Science.gov

Sample records for microbial cells immobilized

  1. Immobilization of microbial cell and yeast cell and its application to biomass conversion using radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Fujimura, Takashi; Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao

    The recent results of immobilization of cellulase-producing cells and ethanol-fermentation yeast by radiation were reported. The enzyme of cellulase produced by immobilized cells was used for saccharification of lignocellulosic wastes and immobilized yeast cells were used for fermentation reaction from glucose to ethanol. The wastes such as chaff and bagasse were treated by γ-ray or electron-beam irradiation in the presence of alkali and subsequent mechanical crushing, to form a fine powder less than 50 μm in diameter. On the other hand, Trichoderma reesei as a cellulase-producing microbial cell was immobilized on a fibrous carrier having a specific porous structure and cultured to produce cellulase. The enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated waste was carried out using the produced cellulase. The enhanced fermentation process to produce ethanol from glucose with the immobilized yeast by radiation was also studied. The ethanol productivity of immobilized growing yeast cells thus obtained was thirteen times that of free yeast cells in a 1:1 volume of liquid medium to immobilized yeast cells.

  2. Simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biomass production by an immobilized photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Huanhuan; Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Hu, Youshuang; Zhao, Yingying

    2014-05-01

    A photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) was constructed by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells to fulfill electricity generation, biomass production and wastewater treatment. The immobilization conditions, including the concentration of immobilized matrix, initial inoculation concentration and cross-linking time, were investigated both for the growth of C. vulgaris and power generation. It performed the best at 5 % sodium alginate and 2 % calcium chloride as immobilization matrix, initial inoculation concentration of 10(6) cell/mL and cross-linking time of 4 h. Our findings indicated that C. vulgaris immobilization was an effective and promising approach to improve the performance of PAMFC, and after optimization the power density and Coulombic efficiency improved by 258 and 88.4 %, respectively. Important parameters such as temperature and light intensity were optimized on the performance. PAMFC could achieve a COD removal efficiency of 92.1 %, and simultaneously the maximum power density reached 2,572.8 mW/m(3) and the Coulombic efficiency was 14.1 %, under the light intensity of 5,000 lux and temperature at 25 °C.

  3. Immobilization of microbial cells on inner epidermis of onion bulb scale for biosensor application.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; D'Souza, S F

    2011-07-15

    Inner epidermis of onion bulb scales was used as a natural support for immobilization of microbial cells for biosensor application. A bacterium Sphingomonas sp. that hydrolyzes methyl parathion into a chromophoric product, p-nitrophenol (PNP), has been isolated and identified in our laboratory. PNP can be detected by electrochemical and colorimetric methods. Whole cells of Sphingomonas sp. were immobilized on inner epidermis of onion bulb scale by adsorption followed by cross-linking methods. Cells immobilized onion membrane was directly placed in the wells of microplate and associated with the optical transducer. Methyl parathion is an organophosphorus pesticide that has been widely used in the field of agriculture for insect pest control. This pesticide causes environmental pollution and ecological problem. A detection range 4-80 μM of methyl parathion was estimated from the linear range of calibration plot of enzymatic assay. A single membrane was reused for 52 reactions and was found to be stable for 32 days with 90% of its initial hydrolytic activity. The applicability of the cells immobilized onion membrane was also demonstrated with spiked samples.

  4. Power generation enhancement in novel microbial carbon capture cells with immobilized Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minghua; He, Huanhuan; Jin, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2012-09-01

    With the increasing concerns for global climate change, a sustainable, efficient and renewable energy production from wastewater is imperative. In this study, a novel microbial carbon capture cell (MCC), is constructed for the first time by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to fulfill the zero discharge of carbon dioxide. This process can achieve an 84.8% COD removal, and simultaneously the maximum power density can reach 2485.35 mW m-3 at a current density of 7.9 A m-3 and the Coulombic efficiency is 9.40%, which are 88% and 57.7% greater than that with suspended C. vulgaris, respectively. These enhancements in performance demonstrate the feasibility of an economical and effective approach for the simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biodiesel production from microalgae.

  5. Immobilization of Microbial Cells for Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentation of Wine and Cider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Manojlović, Verica; Nedović, Viktor A.

    Wine- or cider-making is highly associated with biotechnology owing to the traditional nature of must fermentation.. Nowadays, there have been considerable developments in wine- or cider-making techniques affecting all phases of wine or cider production, but more importantly, the fermentation process. It is well-known that the transformation of grape must by microbial activity results in the production of wine, and the fermentation of apples (or sometimes pears) in the production of cider. In this process, a variety of compounds affecting the organoleptic profile of wine or cider are synthesized. It is also common sense that in wine- or cider-making, the main objective is to achieve an adequate quality of the product. The technological progress and the improved quality of the wines or ciders have been associated with the control of technical parameters. Herein, cell immobilization offers numerous advantages, such as enhanced fermentation productivity, ability for cell recycling, application of continuous configurations, enhanced cell stability and viability, and improvement of quality (Margaritis and Merchant 1984; Stewart and Russel 1986; Kourkoutas et al. 2004a).

  6. Immobilization of a Metal-Nitrogen-Carbon Catalyst on Activated Carbon with Enhanced Cathode Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-23

    Applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are limited in part by low power densities mainly due to cathode performance. Successful immobilization of an Fe-N-C co-catalyst on activated carbon (Fe-N-C/AC) improved the oxygen reduction reaction to nearly a four-electron transfer, compared to a twoelectron transfer achieved using AC. With acetate as the fuel, the maximum power density was 4.7±0.2 W m(-2) , which is higher than any previous report for an air-cathode MFC. With domestic wastewater as a fuel, MFCs with the Fe-N-C/AC cathode produced up to 0.8±0.03 W m(-2) , which was twice that obtained with a Pt-catalyzed cathode. The use of this Fe-N-C/AC catalyst can therefore substantially increase power production, and enable broader applications of MFCs for renewable electricity generation using waste materials.

  7. Immobilization of a Metal-Nitrogen-Carbon Catalyst on Activated Carbon with Enhanced Cathode Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-23

    Applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are limited in part by low power densities mainly due to cathode performance. Successful immobilization of an Fe-N-C co-catalyst on activated carbon (Fe-N-C/AC) improved the oxygen reduction reaction to nearly a four-electron transfer, compared to a twoelectron transfer achieved using AC. With acetate as the fuel, the maximum power density was 4.7±0.2 W m(-2) , which is higher than any previous report for an air-cathode MFC. With domestic wastewater as a fuel, MFCs with the Fe-N-C/AC cathode produced up to 0.8±0.03 W m(-2) , which was twice that obtained with a Pt-catalyzed cathode. The use of this Fe-N-C/AC catalyst can therefore substantially increase power production, and enable broader applications of MFCs for renewable electricity generation using waste materials. PMID:27416965

  8. Industrial applications of immobilized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Linko, P.; Linko, Y.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Although the application of the natural attraction of many microorganisms to surfaces has been applied in vinegar production since the early 1980s, and has long been utilized in waste water purification, the development of microbial cell immobilization techniques for special applications dates back only to the early 1960s. The immobilization may involve whole cells, cell fragments, or lysed cells. Whole cells may retain their metabolic activity with their complex multienzyme systems and cofactor regeneration mechanisms intact, or they may be killed in the process with only a few desired enzymes remaining active in the final biocatalyst. Cells may also be coimmobilized with an enzyme to carry out special reactions. Although relatively few industrial scale applications exist today, some are of very large scale. Current applications vary from relatively small scale steroid conversions to amino acid production and high fructose syrup manufacture. A vast number of potential applications are already known, and one of the most interesting applications may be in continuous fermentation such as ethanol production by immobilized living microorganisms. 373 references.

  9. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Żur, Joanna; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability. PMID:27455220

  10. The immobilization of microbial cells, subcellular organelles, and enzymes in calcium alginate gels. Reprinted from Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Vol. XIX, No. 3, Pages 387-397 (1977).

    PubMed

    Kierstan, M; Bucke, C

    2000-03-20

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, Kluyveromyces marxianus cells, inulase, glucose oxidase, chloroplasts, and mitochondria were immobilized in calcium alginate gels. Ethanol production from glucose solutions by an immobilized preparation of S. cerevisiae was demonstrated over a total of twenty-three days, and the half-life of such a preparation was shown to be about ten days. Immobilized K. marxianus, inulase, and glucose oxidase preparations were used to demonstrate the porosity and retraining properties of calcium alginate gels. Calcium alginate-immobilized chloroplasts were shown to perform the Hill reaction. Some experiments with immobilized mitochondria are reported.

  11. Nitrogen fixation by immobilized NIF derepressed Klebsiella pneumoniae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, K.; Toda, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In vitro production of ammonia through biological means poses a number of challenges. The organisms should be able to accumulate considerable concentrations of ammonia in the medium. Secondly, nonphotosynthetic organisms must be supplied with high-energy substrates to carry out the fixation reaction. Thirdly, the organisms must be kept in a viable state to produce ammonia over long periods of time. In this article, preliminary results on the production of ammonia by a mutant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in continuous reactor systems are discussed. Continuous production of ammonia becomes feasible through the immobilization of the whole microbial cells and then through the use of the resulting catalyst system in a flow-through reactor. The rationale for immobilizing microbial cells and the advantages of such an approach over traditional fermentation processes are briefly described as they relate to the microbial production of ammonia. The microbial cells can be immobilized in such a way that their viability is still maintained in the immobilized state. This, in turn, obviates addition of cofactors, which is often an expensive step associated with immobilized multi-enzyme systems. Reconstituted bovine-hide collagen as the carrier matrix for fixing the cells was the carrier of choice for our work on immobilized Klebsiella cells. Polyacrylamide gels were examined as an alternate carrier matrix but results from this were found to be inferior to those collagen immobilized cell system.

  12. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew; Smith, April; Balkwill, Dr. David; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2007-01-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  13. Microbial uranium immobilization independent of nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Smith, April C; Balkwill, David L; Fagan, Lisa A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2007-09-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low-pH environments and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This work investigated the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 5.7-6.2 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.2) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  14. The 13C/12C fractionation by microbial cells immobilized on a solid-phase carrier during the growth on glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyakun, Anatoly; Kochetkov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Problem. In microbiological ecology, the level of basal СО2 respiration and the potential of microbial activity defined as substrate-induced respiration (SIR) are used as criteria of the metabolic state of soil microbiota. The peculiar feature of glucose metabolism in soil is its utilization by microbial cells immobilized on soil particles as a solid-phase carrier. The efficiency of substrate utilization and СО2 production in such cases depend on the rate of microorganisms' growth and colonization of the solid-phase carrier surface, where the substrate is located. The products of microbial metabolism are supposed to inherit the substrate isotope composition correct to the isotopic effects accompanying substrate utilization and metabolic transformations. However, all experiments in carbon isotope fractionation during microbial utilization of glucose as a substrate have been carried out with microorganisms growing in liquid media. Objective: Study of the kinetics of glucose utilization as a test substrate during the growth of soil microorganisms immobilized on a solid-phase carrier and ascertainment of peculiarities of the formation of carbon isotope composition of produced metabolic СО2. The objects of research were Pseudomonas aureofaciens BS1393(pBS216) (culture A) and Rhodococcus sp. 3-30 (culture B) as representatives of pseudomonades and rhodococci, which occur in the soils of different genesis and are of defining value in development and implementation of biotechnological schemes for degradation of toxic organic pollutants in the environment. Results and discussion. The cultures under study had different rates of growth on glucose. Specific rates of СО2 production during the growth of cultures A and B on glucose were 0.34 (± 0.05) and 0.078 (± 0.01) μg С-СО2 h-1, respectively. The lag periods of culture (A and B) growth were about 4.3 and 26 h, respectively. Comparison of the lag periods of these representatives of pseudomonades and rhodococci

  15. Final Report: Role of microbial synergies in immobilization of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Slava Epstein, Ph.D. and Kim Lewis, Ph.D.

    2012-11-14

    This Subsurface Microbial Ecology and Community Dynamics project tested the following hypothesis: synergistic groups of microorganisms immobilize heavy elements more efficiently than do individual species. We focused on groundwater at several DOE FRC and their microbial communities affecting the fate of U, Tc, and Cr. While we did not obtain evidence to support the original hypothesis, we developed a platform to accessing novel species from the target environments. We implemented this technology and discovered and isolated novel species capable of immobilization of uranium and species with exceptionally high resistances to the extant toxic factors. We have sequenced their genomes are are in the process of investigating the genomic contents behind these surprising resistances.

  16. Hydrogen production by immobilized whole cells of Clostridium butyricum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Karube, I.

    Immobilized microbial cells were used in a batch system in an attempt to achieve continuous hydrogen production from glucose and waste waters. Clostridium butyricum IFO 3847 was immobilized in polyacrylamide gel and continuously produced hydrogen from glucose. The hydrogen producing bacteria were then immobilized in 2% agar gel and showed continuous hydrogen production from an alcohol factory's waste waters. The hydrogen production rate became constant above BOD 1500 ppm when performed with a batch system. The immobilized whole cells continuously produced hydrogen over a 20 day period, producing about 6 ml/min/kg wet gels. Hydrogen production by bacteria immobilized in acetylcellulose filters was six times higher than that by cells entrapped in agar gels.

  17. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.; Martial Taillefert

    2006-06-01

    The following is a summary of progress in our project ''Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phosphatases'' during the second year of the project. (1). Assignment of microbial phosphatases to molecular classes. One objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and possible contributions of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to the dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Non-specific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. To address this objective we have designed a collection of PCR primer sets based on known microbial acid phosphatase sequences. Genomic DNA is extracted from subsurface FRC isolates and amplicons of the expected sizes are sequenced and searched for conserved signature motifs. During this reporting period we have successfully designed and tested a suite of PCR primers for gram-positive and gram-negative groups of the following phosphatase classes: (1) Class A; (2) Class B; and (3) Class C (gram negative). We have obtained specific PCR products for each of the classes using the primers we have designed using control strains as well as with subsurface isolates.

  18. Use of microbial encapsulation/immobilization for biodegradation of PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.E.; Lantz, S.; Mueller, J.G.; Schultz, W.W.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1995-12-31

    Bioaugmentation as a strategy in bioremediation has great potential but has had little success to support its use. Problems have arisen because of a general inability to support the growth and/or activity of the introduced organism in the environment because of competition factors, poor survival of the inoculum, and grazing by protozoa. A specialized technique that has been used to overcome these problems is cell immobilization or encapsulation, in which the inoculant can be placed in environmental media in a way that reduces competition from the indigenous microflora and allows expression of the specific introduced metabolic function. Packaging of specific bacterial or fungal cells in a porous polymeric material potentially improves storage of inocula, and enhances the capability of directly introducing viable and active cells into environmental material at some future time without the need to regrow the cells. The authors have been experimenting with encapsulation;immobilization procedures for use in the bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the potential usefulness of polyurethane foam and vermiculite for this purpose and show that optimal PAH degradation can be maintained with immobilized cells.

  19. Microbially-induced Carbonate Precipitation for Immobilization of Toxic Metals.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepika; Qian, Xin-Yi; Pan, Xiangliang; Achal, Varenyam; Li, Qianwei; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and industrialization resulting from growing populations contribute to environmental pollution by toxic metals and radionuclides which pose a threat to the environment and to human health. To combat this threat, it is important to develop remediation technologies based on natural processes that are sustainable. In recent years, a biomineralization process involving ureolytic microorganisms that leads to calcium carbonate precipitation has been found to be effective in immobilizing toxic metal pollutants. The advantage of using ureolytic organisms for bioremediating metal pollution in soil is their ability to immobilize toxic metals efficiently by precipitation or coprecipitation, independent of metal valence state and toxicity and the redox potential. This review summarizes current understanding of the ability of ureolytic microorganisms for carbonate biomineralization and applications of this process for toxic metal bioremediation. Microbial metal carbonate precipitation may also be relevant to detoxification of contaminated process streams and effluents as well as the production of novel carbonate biominerals and biorecovery of metals and radionuclides that form insoluble carbonates.

  20. Immobilization of whole cells using polymeric coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.W.; Klei, H.E.; Sunstrom, D.V.; Voronka, P.J.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A cell immobilization procedure was developed using latex coatings on solid particles. The method's widespread applicability has been demonstrated by successfully immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ethanol production), Bacillus subtilis (tryptophan production). Penicillium chrysogenum (penicillin G production), and Escherichia coli (aspartic acid production). In contrast to other immobilization methods, this procedure produces a pellicular particle that is porous, allowing rapid substrate and gas transfer, has a hard core to avoid compression in large beds, and is dense to allow use in fluidized beds. The immobilization procedure was optimized with S. cerevisiae. Kinetic constants obtained were used to calculate effectiveness factors to show that there was minimal intraparticle diffusion resistance. Reactors utilizing the optimized particles were run for 300 hours to evaluate immobilized particle half-life which was 250 hours.

  1. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  2. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    The overall objective of this project is to examine the activity of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO4 3- as a means to detoxify radionuclides and heavy metals. An experimental approach was designed to determine the extent of phosphatase activity in bacteria previously isolated from contaminated subsurface soils collected at the ERSP Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. Screening of 135 metal resistant isolates for phosphatase activity indicated the majority (75 of 135) exhibited a phosphatase-positive phenotype. During this phase of the project, a PCR based approach has also been designed to assay FRC isolates for the presence of one or more classes of the characterized non-specific acid phophastase (NSAP) genes likely to be involved in promoting U(VI) precipitation. Testing of a subset of Pb resistant (Pbr) Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella strains indicated 4 of the 9 Pbr isolates exhibited phosphatase phenotypes suggestive of the ability to bioprecipitate U(VI). Two FRC strains, a Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 and a Bacillus sp. strain Y9-2, were further characterized. The Rahnella sp. exhibited enhanced phosphatase activity relative to the Bacillus sp. Whole-cell enzyme assays identified a pH optimum of 5.5, and inorganic phosphate accumulated in pH 5.5 synthetic groundwater (designed to mimic FRC conditions) incubations of both strains in the presence of a model organophosphorus substrate provided as the sole C and P source. Kinetic experiments showed that these two organisms can grow in the presence of 200 μM dissolved uranium and that Rahnella is much more efficient in precipitating U(VI) than Bacillus sp. The

  3. Cultivation of an immobilized (hyper)thermophilic marine microbial community in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Landreau, M; Duthoit, F; Roussel, E; Schönherr, S; Georges, Myriam; Godfroy, A; Le Blay, G

    2016-09-01

    Cultivation in a bioreactor of immobilized deep-sea hydrothermal microbial community was tested in order to assess the stability and reactivity of this new system. A community composed of eight hydrothermal strains was entrapped in a polymer matrix that was used to inoculate a continuous culture in a gas-lift bioreactor. The continuous culture was performed for 41 days at successively 60°C, 55°C, 60°C, 85°C and 60°C, at pH 6.5, in anaerobic condition and constant dilution rate. Oxic stress and pH variations were tested at the beginning of the incubation. Despite these detrimental conditions, three strains including two strict anaerobes were maintained in the bioreactor. High cell concentrations (3 × 10(8) cells mL(-1)) and high ATP contents were measured in both liquid fractions and beads. Cloning-sequencing and qPCR revealed that Bacillus sp. dominated at the early stage, and was later replaced by Thermotoga maritima and Thermococcus sp. Acetate, formate and propionate concentrations varied simultaneously in the liquid fractions. These results demonstrate that these immobilized cells were reactive to culture conditions. They were protected inside the beads during the stress period and released in the liquid fraction when conditions were more favorable. This confirms the advantage of immobilization that highlights the resilience capacity of certain hydrothermal microorganisms after a stress period. PMID:27528693

  4. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Wilson, Jarad J.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-04-05

    The overall goal of this project is to examine the role of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. During this phase of the project we have been conducting assays to determine the effects of pH, inorganic anions and organic ligands on U(VI) mineral formation and precipitation when FRC bacterial isolates were grown in simulated groundwater medium. The molecular characterization of FRC isolates has also been undertaken during this phase of the project. Analysis of a subset of gram-positive FRC isolates cultured from FRC soils (Areas 1, 2 and 3) and background sediments have indicated a higher percentage of isolates exhibiting phosphatase phenotypes (i.e., in particular those surmised to be PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible) relative to isolates from the reference site. A high percentage of strains that exhibited such putatively PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible phosphatase phenotypes were also resistant to the heavy metals lead and cadmium. Previous work on FRC strains, including Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella spp., has demonstrated differences in tolerance to U(VI) toxicity (200 {micro}M) in the absence of organophosphate substrates. For example, Arthrobacter spp. exhibited the greatest tolerance to U(VI) while the Rahnella spp. have been shown to facilitate the precipitation of U(VI) from solution and the Bacillus spp. demonstrate the greatest sensitivity to acidic conditions and high concentrations of U(VI). PCR-based detection of FRC strains are being conducted to determine if non-specific acid phosphatases of the known molecular classes [i.e., classes A, B and C] are present in these FRC isolates. Additionally, these

  5. Treatability of cheese whey for single-cell protein production in nonsterile systems: Part I. Optimal condition for lactic acid fermentation using a microaerobic sequencing batch reactor (microaerobic SBR) with immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 2265 and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Monkoondee, Sarawut; Kuntiya, Ampin; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Techapun, Charin; Kawee-Ai, Arthitaya; Seesuriyachan, Phisit

    2016-05-18

    Cheese whey contains a high organic content and causes serious problems if it is released into the environment when untreated. This study aimed to investigate the optimum condition of lactic acid production using the microaerobic sequencing batch reactor (microaerobic SBR) in a nonsterile system. The high production of lactic acid was achieved by immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 2265 to generate an acidic pH condition below 4.5 and then to support single-cell protein (SCP) production in the second aerobic sequencing batch reactor (aerobic SBR). A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days and a whey concentration of 80% feeding gave a high lactic acid yield of 12.58 g/L, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 62.38%, and lactose utilization of 61.54%. The microbial communities in the nonsterile system were dominated by members of lactic acid bacteria, and it was shown that the inoculum remained in the system up to 330 days. PMID:26178366

  6. Biodegradation of different petroleum hydrocarbons by free and immobilized microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tiantian; Pi, Yongrui; Bao, Mutai; Xu, Nana; Li, Yiming; Lu, Jinren

    2015-12-01

    The efficiencies of free and immobilized microbial consortia in the degradation of different types of petroleum hydrocarbons were investigated. In this study, the biodegradation rates of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and crude oil reached about 80%, 30%, 56% and 48% under the optimum environmental conditions of free microbial consortia after 7 d. We evaluated five unique co-metabolic substances with petroleum hydrocarbons, α-lactose was the best co-metabolic substance among glucose, α-lactose, soluble starch, yeast powder and urea. The orthogonal biodegradation analysis results showed that semi-coke was the best immobilized carrier followed by walnut shell and activated carbon. Meanwhile, the significance of various factors that contribute to the biodegradation of semi-coke immobilized microbial consortia followed the order of: α-lactose > semi-coke > sodium alginate > CaCl2. Moreover, the degradation rate of the immobilized microbial consortium (47%) was higher than that of a free microbial consortium (26%) under environmental conditions such as the crude oil concentration of 3 g L(-1), NaCl concentration of 20 g L(-1), pH at 7.2-7.4 and temperature of 25 °C after 5 d. SEM and FTIR analyses revealed that the structure of semi-coke became more porous and easily adhered to the microbial consortium; the functional groups (e.g., hydroxy and phosphate) were identified in the microbial consortium and were changed by immobilization. This study demonstrated that the ability of microbial adaptation to the environment can be improved by immobilization which expands the application fields of microbial remediation.

  7. Biodegradation of different petroleum hydrocarbons by free and immobilized microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tiantian; Pi, Yongrui; Bao, Mutai; Xu, Nana; Li, Yiming; Lu, Jinren

    2015-12-01

    The efficiencies of free and immobilized microbial consortia in the degradation of different types of petroleum hydrocarbons were investigated. In this study, the biodegradation rates of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and crude oil reached about 80%, 30%, 56% and 48% under the optimum environmental conditions of free microbial consortia after 7 d. We evaluated five unique co-metabolic substances with petroleum hydrocarbons, α-lactose was the best co-metabolic substance among glucose, α-lactose, soluble starch, yeast powder and urea. The orthogonal biodegradation analysis results showed that semi-coke was the best immobilized carrier followed by walnut shell and activated carbon. Meanwhile, the significance of various factors that contribute to the biodegradation of semi-coke immobilized microbial consortia followed the order of: α-lactose > semi-coke > sodium alginate > CaCl2. Moreover, the degradation rate of the immobilized microbial consortium (47%) was higher than that of a free microbial consortium (26%) under environmental conditions such as the crude oil concentration of 3 g L(-1), NaCl concentration of 20 g L(-1), pH at 7.2-7.4 and temperature of 25 °C after 5 d. SEM and FTIR analyses revealed that the structure of semi-coke became more porous and easily adhered to the microbial consortium; the functional groups (e.g., hydroxy and phosphate) were identified in the microbial consortium and were changed by immobilization. This study demonstrated that the ability of microbial adaptation to the environment can be improved by immobilization which expands the application fields of microbial remediation. PMID:26565634

  8. Applications of Microbial Cell Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of microbial cell sensors have been developed as analytical tools. The microbial cell sensor utilizes microbes as a sensing element and a transducer. The characteristics of microbial cell sensors as sensing devices are a complete contrast to those of enzyme sensors or immunosensors, which are highly specific for the substrates of interest, although the specificity of the microbial cell sensor has been improved by genetic modification of the microbe used as the sensing element. Microbial cell sensors have the advantages of tolerance to measuring conditions, a long lifetime, and good cost performance, and have the disadvantage of a long response time. In this review, applications of microbial cell sensors are summarized.

  9. Cell growth on immobilized cell growth factor. 8. Protein-free cell culture on insulin-immobilized microcarriers.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Uno, T; Liu, S Q; Imanishi, Y

    1992-12-01

    In order to develop a new protein-free cell culture system, microcarriers immobilized with insulin were synthesized. For the synthesis, glass and polyacrylamide beads were treated for the introduction of amino groups on the surface, and insulin was immobilized on the surface by using several method. Anchorage-dependent cells. mouse fibroblast cells STO and fibroic sarcoma cells HSDM(1)C(1), and the anchorage-independent cells, mouse hybridoma cells SJK132-20 and RDP 45/20 were cultivated on the microcarriers immobilized with insulin. The insulin-immobilized microcarriers did not have any effect on the proliferation of the anchorage independent cells but promoted the growth of anchorage-dependent cells remarkably. The activity of immobilized insulin was larger than that of free or adsorbed insulin. The repeated use of the insulin-immobilized microcarrier was possible, and the promotion activity in the the repeated use was greater than that in the use.

  10. Invertase in immobilized cells of Papaver somniferum L.

    PubMed

    Stano, J; Nemec, P; Bezáková, L; Kovács, P; Kákoniova, D; Neubert, K; Lisková, D

    1997-03-01

    Papaver somniferum L., (opium poppy) cells were after permeabilization in Tween 80 immobilized by glutaraldehyde without any carrier. Cells immobilized by cross-linking performed the hydrolysis of sucrose. The immobilized cells were characterized by high invertase activity and appropriate physico-mechanical properties.

  11. Ethanol tolerance of immobilized brewers' yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Norton, S; Watson, K; D'Amore, T

    1995-04-01

    A method based on the survival of yeast cells subjected to an ethanol or heat shock was utilized to compare the stress resistance of free and carrageenan-immobilized yeast cells. Results demonstrated a significant increase of yeast survival against ethanol for immobilized cells as compared to free cells, while no marked difference in heat resistance was observed. When entrapped cells were released by mechanical disruption of the gel beads and submitted to the same ethanol stress, they exhibited a lower survival rate than entrapped cells, but a similar or slightly higher survival rate than free cells. The incidence of ethanol- or heat-induced respiratory-deficient mutants of entrapped cells was equivalent to that of control or non-stressed cells (1.3 +/- 0.5%) whereas ethanol- and heat-shocked free and released cells exhibited between 4.4% and 10.9% average incidence of respiration-deficient mutants. It was concluded that the carrageenan gel matrix provided a protection against ethanol, and that entrapped cells returned to normal physiological behaviour as soon as they were released. The cell growth rate was a significant factor in the resistance of yeast to high ethanol concentrations. The optimum conditions to obtain reliable and reproducible results involved the use of slow-growing cells after exhaustion of the sugar substrate.

  12. Structure and Function of Subsurface Microbial Communities Affecting Radionuclide Transport and Bio-immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kerkhof, Lee

    2013-10-23

    The goal of this research project was to employ a multi-disciplinary team to investigate the DOE-ERSP Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC), which contains well-defined subsurface contaminant plumes with contrasting pH and redox conditions. Part of the team would pursue cultivation-independent characterization of the microbial groups catalyzing relevant biogeochemical reactions to gain an understanding of the physiological mechanisms controlling radionuclide immobilization. Other team members would focus on cultivation and physiological characterization of model microorganisms from the site using single cell sorting methods. In order to understand and predict the in situ function of microbial communities, the PIs hope to develop new strategies for cultivation and to couple phylogenetic structure with microbial community function. Specific objectives by the Rutgers group was to discern the active bacteria at the Oak Ridge Research Field Challenge Site: 1. by applying stable isotope probing techniques to enrichment cultures developed from Florida State University; 2. by fingerprinting intact rRNA from groundwater samples obtained along the various flow pathways at ORFRC; and 3. by identifying functional genes for N and S cycling along the flowpaths to aid in detection of active bacteria.

  13. Microbial Cell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elad, Tal; Lee, Jin Hyung; Gu, Man Bock; Belkin, Shimshon

    The coming of age of whole-cell biosensors, combined with the continuing advances in array technologies, has prepared the ground for the next step in the evolution of both disciplines - the whole cell array. In the present chapter, we highlight the state-of-the-art in the different disciplines essential for a functional bacterial array. These include the genetic engineering of the biological components, their immobilization in different polymers, technologies for live cell deposition and patterning on different types of solid surfaces, and cellular viability maintenance. Also reviewed are the types of signals emitted by the reporter cell arrays, some of the transduction methodologies for reading these signals, and the mathematical approaches proposed for their analysis. Finally, we review some of the potential applications for bacterial cell arrays, and list the future needs for their maturation: a richer arsenal of high-performance reporter strains, better methodologies for their incorporation into hardware platforms, design of appropriate detection circuits, the continuing development of dedicated algorithms for multiplex signal analysis, and - most importantly - enhanced long term maintenance of viability and activity on the fabricated biochips.

  14. Recent insights into the cell immobilization technology applied for dark fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Nagarajan, Dillirani; Ghimire, Anish; Lay, Chyi-How; Lin, Chiu-Yue; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-11-01

    The contribution and insights of the immobilization technology in the recent years with regards to the generation of (bio)hydrogen via dark fermentation have been reviewed. The types of immobilization practices, such as entrapment, encapsulation and adsorption, are discussed. Materials and carriers used for cell immobilization are also comprehensively surveyed. New development of nano-based immobilization and nano-materials has been highlighted pertaining to the specific subject of this review. The microorganisms and the type of carbon sources applied in the dark hydrogen fermentation are also discussed and summarized. In addition, the essential components of process operation and reactor configuration using immobilized microbial cultures in the design of varieties of bioreactors (such as fixed bed reactor, CSTR and UASB) are spotlighted. Finally, suggestions and future directions of this field are provided to assist the development of efficient, economical and sustainable hydrogen production technologies. PMID:27561626

  15. Recent insights into the cell immobilization technology applied for dark fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Nagarajan, Dillirani; Ghimire, Anish; Lay, Chyi-How; Lin, Chiu-Yue; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-11-01

    The contribution and insights of the immobilization technology in the recent years with regards to the generation of (bio)hydrogen via dark fermentation have been reviewed. The types of immobilization practices, such as entrapment, encapsulation and adsorption, are discussed. Materials and carriers used for cell immobilization are also comprehensively surveyed. New development of nano-based immobilization and nano-materials has been highlighted pertaining to the specific subject of this review. The microorganisms and the type of carbon sources applied in the dark hydrogen fermentation are also discussed and summarized. In addition, the essential components of process operation and reactor configuration using immobilized microbial cultures in the design of varieties of bioreactors (such as fixed bed reactor, CSTR and UASB) are spotlighted. Finally, suggestions and future directions of this field are provided to assist the development of efficient, economical and sustainable hydrogen production technologies.

  16. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  17. Stability of alginate-immobilized algal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dainty, A.L.; Goulding, K.H.; Robinson, P.K.; Simpkins, I; Trevan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were carried out using immobilized Chlorella cells to determine the diameter, compressibility, tolerance to phosphate chelation, and ability to retain algal cells during incubation of various alginate beads. These physical bead-characteristics were affected by a variety of interactive factors, including multivalent cation type (hardening agent) and cell, cation, and alginate concentration, the latter exhibiting a predominant influence. The susceptibility of alginate beads to phosphate chelation involved a complex interaction of cation type, concentration, and pH of phosphate solution. A scale of response ranging from gel swelling to gel shrinking was observed for a range of conditions. However, stable Ca alginate beads were maintained in incubation media with a pH of 5.5 and a phosphate concentration of 5 micro M. A preliminary investigation into cell leakage from the beads illustrated the importance of maintaining a stable gel structure and limiting cell growth to reduce leakage.

  18. Microbial fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nealson, Kenneth H; Pirbazari, Massoud; Hsu, Lewis

    2013-04-09

    A microbial fuel cell includes an anode compartment with an anode and an anode biocatalyst and a cathode compartment with a cathode and a cathode biocatalyst, with a membrane positioned between the anode compartment and the cathode compartment, and an electrical pathway between the anode and the cathode. The anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an organic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an inorganic substance. The reduced organic substance can form a precipitate, thereby removing the inorganic substance from solution. In some cases, the anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an inorganic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an organic or inorganic substance.

  19. Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P

    2015-01-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells and microbial electrolyzers represent an upcoming technology for production of electricity and hydrogen using a hybrid electrocatalytic-biocatalytic approach. The combined catalytic efficiency of these processes has potential to make this technology highly efficient among the various renewable energy production alternatives. This field has attracted electrochemists, biologists and many other disciplines due to its potential to contribute to the energy, water and environment sectors. A brief introduction to the technology is provided followed by current research needs from a bioelectrochemical perspective. Insights into the operation and limitations of these systems achieved via cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are discussed along with the power management needs to develop the application aspects. Besides energy production, other potential applications in bioenergy, bioelectronics, chemical production and remediation are also highlighted.

  20. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes.

  1. Microbially Mediated Immobilization of Contaminants Through In Situ Biostimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Fendorf

    2003-07-31

    In most natural environments, a multitude of metabolic substrates are resent simultaneously. Organisms that can utilize uranium as a metabolic substrate for respiration also may have the ability to use a variety of other oxidized substrates as electron acceptors. Thus, these substrates are, in effect, competing for electrons that are being passed through the electron transport chain during respiration. To assess the feasibility of in situ immobilization of uranium in subsurface environments and to understand the cycling of uranium, it is necessary to discern the chemical and/or biological conditions dictating which terminal electron acceptor(s) will be utilized.

  2. Hydrodynamic deposition: a novel method of cell immobilization.

    PubMed

    Salter, G J; Kell, D B; Ash, L A; Adams, J M; Brown, A J; James, R

    1990-06-01

    A novel method of cell immobilization is described. The cell support consists of ceramic microspheres of approximately 50-75 microns diameter. The spheres are hollow, having a wall thickness of 10-15 microns and one entrance (ca. 20 microns diameter). The walls are porous with a mean pore size of approximately 90 nm. When a cell suspension (of S. cerevisiae) is passed through a column of such particles, cells are immobilized. Conditions are devised such that the overwhelming majority of cells are held in the central cavity of the support and not between the particles. Provided turbulence is avoided, the distribution of cells along the column length in the steady state is rather homogeneous. The facts that (a) essentially all particles, regardless of orientation, entrap cells, and (b) nonporous particles also entrap cells with high efficiency, indicate that filtration effects are irrelevant and that heretofore unrecognized hydrodynamic forces are alone responsible for the cell immobilization. Cells can be immobilized to high biomass densities, while the hydrodynamic properties of columns containing such immobilized cells are excellent. We describe an on-line electronic method for the real-time measurement of immobilized cellular biomass. Cell growth (so recorded) and metabolism continue to occur in such particles at high rates. Using the glycolytic production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae as a model reaction, volumetric productivities as great as any published are obtained. Thus the "lobster-pot effect" or "hydrodynamic deposition" represents a novel, promising, and generally applicable method of cell immobilization.

  3. Improved microbial fuel cell performance by encapsulating microbial cells with a nickel-coated sponge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueying; Du, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xia; Li, Naiqiang; Xu, Ping; Ding, Yi

    2013-03-15

    Development of novel anodic materials that could facilitate microbial biofilm formation, substrate transfer, and electron transfer is vital to enhance the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, nickel-coated sponge, as a novel and inexpensive material with an open three-dimensional macro-porous structure, was employed as an anode to encapsulate microbial cells. Compared with planar carbon paper, the nickel-coated sponge did not only offer a high surface area to facilitate microbial cells attachment and colonization but also supported sufficient substrate transfer and electron transfer due to multiplexed and highly conductive pathways. As expected, the resulting nickel-coated sponge biofilm demonstrated excellent electrochemical activity and power output stability during electricity generation processes. A higher maximum power density of 996 mW m(-2) and a longer, more stable electricity generation period were achieved with the nickel-coated sponge biofilm than previously reported results. Notably, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal reached 90.3% in the anode chamber, suggesting that the nickel-coated sponge is a highly promising anodic material and an efficient immobilization method for the fabrication of MFCs. PMID:22939511

  4. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-06-01

    The first objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and the role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Nonspecific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. We have previously shown that PO43- accumulation during growth on a model organophosphorus compound was attributable to the overproduction of alkaline phosphatase by genetically modified subsurface pseudomonads [Powers et al. (2002) FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 41:115-123]. During this report period, we have extended these results to include indigenous metal resistant subsurface microorganisms cultivated from the Field Research Center (FRC), in Oak Ridge Tennessee.

