasma or a multi-colour disk black body (MCD). In all cases, the thermal component shows a relatively low temperature (kT˜0.14{-}0.22 keV). Finally we discuss the optical/X-ray properties of HoII X-1 with regards to the possible nature of the source. The existence of an X-ray ionized nebula coincident with the ULX and the soft X-ray component with a cool accretion disk favours the interpretation as an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). However, the complex velocity behaviour at the position of the ULX indicates a dynamical influence of the black hole on the local HII gas.

  5. Copernicus observations of a number of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culhane, J. L.; Mason, K. O.; Sanford, P. W.; White, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Copernicus satellite was launched on 21 August 1972. The main experiment on board is the University of Princeton UV telescope. In addition a cosmic X-ray package of somewhat modest aperture was provided by the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) of University College London. Following a brief description of the instrument, a list of galactic sources observed during the year is presented. Although the X-ray detection aperture is small, the ability to point the satellite for long periods of time with high accuracy makes Copernicus an ideal vehicle for the study of variable sources.

  6. Conceptual study of moderately coupled plasmas and experimental comparison of laboratory x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.

    1993-12-01

    In this thesis the fundamental concepts of moderately coupled plasmas, for which 2{approx_lt}ln{Lambda}{sub b}{approx_lt}10, are, for the first time, presented. This investigation is motivated because neither the conventional Fokker-Planck approximation [for weakly coupled plasmas (ln{Lambda}{sub b}{approx_lt}10)] nor the theory of dielectric response with correlations for strongly coupled plasmas (ln{Lambda}{sub b}{approx_lt}1) has satisfactorily addressed this regime. Specifically, herein the standard Fokker-Planck operator for Coulomb collisions has been modified to include hitherto neglected terms that are directly associated with large-angle scattering. In addition a reduced electron-ion collision operator has been calculated that, for the first time, manifests 1/ln{Lambda}{sub b} corrections. Precise calculations of some relaxation rates and crude calculations of electron transport coefficients have been made. As one of major applications of the modified Fokker-Planck equation, the stopping powers and {rho}R have been calculated for charged fusion products ({alpha}`s, {sup 3}H, {sup 3}He) and hot electrons interacting with plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. In the second major topic of this thesis, advances made in the area of laboratory x-ray sources are presented. First, and most importantly, through the use a Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator, a charged particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) source has been developed. Intense line x radiation (including K-, L-, M-, and N-lines) with wavelengths from 0.5 {angstrom} to 111 {angstrom} have been successfully produced. Second, a new high intensity electron-beam x-ray generator has also been developed, and it has been used with advantage in the soft x-ray region ( < 3 keV). Finally, a direct comparisons of both sources (PIXE and electron-beam x-ray sources) to a commercially available radioactive {alpha} fluorescent x-ray source has been made.

  7. Resolved atomic lines reveal outflows in two ultraluminous X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ciro; Middleton, Matthew J; Fabian, Andrew C

    2016-05-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are extragalactic, off-nucleus, point sources in galaxies, and have X-ray luminosities in excess of 3 × 10(39) ergs per second. They are thought to be powered by accretion onto a compact object. Possible explanations include accretion onto neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, onto stellar-mass black holes (of up to 20 solar masses) at or in excess of the classical Eddington limit, or onto intermediate-mass black holes (10(3)-10(5) solar masses). The lack of sufficient energy resolution in previous analyses has prevented an unambiguous identification of any emission or absorption lines in the X-ray band, thereby precluding a detailed analysis of the accretion flow. Here we report the presence of X-ray emission lines arising from highly ionized iron, oxygen and neon with a cumulative significance in excess of five standard deviations, together with blueshifted (about 0.2 times light velocity) absorption lines of similar significance, in the high-resolution X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC 1313 X-1 and NGC 5408 X-1. The blueshifted absorption lines must occur in a fast-outflowing gas, whereas the emission lines originate in slow-moving gas around the source. We conclude that the compact object in each source is surrounded by powerful winds with an outflow velocity of about 0.2 times that of light, as predicted by models of accreting supermassive black holes and hyper-accreting stellar-mass black holes. PMID:27120159

  8. Resolved atomic lines reveal outflows in two ultraluminous X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ciro; Middleton, Matthew J; Fabian, Andrew C

    2016-05-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are extragalactic, off-nucleus, point sources in galaxies, and have X-ray luminosities in excess of 3 × 10(39) ergs per second. They are thought to be powered by accretion onto a compact object. Possible explanations include accretion onto neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, onto stellar-mass black holes (of up to 20 solar masses) at or in excess of the classical Eddington limit, or onto intermediate-mass black holes (10(3)-10(5) solar masses). The lack of sufficient energy resolution in previous analyses has prevented an unambiguous identification of any emission or absorption lines in the X-ray band, thereby precluding a detailed analysis of the accretion flow. Here we report the presence of X-ray emission lines arising from highly ionized iron, oxygen and neon with a cumulative significance in excess of five standard deviations, together with blueshifted (about 0.2 times light velocity) absorption lines of similar significance, in the high-resolution X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC 1313 X-1 and NGC 5408 X-1. The blueshifted absorption lines must occur in a fast-outflowing gas, whereas the emission lines originate in slow-moving gas around the source. We conclude that the compact object in each source is surrounded by powerful winds with an outflow velocity of about 0.2 times that of light, as predicted by models of accreting supermassive black holes and hyper-accreting stellar-mass black holes.

  9. Resolved atomic lines reveal outflows in two ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Ciro; Middleton, Matthew J.; Fabian, Andrew C.

    2016-05-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources are extragalactic, off-nucleus, point sources in galaxies, and have X-ray luminosities in excess of 3 × 1039 ergs per second. They are thought to be powered by accretion onto a compact object. Possible explanations include accretion onto neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, onto stellar-mass black holes (of up to 20 solar masses) at or in excess of the classical Eddington limit, or onto intermediate-mass black holes (103-105 solar masses). The lack of sufficient energy resolution in previous analyses has prevented an unambiguous identification of any emission or absorption lines in the X-ray band, thereby precluding a detailed analysis of the accretion flow. Here we report the presence of X-ray emission lines arising from highly ionized iron, oxygen and neon with a cumulative significance in excess of five standard deviations, together with blueshifted (about 0.2 times light velocity) absorption lines of similar significance, in the high-resolution X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC 1313 X-1 and NGC 5408 X-1. The blueshifted absorption lines must occur in a fast-outflowing gas, whereas the emission lines originate in slow-moving gas around the source. We conclude that the compact object in each source is surrounded by powerful winds with an outflow velocity of about 0.2 times that of light, as predicted by models of accreting supermassive black holes and hyper-accreting stellar-mass black holes.

  10. Chandra Observations of Unresolved X-Ray Sources Around Two Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Hughes, John P.; Donahue, Megan; Joy, Marshall; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have searched for unresolved X-ray sources in the vicinity of two rich clusters of galaxies: Abell 1995 (A1995) and MS 0451.6-0305 (MS0451), using the Chandra X-ray observatory. We detected significantly more unresolved sources around A1995 than expected based on the number of X-ray sources to the same flux limit detected in deep Chandra observations of blank fields. Previous studies have also found excess X-ray sources in the vicinity of several nearby clusters of galaxies using ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite), and recently in more distant (z is approximately 0.5) clusters (RXJ0030 and 3C295) using Chandra. In contrast, we detect only 14 unresolved X-ray sources near MS0451, which is consistent with the number expected from a cluster-free background. We determine the luminosity functions of the extra sources under the assumption that they are at the distance of their respective clusters. The characteristic luminosity of the extra sources around A1995 must be an order of magnitude fainter than that of the extra sources around RXJ0030 and 3C295. The apparent lack of extra sources around MS0451 is consistent with its greater distance and the same characteristic luminosity as the A1995 sources. Hardness ratios suggest that, on average, the extra sources in A1995 may have harder spectra than those of RXJ0030 and 3C295. These results indicate that different classes of objects may dominate in different clusters, perhaps depending on the formation history and/or dynamical state of the accompanying cluster.

  11. Columbia/Einstein observations of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    The imaging observations of galactic clusters are presented. These fall into three categories: pre-main-sequence stars in the Orion nebulae, isolated-main-and-post main-sequence stars, and supernova remnants SNR. In addition to SNR, approximately 30 sources were detected.

  12. X-ray illumination of globular cluster puzzles. [globular cluster X ray sources as clues to Milky Way Galaxy age and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightman, A. P.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Globular clusters are thought to be among the oldest objects in the Galaxy, and provide, in this connection, important clues for determining the age and process of formation of the Galaxy. The present investigation is concerned with puzzles relating to the X-ray emission of globular clusters, taking into account questions regarding the location of X-ray emitting clusters (XEGC) unusually near the galactic plane and/or galactic center. An adopted model is discussed for the nature, formation, and lifetime of X-ray sources in globular clusters. An analysis of the available data is conducted in connection with a search for correlations between binary formation time scales, central relaxation times, galactic locations, and X-ray emission. The positive correlation found between distance from galactic center and two-body binary formation time for globular clusters, explanations for this correlation, and the hypothesis that X-ray sources in globular clusters require binary star systems provide a possible explanation of the considered puzzles.

  13. Note: Studies on target placement in TE(111) cylindrical cavity of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for the enhancement of x-ray dose.

    PubMed

    Selvakumaran, T S; Baskaran, R; Singh, A K; Sista, V L S Rao

    2010-03-01

    X-ray source based on electron cyclotron resonance principle has been constructed using TE(111) cylindrical cavity. At present the device is used to provide low energy x-ray field for thermoluminescent dosimeter badge calibration. Theoretical and experimental studies on the effect of target placement inside the TE(111) cylindrical cavity for enhancing the x-ray output are carried out and the results are presented in this note. Optimum target location is identified by theoretical analysis on the electric field distribution inside the cavity using MICROWAVE STUDIO program. By modifying the magnetic field configuration, the resonance region is shifted to the optimum target location. The microwave transmission line is upgraded with a three stub tuner which improves the microwave coupling from the source to the target loaded cavity. Molybdenum target is located at a radial distance of 2.5 cm from the cavity center and the x-ray dose rate is measured at 20 cm from the exit port for different microwave power. With the introduction of the target, the x-ray output has improved nearly from 70% to 160% in the microwave power of 150-500 W.

  14. At-wavelength metrology of x-ray optics at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon G.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2014-09-01

    Modern, third-generation synchrotron radiation sources provide coherent and extremely bright beams of X-ray radiation. The successful exploitation of such beams depends to a significant extent on imperfections and misalignment of the optics employed on the beamlines. This issue becomes even more critical with the increasing use of active optics, and the desire to achieve diffraction-limited and coherence-preserving X-ray beams. In recent years, significant progress has been made to improve optic testing and optimization techniques, especially those using X-rays for so-called atwavelength metrology. These in-situ and at-wavelength metrology methods can be used not only to optimize the performance of X-ray optics, but also to correct and minimize the collective distortions of upstream beamline optics, including monochromators, and transmission windows. An overview of at-wavelength metrology techniques implemented at Diamond Light Source is presented, including grating interferometry and X-ray near-field speckle based techniques. Representative examples of the application of these techniques are also given, including in-situ and atwavelength calibration and optimization of: active, piezo bimorph mirrors; Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors; and refractive optics such as compound refractive lenses.

  15. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources.

    PubMed

    Spanier, M; Herzog, C; Grötzsch, D; Kramer, F; Mantouvalou, I; Lubeck, J; Weser, J; Streeck, C; Malzer, W; Beckhoff, B; Kanngießer, B

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample. PMID:27036820

  16. Hard X-Ray Emission and the Ionizing Source in LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terashima, Yuichi; Ho, Luis C.; Ptak, Andrew F.

    2000-01-01

    We report X-ray fluxes in the 2-10 keV band from LINERs (low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions) and low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies obtained with the ASCA satellite. Observed X-ray luminosities are in the range between 4 x 10(exp 39) and 5 x 10(exp 41) ergs/s, which are significantly smaller than that of the "classical" low-luminosity Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051. We found that X-ray luminosities in 2-10 keV of LINERs with broad H.alpha emission in their optical spectra (LINER 1s) are proportional to their Ha luminosities. This correlation strongly supports the hypothesis that the dominant ionizing source in LINER 1s is photoionization by hard photons from low-luminosity AGNs. On the other hand, the X-ray luminosities of most LINERs without broad H.alpha emission (LINER 2s) in our sample are lower than LINER 1s at a given H.alpha luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities in these objects are insufficient to power their H.alpha luminosities, suggesting that their primary ionizing source is other than an AGN, or that an AGN, if present, is obscured even at energies above 2 keV.

  17. A new hybrid target concept for multi-keV X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primout, M.; Babonneau, D.; Jacquet, L.; Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Brebion, D.; Stemmler, P.; Fournier, K. B.; Marrs, R.; May, M. J.; Heeter, R. F.; Wallace, R. J.; Nishimura, H.; Fujioka, S.; Tanabe, M.; Nagai, H.

    2013-12-01

    A novel concept for using hybrid targets to create multi-keV X-ray sources was tested on the GEKKO XII facility of the OSAKA University and on the OMEGA facility of the University of Rochester. The sources were made via laser irradiation of a titanium foil placed at the end of a plastic cylinder, filled with a very low-density (2 and 5 mg/cm3) silicon-dioxide aerogel that was designed to control the longitudinal expansion of the titanium plasma. Preliminary calculations were used to determine optimal conditions for the aerogel density, cylinder diameter and length that maximize multi-keV X-ray emission. The X-ray emission power was measured on OMEGA using absolutely calibrated broad-band, diode-based CEA diagnostics, in addition to high resolution crystal spectrometers. On GEKKO XII, the heat wave propagation velocity in the aerogel was also measured with an X-ray framing camera. The advantage of using the thermal wave generated in the aerogel to heat a solid material to increase the conversion efficiency has not been fully demonstrated in these experiments. However, it was shown that a 5 mg/cm3 aerogel placed in front of a titanium foil can improve the x-ray conversion efficiency with respect to the case of 2 mg/cm3 for some target diameter and length.