  5. Advances in ethanol production using immobilized cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Merchant, F.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The application of immobilized cell systems for the production of ethanol has resulted in substantial improvements in the efficiency of the process when compared to the traditional free cell system. In this review, the various methods of cell immobilization employed in ethanol production systems have been described in detail. Their salient features, performance characteristics, advantages and limitations have been critically assessed. More recently, these immobilized cell systems have also been employed for the production of ethanol from non-conventional feedstocks such as Jerusalem artichoke extracts, cheese whey, cellulose, cellobiose and xylose. Ethanol production by immobilized yeast and bacterial cells has been attempted in various bioreactor types. Although most of these studies have been carried out using laboratory scale prototype bioreactors, it appears that only fluidized bed, horizontally packed bed bioreactors and tower fermenters may find application on scale-up. Several studies have indicated that upon immobilization, yeast cells performing ethanol fermentation exhibit more favourable physiological and metabolic properties. This, in addition to substantial improvements in ethanol productivities by immobilized cell systems, is indicative of the fact that future developments in the production of ethanol and alcoholic beverages will be directed towards the use of immobilized cell systems. 291 references.

  6. Continuous fermentation: improvement of cell immobilization by zeta potential measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Michaux, M.; Paquot, M.; Baijot, B.; Thonart, P.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of various agents such as inulin, proteins, and cationic polymers on the zeta potential of yeast cells has been studied. With various agents, it appears feasible to give a positive charge to the cell and a negative one to the carrier. Under these conditions, the yield of immobilization (mg cells/g support) is significantly improved. This is the case with various agents such as proteins and cationic polymers. For example, the yeild of cell immobilization (Saccharomyces) on sawdust varied from 94.2 to 145.8 mg/g of support with addition of gelatin (0.05%). The results demonstrate the influence of zeta potential on cell immobilization by adsorption. These immobilized cells are advantageously used in continuous production of ethanol. 3 figures, 8 tables.

  7. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to

  8. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  9. Pentachlorophenol contaminated groundwater bioremediation using immobilized Sphingomonas cells inoculation in the bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chu-Fang; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2008-03-21

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used as a wood preservative for more than 100 years. The extensive use of PCP has widely contaminated soil and groundwater. PCP is toxic to living organisms. The main objective of this research was to inoculate the pure PCP-degrading bacterium strain Sphingomonas chlorophenolica PCP-1, isolated from PCP-contaminated soils, into PCP-contaminated groundwater for remediation purposes. The factors that influenced the bioremediation were explored with batch experiments using the inoculated immobilized and suspended cells as inoculation. A biological treatment system inoculated with immobilized cells was set up to estimate the microbial capability to degrade PCP. The results indicated that the suspended and immobilized cells could be inoculated into PCP-contaminated groundwater without adding other supplementary nitrogen and phosphate sources in batch conditions. Moreover, PCP decomposition was accompanied with released Cl- and decreasing pH value. The optimum HRT in the bioreactor system was 12.6h. PCP removal in the bioreactor remained stable and PCP removal efficiency was higher than 92% at this phase. Furthermore, PCP concentration in the biotreatment system effluent remained undetectable. It is possible to bioremediate PCP-contaminated groundwater using immobilized S. chlorophenolica PCP-1 cells in a bioreactor system. The proposed biological treatment system could be maintained for at least for 2 months.

  10. Microbial Activation of Bacillus subtilis-Immobilized Microgel Particles for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Son, Han Am; Choi, Sang Koo; Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Bohyun; Kim, Hyun Tae; Sung, Won Mo; Kim, Jin Woong

    2016-09-01

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery involves the use of microorganisms to extract oil remaining in reservoirs. Here, we report fabrication of microgel particles with immobilized Bacillus subtilis for application to microbially enhanced oil recovery. Using B. subtilis isolated from oil-contaminated soils in Myanmar, we evaluated the ability of this microbe to reduce the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface via production of biosurfactant molecules, eventually yielding excellent emulsification across a broad range of the medium pH and ionic strength. To safely deliver B. subtilis into a permeable porous medium, in this study, these bacteria were physically immobilized in a hydrogel mesh of microgel particles. In a core flooding experiment, in which the microgel particles were injected into a column packed with silica beads, we found that these particles significantly increased oil recovery in a concentration-dependent manner. This result shows that a mesh of microgel particles encapsulating biosurfactant-producing microorganisms holds promise for recovery of oil from porous media.

  11. Microbial Activation of Bacillus subtilis-Immobilized Microgel Particles for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Son, Han Am; Choi, Sang Koo; Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Bohyun; Kim, Hyun Tae; Sung, Won Mo; Kim, Jin Woong

    2016-09-01

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery involves the use of microorganisms to extract oil remaining in reservoirs. Here, we report fabrication of microgel particles with immobilized Bacillus subtilis for application to microbially enhanced oil recovery. Using B. subtilis isolated from oil-contaminated soils in Myanmar, we evaluated the ability of this microbe to reduce the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface via production of biosurfactant molecules, eventually yielding excellent emulsification across a broad range of the medium pH and ionic strength. To safely deliver B. subtilis into a permeable porous medium, in this study, these bacteria were physically immobilized in a hydrogel mesh of microgel particles. In a core flooding experiment, in which the microgel particles were injected into a column packed with silica beads, we found that these particles significantly increased oil recovery in a concentration-dependent manner. This result shows that a mesh of microgel particles encapsulating biosurfactant-producing microorganisms holds promise for recovery of oil from porous media. PMID:27506231

  12. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes.

  13. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes. PMID:26436087

  14. Towards a Microbial Thermoelectric Cell

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Barreiro, Raúl; Abendroth, Christian; Vilanova, Cristina; Moya, Andrés; Porcar, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial growth is an exothermic process. Biotechnological industries produce large amounts of heat, usually considered an undesirable by-product. In this work, we report the construction and characterization of the first microbial thermoelectric cell (MTC), in which the metabolic heat produced by a thermally insulated microbial culture is partially converted into electricity through a thermoelectric device optimized for low ΔT values. A temperature of 41°C and net electric voltage of around 250–600 mV was achieved with 1.7 L baker’s yeast culture. This is the first time microbial metabolic energy has been converted into electricity with an ad hoc thermoelectric device. These results might contribute towards developing a novel strategy to harvest excess heat in the biotechnology industry, in processes such as ethanol fermentation, auto thermal aerobic digestion (ATAD) or bioremediation, which could be coupled with MTCs in a single unit to produce electricity as a valuable by-product of the primary biotechnological product. Additionally, we propose that small portable MTCs could be conceived and inoculated with suitable thermophilic of hyperthermophilic starter cultures and used for powering small electric devices. PMID:23468862

  15. Towards a microbial thermoelectric cell.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barreiro, Raúl; Abendroth, Christian; Vilanova, Cristina; Moya, Andrés; Porcar, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial growth is an exothermic process. Biotechnological industries produce large amounts of heat, usually considered an undesirable by-product. In this work, we report the construction and characterization of the first microbial thermoelectric cell (MTC), in which the metabolic heat produced by a thermally insulated microbial culture is partially converted into electricity through a thermoelectric device optimized for low ΔT values. A temperature of 41°C and net electric voltage of around 250-600 mV was achieved with 1.7 L baker's yeast culture. This is the first time microbial metabolic energy has been converted into electricity with an ad hoc thermoelectric device. These results might contribute towards developing a novel strategy to harvest excess heat in the biotechnology industry, in processes such as ethanol fermentation, auto thermal aerobic digestion (ATAD) or bioremediation, which could be coupled with MTCs in a single unit to produce electricity as a valuable by-product of the primary biotechnological product. Additionally, we propose that small portable MTCs could be conceived and inoculated with suitable thermophilic of hyperthermophilic starter cultures and used for powering small electric devices.

  16. Alginate immobilization of Escherichia coli MTCC 1652 whole cells for bioconversion of glycyrrhizinic acid and into 18-beta glycyrrhetinic acid.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Panda, B P

    2013-12-15

    Microbial biotransformation of Glycyrrhizinic acid (GL) into 18-beta Glycyrrhetinic Acid (GA) was achieved using Escherichia coli MTCC 1652 whole cell. The E. coli whole cell was immobilized by entrapment method within calcium alginate beads using cell suspension of equal volume with sodium alginate 8%. The pH of solution, reaction volume and % of GL were optimized during the immobilization procedure and optimum pH 6.5, reaction volume of 4 mL and at 3% GL concentration for 12 h of incubation time showed highest concentration of GA (72.649 microg mL(-1)) with 76% bioconversion of GL to GA. Under optimized condition the immobilized cell produces 58.663 microg per mL of GA in licorice root extract containing 95.118 microg of GL per mL of the extract with 61% conversion at 12 h.

  17. Covalent immobilization of p-selectin enhances cell rolling.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seungpyo; Lee, Dooyoung; Zhang, Huanan; Zhang, Jennifer Q; Resvick, Jennifer N; Khademhosseini, Ali; King, Michael R; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2007-11-20

    Cell rolling is an important physiological and pathological process that is used to recruit specific cells in the bloodstream to a target tissue. This process may be exploited for biomedical applications to capture and separate specific cell types. One of the most commonly studied proteins that regulate cell rolling is P-selectin. By coating surfaces with this protein, biofunctional surfaces that induce cell rolling can be prepared. Although most immobilization methods have relied on physisorption, chemical immobilization has obvious advantages, including longer functional stability and better control over ligand density and orientation. Here we describe chemical methods to immobilize P-selectin covalently on glass substrates. The chemistry was categorized on the basis of the functional groups on modified glass substrates: amine, aldehyde, and epoxy. The prepared surfaces were first tested in a flow chamber by flowing microspheres functionalized with a cell surface carbohydrate (sialyl Lewis(x)) that binds to P-selectin. Adhesion bonds between P-selectin and sialyl Lewis(x) dissociate readily under shear forces, leading to cell rolling. P-selectin immobilized on the epoxy glass surfaces exhibited enhanced long-term stability of the function and better homogeneity as compared to that for surfaces prepared by other methods and physisorbed controls. The microsphere rolling results were confirmed in vitro with isolated human neutrophils. This work is essential for the future development of devices for isolating specific cell types based on cell rolling, which may be useful for hematologic cancers and certain metastatic cancer cells that are responsive to immobilized selectins.

  18. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Joel E. Kostka; Lainie Petrie; Nadia North; David L. Balkwill; Joseph W. Stucki; Lee Kerkhof

    2004-03-17

    The overall objective of our project is to understand the microbial and geochemical mechanisms controlling the reduction and immobilization of U(VI) during biostimulation in subsurface sediments of the Field Research Center (FRC) which are cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate. The focus will be on activity of microbial populations (metal- and nitrate-reducing bacteria) and iron minerals which are likely to make strong contributions to the fate of uranium during in situ bioremediation. The project will: (1) quantify the relationships between active members of the microbial communities, iron mineralogy, and nitrogen transformations in the field and in laboratory incubations under a variety of biostimulation conditions, (2) purify and physiologically characterize new model metal-reducing bacteria isolated from moderately acidophilic FRC subsurface sediments, and (3) elucidate the biotic and abiotic mechanisms by which FRC aluminosilicate clay minerals are reduced and dissolved under environmental conditions resembling those during biostimulation. Active microbial communities will be assessed using quantitative molecular techniques along with geochemical measurements to determine the different terminal-electron-accepting pathways. Iron minerals will be characterized using a suite of physical, spectroscopic, and wet chemical methods. Monitoring the activity and composition of the denitrifier community in parallel with denitrification intermediates during nitrate removal will provide a better understanding of the indirect effects of nitrate reduction on uranium speciation. Through quantification of the activity of specific microbial populations and an in-depth characterization of Fe minerals likely to catalyze U sorption/precipitation, we will provide important inputs for reaction-based biogeochemical models which will provide the basis for development of in situ U bioremediation strategies. In collaboration with Jack Istok and Lee Krumholz, we have begun to study the

  19. Cell immobilization in kappa-carrageenan for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Luong, J H

    1985-12-01

    A combination of extended Monod kinetics and the diffusional equation was used for evaluating the effectiveness factor of entrapped immobilized cells. Based on the kinetics of Zymomonas mobilis reported in the literature, the numerical results have revealed that the problem of mass transfer diffusional restrictions can be neglected by using small beads (1 mm in diameter) with a corresponding cell loading up to 276 g/L gel. On the basis of the numerical results obtained, the application of immobilized cells for continuous ethanol production was investigated. The kappa-carrageenan method was utilized to entrap Z. mobilis CP4, a potential ethanol producer. A two stage fermentation process has also been developed for ethanol production by the Z. mobilis carrageenan-bound cells. About 90 g/L ethanol was produced by immobilized cells at a total residence time of 1.56 h. The ethanol yield was estimated to be 93% of theoretical. The results obtained in this study also indicated that the control of optimum pH in an immobilized cell column is necessary to enhance the rate of ethanol production. PMID:18553626

  20. Immobilized cells used for detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Karube, I; Nakanishi, K

    1994-02-01

    Many kinds of biosensor have now been developed and utilized for various types of analysis including clinical, medical and environmental monitoring, industrial process control, as well as many other applications. The microbial biosensor has advantages, such as longer lifetime and lower cost, over other types of biosensor. Recently, photobacteria and recombinant bacteria have been employed in biosensors both for determining biochemical oxygen demand and for detecting heavy metals and other toxic compounds.

  1. Development and characterization of a novel immobilized microbial membrane for rapid determination of biochemical oxygen demand load in industrial waste-waters.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shikha; Kumar, Anil; Mehra, N K; Makhijani, S D; Manoharan, A; Gangal, V; Kumar, Rita

    2003-01-01

    The rapid determination of waste-water quality of waste-water treatment plants in terms of pollutional strength, i.e. biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is difficult or even impossible using the chemical determination method. The present study reports the determination of BOD within minutes using microbial BOD sensors, as compared to the 5-day determination using the conventional method. Multiple criteria establish the basis for the development of a BOD biosensor useful for rapid and reliable BOD estimation in industrial waste-waters. Of these, preparation of a suitable novel immobilized microbial membrane used in conjunction with an apt transducer is discussed. As a result, a microbial biosensor based on a formulated, synergistic, pre-tested microbial consortium has been developed for the measurement of BOD load of various industrial waste-waters. The sensor showed maximum response in terms of current difference, when a cell concentration of 2.25 x 10(10) CFU, harvested in their log phase of growth were utilized for microbial membrane construction. The sensor showed a stability of 180 days when the prepared membranes were stored at a temperature of 4 degrees C in 50 mM phosphate buffer of pH 6.8. The reusability of the immobilized membranes was up to 200 cycles without appreciable loss of their response characteristics. A linear relationship between the current change and a glucose-glutamic acid (GAA) concentration up to 60 mg l(-1) was observed (r=0.999). The lower detection limit was 1.0 mg l(-1) BOD. The sensor response was reproducible within +/-5% of the mean in a series of ten samples having 44 mg l(-1) BOD using standard a GGA solution. When used for the BOD estimation of industrial waste-waters, a relatively good agreement was found between the two methods, i.e. 5-day BOD and that measured by the developed microbial sensor. PMID:12445441

  2. Cellobiose hydrolysis using Pichia etchellsii cells immobilized in calcium alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, D.; Ghose, T.K.

    1984-04-01

    Cellulose degradation rates can be increased by the hydrolysis of cellobiose using immobilized beta-glucosidase. Production of beta-glucosidase in four yeasts was studied and a maximum activity of 1.22 IU/mg cells was obtained in cells of Pichia etchellsii grown on 3% cellobiose. The immobilization of beta-glucosidase containing cells on various solid supports was studied and entrapment in calcium alginate gel beads was found to be the best method. After ten sequential batch uses of the preparation, 96.5% of the initial activity was retained. The pH and temperature optima for free and immobilized cells were pH 6.5 (0.05M Maleate buffer) and 50/sup 0/C however, the enzyme has a better thermal stability at 45/sup 0/C. Beads stored at 4/sup 0/C for six months retain 80% of their activity. Kinetic studies performed on free and immobilized cells show that glucose is a noncompetitive product inhibitor. The immobilized preparation was limited by pore diffusion but exhibited no film-diffusion resistance during packed bed reactor operation. Good plug flow characteristics were observed. A model for reaction with pore diffusion for a noncompetitive type of inhibited system was developed and applied to this system. The reation rate with diffusional limitations was determined by using the model and effectiveness factors were calculated for different particle sizes. The modified rate expression using the effectiveness factor represented batch and packed bed reactor operation satisfactorily. The productivity in the packed bed column fell rapidly with an increase in conversion rate indicating that the operating conditions of the column would have to balance high conversion rates with acceptable productivity. The half-life in the column was affected by temperature, increasing to over seventeen days at 40/sup 0/C and decreasing to less than two days at 50/sup 0/C.

  3. Growth and immobilization of tripterygium wilfordii cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Pépin, M F; Chavarie, C; Archambault, J

    1991-12-20

    The plant Tripterygium wilfordii produces di- and triterpenes of interest for male contraception and treatment of arthritis and skin disorders. Cell line TRP4a obtained form this plant in 1981 was reported to produce these valuable compounds at yields ( approximately 0.04% of the biomass dry weight) higher than found in the plant (0.001%). In order to improve this production, studies were carried out to determine the feasibility of eliminating the troublesome component of coconut milk originally used to culture this cell line. A defined formulation suitable for growth ad maintenance has been developed. This medium consisted of Gamborg's PRL4 or B5 medium supplemented with 2 mg L(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 20 g L(-1) sucrose. Furthermore, monitoring of carbohydrate uptake revealed that T. wilfordii cells, contrary to many plant cell species, did not hydrolyze sucrose extra-cellularly before uptake. Replacement of this disaccharide by glucose or fructose increased specific growth rate from 0.15 to 0.25 day(-1). As tripdiolide is reported to be present in broth extract in significant amounts, plant cell immobilization technology offers a promising alternative to suspension cultures, especially in view to on line harvesting of the product. Surface immobilized T. wilfordii cell cultures were successfully carried out in 2-L bioreactors. Their biomass production and carbohydrate uptake were comparable to those observed for shake flask grown suspension cultures. Higher nitrate and ammonium uptake were found in immobilized cultures. PMID:18600729

  4. Continuous glutamate production using an immobilized whole-cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S.; Ryu, D.D.Y.

    1982-10-01

    For the purpose of saving the energy and raw materials required in a glutamate fermentation, an immobilized whole-cell system was prepared and its performance in a continuous reactor system was evaluated. Corynebacterium glutamicum (a mutant strain of ATCC 13058) whole cell was immobilized in k-carrageenan matrix and the gel structure was strengthened by treatment with a hardening agent. The effective diffusivities of carrageenan gel for glucose and oxygen were formed to decrease significantly with an increase in carrageenan concentration, while the gel strength showed an increasing trend. Based on the physical and chemical properties of carrageenan gel, the immobilized method was improved and the operation of the continuous reactor system was partially optimized. In an air-stirred fermentor, the continuous production of glutamate was carried out. The effect of the dilution rate of glutamate production and operation stability was investigated. The performance of the continuous wbole-cell reactor system was evaluated by measuring glutamate productivity for a period of 30 days; it was found to be far superior to the performance of convention batch reactor systems using free cells.

  5. Simulation and analysis of immobilized-cell fermentors

    SciTech Connect

    Heyman, E.C.; Nguyen, X.N.

    1982-06-01

    Immobilized cell bioreactors are important for developing high-productivity fermentation processes. A computer simulation program has been devised to aid in the design of three basic fermentor types including batch, tubular, and continuous stirred tank and the analysis of important process variables. Parametric studies on the sensitivity of fermentor residence time for the glucose to ethanol yeast fermentation system with changes kinetic constants, film/pore diffusion limitations, gel support characteristics and recycle of product flow are discussed.

  6. Conformal coating of mammalian cells immobilized onto magnetically driven beads.

    PubMed

    Khademhosseini, Ali; May, Michael H; Sefton, Michael V

    2005-01-01

    A novel cell bead system, comprising a magnetic core, a spherical annulus of agarose-immobilized cells, all conformally coated within a synthetic polymer, is proposed as a means of immunoisolating mammalian cells in a system that provides a balance between low total implant volume, retrievability, and diffusion limitations. A successful immunoisolation system could be used to transplant cells without eliciting an inappropriate host response. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were immobilized at the periphery of large (approximately 2 mm) agarose beads containing inert magnetic cores (< or = 1 mm) and coated in a hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate (HEMA-MMA) copolymer by interfacial precipitation. The beads were coated in liquid gradients containing polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or bromooctane. Although many cells were adversely affected by the coating process, the cells that did survive (30-50% of those loaded into the beads) remained viable for a period of at least 2 weeks. This viability was much higher than achieved previously because of a number of factors, such as the aqueous agarose, the hydrophobic bromooctane intermediate layer, and faster coating times that minimize the exposure of the cells to organic solvents. Also, a mathematical model was used to describe oxygen transport within the annular agarose beads. These results provide evidence that the proposed geometry and the fabrication approach may be useful for a variety of applications that involve cell encapsulation.

  7. Microbial reduction and precipitation of vanadium (V) in groundwater by immobilized mixed anaerobic culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baogang; Hao, Liting; Tian, Caixing; Yuan, Songhu; Feng, Chuanping; Ni, Jinren; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2015-09-01

    Vanadium is an important contaminant impacted by natural and industrial activities. Vanadium (V) reduction efficiency as high as 87.0% was achieved by employing immobilized mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculated seed within 12h operation, while V(IV) was the main reduction product which precipitated instantly. Increasing initial V(V) concentration resulted in the decrease of V(V) removal efficiency, while this index increased first and then decreased with the increase of initial COD concentration, pH and conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis indicated the decreased microbial diversity. V(V) reduction was realized through dissimilatory reduction process by significantly enhanced Lactococcus and Enterobacter with oxidation of lactic and acetic acids from fermentative microorganisms such as the enriched Paludibacter and the newly appeared Acetobacterium, Oscillibacter. This study is helpful to detect new functional species for V(V) reduction and constitutes a step ahead in developing in situ bioremediations of vanadium contamination.

  8. Cellobiose hydrolysis using Pichia etchellsii cells immobilized in calcium alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, D.; Ghose, T.K.

    1984-01-01

    The rate of cellulose degradation, limited by inhibition by cellobiose, can be increased by hydrolysis of cellobiose to glucose using immobilized ..beta..-glucosidase. Production of ..beta..-glucosidase in four yeasts was studied and a maximum activity of 1.22 IU/mg cells was obtained in cells of Pichia etchellsii when grown on 3% cellobiose as the sole carbon source. Immobilization of ..beta..-glucosidase containing cells of Pichia etchellsii on various solid supports was conducted and immobilization by entrapment in calcium alginate gel beads was found to be the most simple and efficient method. The immobilized preparation was found to be limited by pore diffusion but exhibited no film-diffusion resistance during packed bed reactor operation. Good plug flow characteristics were observed in the packed bed column indicated by a low dispersion number of 0.1348. A model for reaction with pore diffusion for a noncompetitive type of inhibited system was developed and applied to the cellobiose hydrolysis system. The rate of reaction with diffusional limitations was determined by using the model and effectiveness factors were calculated for different particle sizes. An effectiveness factor of 0.49 was obtained for a particle diameter of 2.5 mm. The modified rate expression using the effectiveness factor represented batch and packed bed reactor operation satisfactorily. The productivity in the packed bed column was found to fall rapidly with increase in conversion rate indicating that the operating conditions of the column would have to be a compromise between high conversion rates and reasonable productivity. A half-life of over seven days was obtained at the operating temperature of 45/sup 0/C in continuous operation of the packed bed reactor. However, the half-life in the column was found to be greatly affected by temperature, increasing to over seve

  9. [Bioanode for a microbial fuel cell based on Gluconobacter oxydans inummobilized into a polymer matrix].

    PubMed

    Alferov, S V; Minaĭcheva, P R; Arliapov, V A; Asulian, L D; Alferov, V A; Ponomareva, O N; Reshetilov, A N

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. industrius RKM V-1280 were immobilized into a synthetic matrix based on polyvinyl alcohol modified with N-vinylpyrrolidone and used as biocatalysts for the development ofbioanodes for microbial fuel cells. The immobilization method did not significantly affect bacterial substrate specificity. Bioanodes based on immobilized bacteria functioned stably for 7 days. The maximum voltage (fuel cell signal) was reached when 100-130 µM of an electron transport mediator, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, was added into the anode compartment. The fuel cell signals reached a maximum at a glucose concentration higher than 6 mM. The power output of the laboratory model of a fuel cell based on the developed bioanode reached 7 mW/m2 with the use of fermentation industry wastes as fuel.

  10. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  11. Reduction and immobilization of hexavalent chromium by microbially reduced Fe-bearing clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10, 20, and 30 °C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10 °C, though at 30 °C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  12. Ethanol fermentation in an immobilized cell reactor using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Ghasem; Younesi, Habibollah; Syahidah Ku Ismail, Ku

    2004-05-01

    Fermentation of sugar by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for production of ethanol in an immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was successfully carried out to improve the performance of the fermentation process. The fermentation set-up was comprised of a column packed with beads of immobilized cells. The immobilization of S. cerevisiae was simply performed by the enriched cells cultured media harvested at exponential growth phase. The fixed cell loaded ICR was carried out at initial stage of operation and the cell was entrapped by calcium alginate. The production of ethanol was steady after 24 h of operation. The concentration of ethanol was affected by the media flow rates and residence time distribution from 2 to 7 h. In addition, batch fermentation was carried out with 50 g/l glucose concentration. Subsequently, the ethanol productions and the reactor productivities of batch fermentation and immobilized cells were compared. In batch fermentation, sugar consumption and ethanol production obtained were 99.6% and 12.5% v/v after 27 h while in the ICR, 88.2% and 16.7% v/v were obtained with 6 h retention time. Nearly 5% ethanol production was achieved with high glucose concentration (150 g/l) at 6 h retention time. A yield of 38% was obtained with 150 g/l glucose. The yield was improved approximately 27% on ICR and a 24 h fermentation time was reduced to 7 h. The cell growth rate was based on the Monod rate equation. The kinetic constants (K(s) and mu(m)) of batch fermentation were 2.3 g/l and 0.35 g/lh, respectively. The maximum yield of biomass on substrate (Y(X-S)) and the maximum yield of product on substrate (Y(P-S)) in batch fermentations were 50.8% and 31.2% respectively. Productivity of the ICR were 1.3, 2.3, and 2.8 g/lh for 25, 35, 50 g/l of glucose concentration, respectively. The productivity of ethanol in batch fermentation with 50 g/l glucose was calculated as 0.29 g/lh. Maximum production of ethanol in ICR when compared to batch reactor has shown to increase

  13. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    increase was shown to quickly saturate with cell mass attached on the electrode. Based on recent modelling data that suggested that the electrode currents might be limited by the poor electrical conductivity of the anode, the power density versus electrical conductivity of a yeast-immobilized anode was investigated. Introduction of high aspect ratio carbon fiber filaments to the immobilization matrix increased the electrical conductivity of the anode. Although a higher electrical conductivity clearly led to an increase in power densities, it was shown that the principal limitation to power density increase was coming from proton transfer limitations in the immobilized anode. Partial overcoming of the gradients lead a power density of ca. 250 microW cm-2, which is the highest reported for yeast powered MFCs. A yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cell was investigated as a power source for low power sensors using raw tree sap. It was shown that yeast can efficiently utilize the sucrose present in the raw tree sap to produce electricity when excess salt is added to the medium. Therefore the salinity of a potential energy source is an important consideration when MFCs are being considered for energy harvesting from natural sources.

  14. Microfabricated glass devices for rapid single cell immobilization in mouse zygote microinjection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Sun, Yu

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the design and microfabrication of a vacuum-based cell holding device for single-cell immobilization and the use of the device in mouse zygote microinjection. The device contains many through-holes, constructed via two-sided glass wet etching and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-glass bonding. Experimental results of mouse zygote immobilization and microinjection demonstrate that the device is effective for rapid cell immobilization and does not produce negative effect on embryonic development.

  15. Tris-sucrose buffer system: a new specially designed medium for extracellular invertase production by immobilized cells of isolated yeast Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut; Canli, Ozden; Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Ortucu, Serkan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to isolate new yeasts with high extracellular (exo) invertase activity and to investigate the usability of buffer systems as invertase production media by immobilized yeast cells. Among 70 yeast isolates, Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61 had the highest exo-invertase activity. Immobilization of yeast cells was performed using sodium alginate. Higher exo-invertase activity for immobilized cells was achieved in tris-sucrose buffer system (TSBS) compared to sodium acetate buffer system and potassium phosphate buffer system. TSBS was prepared by dissolving 30 g of sucrose in 1 L of tris buffer solution. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation time for invertase production with immobilized cells were determined as 8.0, 35 °C and 36 h in TSBS, respectively. Under optimized conditions, maximum exo-invertase activity was found to be 28.4 U/mL in sterile and nonsterile TSBS. Immobilized cells could be reused in 14 and 12 successive cycles in sterile and nonsterile TSBS without any loss in the maximum invertase activity, respectively. This is the first report which showed that immobilized microbial cells could be used as a biocatalyst for exo-invertase production in buffer system. As an additional contribution, a new yeast strain with high invertase activity was isolated.

  16. Geometrical design of immobilized cell modula units for ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bourassa, J.F.; LeDuy, A.

    1987-06-01

    Formula are developed for calculating the performance characteristics (surface-to-total-volume ratio, surface-to-packing-volume ratio, and void volume fraction) of four different types of immobilized cell modular units (ICMUs) for ethanol fermentation: plate-type, spiral-type, beehive-type and bead-type ICMUs. Examples are used to illustrate how the formulas are useful for investigating the effects of characteristic dimensions of packing geometry, as well as the effect of scale on the performance characteristics of the ICMUs. (Refs. 4).

  17. Geometrical design of immobilized cell modular units for ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, J F; Leduy, A

    1987-06-01

    Formula are developed for calculating the performance characteristics (surface-to-total-volume ratio, surface-to-packing-volume ratio, and void volume fraction) of four different types of immobilized cell modular units (ICMUs) for ethanol fermentation: plate-type, spiral-type, beehive-type and bead-type ICMUs. Examples are used to illustrate how the formulas are useful for investigating the effects of characteristic dimensions of packing geometry, as well as the effect of scale on the performance characteristics of the ICMUs. PMID:18576567

  18. Growth and by-product profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cells immobilized in foamed alginate.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska, Agnieszka; Kregiel, Dorota; Guneser, Onur; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study how the yeast cell immobilization technique influences the growth and fermentation profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultivated on apple/chokeberry and apple/cranberry pomaces. Encapsulation of the cells was performed by droplet formation from a foamed alginate solution. The growth and metabolic profiles were evaluated for both free and immobilized cells. Culture media with fruit waste produced good growth of free as well as immobilized yeast cells. The fermentation profiles of K. marxianus were different with each waste material. The most varied aroma profiles were noted for immobilized yeast cultivated on apple/chokeberry pomace. PMID:25277269

  19. Use of ATP to characterize biomass viability in freely suspended and immobilized cell bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gikas, P.; Livingston, A.G. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    This work describes investigations into the viability of cells growing on 3,4-dichloroaniline (34DCA). Two bio-reactors are employed for microbial growth, a continuous stirred tank (CST) bioreactor with a 2-L working volume, and a three-phase air lift (TPAL) bioreactor with a 3-L working volume. Experiments have been performed at several dilution rates between 0.027 and 0.115 h[sup [minus]1] in the CST bioreactor and between 0.111 and 0.500h[sup [minus]1] in the TPAL bioreactor. The specific ATP concentration was calculated at each dilution rate in the suspended biomass in both bioreactors as well as in the immobilized biomass in the TPAL bioreactor. The cultures were inspected under an electron microscope to monitor compositional changes. Results from the CST bioreactor showed that the biomass-specific ATP concentration increases from 0.44 to 1.86 mg ATP g[sup [minus]1] dry weight (dw) as dilution rate increases from 0.027 to 0.115 h[sup [minus]1]. At this upper dilution rate the cells were washed out. The specific ATP concentration reached a limiting average value of 1.73 mg ATP g[sup [minus]1] dw, which is assumed to be the quantity of ATP in 100% viable biomass, In the TPAL bioreactor, the ATP level increased with dilution rat in both the immobilized and suspended biomass. The specific ATP concentration in the immobilized biomass increased from approximately 0.051 mg ATP g[sup [minus]1] dw at dilution rates between 0.111 and 0.200 h[sup [minus]1] to approximately 0.119 mg ATP g[sup [minus]1] dw at dilution rates between 0.300 and 0.500 h[sup [minus]1].

  20. Why should cell biologists study microbial pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    One quarter of all deaths worldwide each year result from infectious diseases caused by microbial pathogens. Pathogens infect and cause disease by producing virulence factors that target host cell molecules. Studying how virulence factors target host cells has revealed fundamental principles of cell biology. These include important advances in our understanding of the cytoskeleton, organelles and membrane-trafficking intermediates, signal transduction pathways, cell cycle regulators, the organelle/protein recycling machinery, and cell-death pathways. Such studies have also revealed cellular pathways crucial for the immune response. Discoveries from basic research on the cell biology of pathogenesis are actively being translated into the development of host-targeted therapies to treat infectious diseases. Thus there are many reasons for cell biologists to incorporate the study of microbial pathogens into their research programs. PMID:26628749

  1. Electrochemical Performance and Microbial Characterization of Thermophilic Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrighton, K. C.; Agbo, P.; Brodie, E. L.; Weber, K. A.; Desantis, T. Z.; Anderson, G. L.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Significant research effort is currently focused on microbial fuel cells (MFC) as a source of renewable energy. To date, most of these efforts have concentrated on MFCs operating at mesophilic temperatures. However, many previous studies have reported on the superiority of thermophilic conditions in anaerobic digestion and demonstrated a net gain in energy yield, in terms of methane, relative to the increased energy requirements of operation. Because of this, our recent studies on MFCs focused on investigating the operation and microbiology associated with thermophilic MFCs operating at 55°C. Over 100-day operation, these MFCs were highly stable and achieved a maximum power density of 24mW/m2 and a columbic efficiency of 89 percent with acetate as the sole electron donor. In order to characterize the microbial community involved in thermophilic electricity generation, DNA and RNA were isolated from the electrode and PhyloChip analyses performed. Exploring the changes in the microbial community over time in electricity producing MFC revealed an increase in relative abundance of populations belonging to the Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, and alpha Proteobacteria by at least one order of magnitude. In contrast, these populations decreased in the open circuit and no electron donor amended controls. In order to better characterize the active microbial populations, we enriched and isolated a novel organism, strain JR, from samples collected from an operating MFC. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis strain JR was a member of the family Peptococcaceae, within the Phylum Firmicutes, clustering with Thermincola ferriacetica (98 percent similarity). Phenotypic characterization revealed that strain JR was capable of thermophilic dissimilatory reduction of insoluble electron acceptors such as amorphous Fe(III); as well as reduction of the model quinone 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate. Thermincola strain JR was also capable of producing current by coupling acetate oxidation to anodic

  2. Metal organic frameworks for enzyme immobilization in biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodell, JaDee

    Interest in biofuel cells has been rapidly expanding as an ever-growing segment of the population gains access to electronic devices. The largest areas of growth for new populations using electronic devices are often in communities without electrical infrastructure. This lack of infrastructure in remote environments is one of the key driving factors behind the development of biofuel cells. Biofuel cells employ biological catalysts such as enzymes to catalyze oxidation and reduction reactions of select fuels to generate power. There are several benefits to using enzymes to catalyze reactions as compared to traditional fuel cells which use metal catalysts. First, enzymes are able to catalyze reactions at or near room temperature, whereas traditional metal catalysts are only efficient at very high temperatures. Second, biofuel cells can operate under mild pH conditions which is important for the eventual design of safe, commercially viable devices. Also, biofuel cells allow for implantable and flexible technologies. Finally, enzymes exhibit high selectivity and can be combined to fully oxidize or reduce the fuel which can generate several electrons from a single molecule of fuel, increasing the overall device efficiency. One of the main challenges which persist in biofuel cells is the instability of enzymes over time which tend to denature after hours or days. For a viable commercial biofuel cell to be produced, the stability of enzymes must be extended to months or years. Enzymes have been shown to have improved stability after being immobilized. The focus of this research was to find a metal organic framework (MOF) structure which could successfully immobilize enzymes while still allowing for electron transport to occur between the catalytic center of the enzyme and the electrode surface within a biofuel cell for power generation. Four MOF structures were successfully synthesized and were subsequently tested to determine the MOF's ability to immobilize the following

  3. Nanotechnology, bionanotechnology and microbial cell factories

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is increasingly using both materials and nano-objects synthesized by living beings, most of them produced by microbial cells. Emerging technologies and highly integrative approaches (such as 'omics and systems biology), that have been largely proven successful for the production of proteins and secondary metabolites are now expected to become fully adapted for the improved biological production of nanostructured materials with tailored properties. The so far underestimated potential of microbial cell factories in nanotechnology and nanomedicine is expected to emerge, in the next years, in the context of novel needs envisaged in the nanoscience universe. This should prompt a careful revisiting of the microbial cell factories as the most versatile biological platforms to supply functional materials for nanotechnological applications. PMID:20602780

  4. [Immobilization of E. coli cells in polyacrylamide-based microporous cryogels].

    PubMed

    Lusta, K A; Starostina, N G; Gorkina, N B; Fikhte, B A; Lozinskiĭ, V I

    1988-01-01

    E. coli cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide cryogel by three ways: (1) introduction of cells in the reaction mixture followed by cryopolymerization; (2) the filling of the cryogel pores followed by cell fixation with diluted glutaric dialdehyde (GDA), and (3) the filling of the macropores of the polymeric matrix with modified surface. The ultrastructure of the gels and immobilized cells as well as distribution of attachment of the cells immobilized by different techniques were studied. The first type of immobilization was characterized by the highest quantity of the biomass in the gel (by protein) and by a sharp decrease of the cell viability. The second failed to retain the cells in the pores, and the GDA treatment significantly decreased the viability index. The latter technique was the mildest and completely maintained the viability of the population. However, the biomass content was lower as compared to the first type of immobilization, but could be considerably increased by the GDA treatment.

  5. [The injured and the immobilized muscle cell: ultrastructural observations].