  18. Design of the X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at the Taiwan Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. H.; Yin, G. C.; Wang, D. J.; Chang, C. H.; Juang, J. M.; Huang, L. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Chang, C. F.; Chu, C. H.; Tang, M. T.

    2013-03-01

    The X-ray Nanoprobe (XNP) Beamline Project has been granted as one of the first seven beamlines at the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS). The XNP beamline and the associated instruments are designed to utilize the highly brilliant TPS light source for resolving the atomic, chemical and electronic structures of semiconductor-based devices with tens nm spatial resolution in tomographic and nondestructive manners. The beamline optics is deliberated to deliver focal spot around 40 nm with photon flux in the level of 1010 photons/sec. The stability of the focal position will be highly improved by operating the double crystal monochromator (DCM) in horizontally diffracting geometry, with minor sacrifice in energy resolution. The relative movement between sample and focusing optics is controlled by ultra-precise linear translational/flexure stages and monitored by laser interferometers. The end stations will provide conventional X-ray probes including, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), and the emerging techniques, such as the Bragg-ptychography (BP) to overcome the spatial resolution set by the focusing optics. A novel scanning mechanism incorporating surface diffraction and BP for mapping the 3D interfacial strains is under development. The XNP beamline and associated instruments are expected to take the first synchrotron light by the end of 2015.

  19. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, M.; Herzog, C.; Grötzsch, D.; Kramer, F.; Mantouvalou, I.; Lubeck, J.; Weser, J.; Streeck, C.; Malzer, W.; Beckhoff, B.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample.

  20. The Dosimetric Parameters Investigation of the Pulsed X-ray and Gamma Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchebrov, S. G.; Miloichikova, I. A.; Shilova, X. O.

    2016-01-01

    The most common type of radiation used for diagnostic purposes are X-rays. However, X-rays methods have limitations related to the radiation dose for the biological objects. It is known that the use of the pulsed emitting source synchronized with the detection equipment for internal density visualization of objects significant reduces the radiation dose to the object. In the article the analysis of the suitability of the different dosimetric equipment for the radiation dose estimation of the pulsed emitting sources is carried out. The approbation results on the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 of the dosimetry systems workability with the pulse radiation and its operation range are presented. The results of the dose field investigation of the portable betatron OB-4 are demonstrated. The depth dose distribution in the air, lead and water of the pulsed bremsstrahlung generated by betatron are shown.

  1. A long-period, violently variable X-ray source in a young supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Caraveo, P A; Mereghetti, S; Tiengo, A; Bignami, G F

    2006-08-11

    Observations with the Newton X-ray Multimirror Mission satellite show a strong periodic modulation at 6.67 +/- 0.03 hours of the x-ray source at the center of the 2000-year-old supernova remnant RCW 103. No fast pulsations are visible. If genetically tied to the supernova remnant, the source could either be an x-ray binary, composed of a compact object and a low-mass star in an eccentric orbit, or an isolated neutron star. In the latter case, the combination of its age and period would indicate that it is a peculiar magnetar, dramatically slowed down, possibly by a supernova debris disc. Both scenarios require nonstandard assumptions about the formation and evolution of compact objects in supernova explosions.

  2. Development of a model of an x-ray tube transmission source

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Joetta M; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Moss, Cal E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of an x-ray tube based source for transmission measurements of UF6 gas, we have developed a one-dimensional, spreadsheet-based model of the source. Starting with the spectrum produced by an x-ray tube we apply the linear attenuation coefficients for various notch filters, the aluminum pipe, and UF6 gas. This model allows calculation of the transmitted spectrum based on the type of filter, the thickness of the filter, the x-ray tube high voltage, the Al pipe thickness, and the UF6 gas pressure. The sensitivity of the magnitude of the transmission peak produced by the notch filter to any of these variables can be explored quickly and easily to narrow the choices for experimental measurements. To validate the spreadsheet based model, comparisons have been made to various experimental data.

  3. Time-dependent spherically symmetric accretion onto compact X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Ostriker, J. P.; Stark, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical arguments and a numerical hydrodynamic code are used to investigate spherically symmetric accretion onto a compact object, in an attempt to provide some insight into gas flows heated by an outgoing X-ray flux. It is shown that preheating of spherically symmetric accretion flows by energetic radiation from an X-ray source results in time-dependent behavior for a much wider range of source parameters than was determined previously and that there are two distinct types of instability. The results are compared with observations of X-ray bursters and transients as well as with theories on quasars and active galactic nuclei that involve quasi-spherically symmetric accretion onto massive black holes. Models based on spherically symmetric accretion are found to be inconsistent with observations of bursters and transients.

  4. Single particle imaging with soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Andrew V.; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Bucksbaum, Phillip; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P.; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Farquar, George R.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Gumprecht, Lars; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hantke, Max; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stephan P.; Hauser, Günther; Holl, Peter; Hoemke, André; Jönsson, Olof; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kiskinova, Maya; Krasniqi, Faton; Krzywinski, Jacek; Liang, Mengning; Loh, Ne-Te Duane; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Marchesini, Stefano; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Odic, Duško; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schultz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Strüder, Lothar; Svenda, Martin; Tobias, Herbert; Ullrich, Joachim; Weidenspointner, Georg; Westphal, Daniel; White, Thomas A.; Williams, Garth; Hajdu, Janos; Schlichting, Ilme; Bogan, Michael J.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2011-06-01

    Results of coherent diffractive imaging experiments performed with soft X-rays (1-2 keV) at the Linac Coherent Light Source are presented. Both organic and inorganic nano-sized objects were injected into the XFEL beam as an aerosol focused with an aerodynamic lens. The high intensity and femtosecond duration of X-ray pulses produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source allow structural information to be recorded by X-ray diffraction before the particle is destroyed. Images were formed by using iterative methods to phase single shot diffraction patterns. Strategies for improving the reconstruction methods have been developed. This technique opens up exciting opportunities for biological imaging, allowing structure determination without freezing, staining or crystallization.

  5. X-Ray Properties of the Youngest Radio Sources and Their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sobolewska, Małgosia; Migliori, Giulia; Guainazzi, Matteo; Hardcastle, Martin; Ostorero, Luisa; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2016-05-01

    We present the first results from our X-ray study of young radio sources classified as compact symmetric objects (CSOs). Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we observed six CSOs for the first time in X-rays, and re-observed four CSOs already observed with XMM-Newton or BeppoSAX. We also included six other CSOs with archival data to built a pilot study of a sample of the 16 CSO sources observed in X-rays to date. All the sources are nearby, z\\lt 1, and the age of their radio structures (\\lt 3000 yr) has been derived from the expansion velocity of their hot spots. Our results show the heterogeneous nature of the CSOs’ X-ray emission, indicating a complex environment associated with young radio sources. The sample covers a range in X-ray luminosity, {L}2{--10{keV}}˜ {10}41–1045 erg s‑1, and intrinsic absorbing column density of {N}{{H}}≃ {10}21–1022 cm‑2. In particular, we detected extended X-ray emission in 1718‑649 a hard photon index of {{Γ }}≃ 1 in 2021+614 and 1511+0518 consistent with either a Compton-thick absorber or non-thermal emission from compact radio lobes, and in 0710+439 an ionized iron emission line at {E}{rest}=(6.62+/- 0.04) keV and EW ˜ 0.15–1.4 keV, and a decrease by an order of magnitude in the 2–10 keV flux since the 2008 XMM-Newton observation in 1607+26. We conclude that our pilot study of CSOs provides a variety of exceptional diagnostics and highlights the importance of deep X-ray observations of large samples of young sources. This is necessary in order to constrain theoretical models for the earliest stage of radio source evolution and to study the interactions of young radio sources with the interstellar environment of their host galaxies.

  6. X-Ray Analysis of Point Sources and Diffuse Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broming, Emma J.; Fuse, C.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to determine the evolutionary state of Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), we have performed an analysis of the sixteen HCGs in the Chandra X-Ray Observatory archives. HCGs are dense galactic systems, interacting on short time scales, which are ideal for studying galaxy mergers and interactions. We have analyzed both the diffuse gas emission of the compact groups as well as their associated individual point source populations. The total X-ray gas and total point source luminosities were used to determine the group's state of evolution. It was expected that the point source activity would allow for a clear-cut separation between compact groups in different evolutionary states. The sample groups were sorted into three evolutionary categories. Type-A groups are young systems, displaying a group dominated by spiral galaxies, active star formation, and little intragroup X-ray gas. Type-B groups are characterized by an intermediate X-ray point source population, an increased activity and interaction between group members, and intermediate diffuse gas component. HCG 97 is an example of a type-B system. It contains an intragroup gas medium, and eleven associated point sources. As the system further evolves, we expect to find a greater number of point sources. Type-C systems display an advanced stage of interaction between members, an extensive luminous point source population and a large diffuse gas reservoir. HCG 92, Stephan's Quintet, is the archetypical type-C system; it contains a large intragroup gas halo and twenty-six associated point sources. The archival HCGs investigated display a positive correlation between total point source luminosity and total diffuse gas luminosity. The results suggest X-ray point sources can be used to evaluate the evolutionary state of a group. Further research will probe the connection between fully coalesced compact groups and isolated elliptical galaxies.

  7. Accretion Disks in Supersoft X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popham, Robert; DiStefano, Rosanne

    1996-01-01

    We examine the role of the accretion disk in the steady-burning white dwarf model for supersoft sources. The accretion luminosity of the disk is quite small compared to the nuclear burning luminosity of the central source. Thus, in contrast to standard accretion disks, the main role of the disk is to reprocess the radiation from the white dwarf. We calculate models of accretion disks around luminous white dwarfs and compare the resulting disk fluxes to optical and UV observations of the LMC supersoft sources CAL 83, CAL 87, and RX J0513.9-6951. We find that if the white dwarf luminosity is near the upper end of the steady-burning region, and the flaring of the disk is included, then reprocessing by the disk can account for the UV fluxes and a substantial fraction of the optical fluxes of these systems. Reprocessing by the companion star can provide additional optical flux, and here too the disk plays an important role: since the disk is fairly thick, it shadows a significant fraction of the companion's surface.

  8. Simulations of a Johann/Johansson diffraction spectrometer for x-ray experiments at an electron beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabłoński, Ł.; Jagodziński, P.; Banaś, D.; Pajek, M.

    2013-09-01

    The ray tracing simulations of x-ray spectra for a compact six-crystal Johann/Johansson diffraction spectrometer covering a wide photon energy range (70 eV-15 keV), i.e. from the extended ultraviolet to the hard x-ray region, are discussed in the context of x-ray experiments at an electron beam ion source facility. In particular, the x-ray line profiles and energy resolution for different diffraction crystals and multilayers were studied, and the effects of extension of x-ray source size and misalignment were investigated. The simulations were also performed for x-ray emission from solid targets bombarded by electrons, which will be used for calibration of the x-ray spectrometer.

  9. Variability of Optical Counterparts to X-ray Selected Sources in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, Peter; Torres, Manuel; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Britt, Christopher; Steeghs, Danny; Galactic Bulge Survey Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide-field, multi-wavelength survey of new X-ray sources in the Galactic Bulge detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The goals of the GBS are to test binary population models by uncovering quiescent Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXB), and to identify suitable systems for follow-up mass determination using multi-wavelength observations. This follow-up is essential to better determine black hole and neutron star mass distributions. We present preliminary results from the southernmost portion of the GBS positioned 1.5-2.0 degrees below the Galactic Center which contains 424 unique X-ray sources. The optical photometry presented here were acquired using the DECam imager and the previous Mosaic-II imager on the 4m Blanco telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We combine photometry with optical spectroscopy from several different telescopes to help characterize the detected X-ray sources. To accomplish this goal, we analyze the light curve morphology and the spectroscopic features of the optical counterparts to classify these binary systems. I will describe the technique for determining the correct optical counterpart within the error circle using image subtraction and report on the statistics of the sample. I will then summarize the candidate LMXBs we have identified so far and highlight other interesting sources. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789 and by NASA through Chandra Award Number AR3-14002X issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under contract NAS8-03060. We also acknowledge support from a Graduate Student Research Award administered by the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium (LaSPACE).

  10. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector

  11. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  12. Performance Characteristics Of An Intensity Modulated Advanced X-Ray Source (IMAXS) For Homeland Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Brown, Craig; Christensen, Phil. A.; Condron, Cathie; Hernandez, Michael; Ingle, Mike; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D.; Ross, Randy; Schonberg, Russell G.

    2011-06-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband must address stringent, competitive performance requirements. High x-ray intensity is needed to penetrate dense cargo, while low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint, i.e. the size of the controlled area, required shielding and the dose to personnel. In a collaborative effort between HESCO/PTSE Inc., XScell Corp., Stangenes Industries, Inc. and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., an Intensity Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) was designed and produced. Cargo inspection systems utilizing such a source have been projected to achieve up to 2 inches steel-equivalent greater penetration capability, while on average producing the same or smaller radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the design can be used to obtain the same penetration capability as with conventional sources, but reducing the radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to anticipate the needed intensity for each x-ray pulse by evaluating signal strength in the cargo inspection system detector array for the previous pulse. The IMAXS is therefore capable of changing intensity from one pulse to the next by an electronic signal provided by electronics inside the cargo inspection system detector array, which determine the required source intensity for the next pulse. We report on the completion of a 9 MV S-band (2998 MHz) IMAXS source and comment on its performance.

  13. Spectral variability of Cyg X-3. [X ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Saba, J. L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The 1.7-40 keV spectra of Cyg X-3 obtained about a year apart, using the same rocket payload, show large spectral differences. The two observations suggest that while the luminosity of this source remains roughly the same, its spectrum can vary from a featureless blackbody distribution to a flat spectrum which includes strong iron line emission at approximately 6.7 keV. The flux in the line corresponds to an equivalent continuum width of 1.2 keV.

  14. Chandra Discovery of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources in M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Sulimanov, Valery; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A Chandra ACIS-S imaging observation of the nearby galaxy M81 (NGC 3031) reveals 9 luminous soft X-ray sources. The local environments, X-ray spectral properties, and X-ray light curves of the sources are presented and discussed in the context of prevailing physical models for supersoft sources. It is shown that the sample falls within expectations based on population synthesis models taken from the literature though the high observed luminosities (L approx.2e36 to approx.3e38 ergs in the 0.2--2.0-keV band) and equivalent blackbody temperatures (T approx.40 to 80 eV) place the brightest detected M81 objects at the high luminosity end of the class of supersoft sources defined by previous ROSAT and Einstein studies of nearby galaxies. This is interpreted as a natural consequence of the higher sensitivity of Chandra to hotter and more luminous systems. Most of the sources can be explained as canonical supersoft sources, secreting white dwarfs powered by steady surface nuclear burning, with X-ray spectra well-fit by hot white dwarf local thermodynamic equilibrium atmosphere models. An exceptionally bright source is scrutinized in greater detail as its estimated barometric luminosity, L approx. 1.5e39 ergs, greatly exceeds theoretical estimates for supersoft sources. This source may be beyond the stability limit and undergoing a phase of mass outflow under extreme conditions. Alternatively, a model in which the observed X-ray spectrum arises from an accretion disk around a blacklists of mass approx.1200/sqrt(cosi) solar masses (viewed at an inclination angle 1) cannot be excluded.

  15. Studies of a prototype linear stationary x-ray source for tomosynthesis imaging.

    PubMed

    Schwoebel, P R; Boone, John M; Shao, Joe

    2014-05-21

    A prototype linear x-ray source to implement stationary source-stationary detector tomosynthesis (TS) imaging has been studied. Potential applications include human breast and small animal imaging. The source is comprised of ten x-ray source elements each consisting of a field emission cathode, electrostatic lens, and target. The electrostatic lens and target are common to all elements. The source elements form x-ray focal spots with minimum diameters of 0.3-0.4 mm at electron beam currents of up to 40 mA with a beam voltage of 40 kV. The x-ray flux versus time was quantified from each source. X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra from tungsten targets were produced using electron beam energies from 35 to 50 keV. The half-value layer was measured to be 0.8, 0.9, and 1.0 mm, respectively, for the 35, 40, and 45 kV tube potentials using the tungsten target. The suppression of voltage breakdown events, particularly during source operation, and the use of a modified form of the standard cold-cathode geometry, enhanced source reliability. The prototype linear source was used to collect tomographic data sets of a mouse phantom using digital TS reconstruction methods and demonstrated a slice-sensitivity profile with a full-width-half-maximum of 1.3 mm. Lastly, preliminary studies of tomographic imaging of flow through the mouse phantom were performed.

  16. Studies of a prototype linear stationary X-ray source for tomosynthesis imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schwoebel, P R; Boone, John M.; Shao, Joe

    2014-01-01

    A prototype linear X-ray source to implement stationary source – stationary detector tomosynthesis imaging has been studied. Potential applications include human breast and small animal imaging. The source is comprised of ten X-ray source elements each consisting of a field emission cathode, electrostatic lens, and target. The electrostatic lens and target are common to all elements. The source elements form X-ray focal spots with minimum diameters of 0.3 to 0.4 mm at electron beam currents of up to 40 mA with a beam voltage of 40 kV. The X-ray flux versus time was quantified from each source. X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra from tungsten targets were produced using electron beam energies from 35 to 50 keV. The half-value layer was measured to be 0.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.0 mm, respectively, for the 35 kV, 40 kV, and 45 kV tube potentials using the tungsten target. The suppression of voltage breakdown events, particularly during source operation, and the use of a modified form of the standard cold-cathode geometry, enhanced source reliability. The prototype linear source was used to collect tomographic data sets of a mouse phantom using digital tomosynthesis reconstruction methods and demonstrated a slice-sensitivity profile with a full-width-half-maximum of 1.3 mm. Lastly, preliminary studies of tomographic imaging of flow through the mouse phantom were performed. PMID:24743496

  17. Location of the Norma transient with the HEAO 1 scanning modulation collimator. [X ray source in Norma Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Gursky, H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A precise position has been obtained for an X-ray transient source in Norma. The location uncertainty includes a variable star previously suggested to be the optical counterpart. This transient is associated with the steady X-ray source MX 1608-52 and probably with an X-ray burst source. A binary system containing a low-mass primary and a neutron-star or black-hole secondary of a few solar masses is consistent with the observations.

  18. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, F A; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

    2014-10-01

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems. The most challenging sources to explain are those at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity in the 3-30 kiloelectronvolt range of 4.9 × 10(39) ergs per second. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable source that can reach an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt range of 1.8 × 10(40) ergs per second. This association implies a luminosity of about 100 times the Eddington limit for a 1.4-solar-mass object, or more than ten times brighter than any known accreting pulsar. This implies that neutron stars may not be rare in the ultraluminous X-ray population, and it challenges physical models for the accretion of matter onto magnetized compact objects. PMID:25297433

  19. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, F A; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

    2014-10-01

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems. The most challenging sources to explain are those at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity in the 3-30 kiloelectronvolt range of 4.9 × 10(39) ergs per second. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable source that can reach an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt range of 1.8 × 10(40) ergs per second. This association implies a luminosity of about 100 times the Eddington limit for a 1.4-solar-mass object, or more than ten times brighter than any known accreting pulsar. This implies that neutron stars may not be rare in the ultraluminous X-ray population, and it challenges physical models for the accretion of matter onto magnetized compact objects.

  20. Locating and Determining the Nature of a Persistent Hard X-Ray Source GROJ1814-12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    The nature of the persistent hard X-ray source GROJ1814-12 discovered by BATSE a year ago is puzzling. Several potential X-ray sources are in the approximately 25 ft radius error box. Our XTE scanning observation attempted to determine the exact position of the hard X-ray source with respect with other sources. No obvious candidate is emerging from the analysis. A report is being prepared by the observing group. The persistent hard X-ray source GROJ1814-12 might be an example of a low-mass X-ray binary producing a strong flux of hard X-rays, and therefore be of the greatest importance for the theory of neutron star emission.

  1. The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

  2. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-09-30

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  3. Galactic bulge X-ray burst sources from disrupted globular clusters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.

    1985-01-01

    The origin of the bright galactic bulge X-ray sources, or GX sources, is unclear despite intensive study for the past 15 years. It is suggested that the fact that many (or most) of the GX sources are X-ray burst sources (GXRBS) and are otherwise apparently identical to the luminous X-ray sources found in globular cluster cores implies that they too may have a globular cluster origin. The possibility that the compact X-ray binaries found in globulars are ejected is constrained by observations of CVs in and out of clusters. The GXRBS are instead hypothesized to have been formed by capture processes in globular clusters which have now largely been disrupted by repeated tidal stripping and shocking in the galactic plane. A statistical analysis of the 12 GXRBS which have precise positions from Einstein and/or optical (or radio) observations indicate that it is probably significant that a bright, of less than about 19, G or K star is found within the error circle (3 arcmin radius) in four cases. These may be surviving giants in a disrupted globular cluster core. Implications for globular cluster evolution and the GXRBS themselves are discussed.

  4. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew A; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Jordan, Inga; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Müächler, Jean-Pierre; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto; Wörner, Hans Jakob; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2013-07-01

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II α lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented. PMID:23902081

  5. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre; Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van

    2013-07-15

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II α lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

  6. A Figure of Merit Comparison between Bremsstrahlung and Monoenergetic X-Ray Sources for Angiography.

    PubMed

    Boone, J M; Seibert, J A

    1994-01-01

    A figure of merit (FOM) has been developed which embodies parameters related to image quality in the numerator and radiation integral dose to the patient in the denominator. In this manner, maximizing image quality and minimizing radiation dose amounts to maximizing the FOM. Furthermore, the FOM is designed to be independent of x-ray exposure (number of photons used), and this eliminates one important parameter in an optimization scenario. Monoenergetic x-ray beams (0% bandwidth) are compared with conventional Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources from a tungsten target, for angiographic imaging systems using 144 mg/cm2 Csl image intensifiers as the detector. Thus the results are applicable to both digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and digital fluoroscopic procedures involving iodine-based contrast (e.g., roadmapping). The results demonstrate improvement factors (the ratio of the best FOM of the monoenergetic beam over the best FOM of the polyenergetic beam) ranging from 2.3 to 1.4. The improvement factors averaged over four iodine contrast thicknesses (50, 100, 500, and 1000 mg/cm2) were 1.61 (σ = 0.159) for the 10 cm thick patient, 1.68 (σ= 0.172) for the 20 cm thick patient, and 1.82 (σ= 0.186) for the 30 cm thick patient. The conclusions are that monoenergetic x-ray beams are capable of delivering the same image quality at about half the radiation dose to the patient compared to conventional X-ray tubes. PMID:21307470

  7. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF MF 16 NEBULA AND THE ASSOCIATED ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P. E-mail: rpdudik@usno.navy.mil

    2012-06-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 6946 X-1 and its associated nebula MF 16. This ULX has very similar properties to the famous Holmberg II ULX, the first ULX to show a prominent infrared [O IV] emission line comparable to those found in active galactic nuclei. This paper attempts to constrain the ULX spectral energy distribution (SED) given the optical/UV photometric fluxes and high-resolution X-ray observations. Specifically, Chandra X-ray data and published Hubble optical/UV data are extrapolated to produce a model for the full optical to X-ray SED. The photoionization modeling of the IR lines and ratios is then used to test different accretion spectral models. While either an irradiated disk model or an O-supergiant plus accretion disk model fits the data very well, we prefer the latter because it fits the nebular parameters slightly better. In this second case the accretion disk alone dominates the extreme-UV and X-ray emission, while an O-supergiant is responsible for most of the far-UV emission.

  8. Temperature of thermal X-ray and. gamma. -ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    A framework is developed for the accurate determination of the temperature of a source, assuming that it is optically thin and emits a bremsstrahlung spectrum. The temperature can be measured from the shape of the spectral distribution, and an explicit relation is derived for the temperature in terms of this slope and a sum of correction terms to the limiting form of the bremsstrahlung formula. The corrections can be evaluted easily in terms of simple, though accurate, asymptotic formulae and are due to (i) correction to an asymptotic form of a modified Bessel function, (ii) a lowest-order correction to the Born approximation to the bremsstrahlung cross-section, (iii) relativistic corrections to the plasma electron energy distribution and to the nonrelativistic limit to the electron-ion bremstrahlung cross section, (iv) the contribution from electron-electron bremsstrahlung. For the case where there is a distribution of temperatures in the plasma, an additional correction is derived in terms of the rms variation in the plasma temperature. Some corresponding results for highly relativistic plasmas are given. The intermediate domain (kTapprox.m/sub e/c/sup 2/) is also discussed, and a rough general formula is suggested.

  9. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  10. Characteristics of Radiation Generated with the X-ray Source NESTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Gladkikh, P.; Kovalyova, N.; Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.

    2007-01-19

    The results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of the basic SR characteristics, generated from bending magnets of the storage ring NESTOR and hard X-rays generated through Compton scattering of an intense laser beam by relativistic electron are presented in this work. It is shown that Compton X-ray source NESTOR which construction in NSC KIPT is supported with NATO grant number SfP-977982 covers radiation energy range from 0.3 eV till 1 MeV with photon flux of about 1010 - 1012 phot/s. The possible areas of radiation application of the storage ring NESTOR are given.

  11. Diamond planar refractive lenses for third- and fourth-generation X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Nöhammer, Bernd; Hoszowska, Joanna; Freund, Andreas K; David, Christian

    2003-03-01

    The fabrication and testing of planar refractive hard X-ray lenses made from bulk CVD diamond substrates is reported. The lens structures were generated by electron-beam lithography and transferred by reactive-ion etching into the diamond. Various lens designs were fabricated and tested at 12.4 and 17.5 keV photon energy. Efficiencies of up to 71% and gains of up to 26 were achieved. A line focus of 3.2 micro m (FWHM) was measured. These lenses should be able to withstand the extreme flux densities expected at the planned fourth-generation X-ray sources.