    PubMed

    Lüthi, J M; Gerber, C; Claassen, H; Hoppeler, H

    1989-06-01

    Muscle soreness is a common feature among athletes and untrained individuals who engage in unusual, especially intense eccentric exercise. Various biochemical markers as for example elevated CK demonstrate a damage of muscle cells. The most prominent structural finding is a varying degree of disruption of the contractile material up to cell degeneration. These morphological findings reach their maximum 2 or 3 days after exercise. Signs of regeneration, however, are seen even weeks after exercise. In a prospective study we investigated the structures of the quadriceps muscle in 41 patients with chronic symptomatic instability of the anterior cruciate ligament before, 9 and 26 weeks after operation using the needle biopsy technique. The immobilized muscle showed a rapid and large atrophy which markedly reduced aerobic capacity as well as maximal strength. Preoperative values weren't attained 26 weeks postoperative despite intense physiotherapeutic exercise. The control leg showed an atrophy as well, but only aerobic capacity was reduced, maximal strength remained about the same.

  6. Novel oxygen-releasing immobilized cell beads for bioremediation of BTEX-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Wen; Wu, Chih-Hung; Tang, Chen-Ting; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2012-11-01

    Novel oxygen-releasing bead (ORB) and oxygen-releasing immobilized cell bead (ORICB) were prepared. Their oxygen releasing characteristics and effect on degradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX)-contaminated groundwater were evaluated in a column. ORB prepared by CaO(2)-encapsulated freezing had much better oxygen-releasing capacity (0.526 mg O(2) per ORB) than that by the mixing-freezing method. The encapsulated-ORB did not influence groundwater pH. Two BTEX degraders were utilized to prepare the ORICB. The ORICBs-column rapidly (hydraulic retention time: 0.872 day) degraded BTEX after a 2-5 day acclimation period. The BTEX removal increased as flow distances increased. At BTEX concentration of 120 mg L(-1), 67% of benzene and 81-90% of TEX were removed. The SEM shows that micropores existed in the ORBs and BTEX degraders were immobilized. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles indicate that BTEX degraders were distributed throughout the column. The BTEX concentration of 120 mg L(-1) markedly altered the structure of the indigenous microbial community.

  7. Electrochemical communication between microbial cells and electrodes via osmium redox systems.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Kamrul; Patil, Sunil A; Leech, Dónal; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Gorton, Lo

    2012-12-01

    Electrochemical communication between micro-organisms and electrodes is the integral and fundamental part of BESs (bioelectrochemical systems). The immobilization of bacterial cells on the electrode and ensuring efficient electron transfer to the electrode via a mediator are decisive features of mediated electrochemical biosensors. Notably, mediator-based systems are essential to extract electrons from the non-exoelectrogens, a major group of microbes in Nature. The advantage of using polymeric mediators over diffusible mediators led to the design of osmium redox polymers. Their successful use in enzyme-based biosensors and BFCs (biofuel cells) paved the way for exploring their use in microbial BESs. The present mini-review focuses on osmium-bound redox systems used to date in microbial BESs and their role in shuttling electrons from viable microbial cells to electrodes.

  8. Concomitant microbial generation of palladium nanoparticles and hydrogen to immobilize chromate.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, Dev; Hennebel, Tom; Taghavi, Safiyh; Mast, Jan; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy; van der Lelie, Daniel; Fitts, Jeffrey P

    2010-10-01

    The catalytic properties of various metal nanoparticles have led to their use in environmental remediation. Our aim is to develop and apply an efficient bioremediation method based on in situ biosynthesis of bio-Pd nanoparticles and hydrogen. C. pasteurianum BC1 was used to reduce Pd(II) ions to form Pd nanoparticles (bio-Pd) that primarily precipitated on the cell wall and in the cytoplasm. C. pasteurianum BC1 cells, loaded with bio-Pd nanoparticle in the presence of glucose, were subsequently used to fermentatively produce hydrogen and to effectively catalyze the removal of soluble Cr(VI) via reductive transformation to insoluble Cr(III) species. Batch and aquifer microcosm experiments using C. pasteurianum BC1 cells loaded with bio-Pd showed efficient reductive Cr(VI) removal, while in control experiments with killed or viable but Pd-free bacterial cultures no reductive Cr(VI) removal was observed. Our results suggest a novel process where the in situ microbial production of hydrogen is directly coupled to the catalytic bio-Pd mediated reduction of chromate. This process offers significant advantages over the current groundwater treatment technologies that rely on introducing preformed catalytic nanoparticles into groundwater treatment zones and the costly addition of molecular hydrogen to above ground pump and treat systems.

  9. Phosphorus availability and microbial immobilization in a Nitisol with the application of mineral and organo-mineral fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Morais, Francisco A; Gatiboni, Luciano C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate P availability, P and C contained in the microbial biomass, and enzymatic activity (acid phosphatases and β-glucosidases) in a Nitisol with the application of mineral and organo-mineral fertilizers. The experiment was performed in a protected environment with control over air temperature and soil moisture. The experimental design was organized in a "5 x 4" factorial arrangement with five sources of P and four times of soil incubation. The sources were: control (without P), triple superphosphate, diammonium phosphate, natural Arad reactive rock phosphate, and organo-mineral fertilizer. The experimental units consisted of PVC columns filled with agricultural soil. The columns were incubated and broken down for analysis at 1, 20, 40, and 60 days after application of the fertilizers. In each column, samples were taken at the layers of 0-2.5, 2.5-5.0, and 5.0-15.0 cm below the zone of the fertilizers. The application of soluble phosphates and organo-mineral fertilizer temporarily increased P availability in the zone near the fertilizers (0-2.5 cm), with maximum availability occurring at approximately 32 days. Microbial immobilization showed behavior similar to P availability, and the greatest immobilizations occurred at approximately 30 days. The organo-mineral fertilizer was not different from soluble phosphates. PMID:26628018

  10. Phosphorus availability and microbial immobilization in a Nitisol with the application of mineral and organo-mineral fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Morais, Francisco A; Gatiboni, Luciano C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate P availability, P and C contained in the microbial biomass, and enzymatic activity (acid phosphatases and β-glucosidases) in a Nitisol with the application of mineral and organo-mineral fertilizers. The experiment was performed in a protected environment with control over air temperature and soil moisture. The experimental design was organized in a "5 x 4" factorial arrangement with five sources of P and four times of soil incubation. The sources were: control (without P), triple superphosphate, diammonium phosphate, natural Arad reactive rock phosphate, and organo-mineral fertilizer. The experimental units consisted of PVC columns filled with agricultural soil. The columns were incubated and broken down for analysis at 1, 20, 40, and 60 days after application of the fertilizers. In each column, samples were taken at the layers of 0-2.5, 2.5-5.0, and 5.0-15.0 cm below the zone of the fertilizers. The application of soluble phosphates and organo-mineral fertilizer temporarily increased P availability in the zone near the fertilizers (0-2.5 cm), with maximum availability occurring at approximately 32 days. Microbial immobilization showed behavior similar to P availability, and the greatest immobilizations occurred at approximately 30 days. The organo-mineral fertilizer was not different from soluble phosphates.

  11. Cell growth on immobilized cell growth factor. 7. Protein-free cell culture by using growth-factor-immobilized polymer membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Ito, Y; Imanishi, Y

    1993-02-01

    A protein-free culture of anchorage-dependent cells, mouse fibroblast cells, STO and 3T3-L1 and fibroic sarcoma cells, Swiss albino HSDM1C1, grown on a cell-growth protein, insulin, and/or a cell-adhesion protein, collagen, which are immobilized or coimmobilized on surface-hydrolyzed poly(methyl methacrylate) membrane, was investigated. By adding metal ions and lipids to the culture medium, a protein-free culture medium was composed, which was potent in promoting cell proliferation similarly to serum-containing culture medium. In particular, with insulin/collagen-coimmobilized membrane, a protein-free culture was established without detachment of growing cells over a long period. These protein-immobilized membranes could be used repeatedly. PMID:7763456

  12. Effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper in synthesized Fe(III) minerals and Fe-rich soils.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaohua; Zhang, Youchi; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Wensui

    2014-04-01

    The effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper were investigated in a high concentration of sulfate with synthesized Fe(III) minerals and red earth soils rich in amorphous Fe (hydr)oxides. Batch microcosm experiments showed that red earth soil inoculated with subsurface sediments had a faster Fe(III) bioreduction rate than pure amorphous Fe(III) minerals and resulted in quicker immobilization of Cu in the aqueous fraction. Coinciding with the decrease of aqueous Cu, SO4(2-) in the inoculated red earth soil decreased acutely after incubation. The shift in the microbial community composite in the inoculated soil was analyzed through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Results revealed the potential cooperative effect of microbial Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction on copper immobilization. After exposure to air for 144 h, more than 50% of the immobilized Cu was remobilized from the anaerobic matrices; aqueous sulfate increased significantly. Sequential extraction analysis demonstrated that the organic matter/sulfide-bound Cu increased by 52% after anaerobic incubation relative to the abiotic treatment but decreased by 32% after oxidation, indicating the generation and oxidation of Cu-sulfide coprecipitates in the inoculated red earth soil. These findings suggest that the immobilization of copper could be enhanced by mediating microbial Fe(III) reduction with sulfate reduction under anaerobic conditions. The findings have an important implication for bioremediation in Cucontaminated and Fe-rich soils, especially in acid-mine-drainage-affected sites.

  13. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO[sub 2]-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  14. [Advances in microbial solar cells--A review].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yu, Changping; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-08-01

    The energy crisis has become one of the major problems hindering the development of the world. The emergence of microbial fuel cells provides a new solution to the energy crisis. Microbial solar cells, integrating photosynthetic organisms such as plants and microalgae into microbial fuel cells, can convert solar energy into electrical energy. Microbial solar cell has steady electric energy, and broad application prospects in wastewater treatment, biodiesel processing and intermediate metabolites production. Here we reviewed recent progress of microbial solar cells from the perspective of the role of photosynthetic organisms in microbial fuel cells, based on a vast amount of literature, and discussed their advantages and deficiency. At last, brief analysis of the facing problems and research needs of microbial fuel cells are undertaken. This work was expected to be beneficial for the application of the microbial solar cells technology.

  15. Autonomous, Retrievable, Deep Sea Microbial Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work by providing bacteria in anaerobic sediments with an electron acceptor (anode) that stimulates metabolism of organic matter. The buried anode is connected via control circuitry to a cathode exposed to oxygen in the overlying water. During metabolism, bacteria release hydrogen ions into the sediment and transfer electrons extra-cellularly to the anode, which eventually reduce dissolved oxygen at the cathode, forming water. The open circuit voltage is approximately 0.8 v. The voltage between electrodes is operationally kept at 0.4 v with a potentiastat. The current is chiefly limited by the rate of microbial metabolism at the anode. The Office of Naval Research has encouraged development of microbial fuel cells in the marine environment at a number of academic and naval institutions. Earlier work in shallow sediments of San Diego Bay showed that the most important environmental parameters that control fuel cell power output in San Diego Bay were total organic carbon in the sediment and seasonal water temperature. Current MFC work at SPAWAR includes extension of microbial fuel cell tests to the deep sea environment (>1000 m) and, in parallel, testing microbial fuel cells in the laboratory under deep sea conditions. One question we are asking is whether MFC power output from deep water sediments repressurized and chilled in the laboratory comparable to those measured in situ. If yes, mapping the power potential of deep sea sediments may be made much easier, requiring sediment grabs and lab tests rather than deployment and retrieval of fuel cells. Another question we are asking is whether in situ temperature and total organic carbon in the deep sea sediment can predict MFC power. If yes, then we can make use of the large collection of publicly available, deep sea oceanographic measurements to make these predictions, foregoing expensive work at sea. These regressions will be compared to those derived from shallow water measurements.

  16. Interval scanning photomicrography of microbial cell populations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A single reproducible area of the preparation in a fixed focal plane is photographically scanned at intervals during incubation. The procedure can be used for evaluating the aerobic or anaerobic growth of many microbial cells simultaneously within a population. In addition, the microscope is not restricted to the viewing of any one microculture preparation, since the slide cultures are incubated separately from the microscope.

  17. Biodegradation of phenol by using free and immobilized cells of Acinetobacter sp. BS8Y.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lichun; Ruan, Qiping; Li, Rulan; Li, Tiandong

    2013-03-01

    Strain BS8Y with high biodegradation activity and high tolerance of phenol was isolated from activated sludge in an insulating material plant of China. This strain was capable of removing 99.2% of the initial 600 mg/l phenol in liquid minimal medium within 24 h and tolerating phenol at concentrations of up to 1,200 mg/ml. DNA sequencing and homologous analysis of the 16S rRNA gene identified that the strain BS8Y belonged to an Acinetobacter species. Polyvinyl alcohol was used as gel matrix to immobilize the strain BS8Y. The factors affecting the phenol degradation by immobilized cells and the phenol removal efficiency of free and immobilized cells were investigated; the stability of the immobilized cells is also reported. The results show that the immobilized cells could tolerate a higher phenol level and protected the bacteria much more effectively against changes in temperature and pH. The phenol degradation efficiency was high at up to 96% within 30 h, with an initial concentration of 800 mg/l phenol, and the immobilized cells showed better performance than the suspended cells. Reusability tests revealed that the immobilized cells were stable enough even after reuse for ten times or storing at 4°C for 35 d. These results demonstrate that immobilized Acinetobacter sp. BS8Y possesses a good application potential in the treatment of phenol-containing wastewater.

  18. Single-cell transcriptomics for microbial eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kolisko, Martin; Boscaro, Vittorio; Burki, Fabien; Lynn, Denis H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-11-17

    One of the greatest hindrances to a comprehensive understanding of microbial genomics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution is that most microbial life is not in culture. Solutions to this problem have mainly focused on whole-community surveys like metagenomics, but these analyses inevitably loose information and present particular challenges for eukaryotes, which are relatively rare and possess large, gene-sparse genomes. Single-cell analyses present an alternative solution that allows for specific species to be targeted, while retaining information on cellular identity, morphology, and partitioning of activities within microbial communities. Single-cell transcriptomics, pioneered in medical research, offers particular potential advantages for uncultivated eukaryotes, but the efficiency and biases have not been tested. Here we describe a simple and reproducible method for single-cell transcriptomics using manually isolated cells from five model ciliate species; we examine impacts of amplification bias and contamination, and compare the efficacy of gene discovery to traditional culture-based transcriptomics. Gene discovery using single-cell transcriptomes was found to be comparable to mass-culture methods, suggesting single-cell transcriptomics is an efficient entry point into genomic data from the vast majority of eukaryotic biodiversity.

  19. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-06-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L-1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L-1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h-l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  20. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-01-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L−1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L−1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h−l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  1. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-06-16

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L-1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L-1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h-l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents.

  2. Formaldehyde degradation by Ralstonia eutropha in an immobilized cell bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Alireza; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    The formaldehyde (FA) degradation ability of the loofa-immobilized Ralstonia eutropha cells in a packed bed reactor was modeled using a statistically based design of the experiment (DOE) considering application of response surface methodology (RSM). The simultaneous effects of four operative test factors on the cells performance in terms of FA degradation rate and extent of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were monitored. The combination of factors at initial FA concentration of 629.7 mg L(-1)h(-1), recycling substrate flow rate of 4.4 mL min(-1), aeration rate of 1.05 vvm, and the system's temperature of 28.8°C resulted the optimal conditions for the FA biodegradation rate and COD removal efficiency. Loofa porous structure was found to be a protective environment for the cells in exposing to the toxic substances and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed extensive cells penetration within this support. Oxygen transfer analysis in the form of evaluating K la value was also carried out and at the optimum conditions of the DOE was equaled to 9.96 h(-1)and oxygen uptake rate was 35.6 mg L(-1)h(-1).

  3. Microbial fuel cells for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijia; Zhou, Minghua; Liu, Mengmeng; Yang, Weilu; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) face major hurdles for real-world applications as power generators with the exception of powering small sensor devices. Despite tremendous improvements made in the last two decades, MFCs are still too expensive to build and operate and their power output is still too small. In view of this, in recently years, intensive researches have been carried out to expand the applications into other areas such as acid and alkali production, bioremediation of aquatic sediments, desalination and biosensors. Unlike power applications, MFC sensors have the immediate prospect to be practical. This review covers the latest developments in various proposed biosensor applications using MFCs including monitoring microbial activity, testing biochemical oxygen demand, detection of toxicants and detection of microbial biofilms that cause biocorrosion.

  4. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Megadi, Veena B; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water.

  5. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Megadi, Veena B; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  6. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1

    PubMed Central

    Tallur, Preeti N.; Mulla, Sikandar I.; Megadi, Veena B.; Talwar, Manjunatha P.; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  7. Preparation and characterization of. beta. -D-glucosidase immobilized in calcium alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Krasniak, S.R.; Smith, R.D.; Spielberg, F.; Zachry, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    The immobilization of enzymes, organelles, and microbial cells within calcium alginate gel spheres has been reported. Few reports exist, however, on the use of these spheres for enzyme immobilization. The study reported here describes the immobilization of ..beta..-D-glucosidase within calcium alginate gel spheres and addresses the problems of loss of enzyme activity in the spheres via inhibition and leakage.

  8. Production of xanthan gum by free and immobilized cells of Xanthomonas campestris and Xanthomonas pelargonii.

    PubMed

    Niknezhad, Seyyed Vahid; Asadollahi, Mohammad Ali; Zamani, Akram; Biria, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Production of xanthan gum using immobilized cells of Xanthomonas campestris and Xanthomonas pelargonii grown on glucose or hydrolyzed starch as carbon sources was investigated. Calcium alginate (CA) and calcium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol-boric acid (CA-PVA) beads were used for the immobilization of cells. Xanthan titers of 8.2 and 9.2g/L were obtained for X. campestris cells immobilized in CA-PVA beads using glucose and hydrolyzed starch, respectively, whereas those for X. pelargonii were 8 and 7.9 g/L, respectively. Immobilized cells in CA-PVA beads were successfully employed in three consecutive cycles for xanthan production without any noticeable degradation of the beads whereas the CA beads were broken after the first cycle. The results of this study suggested that immobilized cells are advantageous over the free cells for xanthan production. Also it was shown that the cells immobilized in CA-PVA beads are more efficient than cells immobilized in CA beads for xanthan production. PMID:26526173

  9. Degradation of h-acid by free and immobilized cells of Alcaligenes latus

    PubMed Central

    Usha, M.S.; Sanjay, M.K.; Gaddad, S.M.; Shivannavar, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Alcaligenes latus, isolated from industrial effluent, was able to grow in mineral salts medium with 50 ppm (0.15 mM) of H-acid as a sole source of carbon. Immobilization of Alcaligenes latus in Ca-alginate and polyurethane foam resulted in cells embedded in the matrices. When free cells and immobilized cells were used for biodegradation studies at concentration ranging from 100 ppm (0.3 mM) to 500 ppm (1.15 mM) degradation rate was enhanced with immobilized cells. Cells immobilized in polyurethane foam showed 100% degradation up to 350 ppm (1.05 mM) and 57% degradation at 500 ppm (1.5 mM). Degradation rate of Ca-alginate immobilized cells was less as compared to that of polyurethane foam immobilized cells. With Ca-alginate immobilized cells 100% degradation was recorded up to 200 ppm (0.6 mM) of H-acid and only 33% degradation was recorded at 500 ppm (1.5 mM) of H-acid. Spectral analysis of the products after H-acid utilization showed that the spent medium did not contain any aromatic compounds indicating H-acid degradation by A. latus. PMID:24031573

  10. Immobilization of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MBL27 cells for enhanced antimicrobial protein production using calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Kumaravel, Vijayalakshmi; Gopal, Suseela Rajakumar

    2010-12-01

    Cell immobilization is one of the common techniques for increasing the overall cell concentration and productivity. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MBL27 cells were immobilized in calcium alginate beads and it is a promising method for repeated AMP (antimicrobial protein) production. The present study aimed at determining the optimal conditions for immobilization of B. amyloliquefaciens MBL27 cells in calcium alginate beads and the operational stability for enhanced production of the AMP. AMP production with free and immobilized cells was also done. In batch fermentation, maximum AMP production (7300 AU (arbitrary units)/ml against Staphylococcus aureus) was obtained with immobilized cells in shake flasks under optimized parameters such as 3% (w/v) sodium alginate, 136 mM CaCl2 with 350 alginate beads/flask of 2.7-3.0 mm diameter. In repeated cultivation, the highest activity was obtained after the second cycle of use and approx. 94% production was noted up to the fifth cycle. The immobilized cells of B. amyloliquefaciens MBL27 in alginate beads are more efficient for the production of AMP and had good stability. The potential application of AMP as a wound healant and the need for development of economical methods for improved production make whole cell immobilization an excellent alternative method for enhanced AMP production.

  11. From microbial communities to cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1985-01-01

    The eukraotic cell, the unit of structure of protoctists, plants, fungi, and animals, is not at all homologous to prokaryotic cells. Instead the eukaryotic cell is homologous to communities of microorganisms such as those of the sulfuretum. This research is based on the hypothesis that at least four different interacting community members entered the original associations that, when stabilized, led to the emergence of eukaryotic cells. These are: (1) host nucleocytoplasm (thermoplasma like archaebacteria); (2) mitochrondria (paracoccus or bdellovibryo like respiring bacteria; and (3) plastids (cyanobacteria) and undulipodia. Tubulin like protein was found in the free living spirochete Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis and in several other spirochetes. The amino acid sequence was to see if the spirochete protein is homologous to the tubulin of undulipodial and mitotic spindle microtubules.

  12. Microbial fed-batch production of 1,3-propanediol using raw glycerol with suspended and immobilized Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sun-Ae; Moon, Chuloo; Kang, Cheol-Hee; Kong, Sean W; Sang, Byoung-In; Um, Youngsoon

    2010-05-01

    The production of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) was investigated with Klebsiella pneumoniae DSM 4799 using raw glycerol without purification obtained from a biodiesel production process. Fed-batch cultures with suspended cells revealed that 1,3-PD production was more effective when utilizing raw glycerol than pure glycerol (productivity after 47 h of fermentation, 0.84 g L(-1) 1 h(-1) versus 1.51 g L(-1) h(-1) with pure and raw glycerol,respectively). In addition, more than 80 g/L of 1,3-PD was produced using raw glycerol;this is the highest 1,3-PD concentration reported thus far for K. pneumoniae using raw glycerol. Repeated fed-batch fermentation with cell immobilization in a fixed-bed reactor was performed to enhance 1,3-PD production. Production of 1,3-PD increased with the cycle number (1.06 g L(-1) h(-1) versus 1.61 g L(-1) h(-1) at the first and fourth cycle, respectively)due to successful cell immobilization. During 46 cycles of fed-batch fermentation taking place over 1,460 h, a stable and reproducible 1,3-PD production performance was observed with both pure and raw glycerol. Based on our results, repeated fed batch with immobilized cells is an efficient fermentor configuration, and raw glycerol can be utilized to produce 1,3-PD without inhibitory effects caused by accumulated impurities.

  13. Wireless sensors powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shantaram, Avinash; Beyenal, Haluk; Raajan, Raaja; Veluchamy, Angathevar; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-07-01

    Monitoring parameters characterizing water quality, such as temperature, pH, and concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters, is often followed by transmitting the data to remote receivers using telemetry systems. Such systems are commonly powered by batteries, which can be inconvenient at times because batteries have a limited lifetime and must be recharged or replaced periodically to ensure that sufficient energy is available to power the electronics. To avoid these inconveniences, a microbial fuel cell was designed to power electrochemical sensors and small telemetry systems to transmit the data acquired by the sensors to remote receivers. The microbial fuel cell was combined with low-power, high-efficiency electronic circuitry providing a stable power source for wireless data transmission. To generate enough power for the telemetry system, energy produced by the microbial fuel cell was stored in a capacitor and used in short bursts when needed. Since commercial electronic circuits require a minimum 3.3 V input and our cell was able to deliver a maximum of 2.1 V, a DC-DC converter was used to boost the potential. The DC-DC converter powered a transmitter, which gathered the data from the sensor and transmitted it wirelessly to a remote receiver. To demonstrate the utility of the system, temporal variations in temperature were measured, and the data were wirelessly transmitted to a remote receiver.

  14. Wireless sensors powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shantaram, Avinash; Beyenal, Haluk; Raajan, Raaja; Veluchamy, Angathevar; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-07-01

    Monitoring parameters characterizing water quality, such as temperature, pH, and concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters, is often followed by transmitting the data to remote receivers using telemetry systems. Such systems are commonly powered by batteries, which can be inconvenient at times because batteries have a limited lifetime and must be recharged or replaced periodically to ensure that sufficient energy is available to power the electronics. To avoid these inconveniences, a microbial fuel cell was designed to power electrochemical sensors and small telemetry systems to transmit the data acquired by the sensors to remote receivers. The microbial fuel cell was combined with low-power, high-efficiency electronic circuitry providing a stable power source for wireless data transmission. To generate enough power for the telemetry system, energy produced by the microbial fuel cell was stored in a capacitor and used in short bursts when needed. Since commercial electronic circuits require a minimum 3.3 V input and our cell was able to deliver a maximum of 2.1 V, a DC-DC converter was used to boost the potential. The DC-DC converter powered a transmitter, which gathered the data from the sensor and transmitted it wirelessly to a remote receiver. To demonstrate the utility of the system, temporal variations in temperature were measured, and the data were wirelessly transmitted to a remote receiver. PMID:16053108

  15. Life cycle assessment of high-rate anaerobic treatment, microbial fuel cells, and microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jeffrey M; Rozendal, René A; Hertle, Christopher K; Lant, Paul A; Rabaey, Korneel

    2010-05-01

    Existing wastewater treatment options are generally perceived as energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Much attention has been focused on two new approaches in the past years, (i) microbial fuel cells and (ii) microbial electrolysis cells, which directly generate electrical current or chemical products, respectively, during wastewater treatment. These systems are commonly denominated as bioelectrochemical systems, and a multitude of claims have been made in the past regarding the environmental impact of these treatment options. However, an in-depth study backing these claims has not been performed. Here, we have conducted a life cycle assessment (LCA) to compare the environmental impact of three industrial wastewater treatment options, (i) anaerobic treatment with biogas generation, (ii) a microbial fuel cell treatment, with direct electricity generation, and (iii) a microbial electrolysis cell, with hydrogen peroxide production. Our analysis showed that a microbial fuel cell does not provide a significant environmental benefit relative to the "conventional" anaerobic treatment option. However, a microbial electrolysis cell provides significant environmental benefits through the displacement of chemical production by conventional means. Provided that the target conversion level of 1000 A.m(-3) can be met, the decrease in greenhouse gas emissions and other environmentally harmful emissions (e.g., aromatic hydrocarbons) of the microbial electrolysis cell will be a key driver for the development of an industrial standard for this technology. Evidently, this assessment is highly dependent on the underlying assumptions, such as the used reactor materials and target performance. This provides a challenge and an opportunity for researchers in the field to select and develop appropriate and environmentally benign materials of construction, as well as demonstrate the required 1000 A.m(-3) performance at pilot and full scale.

  16. Phospholipid polymer-based antibody immobilization for cell rolling surfaces in stem cell purification system.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Atsushi; Chen, Hao; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-conjugated cell rolling column that successfully separates stem cell subpopulations depending on the cell surface marker density, but a large amount of the injected cells were retained in the column because of non-specific interactions. In this study, an amphiphilic copolymer, poly[2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-co-n-butyl methacrylate (nBMA)-co-N-vinyl formamide (NVf)], with phospholipid polar side groups was designed as a novel antibody-immobilizing modifier. The formamide groups in NVf units were converted to active maleimide groups. A plastic flow microfluidic chamber was coated with the copolymers, and a reduced anti-CD90 antibody was immobilized. The adipose tissue-derived stem cells isolated from the rat were injected into the flow chamber, and their rolling behavior was observed under a microscope with a high-speed camera. Non-specific cell adhesion was reduced strongly by means of this immobilization method because of the MPC unit, resulting in a high percentage of rolling cells. These results demonstrate that a surface coated with phospholipid polar groups can be used in an effective stem cell separation system based on the cell rolling process.

  17. Beta-glucanase productivity improvement via cell immobilization of recombinant Escherichia coli cells in different matrices.

    PubMed

    Beshay, Usama; El-Enshasy, Hesham; Ismail, I M K; Moawad, Hassan; Abd-El-Ghany, Sawsan

    2011-01-01

    The studies have been performed to analyze the production of beta-glucanase by a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli immobilized in different matrices. Porous sintered glass SIRAN, Ceramic supporting matrices and Broken Pumice stone as well as SIRAN Raschig-rings were examined for the immobilization of whole bacterial cells. The beta-glucanase activity of bacteria immobilized in CeramTec PST 5 (4-5 mm) was very low. CeramTec PST 5 (1.5-2.5 mm) was found to be the best carrier compared to all other matrices regarding glucanase production (630 U/ml) and compared to enzyme activity produced by free cells (500 U/ml). Different doses of matrices were applied (2, 5, 7, 10 g/lask) in the form of "matrix weight". Using 2 g/flask of CeramTec PST 5 (1.5-2.5 mm) yielded enzyme activity of 630 U/ml). CeramTec gives highest operational stability of beta-glucanase by repeated batch fermentation to 5 cycles, and activity reached 660 U/ml. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed a high number of vegetative cells that continued growth inside the matrices, indicating that beta-glucanase activity improvement was due to the immobilization of the cells.

  18. Kinetic analysis of dihydroxyacetone production from crude glycerol by immobilized cells of Gluconobacter oxydans MTCC 904.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Pritam Kumar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2016-09-01

    The present study has investigated kinetic features of bioconversion of biodiesel-derived crude glycerol to dihydroxyacetone with immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans cells using modified Haldane substrate-inhibition model. The results have been compared against free cells and pure glycerol. Relative variations in the kinetic parameters KS, KI, Vmax, n and X reveal that immobilized G. oxydans cells (on PU foam substrate) with crude glycerol as substrate give higher order of inhibition (n) and lower maximum reaction velocities (Vmax). These results are essentially implications of substrate transport restrictions across immobilization matrix, which causes retention of substrate in the matrix and reduction in fractional available substrate (X) for the cells. This causes reduction in both KS (substrate concentration at Vmax/2) and KI (inhibition constant) as compared to free cells. For immobilized cells, substrate concentration (Smax) corresponding to Vmax is practically same for both pure and crude glycerol as substrate. PMID:27343447

  19. Microbial fuel cell with improved anode

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2010-04-13

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing a microbial fuel cell, wherein the method includes: (i) inoculating an anodic liquid medium in contact with an anode of the microbial fuel cell with one or more types of microorganisms capable of functioning by an exoelectrogenic mechanism; (ii) establishing a biofilm of the microorganisms on and/or within the anode along with a substantial absence of planktonic forms of the microorganisms by substantial removal of the planktonic microorganisms during forced flow and recirculation conditions of the anodic liquid medium; and (iii) subjecting the microorganisms of the biofilm to a growth stage by incorporating one or more carbon-containing nutritive compounds in the anodic liquid medium during biofilm formation or after biofilm formation on the anode has been established.

  20. Effective Immobilization of Agrobacterium sp. IFO 13140 Cells in Loofa Sponge for Curdlan Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Camila Ortiz; Ruiz, Suelen Pereira; Nogueira, Marcela Tiemi; Bona, Evandro; Portilho, Márcia; Matioli, Graciette

    2015-05-04

    Curdlan production by Agrobacterium sp. IFO13140 immobilized on loofa sponge, alginate and loofa sponge with alginate was investigated. There was no statistically-significant difference in curdlan production when the microorganism was immobilized in different matrices. The loofa sponge was chosen because of its practical application and economy and because it provides a high stability through its continued use. The best conditions for immobilization on loofa sponge were 50 mg of cell, 200 rpm and 72 h of incubation, which provided a curdlan production 1.50-times higher than that obtained by free cells. The higher volumetric productivity was achieved by immobilized cells (0.09 g/L/h) at 150 rpm. The operating stability was evaluated, and until the fourth cycle, immobilized cells retained 87.40% of the production of the first cycle. The immobilized cells remained active after 300 days of storage at 4 °C. The results of this study demonstrate success in immobilizing cells for curdlan biosynthesis, making the process potentially suitable for industrial scale-up. Additional studies may show a possible contribution to the reduction of operating costs.

  1. Site-specific, covalent immobilization of BirA by microbial transglutaminase: A reusable biocatalyst for in vitro biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang-Mei; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Fen; Yang, Hong-Ming; Tang, Jin-Bao

    2016-10-15

    A facile approach for the production of a reusable immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli biotin ligase (BirA) onto amine-modified magnetic microspheres (MMS) via covalent cross-linking catalyzed using microbial transglutaminase (MTG) was proposed in this study. The site-specifically immobilized BirA exhibited approximately 95% of enzymatic activity of the free BirA, and without a significant loss in intrinsic activity after 10 rounds of recycling (P > 0.05). In addition, the immobilized BirA can be easily recovered from the solution via a simple magnetic separation. Thus, the immobilized BirA may be of general use for in vitro biotinylation in an efficient and economical manner. PMID:27480497

  2. Application of the adhesive bacterionanofiber AtaA to a novel microbial immobilization method for the production of indigo as a model chemical.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masahito; Shigemori, Kazuki; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    The toluene-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 shows high adhesiveness mediated by the bacterionanofiber protein AtaA, which is a new member of the trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) family. In contrast to other reported TAAs, AtaA mediates the adhesion of Tol 5 to various abiotic surfaces ranging from hydrophobic plastics to hydrophilic glass and stainless steel. The expression of ataA in industrially relevant bacteria improves their adhesiveness and enables immobilization directly onto support materials. This represents a new method that can be alternated with conventional immobilization via gel entrapment and chemical bonding. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of this immobilizing method by utilizing AtaA. As a model case for this method, the indigo producer Acinetobacter sp. ST-550 was transformed with ataA and immobilized on a polyurethane support. The immobilized ST-550 cells were transferred directly to a reaction solution containing indole as the substrate. The immobilized ST-550 cells showed a faster indigo production rate at high concentrations of indole compared with planktonic ST-550 not expressing the ataA gene, implying that immobilization enhanced the tolerance of ST-550 to the substrate indole. As a result, the immobilized ST-550 produced fivefold higher levels of indigo than planktonic ST-550. These results proved that AtaA is useful for bacterial immobilization. PMID:23893702

  3. Progress on implantable biofuel cell: Nano-carbon functionalization for enzyme immobilization enhancement.

    PubMed

    Babadi, Arman Amani; Bagheri, Samira; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abdul

    2016-05-15

    Biofuel cells are bio-electrochemical devices, which are suitable for the environmentally friendly generation of energy. Enzymatic biofuel cell (EBFC) operates at ambient temperature and pH. Biofuel cells utilize vegetable and animal fluids (e.g. glucose) as a biofuel to produce energy. Fundamental part of each Glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) is two bioelectrodes which their surface utilizes as an enzyme immobilized site. Glucose oxidase (GOx) or glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) were immobilized on bioanode and oxidize glucose while oxygen reduced in biocathode using immobilized laccase or bilirubin oxidase in order to generate sufficient power. Glucose biofuel cells are capable to generate sufficient power for implanted devices. The key step of manufacturing a bioelectrode is the effective enzyme immobilization on the electrode surface. Due to the thin diameter of carbon nanomaterials, which make them accessible to the enzyme active sites, they are applicable materials to establish electronic communication with redox enzymes. Carbon nanomaterials regenerate the biocatalysts either by direct electron transfer or redox mediators which serve as intermediated for the electron transfer. Nano-carbon functionalization is perfectly compatible with other chemical or biological approaches to enhance the enzyme functions in implantable biofuel cells. Efficient immobilization of enzyme using the functionalized nano-carbon materials is the key point that greatly increases the possibilities of success. Current review highlights the progress on implantable biofuel cell, with focus on the nano-carbon functionalization for enzyme immobilization enhancement in glucose/O2 biofuel cells. PMID:26785309

  4. “Fish-in-Net”, a Novel Method for Cell Immobilization of Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xuedun; Wang, Zhi; Li, Yang; Zhao, Zijian; Liu, Jiayin; Jiang, Li; Xu, Haoran; Li, Zhengqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Inorganic mesoporous materials exhibit good biocompatibility and hydrothermal stability for cell immobilization. However, it is difficult to encapsulate living cells under mild conditions, and new strategies for cell immobilization are needed. We designed a “fish-in-net” approach for encapsulation of enzymes in ordered mesoporous silica under mild conditions. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the potential of this approach in immobilization of living cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Zymomonas mobilis cells were encapsulated in mesoporous silica-based materials under mild conditions by using a “fish-in-net” approach. During the encapsulation process, polyethyleneglycol was used as an additive to improve the immobilization efficiency. After encapsulation, the pore size, morphology and other features were characterized by various methods, including scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis, transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Furthermore, the capacity of ethanol production by immobilized Zymomonas mobilis and free Zymomonas mobilis was compared. Conclusions/Significance In this study, Zymomonas mobilis cells were successfully encapsulated in mesoporous silica-based materials under mild conditions by the “fish-in-net” approach. Encapsulated cells could perform normal metabolism and exhibited excellent reusability. The results presented here illustrate the enormous potential of the “fish-in-net” approach for immobilization of living cells. PMID:24236145

  5. Microbial fuel cells: Their application and microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhen

    The energy crisis is an urgent global issue due to the increased consumption of the finite amount of fossil fuel. As a result, looking for alternative energy sources is of critical importance. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology can extract electric energy from wastewater, and thus is a sustainable approach to supply energy to our electricity-based society. My research focuses on the development of a suitable MFC reactor for wastewater treatment and the understanding of the microbial function in the MFC process. First, together with colleagues, I have developed a novel MFC reactor, named upflow microbial fuel cell (UMFC), by combining upflow and MFC technologies. The power output from the UMFC was improved by 10-fold after it was modified with a U-shape cathode. The UMFC appears to be a practical reactor for continuous operation, though the output of electric power requires further improvement. In addition, a sediment MFC with a rotating cathode was also developed and its performance was examined. Second, I have adopted a human distal gut anaerobe, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, as the model organism to study the role of fermentative bacterium in electricity generation. When B. thetaiotaomicron grew under an applied electric potential, an electric current was generated. GeneChip data indicated that this bacterium did not alter its metabolism during this process. Although B. thetaiotaomicron may not be capable of respiration with an electrode as the electron acceptor, the experiment has demonstrated that fermentative bacteria may play an important role in electricity generation.

  6. DETOXIFICATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES BY IMMOBILIZED ESCHERICHIA COLI EXPRESSING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE ON CELL SURFACE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved whole-cell technology for detoxifying organophosphate nerve agents was recently developed based on genetically engineered Escherichia coli with organophosphorus hydrolase anchored on the surface. This article reports the immobilization of these novel biocatalys...

  7. Analysis of secondary cells with lithium anodes and immobilized fused-salt electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Rogers, G. L.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Secondary cells with liquid lithium anodes, liquid bismuth or tellurium cathodes, and fused lithium halide electrolytes immobilized as rigid pastes operate between 380 and 485 degrees. Applications include power sources in space, military vehicle propulsion and special commercial vehicle propulsion.

  8. Microwave-synthesized magnetic chitosan microparticles for the immobilization of yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Maderova, Zdenka; Baldikova, Eva; Horska, Katerina; Safarikova, Mirka

    2015-01-01

    An extremely simple procedure has been developed for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells on magnetic chitosan microparticles. The magnetic carrier was prepared using an inexpensive, simple, rapid, one-pot process, based on the microwave irradiation of chitosan and ferrous sulphate at high pH. Immobilized yeast cells have been used for sucrose hydrolysis, hydrogen peroxide decomposition and the adsorption of selected dyes. PMID:24753015

  9. Effects of light, microbial activity, and sediment resuspension on the phosphorus immobilization capability of drinking water treatment residuals in lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-12-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), nonhazardous by-products generated in a drinking water treatment plant, can be reused to immobilize phosphorus (P) to control the internal P loading from lake sediments for eutrophication control. Reasonably, before practical application, it is essential to determine the P immobilization capability of WTRs in lake sediments under various conditions. In this work, laboratory scale experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of light, microbial activity, and sediment resuspension on the P immobilization capability of WTRs. The results suggested that absence of light, low microbial activity, and sediment resuspension can increase the internal P loading from lake sediments. WTRs can, however, reduce the internal P loading significantly. Further analysis demonstrated that WTRs can stabilize P, decreasing the P bioavailability in the sediments under varied conditions. WTRs also presented little undesirable effects on the dissolved oxygen levels and pH of overlying water. Therefore, light, microbial activity, and sediment resuspension have little effect on the P immobilization capability of WTRs in lake sediments.

  10. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. Results A bacterial laccase (WlacD) was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ) anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG) 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR) 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu2+- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l) with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h) and 97.1% (18 h), as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l) by 80.5% (3 h) and 89.0% (18 h), was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l). No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved via a subsequent 4-h

  11. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  12. Cell immobilization technique for the enhanced production of alpha-galactosidase by Streptomyces griseoloalbus.

    PubMed

    Anisha, G S; Prema, P

    2008-06-01

    Streptomyces griseoloalbus was immobilized in calcium alginate gel and the optimal immobilization parameters (concentrations of sodium alginate and calcium chloride, initial biomass and curing time) for the enhanced production of alpha-galactosidase were determined. The immobilization was most effective with 3% sodium alginate and 0.1M calcium chloride. The optimal initial biomass for immobilization was approximately 2.2g (wet wt.). The alginate-entrapped cells were advantageous because there was a twofold increase in the enzyme yield (55 U/ml) compared to the highest yield obtained with free cells (23.6 U/ml). Moreover, with immobilized cells the maximum yield was reached after 72 h of incubation in batch fermentation under optimal conditions, whereas in the case of free cells the maximum enzyme yield was obtained only after 96 h of incubation. The alginate beads had good stability and also retained 75% ability of enzyme production even after eight cycles of repeated batch fermentation. It is significant that this is the first report on whole-cell immobilization for alpha-galactosidase production.

  13. Stimulation of Carotenogenesis by Microbial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciegler, A.; Pazola, Z.; Hall, H. H.

    1964-01-01

    Spent mycelia of Blakeslea trispora recovered from a previous fermentation enhanced carotene production by mated cultures of the same organism. Peak yields of 107 to 142 mg of carotene per 100 ml of medium were achieved in 6 days. β-Carotene constituted 92% of the total carotenoids produced. The enhancing substance was found present in an aqueous extract of the mycelium. Part of its activity was due to an organic acid fraction. Other microbial cells, molds, yeasts, and bacteria were also capable of enhancing carotene production. PMID:14131364

  14. [Study on immobilized cells for producing alpha-amylase by using polyving alcohol as the carrier(II): The effect of fermentating conditions on the ability producing alpha-amylase of the cells immobilized with polyving alcohol as the corrier and continuous fermentation of the immobilized cells in CSTR].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Wang, J; Li, Z

    1998-03-01

    The effects of fermentating conditions on the ability of immobilized cells with PVA as carrier for producing alpha-amylase were studied. The continuous fermentation with the immobilized cells were tested in continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The results showed that the adaptability of the immobilized Bacillus substilis to pH increased after immobilization. In CSTR, the immobilized cells can be fermentated continuously for 360 hrs and the activity of alpha-amylase can be kept on the level of about 170 u/ml.

  15. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  16. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-02-06

    This project represented a joint effort between Florida State University (FSU), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Illinois (U of I). FSU served as the lead institution and Dr. J.E. Kostka was responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliverables. This project was designed to elucidate the microbial ecology and geochemistry of metal reduction in subsurface environments at the U.S. DOE-NABIR Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORFRC). Our objectives were to: 1) characterize the dominant iron minerals and related geochemical parameters likely to limit U(VI) speciation, 2) directly quantify reaction rates and pathways of microbial respiration (terminal-electron-accepting) processes which control subsurface sediment chemistry, and 3) identify and enumerate the organisms mediating U(VI) transformation. A total of 31 publications and 47 seminars or meeting presentations were completed under this project. One M.S. thesis (by Nadia North) and a Ph.D. dissertation (by Lainie Petrie-Edwards) were completed at FSU during fall of 2003 and spring of 2005, respectively. Ph.D. students, Denise Akob and Thomas Gihring have continued the student involvement in this research since fall of 2004. All of the above FSU graduate students were heavily involved in the research, as evidenced by their regular attendance at PI meetings and ORFRC workshops.

  17. Continuous ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. II. Use of immobilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-07-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 cells were immobilized in Na alginate beads and used in a packed-bed bioreactor system for the continuous production of ethanol from the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers. Volumetric ethanol productivities of 104 and 80 g ethanol/L/h were obtained at 80 and 92% sugar utilization, respectively. The maximum volumetric ethanol productivity of the immobilized cell bioreactor system was found to be 15 times higher than that of an ordinary continuous-stirred-tank (CST) bioreactor using free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus. The immobilized cell bioreactor system was operated continuously at a constant dilution rate of 0.66/h for 12 days resulting in only an 8% loss of the original immobilized cell activity, which corresponds to an estimated half-life of ca. 72 days. The maximum specific ethanol productivity and maximum specific sugar uptake rate of the immobilized cells were found to be 0.55 g ethanol/g biomass/h and 1.21 g sugars/g biomass/h, respectively. (Refs. 27).

  18. Investigation of the Potential for 90Sr Immobilization in INTEC Perched Water via Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Karen E. Wright; William A. Smith

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the applicability of a biogeochemical sequestration approach for remediation of 90Sr contamination in perched water zones underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The approach is based on the accelerated co-precipitation of the contaminant in calcite, where the acceleration is catalyzed by the microbial urea hydrolysis. We have previously demonstrated the potential for this remediation mechanism to immobilize strontium. Urea hydrolysis promotes calcite precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing groundwater pH and alkalinity. Ureolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many environmental microorganisms. In the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which is saturated with respect to calcite, any co-precipitated 90Sr should be effectively sequestered over the long-term, even after return to pre-manipulation conditions. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the NH4+ ions produced by the reaction can exchange with cations sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture via a more stable mechanism (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  19. Wiring microbial biofilms to the electrode by osmium redox polymer for the performance enhancement of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Shin, Hyosul; Kang, Chan; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-04-01

    An osmium redox polymer, PAA-PVI-[Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2Cl]+/2+ that has been used in enzymatic fuel cells and microbial sensors, was applied for the first time to the anode of single-chamber microbial fuel cells with the mixed culture inoculum aiming at enhancing performance. Functioning as a molecular wire connecting the biofilm to the anode, power density increased from 1479 mW m(-2) without modification to 2355 mW m(-2) after modification of the anode. Evidence from cyclic voltammetry showed that the catalytic activity of an anodic biofilm was greatly enhanced in the presence of an osmium redox polymer, indicating that electrons were more efficiently transferred to the anode via co-immobilized osmium complex tethered to wiring polymer chains at the potential range of -0.3 V-+0.1 V (vs. SCE). The optimum amount of the redox polymer was determined to be 0.163 mg cm(-2).

  20. Wiring microbial biofilms to the electrode by osmium redox polymer for the performance enhancement of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Shin, Hyosul; Kang, Chan; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-04-01

    An osmium redox polymer, PAA-PVI-[Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2Cl]+/2+ that has been used in enzymatic fuel cells and microbial sensors, was applied for the first time to the anode of single-chamber microbial fuel cells with the mixed culture inoculum aiming at enhancing performance. Functioning as a molecular wire connecting the biofilm to the anode, power density increased from 1479 mW m(-2) without modification to 2355 mW m(-2) after modification of the anode. Evidence from cyclic voltammetry showed that the catalytic activity of an anodic biofilm was greatly enhanced in the presence of an osmium redox polymer, indicating that electrons were more efficiently transferred to the anode via co-immobilized osmium complex tethered to wiring polymer chains at the potential range of -0.3 V-+0.1 V (vs. SCE). The optimum amount of the redox polymer was determined to be 0.163 mg cm(-2). PMID:26599210

  1. Biodegradation of pesticide profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-09-01

    Profenofos is an organophosphate pesticide used extensively in agriculture to control pests. A bacterium capable of degrading profenofos was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil samples and identified as Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM based on its morphological and biochemical characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. 4-Bromo-2-chlorophenol was identified as a metabolite of profenofos degradation by HPLC and GC-MS analysis. The organism degraded profenofos by hydrolysis to yield 4-bromo-2-chlorophenol which was further utilized as carbon source for growth. The organism utilized various organophosphate pesticides such as temephos, quinalphos, and chloropyrifos as carbon sources. The optimum conditions for degradation of profenofos by P. suwonensis strain HMN were found to be at pH 7 and 30 °C. We have investigated the rate of degradation of profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM in various matrices such as sodium alginate (SA), sodium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (SA-PVA), and SA-bentonite clay. The rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos by the freely suspended cells were compared with that by immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells showed higher rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos then freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in SA and SA-PVA. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM could be reused for more than 32 cycles without losing their degradation capacity. Thus, the immobilized cells are more efficient than freely suspended cells for the degradation of organophosphate pesticide contaminated water.

  2. Biodegradation of pesticide profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-09-01

    Profenofos is an organophosphate pesticide used extensively in agriculture to control pests. A bacterium capable of degrading profenofos was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil samples and identified as Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM based on its morphological and biochemical characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. 4-Bromo-2-chlorophenol was identified as a metabolite of profenofos degradation by HPLC and GC-MS analysis. The organism degraded profenofos by hydrolysis to yield 4-bromo-2-chlorophenol which was further utilized as carbon source for growth. The organism utilized various organophosphate pesticides such as temephos, quinalphos, and chloropyrifos as carbon sources. The optimum conditions for degradation of profenofos by P. suwonensis strain HMN were found to be at pH 7 and 30 °C. We have investigated the rate of degradation of profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM in various matrices such as sodium alginate (SA), sodium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (SA-PVA), and SA-bentonite clay. The rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos by the freely suspended cells were compared with that by immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells showed higher rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos then freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in SA and SA-PVA. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM could be reused for more than 32 cycles without losing their degradation capacity. Thus, the immobilized cells are more efficient than freely suspended cells for the degradation of organophosphate pesticide contaminated water. PMID:25832924

  3. A thermophilic microbial fuel cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, Sarah M.; Vuoriranta, Pertti; Tuovinen, Olli H.

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are reactors able to generate electricity by capturing electrons from the anaerobic respiratory processes of microorganisms. While the majority of MFCs have been tested at ambient or mesophilic temperatures, thermophilic systems warrant evaluation because of the potential for increased microbial activity rates on the anode. MFC studies at elevated temperatures have been scattered, using designs that are already established, specifically air-cathode single chambers and two-chamber designs. This study was prompted by our previous attempts that showed an increased amount of evaporation in thermophilic MFCs, adding unnecessary technical difficulties and causing excessive maintenance. In this paper, we describe a thermophilic MFC design that prevents evaporation. The design was tested at 57 °C with an anaerobic, thermophilic consortium that respired with glucose to generate a power density of 375 mW m -2 after 590 h. Polarization and voltage data showed that the design works in the batch mode but the design allows for adoption to continuous operation.

  4. Hydrophilic PCU scaffolds prepared by grafting PEGMA and immobilizing gelatin to enhance cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changcan; Yuan, Wenjie; Khan, Musammir; Li, Qian; Feng, Yakai; Yao, Fanglian; Zhang, Wencheng

    2015-05-01

    Gelatin contains many functional motifs which can modulate cell specific adhesion, so we modified polycarbonate urethane (PCU) scaffold surface by immobilization of gelatin. PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by direct immobilizing gelatins onto the surface of aminated PCU scaffolds. To increase the immobilization amount of gelatin, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted onto PCU scaffolds by surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Then, following amination and immobilization, PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were obtained. Both modified scaffolds were characterized by chemical and biological methods. After immobilization of gelatin, the microfiber surface became rough, but the original morphology of scaffolds was maintained successfully. PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were more hydrophilic than PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds. Because hydrophilic PEGMA and gelatin were grafted and immobilized onto the surface, the PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds showed low platelet adhesion, perfect anti-hemolytic activity and excellent cell growth and proliferation capacity. It could be envisioned that PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds might have potential applications in tissue engineering artificial scaffolds.

  5. Practical reactor systems for yeast cell immobilization using biomass support particles

    SciTech Connect

    Black, G.M.; Webb, C.; Mattews, T.M.; Atkinson, B.

    1984-01-01

    The technique of cell immobilization using porous support particles (biomass support particles) has been successfully applied to yeast cells. Two reactor configurations exploiting the use of these particles have been developed and assessed for use in aseptic yeast fermentations. A liquid-fluidized bed fermenter has been devised for use with particles denser than the fermentation liquor whilst a gas-stirred circulating bed fermenter proved suitable for particles of essentially neutral buoyancy. Both systems have been operated successfully for extended periods of continuous operation. The utilization of biomass support particle technology in such reactors provides a practical and robust system for immobilized cell reactors. This technology offers significant opportunities for further development.

  6. Combining microbial cultures for efficient production of electricity from butyrate in a microbial electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Joseph F; Garcia-Peña, Ines; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-10-01

    Butyrate is an important product of anaerobic fermentation; however, it is not directly used by characterized strains of the highly efficient anode respiring bacteria (ARB) Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrochemical cells. By combining a butyrate-oxidizing community with a Geobacter rich culture, we generated a microbial community which outperformed many naturally derived communities found in the literature for current production from butyrate and rivaled the highest performing natural cultures in terms of current density (∼ 11A/m(2)) and Coulombic efficiency (∼ 70%). Microbial community analyses support the shift in the microbial community from one lacking efficient ARB in the marine hydrothermal vent community to a community consisting of ∼ 80% Geobacter in the anode biofilm. This demonstrates the successful production and adaptation of a novel microbial culture for generating electrical current from butyrate with high current density and high Coulombic efficiency, by combining two mixed microbial cultures containing complementing biochemical pathways.

  7. Sensitive determination of L-lysine with a new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Akyilmaz, Erol; Erdoğan, Ali; Oztürk, Ramazan; Yaşa, Ihsan

    2007-01-15

    A new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL-12632 cells, which had been induced for lysine oxidase enzyme and immobilized in gelatin by a cross-linking agent was developed for the sensitive determination of L-lysine amino acid. To construct the microbial biosensor S. cerevisiae cells were activated and cultured in a suitable culture medium. By using gelatine (8.43 mg cm(-2)) and glutaraldehyde (0.25%), cells obtained in the logarithmic phase of the growth curve at the end of a 14 h period were immobilized and fixed on a pretreated oxygen sensitive Teflon membrane of a dissolved oxygen probe. The assay procedure of the microbial biosensor is based on the determination of the differences of the respiration activity of the cells on the oxygenmeter in the absence and the presence of L-lysine. According to the end point measurement technique used in the experiments it was determined that the microbial biosensor response depended linearly on L-lysine concentrations between 1.0 and 10.0 microM with a 1 min response time. In optimization studies of the microbial biosensor, the most suitable microorganism quantities were found to be 0.97x10(5)CFU cm(-2). In addition phosphate buffer (pH 7.5; 50 mM) and 30 degrees C were obtained as the optimum working conditions. In characterization studies of the microbial biosensor some parameters such as substrate specificity, interference effects of some substances on the microbial biosensor responses, reproducibility of the biosensor and operational and storage stability were investigated.

  8. Micromachined microbial and photosynthetic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Mu; Lam, Kien B.; Lin, Liwei

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents two types of fuel cells: a miniature microbial fuel cell (µMFC) and a miniature photosynthetic electrochemical cell (µPEC). A bulk micromachining process is used to fabricate the fuel cells, and the prototype has an active proton exchange membrane area of 1 cm2. Two different micro-organisms are used as biocatalysts in the anode: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) is used to catalyze glucose and (2) Phylum Cyanophyta (blue-green algae) is used to produce electrons by a photosynthetic reaction under light. In the dark, the µPEC continues to generate power using the glucose produced under light. In the cathode, potassium ferricyanide is used to accept electrons and electric power is produced by the overall redox reactions. The bio-electrical responses of µMFCs and µPECs are characterized with the open-circuit potential measured at an average value of 300-500 mV. Under a 10 ohm load, the power density is measured as 2.3 nW cm-2 and 0.04 nW cm-2 for µMFCs and µPECs, respectively.

  9. Biosensoric potential of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás; Rákhely, Gábor; Czeller, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Recent progress in microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has highlighted the potential of these devices to be used as biosensors. The advantages of MFC-based biosensors are that they are phenotypic and can function in either assay- or flow-through formats. These features make them appropriate for contiguous on-line monitoring in laboratories and for in-field applications. The selectivity of an MFC biosensor depends on the applied microorganisms in the anodic compartment where electron transfer (ET) between the artificial surface (anode) and bacterium occurs. This process strongly determines the internal resistance of the sensoric system and thus influences signal outcome and response time. Despite their beneficial characteristics, the number of MFC-based biosensoric applications has been limited until now. The aim of this mini-review is to turn attention to the biosensoric potential of MFCs by summarizing ET mechanisms on which recently established and future sensoric devices are based.

  10. Microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells for the production of bioelectricity and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Tao; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2013-01-01

    Today's global energy crisis requires a multifaceted solution. Bioenergy is an important part of the solution. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology stands out as an attractive potential technology in bioenergy. MFCs can convert energy stored in organic matter directly into bioelectricity. MFCs can also be operated in the electrolysis mode as microbial electrolysis cells to produce bioproducts such as hydrogen and ethanol. Various wastewaters containing low-grade organic carbons that are otherwise unutilized can be used as feed streams for MFCs. Despite major advances in the past decade, further improvements in MFC power output and cost reduction are needed for MFCs to be practical. This paper analysed MFC operating principles using bioenergetics and bioelectrochemistry. Several major issues were explored to improve the MFC performance. An emphasis was placed on the use of catalytic materials for MFC electrodes. Recent advances in the production of various biomaterials using MFCs were also investigated.

  11. Live cell imaging compatible immobilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in microfluidic platform for biodiesel research.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Woo; Na, Sang Cheol; Nguyen, Thanh Qua; Paik, Sang-Min; Kang, Myeongwoo; Hong, Daewha; Choi, Insung S; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel surface immobilization method for live-cell imaging of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for continuous monitoring of lipid droplet accumulation. Microfluidics allows high-throughput manipulation and analysis of single cells in precisely controlled microenvironment. Fluorescence imaging based quantitative measurement of lipid droplet accumulation in microalgae had been difficult due to their intrinsic motile behavior. We present a simple surface immobilization method using gelatin coating as the "biological glue." We take advantage of hydroxyproline (Hyp)-based non-covalent interaction between gelatin and the outer cell wall of microalgae to anchor the cells inside the microfluidic device. We have continuously monitored single microalgal cells for up to 6 days. The immobilized microalgae remain viable (viability was comparable to bulk suspension cultured controls). When exposed to wall shear stress, most of the cells remain attached up to 0.1 dyne/cm(2) . Surface immobilization allowed high-resolution, live-cell imaging of mitotic process in real time-which followed previously reported stages in mitosis of suspension cultured cells. Use of gelatin coated microfluidics devices can result in better methods for microalgae strain screening and culture condition optimization that will help microalgal biodiesel become more economically viable. PMID:25220860

  12. On chip single-cell separation and immobilization using optical tweezers and thermosensitive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Arai, Fumihito; Ng, Chinaik; Maruyama, Hisataka; Ichikawa, Akihiko; El-Shimy, Haitham; Fukuda, Toshio

    2005-12-01

    A novel approach appropriate for rapid separation and immobilization of a single cell by concomitantly utilizing laser manipulation and locally thermosensitive hydrogelation is proposed in this paper. We employed a single laser beam as optical tweezers for separating a target cell and locating it adjacent to a fabricated, transparent micro heater. Simultaneously, the target cell is immobilized or partially entrapped by heating the thermosensitive hydrogel with the micro heater. The state of the thermosensitive hydrogel can be switched from sol to gel and gel to sol by controlling the temperature through heating and cooling by the micro heater. After other unwanted cells are removed by the high-speed cleaning flow in the microchannel, the entrapped cell is successfully isolated. It is possible to collect the immobilized target cell for analysis or culture by switching off the micro heater and releasing the cell from the entrapment. We demonstrated that the proposed approach is feasible for rapid manipulation, immobilization, cleaning, isolation and extraction of a single cell. The experimental results are shown here. PMID:16286972

  13. Immobilization of bioluminescent Escherichia coli cells using natural and artificial fibers treated with polyethyleneimine.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Hsu, Chia-Hua; Soma, Pavan K; Lo, Y Martin

    2009-07-01

    Biosensors based on whole-cell bioluminescence have the potential to become a cost-effective alternative to conventional detection methods upon validation of target selectivity and sensitivity. However, quantitative analysis of bioluminescence is greatly hindered due to lack of control over the total number of cells in a suspending culture. In this study, the effect of surface properties of genetically engineered luminous E. coli cells and fibrous matrices on the immobilization capacity and effectiveness under various environmental conditions were characterized. Four different fibers, including cotton, polyester, viscose rayon, and silk, were investigated. Although cell adhesion was observed on untreated viscose and cotton fibers, viscose fiber pretreated with 0.667% polyethyleneimine (PEI) was found capable of immobilizing the most viable E. coli DPD2234 cells, followed by viscose treated with 0.33% and 1% PEI. The cells immobilized on PEI-treated viscose remained viable and yielded 20% or more bioluminescence signals immediately upon contact with the inducer up to 72 h without feeding nutrients to the cells, suggesting that viscose treated with 0.667% PEI could provide a stable immobilization mechanism for bioluminescent E. coli cells with long sensing period, quick response time, and good signal reproducibility.

  14. Biological denitrification in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Clauwaert, Peter; Rabaey, Korneel; Aelterman, Peter; de Schamphelaire, Liesje; Pham, The Hai; Boeckx, Pascal; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2007-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that remove carbon as well as nitrogen compounds out of wastewater are of special interest for practice. We developed a MFC in which microorganisms in the cathode performed a complete denitrification by using electrons supplied by microorganisms oxidizing acetate in the anode. The MFC with a cation exchange membrane was designed as a tubular reactor with an internal cathode and was able to remove up to 0.146 kg NO(3-)-N m(-3) net cathodic compartment (NCC) d(-1) (0.080 kg NO(3-)-N m(-3) total cathodic compartment d(-1) (TCC)) at a current of 58 A m(-3) NCC (32 A m(-3) TCC) and a cell voltage of 0.075 V. The highest power output in the denitrification system was 8 W m(-3) NCC (4 W m(-3) TCC) with a cell voltage of 0.214 V and a current of 35 A m(-3) NCC. The denitrification rate and the power production was limited bythe cathodic microorganisms, which only denitrified significantly at a cathodic electrode potential below 0 V versus standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). This is, to our knowledge, the first study in which a MFC has both a biological anode and cathode performing simultaneous removal of an organic substrate, power production, and complete denitrification without relying on H2-formation or external added power.

  15. Microbial fuel cells and microbial ecology: applications in ruminant health and production research.

    PubMed

    Bretschger, Orianna; Osterstock, Jason B; Pinchak, William E; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Nelson, Karen E

    2010-04-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems employ the catalytic activity of microbes to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic, and in some cases inorganic, substrates. MFC systems have been primarily explored for their use in bioremediation and bioenergy applications; however, these systems also offer a unique strategy for the cultivation of synergistic microbial communities. It has been hypothesized that the mechanism(s) of microbial electron transfer that enable electricity production in MFCs may be a cooperative strategy within mixed microbial consortia that is associated with, or is an alternative to, interspecies hydrogen (H(2)) transfer. Microbial fermentation processes and methanogenesis in ruminant animals are highly dependent on the consumption and production of H(2)in the rumen. Given the crucial role that H(2) plays in ruminant digestion, it is desirable to understand the microbial relationships that control H(2) partial pressures within the rumen; MFCs may serve as unique tools for studying this complex ecological system. Further, MFC systems offer a novel approach to studying biofilms that form under different redox conditions and may be applied to achieve a greater understanding of how microbial biofilms impact animal health. Here, we present a brief summary of the efforts made towards understanding rumen microbial ecology, microbial biofilms related to animal health, and how MFCs may be further applied in ruminant research.

  16. Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Ecology: Applications in Ruminant Health and Production Research

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Jason B.; Pinchak, William E.; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Nelson, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems employ the catalytic activity of microbes to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic, and in some cases inorganic, substrates. MFC systems have been primarily explored for their use in bioremediation and bioenergy applications; however, these systems also offer a unique strategy for the cultivation of synergistic microbial communities. It has been hypothesized that the mechanism(s) of microbial electron transfer that enable electricity production in MFCs may be a cooperative strategy within mixed microbial consortia that is associated with, or is an alternative to, interspecies hydrogen (H2) transfer. Microbial fermentation processes and methanogenesis in ruminant animals are highly dependent on the consumption and production of H2in the rumen. Given the crucial role that H2 plays in ruminant digestion, it is desirable to understand the microbial relationships that control H2 partial pressures within the rumen; MFCs may serve as unique tools for studying this complex ecological system. Further, MFC systems offer a novel approach to studying biofilms that form under different redox conditions and may be applied to achieve a greater understanding of how microbial biofilms impact animal health. Here, we present a brief summary of the efforts made towards understanding rumen microbial ecology, microbial biofilms related to animal health, and how MFCs may be further applied in ruminant research. PMID:20024685

  17. [Comparison of fibroblastic cell compatibility of type I collagen-immobilized titanium between electrodeposition and immersion].

    PubMed

    Kyuragi, Takeru

    2014-03-01

    Titanium is widely used for medical implants. While many techniques for surface modification have been studied for optimizing its biocompatibility with hard tissues, little work has been undertaken to explore ways of maximizing its biocompatibility with soft tissues. We investigated cell attachment to titanium surfaces modified with bovine Type I collagen immobilized by either electrodeposition or a conventional immersion technique. The apparent thickness and durability of the immobilized collagen layer were evaluated prior to incubation of the collagen-immobilized titanium surfaces with NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The initial cell attachment and expression of actin and vinculin were evaluated. We determined that the immobilized collagen layer was much thicker and more durable when placed using the electrodeposition technique than the immersion technique. Both protocols produced materials that promoted better cell attachment, growth and structural protein expression than titanium alone. However, electrodeposition was ultimately superior to immersion because it is quicker to perform and produces a more durable collagen coating. We conclude that electrodeposition is an effective technique for immobilizing type I collagen on titanium surfaces, thus improving their cytocompatibility with fibroblasts.

  18. Enzymatic production of atranorin: a component of the oak moss absolute by immobilized lichen cells.

    PubMed

    Vicente, C; Fontaniella, B; Millanes, A M; Sebastián, B; Legaz, M E

    2003-04-01

    Cells of the lichen, Evernia prunastri, immobilized in calcium alginate were able to produce the depside atranorin from acetate. The synthesis of the depside was enhanced by molecular oxygen and NADH. This enhancement suggested the participation of an oxidase and an alcohol dehydrogenase to produce an aldehyde-substituted phenolic acid, hematommic acid, as the most probable precursor of atranorin. The participation of both enzymes was confirmed by loading immobilized cells with sodium azide, an inhibitor of several metallo-oxidases, and pyrazole, an inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase, which impeded atranorin production and accumulated beta-methyl orsellinate (after azide loading) or its alcohol derivative (after pirazole treatment). PMID:18494879

  19. Continuous separation of cells of high osteoblastic differentiation potential from mesenchymal stem cells on an antibody-immobilized column.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Atsushi; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2010-05-01

    Here, we report that two distinctive cell populations with osteoblastic differentiation ability were found in adherent cell populations from bone marrow. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were conventionally isolated by using adherent property of bone marrow cells onto a plastic culture dish. MSCs enriched on the basis of their adherent property were considered phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous. We developed a ligand-immobilized surface for separating subpopulation of adherent cells derived from bone marrow by the cell rolling process. We successfully isolate two cell populations with high differentiation ability for osteoblasts in adherent bone marrow cells by using the anti-CD34 antibody-immobilized column. The antibody was covalently conjugated with polyacrylic acid and introduced onto the inner surface of a silicone tube. When cell suspension of MSCs was injected into the antibody-immobilized column, different cell populations were isolated. After the cultivation of isolated cells in the osteoblastic differentiation medium for 1 week, few sub-populations were strongly induced to form osteoblastic cells. This study revealed that the ligand-immobilized surface can be used to continually separate cell populations under a labeling-free condition. PMID:20185169

  20. Development of bioreactors for the culture of surface immobilized plant cells.

    PubMed

    Archambault, J; Volesky, B; Kurz, W G

    1990-03-25

    The scaleup of the technique of plant cell surface immobilization was performed successfully in specifically designed laboratory size bioreactors. The immobilizing matrix was formed into a vertically wound spiral providing for a high immobilizing area-to-volume ratio (0.8-1.2 cm(-1)). A modified airlift and a mechanically stirred vessel delivered a best bioreactor performance characterized by low biomass frothing and highly efficient plant cell attachment and retention (>or=96%). The growth of Catharanthus roseus cells investigated in these bioreactors was found not to be mass transfer limited. It required mild mixing and aeration levels (k(L)a approximately 10-15 h(-1)). The biomass formation pattern of surface immobilized plant cells generally exhibited a linear growth phase followed by a stationary phase characterized by the presence of residual carbohydrates in the medium, contrary to suspension cultures. This behavior was found to depend on the plant cell type and/or line cultured, as well as on the inoculum age. The space restriction and unidirectional growth of the SIPC biofilm combined with the limited availability of essential intracellular nutrients rapidly accumulated from the medium by the stationary phase inoculated plant cells all likely contributed to the culture behavior.

  1. Ethanol production from nonsterilized carob pod extract by free and immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells using fed-batch culture

    SciTech Connect

    Roukas, T. . Dept. of Food Science and Technology)

    1994-02-05

    The production of ethanol from carob pod extract by free and immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in batch and fed-batch culture was investigated. Fed-batch culture proved to be a better fermentation system for the production of ethanol than batch culture. In fed-batch culture, both free and immobilized S. cerevisiae cells gave the same maximum concentration of final ethanol at an initial sugar concentration of 300 g/L and F = 167 mL/h. The maximum ethanol productivity was obtained with both free and immobilized cells at a substrate concentration of 300 g/L and F = 334 mL/h. In repeated fed-batch culture, immobilized S. cerevisiae cells gave a higher overall ethanol concentration compared with the free cells. The immobilized S. cerevisiae cells in Ca-alginate beads retained their ability to produce ethanol for 10 days.

  2. Microalgal immobilization methods.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    In this review, methods for the most common microalgal immobilization procedures are gathered and described. Passive (due to natural adherence of cells to surfaces) and active immobilization methods should be distinguished. Among active immobilization methods, calcium alginate entrapment is the most widely used method if living cells are intended to be immobilized, due to the chemical, optical, and mechanical characteristics of this substance. Immobilization in synthetic foams, immobilization in agar and carrageenan as well as immobilization in silica-based matrix or filters are also discussed and described. Finally, some considerations on the use of flocculation for microalgae are mentioned.

  3. Evaluation of the stability of arsenic immobilized by microbial sulfate reduction using TCLP extractions and long-term leaching techniques.

    PubMed

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2005-07-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the stability or leachability of arsenic immobilized by microbial sulfate reduction. Anoxic solid-phase samples taken from a bioreactor previously used to treat metal and As contaminated water using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) were subjected to the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and long-term column leaching tests. The results from TCLP experiments showed that the concentration of As leached from solid-phase sulfide material (SSM) samples after an 18 h extraction time was <300 microgl(-1), which is below the current maximum Australian TCLP leachate value for As, and thus would not be characterized as a hazardous waste. In terms of percent total As leached, this was equivalent to <8.5% for SSM samples initially containing 61.3 mgkg(-1) As. The levels of As extracted by the TCLP was found to be significantly lowered or underestimated in the presence of dissolved oxygen, with As concentrations increasing with decreasing headspace-to-leachant volume ratios. The concentration of As was also consistently higher in nitrogen purged extractions compared to those performed in air. This was attributed to the dissolution of Fe-sulfide precipitates and subsequent oxidation of Fe(II) ions and precipitation of ferric(hydr)oxides, resulting in the adsorption of soluble As and corresponding decrease in As concentrations. According to the experimental data, it is recommended that TCLP tests for As leachability should be performed at least in zero-headspace vessels or preferably under nitrogen to minimize the oxidation of Fe(II) to ferric(hydr)oxides. In long-term leaching studies (approximately 68 days), it was found that the low solubility of the SSM ensured that rate of release of As was relatively slow, and the resulting leachate concentrations of As were below the current Australian guideline concentration for arsenic in drinking water.

  4. Cells immobilized on patterns printed in DNA by an inkjet printer.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kengo; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-05-01

    The ability to two-dimensionally align various kinds of cells freely onto substrate would be a useful tool for analysis of cell-cell interactions. In this study, we aimed to establish a method for attaching cells to the substrate, in which the pattern is drawn by an inkjet printer. Poly-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was immobilized onto the cell surface by use of DNA-conjugated poly(ethylene) glycol-phospholipid (DNA-PEG-lipid), which is the amphiphilic conjugate of PEG-lipid and single-stranded DNA. The surface of the substrate was then modified with the complementary DNA using an inkjet printer. Finally, DNA-immobilized cells were attached onto the substrate through DNA hybridization. The use of the inkjet printer enabled us to draw the DNA pattern accurately on the substrate with a resolution of a few hundred micrometers. DNA-immobilized cells could be attached precisely along the DNA pattern on the substrate. In addition, various kinds of cells could be attached simultaneously by using various sequences of DNA. Our technique is promising for analysis of cell-cell interactions and differentiation induction in stem cell research.

  5. Combining microbial cultures for efficient production of electricity from butyrate in a microbial electrochemical cell

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Joseph F.; Garcia-Peña, Ines; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I.; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Butyrate is an important product of anaerobic fermentation; however, it is not directly used by characterized strains of the highly efficient anode respiring bacteria (ARB) Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrochemical cells. By combining a butyrate-oxidizing community with a Geobacter rich culture, we generated a microbial community which outperformed many naturally derived communities found in the literature for current production from butyrate and rivaled the highest performing natural cultures in terms of current density (~11 A/m2) and Coulombic efficiency (~70%). Microbial community analyses support the shift in the microbial community from one lacking efficient ARB in the marine hydrothermal vent community to a community consisting of ~80% Geobacter in the anode biofilm. This demonstrates the successful production and adaptation of a novel microbial culture for generating electrical current from butyrate with high current density and high Coulombic efficiency, by combining two mixed micro bial cultures containing complementing biochemical pathways. PMID:25048958

  6. Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

    2014-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

  7. Over-pressurized bioreactors: application to microbial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marlene; Belo, Isabel; Mota, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In industrial biotechnology, microbial cultures are exposed to different local pressures inside bioreactors. Depending on the microbial species and strains, the increased pressure may have detrimental or beneficial effects on cellular growth and product formation. In this review, the effects of increased air pressure on various microbial cultures growing in bioreactors under moderate total pressure conditions (maximum, 15 bar) will be discussed. Recent data illustrating the diversity of increased air pressure effects at different levels in microbial cells cultivation will be presented, with particular attention to the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on cellular growth and product formation, and the concomitant effect of oxygen pressure on antioxidant cellular defense mechanisms.

  8. Polygalacturonase production by calcium alginate immobilized Enterobacter aerogenes NBO2 cells.

    PubMed

    Darah, I; Nisha, M; Lim, Sheh-Hong

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial cells of Enterobacter aerogenes NBO2 were entrapped in calcium alginate beads in order to enhance polygalacturonase production compared to free cells. The optimized condition of 5 % (w/v) sodium alginate concentration, agitation speed of 250 rpm, and 15 beads of calcium alginate with inoculum size of 4 % (v/v; 5.4 × 10(7) cells/ml) produced 23.48 U/mL of polygalacturonase compared to free cells of 18.54 U/ml. There was about 26.6 % increment in polygalaturonase production. However, in this study, there was 296.6 % of increment in polygalacturonase production after improvement parameters compared to before improvement parameters of calcium alginate bead immobilization cells (5.92 U/ml). This research has indicated that optimized physical parameters of calcium alginate bead immobilization cells have significantly enhanced the production of polygalacturonase.