  12. Condenser for Koehler-like illumination in transmission x-ray microscopes at undulator sources.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Ulrich; Lindblom, Magnus; Charalambous, Pambos; Kaulich, Burkhard; Wilhein, Thomas

    2006-05-15

    We report on a novel condenser for full-field transmission x-ray microscopes that use synchrotron radiation from an undulator source. The condenser produces a Koehler-like homogeneous intensity distribution in the sample plane and eliminates object illumination problems connected with the high degree of spatial coherence in an undulator beam. The optic consists of a large number of small linear diffraction gratings and is therefore relatively easy to manufacture. First imaging experiments with a prototype condenser were successfully performed with the Twinmic x-ray microscope at the Elettra synchrotron facility in Italy. PMID:16642140

  13. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milli­seconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented. PMID:25931061

  14. The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Chollet, Matthieu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Cammarata, Marco; Damiani, Daniel; Defever, Jim; Delor, James T.; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Langton, J. Brian; Nelson, Silke; Ramsey, Kelley; Robert, Aymeric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Stefanescu, Daniel; Srinivasan, Venkat; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument achieves femtosecond time-resolution with hard X-ray methods using a free-electron laser source. It covers a photon energy range of 4–24 keV. A femtosecond optical laser system is available across a broad spectrum of wavelengths for generating transient states of matter. The instrument is designed to emphasize versatility and the scientific goals encompass ultrafast physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transformation of matter and transfer of energy at the atomic scale. PMID:25931060

  15. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; et al

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  16. The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Chollet, Matthieu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Cammarata, Marco; Damiani, Daniel; Defever, Jim; Delor, James T.; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Langton, J. Brian; Nelson, Silke; et al

    2015-04-21

    The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument achieves femtosecond time-resolution with hard X-ray methods using a free-electron laser source. It covers a photon energy range of 4–24 keV. A femtosecond optical laser system is available across a broad spectrum of wavelengths for generating transient states of matter. The instrument is designed to emphasize versatility and the scientific goals encompass ultrafast physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transformation of matter and transfer of energy at the atomic scale.

  17. The Mechanism of the Optical Variability of Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, A.; Matsuda, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Fukue, J.

    1999-12-01

    We present models of an accretion disk of Supersoft X-ray Sources (SSXSs) to compare with observations. Some SSXSs show peculior behavior in optical light curves. Especially SSXS RX J0513 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is known for its quasi-periodic optical variability and X-ray on/off. Considering these observations, we examine three models of an accretion disk whose shape may affect the luminosity from the binary system. We, then, compare the computed spectra based on three models with observation. Two models give good agreements in the optical range, while the other does not. Using present models, we may predict the spectrum in currently unobservable wavelength.

  18. Achromatic approach to phase-based multi-modal imaging with conventional X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A; Kallon, Gibril; Basta, Dario; Diemoz, Paul C; Vincenzi, Alessandro; Delogu, Pasquale; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-06-15

    Compatibility with polychromatic radiation is an important requirement for an imaging system using conventional rotating anode X-ray sources. With a commercially available energy-resolving single-photon-counting detector we investigated how broadband radiation affects the performance of a multi-modal edge-illumination phase-contrast imaging system. The effect of X-ray energy on phase retrieval is presented, and the achromaticity of the method is experimentally demonstrated. Comparison with simulated measurements integrating over the energy spectrum shows that there is no significant loss of image quality due to the use of polychromatic radiation. This means that, to a good approximation, the imaging system exploits radiation in the same way at all energies typically used in hard-X-ray imaging. PMID:26193618

  19. Quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray source via laser Compton scattering and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Yasumoto, M.; Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Yanagida, T.; Nakajyo, T.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray source via laser Compton scattering (LCS) based on an S-band compact electron linac at AIST. The number of total photons and the maximum X-ray energy was 107 photons/sec and about 40 keV, respectively, in 15-degree crossing angle between a 42 MeV electron beam and a 800 nm Ti:Sa laser. The biological observation of the human bone with fractures has been successfully demonstrated using the LCS X-ray of 26.4 keV with the in-line phase contrast scheme. Good contrast enhancement is clearly observed between the absorption and the phase contrast images.

  20. Short x-ray pulse generation using deflecting cavities at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Sajaev, V.; Borland, M.; Chae, Y.-C.; Decker, G.; Dejus, R.; Emery, L.; Harkay, K.; Nassiri, A.; Shastri, S.; Waldschmidt, G.; Yang, B.; Anfinrud, P.; Dolgashev, V.; NIH; SLAC

    2007-11-11

    Storage-ring-based third-generation light sources can provide intense radiation pulses with durations as short as 100 ps. However, there is growing interest within the synchrotron radiation user community in performing experiments with much shorter X-ray pulses. Zholents et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 425 (1999) 385] recently proposed using RF orbit deflection to generate sub-ps X-ray pulses. In this scheme, two deflecting cavities are used to deliver a longitudinally dependent vertical kick to the beam. An optical slit can then be used to slice out a short part of the radiation pulse. Implementation of this scheme is planned for one APS beamline in the near future. In this paper, we summarize our feasibility study of this method and the expected X-ray beam parameters. We find that a pulse length of less than two picoseconds can be achieved.

  1. Blind source separation based x-ray image denoising from an image sequence.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan; Fei, Bin; Li, Wei-Liang

    2015-09-01

    Blind source separation (BSS) based x-ray image denoising from an image sequence is proposed. Without priori knowledge, the useful image signal can be separated from an x-ray image sequence, for original images are supposed as different combinations of stable image signal and random image noise. The BSS algorithms such as fixed-point independent component analysis and second-order statistics singular value decomposition are used and compared with multi-frame averaging which is a common algorithm for improving image's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Denoising performance is evaluated in SNR, standard deviation, entropy, and runtime. Analysis indicates that BSS is applicable to image denoising; the denoised image's quality will get better when more frames are included in an x-ray image sequence, but it will cost more time; there should be trade-off between denoising performance and runtime, which means that the number of frames included in an image sequence is enough. PMID:26429442

  2. Blind source separation based x-ray image denoising from an image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan; Fei, Bin; Li, Wei-Liang

    2015-09-01

    Blind source separation (BSS) based x-ray image denoising from an image sequence is proposed. Without priori knowledge, the useful image signal can be separated from an x-ray image sequence, for original images are supposed as different combinations of stable image signal and random image noise. The BSS algorithms such as fixed-point independent component analysis and second-order statistics singular value decomposition are used and compared with multi-frame averaging which is a common algorithm for improving image's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Denoising performance is evaluated in SNR, standard deviation, entropy, and runtime. Analysis indicates that BSS is applicable to image denoising; the denoised image's quality will get better when more frames are included in an x-ray image sequence, but it will cost more time; there should be trade-off between denoising performance and runtime, which means that the number of frames included in an image sequence is enough.

  3. Broadband X-ray Spectroscopy of the ADC Source 4U 1822-37 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, J.; White, N.

    2006-01-01

    We will present the broadband spectra of the low mass x-ray binary 4U 1822-37, recently observed with Suzaku. 4U 1822-37 is the canonical accretion disk corona (ADC) source where the compact object is obscured by an extended corona that intercepts and scatters the central continuum emission, some of which is then reprocessed in the outer regions of the accretion disk. 4U 1822-37 therefore serves as an important link between x-ray binaries and AGN. The broadband x-ray spectra from the Suzaku XIS and HXD provide a unique opportunity to probe the physical conditions in the corona and the accretion disk for this important accretion geometry.

  4. ESO 103-G35 - A new Seyfert galaxy and possible X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M. M.; Feldman, F. R.; Marshall, F. E.; Wamsteker, W.

    1979-01-01

    By means of an objective prism plate, two emission-line galaxies have been identified within the 0.7-sq deg HEAO-A2 error box for the X-ray source H1834-653. Optical spectrophotometric observations are reported for both objects as well as the galaxy NGC 6684, which also lies near the position of H1834-653. These data show that one of the emission-line galaxies, ESO 103-G35, is a Seyfert galaxy with a high-excitation forbidden-line spectrum and weak broad emission wings at H-alpha. Further measurements of this galaxy reveal an infrared excess at wavelengths longer than 2.2 microns. The H-alpha luminosity of ESO 103-G35 is consistent with the X-ray luminosity estimated from the HEAO-A2 data, thus strengthening the likelihood of association of this galaxy with the X-ray emission.

  5. A VARIABLE BLACK HOLE X-RAY SOURCE IN AN NGC 1399 GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, I Chun; Kundu, Arunav; Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Joseph, Tana D. E-mail: akundu@pa.msu.ed E-mail: tjm@astro.soton.ac.u

    2010-09-20

    We have discovered an accreting black hole (BH) in a spectroscopically confirmed globular cluster (GC) in NGC 1399 through the monitoring of its X-ray activity. The source, with a peak luminosity of L{sub X} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, reveals an order of magnitude change in the count rate within {approx_equal}10 ks in a Chandra observation. The BH resides in a metal-rich [Fe/H] {approx_equal} 0.2 GC. After RZ 2109 in NGC 4472 this is only the second BH X-ray source in a GC confirmed via rapid X-ray variability. Unlike RZ 2109, the X-ray spectrum of this BH source did not change during the period of rapid variability. In addition to the short-term variability the source also exhibits long-term variability. After being bright for at least a decade since 1993, within a span of two years it became progressively fainter, and eventually undetectable, or marginally detectable, in deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. The source also became harder as it faded. The characteristics of the long-term variability in itself provide sufficient evidence to identify the source as a BH. The long-term decline in the luminosity of this object was likely not recognized in previous studies because the rapid variability within the bright epoch suppressed the average luminosity in that integration. The hardening of the spectrum accompanying the fading would also make this BH source indistinguishable from an accreting neutron star in some epochs. Therefore, some low-mass X-ray binaries identified as neutron-star accretors in snapshot studies of nearby galaxies may also be BHs. Thus, the discovery of the second confirmed BH in an extragalactic GC through rapid variability at the very least suggests that accreting BHs in GCs are not exceedingly rare occurrences.

  6. Three transient X-ray sources during the INTEGRAL revolution 1710

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Charles, Phil; Chenevez, J.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-08-01

    During recent INTEGRAL observations of the Musca and Norma regions (revolutions 1710) performed between 2016-08-05 16:00:36 UTC and 2016-08-07 21:02:14 UTC a renewed activity from the following transient X-ray sources has been detected.

  7. X-ray source characteristics and detection efficiencies of prototype Lixiscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The radioactive X-ray sources and scintillator screens used in prototype Lixiscope units are described. Some of those considerations necessary for the optimization of future Lixiscope designs are stressed as well as some semi-quantitative information on the present prototype devices.

  8. On the evolutionary status of bright, low-mass X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbink, R. F.; Rappaport, S.; Savonije, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A model of bright, low-mass X-ray binaries is proposed which features a lower giant-branch star losing mass on a nuclear time scale to an accreting compact companion. Simple numerical models show that mass transfer rates equal to or greater than 10 to the -9th solar masses per yr are sustained at very nearly a constant rate until the envelope of the donor star is exhausted. The model predicts orbital periods in the range 1-200 days and X-ray to optical luminosity ratios Lx/Lopt = 200-1000 for these sources. It accounts in a natural way for the large fraction of the total galactic bulge luminosity emitted by a few bright (10 to the 37th erg/s or greater) sources. It also accords very well with the observed X-ray and optical properties of the halo source Cyg X-2 and also with those of 2S 0921-63, provided this latter system contains a massive accreting white dwarf rather than a neutron star. Problems of the prior evolution of low-mass X-ray sources are also briefly delineated.

  9. Compact galactic X-ray sources; Proceedings of the Workshop, Washington, D.C., April 20, 21, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. (Editor); Pines, D.

    1979-01-01

    The current status and future prospects regarding the study of compact galactic X-ray sources are reviewed; key questions addressable by X-ray observations are outlined, and various proposed types of missions are evaluated in terms of their ability to address these questions. Subjects discussed include degenerate dwarfs and cataclysmic variables, bursters, neutron stars, black holes, and erratic variables, transients, and patrol programs. Specific topics include future X-ray observations of magnetic binaries, the thermonuclear-flash model for X-ray burst sources, neutron star X-ray sources, prospects for experimental research on black holes in binary systems, and compact X-ray source observations after Explorer with the LAMAR.

  10. Phase-locked MHz pulse selector for x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Förster, Daniel F; Lindenau, Bernd; Leyendecker, Marko; Janssen, Franz; Winkler, Carsten; Schumann, Frank O; Kirschner, Jürgen; Holldack, Karsten; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2015-05-15

    Picosecond x-ray pulses are extracted with a phase-locked x-ray pulse selector at 1.25 MHz repetition rate from the pulse trains of the accelerator-driven multiuser x-ray source BESSY II preserving the peak brilliance at high pulse purity. The system consists of a specially designed in-vacuum chopper wheel rotating with ≈1  kHz angular frequency. The wheel is driven in an ultrahigh vacuum and is levitated on magnetic bearings being capable of withstanding high centrifugal forces. Pulses are picked by 1252 high-precision slits of 70 μm width on the outer rim of the wheel corresponding to a temporal opening window of the chopper of 70 ns. We demonstrate how the electronic phase stabilization of ±2  ns together with an arrival time jitter of the individual slits of the same order of magnitude allows us to pick short single bunch x-ray pulses out of a 200 ns ion clearing gap in a multibunch pulse train as emitted from a synchrotron facility at 1.25 MHz repetition rate with a pulse purity below the shot noise detection limit. The approach is applicable to any high-repetition pulsed radiation source, in particular in the x-ray spectral range up to 10 keV. The opening window in a real x-ray beamline, its stability, as well as the limits of mechanical pulse picking techniques in the MHz range are discussed. PMID:26393715

  11. kHz femtosecond laser-plasma hard X-ray and fast ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoss, A.; Korn, G.; Richardson, M. C.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Voigt, U.; Siders, C. W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2002-04-01

    We describe the first demonstration of a new stable, kHz femtosecond laser-plasma source of hard x-ray continuum and Kα emission using a thin liquid metallic jet target. kHz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot-to-shot and is debris-free. We have solved this requirement with the use of a fine (10-30 μm diameter) liquid metal jet target that provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We will show hard x-ray spectra recorded from liquid Ga targets that show the generation of the 9.3 keV and 10.3 keV, Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multi-keV Bremsstrahlung continuum. This source was generated by a 50fs duration, 1 kHz, 2W, high intensity Ti:Sapphire laser. We will discuss the extension of this source to higher powers and higher repetition rates, providing harder x-ray emission, with the incorporation of pulse-shaping and other techniques to enhance the x-ray conversion efficiency. Using the same liquid target technology, we have also demonstrated the generation of forward-going sub-MeV protons from a 10 μm liquid water target at 1 kHz repetition rates. kHz sources of high energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies, as well as lead to the efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors both in the forward and backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high repetition-rate lasers sources increase, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency and directionality to occur. The impact of these developments on a number of fields will be discussed. As compact

  12. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Witte, Katharina; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Kanngiesser, Birgit; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:25832284

  13. On the nature of the sources of hard pulse X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shklovskiy, I. S.

    1978-01-01

    Besides the identified sources of cosmic pulse X-ray radiation with globular clusters NGC 6624, NGC 1851 and MXB 1730-335 several new identifications were made. The source in Norma was probably identified with globular cluster NGC 5927, the source in Aquila with globular cluster NGC 6838 (M71), and the source in Puppis with globular cluster NGC 2298. Gamma pulses discovered by the Vela satellites and X-ray pulses thoroughly measured by the SAS-3, Ariel-5, and ANS satellites are thought to be the same phenomenon. The sources of such a radiation must be some kind of peculiarity at the central part of globular clusters; it is most probably a massive black hole. The sources of hard pulse radiation which cannot be identified with globular clusters are considered to be a new kind of galactic object, invisible globular clusters, which are naked nuclei of globular clusters.