  9. Immobilization of Erwinia sp. D12 Cells in Alginate-Gelatin Matrix and Conversion of Sucrose into Isomaltulose Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguti, Haroldo Yukio; Carvalho, Priscila Hoffmann; Figueira, Joelise Alencar; Sato, Hélia Harumi

    2011-01-01

    Isomaltulose is a noncariogenic reducing disaccharide and also a structural isomer of sucrose and is used by the food industry as a sucrose replacement. It is obtained through enzymatic conversion of microbial sucrose isomerase. An Erwinia sp. D12 strain is capable of converting sucrose into isomaltulose. The experimental design technique was used to study the influence of immobilization parameters on converting sucrose into isomaltulose in a batch process using shaken Erlenmeyer flasks. We assessed the effect of gelatin and transglutaminase addition on increasing the reticulation of granules of Erwinia sp. D12 cells immobilized in alginate. Independent parameters, sodium alginate concentration, cell mass concentration, CaCl2 concentration, gelatin concentration, and transglutaminase concentration had all a significant effect (P < 0.05) on isomaltulose production. Erwinia sp. D12 cells immobilized in 3.0% (w/v) sodium alginate, 47.0% (w/v) cell mass, 0.3 molL−1 CaCl2, 1.7% (w/v) gelatin and 0.15% (w/v) transglutaminase presented sucrose conversion into isomaltulose, of around 50–60% in seven consecutive batches. PMID:21785708

  10. Immobilization of Cell-Adhesive Laminin Peptides in Degradable PEGDA Hydrogels Influences Endothelial Cell Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Saniya; Saik, Jennifer E.; Gould, Dan J.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Attachment, spreading, and organization of endothelial cells into tubule networks are mediated by interactions between cells in the extracellular microenvironment. Laminins are key extracellular matrix components and regulators of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. In this study, laminin-derived peptides were conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monoacrylate and covalently incorporated into degradable PEG diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels to investigate the influence of these peptides on endothelial cellular adhesion and function in organizing into tubule networks. Degradable PEGDA hydrogels were synthesized by incorporating a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)–sensitive peptide, GGGPQGIWGQGK (abbreviated PQ), into the polymer backbone. The secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by endothelial cells promotes polymer degradation and consequently cell migration. We demonstrate the formation of extensive networks of tubule-like structures by encapsulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in hydrogels with immobilized synthetic peptides. The resulting structures were stabilized by pericyte precursor cells (10T1/2s) in vitro. During tubule formation and stabilization, extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen IV and laminin were deposited. Tubules formed in the matrix of metalloproteinase sensitive hydrogels were visualized from 7 days to 4 weeks in response to different combination of peptides. Moreover, hydrogels functionalized with laminin peptides and transplanted in a mouse cornea supported the ingrowth and attachment of endothelial cells to the hydrogel during angiogenesis. Results of this study illustrate the use of laminin-derived peptides as potential candidates for modification of biomaterials to support angiogenesis. PMID:23914330

  11. Anodic and cathodic microbial communities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Franzetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Edoardo; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2015-01-25

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a rapidly growing technology for energy production from wastewater and biomasses. In a MFC, a microbial biofilm oxidizes organic matter and transfers electrons from reduced compounds to an anode as the electron acceptor by extracellular electron transfer (EET). The aim of this work was to characterize the microbial communities operating in a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell (SCMFC) fed with acetate and inoculated with a biogas digestate in order to gain more insight into anodic and cathodic EET. Taxonomic characterization of the communities was carried out by Illumina sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Microorganisms belonging to Geovibrio genus and purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria were found to be dominant in the anodic biofilm. The alkaliphilic genus Nitrincola and anaerobic microorganisms belonging to Porphyromonadaceae family were the most abundant bacteria in the cathodic biofilm.

  12. Effects of immobilized glycosaminoglycans on the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Uygun, Basak E; Stojsih, Sarah E; Matthew, Howard W T

    2009-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with potential for multilineage differentiation. They represent an attractive cell source alternative to embryonic stem cells for therapeutic applications. Optimal utilization of MSCs for tissue engineering requires improved biomaterials that can enhance their growth and direct differentiation. The biological activity of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) has been previously exploited for use in tissue engineering applications. In this study, MSC proliferation and differentiation was studied on GAG-derivatized chitosan membranes. The GAGs included heparin, heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin 4-sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid. The covalent GAG immobilization method and amount of immobilized GAG were varied. It was found that MSC growth increased as much as fivefold on GAG-immobilized surfaces compared to tissue culture plastic and chitosan-only controls. The MSC growth rates increased significantly with increasing GAG density on the culture surfaces. The MSC proliferation rates on heparin, heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin 6-sulfate exhibited nonlinear increases with the level of fibronectin binding on these surfaces. In contrast, MSC proliferation on hyaluronic acid and chondroitin 4-sulfate was found to be independent of fibronectin or vitronectin binding on the surfaces, suggesting that these GAGs influenced MSC proliferation through different mechanisms. In conclusion, the results indicate that GAG immobilization on chitosan scaffolds provides an effective means of manipulating MSC proliferation and has promising potential for directing MSC differentiation in tissue engineering applications employing chitosan. PMID:19456238

  13. Effect of immobilized cells in calcium alginate beads in alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in calcium alginate and chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads and studied in the fermentation of glucose and sucrose for ethanol production. The batch fermentations were carried out in an orbital shaker and assessed by monitoring the concentration of substrate and product with HPLC. Cell immobilization in calcium alginate beads and chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads allowed reuse of the beads in eight sequential fermentation cycles of 10 h each. The final concentration of ethanol using free cells was 40 g L-1 and the yields using glucose and sucrose as carbon sources were 78% and 74.3%, respectively. For immobilized cells in calcium alginate beads, the final ethanol concentration from glucose was 32.9 ± 1.7 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 3.4% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 33.5 ± 4.6 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 8.6% yield. For immobilized cells in chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads, the ethanol concentration from glucose was 30.7 ± 1.4 g L-1 with a 61.1 ± 2.8% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 31.8 ± 6.9 g L-1 with a 62.1 ± 12.8% yield. The immobilized cells allowed eight 10 h sequential reuse cycles to be carried out with stable final ethanol concentrations. In addition, there was no need to use antibiotics and no contamination was observed. After the eighth cycle, there was a significant rupture of the beads making them inappropriate for reuse. PMID:23721664

  14. Effect of immobilized cells in calcium alginate beads in alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Juliana C; Rodrigues, J Augusto R; Moran, Paulo J S; Valença, Gustavo P; Nunhez, José R

    2013-05-30

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in calcium alginate and chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads and studied in the fermentation of glucose and sucrose for ethanol production. The batch fermentations were carried out in an orbital shaker and assessed by monitoring the concentration of substrate and product with HPLC. Cell immobilization in calcium alginate beads and chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads allowed reuse of the beads in eight sequential fermentation cycles of 10 h each. The final concentration of ethanol using free cells was 40 g L-1 and the yields using glucose and sucrose as carbon sources were 78% and 74.3%, respectively. For immobilized cells in calcium alginate beads, the final ethanol concentration from glucose was 32.9 ± 1.7 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 3.4% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 33.5 ± 4.6 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 8.6% yield. For immobilized cells in chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads, the ethanol concentration from glucose was 30.7 ± 1.4 g L-1 with a 61.1 ± 2.8% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 31.8 ± 6.9 g L-1 with a 62.1 ± 12.8% yield. The immobilized cells allowed eight 10 h sequential reuse cycles to be carried out with stable final ethanol concentrations. In addition, there was no need to use antibiotics and no contamination was observed. After the eighth cycle, there was a significant rupture of the beads making them inappropriate for reuse.

  15. AC power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Heming; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) directly convert biodegradable substrates to electricity and carry good potential for energy-positive wastewater treatment. However, the low and direct current (DC) output from MFC is not usable for general electronics except small sensors, yet commercial DC-AC converters or inverters used in solar systems cannot be directly applied to MFCs. This study presents a new DC-AC converter system for MFCs that can generate alternating voltage in any desired frequency. Results show that AC power can be easily achieved in three different frequencies tested (1, 10, 60 Hz), and no energy storage layer such as capacitors was needed. The DC-AC converter efficiency was higher than 95% when powered by either individual MFCs or simple MFC stacks. Total harmonic distortion (THD) was used to investigate the quality of the energy, and it showed that the energy could be directly usable for linear electronic loads. This study shows that through electrical conversion MFCs can be potentially used in household electronics for decentralized off-grid communities.

  16. Microscale microbial fuel cells: Advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seokheun

    2015-07-15

    The next generation of sustainable energy could come from microorganisms; evidence that it can be seen with the given rise of Electromicrobiology, the study of microorganisms' electrical properties. Many recent advances in electromicrobiology stem from studying microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which are gaining acceptance as a future alternative "green" energy technology and energy-efficient wastewater treatment method. MFCs are powered by living microorganisms with clean and sustainable features; they efficiently catalyse the degradation of a broad range of organic substrates under natural conditions. There is also increasing interest in photosynthetic MFCs designed to harness Earth's most abundant and promising energy source (solar irradiation). Despite their vast potential and promise, however, MFCs and photosynthetic MFCs have not yet successfully translated into commercial applications because they demonstrate persistent performance limitations and bottlenecks associated with scaling up. Instead, microscale MFCs have received increasing attention as a unique platform for various applications such as powering small portable electronic elements in remote locations, performing fundamental studies of microorganisms, screening bacterial strains, and toxicity detection in water. Furthermore, the stacking of miniaturized MFCs has been demonstrated to offer larger power densities than a single macroscale MFC in terms of scaling up. In this overview, we discuss recent achievements in microscale MFCs as well as their potential applications. Further scientific and technological challenges are also reviewed.

  17. Inhibiting Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation via Immobilization of Heparin/Fibronectin Complexes on Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui Cai; Xu, Qi Fei; Yang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of heparin/fibronectin (Hep/Fn) complexes on neointimal hyperplasia following endovascular intervention. Hep/Fn complexes were immobilized onto titanium (Ti) surfaces, with subsequent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Toluidine Blue O (TBO) and immunohistochemistry methods were used to characterize surface properties. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) cultures were used to evaluate the effect of Hep/Fn complexes on SMC proliferation. Results showed that Hep/Fn complexes successfully immobilized onto Ti surfaces and resulted in an inhibition of SMC proliferation. This study suggests that Hep/Fn surface-immobilized biomaterials develop as a new generation of biomaterials to prevent neointimal hyperplasia, particularly for use in cardiovascular implants. PMID:26055566

  18. Implementation of microbial fuel cell in harvesting energy using wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, N. L.; Wahab, M. S. Abdul; Sharif, S. A. Md; Ramly, N. H.

    2016-02-01

    In this century, most of the companies use the electricity from the fossils fuels such as oil, gas and coal. This method will give negative impact to the environment and the fossils fuel will be run out. This project is to develop a microbial fuels cell that can produce electricity. There are several types of the microbial fuel cell, which are a single chamber, double chamber and continuous. In this paper, the double chamber microbial fuel cell was selected to investigate the effect of suspended sludge into the double chamber microbial fuels cell. The salt bridge will construct between both chambers of the double chamber microbial fuels cell. Carbon graphite rod is selected as an electrode at the cathode and anode to transfer the electron from the anode to the cathode. Electricity is generated from the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter by bacteria. At the end of this project, the microbial fuels cell was successful in generating electricity that can be used for a specific application.

  19. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  20. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:27459246

  1. Gibberellic acid production by free and immobilized cells in different culture systems.

    PubMed

    Durán-Páramo, Enrique; Molina-Jiménez, Héctor; Brito-Arias, Marco A; Robles-Martínez, Fabián

    2004-01-01

    Gibberellic acid production was studied in different fermentation systems. Free and immobilized cells of Gibberella fujikuroi cultures in shake-flask, stirred and fixed-bed reactors were evaluated for the production of gibberellic acid (GA3). Gibberellic acid production with free cells cultured in a stirred reactor reached 0.206 g/L and a yield of 0.078 g of GA3/g biomass.

  2. Rapid detection of microbial cell abundance in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Andrea M; Yuan, Quan; Close, Dan M; O'Dell, Kaela B; Fortney, Julian L; Wu, Jayne; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-15

    The detection and quantification of naturally occurring microbial cellular densities is an essential component of environmental systems monitoring. While there are a number of commonly utilized approaches for monitoring microbial abundance, capacitance-based biosensors represent a promising approach because of their low-cost and label-free detection of microbial cells, but are not as well characterized as more traditional methods. Here, we investigate the applicability of enhanced alternating current electrokinetics (ACEK) capacitive sensing as a new application for rapidly detecting and quantifying microbial cellular densities in cultured and environmentally sourced aquatic samples. ACEK capacitive sensor performance was evaluated using two distinct and dynamic systems - the Great Australian Bight and groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN. Results demonstrate that ACEK capacitance-based sensing can accurately determine microbial cell counts throughout cellular concentrations typically encountered in naturally occurring microbial communities (10(3)-10(6) cells/mL). A linear relationship was observed between cellular density and capacitance change correlations, allowing a simple linear curve fitting equation to be used for determining microbial abundances in unknown samples. This work provides a foundation for understanding the limits of capacitance-based sensing in natural environmental samples and supports future efforts focusing on evaluating the robustness ACEK capacitance-based within aquatic environments. PMID:27315516

  3. An efficient magnetically modified microbial cell biocomposite for carbazole biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic modification of microbial cells enables to prepare smart biocomposites in bioremediation. In this study, we constructed an efficient biocomposite by assembling Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the surface of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells. The average particle size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was about 20 nm with 45.5 emu g-1 saturation magnetization. The morphology of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells before and after Fe3O4 nanoparticle loading was verified by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Compared with free cells, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite had the same biodegradation activity but exhibited remarkable reusability. The degradation activity of the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite increased gradually during recycling processes. Additionally, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite could be easily separated and recycled by an external magnetic field due to the super-paramagnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticle coating. These results indicated that magnetically modified microbial cells provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of hazardous compounds. PMID:24330511

  4. Capture of endothelial cells under flow using immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Randall J.; Koobatian, Maxwell T.; Shahini, Aref; Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to capture endothelial cells (EC) with high specificity under fluid flow. To this end, we engineered a surface consisting of heparin bound to poly-L-lysine to permit immobilization of VEGF through the C-terminal heparin-binding domain. The immobilized growth factor retained its biological activity as shown by proliferation of EC and prolonged activation of KDR signaling. Using a microfluidic device we assessed the ability to capture EC under a range of shear stresses from low (0.5 dyne/cm2) to physiological (15 dyne/cm2). Capture was significant for all shear stresses tested. Immobilized VEGF was highly selective for EC as evidenced by significant capture of human umbilical vein and ovine pulmonary artery EC but no capture of human dermal fibroblasts, human hair follicle derived mesenchymal stem cells, or mouse fibroblasts. Further, VEGF could capture EC from mixtures with non-EC under low and high shear conditions as well as from complex fluids like whole human blood under high shear. Our findings may have far reaching implications, as they suggest that VEGF could be used to promote endothelialization of vascular grafts or neovascularization of implanted tissues by rare but continuously circulating EC. PMID:25771020

  5. Amperometric determination of nitric oxide derived from pulmonary artery endothelial cells immobilized in a microchip channel.

    PubMed

    Spence, Dana M; Torrence, Nicholas J; Kovarik, Michelle L; Martin, R Scott

    2004-11-01

    A simple method for immobilizing a confluent layer of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (bPAECs) in microchip-based channels is described. The microchips are prepared from poly(dimethylsiloxane) and have channel dimensions that approximate resistance vessels in vivo. The reversibly sealed channels were coated with fibronectin (100 microg ml(-1)) by aspiration. The bPAECs, which were introduced in the same manner, became attached to the fibronectin coating in about 2 h. The microchip could then be resealed over a micromolded carbon ink electrode (24 microm width x 6 microm height). Coating the carbon microelectrode with a 0.05% Nafion solution selectively blocked nitrite (10 microM) from being transported to the electrode surface while nitric oxide (NO, 10 microM) was amperometrically measured. Upon stimulation with adenosine triphosphate (ATP, 100 microM) the immobilized bPAECs produced and released micromolar amounts of NO. This NO production was effectively inhibited when the immobilized cells were incubated with L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a competitive inhibitor for nitric oxide synthase. Moreover, once the immobilized bPAECs were no longer able to produce NO, incubation with L-arginine allowed for further ATP-stimulated NO production.

  6. [Microbial sensors: achievements, problems, prospects].

    PubMed

    Korpan, Ia I; El'skaia, A V

    1995-12-01

    The review summarizes the literature data on the design of laboratory and commercial types of biosensors based on living cells of microorganisms. The following aspects are discussed: microbiological, biochemical and physical fundamentals of microbial sensors; operation modes and fields of application of cell-based biosensors; immobilization technique for biological recognition systems; benefits and problems in this field of biotechnology.

  7. Enrichment of microbial electrolysis cell biocathodes from sediment microbial fuel cell bioanodes.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, John M; Zaybak, Zehra; Call, Douglas F; Nam, Joo-Youn; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-08-01

    Electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes were produced by first enriching graphite fiber brush electrodes as the anodes in sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs) using two different marine sediments and then electrically inverting the anodes to function as cathodes in two-chamber bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Electron consumption occurred at set potentials of -439 mV and -539 mV (versus the potential of a standard hydrogen electrode) but not at -339 mV in minimal media lacking organic sources of energy. Results at these different potentials were consistent with separate linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) scans that indicated enhanced activity (current consumption) below only ca. -400 mV. MFC bioanodes not originally acclimated at a set potential produced electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes, but bioanodes operated at a set potential (+11 mV) did not. CO(2) was removed from cathode headspace, indicating that the electrotrophic biocathodes were autotrophic. Hydrogen gas generation, followed by loss of hydrogen gas and methane production in one sample, suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. There was abundant microbial growth in the biocathode chamber, as evidenced by an increase in turbidity and the presence of microorganisms on the cathode surface. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated prominent sequences most similar to those of Eubacterium limosum (Butyribacterium methylotrophicum), Desulfovibrio sp. A2, Rhodococcus opacus, and Gemmata obscuriglobus. Transfer of the suspension to sterile cathodes made of graphite plates, carbon rods, or carbon brushes in new BESs resulted in enhanced current after 4 days, demonstrating growth by these microbial communities on a variety of cathode substrates. This report provides a simple and effective method for enriching autotrophic electrotrophs by the use of sMFCs without the need for set potentials, followed by the use of potentials more negative than -400 mV. PMID:22610438

  8. Enrichment of Microbial Electrolysis Cell Biocathodes from Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanodes

    SciTech Connect

    Pisciotta, JM; Zaybak, Z; Call, DF; Nam, JY; Logan, BE

    2012-07-18

    Electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes were produced by first enriching graphite fiber brush electrodes as the anodes in sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs) using two different marine sediments and then electrically inverting the anodes to function as cathodes in two-chamber bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Electron consumption occurred at set potentials of -439 mV and -539 mV (versus the potential of a standard hydrogen electrode) but not at -339 mV in minimal media lacking organic sources of energy. Results at these different potentials were consistent with separate linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) scans that indicated enhanced activity (current consumption) below only ca. -400 mV. MFC bioanodes not originally acclimated at a set potential produced electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes, but bioanodes operated at a set potential (+11 mV) did not. CO, was removed from cathode headspace, indicating that the electrotrophic biocathodes were autotrophic. Hydrogen gas generation, followed by loss of hydrogen gas and methane production in one sample, suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. There was abundant microbial growth in the biocathode chamber, as evidenced by an increase in turbidity and the presence of microorganisms on the cathode surface. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated prominent sequences most similar to those of Eubacterium limosum (Butyribacterium methylotrophicum), Desulfovibrio sp. A2, Rhodococcus opacus, and Gemmata obscuriglobus. Transfer of the suspension to sterile cathodes made of graphite plates, carbon rods, or carbon brushes in new BESs resulted in enhanced current after 4 days, demonstrating growth by these microbial communities on a variety of cathode substrates. This report provides a simple and effective method for enriching autotrophic electrotrophs by the use of sMFCs without the need for set potentials, followed by the use of potentials more negative than -400 mV.

  9. Enrichment of Microbial Electrolysis Cell Biocathodes from Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanodes

    PubMed Central

    Pisciotta, John M.; Zaybak, Zehra; Call, Douglas F.; Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-01-01

    Electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes were produced by first enriching graphite fiber brush electrodes as the anodes in sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs) using two different marine sediments and then electrically inverting the anodes to function as cathodes in two-chamber bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Electron consumption occurred at set potentials of −439 mV and −539 mV (versus the potential of a standard hydrogen electrode) but not at −339 mV in minimal media lacking organic sources of energy. Results at these different potentials were consistent with separate linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) scans that indicated enhanced activity (current consumption) below only ca. −400 mV. MFC bioanodes not originally acclimated at a set potential produced electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes, but bioanodes operated at a set potential (+11 mV) did not. CO2 was removed from cathode headspace, indicating that the electrotrophic biocathodes were autotrophic. Hydrogen gas generation, followed by loss of hydrogen gas and methane production in one sample, suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. There was abundant microbial growth in the biocathode chamber, as evidenced by an increase in turbidity and the presence of microorganisms on the cathode surface. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated prominent sequences most similar to those of Eubacterium limosum (Butyribacterium methylotrophicum), Desulfovibrio sp. A2, Rhodococcus opacus, and Gemmata obscuriglobus. Transfer of the suspension to sterile cathodes made of graphite plates, carbon rods, or carbon brushes in new BESs resulted in enhanced current after 4 days, demonstrating growth by these microbial communities on a variety of cathode substrates. This report provides a simple and effective method for enriching autotrophic electrotrophs by the use of sMFCs without the need for set potentials, followed by the use of potentials more negative than −400 mV. PMID:22610438

  10. Improved lectin-mediated immobilization of human red blood cells in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Ingo; Gustavsson, Per Erik; Ersson, Bo; Lundahl, Per

    2003-01-25

    A new type of agarose bead, superporous agarose, was used as a gel support for immobilization of human red blood cells (RBCs) mediated by wheat germ lectin. The number of immobilized cells was similar to that obtained with commercial wheat germ lectin-agarose but the cell stability appeared to be superior. This allowed improved frontal affinity chromatographic analyses of cytochalasin B (CB)-binding to the glucose transporter GLUT1 which established a ratio of one CB-binding site per GLUT1 dimer for both plain RBCs or those treated with different poly amino acids. The measured dissociation constants, 70+/-14 nM for CB and 12+/-3 mM for glucose binding to GLUT1, are similar to those reported earlier.

  11. Enhanced dibenzothiophene biodesulfurization by immobilized cells of Brevibacterium lutescens in n-octane-water biphasic system.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yong; Shao, Rong; Qi, Gang; Ding, Bin-Bin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, it was the first report that the Brevibacterium lutescens CCZU12-1 was employed as a sulfur removing bacteria. Using dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the sole sulfur source, B. lutescens could selectively degrade DBT into 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) via the "4S" pathway. In the basal salt medium (BSM) supplemented with 0.25 mM DBT and 0.5 g/L Tween-80, high desulfurization rate (100 %) was obtained by growth cells after 60 h. Furthermore, the n-octane-water (10:90, v/v) biphasic system was built for the biodesulfurization by resting cells. Moreover, a combination of magnetic nano Fe3O4 particles with calcium alginate immobilization was used for enhancing biodesulfurization. In this n-octane-water biphasic system, immobilized B. lutescens cells could be reused for not less than four times. Therefore, B. lutescens CCZU12-1 shows high potential in the biodesulfurization.

  12. Scale-up and performance of an immobilized cell reactor separator for the production of ethanol from whey lactose

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Okos, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    An adsorbed microbial cell, trickle flow, reactor incorporating a circulating gas phase to simultaneously separate a volatile inhibitory product has shown high fermentation rates and effective product separation on a 1 in. diameter lab bench scale. Carbon dioxide generated by the fermentation is recirculated to strip the volatile fermentation product from the fermentation broth. Random and structured packings were evaluated and a parallel type structured packing was developed consisting of a plates of absorbant material to which cells are adsorbed and spaced to allow passage of the circulating gas stream. The substrate solution flows by gravity in a capillary flow fashion down through the plates in which the cells are immobilized. The theoretical reactor separation and fermentation performance as a function of plate thickness and gas channel spacing was evaluated. This reactor has been scaled up to a 6 in. ID reactor with a total reactor volume of about 50 liters using a spiral wound version of the parallel plates, and then to a 24 in. ID reactor with a reactor volume of about 1300 liters. 16 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Growth characteristics of Sanguinaria canadensis L. cell suspensions and immobilized cultures for production of benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Rho, D; Chauret, N; Laberge, N; Archambault, J

    1992-02-01

    Sanguinaria canadensis L. plants were harvested from a local forest and calli were initiated from leaf explants. The production of benzophenanthridine alkaloids (i.e. sanguinarine, sanguilutine, sanguirubine, chelerythrine, chelilutine and chelirubine) by S. canadensis cell grown in modified B5 and IM2 media was compared to the alkaloid content of rhizomes. Sanguinarine accounted for approximately 80% of the total alkaloid content of cultured cells (1.3%, g g-1) while sanguinarine and sanguirubine accounted for 70% of rhizome alkaloids (9.0%, g g-1). Sanguinarine, chelirubine and chelerythrine were the only known alkaloids detected in cultured S. canadensis cells. Maximum alkaloid production of cultures performed using B5 medium, containing half the original nitrate concentration, was observed following extracellular nitrate and sugar depletion. The scale-up of this culture was successfully performed in a 2-1 immobilization bioreactor. The consumption of sugar and nitrate as well as the oxygen (OTR) and carbon dioxide (CTR) transfer rates of the immobilized cell culture were monitored for 15 days. The maximum sugar and nitrate consumption rates were 1.8 g l-1 per day and 2.3 mM per day respectively. The maximum OTR and CTR of the immobilized cell culture were 0.8 mmol O2 l-1 h-1 and 0.95 mmol CO2 l-1 h-1 respectively. The sanguinarine yield of this culture reached 1.0% based on biomass dry weight (g g-1 dw) by day 15.

  14. Evaluation of the use of Sr2+ in alginate immobilization of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widerøe, Hege; Danielsen, Signe

    2001-05-01

    In recent years the method of immobilization of living cells in Ca-alginate beads has gained a wide range of applications. In all cases high chemical stability of the immobilization material and mild conditions for the cells are prerequisites. However, in long-term experiments that may last for several days Ca-alginate may dissolve due to an exchange of Ca2+ with Na+, forming fluid Na-alginate. As well as Ca-alginate, the more chemically stable Sr-alginate and Ba-alginate are materials that have been used for the immobilization of living cells. In this study, the effects of Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ on growth, viability and intracellular free calcium concentration in a human leukemic T cell line (Jurkat) were investigated. The findings in this study, and the fact that Sr-alginate has a considerably higher chemical stability than Ca-alginate, led to the conclusion that Sr-alginate is a more suitable material for use in the entrapment of living cells in long-term studies.

  15. Evaluation of the use of Sr2+ in alginate immobilization of cells.

    PubMed

    Widerøe, H; Danielsen, S

    2001-05-01

    In recent years the method of immobilization of living cells in Ca-alginate beads has gained a wide range of applications. In all cases high chemical stability of the immobilization material and mild conditions for the cells are prerequisites. However, in long-term experiments that may last for several days Ca-alginate may dissolve due to an exchange of Ca2+ with Na+, forming fluid Na-alginate. As well as Ca-alginate, the more chemically stable Sr-alginate and Ba-alginate are materials that have been used for the immobilization of living cells. In this study, the effects of Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ on growth, viability and intracellular free calcium concentration in a human leukemic T cell line (Jurkat) were investigated. The findings in this study, and the fact that Sr-alginate has a considerably higher chemical stability than Ca-alginate, led to the conclusion that Sr-alginate is a more suitable material for use in the entrapment of living cells in long-term studies.

  16. Electricity production from municipal solid waste using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, H Y; Pai, T Y; Liu, M H; Chang, C A; Lo, F C; Chang, T C; Lo, H M; Chiang, C F; Chao, K P; Lo, W Y; Lo, S W; Chu, Y L

    2016-07-01

    The organic content of municipal solid waste has long been an attractive source of renewable energy, mainly as a solid fuel in waste-to-energy plants. This study focuses on the potential to use microbial fuel cells to convert municipal solid waste organics into energy using various operational conditions. The results showed that two-chamber microbial fuel cells with carbon felt and carbon felt allocation had a higher maximal power density (20.12 and 30.47 mW m(-2) for 1.5 and 4 L, respectively) than those of other electrode plate allocations. Most two-chamber microbial fuel cells (1.5 and 4 L) had a higher maximal power density than single-chamber ones with corresponding electrode plate allocations. Municipal solid waste with alkali hydrolysis pre-treatment and K3Fe(CN)6 as an electron acceptor improved the maximal power density to 1817.88 mW m(-2) (~0.49% coulomb efficiency, from 0.05-0.49%). The maximal power density from experiments using individual 1.5 and 4 L two-chamber microbial fuel cells, and serial and parallel connections of 1.5 and 4 L two-chamber microbial fuel cells, was found to be in the order of individual 4 L (30.47 mW m(-2)) > serial connection of 1.5 and 4 L (27.75) > individual 1.5 L (20.12) > parallel connection of 1.5 and 4 L (17.04) two-chamber microbial fuel cells . The power density using municipal solid waste microbial fuel cells was compared with information in the literature and discussed.

  17. Lead and copper immobilization in a shooting range soil using soybean stover- and pine needle-derived biochars: Chemical, microbial and spectroscopic assessments.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mahtab; Ok, Yong Sik; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Lim, Jung Eun; Kim, Byung-Yong; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Young Han; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Lee, Sung-Eun; Lee, Sang Soo

    2016-01-15

    Biochar (BC) could be a potential candidate for the remediation of metal contaminated soil. Mechanistic understandings are needed for the appropriate selection of BC and investigating molecular microbial ecological interactions. The soybean stover-derived BCs were more effective in immobilizing Pb (88%) and Cu (87%) than the pine needle-derived BCs in a contaminated shooting range soil. The sequential chemical extractions indicated that BCs stimulated the geochemical transformation of metal species. Spectroscopic investigations using scanning electron microscopic elemental dot mapping and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic measurements showed that Pb in the BCs amended soils was immobilized by the formation of stable chloropyromorphite. Soil organic C and microbial activity were also enhanced by BC. The non-labile C fraction in the soil amended with BCs produced at 700°C was increased. Biochars showed less impact on the bacterial community than feedstock biomass as promulgated by the pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene. The feedstock type (namely soybean stover and pine needles) was the main factor influencing the BCs efficacy on metals' (im) mobilization and bacterial health in soils. PMID:26355413

  18. Lead and copper immobilization in a shooting range soil using soybean stover- and pine needle-derived biochars: Chemical, microbial and spectroscopic assessments.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mahtab; Ok, Yong Sik; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Lim, Jung Eun; Kim, Byung-Yong; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Young Han; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Lee, Sung-Eun; Lee, Sang Soo

    2016-01-15

    Biochar (BC) could be a potential candidate for the remediation of metal contaminated soil. Mechanistic understandings are needed for the appropriate selection of BC and investigating molecular microbial ecological interactions. The soybean stover-derived BCs were more effective in immobilizing Pb (88%) and Cu (87%) than the pine needle-derived BCs in a contaminated shooting range soil. The sequential chemical extractions indicated that BCs stimulated the geochemical transformation of metal species. Spectroscopic investigations using scanning electron microscopic elemental dot mapping and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic measurements showed that Pb in the BCs amended soils was immobilized by the formation of stable chloropyromorphite. Soil organic C and microbial activity were also enhanced by BC. The non-labile C fraction in the soil amended with BCs produced at 700°C was increased. Biochars showed less impact on the bacterial community than feedstock biomass as promulgated by the pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene. The feedstock type (namely soybean stover and pine needles) was the main factor influencing the BCs efficacy on metals' (im) mobilization and bacterial health in soils.

  19. Modeling of Sustainable Base Production by Microbial Electrolysis Cell.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Maxime; Sugnaux, Marc; Comninellis, Christos; Nealson, Kenneth; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    A predictive model for the microbial/electrochemical base formation from wastewater was established and compared to experimental conditions within a microbial electrolysis cell. A Na2 SO4 /K2 SO4 anolyte showed that model prediction matched experimental results. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a strong base (pH≈13) was generated using applied voltages between 0.3 and 1.1 V. Due to the use of bicarbonate, the pH value in the anolyte remained unchanged, which is required to maintain microbial activity.

  20. Microbial communities involved in electricity generation from sulfide oxidation in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Raymond J; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang

    2010-10-15

    Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal can be achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In electricity harvesting from sulfide oxidation in such an MFC, various microbial communities are involved. It is essential to elucidate the microbial communities and their roles in the sulfide conversion and electricity generation. In this work, an MFC was constructed to enrich a microbial consortium, which could harvest electricity from sulfide oxidation. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that microbial catalysis was involved in electricity output in the sulfide-fed MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities could perform catalysis independently, and synergistic interactions occurred when the two communities worked together. A 16S rRNA clone library analysis was employed to characterize the microbial communities in the MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities shared similar richness and diversity, while the LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two community structures were significantly different. The exoelectrogenic, sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the MFC anodic chamber. The discovery of these bacteria was consistent with the community characteristics for electricity generation from sulfide oxidation. The exoelectrogenic bacteria were found both on the anode and in the solution. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were present in greater abundance on the anode than in the solution, while the sulfate-reducing bacteria preferably lived in the solution.

  1. Optimizing Immobilized Enzyme Performance in Cell-Free Environments to Produce Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Belfort, Georges; Grimaldi, Joseph J.

    2015-01-27

    Limitations on biofuel production using cell culture (Escherichia coli, Clostridium, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, brown microalgae, blue-green algae and others) include low product (alcohol) concentrations (≤0.2 vol%) due to feedback inhibition, instability of cells, and lack of economical product recovery processes. To overcome these challenges, an alternate simplified biofuel production scheme was tested based on a cell-free immobilized enzyme system. Using this cell free system, we were able to obtain about 2.6 times higher concentrations of iso-butanol using our non-optimized system as compared with live cell systems. This process involved two steps: (i) converts acid to aldehyde using keto-acid decarboxylase (KdcA), and (ii) produces alcohol from aldehyde using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with a cofactor (NADH) conversion from inexpensive formate using a third enzyme, formate dehydrogenase (FDH). To increase stability and conversion efficiency with easy separations, the first two enzymes were immobilized onto methacrylate resin. Fusion proteins of labile KdcA (fKdcA) were expressed to stabilize the covalently immobilized KdcA. Covalently immobilized ADH exhibited long-term stability and efficient conversion of aldehyde to alcohol over multiple batch cycles without fusions. High conversion rates and low protein leaching were achieved by covalent immobilization of enzymes on methacrylate resin. The complete reaction scheme was demonstrated by immobilizing both ADH and fKdcA and using FDH free in solution. The new system without in situ removal of isobutanol achieved a 55% conversion of ketoisovaleric acid to isobutanol at a concentration of 0.5 % (v/v). Further increases in titer will require continuous removal of the isobutanol using our novel brush membrane system that exhibits a 1.5 fold increase in the separation factor of isobutanol from water versus that obtained for commercial silicone rubber membranes. These bio-inspired brush membranes are based on the

  2. Three immobilized-cell columnar bioreactors for enhanced production of commodity chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, B.H.; Scott, C.D.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1993-12-31

    Immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors (FBRs) can be used with a variety of fermentations to increase production of fuels, solvents, organic acids, and other fermentation products. Part of the increased rates and yields are due to the immobilization of the biocatalyst at high concentrations. This FBR system with immobilized Zymomonas mobilis increased ethanol productivity more than tenfold with 99% conversion and near stoichiometric yields. FBRs also offer several additional modes of operation for simultaneous fermentation and separation to further increase production by removing the inhibitory products directly from the continuous fermentation. The production of lactic acid by immobilized Lactobacillus was augmented with the addition and removal of solid adsorbent particles to the FBR. An immiscible organic extractant also was used to extract butanol from the acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Demonstrations with these FBR systems have already shown definite advantages by improved overall product yields (decreasing feed costs) and by increased rates (decreasing capital and operating costs). Further demonstration and scale-up continue.

  3. Three immobilized-cell columnar bioreactors for enhanced production of commodity chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, B.H.; Scott, C.D.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1993-07-01

    Immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors (FBRS) can be used with a variety of fermentations to increase production of fuels, solvents, organic acids, and other fermentation products. Part of the increased rates and yields are due to the immobilization of the biocatalyst at high concentrations. This FBR system with immobilized Zymomonas mobiles increased ethanol productivity more than tenfold with 99% conversion and near stoichiometric yields. FBRs also offer several additional modes of operation for simultaneous fermentation and separation to further increase production by removing the inhibitory products directly from the continuous fermentation. The production of lactic acid by immobilized Lactobacillus was augmented with the addition and removal of solid adsorbent particles to the FBR. An immiscible organic extractant also was used to extract butanol from the acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Demonstrations with these FBR systems have already shown definite advantages by improved overall product yields (decreasing feed costs) and by increased rates (decreasing capital and operating costs). Further demonstration and scale-up continue.

  4. A novel cell weighing method based on the minimum immobilization pressure for biological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Qili; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Cui, Maosheng; Sun, Mingzhu; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Xin

    2015-07-28

    A novel weighing method for cells with spherical and other regular shapes is proposed in this paper. In this method, the relationship between the cell mass and the minimum aspiration pressure to immobilize the cell (referred to as minimum immobilization pressure) is derived for the first time according to static theory. Based on this relationship, a robotic cell weighing process is established using a traditional micro-injection system. Experimental results on porcine oocytes demonstrate that the proposed method is able to weigh cells at an average speed of 16.3 s/cell and with a success rate of more than 90%. The derived cell mass and density are in accordance with those reported in other published results. The experimental results also demonstrated that this method is able to detect less than 1% variation of the porcine oocyte mass quantitatively. It can be conducted by a pair of traditional micropipettes and a commercial pneumatic micro-injection system, and is expected to perform robotic operation on batch cells. At present, the minimum resolution of the proposed method for measuring the cell mass can be 1.25 × 10{sup −15 }kg. Above advantages make it very appropriate for quantifying the amount of the materials injected into or moved out of the cells in the biological applications, such as nuclear enucleations and embryo microinjections.

  5. Internalization: acute apoptosis of breast cancer cells using herceptin-immobilized gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rathinaraj, Pierson; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Huh, Do Sung

    2015-01-01

    Herceptin, the monoclonal antibody, was successfully immobilized on gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to improve their precise interactions with breast cancer cells (SK-BR3). The mean size of the GNPs (29 nm), as determined by dynamic light scattering, enlarged to 82 nm after herceptin immobilization. The in vitro cell culture experiment indicated that human skin cells (FB) proliferated well in the presence of herceptin-conjugated GNP (GNP–Her), while most of the breast cancer cells (SK-BR3) had died. To elucidate the mechanism of cell death, the interaction of breast cancer cells with GNP–Her was tracked by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Consequently, GNP–Her was found to be bound precisely to the membrane of the breast cancer cell, which became almost saturated after 6 hours incubation. This shows that the progression signal of SK-BR3 cells is retarded completely by the precise binding of antibody to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 receptor of the breast cancer cell membrane, causing cell death. PMID:25709498

  6. A novel cell weighing method based on the minimum immobilization pressure for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qili; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Cui, Maosheng; Sun, Mingzhu; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Xin

    2015-07-01

    A novel weighing method for cells with spherical and other regular shapes is proposed in this paper. In this method, the relationship between the cell mass and the minimum aspiration pressure to immobilize the cell (referred to as minimum immobilization pressure) is derived for the first time according to static theory. Based on this relationship, a robotic cell weighing process is established using a traditional micro-injection system. Experimental results on porcine oocytes demonstrate that the proposed method is able to weigh cells at an average speed of 16.3 s/cell and with a success rate of more than 90%. The derived cell mass and density are in accordance with those reported in other published results. The experimental results also demonstrated that this method is able to detect less than 1% variation of the porcine oocyte mass quantitatively. It can be conducted by a pair of traditional micropipettes and a commercial pneumatic micro-injection system, and is expected to perform robotic operation on batch cells. At present, the minimum resolution of the proposed method for measuring the cell mass can be 1.25 × 10-15 kg. Above advantages make it very appropriate for quantifying the amount of the materials injected into or moved out of the cells in the biological applications, such as nuclear enucleations and embryo microinjections.

  7. Continuous conversion of sweet sorghum juice to ethanol using immobilized yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mohite, U.; SivaRaman, H.

    1984-01-01

    While extensive work has been reported on sugarcane and sugarcane molasses for ethanol production, relatively few reports are available on ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice. With the advent of immobilized cell technology, an attempt has been made to utilize this technology for the production of ethanol from sweet sorghum juice. The species was Sorghum bicolar (Moench). The maximum productivity obtained at 30/sup 0/C with Saccharomyces uvarum cells immobilized in gelatin was 168 g/L h at an ethanol concentration of 2.4 g (w/v) using sweet sorghum juice having 11.5% fermentable sugars. The calculated value for full conversion was 86 g/L at an ethanol concentration of 5.5 g (w/v). The low concentration of total sugars in the juice, however, would make ethanol recovery expensive unless a uniformly high concentration of 16% or more of total sugars can be obtained.

  8. Production of biofuels from pretreated microalgae biomass by anaerobic fermentation with immobilized Clostridium acetobutylicum cells.

    PubMed

    Efremenko, E N; Nikolskaya, A B; Lyagin, I V; Senko, O V; Makhlis, T A; Stepanov, N A; Maslova, O V; Mamedova, F; Varfolomeev, S D

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the possible use of pretreated biomass of various microalgae and cyanobacteria as substrates for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum cells immobilized into poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel. To this end, the biochemical composition of photosynthetic microorganisms cultivated under various conditions was studied. The most efficient technique for pretreating microalgal biomass for its subsequent conversion into biofuels appeared to be thermal decomposition at 108 °C. For the first time the maximum productivity of the ABE fermentation in terms of hydrogen (8.5 mmol/L medium/day) was obtained using pretreated biomass of Nannochloropsis sp. Maximum yields of butanol and ethanol were observed with Arthrospira platensis biomass used as the substrate. Immobilized Clostridium cells were demonstrated to be suitable for multiple reuses (for a minimum of five cycles) in ABE fermentation for producing biofuels from pretreated microalgal biomass.

  9. Continuous Ethanol Production Using Immobilized-Cell/Enzyme Biocatalysts in Fluidized-Bed Bioreactor (FBR)

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, NP

    2003-11-16

    The immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Previous studies at ORNL using immobilized Zymomonas mobilis in FBR at both laboratory and demonstration scale (4-in-ID by 20-ft-tall) have shown that the system was more than 50 times as productive as industrial benchmarks (batch and fed-batch free cell fermentations for ethanol production from glucose). Economic analysis showed that a continuous process employing the FBR technology to produce ethanol from corn-derived glucose would offer savings of three to six cents per gallon of ethanol compared to a typical batch process. The application of the FBR technology for ethanol production was extended to investigate more complex feedstocks, which included starch and lignocellulosic-derived mixed sugars. Economic analysis and mathematical modeling of the reactor were included in the investigation. This report summarizes the results of these extensive studies.

  10. Polyglycerol dendrimers immobilized on radiation grafted poly-HEMA hydrogels: Surface chemistry characterization and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higa, Olga Z.; Faria, Henrique Antonio Mendonça; de Queiroz, Alvaro A. A.

    2014-05-01

    Radiation induced grafting of poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) on low density polyethylene (LDPE) films and subsequent immobilization of poly(glycerol) dendrimer (PGLD) has been performed with the aim to improve cell adhesion and proliferation on the surface of the polymer, in order to enhance their properties for bone tissue engineering scaffolding applications. Radiation grafting of PHEMA onto LDPE was promoted by γ-ray radiation. The covalent immobilization of PGLD on LDPE-g-PHEMA surface was performed by using a dicyclohexyl carbodiimide (DCC)/N,N-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) method. The occurrence of grafting polymerization of PHEMA and further immobilization of PGLD was quantitatively confirmed by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fluorescence, respectively. The LDPE-g-PHEMA surface topography after PGLD coupling was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hydrophilicity of the LDPE-g-PHEMA film was remarkably improved compared to that of the ungrafted LDPE. The core level XPS ESCA spectrum of PHEMA-grafted LDPE showed two strong peaks at 286.6 eV (from hydroxyl groups and ester groups) and 289.1 eV (from ester groups) due to PHEMA brushes grafted onto LDPE surfaces. The results from the cell adhesion studies show that MCT3-E1 cells tended to spread more slowly on the LDPE-g-PHEMA than on the LDPE-g-PHEMA-i-PGLD.

  11. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212.

  12. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212. PMID:25418076

  13. Enhancement of chitosanase production by cell immobilization of Gongronella sp. JG.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingping; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Li; Tang, Mingli

    2013-01-01

    Chitosanase production of Gongronella sp. JG cells immobilized in calcium alginate gel and polyurethane foam was compared with that of the free cells, there was a 60% increase in the enzyme yield (2429 U/L) compared to the highest yield obtained from free cells (1513 U/L). The optimal immobilization parameters (concentrations of sodium alginate, calcium chloride, bead inoculums, bead diameter, etc) for the enhanced production of chitosanase were determined as: sodium alginate 2% (w/v), 0.1 M calcium chloride, inoculum 10 mL beads to 100 mL production media and 2.7 mm bead diameter. Maximum chitosanase production was achieved with initial pH of 5.5 and temperature of 30 °C. The alginate beads had well stability, retained 85% ability of enzyme production even after 7 cycles of repeated batch fermentation. These results showed the immobilization technique was a feasible and economical method for chitosansase production by Gongronella sp. JG.

  14. Mobile and immobile calcium buffers in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z; Neher, E

    1993-01-01

    1. The calcium binding capacity (kappa S) of bovine chromaffin cells preloaded with fura-2 was measured during nystatin-perforated-patch recordings. 2. Subsequently, the perforated patch was ruptured to obtain a whole-cell recording situation, and the time course of kappa S was monitored during periods of up to one hour. 3. No rapid change (within 10-20 s) of kappa S was observed upon transition to whole-cell recording, as would be expected, if highly mobile organic anions contributed significantly to calcium buffering. However, approximately half of the cells investigated displayed a drop in kappa S within 2-5 min, indicative of the loss of soluble Ca2+ binding proteins in the range of 7-20 kDa. 4. The average Ca2+ binding capacity (differential ratio of bound calcium over free calcium) was 9 +/- 7 (mean +/- S.E.M.) for the poorly mobile component and 31 +/- 10 for the fixed component. It was concluded that a contribution of 7 from highly mobile buffer would have been detected, if present. Thus, this value can be considered as an upper bound to highly mobile Ca2+ buffer. 5. Both mobile and fixed calcium binding capacity appeared to have relatively low Ca2+ affinity, since kappa S did not change in the range of Ca2+ concentrations between 0.1 and 3 microM. 6. It was found that cellular autofluorescence and contributions to fluorescence of non-hydrolysed or compartmentalized dye contribute a serious error in estimation of kappa S. 'Balanced loading', a degree of fura-2 loading such that the calcium binding capacity of fura-2 equals cellular calcium binding capacity, minimizes these errors. Also, changes in kappa S at the transition from perforated-patch to whole-cell recording can be most faithfully recorded for similar degrees of loading in both situations. 7. Nystatin was found unable to make pores from inside of the plasma membrane of chromaffin cells. With careful preparation and storage the diluted nystatin solution maintained its high activity of membrane

  15. Batteryless, wireless sensor powered by a sediment microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Conrad; Dewan, Alim; Heo, Deukhyoun; Beyenal, Haluk

    2008-11-15

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) are considered to be an alternative renewable power source for remote monitoring. There are two main challenges to using SMFCs as power sources: 1) a SMFC produces a low potential at which most sensor electronics do not operate, and 2) a SMFC cannot provide continuous power, so energy from the SMFC must be stored and then used to repower sensor electronics intermittently. In this study, we developed a SMFC and a power management system (PMS) to power a batteryless, wireless sensor. A SMFC operating with a microbial anode and cathode, located in the Palouse River, Pullman, Washington, U.S.A., was used to demonstrate the utility of the developed system. The designed PMS stored microbial energy and then started powering the wireless sensor when the SMFC potential reached 320 mV. It continued powering until the SMFC potential dropped below 52 mV. The system was repowered when the SMFC potential increased to 320 mV, and this repowering continued as long as microbial reactions continued. We demonstrated that a microbial fuel cell with a microbial anode and cathode can be used as an effective renewable power source for remote monitoring using custom-designed electronics.

  16. Protozoan grazing reduces the current output of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dawn E; Nevin, Kelly P; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Woodard, Trevor L; Strickland, Justin N; Lovley, Derek R

    2015-10-01

    Several experiments were conducted to determine whether protozoan grazing can reduce current output from sediment microbial fuel cells. When marine sediments were amended with eukaryotic inhibitors, the power output from the fuel cells increased 2-5-fold. Quantitative PCR showed that Geobacteraceae sequences were 120 times more abundant on anodes from treated fuel cells compared to untreated fuel cells, and that Spirotrichea sequences in untreated fuel cells were 200 times more abundant on anode surfaces than in the surrounding sediments. Defined studies with current-producing biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens and pure cultures of protozoa demonstrated that protozoa that were effective in consuming G. sulfurreducens reduced current production up to 91% when added to G. sulfurreducens fuel cells. These results suggest that anode biofilms are an attractive food source for protozoa and that protozoan grazing can be an important factor limiting the current output of sediment microbial fuel cells.

  17. Functionally Stable and Phylogenetically Diverse Microbial Enrichments from Microbial Fuel Cells during Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Gorby, Yuri A.; Bretschger, Orianna

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to recover energy from organic matter in the form of electricity. One of the goals of MFC research is to develop the technology for cost-effective wastewater treatment. However, before practical MFC applications are implemented it is important to gain fundamental knowledge about long-term system performance, reproducibility, and the formation and maintenance of functionally-stable microbial communities. Here we report findings from a MFC operated for over 300 days using only primary clarifier effluent collected from a municipal wastewater treatment plant as the microbial resource and substrate. The system was operated in a repeat-batch mode, where the reactor solution was replaced once every two weeks with new primary effluent that consisted of different microbial and chemical compositions with every batch exchange. The turbidity of the primary clarifier effluent solution notably decreased, and 97% of biological oxygen demand (BOD) was removed after an 8–13 day residence time for each batch cycle. On average, the limiting current density was 1000 mA/m2, the maximum power density was 13 mW/m2, and coulombic efficiency was 25%. Interestingly, the electrochemical performance and BOD removal rates were very reproducible throughout MFC operation regardless of the sample variability associated with each wastewater exchange. While MFC performance was very reproducible, the phylogenetic analyses of anode-associated electricity-generating biofilms showed that the microbial populations temporally fluctuated and maintained a high biodiversity throughout the year-long experiment. These results suggest that MFC communities are both self-selecting and self-optimizing, thereby able to develop and maintain functional stability regardless of fluctuations in carbon source(s) and regular introduction of microbial competitors. These results contribute significantly toward the practical application of

  18. Methods for understanding microbial community structures and functions in microbial fuel cells: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Wei; Ge, Zheng; He, Zhen; Zhang, Husen

    2014-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) employ microorganisms to recover electric energy from organic matter. However, fundamental knowledge of electrochemically active bacteria is still required to maximize MFCs power output for practical applications. This review presents microbiological and electrochemical techniques to help researchers choose the appropriate methods for the MFCs study. Pre-genomic and genomic techniques such as 16S rRNA based phylogeny and metagenomics have provided important information in the structure and genetic potential of electrode-colonizing microbial communities. Post-genomic techniques such as metatranscriptomics allow functional characterizations of electrode biofilm communities by quantifying gene expression levels. Isotope-assisted phylogenetic analysis can further link taxonomic information to microbial metabolisms. A combination of electrochemical, phylogenetic, metagenomic, and post-metagenomic techniques offers opportunities to a better understanding of the extracellular electron transfer process, which in turn can lead to process optimization for power output.

  19. Microbially-reduced graphene scaffolds to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Shungui; Zhao, Bo; Zhuang, Li; Wang, Yueqiang

    2012-07-01

    A one-pot method is exploited by adding graphene oxide (GO) and acetate into an microbial fuel cell (MFC) in which GO is microbially reduced, leading to in situ construction of a bacteria/graphene network in the anode. The obtained microbially reduced graphene (MRG) exhibits comparable conductivity and physical characteristics to the chemically reduced graphene. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the number of exoelectrogens involved in extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the solid electrode, increases due to the presence of graphene scaffolds, and the EET is facilitated in terms of electron transfer kinetics. As a result, the maximum power density of the MFC is enhanced by 32% (from 1440 to 1905 mW m(-2)) and the coulombic efficiency is improved by 80% (from 30 to 54%). The results demonstrate that the construction of the bacteria/graphene network is an effective alternative to improve the MFC performance.

  20. Simultaneous microbial and electrochemical reductions of vanadium (V) with bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Ying; Hao, Liting; Liu, Ye; Feng, Chuanping; Liu, Yuqian; Wang, Zhongli

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous microbial and electrochemical reductions of vanadium (V) with bioelectricity generation were realized in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). With initial V(V) concentrations of 75 mg/l and 150 mg/l in anolyte and catholyte, respectively, stable power output of 419±11 mW/m(2) was achieved. After 12h operation, V(V) concentration in the catholyte decreased to the value similar to that of the initial one in the anolyte, meanwhile it was nearly reduced completely in the anolyte. V(IV) was the main reduction product, which subsequently precipitated, acquiring total vanadium removal efficiencies of 76.8±2.9%. Microbial community analysis revealed the emergence of the new species of Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes as well as the enhanced Spirochaetes mainly functioned in the anode. This study opens new pathways to successful remediation of vanadium contamination.

  1. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zajonc, Dirk M; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  2. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  3. Bioethanol Production from Uncooked Raw Starch by Immobilized Surface-engineered Yeast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Wu, Kuo-Wei; Fukuda, Hideki

    Surface-engineered yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae codisplaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase and Streptococcus bovis α-amylase on the cell surface was used for direct production of ethanol from uncooked raw starch. By using 50 g/L cells during batch fermentation, ethanol concentration could reach 53 g/L in 7 days. During repeated batch fermentation, the production of ethanol could be maintained for seven consecutive cycles. For cells immobilized in loofa sponge, the concentration of ethanol could reach 42 g/L in 3 days in a circulating packed-bed bioreactor. However, the production of ethanol stopped thereafter because of limited contact between cells and starch. The bioreactor could be operated for repeated batch production of ethanol, but ethanol concentration dropped to 55% of its initial value after five cycles because of a decrease in cell mass and cell viability in the bioreactor. Adding cells to the bioreactor could partially restore ethanol production to 75% of its initial value.

  4. CD1-Restricted T Cell Recognition of Microbial Lipoglycan Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieling, P. A.; Chatterjee, D.; Porcelli, S. A.; Prigozy, T. I.; Mazzaccaro, R. J.; Soriano, T.; Bloom, B. R.; Brenner, M. B.; Kronenberg, M.; Brennan, P. J.; Modlin, R. L.

    1995-07-01

    It has long been the paradigm that T cells recognize peptide antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. However, nonpeptide antigens can be presented to T cells by human CD1b molecules, which are not encoded by the MHC. A major class of microbial antigens associated with pathogenicity are lipoglycans. It is shown here that human CD1b presents the defined mycobacterial lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) to αβ T cell receptor-bearing lymphocytes. Presentation of these lipoglycan antigens required internalization and endosomal acidification. The T cell recognition required mannosides with α(1-->2) linkages and a phosphatidylinositol unit. T cells activated by LAM produced interferon γ and were cytolytic. Thus, an important class of microbial molecules, the lipoglycans, is a part of the universe of foreign antigens recognized by human T cells.

  5. Ethanol production by fermentation using immobilized cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in cashew apple bagasse.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexandre Monteiro; Gondim, Diego Romão; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros

    2010-05-01

    In this work, cashew apple bagasse (CAB) was used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization. The support was prepared through a treatment with a solution of 3% HCl, and delignification with 2% NaOH was also conducted. Optical micrographs showed that high populations of yeast cells adhered to pre-treated CAB surface. Ten consecutive fermentations of cashew apple juice for ethanol production were carried out using immobilized yeasts. High ethanol productivity was observed from the third fermentation assay until the tenth fermentation. Ethanol concentrations (about 19.82-37.83 g L(-1) in average value) and ethanol productivities (about 3.30-6.31 g L(-1) h(-1)) were high and stable, and residual sugar concentrations were low in almost all fermentations (around 3.00 g L(-1)) with conversions ranging from 44.80% to 96.50%, showing efficiency (85.30-98.52%) and operational stability of the biocatalyst for ethanol fermentation. Results showed that cashew apple bagasse is an efficient support for cell immobilization aiming at ethanol production.

  6. Cell Proliferation on Macro/Nano Surface Structure and Collagen Immobilization of 3D Polycaprolactone Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Ouk; Myung, Sung-Woon; Kook, Min-Suk; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. The macro/nano morphology of, 3D PCL scaffolds surface was etched with oxygen plasma. Acrylic acid (AA) plasma-polymerization was performed to functionalize the macro/nano surface with carboxyl groups and then collagen was immobilized with plasma-polymerized 3D PCL scaffolds. After O2 plasma and AA plasma-polymerization, contact angles were decreased. The FE-SEM and AFM results showed that O2 plasma is increased the surface roughness. The MTT assay results showed that proliferation of the M3CT3-E1 cells increased on the oxygen plasma treated and collagen immobilized 3D PCL scaffolds. PMID:27433597

  7. Production Strategies and Applications of Microbial Single Cell Oils

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Katrin; Glück, Claudia; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 class (e.g., α-linolenic acid, linoleic acid) are essential for maintaining biofunctions in mammalians like humans. Due to the fact that humans cannot synthesize these essential fatty acids, they must be taken up from different food sources. Classical sources for these fatty acids are porcine liver and fish oil. However, microbial lipids or single cell oils, produced by oleaginous microorganisms such as algae, fungi and bacteria, are a promising source as well. These single cell oils can be used for many valuable chemicals with applications not only for nutrition but also for fuels and are therefore an ideal basis for a bio-based economy. A crucial point for the establishment of microbial lipids utilization is the cost-effective production and purification of fuels or products of higher value. The fermentative production can be realized by submerged (SmF) or solid state fermentation (SSF). The yield and the composition of the obtained microbial lipids depend on the type of fermentation and the particular conditions (e.g., medium, pH-value, temperature, aeration, nitrogen source). From an economical point of view, waste or by-product streams can be used as cheap and renewable carbon and nitrogen sources. In general, downstream processing costs are one of the major obstacles to be solved for full economic efficiency of microbial lipids. For the extraction of lipids from microbial biomass cell disruption is most important, because efficiency of cell disruption directly influences subsequent downstream operations and overall extraction efficiencies. A multitude of cell disruption and lipid extraction methods are available, conventional as well as newly emerging methods, which will be described and discussed in terms of large scale applicability, their potential in a modern biorefinery and their influence on product quality. Furthermore, an overview is given about applications of microbial lipids or derived fatty

  8. Enhanced product formation in continuous fermentations with microbial cell recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, D.N.; Young, M.D.

    1981-02-01

    The effect of partial recycle of microbial cells on the operation of a chemostat has been investigated for two fermentations. Stable steady states with and without partial cell recycle were obtained for the conversion of d-sorbitol to L-sorbose by Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. suboxydans 1916B and for the conversion of glucose to 2-ketogluconic acid by Serratia marcescens NRRl B-486. The employment of partial cell recycle dramatically increased product formation rates for both fermentations.

  9. Recent advances in microbial single cell genomics technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single cell genomics is increasingly utilized as a powerful tool to decipher the metabolic potential, evolutionary histories and in situ interactions of environmental microorganisms. I will present several new developments of this exciting technology, which improve genomic data recovery from individual cells and allow its integration with cell's phenotypic properties. I will also demonstrate how these new technical capabilities help understanding the biology of the "microbial dark matter" inhabiting marine and terrestrial subsurface environments.

  10. Chitooligomer-Immobilized Biointerfaces with Micropatterned Geometries for Unidirectional Alignment of Myoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poosala, Pornthida; Kitaoka, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses a robust capacity to regenerate functional architectures with a unidirectional orientation. In this study, we successfully arranged skeletal myoblast (C2C12) cells along micropatterned gold strips on which chitohexaose was deposited via a vectorial chain immobilization approach. Hexa-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc6) was site-selectively modified at its reducing end with thiosemicarbazide, then immobilized on a gold substrate in striped micropatterns via S–Au chemisorption. Gold micropatterns ranged from 100 to 1000 µm in width. Effects of patterning geometries on C2C12 cell alignment, morphology, and gene expression were investigated. Unidirectional alignment of C2C12 cells having GlcNAc6 receptors was clearly observed along the micropatterns. Decreasing striped pattern width increased cell attachment and proliferation, suggesting that the fixed GlcNAc6 and micropatterns impacted cell function. Possibly, interactions between nonreducing end groups of fixed GlcNAc6 and cell surface receptors initiated cellular alignment. Our technique for mimicking native tissue organization should advance applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26784249

  11. Anodic microbial community diversity as a predictor of the power output of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Stratford, James P; Beecroft, Nelli J; Slade, Robert C T; Grüning, André; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between the diversity of mixed-species microbial consortia and their electrogenic potential in the anodes of microbial fuel cells was examined using different diversity measures as predictors. Identical microbial fuel cells were sampled at multiple time-points. Biofilm and suspension communities were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to calculate the number and relative abundance of species. Shannon and Simpson indices and richness were examined for association with power using bivariate and multiple linear regression, with biofilm DNA as an additional variable. In simple bivariate regressions, the correlation of Shannon diversity of the biofilm and power is stronger (r=0.65, p=0.001) than between power and richness (r=0.39, p=0.076), or between power and the Simpson index (r=0.5, p=0.018). Using Shannon diversity and biofilm DNA as predictors of power, a regression model can be constructed (r=0.73, p<0.001). Ecological parameters such as the Shannon index are predictive of the electrogenic potential of microbial communities.

  12. Immobilization of yeast cells on hydrogel carriers obtained by radiation-induced polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Lu Zhao; Carenza, Mario; Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Yoshida, Masaru; Fujimura, Takashi

    Polymer hydrogels were obtained by radiation-induced copolymerization at -78°C of aqueous solutions of acrylic and methacrylic esters. The matrices were characterized by equilibrium water content measurements, by optical microscopy observations and by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Yeast cells were immobilized on these hydrogels and the ethanol productivity by batch fermentation was determined. Matrix hydrophilicity and porosity were found to deeply influence the adhesion of yeast cells and, hence, the ethanol productivity. The latter as well as other physico-chemical properties were also affected by the presence of a crosslinking agent added in small amounts to the polymerizing mixture.

  13. The use of covalently immobilized stem cell factor to selectively affect hematopoietic stem cell activity within a gelatin hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Mahadik, Bhushan P; Pedron Haba, Sara; Skertich, Luke J; Harley, Brendan A C

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare stem cell population found primarily in the bone marrow and responsible for the production of the body's full complement of blood and immune cells. Used clinically to treat a range of hematopoietic disorders, there is a significant need to identify approaches to selectively expand their numbers ex vivo. Here we describe a methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel for in vitro culture of primary murine HSCs. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a critical biomolecular component of native HSC niches in vivo and is used in large dosages in cell culture media for HSC expansion in vitro. We report a photochemistry based approach to covalently immobilize SCF within GelMA hydrogels via acrylate-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethers. PEG-functionalized SCF retains the native bioactivity of SCF but can be stably incorporated and retained within the GelMA hydrogel over 7 days. Freshly-isolated murine HSCs cultured in GelMA hydrogels containing covalently-immobilized SCF showed reduced proliferation and improved selectivity for maintaining primitive HSCs. Comparatively, soluble SCF within the GelMA hydrogel network induced increased proliferation of differentiating hematopoietic cells. We used a microfluidic templating approach to create GelMA hydrogels containing gradients of immobilized SCF that locally direct HSC response. Together, we report a biomaterial platform to examine the effect of the local presentation of soluble vs. matrix-immobilized biomolecular signals on HSC expansion and lineage specification. This approach may be a critical component of a biomaterial-based artificial bone marrow to provide the correct sequence of niche signals to grow HSCs in the laboratory.

  14. The use of covalently immobilized stem cell factor to selectively affect hematopoietic stem cell activity within a gelatin hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Mahadik, B.P.; Haba, S. Pedron; Skertich, L.J.; Harley, B.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare stem cell population found primarily in the bone marrow and responsible for the production of the body’s full complement of blood and immune cells. Used clinically to treat a range of hematopoietic disorders, there is a significant need to identify approaches to selectively expand their numbers ex vivo. Here we describe a methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel for in vitro culture of primary murine HSCs. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a critical biomolecular component of native HSC niches in vivo and is used in large dosages in cell culture media for HSC expansion in vitro. We report a photochemistry based approach to covalently immobilize SCF within GelMA hydrogels via acrylate-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethers. PEG-functionalized SCF retains the native bioactivity of SCF but can be stably incorporated and retained within the GelMA hydrogel over 7 days. Freshly-isolated murine HSCs cultured in GelMA hydrogels containing covalently-immobilized SCF showed reduced proliferation and improved selectivity for maintaining primitive HSCs. Comparatively, soluble SCF within the GelMA hydrogel network induced increased proliferation of differentiating hematopoietic cells. We used a microfluidic templating approach to create GelMA hydrogels containing gradients of immobilized SCF that locally direct HSC response. Together, we report a biomaterial platform to examine the effect of the local presentation of soluble vs. matrix-immobilized biomolecular signals on HSC expansion and lineage specification. This approach may be a critical component of a biomaterial-based artificial bone marrow to provide the correct sequence of niche signals to grow HSCs in the laboratory. PMID:26232879

  15. Constrained diffusion or immobile fraction on cell surfaces: a new interpretation.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, T J; Brust-Mascher, I; Slattery, J P; Baird, B; Webb, W W

    1996-01-01

    Protein lateral mobility in cell membranes is generally measured using fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR). Since the development of this technique, the data have been interpreted by assuming free Brownian diffusion of cell surface receptors in two dimensions, an interpretation that requires that a subset of the diffusing species remains immobile. The origin of this so-called immobile fraction remains a mystery. In FPR, the motions of thousands of particles are inherently averaged, inevitably masking the details of individual motions. Recently, tracking of individual cell surface receptors has identified several distinct types of motion (Gross and Webb, 1988; Ghosh and Webb, 1988, 1990, 1994; Kusumi et al. 1993; Qian et al. 1991; Slattery, 1995), thereby calling into question the classical interpretation of FPR data as free Brownian motion of a limited mobile fraction. We have measured the motion of fluorescently labeled immunoglobulin E complexed to high affinity receptors (Fc epsilon RI) on rat basophilic leukemia cells using both single particle tracking and FPR. As in previous studies, our tracking results show that individual receptors may diffuse freely, or may exhibit restricted, time-dependent (anomalous) diffusion. Accordingly, we have analyzed FPR data by a new model to take this varied motion into account, and we show that the immobile fraction may be due to particles moving with the anomalous subdiffusion associated with restricted lateral mobility. Anomalous subdiffusion denotes random molecular motion in which the mean square displacements grow as a power law in time with a fractional positive exponent less than one. These findings call for a new model of cell membrane structure. PMID:8744314

  16. Segregation of the Anodic Microbial Communities in a Microbial Fuel Cell Cascade.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Douglas M; Smith, Ann; Dahale, Sonal; Stratford, James P; Li, Jia V; Grüning, André; Bushell, Michael E; Marchesi, Julian R; Avignone Rossa, C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analyzed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities.

  17. Segregation of the Anodic Microbial Communities in a Microbial Fuel Cell Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Douglas M.; Smith, Ann; Dahale, Sonal; Stratford, James P.; Li, Jia V.; Grüning, André; Bushell, Michael E.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Avignone Rossa, C.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analyzed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:27242723

  18. Immobilization of cells by electrostatic droplet generation: a model system for potential application in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, V; Djonlagic, J; Obradovic, B; Nedovic, V; Bugarski, B

    2006-01-01

    The process of electrostatic extrusion as a method for cell immobilization was investigated that could be used for potential applications in medicine. An attempt was made to assess the effects of cell addition and polymer concentration on the overall entrapment procedure, ie, on each stage of immobilization: polymer-cell suspension rheological characteristics, electrostatic extrusion process, and the process of gelation. The findings should contribute to a better understanding of polymer–cell interactions, which could be crucial in possible medical treatments. Alginate–yeast was used as a model system for carrier-cells. The electrostatic extrusion was considered as a complex two-phase flow system and the effects of cell and alginate concentrations on the resulting microbead size and uniformity were assessed. Under investigated conditions, microbeads 50–600 μm in diameter were produced and the increase in both alginate and cell concentrations resulted in larger microbeads with higher standard deviations in size. We attempted to rationalize the findings by rheological characterization of the cell–alginate suspensions. Rheological characterization revealed non-Newtonian, pseudoplastic behavior of cell-alginate suspensions with higher viscosities at higher alginate concentrations. However, the presence of cells even at high concentrations (5×108 and 1×109 cells/mL) did not significantly affect the rheological properties of Na-alginate solution. Lastly, we investigated the kinetics of alginate gelation with respect to the quantity of Ca2+ ions and cell presence. The gelation kinetics were examined under conditions of limited supply with Ca2+ ions, which can be essential for immobilization of highly sensitive mammalian cells that require minimal exposure to CaCl2 solution. The molar ratio of G units to Ca2+ ions of 3.8:1 provided complete crosslinking, while the increase in alginate concentration resulted in prolonged gelation times but higher strength of the

  19. Biochips for cell biology by combined dip-pen nanolithography and DNA-directed protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Arrabito, Giuseppe; Reisewitz, Stephanie; Dehmelt, Leif; Bastiaens, Philippe I; Pignataro, Bruno; Schroeder, Hendrik; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2013-12-20

    A general methodology for patterning of multiple protein ligands with lateral dimensions below those of single cells is described. It employs dip pen nanolithography (DPN) patterning of DNA oligonucleotides which are then used as capture strands for DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) of oligonucleotide-tagged proteins. This study reports the development and optimization of PEG-based liquid ink, used as carrier for the immobilization of alkylamino-labeled DNA oligomers on chemically activated glass surfaces. The resulting DNA arrays have typical spot sizes of 4-5 μm with a pitch of 12 μm micrometer. It is demonstrated that the arrays can be further functionalized with covalent DNA-streptavidin (DNA-STV) conjugates bearing ligands recognized by cells. To this end, biotinylated epidermal growth factor (EGF) is coupled to the DNA-STV conjugates, the resulting constructs are hybridized with the DNA arrays and the resulting surfaces used for the culturing of MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cells. Owing to the lateral diffusion of transmembrane proteins in the cell's plasma membrane, specific recruitment and concentration of EGF receptor can be induced specifically at the sites where the ligands are bound on the solid substrate. This is a clear demonstration that this method is suitable for precise functional manipulations of subcellular areas within living cells. PMID:23881817

  20. Biochips for cell biology by combined dip-pen nanolithography and DNA-directed protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Arrabito, Giuseppe; Reisewitz, Stephanie; Dehmelt, Leif; Bastiaens, Philippe I; Pignataro, Bruno; Schroeder, Hendrik; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2013-12-20

    A general methodology for patterning of multiple protein ligands with lateral dimensions below those of single cells is described. It employs dip pen nanolithography (DPN) patterning of DNA oligonucleotides which are then used as capture strands for DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) of oligonucleotide-tagged proteins. This study reports the development and optimization of PEG-based liquid ink, used as carrier for the immobilization of alkylamino-labeled DNA oligomers on chemically activated glass surfaces. The resulting DNA arrays have typical spot sizes of 4-5 μm with a pitch of 12 μm micrometer. It is demonstrated that the arrays can be further functionalized with covalent DNA-streptavidin (DNA-STV) conjugates bearing ligands recognized by cells. To this end, biotinylated epidermal growth factor (EGF) is coupled to the DNA-STV conjugates, the resulting constructs are hybridized with the DNA arrays and the resulting surfaces used for the culturing of MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cells. Owing to the lateral diffusion of transmembrane proteins in the cell's plasma membrane, specific recruitment and concentration of EGF receptor can be induced specifically at the sites where the ligands are bound on the solid substrate. This is a clear demonstration that this method is suitable for precise functional manipulations of subcellular areas within living cells.

  1. The Microbial Fuel Cell as an Education Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewan, Alim; Van Wie, Bernard; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical engineering programs offer courses from a variety of disciplines to teach their students multidisciplinary concepts, but often these courses lack appropriate tools for linking newly learned concepts to principles learned in the core courses. This paper describes our experience of incorporating a microbial fuel cell education module…

  2. Oxygen - Enemy or Friend for Microbial Fuel Cell Anode Performance?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until recently, scientists and engineers have held a strong belief that oxygen intrusion into the anode chamber of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) is detrimental to microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance because oxygen acts as an alternate electron acceptor. This would, according to recent beliefs...

  3. Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with a Pressurized Cathode Chamber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) power densities are often constrained by the oxygen reduction reaction rate on the cathode electrode. One important factor for this is the normally low solubility of oxygen in the aqueous cathode solution creating mass transport limitations, which hinder oxygen reduction a...

  4. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  5. Nitrilase-catalyzed conversion of (R,S)-mandelonitrile by immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli cells harboring nitrilase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Ya-Ping; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-07-01

    (R)-(-)-Mandelic acid (R-MA) is widely used both as a versatile intermediate for pharmaceuticals and a resolving agent in chiral resolution processes. In the current study, to improve the stability of operation, recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing nitrilase from Alcaligenes faecalis were immobilized for the enantioselective hydrolysis of (R,S)-mandelonitrile to R-MA. Different immobilization methods including entrapment matrices, entrapment matrices cross-linked by cross-linking and polymerization agents, and direct cross-linking cells using glutaraldehyde (GA) or bionic silicon were investigated. To facilitate industrial solid-liquid separation, the direct cross-linking recombinant E. coli cells using diatomite/GA/polyethyleneimine with 135.95% relative activity compared with free cells was chosen using water as the reaction medium. The operational stability of the immobilized cells was obviously superior to that of free cells, without significant activity loss after 28 cycles of batch reaction and the successive production of R-MA could reach 1.88 M. Moreover, the immobilized cells showed good storage stability with about 52% relative activity after storing for 30 days at 4 °C. Therefore, the immobilized biocatalyst is very promising for upscale production of optically pure R-MA with high performance and low cost.

  6. High shear enrichment improves the performance of the anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hai The; Boon, Nico; Aelterman, Peter; Clauwaert, Peter; De Schamphelaire, Liesje; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Verbeken, Kim; Rabaey, Korneel; Verstraete, Willy

    2008-01-01

    Summary In many microbial bioreactors, high shear rates result in strong attachment of microbes and dense biofilms. In this study, high shear rates were applied to enrich an anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Enrichment at a shear rate of about 120 s−1 resulted in the production of a current and power output two to three times higher than those in the case of low shear rates (around 0.3 s−1). Biomass and biofilm analyses showed that the anodic biofilm from the MFC enriched under high shear rate conditions, in comparison with that under low shear rate conditions, had a doubled average thickness and the biomass density increased with a factor 5. The microbial community of the former, as analysed by DGGE, was significantly different from that of the latter. The results showed that enrichment by applying high shear rates in an MFC can result in a specific electrochemically active biofilm that is thicker and denser and attaches better, and hence has a better performance. PMID:21261869

  7. Microbial community dynamics in continuous microbial fuel cells fed with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Sotres, Ana; Tey, Laura; Bonmatí, August; Viñas, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Two-chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry were assessed. Additionally, the use of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES-Inh) was studied. The synthetic wastewater-fed MFC (MFCSW) showed a maximum power density (PDmax) of 2138mWm(-3), and the addition of BES-Inh (10mM) did not show any improvement in its performance (PDmax=2078mWm(-3)). When pig slurry was used as feed (MFCPS), PDmax increased up to 5623mWm(-3). The microbial community composition was affected by the type of substrate used. While, Pseudomonadaceae and Clostridiaceae were the most representative families within the acetate-based medium, Flavobacteriaceae, Chitinophagaceae, Comamonadaceae and Nitrosomonadaceae were predominant when pig slurry was used as feed. Otherwise, only the Eubacterial microbial community composition was strongly modified when adding BES-Inh, thus leading to an enrichment of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Oppositely, the Archaeal community was less affected by the addition of BES-Inh, and Methanosarcina sp., arose as the predominant family in both situations. Despite all the differences in microbial communities, 6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to Bacteroidetes (Porphyromonadaceae and Marinilabiaceae) and Firmicutes (Clostridiales) were found to be common to both MFCs, also for different contents of COD and N-NH4(+), and therefore could be considered as the bioanode core microbiome.