  14. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Kanngießer, Birgit; Witte, Katharina; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  15. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Witte, Katharina; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Kanngießer, Birgit; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  16. Discovery of Extremely Embedded X-ray Sources in the R Coronae Australis Star Forming Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Ken-Ji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Petre, Rob; White, Nicholas E.; Stelzer, Beate; Nedachi, Ko; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-01-01

    We detected three extremely embedded X-ray sources in the R Corona Australis (R CrA) star forming core, IRS 7 region. Two weak X-ray sources are associated with the VLA centimeter radio sources 10E & W, whereas the third brightest source detected in the two XMM-Newton observations on March 2003 has no counterpart at any wavelengths. The large K-band upper-limit (19.4m) measured with the University of Hawaii 88-inch Telescope and strong absorption derived in X-rays (N(sub H) approx. 2.8 x 10(exp 23)/sq cm equivalent to A(sub v) approx. 180 m) indicate that the source is younger than typical Class I protostars, i.e. a Class 0 protostar or an intermittent phase between Class 0 and Class I protostars. The X-ray luminosity was less than one thirtieth (log L(sub x) less than or approx. equals 29.3 ergs/s) in the former Chandra observation in October 2000, which suggests that the X-ray activity, probably generated by magnetic activity, is triggered by an intermittent mass accretion episode such as FU Ori type outbursts. Because the source was detected at high significance in the XMM-Newton observations (approx. 2,000 cnts), X-ray properties of such young protostars can be well investigated for the first time. The light curves were constant in the 1st observation and increased linearly by a factor of two during 30 ksec in the 2nd observation. Both spectra showed iron K lines originated in hot thin-thermal plasma and fluorescence by cold gas. They can be reproduced by an absorbed thin-thermal plasma model with a Gaussian component at 6.4 keV (kT approx. 3-4 keV, L(sub x) approx. 7-20 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s). The rising timescale of the light curves in the 2nd observation was too slow for magnetically generated X-ray flares, whereas large equivalent width of the fluorescence iron K line in the 1st observation (approx. 810 eV) requires strong partial covering of the X-ray source. These results suggest that a confined hot (perhaps accretion) spot on the protostellar core was

  17. The nuclear X-ray source in NGC 3628: A strange active galactic nucleus or the most luminous high-mass X-ray binary known?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1995-01-01

    After 12 years, during which its unabsorbed soft X-ray flux in the 0.1-2.0 keV band was almost constant at about f(sub x) approximately 10(exp -12) ergs/s/sq cm, the compact nuclear source in NGC 3628 was not detected in one of our ROSAT observations, with a limiting sensitivity of f(sub x) approximately 5 x 10(exp -14) ergs/s/sq cm. Our data can be explained in two ways. The source is either the most massive X-ray binary known so far, with a greater than and approximately equal to 75 solar mass black hole, or an unusual low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary, while the luminosity of the source of L(sub x) is approximately equal to 10(exp 40) ergs/s is more similar to those of low-luminosity AGNs. If it is an AGN, variable obscuration might explain the observed light curve.

  18. PLEIADES: High Peak Brightness, Subpicosecond Thomson Hard-X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Harteman, F V; Le Sage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-12-15

    The Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) facility, is a unique, novel, tunable (10-200 keV), ultrafast (ps-fs), hard x-ray source that greatly extends the parameter range reached by existing 3rd generation sources, both in terms of x-ray energy range, pulse duration, and peak brightness at high energies. First light was observed at 70 keV early in 2003, and the experimental data agrees with 3D codes developed at LLNL. The x-rays are generated by the interaction of a 50 fs Fourier-transform-limited laser pulse produced by the TW-class FALCON CPA laser and a highly focused, relativistic (20-100 MeV), high brightness (1 nC, 0.3-5 ps, 5 mm.mrad, 0.2% energy spread) photo-electron bunch. The resulting x-ray brightness is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} ph/mm{sup 2}/s/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW. The beam is well-collimated (10 mrad divergence over the full spectrum, 1 mrad for a single color), and the source is a unique tool for time-resolved dynamic measurements in matter, including high-Z materials.

  19. The Chandra COSMOS-Legacy Survey: Source X-Ray Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, S.; Lanzuisi, G.; Civano, F.; Iwasawa, K.; Suh, H.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Allevato, V.; Griffiths, R.; Miyaji, T.; Ranalli, P.; Salvato, M.; Schawinski, K.; Silverman, J.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Vignali, C.

    2016-10-01

    We present the X-ray spectral analysis of the 1855 extragalactic sources in the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey catalog having more than 30 net counts in the 0.5–7 keV band. A total of 38% of the sources are optically classified type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 60% are type 2 AGNs, and 2% are passive, low-redshift galaxies. We study the distribution of AGN photon index Γ and of the intrinsic absorption {N}{{H},{{z}}} based on the sources’ optical classification: type 1 AGNs have a slightly steeper mean photon index Γ than type 2 AGNs, which, on the other hand, have average {N}{{H},{{z}}} ∼ 3 times higher than type 1 AGNs. We find that ∼15% of type 1 AGNs have {N}{{H},{{z}}}\\gt {10}22 cm‑2, i.e., are obscured according to the X-ray spectral fitting; the vast majority of these sources have {L}2{--10{keV}} \\gt 1044 erg s‑1. The existence of these objects suggests that optical and X-ray obscuration can be caused by different phenomena, the X-ray obscuration being, for example, caused by dust-free material surrounding the inner part of the nuclei. Approximately 18% of type 2 AGNs have {N}{{H},{{z}}}\\lt {10}22 cm‑2, and most of these sources have low X-ray luminosities (L {}2{--10{keV}} \\lt 1043 erg s‑1). We expect a part of these sources to be low-accretion, unobscured AGNs lacking broad emission lines. Finally, we also find a direct proportional trend between {N}{{H},{{z}}} and host-galaxy mass and star formation rate, although part of this trend is due to a redshift selection effect.

  20. Characterisation of flash X-ray source generated by Kali-1000 Pulse Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, N.; Durga Prasada Rao, A.; Mittal, K. C.

    2016-02-01

    The electron beam-driven Rod Pinch Diode (RPD) is presently fielded on KALI-1000 Pulse Power System at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Visakhapatnam and is a leading candidate for future flash X-ray radiographic sources. The diode is capable of producing less than 2-mm radiation spot sizes and greater than 350 milli rads of dose measured at 1 m from the X-ray source. KALI-1000 Pulse Power Source is capable of delivering up to 600 kV using a Tesla Transformer with Demineralized Insulated Transmission Line (DITL), the diode typically operates between 250-330 kV . Since the radiation dose has a power-law dependence on diode voltage, this limits the dose production on KALI-1000 system. Radiation dose with angular variation is measured using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's) and the X-ray spot size is measured using pin hole arrangement with image plate (IP) to obtain the time-integrated source profile as well as a time-resolved spot diagnostic. An X-ray pinhole camera was used to pick out where the energetic e-beam connects to the anode. Ideally the diode should function such that the radiation is emitted from the tip. The camera was mounted perpendicular to the machine's axis to view the radiation from the tip. Comparison of the spot sizes of the X-ray sources obtained by the pin hole and rolled edge arrangements was carried and results obtained by both the techniques are with in ± 10% of the average values.

  1. The BL LAC phenomenon: X-ray observations of transition objects and determination of the x-ray spectrum of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities related to two ROSAT investigations: (1) x-ray properties of radio galaxies thought to contain BL Lac type nuclei; and (2) x-ray spectra of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources. The following papers describing the research are provided as attachments: Multiple X-ray Emission Components in Low Power Radio Galaxies; New X-ray Results on Radio Galaxies; Analysis Techniques for a Multiwavelength Study of Radio Galaxies; Separation of X-ray Emission Components in Radio Galaxies; X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies and Quasars; Extended and Compact X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies; and X-ray Spectra of a Complete Sample of Extragalactic Core-dominated Radio Sources.

  2. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of multicharged argon and krypton ions using a laser-produced x-ray source with a gas-puff target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Dyakin, Vladimir M.; Faenov, Anatoly Y.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Jarocki, Roman; Nilsen, Joseph; Osterheld, Albert L.; Skobelev, Igor Y.; Szczurek, Miroslaw

    1997-10-01

    A hot and dense plasma can be produced by high-power laser irradiation of a high-pressure gas puff target. The plasma emits strong x-ray radiation in low photon-energy range (soft x-rays and XUV radiation) and is considered to be used as a debrisless laser-produced x-ray source. It was shown that the laser-irradiated gas puff plasma is an ideal source for the high-resolution spectroscopic studies of complex spectra of the multicharged ions. This paper reports our investigations of x-ray spectra of heliumlike argon and neonlike krypton ions. The gas puff targets were created with the use of a specially designed high-pressure solenoid valve operating at a backing pressure up to 15 at and quipped with a sonic-type circular nozzle of 0.5 mm in diameter. Parameters of the gas puff targets were measured using x-ray shadowgraphy and laser interferometry. To irradiate the gas puff targets we have used a Nd:glass laser, which generates 10 J pulses in 1 ns FWHM. The laser beam was focused onto the gas puff target perpendicularly in respect to the flow of gas using an aspherical lens. The diameter of a laser beam in the focus were about 100 micrometers , what ensured the radiation power density to be of order of 1014 W/cm2. To measure x-ray spectra emitted by a laser-irradiated gas puff target we have used a simple focusing crystal spectrographs with a mica crystal curved into a spherical surface of radius R equals 100 mm. The spectra were recorded on Kodak RAR 2495 x-ray commercial film. The high resolving power of the spectrograph of about (lambda) /(Delta) (lambda) equals 10000 permitted high-precision wavelength spectral measurements. The measured x-ray spectra have the small spectra width of the observed lines associated with the low expansion velocity of the laser- irradiated gas puff plasma. Dielectronic sodiumlike satellites to neonlike krypton resonance lines have measured for the first time. High-resolution spectra of heliumlike argon were also obtained. The

  3. Chandra Discovers X-ray Source at the Center of Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Culminating 25 years of searching by astronomers, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology say that a faint X-ray source, newly detected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, may be the long-sought X-ray emission from a known supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Frederick K. Baganoff and colleagues from Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and the University of California, Los Angeles, will present their findings today in Atlanta at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Baganoff, lead scientist for the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) team's "Sagittarius A* and the Galactic Center" project and postdoctoral research associate at MIT, said that the precise positional coincidence between the new X-ray source and the radio position of a long-known source called Sagittarius A* "encourages us to believe that the two are the same." Sagittarius A* is a point-like, variable radio source at the center of our galaxy. It looks like a faint quasar and is believed to be powered by gaseous matter falling into a supermassive black hole with 2.6 million times the mass of our Sun. Chandra's remarkable detection of this X-ray source has placed astronomers within a couple of years of a coveted prize: measuring the spectrum of energy produced by Sagittarius A* to determine in detail how the supermassive black hole that powers it works. "The race to be the first to detect X-rays from Sagittarius A* is one of the hottest and longest-running in all of X-ray astronomy," Baganoff said. "Theorists are eager to hear the results of our observation so they can test their ideas." But now that an X-ray source close to Sagittarius A* has been found, it has taken researchers by surprise by being much fainter than expected. "There must be something unusual about the environment around this black hole that affects how it is fed and how the gravitational energy released from the infalling matter is

  4. On the physical nature of the source of ultraluminous X-ray pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Kazarian, G.