  8. Microbial fuel cell treatment of fuel process wastewater

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Tsouris, Constantino

    2013-12-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for cleansing fuel processing effluent containing carbonaceous compounds and inorganic salts, the method comprising contacting the fuel processing effluent with an anode of a microbial fuel ell, the anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of the carbonaceous compounds while producing electrical energy from the oxidative degradation, and directing the produced electrical energy to drive an electrosorption mechanism that operates to reduce the concentration of one or more inorganic salts in the fuel processing effluent, wherein the anode is in electrical communication with a cathode of the microbial fuel cell. The invention is also directed to an apparatus for practicing the method.

  9. Coastal microbial fuel cell: scaling laws and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; McNeilly, Frank J.; Thivierge, Daniel P.; Fredette, Albert R.

    2006-05-01

    Microbes, like Geobacters, have inhabited the seafloors around the world since the early days of earth. Such regions are anaerobic and they gain energy by using the widely prevalent iron oxides and organic matters. Because they appear to colonize conducting surfaces that act as sinks of electrons, microbial fuel cells have been shown to convert organic matter to electricity. A microbial fuel cell system has been deployed in Narragansett Bay in Newport, Rhode Island for a year. Currently, the cathode and anode areas are of the order of that of a small wind mill. Measurements have been carried out to determine the marine scaling laws of power harvesting in passive benthic microbial fuel cells. The focus has been on the ocean engineering aspects such as marine scaling laws and the integration of the biochemical and the electronic systems. The characteristics examined are: the relationship of electrode surface area and power produced, the stabilization rates of ionic paths, that is, the effects of location depth of cathodes on stabilization after deployment, the effects of solar and lunar cycles in the Narragansett Bay on the dynamic components of power produced, and the hysteresis effects between periods of active power harvesting and dormancy; the effects of 'on sediment surface' versus 'in sediment' anode deployment have been examined for smaller electrode areas so far. A capacitance model of power consumption and harvesting has been proposed for the marine environment. It is assumed that the primordial benthic microbe laden layer of the earth acts like a giant capacitor. In the microbial fuel cell, this charged benthic layer acts in series with a smaller constant voltage DC power source. This giant benthic capacitance is a result of untapped accumulated charge from the microbes while the DC source originates from the real-time production due to the microbes. Finally, the microbial fuel cell is integrated with a power conversion system to intermittently energize a

  10. Electricity production and microbial biofilm characterization in cellulose-fed microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z; Steinberg, L M; Regan, J M

    2008-01-01

    Converting biodegradable materials into electricity, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) present a promising technology for renewable energy production in specific applications. Unlike typical soluble substrates that have been used as electron donors in MFC studies, cellulose is unique because it requires a microbial consortium that can metabolize both an insoluble electron donor (cellulose) and electron acceptor (electrode). In this study, electricity generation and the microbial ecology of cellulose-fed MFCs were analyzed using a defined co-culture of Clostridium cellulolyticum and Geobacter sulfurreducens. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR showed that when particulate MN301 cellulose was used as sole substrate, most Clostridium cells were found adhered to cellulose particles in suspension, while most Geobacter cells were attached to the electrode. By comparison, both bacteria resided in suspension and biofilm samples when soluble carboxymethyl cellulose was used. This distinct function-related distribution of the bacteria suggests an opportunity to optimize reactor operation by settling cellulose and decanting supernatant to extend cellulose hydrolysis and improve cellulose-electricity conversion.

  11. Immobilization of fibronectin in chitosan substrates improves cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Custódio, C A; Alves, C M; Reis, R L; Mano, J F

    2010-06-01

    Covalent grafting of biomolecules is a strategy to improve the biocompatibility and bioactivity of materials. However, it is critical to maintain the biological activity of the biomolecule upon its attachment to the surface. In the present study we compared the biological properties of chitosan, in which the surface was enriched with fibronectin (Fn), using two methodologies: chemical immobilization, using a water-soluble carbodiimide; and simple adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirmed the successful immobilization of Fn onto modified membranes. SaOs-2 cells were seeded onto these surfaces to assess the biological consequences of such modifications. The presence of Fn stimulated cell adhesion on chitosan. It was found that after 7 days of culture in the presence of covalently attached Fn, the cells are confluent; significantly fewer cells were detected in unmodified film and in film with adsorbed Fn. This result is consistent with the fact that considerable desorption of Fn from chitosan takes place within 24 h in culture medium. This study showed that Fn may be easily covalently attached onto chitosan substrates, improving the biological performance of the material. The technique could find applications in tissue-engineering strategies, as the surface modification of chitosan-based substrates could be carried out in more complex geometries, such as in scaffolds or particles. PMID:20049746

  12. Chitin hydrolysis assisted by cell wall degrading enzymes immobilized of Thichoderma asperellum on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol beads.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Kátia F; Cortijo-Triviño, David; Batista, Karla A; Ulhoa, Cirano J; García-Ruiz, Pedro A

    2013-07-01

    In this study, cell wall degrading enzymes produced by Thrichoderma asperellum (TCWDE) were immobilized on totally cinnamoylated D-sorbitol (TCNSO) beads and used for chitin hydrolysis. In order to optimize immobilization efficiency, the reaction time was varied from 2 to 12 h and reactions were conducted in the presence or absence of Na2SO4. Immobilized enzymes were analysed concerning to thermal and operational stability. Immobilization in presence of Na2SO4 was 54% more efficient than immobilization in absence of salt. After optimization, 32% of the total enzyme offered was immobilized, with 100% of bounding efficiency, measured as the relation between protein and enzyme immobilized. Free and TCNSO-TCWDE presented very similar kinetics with maximum hydrolysis reached at 90 min of reaction. Thermal stability of both free and TCNSO-TCWDE was similar, with losses in activity after 55 °C. Moreover, free and TCNSO-TCWDE retained 100% activity after 3h incubation at 55 °C. TCNSO-TCWDE were used in a bath-wise reactor during 14 cycles, producing 1825 μg of N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) maintaining 83% of initial activity.

  13. [Application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) in solid waste composting].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinxin; Wang, Xin; Tang, Jingchun

    2012-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a new technology that can recover energy from biomass with simultaneous waste treatment. This technique has been developed fast in recent years in combining with environmental techniques such as wastewater treatment, degradation of toxic pollutants and desalination. With the increase of solid waste, applying MFC in composting is promising due to its property of waste disposal with simultaneous energy generation. In this paper, the microbial community of MFCs during composting was summarized. Four major influencing factors including electrodes, separators, oxygen supplement and configurations on the performance of composting MFCs were discussed. The characteristics of composting MFC as a new technique for reducing solid waste were as follows: high microbial biomass resulted in the high current density; adaptable to different environmental conditions; self-adjustable temperature with high energy efficiency; the transportation of proton from anode to cathode were limited by different solid substrates.

  14. [Microbial fuel cells as an alternative power supply].

    PubMed

    Il'in, V K; Smirnov, I A; Soldatov, P É; Korshunov, D V; Tiurin-Kuz'min, A Iu; Starkova, L V; Chumakov, P E; Emel'ianova, L K; Novikova, L M; Debabov, V G; Voeĭkova, T A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the work was designing and prototyping of microbial fuel cells (MFC) and comparative evaluation of the electrogenic activity of wastewater autochthonous microorganisms as well as bacterial monocultures. Objects were model electrogenic strain Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and an Ochrobactrum sp. strain isolated from the active anode biofilm of MFC composed as an electricity generating system. The study employed the methods typically used for aerobic and anaerobic strains, current measurement, identification of new electrogenic strains in microbial association of wastewater sludge and species definition by rRNA 16-S. As a result, two MFCs prototypes were tried out. Besides, it was shown that electrogenic activity of S. oneidensis MR-1 and Ochrobactrum sp. monocultures is similar but differs from that of the microbial association of the anode biofilm.

  15. Programmed Cell Death and Complexity in Microbial Systems.

    PubMed

    Durand, Pierre M; Sym, Stuart; Michod, Richard E

    2016-07-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is central to organism development and for a long time was considered a hallmark of multicellularity. Its discovery, therefore, in unicellular organisms presents compelling questions. Why did PCD evolve? What is its ecological effect on communities? To answer these questions, one is compelled to consider the impacts of PCD beyond the cell, for death obviously lowers the fitness of the cell. Here, we examine the ecological effects of PCD in different microbial scenarios and conclude that PCD can increase biological complexity. In mixed microbial communities, the mode of death affects the microenvironment, impacting the interactions between taxa. Where the population comprises groups of relatives, death has a more explicit effect. Death by lysis or other means can be harmful, while PCD can evolve by providing advantages to relatives. The synchronization of death between individuals suggests a group level property is being maintained and the mode of death also appears to have had an impact during the origin of multicellularity. PCD can result in the export of fitness from the cell to the group level via re-usable resources and PCD may also provide a mechanism for how groups beget new groups comprising kin. Furthermore, PCD is a means for solving a central problem of group living - the toxic effects of death - by making resources in dying cells beneficial to others. What emerges from the data reviewed here is that while PCD carries an obvious cost to the cell, it can be a driver of complexity in microbial communities. PMID:27404254

  16. Simultaneous Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentations by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni Cells Co-immobilized in Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Bleve, Gianluca; Tufariello, Maria; Vetrano, Cosimo; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) usually takes place after the end of alcoholic fermentation (AF). However, the inoculation of lactic acid bacteria together with yeast starter cultures is a promising system to enhance the quality and safety of wine. In recent years, the use of immobilized cell systems has been investigated, with interesting results, for the production of different fermented foods and beverages. In this study we have carried out the simultaneous immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni in alginate beads and used them in microvinifications tests to produce Negroamaro wine. The process was monitored by chemical and sensorial analyses and dominance of starters and cell leaking from beads were also checked. Co-immobilization of S. cerevisiae and O. oeni allowed to perform an efficient fermentation process, producing low volatile acidity levels and ethanol and glycerol concentrations comparable with those obtained by cell sequential inoculum and co-inoculum of yeast and bacteria cells in free form. More importantly, co-immobilization strategy produced a significant decrease of the time requested to complete AF and MLF. The immobilized cells could be efficiently reused for the wine fermentation at least three times without any apparent loss of cell metabolic activities. This integrated biocatalytic system is able to perform simultaneously AF and MLF, producing wines similar in organoleptic traits in comparison with wines fermented following traditional sequential AF and MLF with free cell starters. The immobilized-cell system, that we here describe for the first time in our knowledge, offers many advantages over conventional free cell fermentations, including: (i) elimination of non-productive cell growth phases; (ii) feasibility of continuous processing; (iii) re-use of the biocatalyst. PMID:27379072

  17. Simultaneous Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentations by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni Cells Co-immobilized in Alginate Beads.

    PubMed

    Bleve, Gianluca; Tufariello, Maria; Vetrano, Cosimo; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) usually takes place after the end of alcoholic fermentation (AF). However, the inoculation of lactic acid bacteria together with yeast starter cultures is a promising system to enhance the quality and safety of wine. In recent years, the use of immobilized cell systems has been investigated, with interesting results, for the production of different fermented foods and beverages. In this study we have carried out the simultaneous immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni in alginate beads and used them in microvinifications tests to produce Negroamaro wine. The process was monitored by chemical and sensorial analyses and dominance of starters and cell leaking from beads were also checked. Co-immobilization of S. cerevisiae and O. oeni allowed to perform an efficient fermentation process, producing low volatile acidity levels and ethanol and glycerol concentrations comparable with those obtained by cell sequential inoculum and co-inoculum of yeast and bacteria cells in free form. More importantly, co-immobilization strategy produced a significant decrease of the time requested to complete AF and MLF. The immobilized cells could be efficiently reused for the wine fermentation at least three times without any apparent loss of cell metabolic activities. This integrated biocatalytic system is able to perform simultaneously AF and MLF, producing wines similar in organoleptic traits in comparison with wines fermented following traditional sequential AF and MLF with free cell starters. The immobilized-cell system, that we here describe for the first time in our knowledge, offers many advantages over conventional free cell fermentations, including: (i) elimination of non-productive cell growth phases; (ii) feasibility of continuous processing; (iii) re-use of the biocatalyst. PMID:27379072

  18. Autologous transplant: microbial contamination of hematopoietic stem cell products.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Igor Dullius; Schmalfuss, Tissiana; Röhsig, Liane Marise; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells from peripheral blood (HPCPB) are commonly used for autologous and allogenic transplants in patients with most various onco-hematological diseases, and despite the utilization of sterile techniques during collection and processing of these products, bacterial contamination can occur. This study aimed to investigate the microbial contamination of HPCPB products. Microbial cultures of 837 HPCPB products between the year 2000 and 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to determine the incidence of culture positivity and identify the main organisms that cause contamination. The microbiological studies were performed with an automated system (BacT/Alert(®) bioMérieux Corporate). Thirty-six (4.3%) of 837 microbial cultures were contaminated. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most frequent bacteria isolated from HPCPB products (20 [56%] of the 36 positive microbial cultures). Considering the 36 contaminated samples, 22 HPCPB products were infused and 14 discarded. Pre- and post-infusion antibiotic therapy of the patients transfused with contaminated products was established based on the isolated microorganism and its antibiogram. Microbial contamination rate of HPCPB products was low. Clinically significant outcomes after infusion of contaminated HPCPB products were not observed. PMID:22846122

  19. Oxygen supply for CHO cells immobilized on a packed-bed of Fibra-Cel disks.

    PubMed

    Meuwly, F; Loviat, F; Ruffieux, P-A; Bernard, A R; Kadouri, A; von Stockar, U

    2006-03-01

    Packed-bed bioreactors (PBR) have proven to be efficient systems to culture mammalian cells at very high cell density in perfusion mode, thus leading to very high volumetric productivity. However, the immobilized cells must be continuously supplied with all nutrients in sufficient quantities to remain viable and productive over the full duration of the perfusion culture. Among all nutrients, oxygen is the most critical since it is present at very low concentration due to its low solubility in cell culture medium. This work presents the development of a model for oxygenation in a packed-bed bioreactor system. The experimental system used to develop the model was a packed-bed of Fibra-Cel disk carriers used to cultivate Chinese Hamster Ovary cells at high density ( approximately 6.1 x 10(7) cell/mL) in perfusion mode. With the help of this model, it was possible to identify if a PBR system is operated in optimal or sub-optimal conditions. Using the model, two options were proposed, which could improve the performance of the basal system by about twofold, that is, by increasing the density of immobilized cells per carrier volume from 6.1 x 10(7) to 1.2 x 10(8) cell/mL, or by increasing the packed-bed height from 0.2 to 0.4 m. Both strategies would be rather simple to test and implement in the packed-bed bioreactor system used for this study. As a result, it would be possible to achieve a substantial improvement of about twofold higher productivity as compared with the basal conditions.

  20. Characteristics of an immobilized yeast cell system using very high gravity for the fermentation of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hairui; Yu, Jianliang; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics of ethanol production by immobilized yeast cells were investigated for both repeated batch fermentation and continuous fermentation. With an initial sugar concentration of 280 g/L during the repeated batch fermentation, more than 98% of total sugar was consumed in 65 h with an average ethanol concentration and ethanol yield of 130.12 g/L and 0.477 g ethanol/g consumed sugar, respectively. The immobilized yeast cell system was reliable for at least 10 batches and for a period of 28 days without accompanying the regeneration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inside the carriers. The multistage continuous fermentation was carried out in a five-stage column bioreactor with a total working volume of 3.75 L. The bioreactor was operated for 26 days at a dilution rate of 0.015 h(-1). The ethanol concentration of the effluent reached 130.77 g/L ethanol while an average 8.18 g/L residual sugar remained. Due to the high osmotic pressure and toxic ethanol, considerable yeast cells died without regeneration, especially in the last two stages, which led to the breakdown of the whole system of multistage continuous fermentation.

  1. Effects of lubricant and autologous bone marrow stromal cell augmentation on immobilized flexor tendon repairs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Haruhiko; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test a novel treatment that carbodiimide-derivatized-hyaluronic acid-lubricin (cd-HA-lubricin) combined cell-based therapy in an immobilized flexor tendon repair in a canine model. Seventy-eight flexor tendons from 39 dogs were transected. One tendon was treated with cd-HA-lubricin plus an interpositional graft of 8 × 10(5) BMSCs and GDF-5. The other tendon was repaired without treatment. After 21 day of immobilization, 19 dogs were sacrificed; the remaining 20 dogs underwent a 21-day rehabilitation protocol before euthanasia. The work of flexion, tendon gliding resistance, and adhesion score in treated tendons were significantly less than the untreated tendons (p < 0.05). The failure strength of the untreated tendons was higher than the treated tendons at 21 and 42 days (p < 0.05). However, there is no significant difference in stiffness between two groups at day 42. Histologic analysis of treated tendons showed a smooth surface and viable transplanted cells 42 days after the repair, whereas untreated tendons showed severe adhesion formation around the repair site. The combination of lubricant and cell treatment resulted in significantly improved digit function, reduced adhesion formation. This novel treatment can address the unmet needs of patients who are unable to commence an early mobilization protocol after flexor tendon repair. PMID:26177854

  2. Production of cellulase in a spouted bed fermentor using cells immobilized in biomass support particles

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, C.; Fukuda, H.; Atkinson, B.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous cellulase production by Trichoderma viride QM 9123, immobilized in 6 mm diameter, spherical, stainless steel biomass support particles, has been achieved using a medium containing glucose as the main carbon source. Experiments were carried out in a 10-L spouted bed fermentor. In this type of reactor recycled broth is used to create a jet at the base of a bed of particles, causing the particles to spout and circulate. During the circulation, particles pass through a region of high shear near the jet inlet. This effectively prevents a buildup of excess biomass and thus enables steady-state conditions to be achieved during continuous operation. Continuous production of cellulase was achieved at significantly higher yield and productivity than in conventional systems. At a dilution rate of 0.15 h/sup -1/ (nominal washout rate for freely suspended cells is 0.012 h/sup -1/), the yield of cellulase on glucose was 31% higher than that measured during batch operation, while the volumetric productivity (31.5 FPA U/L x h) was 53% greater than in the batch system. The specific cellulase productivity of the immobilized cells was more than 3 times that of freely suspended cells, showing that diffusional limitations can be beneficial. This offers significant opportunity for the further development of biomass support particles and associated bioreactors.

  3. Immobilized cells of recombinant Escherichia coli strain for continuous production of L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Grazyna; Sobierajski, Bogusław; Chmiel, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    For L-aspartic acid biosynthesis, high production cells of Escherichia coli mutant B-715 and P1 were immobilized in chitosan gel using a technique developed in our laboratory. The immobilization process reduced initial activity of the intact cells, however, the biocatalyst produced was very stabile for long-term use in multi-repeated batch or continuous processes. Temperature influence on the conversion of ammonium fumarate to L-aspartic acid was investigated. In long-term experiments, over 603 hours, the temperature 40 degrees C was found to be the best for both biocatalyst stability and high conversion rate. The optimum substrate concentration was 1.0 M. Continuous production of L-aspartic acid was investigated in three types of column bioreactors characterized by different volumes as well as different high to biocatalyst bed volume rations (Hz/Vz). The highest conversion rate, 99.8%, and the productivity 6 g/g/h (mass of L-aspartic acid per dry mass of cells in biocatalyst per time unit) was achieved in the bioreactor with the highest value Hz/Vz = 3.1, and liquid hour space velocity value of 5.2, defined as the volume of feeding substrate passed per volume of catalyst in bioreactor per one hour. PMID:21905626

  4. Innate and cytokine-driven signals, rather than microbial antigens, dominate in natural killer T cell activation during microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Tatituri, Raju V.V.; Watts, Gerald F.M.; Bhowruth, Veemal; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A.; Barton, Nathaniel; Cohen, Nadia R.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2011-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are critical for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. However, the central question of how iNKT cells are activated by microbes has not been fully explained. The example of adaptive MHC-restricted T cells, studies using synthetic pharmacological α-galactosylceramides, and the recent discovery of microbial iNKT cell ligands have all suggested that recognition of foreign lipid antigens is the main driver for iNKT cell activation during infection. However, when we compared the role of microbial antigens versus innate cytokine-driven mechanisms, we found that iNKT cell interferon-γ production after in vitro stimulation or infection with diverse bacteria overwhelmingly depended on toll-like receptor–driven IL-12. Importantly, activation of iNKT cells in vivo during infection with Sphingomonas yanoikuyae or Streptococcus pneumoniae, pathogens which are known to express iNKT cell antigens and which require iNKT cells for effective protection, also predominantly depended on IL-12. Constitutive expression of high levels of IL-12 receptor by iNKT cells enabled instant IL-12–induced STAT4 activation, demonstrating that among T cells, iNKT cells are uniquely equipped for immediate, cytokine-driven activation. These findings reveal that innate and cytokine-driven signals, rather than cognate microbial antigen, dominate in iNKT cell activation during microbial infections. PMID:21555485

  5. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for bioelectricity generation from organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M Azizul; Omine, Kiyoshi; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakata, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained a lot of attention recently as a mode of converting organic matter into electricity. In this study, a compost-based microbial fuel cell that generates bioelectricity by biodegradation of organic matter is developed. Grass cuttings, along with leaf mold, rice bran, oil cake (from mustard plants) and chicken droppings (waste from chickens) were used as organic waste. The electric properties of the MFC under anaerobic fermentation condition were investigated along with the influence of different types of membranes, the mixing of fly ash, and different types of electrode materials. It is observed that the maximum voltage was increased by mixing fly ash. Cellophane showed the highest value of voltage (around 350mV). Bamboo charcoal is good for anode material; however carbon fiber is better for the cathode material in terms of optimization of power generated. This developed MFC is a simple cell to generate electricity from organic waste.

  6. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for bioelectricity generation from organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M Azizul; Omine, Kiyoshi; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakata, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained a lot of attention recently as a mode of converting organic matter into electricity. In this study, a compost-based microbial fuel cell that generates bioelectricity by biodegradation of organic matter is developed. Grass cuttings, along with leaf mold, rice bran, oil cake (from mustard plants) and chicken droppings (waste from chickens) were used as organic waste. The electric properties of the MFC under anaerobic fermentation condition were investigated along with the influence of different types of membranes, the mixing of fly ash, and different types of electrode materials. It is observed that the maximum voltage was increased by mixing fly ash. Cellophane showed the highest value of voltage (around 350mV). Bamboo charcoal is good for anode material; however carbon fiber is better for the cathode material in terms of optimization of power generated. This developed MFC is a simple cell to generate electricity from organic waste. PMID:23962448

  7. Immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells in carboxymethyl cellulose for production of ethanol from cheese whey: experimental and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Roohina, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Maedeh; Najafpour, Ghasem D

    2016-09-01

    Cheese whey fermentation to ethanol using immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells was investigated in batch and continuous operation. In batch fermentation, the yeast cells were immobilized in carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) polymer and also synthesized graft copolymer of CMC with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone, denoted as CMC-g-PVP, and the efficiency of the two developed cell entrapped beads for lactose fermentation to ethanol was examined. The yeast cells immobilized in CMC-g-PVP performed slightly better than CMC with ethanol production yields of 0.52 and 0.49 g ethanol/g lactose, respectively. The effect of supplementation of cheese whey with lactose (42, 70, 100 and 150 g/l) on fermentative performance of K. marxianus immobilized in CMC beads was considered and the results were used for kinetic studies. The first order reaction model was suitable to describe the kinetics of substrate utilization and modified Gompertz model was quite successful to predict the ethanol production. For continuous ethanol fermentation, a packed-bed immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was operated at several hydraulic retention times; HRTs of 11, 15 and 30 h. At the HRT of 30 h, the ethanol production yield using CMC beads was 0.49 g/g which implies that 91.07 % of the theoretical yield was achieved.

  8. Preservation of Bacillus firmus strain 37 and optimization of cyclodextrin biosynthesis by cells immobilized on loofa sponge.

    PubMed

    Pazzetto, Rúbia; Ferreira, Sabrina Barbosa de Souza; Santos, Elder James Silva; Moriwaki, Cristiane; Guedes, Teresinha Aparecida; Matioli, Graciette

    2012-01-01

    The preservation of Bacillus firmus strain 37 cells by lyophilization was evaluated and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) production by cells immobilized on loofa sponge. Interactions were studied with the variables temperature, pH and dextrin concentration using a central composite design (CCD). Immobilization time influence on β-CD production was also investigated. B. firmus strain 37 cells remained viable after one year of storage, showing that the lyophilization is a suitable method for preservation of the microorganism. From the three-dimensional diagrams and contour plots, the best conditions for β-CD production were determined: temperature 60 °C, pH 8, and 18% dextrin. Considering that the amount of dextrin was high, a new assay was carried out, in which dextrin concentrations of 10, 15, and 18% were tested and the temperature of 60 °C and pH 8 were maintained. The results achieved showed very small differences and therefore, for economic reasons, the use of 10% dextrin is suggested. Increasing the immobilization time of cells immobilized on synthetic sponge the β-CD production decreased and did not change for cells immobilized on loofa sponge. The results of this research are important for microorganism preservation and essential in the optimization of the biosynthesis of CD. PMID:22874792

  9. Preservation of Bacillus firmus strain 37 and optimization of cyclodextrin biosynthesis by cells immobilized on loofa sponge.

    PubMed

    Pazzetto, Rúbia; Ferreira, Sabrina Barbosa de Souza; Santos, Elder James Silva; Moriwaki, Cristiane; Guedes, Teresinha Aparecida; Matioli, Graciette

    2012-01-01

    The preservation of Bacillus firmus strain 37 cells by lyophilization was evaluated and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) production by cells immobilized on loofa sponge. Interactions were studied with the variables temperature, pH and dextrin concentration using a central composite design (CCD). Immobilization time influence on β-CD production was also investigated. B. firmus strain 37 cells remained viable after one year of storage, showing that the lyophilization is a suitable method for preservation of the microorganism. From the three-dimensional diagrams and contour plots, the best conditions for β-CD production were determined: temperature 60 °C, pH 8, and 18% dextrin. Considering that the amount of dextrin was high, a new assay was carried out, in which dextrin concentrations of 10, 15, and 18% were tested and the temperature of 60 °C and pH 8 were maintained. The results achieved showed very small differences and therefore, for economic reasons, the use of 10% dextrin is suggested. Increasing the immobilization time of cells immobilized on synthetic sponge the β-CD production decreased and did not change for cells immobilized on loofa sponge. The results of this research are important for microorganism preservation and essential in the optimization of the biosynthesis of CD.

  10. Immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells in carboxymethyl cellulose for production of ethanol from cheese whey: experimental and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Roohina, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Maedeh; Najafpour, Ghasem D

    2016-09-01

    Cheese whey fermentation to ethanol using immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells was investigated in batch and continuous operation. In batch fermentation, the yeast cells were immobilized in carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) polymer and also synthesized graft copolymer of CMC with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone, denoted as CMC-g-PVP, and the efficiency of the two developed cell entrapped beads for lactose fermentation to ethanol was examined. The yeast cells immobilized in CMC-g-PVP performed slightly better than CMC with ethanol production yields of 0.52 and 0.49 g ethanol/g lactose, respectively. The effect of supplementation of cheese whey with lactose (42, 70, 100 and 150 g/l) on fermentative performance of K. marxianus immobilized in CMC beads was considered and the results were used for kinetic studies. The first order reaction model was suitable to describe the kinetics of substrate utilization and modified Gompertz model was quite successful to predict the ethanol production. For continuous ethanol fermentation, a packed-bed immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was operated at several hydraulic retention times; HRTs of 11, 15 and 30 h. At the HRT of 30 h, the ethanol production yield using CMC beads was 0.49 g/g which implies that 91.07 % of the theoretical yield was achieved. PMID:27126500

  11. Efficient treatment of phenolic wastewater with high salinity using a novel integrated system of magnetically immobilized cells coupling with electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Shi, Shengnan; Song, Lun; Tan, Liang; Li, Meidi; Liu, Jiaxin; Xue, Lanlan

    2016-10-01

    A novel integrated system in which magnetically immobilized cells coupled with a pair of stainless iron meshes-graphite plate electrodes has been designed and operated to enhance the treatment performance of phenolic wastewater under high salinity. With NaCl concentration increased, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol and COD removal rates by integrated system increased significantly, which were obviously higher than the sum of removal rates by single magnetically immobilized cells and electrode reaction. This integrated system exhibited higher removal rates for all the compounds than that by single magnetically immobilized cells during six cycles for reuse, and it still performed better, even when the voltage was cut off. These results indicated that there was a coupling effect between biodegradation and electrode reaction. The investigation of phenol hydroxylase activity and cells concentration confirmed that electrode reaction played an important role in this coupling effect. PMID:27347805

  12. Efficient treatment of phenolic wastewater with high salinity using a novel integrated system of magnetically immobilized cells coupling with electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Shi, Shengnan; Song, Lun; Tan, Liang; Li, Meidi; Liu, Jiaxin; Xue, Lanlan

    2016-10-01

    A novel integrated system in which magnetically immobilized cells coupled with a pair of stainless iron meshes-graphite plate electrodes has been designed and operated to enhance the treatment performance of phenolic wastewater under high salinity. With NaCl concentration increased, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol and COD removal rates by integrated system increased significantly, which were obviously higher than the sum of removal rates by single magnetically immobilized cells and electrode reaction. This integrated system exhibited higher removal rates for all the compounds than that by single magnetically immobilized cells during six cycles for reuse, and it still performed better, even when the voltage was cut off. These results indicated that there was a coupling effect between biodegradation and electrode reaction. The investigation of phenol hydroxylase activity and cells concentration confirmed that electrode reaction played an important role in this coupling effect.

  13. Electricity generation from food wastes and microbial community structure in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianna; Tang, Yu; Liu, Bingfeng; Wu, Di; Ren, Nanqi; Xing, Defeng

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) was studied as an alternate and a novel way to dispose food wastes (FWs) in a waste-to-energy form. Different organic loading rate obviously affected the performance of MFCs fed with FWs. The maximum power density of ~18 W/m(3) (~556 mW/m(2)) was obtained at COD of 3200±400 mg/L and the maximum coulombic efficiency (CE) was ~27.0% at COD of 4900±350 mg/L. The maximum removals of COD, total carbohydrate (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) were ~86.4%, ~95.9% and ~16.1%, respectively. Microbial community analysis using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the combination of the dominant genera of the exoelectrogenic Geobacter and fermentative Bacteroides effectively drove highly efficient and reliable MFC systems with functions of organic matters degradation and electricity generation.

  14. Microbial community structure accompanied with electricity production in a constructed wetland plant microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    This study reveals the complex structure of bacterial and archaeal communities associated with a Canna indica plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) and its electricity production. The PMFC produced a maximum current of 105 mA/m(2) by utilizing rhizodeposits as the sole electron donor without any external nutrient or buffer supplements, which demonstrates the feasibility of PMFCs in practical oligotrophic conditions with low solution conductivity. The microbial diversity was significantly higher in the PMFC than non-plant controls or sediment-only controls, and pyrosequencing and clone library reveal that rhizodeposits conversion to current were carried out by syntrophic interactions between fermentative bacteria (e.g., Anaerolineaceae) and electrochemically active bacteria (e.g., Geobacter). Denitrifying bacteria and acetotrophic methanogens play a minor role in organics degradation, but abundant hydrogenotrophic methanogens and thermophilic archaea are likely main electron donor competitors.

  15. Use of immobilized cells of Zymomonas mobilis in a novel fluidized bioreactor to produce ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Wallace, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A novel 2-L fluidized bioreactor was designed and built and its performance characteristics were compared with those of an ordinary stirred-tank bioreactor. Calcium alginate beads containing immobilized cells of Zymomonas mobilis were used in both types of bioreactors to produce ethanol from glucose. The Ca-alginate beads were exposed to low shear rates inside the fluidized bioreactor and as a result the cell leakage from the beads was found to be about 100 times less than the cell leakage obtained in the mechanically stirred bioreactor. For the operating conditions studied, the fluidized bioreactor system gave at least 64% higher maximum rate of ethanol production and the power consumption per unit volume was found to be about four times less than that obtained with the mechanically stirred bioreactor. 9 figures, 1 table.

  16. Flexible Programming of Cell-Free Protein Synthesis Using Magnetic Bead-Immobilized Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ka-Young; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Park, Ji-Woong; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2012-01-01

    The use of magnetic bead-immobilized DNA as movable template for cell-free protein synthesis has been investigated. Magnetic microbeads containing chemically conjugated plasmids were used to direct cell-free protein synthesis, so that protein generation could be readily programmed, reset and reprogrammed. Protein synthesis by using this approach could be ON/OFF-controlled through repeated addition and removal of the microbead-conjugated DNA and employed in sequential expression of different genes in a same reaction mixture. Since the incubation periods of individual template plasmids are freely controllable, relative expression levels of multiple proteins can be tuned to desired levels. We expect that the presented results will find wide application to the flexible design and execution of synthetic pathways in cell-free chassis. PMID:22470570

  17. Immobilized cell reactor with simultaneous product separation. II. Experimental reactor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1985-07-01

    The Immobilized Cell Reactor-Separator (ICRS) consists of two column reactors: a cocurrent gas-liquid enricher followed by a countercurrent stripper. The columns are four-phase tubular reactors consisting of 1) an inert gas phase, 2) the liquid fermentation broth, 3) the solid column internal packing, and 4) the immobilized biological catalyst or cells. The application of the ICRS to the ethanol-from-whey-lactose fermentation system has been investigated. Operation in the liquid continuous or bubble flow regime allows a high liquid holdup in the reactor and consequent long and controllable liquid residence time but results in a high gas phase pressure drop over the length of the reactor and low gas flow rates. Operation in the gas continuous regime gives high gas flow rates and low pressure drop but also results in short liquid residence time and incomplete column wetting at low liquid loading rates using conventional gas-liquid column packings. Using cells absorbed to conventional ceramic column packing (0.25-in Intalox saddles), it was found that a good reaction could be obtained in the liquid continuous mode, but little separation, while in the gas continuous mode there was little reaction but good separation. Using cells sorbed to an absorbant matrix allowed operation in the gas continuous regime with a liquid holdup of up to 30% of the total reactor volume. Good reaction rates and product separation were obtained using this matrix. High reaction rates were obtained due to high density cell loading in the reactor. A dry cell density of up to 92 g/l reactor was obtained in the enricher. The enricher ethanol productivity ranged from 50 to 160 g/l h while the stripper productivity varied from 0 to 32 g/l h at different feed rates and concentrations. A separation efficiency of as high as 98% was obtained from the system.

  18. Nano-textured Substrates with Immobilized Aptamers for Cancer Cell Isolation and Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuan; Mahmood, M. Arif Iftakher; Li, Na; Allen, Peter B.; Kim, Young-tae; Bachoo, Robert; Ellington, Andrew D.; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Detection of a small number of circulating tumor cells is important, especially at the early stages of cancer. The small number of CTCs is hard to detect as very few approaches are sensitive enough to differentiate these from the pool of other cells. Improving the affinity of a selective surface-functionalized molecule is important given the sparsity of CTCs in vivo. There are a number of proteins and aptamers that provide such a high affinity but using a surface nano-texturing increases this affinity even further. Method This work reports an approach to improve affinity of tumor cell capture by using novel aptamers against cell-membrane over-expressed Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (EGFR) on a nano-textured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. Surface immobilized aptamers are used to specifically capture tumor cells from physiological samples. Results The nano-texturing of PDMS increased surface roughness at the nanoscale. This increased the effective surface area and resulted in a significantly higher degree of surface functionalization. The phenomenon resulted in increased density of immobilized EGFR specific RNA aptamer molecules and provided significantly higher efficiency to capture cancer cells from a mixture. The data showed that CTCs could be captured and enriched leading to higher yield, yet higher background. Conclusion The comparison of glass slides, plain PDMS and nano-textured PDMS functionalized with aptamers show that a two-fold approach of using aptamers on nano-textured PDMS can be an important factor for cancer cytology devices especially for the idea of lab-on-chip towards higher yield in capture efficiency. PMID:21766299

  19. Enhancing isomaltulose production by recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase: culture medium optimization containing agricultural wastes and cell immobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Xu, Hong; Yu, Jianguang; Wang, Yanyuan; Feng, Xiaohai; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2013-10-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose commercially used in food industries. In this work, recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase (SIase) was used to convert sucrose into isomaltulose. To develop an economical industrial medium, untreated cane molasses (10.63 g l⁻¹), yeast extract (25.93 g l⁻¹), and corn steep liquor (10.45 g l⁻¹) were used as main culture compositions for SIase production. The relatively high SIase activity (14.50 ± 0.11 U mg DCW⁻¹) was obtained by the recombinant cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on SIase production by engineered E. coli using untreated cane molasses. The recombinant E. coli cells expressing the SIase gene were immobilized in calcium alginate gel in order to improve the efficiency of recycling. The immobilization was most effective with 2 % (w/v) sodium alginate and 3 % (w/v) calcium chloride. The optimal initial biomass for immobilization was 20 % (w/v, wet wt.), with a hardening time of 8 h for cell immobilization. The immobilized E. coli cells exhibited good stability for 30 batches with the productivity of 0.45 g isomaltulose g pellet⁻¹ h⁻¹. A continuous isomaltulose formation process using a column reactor remained stable for 40 days with 83 ± 2 % isomaltulose yield, which would be beneficial for economical production of isomaltulose. PMID:23300051

  20. Enhancing isomaltulose production by recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase: culture medium optimization containing agricultural wastes and cell immobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Xu, Hong; Yu, Jianguang; Wang, Yanyuan; Feng, Xiaohai; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2013-10-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose commercially used in food industries. In this work, recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase (SIase) was used to convert sucrose into isomaltulose. To develop an economical industrial medium, untreated cane molasses (10.63 g l⁻¹), yeast extract (25.93 g l⁻¹), and corn steep liquor (10.45 g l⁻¹) were used as main culture compositions for SIase production. The relatively high SIase activity (14.50 ± 0.11 U mg DCW⁻¹) was obtained by the recombinant cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on SIase production by engineered E. coli using untreated cane molasses. The recombinant E. coli cells expressing the SIase gene were immobilized in calcium alginate gel in order to improve the efficiency of recycling. The immobilization was most effective with 2 % (w/v) sodium alginate and 3 % (w/v) calcium chloride. The optimal initial biomass for immobilization was 20 % (w/v, wet wt.), with a hardening time of 8 h for cell immobilization. The immobilized E. coli cells exhibited good stability for 30 batches with the productivity of 0.45 g isomaltulose g pellet⁻¹ h⁻¹. A continuous isomaltulose formation process using a column reactor remained stable for 40 days with 83 ± 2 % isomaltulose yield, which would be beneficial for economical production of isomaltulose.