    2016-01-01

    To reconcile the observed unusual high luminosity of NuSTAR X-ray pulsations from M82X-2 with the most extreme violation of the Eddington limit, and in view that the persistent X-ray radiation from M82X-2 almost precludes the possibility of common pulsars, we tackle the problem by the implications of microscopic theory of black hole (MTBH). The preceding developments of MTBH are proved to be quite fruitful for the physics of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic-rays. Namely, replacing a central singularity by the infrastructures inside event horizon, subject to certain rules, MTBH explains the origin of ZeV-neutrinos which are of vital interest for the source of UHE-particles. The M82X-2 is assumed to be a spinning intermediate mass black hole resided in final stage of growth. Then, the thermal blackbody X-ray emission, arisen due to the rotational kinetic energy of black hole, escapes from event horizon through the vista to outside world, which is detected as ultraluminous X-ray pulsations. The M82X-2 indeed releases ˜99.6 % of its pulsed radiative energy predominantly in the X-ray bandpass 0.3-30 keV. We derive a pulse profile and give a quantitative account of energetics and orbital parameters of the semi-detached X-ray binary containing a primary accretor M82X-2 of inferred mass M≃138.5-226 M_{⊙} and secondary massive, M2> 48.3-64.9 M_{⊙}, O/B-type donor star with radius of R> 22.1-25.7 R_{⊙}, respectively. We compute the torque added to M82X-2 per unit mass of accreted matter which yields the measured spin-up rate.

  5. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  6. Initial experimentation with in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kincaid, Russell; Servol, Marina; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Ye, Hongwei; Lipson, Edward; Toth, Remy; Pogany, Andrew; Coman, Ioana

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the imaging performance of our newly constructed in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source. Projection images of nylon fibers with diameters in the 10-330 μm range were obtained using an ultrafast (100 Hz, 28 fs, 40 mJ) laser-based x-ray source with Mo and Ta targets and Be filter, and Gaussian spatial-intensity distribution (FWHMS = 5 μm). A cooled CCD camera (24 μm pitch) with a Gd IIOS II screen coupled via 1:1 optical taper was used (FWHMD = 50 μm). We have investigated nylon-fiber image quality vs. imaging setup geometry and x-ray spectra. The following parameters were evaluated: contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and sampling. In addition, we performed theoretical simulation of image formation for the same objects but within a wide range of geometrical parameters. The rigorous wave-optical formalism was used for modeling of the free-space propagation of x-rays from the object plane to the detector, and the "projection approximation" was used. We found reasonable agreement between predictions of our analytical model and the experiments. We conclude that: a) Optimum magnification maximizing contrast and SNR is almost independent of the source-to-detector (R) distance and depends strongly on the diameter of the fiber. b) The corresponding maximum values of the contrast and SNR are almost linear with respect to R; the optimum magnification decreases with fiber diameter. c) The minimum diameter of fiber defines the minimum source-to-object distance R I if R is fixed and the object is moved.

  7. Measuring the Radius of a Neutron Star; Origin of High X-Ray Luminosities in Optically Passive Galaxies; Resolving the Source of X-Rays in IC 1613"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This recently expired grant has supported the work of the PI, his students, and his collaborators on a variety of ROSAT projects over the past three years. Annual reports have summarized much of the work accomplished; here we provide a brief review of the work resulting from this effort, and a summary of the personnel who have benefited from its support. A high resolution ROSAT HRI X-ray image of the Local Group dwarf IC1613 revealed that the principal source of X-ray emission in this direction arises in a background cluster of galaxies, as first suggested by Eskridge (1995). In addition, however, we found a bright X-ray source coincident with the only known supernova remnant in this galaxy, S # 8. Extensive ground-based follow-up observations in the radio and optical regimes were conducted. We confirmed the nonthermal radio spectral index of the source and measured its extent to be approx. 3 sec at 20 cm. Imaging spectrophotometric observations taken with the multi-pupil spectrograph of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in the FSU allowed us to determine the density and velocity distribution of the gas in the remnant. The simultaneous presence of luminous X-ray and optical emission suggests a relatively young remnant in which the outward-moving shock has recently encountered dense material. Many of this object's properties are similar to those of the brightest optical remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, N49. Another potential source of X-rays in this galaxy which featured prominently in our original proposal, an Oxygen Wolf-Rayet star with a large surrounding wind-blown bubble, was not detected.

  8. Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Henry Herng Wei

    2004-01-01

    The realization of tunable, ultrashort pulse x-ray sources promises to open new venues of science and to shed new light on long-standing problems in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Fundamentally new information can now be accessed. Used in a pump-probe spectroscopy, ultrashort x-ray pulses provide a means to monitor atomic rearrangement and changes in electronic structure in condensed-matter and chemical systems on the physically-limiting time-scales of atomic motion. This opens the way for the study of fast structural dynamics and the role they play in phase transitions, chemical reactions and the emergence of exotic properties in materials with strongly interacting degrees of freedom. The ultrashort pulse x-ray source developed at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on electron slicing in storage rings, and generates ~100 femtosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation spanning wavelengths from the far-infrared to the hard x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The tunability of the source allows for the adaptation of a broad range of static x-ray spectroscopies to useful pump-probe measurements. Initial experiments are attempted on transition metal complexes that exhibit relatively large structural changes upon photo-excitation and which have excited-state evolution determined by strongly interacting structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Specifically, iron(II) complexes undergo a spin-crossover transition upon optical irradiation. The dynamics of the transition involve a metal-to-ligand charge transfer, a ΔS=2 change in magnetic moment and 10% bond dilation in the first coordination shell of the iron. Studies of the electronic dynamics are studied with time-resolved optical absorption measurements. The current progress of time-resolved structural studies to complete the picture of the spin-crossover transition is presented.

  9. Minimum X-ray source size of the on-axis corona in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovčiak, M.; Done, C.

    2016-05-01

    The ``lamppost'' model is often used to describe the X-ray source geometry in AGN, where an infinitesimal point source is located on the black hole spin axis. This is especially invoked for narrow line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies, where an extremely broad iron line seen in episodes of low X-ray flux can both be explained by extremely strong relativistic effects as the source approaches the black hole horizon. The most extreme spectrum seen from the NLS1 1H0707-495 requires that the source is less than 1 GM/c2 above the event horizon in this geometry. However, the source must also be large enough to intercept sufficient seed photons from the disc to make the hard X-ray Compton continuum which produces the observed iron line/reflected spectrum. We use a fully relativistic ray tracing code to show that this implies that the source must be substantially larger than 1 GM/c2 in 1H0707-495 if the disc is the source of seed photons. Hence the source cannot fit as close as 1 GM/c2 to the horizon, so the observed spectrum and variability are not formed purely by effects of strong gravity but probably also by changes in corona and inner accretion flow geometry.

  10. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Yangchao; Li Wenjie; Chen Jie; Liu Longhua; Liu Gang; Tian Jinping; Xiong Ying; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun Wenbing

    2008-10-15

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  11. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed. PMID:19044720

  12. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  13. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  14. Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Joel

    2012-01-03

    In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

  15. Linatron Mi6, the X-Ray Source for Cargo Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gongyin; Turner, John; Nisius, David; Holt, Kevin; Brooks, Alan

    Since its inception in 2008, Linatron Mi6 has been the standard x-ray source for cargo inspection. It produces interlaced dual energy (6MV and 3.5MV) x-ray pulses that enable material discrimination scan in a single pass. Both pulse-to-pulse and longer term stability has been improved. With Linatron Mi6 as the x-ray source, it is now possible to achieve a continuous material discrimination scale, instead of only dividing materials into four classes: organic material, inorganic material, metals and high atomic metals. Other advanced material discrimination features include virtual layer peeling and trust rating. Energy sensitive imaging detectors can extend material discrimination in thin-object region. Although our Linatron Mi9 Linatron, which produces interlaced pulses of 9MV and 6MV x-ray pulses, provides even better material discrimination performance as well as better radiographic performance, it is not as widely used due to increased imaging system size and higher cost of safety shielding.

  16. Monochromatic computed tomography with a compact laser-driven X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Achterhold, K; Bech, M; Schleede, S; Potdevin, G; Ruth, R; Loewen, R; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-01-01

    A laser-driven electron-storage ring can produce nearly monochromatic, tunable X-rays in the keV energy regime by inverse Compton scattering. The small footprint, relative low cost and excellent beam quality provide the prospect for valuable preclinical use in radiography and tomography. The monochromaticity of the beam prevents beam hardening effects that are a serious problem in quantitative determination of absorption coefficients. These values are important e.g. for osteoporosis risk assessment. Here, we report quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements using a laser-driven compact electron-storage ring X-ray source. The experimental results obtained for quantitative CT measurements on mass absorption coefficients in a phantom sample are compared to results from a rotating anode X-ray tube generator at various peak voltages. The findings confirm that a laser-driven electron-storage ring X-ray source can indeed yield much higher CT image quality, particularly if quantitative aspects of computed tomographic imaging are considered.

  17. Production and shielding of x rays from electron beam vapor sources

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.S.

    1986-11-14

    Electron-beam vapor sources are now widely used in material processing sciences and coating technologies, such as the semiconductor industry for producing aluminum films on Si wafers; the metallurgical industry for melting, evaporating, and refining metals; and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for vaporizing metals for laser isotope separation applications. Power for these sources ranges from the kW regime in the semiconductor industry to the multi-MW regime in laser separation technology. Operations of these sources can generate copious amounts of x rays by the direct and indirect interactions of the energetic electrons with the target materials. In this paper, we present the results of our calculations regarding the x-ray emission intensity, angular intensity and energy spectrum distribution, and shielding characteristics for vapor sources with acceleration voltages from 10 kV to 60 kV. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Positions of galactic X-ray sources - Galactic latitudes between zero and 20 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxsey, R. E.; Bradt, H. V.; Dower, R. G.; Jernigan, J. G.; Apparao, K. M. V.

    1977-01-01

    Precise (to 20 or 25 arcsec) positions of six X-ray sources located in the galactic bulge are reported which were obtained as part of a survey of the galactic plane performed with the SAS-3 rotating modulation collimators. The sources include GX1+4, GX9+9, GX3+1, GX9+1, GX13+1, and GX17+2. The error radii and X-ray intensities (2 to 11 keV) determined for the sources are also presented along with finding charts and proposed optical and radio counterparts. The results are compared with those of previous satellite and sounding-rocket experiments. The status of each source with respect to optical or radio identifications is briefly discussed.

  19. A XMM-Newton Observation of Nova LMC 1995, a Bright Supersoft X-ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orio, Marina; Hartmann, Wouter; Still, Martin; Greiner, Jochen

    2003-01-01

    Nova LMC 1995, previously detected during 1995-1998 with ROSAT, was observed again as a luminous supersoft X-ray source with XMM-Newton in December of 2000. This nova offers the possibility to observe the spectrum of a hot white dwarf, burning hydrogen in a shell and not obscured by a wind or by nebular emission like in other supersoft X-ray sources. Notwithstanding uncertainties in the calibration of the EPIC instruments at energy E<0.5 keV, using atmospheric models in Non Local Thermonuclear Equilibrium we derived an effective temperature in the range 400,000-450,000 K, a bolometric luminosity Lbolabout equal to 2.3 times 10 sup37 erg s sup-l, and we verified that the abundance of carbon is not significantly enhanced in the X-rays emitting shell. The RGS grating spectra do not show emission lines (originated in a nebula or a wind) observed for some other supersoft X-ray sources. The crowded atmospheric absorption lines of the white dwarf cannot be not resolved. There is no hard component (expected from a wind, a surrounding nebula or an accretion disk), with no counts above the background at E>0.6 keV, and an upper limit Fx,hard = 10 sup-14 erg s sup-l cm sup-2 to the X-ray flux above this energy. The background corrected count rate measured by the EPIC instruments was variable on time scales of minutes and hours, but without the flares or sudden obscuration observed for other novae. The power spectrum shows a peak at 5.25 hours, possibly due to a modulation with the orbital period. We also briefly discuss the scenarios in which this nova may become a type Ia supernova progenitor.

  20. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  1. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-12-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year.

  2. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. IV. THE SWIFT CATALOG OF POTENTIAL X-RAY COUNTERPARTS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.; Tosti, G.

    2013-11-01

    A significant fraction (∼30%) of the high-energy γ-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog are still of unknown origin, having not yet been associated with counterparts at lower energies. To investigate the nature of these enigmatic sources, we present an extensive search of X-ray sources lying in the positional uncertainty region of a selected sample of these unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) that makes use of all available observations performed by the Swift X-ray Telescope before 2013 March 31, available for 205 UGSs. To detect the fainter sources, we merged all the observations covering the Fermi LAT positional uncertainty region at a 95% level of confidence of each UGS. This yields a catalog of 357 X-ray sources, finding candidate X-ray counterparts for ∼70% of the selected sample. In particular, 25% of the UGSs feature a single X-ray source within their positional uncertainty region, while 45% have multiple X-ray sources. For each X-ray source, we also looked in the corresponding Swift UVOT merged images for optical and ultraviolet counterparts, also performing source photometry. We found ultraviolet-optical correspondences for ∼70% of the X-ray sources. We searched several major radio, infrared, optical, and ultraviolet surveys for possible counterparts within the positional error of the sources in the X-ray catalog to obtain additional information on their nature. Applying the kernel density estimation technique to infrared colors of Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer counterparts of our X-ray sources we select six γ-ray blazar candidates. In addition, comparing our results with previous analyses, we select 11 additional γ-ray blazar candidates.

  3. Pan-STARRS imaging of the x-ray source position within the ANTARES neutrino detection region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K.; Smith, K.; Hub, M.

    2015-09-01

    Further to the Swift x-ray source detection by Doric et al. (GCN 18231, ATel #7987) within the error region of the ANTARES neutrino. The x-ray source is coincident with the bright R=12.6 star USNO-B1.0 0626-0501169 (B-R=1.7 and probably a G/K-type star).

  4. Correlation of X-ray burst properties with source state in the 'atoll' source 4U/MXB 1636 - 53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Klis, M.; Damen, E.; Penninx, W.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.

    1990-01-01

    A series of Exosat observations of the 'atoll' source 4U/MXB 1636 - 53 shows that duration and temperature of the X-ray bursts strongly correlate with the X-ray spectral and fast variability characteristics of the persistent emission of the source. This implies that spectral shape, fast variability, and burst duration and temperature all correlate well with accretion rate M. This provides a strong argument that in the atoll sources, source-state is determined by M, just as in the Z sources. These observations also show that the persistent X-ray intensity can vary independently from the other mentioned characteristics. Therefore, intensity is probably not a good measure for the accretion rate.

  5. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  6. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  7. X-ray sources in dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster and the nearby field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, Marina; Phillipps, S.; Young, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The extent to which dwarf galaxies represent essentially scaled down versions of giant galaxies is an important question with regards the formation and evolution of the galaxy population as a whole. Here, we address the specific question of whether dwarf galaxies behave like smaller versions of giants in terms of their X-ray properties. We discuss two samples of around 100 objects each, dwarfs in the Virgo cluster and dwarfs in a large Northern hemisphere area. We find nine dwarfs in each sample with Chandra detections. For the Virgo sample, these are in dwarf elliptical (or dwarf lenticular) galaxies and we assume that these are (mostly) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) [some may be nuclear sources]. We find a detection rate entirely consistent with scaling down from massive ellipticals, viz. about one bright (i.e. LX > 1038 erg s-1) LMXB per 5 × 109 M⊙ of stars. For the field sample, we find one (known) Seyfert nucleus, in a galaxy which appears to be the lowest mass dwarf with a confirmed X-ray emitting nucleus. The other detections are in star-forming dwarf irregular or blue compact dwarf galaxies and are presumably high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB). This time, we find a very similar detection rate to that in large late-type galaxies if we scale down by star formation rate, roughly one HMXB for a rate of 0.3 M⊙ per year. Nevertheless, there does seem to be one clear difference, in that the dwarf late-type galaxies with X-ray sources appear strongly biased to very low metallicity systems.

  8. Coordinated Broadband Monitoring of Variable X-Ray Sources in NGC 1313

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettcher, Markus

    2005-01-01

    The nearby (3.7 Mpc) late-type barred spiral galaxy NGC 1313 contains three ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that are offset from the center of the galaxy. Two of these have been associated with optical ionized nebulae, and their spectral and variability properties indicate that they contain black holes. The third ULX is SN 1978K, which was the second supernova to be detected and recognized as a supernova from its radio emission, and the first from its X-rays. In this project, we have started a long-term program of X-ray (XMM-Newton), optical (VLT), and radio (ATCA) observations of these and other sources in NGC 1313. This program has been continued through Cycle 3. XMM-Newton observations in cycle 2 consisted of eight 10 ksec priority A monitoring observations between 2003 November 25 and 2004 January 16. The data obtained from these observations have been fully analyzed, and the results have been published in Smith et al. (2004). The results included the identification of the optical counterpart of ULX X-2, and firm upper limits for the radio counterparts of ULXs X-1 and X-2. Previously unknown X-ray spectral variability has been detected in ULXs X-1 and X-2. For SNR 1978K, we were able to extend and refine the X-ray decay light curve. In tandem, we developed a semi-analytical model for the spectral variability of microquasar jets, which will be refined and applied to the combined results from our cycle 2 + 3 observations after the cycle-3 data have been fully analyzed.

  9. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  10. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Tiedtke, K; Sorokin, A A; Jastrow, U; Juranić, P; Kreis, S; Gerken, N; Richter, M; Arp, U; Feng, Y; Nordlund, D; Soufli, R; Fernández-Perea, M; Juha, L; Heimann, P; Nagler, B; Lee, H J; Mack, S; Cammarata, M; Krupin, O; Messerschmidt, M; Holmes, M; Rowen, M; Schlotter, W; Moeller, S; Turner, J J

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray optical elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content. PMID:25321502

  11. On syntheses of the X-ray background with power-law sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Zotti, G.; Boldt, E. A.; Marshall, F. E.; Swank, J. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Cavaliere, A.; Danese, L.; Franceschini, A.

    1982-01-01

    The conditions under which the combined emission from power-law sources can mimic the X-ray background (XRB) spectrum in the 3-50 keV range are considered in view of HEAO 1 A-2 experiment measurements, and it is confirmed that a good fit may be obtained. The required spectral properties of the component sources differ, however, from those observed for local active galactic nuclei. Constraints are deduced for both the low-luminosity extension and evolution of such local objects, and it is shown that any other class of sources contributing to the X-ray background must be characterized by an energy spectral index lower than about 0.4, which is the mean index of the XRB, and exhibit steeper spectra at higher energies.

  12. X-ray observations of Galactic H.E.S.S. sources: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puehlhofer, G.; Eger, P.; Sasaki, M.; Gottschall, D.; Capasso, M.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    X-ray diagnostics of TeV sources continues to be an important tool to identify the nature of newly detected sources as well as to pinpoint the physics processes that are at work in these highly energetic objects. The contribution aims at giving a review of recent studies that we have performed on TeV sources with H.E.S.S. and XMM-Newton and also other X-ray facilities. Here, we will mainly focus on Galactic objects such as gamma-ray binaries, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants (SNRs). Particular emphasis will be given to SNR studies, including recently identified SNRs such as HESS J1731-347 and HESS J1534-571 as well as a revisit of RX J1713.7-3946.

  13. An extended soft X-ray source in Delphinus - H2027+19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, R. A.; Walker, A. B. C.; Charles, P. A.; Nugent, J. J.; Garmire, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    A new extended soft X-ray source has been observed with the HEAO 1 A-2 experiment. The source, H2027+19, emits primarily in the 0.16-0.4 keV band with a total flux in this band of 2 x 10 to the -11th erg/sq cm s. It is found that both simple continuum and coronal plasma models provide good fits to the observed pulse-height spectrum. The most likely physical models are either that the source is an old supernova remnant or that it is a region of enhanced soft X-ray emission surrounding an H I cloud imbedded in a coronal plasma, as suggested by Hayakawa et al. (1979) for the Lupus Loop.

  14. Exotic sources of x-rays for iodine K-edge angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.

    1993-08-01

    Digital Subtractive Angiography (DSA) has been performed to image human coronary arteries using wiggler radiation from electron storage rings. The significant medical promise of this procedure motivates the development of smaller and less costly x-ray sources. Several exotic sources are candidates for consideration, using effects such as Cherenkov, channeling, coherent bremsstrahlung, laser backscattering, microundulator, parametric, Smith-Purcell, and transition radiation. In this work we present an analysis of these effects as possible sources of intense x-rays at the iodine K-edge at 33.169 key. The criteria we use are energy, efficiency, flux, optical properties, and technical realizability. For each of the techniques, we find that they suffer either from low flux, a low energy cutoff, target materials heating, too high electron beam energy requirement, optical mismatch to angiography, or a combination of these. We conclude that the foreseeable state-of-the-art favors a compact storage ring design.

  15. Is the Nova V2672 Oph a Luminous X-ray Source in Quiescence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Koji

    2014-09-01

    The very fast nova V2672 Oph had one of the shortest decay times (t2=2.3 d) and the broadest emission lines (FWZI up to 12,000 km/s) ever observed in novae. It may well be a recurrent nova with a near Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf. There is also a ROSAT all-sky survey Faint Source Catalog source consistent with its position: if confirmed, V2672 Oph would be only the third nova to have been detected in X-rays before the nova eruption. We therefore propose an ACIS-S imaging observation to provide the precise location, and rough timing and spectral characteristics of the ROSAT source. V2672 Oph may join V2487 Oph and V2491 Cyg as novae with quiescent X-ray luminosities not seen in normal cataclysmic variables.

  16. A supersoft variable low-luminosity X-ray source in the globular cluster M3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, P.; Grindlay, J. E.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272) was observed twice with the ROSAT high-resolution imager in order to study the low-luminosity X-ray source 1E 1339.8 + 2837. In 1992 January 1E 1339.8 + 2837 had an X-ray luminosity of 2 x 10 exp 35 ergs/s over an order of magnitude brighter than it was when observed with the Einstein Observatory. The source was unresolved and very soft; such supersoft outbursts would be difficult to detect in the vast majority of globular clusters which are more heavily absorbed than M3. In 1992 June the source was too faint to be detected. The soft outburst luminosity and the blackbody radius suggest that 1E 1339.8 + 2837 is a cataclysmic variable in which much of the luminosity is generated by steady nuclear burning of accreted material on the surface of the white dwarf primary.

  17. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  18. On syntheses of the X-ray background with power-law sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Zotti, G.; Boldt, E. A.; Cavaliere, A.; Danese, L.; Franceschini, A.; Marshall, F. E.; Swank, J. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1981-08-01

    The conditions under which the combined emission from power law sources can mimic the X-ray background (XRB) spectrum in the 3-50 keV range are considered in view of HEAO 1 A-2 experiment measurements, and it is confirmed that a good fit may be obtained. The required spectral properties of the component sources differ, however, from those observed for local active galactic nuclei. Constraints are deduced for both the low luminosity extension and evolution of such local objects, and it is shown that any other class of sources contributing to the X-ray background must be characterized by an energy spectral index lower than about 0.4, which is the mean index of the XRB, and exhibit sleeper spectra at higher energies.

  19. Real world issues for the new soft x-ray synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, B.M.

    1991-05-01

    A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. They are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. An introduction to the properties of undulator radiation is followed by a discussion of some of the challenges to be faced at the new facilities. Examples of predicted undulator output from the Advanced Light Source, a third generation 1--2 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use, are used to highlight differences from present synchrotron radiation sources, including high beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, and other unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. The discovery of rapidly repetitive X-ray bursts from a new source in Scorpius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Doty, J.; Clark, G. W.; Bradt, H. V. D.; Doxsey, R.; Hearn, D. R.; Hoffman, J. A.; Jernigan, J. G.; Li, F. K.; Rappaport, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    Rapidly repetitive X-ray bursts have been observed from a new X-ray source in Scorpius. More than 2000 bursts were observed during the 4-day continual SAS-3 observations of this source designated MXB 1730-335. The time interval between bursts varied from a minimum of about 6 s to a maximum of about 5 minutes. The energy in a given burst is approximately linearly proportional to the time interval to the next burst. The largest bursts observed last for about 60 s and represent an energy release of approximately 10 to the 40th ergs for an assumed distance to the source of 10 kpc. The smallest bursts observed last only for a few seconds. We suggest that the bursts are caused by sporadic precipitations of plasma from a reservoir in the magnetosphere of a neutron star. The reservoir is replenished at a nearly constant rate by mass transferred from a binary companion.

  1. Optical Studies of Ultra Luminous X-ray Sources in NGC4490

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyuz, Aysun; Avdan, Hasan; Avdan, Senay; Aksaker, Nazim

    2016-07-01

    We present optical studies of Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the spiral galaxy NGC4490 which is interacting with the irregular galaxy NGC 4485. ULXs are extra-nuclear, point-like X-ray sources with isotropic luminosities (Lx > 10 ^{39} erg s ^{-1}) above the Eddington limit for a 10 Msun black hole. HST/ACS/WFC and WFPC3 archival data have been analyzed to investigate the optical counterparts of five ULXs in NGC4490. Using relative astrometry the corrected ULX positions were derived only for three sources within the 1σ error radius of 0.5 arcsec on the HST images. We discuss the properties of three optical counterparts and constraints on their physical nature from multiband optical observations.

  2. On syntheses of the X-ray background with power-law sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezotti, G.; Boldt, E. A.; Cavaliere, A.; Danese, L.; Franceschini, A.; Marshall, F. E.; Swank, J. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The conditions under which the combined emission from power law sources can mimic the X-ray background (XRB) spectrum in the 3-50 keV range are considered in view of HEAO 1 A-2 experiment measurements, and it is confirmed that a good fit may be obtained. The required spectral properties of the component sources differ, however, from those observed for local active galactic nuclei. Constraints are deduced for both the low luminosity extension and evolution of such local objects, and it is shown that any other class of sources contributing to the X-ray background must be characterized by an energy spectral index lower than about 0.4, which is the mean index of the XRB, and exhibit sleeper spectra at higher energies.

  3. Structure of the X-ray source in the Virgo cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Fabricant, D.; Topka, K.; Tucker, W.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    High-angular-resolution observations in the 0.15-1.5-keV band with an imaging X-ray telescope shows the extended X-ray source in the Virgo cluster of galaxies to be a diffuse halo of about 15 arcmin core radius surrounding M87. The angular structure of the surface brightness is marginally consistent with either of two simple models: (1) an isothermal (or adiabatic or hydrostatic) sphere plus a point source at M87 accounting for 12% of the total 0.5-1.5-keV intensity or (2) a power-law function without a discrete point source. No evidence for a point source is seen in the 0.15-0.28-keV band, which is consistent with self-absorption by about 10 to the 21st power per sq cm of matter having a cosmic abundance. The power-law models are motivated by the idea that radiation losses regulate the accretion of matter onto M87 and can account for the observed difference in the size of the X-ray source as seen in the present measurements and at higher energies.

  4. Determining x-ray spectra of radiographic sources with a Compton spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Hunter, James F.; King, Nick S. P.; Manard, Manuel J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Sedillo, Robert; Trainham, Rusty; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    Flash radiography is a diagnostic with many physics applications, and the characterization of the energy spectra of such sources is of interest. A Compton spectrometer has been proposed to conduct these measurements. Our Compton spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet constructed by Morgan et al1, and it is designed to measure spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV range. In this device, the x-rays from a radiographic source are collimated into a narrow beam directed on a converter foil. The forward-selected Compton electrons that are ejected from the foil enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The electrons are imaged on a focal plane, with their position determined as a function of their energy. The x-ray spectrum is then reconstructed. Challenges in obtaining these measurements include limited dose of x-rays and the short pulse duration (about 50 ns) for time-resolved measurements. Here we present energy calibration measurements of the spectrometer using a negative ion source. The resolution of the spectrometer was measured in previous calibration experiments to be the greater of 1% or 0.1 MeV/c1. The reconstruction of spectra from a bremsstrahlung source and Co-60 source are also presented.

  5. Modeling a superficial radiotherapy X-ray source for relative dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Christopher D; LaFontaine, Richard; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to empirically characterize and validate a kilovoltage (kV) X-ray beam source model of a superficial X-ray unit for relative dose calculations in water and assess the accuracy of the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25 (BJR 25) percentage depth dose (PDD) data. We measured central axis PDDs and dose profiles using an Xstrahl 150 X-ray system. We also compared the measured and calculated PDDs to those in the BJR 25. The Xstrahl source was modeled as an effective point source with varying spatial fluence and spectra. In-air ionization chamber measurements were made along the x- and y-axes of the X-ray beam to derive the spatial fluence and half-value layer (HVL) measurements were made to derive the spatially varying spectra. This beam characterization and resulting source model was used as input for our in-house dose calculation software (kVDoseCalc) to compute radiation dose at points of interest (POIs). The PDDs and dose profiles were measured using 2, 5, and 15 cm cone sizes at 80, 120, 140, and 150 kVp energies in a scanning water phantom using IBA Farmer-type ionization chambers of volumes 0.65 and 0.13 cc, respectively. The percent difference in the computed PDDs compared with our measurements range from -4.8% to 4.8%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The percent difference between our PDD measurements and those from BJR 25 range from -14.0% to 15.7%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 4.9% and 2.1%, respectively - showing that the measurements are in much better agreement with kVDoseCalc than BJR 25. The range in percent difference between kVDoseCalc and measurement for profiles was -5.9% to 5.9%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.4% and 1.4%, respectively. The results demonstrate that our empirically based X-ray source modeling approach for superficial X-ray therapy can be used to accurately

  6. Biostructural Science Inspired by Next-Generation X-Ray Sources.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Sol M; Lattman, Eaton E

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation synchrotron radiation sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers, energy recovery linacs, and ultra-low-emittance storage rings, are catalyzing novel methods of biomolecular microcrystallography and solution scattering. These methods are described and future trends are predicted. Importantly, there is a growing realization that serial microcrystallography and certain cutting-edge solution scattering experiments can be performed at existing storage ring sources by utilizing new technology. In this sense, next-generation sources are serving two distinct functions, namely, provision of new capabilities that require the newer sources and inspiration of new methods that can be performed at existing sources.

  7. X-RAY SPECTRAL CUTOFF AND THE LACK OF HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES M81 X-6 AND HOLMBERG IX X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, G. C.; Misra, R.; Jithesh, V.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2013-07-10

    We present broadband X-ray spectral study of two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M81 X-6 and Holmberg IX X-1, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We perform joint broadband spectral analysis of the brightest sources in the field, i.e., the two ULXs and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in M81, and demonstrate that the X-ray spectra of the ULXs cut off at energies {approx}> 3 keV with negligible contribution at high energies in the Suzaku HXD/PIN band. The 90% upper limit on the 10-30 keV band luminosity of an underlying broadband power-law component is 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. These limits are more than an order of magnitude lower than the bolometric (0.1-30 keV) luminosity of 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. Our results confirm earlier indications of spectral cutoffs inferred from the XMM-Newton observations of bright ULXs and show that there is not an additional high-energy power-law component contributing significantly to the X-ray emission. The spectral form of the two ULXs are very different from those of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) or AGNs. This implies that the ULXs are neither simply scaled-up versions of stellar-mass BHBs nor scaled-down versions of AGNs.

  8. Diagnostics of underwater electrical wire explosion through a time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Sheftman, D; Shafer, D; Efimov, S; Gruzinsky, K; Gleizer, S; Krasik, Ya E

    2012-10-01

    A time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source was developed as a diagnostic tool for imaging underwater exploding wires. A ~4 ns width pulse of hard x-rays with energies of up to 100 keV was obtained from the discharge in a vacuum diode consisting of point-shaped tungsten electrodes. To improve contrast and image quality, an external pulsed magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils was used. High resolution x-ray images of an underwater exploding wire were obtained using a sensitive x-ray CCD detector, and were compared to optical fast framing images. Future developments and application of this diagnostic technique are discussed.

  9. The atmospheric structures of the companion stars of eclipsing binary x ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, George W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at determining structural features of the atmospheres of the massive early-type companion stars of eclipse x-ray pulsars by measurement of the attenuation of the x-ray spectrum during eclipse transitions and in deep eclipse. Several extended visits were made to ISAS in Japan by G. Clark and his graduate student, Jonathan Woo to coordinate the Ginga observations and preliminary data reduction, and to work with the Japanese host scientist, Fumiaki Nagase, in the interpretation of the data. At MIT extensive developments were made in software systems for data interpretation. In particular, a Monte Carlo code was developed for a 3-D simulation of the propagation of x-rays from the neutron star through the ionized atmosphere of the companion. With this code it was possible to determine the spectrum of Compton-scattered x-rays in deep eclipse and to subtract that component from the observed spectra, thereby isolating the software component that is attributable in large measure to x-rays that have been scattered by interstellar grains. This research has culminated in the submission of paper to the Astrophysical Journal on the determination of properties of the atmosphere of QV Nor, the BOI companion of 4U 1538-52, and the properties of interstellar dust grains along the line of sight from the source. The latter results were an unanticipated byproduct of the investigation. Data from Ginga observations of the Magellanic binaries SMC X-1 and LMC X-4 are currently under investigation as the PhD thesis project of Jonathan Woo who anticipated completion in the spring of 1993.

  10. Infrared observations of eight X-ray sources from Galactic plane surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M. G.; Kniazev, A.; Karasev, D. I.; Berdnikov, L.; Barway, S.

    2013-08-01

    Increasing the identification completeness of sources from new X-ray sky surveys is a necessary condition for further works on analyzing the formation and long-term evolution of star systems in our Galaxy. Infrared observations of several sources selected from Galactic plane surveys as candidates for low-mass X-ray binaries with the IRSF telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory are presented. The infrared fluxes have been reliably measured from five of the eight sources (4U 1556-60, 4U 1708-40, AX J165901-4208, IGR J16287-5021, IGR J17350-2045, AX J171922-3703, SAX J1712.6-3739, 4U 1705-32). One of the objects (AX J165901-4208) may be a candidate for symbiotic X-ray binaries, i.e., binaries in which the companion of a relativistic object is a giant star. The distances have been estimated for three sources and the orbital periods have been estimated for two.

  11. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  12. Geometry of X-ray sources in accreting black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the X-ray sources in the hard spectral state of accreting black-hole binaries has been a subject of intense debate. The paradigm dominant for many years postulated that the accretion disc in the hard state is truncated at some radius >> the innermost stable orbit (ISCO) whereas the disc reaches the ISCO in the soft state. This paradigm explains a large body of observed phenomena, including the spectral and variability differences between the states and outbursts of transient sources, proceeding from quiescence (where no disc is present) through the hard state to the peak flux in the soft state. On the other hand, there have been numerous claims in recent years that the disc extends to the ISCO in the hard state. Also, the primary X-ray source has been postulated to consist of a compact source on-axis of the rotating black hole (a lamppost). Those claims are based on observations of broad Fe K lines and of soft X-ray components interpreted as blackbody-emitting accretion discs. I will discuss arguments for and against the disc truncation and the lamppost geometry based on current spectral and timing results.

  13. Inductive Voltage Adder Driven X-Ray Sources for Hydrodynamic Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, V.; Cordova, S.; Droemer, D.; Gustwiller, J.; Hunt, E.; Johnson, D.L.; MacLeod, G.; Maenchen, John; Menge, P.; Molina, I.; Oliver, B; Olson, C.; Rosenthal, S; Rovang, D.; Smith, I.; Welch, D.; Woo, L.

    1999-06-17

    Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) accelerators were developed to provide high-current (100s of kA) power pulses at high voltage (up to 20 MV) using robust modular components. This architecture simultaneously resolves problems found in conventional pulsed and linear induction accelerators. A variety of high-brightness pulsed x-ray radiographic sources are needed from sub-megavolt to 16-MeV endpoints with greater source brightness (dose/spot) than presently available. We are applying IVA systems to produce very intense (up to 75 TW/cm{sup 2}) electron beams for these flash radiographic applications. The accelerator electromagnetic pulse is converted to a directed electron beam at the end of a self-magnetically insulated vacuum transmission line. The cantilevered cathode threading the accelerator cavities terminates in a small (1-mm diameter) needle, producing the electron beam which is transported to a grounded bremsstrahlung converter within a strong ({approximately}50-T) axial magnetic field. These systems produce mm-sized stable electron beams, yielding very intense x-ray sources. Detailed simulations of the electron beam generation, transport, and target interaction are presented along with scaling laws for the radiation production and x-ray spot size. Experimental studies confirm these simulations and show this reliable, compact, and inexpensive technology scales to 1000-R doses a meter from a mm-diameter source in 50 ns.

  14. MIT modular x-ray source systems for the study of plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.W.; Wenzel, K.W.; Petrasso, R.D.; Lo, D.H.; Li, C.K.; Lierzer, J.R.; Wei, T. )

    1992-10-01

    Two new x-ray source systems are now on line at our facility. Each provides an {ital e}-beam to 25 kV. Targets are interchangeable between machines, and four x-ray detectors may be used simultaneously with a target. The gridded {ital e}-gun of the RACEHORSE system gives a 0.5--1.0-cm pulsable spot on target. The nongridded {ital e}-gun of the SCORPION system provides a 0.3-mm or smaller dc microspot on target. RACEHORSE is being used to study and characterize type-II diamond photoconductors for use in diagnosing plasmas, while SCORPION is being used to develop a slitless spectrograph using photographic film. Source design details and some RACEHORSE results are presented.

  15. A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; Kunz, M.; Chen, K.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Warwick, T.

    2009-03-10

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to x-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an X-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 22 keV. The beam is focused down to {approx} 1 um size at the sample position using a pair of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, strain/stress and/or plastic deformation inside the sample.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

  17. The Broadband XMM-Newton and NuSTAR X-Ray Spectra of Two Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources in the Galaxy IC 342

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vikram; Harrison, Fiona A.; Bachetti, Matteo; Walton, Dominic J.; Furst, Felix; Barret, Didier; Miller, Jon M.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn C.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Ptak, Andrew F.; Stern, Daniel; Webb, Natalie A.; Zhang, William W.

    2015-02-01

    We present results for two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), IC 342 X-1 and IC 342 X-2, using two epochs of XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations separated by ~7 days. We observe little spectral or flux variability above 1 keV between epochs, with unabsorbed 0.3-30 keV luminosities being 1.04+0.08-0.06 × 1040 erg s-1 for IC 342 X-1 and 7.40 ± 0.20 × 1039 erg s-1 for IC 342 X-2, so that both were observed in a similar, luminous state. Both sources have a high absorbing column in excess of the Galactic value. Neither source has a spectrum consistent with a black hole binary in low/hard state, and both ULXs exhibit strong curvature in their broadband X-ray spectra. This curvature rules out models that invoke a simple reflection-dominated spectrum with a broadened iron line and no cutoff in the illuminating power-law continuum. X-ray spectrum of IC 342 X-1 can be characterized by a soft disk-like blackbody component at low energies and a cool, optically thick Comptonization continuum at high energies, but unique physical interpretation of the spectral components remains challenging. The broadband spectrum of IC 342 X-2 can be fit by either a hot (3.8 keV) accretion disk or a Comptonized continuum with no indication of a seed photon population. Although the seed photon component may be masked by soft excess emission unlikely to be associated with the binary system, combined with the high absorption column, it is more plausible that the broadband X-ray emission arises from a simple thin blackbody disk component. Secure identification of the origin of the spectral components in these sources will likely require broadband spectral variability studies.

  18. On the characterisation of a Bragg spectrometer with X-rays from an ECR source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Biri, S.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Indelicato, P.; Leoni, B.; Fuhrmann, H.; Simons, L. M.; Stingelin, L.; Wasser, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2005-06-01

    Narrow X-ray lines from helium-like argon emitted from a dedicated ECR source have been used to determine the response function of a Bragg crystal spectrometer equipped with large area spherically bent silicon (1 1 1) or quartz (1 0 1¯) crystals. The measured spectra are compared with simulated ones created by a ray-tracing code based on the expected theoretical crystal's rocking curve and the geometry of the experimental set-up.

  19. THE ORBITAL PERIOD EVOLUTION OF THE SUPERSOFT X-RAY SOURCE CAL 87

    SciTech Connect

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-12-10

    CAL 87 is one of the best known supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs). However, the measured masses, orbital period, and orbital period evolution of CAL 87 cannot be addressed by the standard thermal-timescale mass-transfer model for SSSs. In this work we explore the orbital evolution of CAL 87 with both analytic and numerical methods. We demonstrate that the characteristics mentioned above can be naturally accounted for by the excited-wind-driven mass-transfer model.

  20. Stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Fender, Rob; Belloni, Tomaso

    2012-08-01

    We review the likely population, observational properties, and broad implications of stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources. We focus on the clear empirical rules connecting accretion and outflow that have been established for stellar-mass black holes in binary systems in the past decade and a half. These patterns of behavior are probably the keys that will allow us to understand black hole feedback on the largest scales over cosmological time scales.