  1. Co-immobilization of gradient-patterned growth factors for directed cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Stefonek-Puccinelli, Tracy Jane; Masters, Kristyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Cell migration is critically important for the repair of chronic wounds, which cost billions of dollars each year to treat and can lead to serious complications, including amputation and death. Growth factors, including epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), are known to be deficient in chronic wounds; unfortunately, traditional delivery of soluble growth factors to wounds is expensive and complicated by their degradation. We have previously shown that directed and accelerated keratinocyte migration could be achieved by creating immobilized gradients of EGF. In this work, we have optimized EGF gradients for cell migration, synthesized and characterized gradient patterns of IGF-1, and tested for migration synergy upon combination of EGF and IGF-1 patterns. An optimal EGF concentration and pattern were identified, resulting in migration that was almost 10-fold that achieved on unpatterned controls. Immobilization of IGF-1 gradients also accelerated and directed keratinocyte migration (p<0.05), however, no difference in migration was found across various IGF-1 concentrations or gradient patterns. Although combining EGF with IGF-1 patterns did not accelerate migration beyond levels achieved using EGF alone, these methods can be applied to create other types of multi-component gradients that will ultimately be utilized to create 3-D bioactive wound dressings. PMID:18850272

  2. Gradient immobilization of a cell adhesion RGD peptide on thermal responsive surface for regulating cell adhesion and detachment.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhui; Wu, Jindan; Gao, Changyou

    2011-06-15

    Using surface initiated atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and an injection method, a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-poly(acrylic acid)-g-RGD (PNIPAAm-b-PAA-g-RGD) gradient surface was prepared. First, a thermoresponsive surface with a constant thickness of PNIPAAm was fabricated, onto which the AA monomers were block copolymerized using the PNIPAAm macromolecules as initiators. During this process, a continuous injection method was employed to yield a molecular weight gradient of PAA on the underlying uniform PNIPAAm layer. RGD peptide was finally covalently immobilized onto the PAA gradient by carbodiimide chemistry. In vitro culture of HepG2 cells showed that immobilization of the RGD peptide could accelerate cell attachment, while the thermoresponsive layer beneath could effectively release the cells by simply lowering temperature. Thus, the PNIPAAm-b-PAA-g-RGD gradient surface, combining the thermal response with cell affinity properties, can well regulate the cell adhesion and detachment, which may thus be useful for investigation of cell-substrate interactions with a smaller number of samples.

  3. Microbial cell retention in a melting High Arctic snowpack, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarsky, Jakub; Björkman, Mats; Kühnel, Rafael; Hell, Katherina; Hodson, Andy; Sattler, Birgit; Psenner, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Introduction The melting snow pack represents a highly dynamic system not only for chemical compounds but also for bacterial cells. Microbial activity was found at subzero temperatures in ice veins when liquid water persists due to high concentration of ions on the surface of snow crystals and brine channels between large ice crystals in ice. Several observations also suggest microbial activity under subzero temperatures in seasonal snow. Even with regard to the spatial and temporal relevance of snow ecosystems, microbial activity in such an extreme habitat represents a relatively small proportion in the carbon flux of the global ecosystem and even of the glacial ecosystems specifically. On the other hand, it represents a remarkable piece of mosaic of the microbial activity in glacial ecosystems because the snow pack represents the first contact between the atmosphere and cryosphere. This topic also embodies vital crossovers to biogeochemistry and ecotoxicology, offering a quantitative view of utilization of various substrates relevant for downstream ecosystems. Here we present our study of the dynamics of both solvents and cells suspended in meltwater of the melting snowpack on a high arctic glacier to demonstrate the spatio-temporal constraint of interaction between solvent and bacterial cells in this environment. Method We used 6 lysimeters inserted into the bottom of the snowpack to collect replicated samples of melt water before it comes into contact with basal ice or slush layer at the base of the snow pack. The sampling site was chosen at Midre Lovénbreen (Svalbard, Kongsfjorden, MLB stake 6) where the snow pack showed melting on the surface but the basal ice was still dry. Sampling was conducted in June 2010 for a period of 10 days once per day and the snow profile was sampled according to distinguished layers in the profile at the beginning of the field mission and as bulk at its end. The height of snow above the lysimeters dropped from the initial 74 cm

  4. Immobilization of pamidronic acids on the nanotube surface of titanium discs and their interaction with bone cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembled layers of vertically aligned titanium nanotubes were fabricated on a Ti disc by anodization. Pamidronic acids (PDAs) were then immobilized on the nanotube surface to improve osseointegration. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the PDA-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes. The in vitro behavior of osteoblast and osteoclast cells cultured on an unmodified and surface-modified Ti disc was examined in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were improved substantially by the topography of the TiO2 nanotubes, producing an interlocked cell structure. PDA immobilized on the TiO2 nanotube surface suppressed the viability of the osteoclasts and reduced their bone resorption activity. PMID:23497321

  5. Immobilization of pamidronic acids on the nanotube surface of titanium discs and their interaction with bone cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Tae-Hyung; Borah, Jyoti S.; Xing, Zhi-Cai; Moon, Sung-Mo; Jeong, Yongsoo; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled layers of vertically aligned titanium nanotubes were fabricated on a Ti disc by anodization. Pamidronic acids (PDAs) were then immobilized on the nanotube surface to improve osseointegration. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the PDA-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes. The in vitro behavior of osteoblast and osteoclast cells cultured on an unmodified and surface-modified Ti disc was examined in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were improved substantially by the topography of the TiO2 nanotubes, producing an interlocked cell structure. PDA immobilized on the TiO2 nanotube surface suppressed the viability of the osteoclasts and reduced their bone resorption activity.

  6. Fermentation efficiency of cells immobilized on delignified brewers' spent grains after low- and high-temperature thin layer thermal drying.

    PubMed

    Tsaousi, Konstantina; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Bekatorou, Argyro; Loukatos, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Low-cost dried yeasts immobilized on delignified brewers' spent grains for use in wine making and brewing were produced by simple thermal drying techniques. To optimize the thermal drying process, vacuum and air stream conditions were examined. Drying of thin layers of the biocatalysts was performed at low (30-38 degrees C) and high temperatures (40-70 degrees C). The fermentation efficiency of the thermally dried biocatalysts was acceptable, with immobilized cells showing a significantly higher thermotolerance compared with free cells. Immobilized cells dried at high temperatures presented slightly improved glucose fermentation efficiency compared with the low-temperature dried biocatalysts. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of aroma volatiles of the fermented products revealed an increase of esters, lower higher alcohol formation, and significantly lower concentration of carbonylic compounds.

  7. An innovative miniature microbial fuel cell fabricated using photolithography.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Zhao, Yue; Qiu, Ke-Qiang; Chu, Jian; Lu, Rui; Sun, Min; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing; Chen, Jie; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yang-Chao; Xiong, Ying

    2011-02-15

    Recently microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have attracted increasing interests in both environmental and energy fields. Among the various MFC configurations, miniature microbial fuel cell (mini-MFC) has a great potential for the application in medical, communication and other areas because of its miniature volume and high output power density. In this work, a 25-μL single-chamber mini-MFC was fabricated using the photolithography technique. The plate-shaped gold anodic electrode in the mini-MFC showed a higher electrochemical activity than the stripe-shaped one. A biofilm of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was formed on the surface of gold electrode in this micro-liter-scale MFCs. As a result, a maximum power density of 29 mW/m(2) and a maximum current density of 2148 mA/m(2) were achieved by this single-chamber mini-MFC.

  8. Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R.

    2011-05-20

    ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

  9. Recent developments in microbial fuel cell technologies for sustainable bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuya

    2008-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microbial catabolic activities to generate electricity from a variety of materials, including complex organic waste and renewable biomass. These sources provide MFCs with a great advantage over chemical fuel cells that can utilize only purified reactive fuels (e.g., hydrogen). A developing primary application of MFCs is its use in the production of sustainable bioenergy, e.g., organic waste treatment coupled with electricity generation, although further technical developments are necessary for its practical use. In this article, recent advances in MFC technologies that can become fundamentals for future practical MFC developments are summarized. Results of recent studies suggest that MFCs will be of practical use in the near future and will become a preferred option among sustainable bioenergy processes.

  10. Composite materials for polymer electrolyte membrane microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Antolini, Ermete

    2015-07-15

    Recently, the feasibility of using composite metal-carbon, metal-polymer, polymer-carbon, polymer-polymer and carbon-carbon materials in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. These materials have been tested as MFC anode catalyst (microorganism) supports, cathode catalysts and membranes. These hybrid materials, possessing the properties of each component, or even with a synergistic effect, would present improved characteristics with respect to the bare components. In this paper we present an overview of the use of these composite materials in microbial fuel cells. The characteristics of the composite materials as well as their effect on MFC performance were compared with those of the individual component and/or the conventionally used materials.

  11. Enhanced microbial reduction of vanadium (V) in groundwater with bioelectricity from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liting; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Ye; Shi, Chunhong; Cheng, Ming; Feng, Chuanping

    2015-08-01

    Bioelectricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly to enhance microbial reduction of vanadium (V) (V(V)) in groundwater. With the maximum power density of 543.4 mW m-2 from the MFC, V(V) removal is accelerated with efficiency of 93.6% during 12 h operation. Higher applied voltage can facilitate this process. V(V) removals decrease with the increase of initial V(V) concentration, while extra addition of chemical oxygen demand (COD) has little effect on performance improvement. Microbial V(V) reduction is enhanced and then suppressed with the increase of conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis implies the accumulated Enterobacter and Lactococcus reduce V(V) with products from fermentative microorganisms such as Macellibacteroides. The presentation of electrochemically active bacteria as Enterobacter promotes electron transfers. This study indicates that application of bioelectricity from MFCs is a promising strategy to improve the efficiency of in-situ bioremediation of V(V) polluted groundwater.

  12. Effect of electricity on microbial community of microbial fuel cell simultaneously treating sulfide and nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Xing, Yajuan; Qaisar, Mahmood

    2015-05-01

    The effect of electric current on microbial community is explored in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) simultaneously treating sulfide and nitrate. The MFCs are operated under four different conditions which exhibited different characteristics of electricity generation. In batch mode, MFCs generate intermittently high current pulses in the beginning, and the current density is instable subsequently, while the current density of MFCs in continuous mode is relatively stable. All operational parameters show good capacity for substrate removal, and nitrogen and sulfate were the main reaction products. Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis is employed to obtain profiles of the bacterial communities present in inoculum and suspension of four MFCs. Based on the community diversity indices and Spearman correlation analyses, significant correlation exists between Richness of the community of anode chamber and the electricity generated, while no strong correlation is evident between other indexes (Shannon index, Simpson index and Equitability index) and the electricity. Additionally, the results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) suggest that MFCs suffering from current shock have similar suspension communities, while the others have diverse microbial communities.

  13. Ohmic resistance affects microbial community and electrochemical kinetics in a multi-anode microbial electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Ryu, Hodon; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2016-11-01

    Multi-anode microbial electrochemical cells (MxCs) are considered as one of the most promising configurations for scale-up of MxCs, but understanding of anode kinetics in multiple anodes is limited in the MxCs. In this study we assessed microbial community and electrochemical kinetic parameters for biofilms on individual anodes in a multi-anode MxC to better comprehend anode fundamentals. Microbial community analysis targeting 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing showed that Geobacter genus was abundant (87%) only on the biofilm anode closest to a reference electrode (low ohmic energy loss) in which current density was the highest among three anodes. In comparison, Geobacter populations were less than 1% for biofilms on other two anodes distant from the reference electrode (high ohmic energy loss), generating small current density. Half-saturation anode potential (EKA) was the lowest at -0.251 to -0.242 V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode) for the closest biofilm anode to the reference electrode, while EKA was as high as -0.134 V for the farthest anode. Our study proves that electric potential of individual anodes changed by ohmic energy loss shifts biofilm communities on individual anodes and consequently influences electron transfer kinetics on each anode in the multi-anode MxC.

  14. Bioethanol production from mixed sugars by Scheffersomyces stipitis free and immobilized cells, and co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Isabella; De Canio, Paola; Cuna, Daniela; Liuzzi, Federico; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2013-09-25

    Bioethanol can be produced from several biomasses including lignocellulosic materials. Besides 6-carbon sugars that represent the prevalent carbohydrates, some of these feedstocks contain significant amounts of 5-carbon sugars. One common limit of the major part of the xylose-fermenting yeasts is the diauxic shift between the uptake of glucose and xylose during the fermentation of mixed syrups. Thus, optimized fermentation strategies are required. In this paper the ability of Scheffersomyces stipitis strain NRRLY-11544 to ferment mixed syrups with a total sugar concentration in the range 40-80 g/L was investigated by using mono cultures, co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Bakers Yeast Type II and single cultures immobilized in silica-hydrogel films. The experimental design for the fermentations with immobilized cells included the process analysis in function of two parameters: the fraction of the gel in the broth and the concentration of the cells loaded in the gel. Furthermore, for each total sugars level, the fermentative course of S. stipitis was analyzed at several glucose-to xylose ratios. The results indicated that the use of S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae in free co-cultures ensured faster processes than single cultures of S. stipitis either free or immobilized. However, the rapid production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae inhibited S. stipitis and caused a stuck of the process. Immobilization of S. stipitis in silica-hydrogel increased the relative consumption rate of xylose-to-glucose by 2-6 times depending on the composition of the fermentation medium. Furthermore the films performances appeared stable over three weeks of continuous operations. However, on the whole, the final process yields obtained with the immobilized cells were not meaningfully different from that of the free cells. This was probably due to concurrent fermentations operated by the cells released in the broth. Optimization of the carrier characteristics could improve the

  15. Microbial community structures differentiated in a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell fueled with rice straw hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbial fuel cell represents a novel technology to simultaneously generate electric power and treat wastewater. Both pure organic matter and real wastewater can be used as fuel to generate electric power and the substrate type can influence the microbial community structure. In the present study, rice straw, an important feedstock source in the world, was used as fuel after pretreatment with diluted acid method for a microbial fuel cell to obtain electric power. Moreover, the microbial community structures of anodic and cathodic biofilm and planktonic culturewere analyzed and compared to reveal the effect of niche on microbial community structure. Results The microbial fuel cell produced a maximum power density of 137.6 ± 15.5 mW/m2 at a COD concentration of 400 mg/L, which was further increased to 293.33 ± 7.89 mW/m2 through adjusting the electrolyte conductivity from 5.6 mS/cm to 17 mS/cm. Microbial community analysis showed reduction of the microbial diversities of the anodic biofilm and planktonic culture, whereas diversity of the cathodic biofilm was increased. Planktonic microbial communities were clustered closer to the anodic microbial communities compared to the cathodic biofilm. The differentiation in microbial community structure of the samples was caused by minor portion of the genus. The three samples shared the same predominant phylum of Proteobacteria. The abundance of exoelectrogenic genus was increased with Desulfobulbus as the shared most abundant genus; while the most abundant exoelectrogenic genus of Clostridium in the inoculum was reduced. Sulfate reducing bacteria accounted for large relative abundance in all the samples, whereas the relative abundance varied in different samples. Conclusion The results demonstrated that rice straw hydrolysate can be used as fuel for microbial fuel cells; microbial community structure differentiated depending on niches after microbial fuel cell operation; exoelectrogens were

  16. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  17. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system. PMID:27375205

  18. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte

    PubMed Central

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system. PMID:27375205

  19. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-07-04

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system.

  20. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-07-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system.

  1. Enhancing factors of electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Cha, Jaehwan; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we investigated various cultural and operational factors to enhance electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) using Geobacter sulfurreducens. The pure culture of G. sulfurreducens was cultivated using various substrates including acetate, malate, succinate, and butyrate, with fumarate as an electron acceptor. Cell growth was observed only in acetate-fed medium, when the cell concentrations increased 4-fold for 3 days. A high acetate concentration suppressed electricity generation. As the acetate concentration was increased from 5 to 20 mM, the power density dropped from 16 to 13 mW/m2, whereas the coulombic efficiency (CE) declined by about half. The immobilization of G. sulfurreducens on the anode considerably reduced the enrichment period from 15 to 7 days. Using argon gas to create an anaerobic condition in the anode chamber led to increased pH, and electricity generation subsequently dropped. When the plain carbon paper cathode was replaced by Pt-coated carbon paper (0.5 mg Pt/cm2), the CE increased greatly from 39% to 83%.

  2. Efficient immobilization of mushroom tyrosinase utilizing whole cells from Agaricus bisporus and its application for degradation of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, Markus; Boll, Stefan; Kossuch, Jan; Bielecki, Julia; Uhl, Stefan; Kleiner, Beatrice; Wichmann, Rolf

    2014-06-15

    A simple and efficient procedure for preparation and immobilization of tyrosinase enzyme was developed utilizing whole cells from the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus, without the need for enzyme purification. Tyrosinase activity in the cell preparation remained constant during storage at 21 °C for at least six months. The cells were entrapped in chitosan and alginate matrix capsules and characterized with respect to their resulting tyrosinase activity. A modification of the alginate with colloidal silica enhanced the activity due to retention of both cells and tyrosinase from fractured cells, which otherwise leached from matrix capsules. The observed activity was similar to the activity that was obtained with immobilized isolated tyrosinase in the same material. Mushroom cells in water were susceptible to rapid inactivation, whereas the immobilized cells maintained 73% of their initial activity after 30 days of storage in water. Application in repeated batch experiments resulted in almost 100% conversion of endocrine disrupting bisphenol A (BPA) for 11 days, under stirring conditions, and 50-60% conversion after 20 days, without stirring under continuous usage. The results represent the longest yet reported application of immobilized tyrosinase for degradation of BPA in environmental water samples.

  3. Microchip-based Integration of Cell Immobilization, Electrophoresis, Post-column Derivatization, and Fluorescence Detection for Monitoring the Release of Dopamine from PC 12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Michelle W.; Martin, R. Scott

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication and evaluation of a multilayer microchip device that can be used to quantitatively measure the amount of catecholamines released from PC 12 cells immobilized within the same device. This approach allows immobilized cells to be stimulated on-chip and, through rapid actuation of integrated microvalves, the products released from the cells are repeatedly injected into the electrophoresis portion of the microchip, where the analytes are separated based upon mass and charge and detected through post-column derivatization and fluorescence detection. Following optimization of the post-column derivatization detection scheme (using naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde and 2-β-mercaptoethanol), off-chip cell stimulation experiments were performed to demonstrate the ability of this device to detect dopamine from a population of PC 12 cells. The final 3-dimensional device that integrates an immobilized PC 12 cell reactor with the bilayer continuous flow sampling/electrophoresis microchip was used to continuously monitor the on-chip stimulated release of dopamine from PC 12 cells. Similar dopamine release was seen when stimulating on-chip versus off-chip yet the on-chip immobilization studies could be carried out with 500 times fewer cells in a much reduced volume. While this paper is focused on PC 12 cells and neurotransmitter analysis, the final device is a general analytical tool that is amenable to immobilization of a variety of cell lines and analysis of various released analytes by electrophoretic means. PMID:18810283

  4. A Hydrogel Bridge Incorporating Immobilized Growth Factors and Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells to Treat Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Ham, Trevor R; Neill, Nicholas; Farrag, Mahmoud; Mohrman, Ashley E; Koenig, Andrew M; Leipzig, Nic D

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes permanent, often complete disruption of central nervous system (CNS) function below the damaged region, leaving patients without the ability to regenerate lost tissue. To engineer new CNS tissue, a unique spinal cord bridge is created to deliver stem cells and guide their organization and development with site-specifically immobilized growth factors. In this study, this bridge is tested, consisting of adult neural stem/progenitor cells contained within a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) hydrogel and protected by a chitosan conduit. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA) are recombinantly produced and tagged with an N-terminal biotin. They are immobilized to streptavidin-functionalized MAC to induce either neuronal or oligodendrocytic lineages, respectively. These bridges are tested in a rat hemisection model of SCI between T8 and T9. After eight weeks treatments including chitosan conduits result in a significant reduction in lesion area and macrophage infiltration around the lesion site (p < 0.0001). Importantly, neither immobilized IFN-γ nor PDGF-AA increased macrophage infiltration. Retrograde tracing demonstrates improved neuronal regeneration through the use of immobilized growth factors. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrates that immobilized growth factors are effective in differentiating encapsulated cells into their anticipated lineages within the hydrogel, while qualitatively reducing glial fibrillary acid protein expression.

  5. A Hydrogel Bridge Incorporating Immobilized Growth Factors and Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells to Treat Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Ham, Trevor R; Neill, Nicholas; Farrag, Mahmoud; Mohrman, Ashley E; Koenig, Andrew M; Leipzig, Nic D

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes permanent, often complete disruption of central nervous system (CNS) function below the damaged region, leaving patients without the ability to regenerate lost tissue. To engineer new CNS tissue, a unique spinal cord bridge is created to deliver stem cells and guide their organization and development with site-specifically immobilized growth factors. In this study, this bridge is tested, consisting of adult neural stem/progenitor cells contained within a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) hydrogel and protected by a chitosan conduit. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA) are recombinantly produced and tagged with an N-terminal biotin. They are immobilized to streptavidin-functionalized MAC to induce either neuronal or oligodendrocytic lineages, respectively. These bridges are tested in a rat hemisection model of SCI between T8 and T9. After eight weeks treatments including chitosan conduits result in a significant reduction in lesion area and macrophage infiltration around the lesion site (p < 0.0001). Importantly, neither immobilized IFN-γ nor PDGF-AA increased macrophage infiltration. Retrograde tracing demonstrates improved neuronal regeneration through the use of immobilized growth factors. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrates that immobilized growth factors are effective in differentiating encapsulated cells into their anticipated lineages within the hydrogel, while qualitatively reducing glial fibrillary acid protein expression. PMID:26913590

  6. [Electricity production from surplus sludge using microbial fuel cells].

    PubMed

    Jia, Bin; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Yong-Lin; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin; Liu, Qian-Qian; Zheng, Shi-Wen

    2009-04-15

    A single-chamber and membrane-less microbial fuel cells were successfully started up using anaerobic sludge as inoculums without any chemical substance for 20 d. The electricity generation of the microbial fuel cell using surplus sludge as fuel and the change of substrate were investigated. The results showed that the obtained maximum voltage and power density were 495 mV and 44 mW x m(-2) (fixed 1,000 Omega), and the internal resistance was about 300 Omega during steady state. In a cycle, the removal efficiency of SS and VSS were 27.3% and 28.7%, pH was 6.5-8.0. In addition, the COD increased from 617 mg x L(-1) to 1,150 mg x L(-1) and decreased afterwards with time. The change of glucose was similar to that of COD, glucose increased from 47 mg x L(-1) to 60 mg x L(-1) and decreased afterwards with time. Consequently, the microbial fuel cell can transform chemical energy of surplus sludge into the cleanest electrical energy, and it provides a new way of sludge recycling.

  7. Immobilized WNT Proteins Act as a Stem Cell Niche for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Molly; Rotherham, Michael; Price, Joshua C; El Haj, Alicia J; Habib, Shukry J

    2016-07-12

    The timing, location, and level of WNT signaling are highly regulated during embryonic development and for the maintenance of adult tissues. Consequently the ability to provide a defined and directed source of WNT proteins is crucial to fully understand its role in tissue development and to mimic its activity in vitro. Here we describe a one-step immobilization technique to covalently bind WNT3A proteins as a basal surface with easy storage and long-lasting activity. We show that this platform is able to maintain adult and embryonic stem cells while also being adaptable for 3D systems. Therefore, this platform could be used for recapitulating specific stem cell niches with the goal of improving tissue engineering. PMID:27411105

  8. Immobilization of Bacillus acidocaldarius whole-cell rhodanese in polysaccharide and insolubilized gelatin gels

    SciTech Connect

    De Riso, L.; Alteriis, E. de; Parascandola, P. |; La Cara, F.; Sada, A.

    1996-04-01

    The presence of rhodanese activity has been investigated in two strains of thermophilic eubacteria and two strains of extremophiles. Bacillus acidocaldarius, a thermoacidophilic eubacterium, showed the highest levels of enzyme activity. Whole cells, previously subjected to one cycle of freeze-thawing, were immobilized by entrapment in the polysaccharide matrices Ca-alginate, {kappa}-carrageenan and chitosan, and in an insolubilized gelatin gel. The results obtained with the different immobilizates in terms of activity yield, possibility of regeneration and operative stability were evaluated with the aim of setting up a continuous system. This was achieved with a system consisting of B. acidocaldarius cells entrapped in an insolubilized gelatin matrix. The latter, in the form of a thin membrane, was employed in a custom-conceived reactor operating as a plug flow reactor. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Glucosyltransferase production by Klebsiella sp. K18 and conversion of sucrose to palatinose using immobilized cells

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Daniela C.; Kawaguti, Haroldo Y.; Sato, Hélia H.

    2009-01-01

    The strain Klebsiella sp. K18 produces the enzyme glucosyltransferase and catalyses the conversion of sucrose to palatinose, an alternative sugar that presents low cariogenicity. Response Surface Methodology was successfully employed to determine the optimal concentration of culture medium components. Maximum glucosyltransferase production (21.78 U mL-1) was achieved using the optimized medium composed by sugar cane molasses (80 g L-1), bacteriological peptone (7 g L-1) and yeast extract (20 g L-1), after 8 hours of fermentation at 28°C. The conversion of sucrose to palatinose was studied utilizing immobilized cells in calcium alginate. The effects of the alginate concentration (2-4%), cell mass concentration (20-40%) and substrate concentration (25-45%) were evaluated and the yield of palatinose was approximately 62.5%. PMID:24031319

  10. Production of phenolics by immobilized cells of the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea: the role of epiphytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blanch, M; Blanco, Y; Fontaniella, B; Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    2001-06-01

    Immobilized lichen cells from the thalli of the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea, supplied with acetate as the only source of carbon, continuously produced phenolic substances, atranorin and physodic acid, over 23 days. Epiphytic bacteria associated with the lichen thallus grew actively, probably using both acetate and reduced compounds supplied by lichen cells, since their active growth was avoided by including 10 microM 3,3'-dichlorophenyl-1,1'dimethylurea in the bath solution. Penicillin largely impeded the growth of epiphytic bacteria and decreased phenolic production, which was recovered only at the end of the experimental period, just when the bacteria started a slow, but active growth. We suggest the cooperation of epiphytic bacteria in the biosynthesis of both atranotrin and physodic acid. PMID:11770830

  11. Acceleration of vertical migration of corneal epithelial cells in albino rats during chronic immobilization stress

    SciTech Connect

    Timoshin, S.S.; Berezhnova, N.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of chronic immobilization stress on the kinetics of corneal epithelial cells from the basal layer into higher layers. Experiments were carried out on 49 male rats. The animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of tritium-thymidine and an additional application of 5 microCi of tritium-thymidine was made to its surface because the cornea has no blood supply. The animals were killed and the cornea removed for investigation. Values of the index of labeled nuclei and intensity of thymidine labeling, characterizing DNA synthesis in the corneas of the control and experimental animals showed no significant change compared with their values in a pervious series of experiments. Chronic exposure to stress increased the velocity of vertical migration of the cells from the basal layer toward the outer layers of the cornea.

  12. Differential effect of the shape of calcium alginate matrices on the physiology of immobilized neuroblastoma N2a and Vero cells: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kintzios, S; Yiakoumetis, I; Moschopoulou, G; Mangana, O; Nomikou, K; Simonian, A

    2007-11-30

    In order to investigate the effect of cell immobilization in calcium alginate gels on cell physiology, we immobilized Vero or N2a neuroblastoma cells in gels shaped either as spherical beads or as thin membrane layers. Throughout a culture period of 4 weeks cell viability, RNA and cytoplasmic calcium concentration and glutathione accumulation were assayed by fluorescence microscopy after provision of an appropriate dye. Non-elaborate culture conditions were applied throughout the experimental period in order to evaluate cell viability under less than optimal storage conditions. Vero cell proliferation was observed only in spherical beads, while N2a cell proliferation was observed in both configurations until the third week of culture. Increased [Ca2+]cyt could be associated with cell proliferation only when cells were immobilized in spherical beads, while a considerable decrease in the biosynthesis of reduced glutathione and RNA was observed in cells immobilized in thin membrane layers. The observed effects of the shape of the immobilization matrix may be due to differences in external mass transfer resistance. Therefore, depending on cell type, cell proliferation could have been promoted by either increased (Vero) or decreased (N2a) nutrient and oxygen flow to immobilized cells. The results of the present study could contribute to an improvement of immobilized cell sensor storability.

  13. Wet Chemistry and Peptide Immobilization on Polytetrafluoroethylene for Improved Cell-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Matthias; Niederer, Kerstin; Frey, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Endowing materials surface with cell-adhesive properties is a common strategy in biomaterial research and tissue engineering. This is particularly interesting for already approved polymers that have a long standing use in medicine because these materials are well characterized and legal issues associated with the introduction of newly synthesized polymers may be avoided. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is one of the most frequently employed materials for the manufacturing of vascular grafts but the polymer lacks cell adhesion promoting features. Endothelialization, i.e., complete coverage of the grafts inner surface with a confluent layer of endothelial cells is regarded key to optimal performance, mainly by reducing thrombogenicity of the artificial interface. This study investigates the growth of endothelial cells on peptide-modified PTFE and compares these results to those obtained on unmodified substrate. Coupling with the endothelial cell adhesive peptide Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV) is performed via activation of the fluorin-containing polymer using the reagent sodium naphthalenide, followed by subsequent conjugation steps. Cell culture is accomplished using Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) and excellent cellular growth on peptide-immobilized material is demonstrated over a two-week period. PMID:27584937

  14. Kinetics of the biodegradation of phenol in wastewaters from the chemical industry by covalently immobilized Trichosporon cutaneum cells.

    PubMed

    Yotova, Lyubov; Tzibranska, Irene; Tileva, Filadia; Markx, G H; Georgieva, Nelly

    2009-03-01

    A simple method for the preparation of the biocatalyst with whole cells is presented, and the applicability of the technique for biodegradation of phenol in wastewater from the chemical industries using the basidomycetes yeast Trichosporon cutaneum is explored. Kinetic studies of the influence of other compounds contained in wastewater as naphthalene, benzene, toluene and pyridine indicate that apart from oil fraction, which is removed, the phenol concentration is the only major factor limiting the growth of immobilized cells. Mathematical models are applied to describe the kinetic behavior of immobilized yeast cells. From the analysis of the experimental curves was shown that the obtained values for the apparent rate parameters vary depending on the substrate concentration (mu(maxapp) from 0.35 to 0.09 h(-1) and K (sapp) from 0.037 to 0.4 g dm(-3)). The inhibitory effect of the phenol on the obtained yield coefficients was investigated too. It has been shown that covalent immobilization of T. cutaneum whole cells to plastic carrier beads is possible, and that cell viability and phenol degrading activity are maintained after the chemical modification of cell walls during the binding procedure. The results obtained indicate a possible future application of immobilized T. cutaneum for destroying phenol in industrial wastewaters. PMID:19052785

  15. Lindane removal by pure and mixed cultures of immobilized actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Saez, Juliana M; Benimeli, Claudia S; Amoroso, María J

    2012-11-01

    Lindane (γ-HCH) is an organochlorine insecticide that has been widely used in developing countries. It is known to persist in the environment and can cause serious health problems. One of the strategies adopted to remove lindane from the environment is bioremediation using microorganisms. Immobilized cells present advantages over free suspended cells, like their high degradation efficiency and protection against toxins. The aims of this work were: (1) To evaluate the ability of Streptomyces strains immobilized in four different matrices to remove lindane, (2) To select the support with optimum lindane removal by pure cultures, (3) To assay the selected support with consortia and (4) To evaluate the reusability of the immobilized cells. Four Streptomyces sp. strains had previously shown their ability to grow in the presence of lindane. Lindane removal by microorganisms immobilized was significantly higher than in free cells. Specifically immobilized cells in cloth sachets showed an improvement of around 25% in lindane removal compared to the abiotic control. Three strains showed significantly higher microbial growth when they were entrapped in silicone tubes. Strains immobilized in PVA-alginate demonstrated lowest growth. Mixed cultures immobilized inside cloth sachets showed no significant enhancement compared to pure cultures, reaching a maximum removal of 81% after 96 h for consortium I, consisting of the four immobilized strains together. Nevertheless, the cells could be reused for two additional cycles of 96 h each, obtaining a maximum removal efficiency of 71.5% when each of the four strains was immobilized in a separate bag (consortium III). PMID:22840534

  16. Specific adhesion of carcinoembryonic antigen-bearing colorectal cancer cells to immobilized carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Levin, L V; Griffin, T W

    1991-11-01

    Recent characterization of the genomic structure of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is consistent with that of a cellular adhesion molecule. To examine this function in colorectal cancer, the adherence of cell lines to microtiter wells coated with CEA and well-described adhesive molecules was determined. The CEA-positive cell line LoVo and the CEA-devoid cell line H-Meso-1 did not differ in adherence to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen and fibronectin, whereas LoVo cells adhered to CEA (10 micrograms/well) in a specific manner (43% bound cells vs. 1.5% bound cells with BSA or alpha-acidglycoprotein controls, P less than 0.01) while H-MESO-1 showed no adhesion to CEA (less than 0.6% bound cells). This adhesion of LoVo cells to CEA was not affected by co-incubation of cells with EDTA, sodium azide, or at 23 degrees C. However, the CEA to CEA adhesive interaction was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the N-terminal domain of the CEA molecule, and decreased by enzymatic removal of CEA from the LoVo cell membrane. The extent of adhesion to immobilized CEA by four CEA-producing cell lines (LoVo, HT29, LS174T and LS174-S), correlated with membrane CEA expression as determined by FACS analysis. The results of these experiments add support to the concept that CEA may function as a specific homotypic cellular adhesion molecule for colorectal cancer cells.

  17. Electrochemical polymerization of 1-(4-nitrophenyl)-2,5-di(2-thienyl)-1 H-pyrrole as a novel immobilization platform for microbial sensing.

    PubMed

    Tuncagil, Sevinc; Odaci, Dilek; Varis, Serhat; Timur, Suna; Toppare, Levent

    2009-09-01

    Two types of bacterial biosensor were constructed by immobilization of Gluconobacter oxydans and Pseudomonas fluorescens cells on graphite electrodes modified with the conducting polymer; poly(1-(4-nitrophenyl)-2,5-di(2-thienyl)-1 H-pyrrole) [SNS(NO(2))]. The measurement was based on the respiratory activity of cells estimated by the oxygen consumption at -0.7 V due to the metabolic activity in the presence of substrate. As well as analytical characterization, the linear detection ranges, effects of electropolymerization time, pH and cell amount were examined by using glucose as the substrate. The linear relationships were observed in the range of 0.25-4.0 mM and 0.2-1.0 mM for G. oxydans and P. fluorescens based sensors, respectively.

  18. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor. Annual progress report, June 1992--May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO{sub 2}-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  19. Recent Progress of Nanostructure Modified Anodes in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Marie; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Nam, Joo-Youn; In, Su-Il

    2015-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-electrochemical system which converts chemical energy into electrical energy by catalytic activity of microorganisms. Electrons produced by microbial oxidation from substrates such as organic matter, complex or renewable biomass are transferred to the anode. Protons produced at the anode migrate to the cathode via the wire and combine with oxygen to form water. Therefore MFC technologies are promising approach for generating electricity or hydrogen gas and wastewater treatment. Electrode materials are one of the keys to increase the power output of MFCs. To improve the cost effective performance of MFCs, various electrodes materials, modifications and configurations have been developed. In this paper, among other recent advances of nanostructured electrodes, especially carbon based anodes, are highlighted. The properties of these electrodes, in terms of surface characteristics, conductivity, modifications, and options were reviewed. The applications, challenges and perspectives of the current MFCs electrode for future development in bio or medical field are briefly discussed. PMID:26716261

  20. Recent Progress of Nanostructure Modified Anodes in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Marie; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Nam, Joo-Youn; In, Su-Il

    2015-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-electrochemical system which converts chemical energy into electrical energy by catalytic activity of microorganisms. Electrons produced by microbial oxidation from substrates such as organic matter, complex or renewable biomass are transferred to the anode. Protons produced at the anode migrate to the cathode via the wire and combine with oxygen to form water. Therefore MFC technologies are promising approach for generating electricity or hydrogen gas and wastewater treatment. Electrode materials are one of the keys to increase the power output of MFCs. To improve the cost effective performance of MFCs, various electrodes materials, modifications and configurations have been developed. In this paper, among other recent advances of nanostructured electrodes, especially carbon based anodes, are highlighted. The properties of these electrodes, in terms of surface characteristics, conductivity, modifications, and options were reviewed. The applications, challenges and perspectives of the current MFCs electrode for future development in bio or medical field are briefly discussed.

  1. Perchlorate reduction in microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline modified cathode.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Jia; Gao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Shu-Guang; Song, Chao; Xu, Yan-Yan

    2015-02-01

    Excellent perchlorate reduction was obtained under various initial concentrations in a non-membrane microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline (PANI) modified graphite cathode as sole electron donor. PANI modification is conducive to the formation of biofilm due to its porous structure and good electrocatalytic performance. Compared with cathode without biofilm, over 12% higher reduction rates were acquired in the presence of biocathode. The study demonstrates that, instead of perchlorate reduction, the main contribution of biofilm is involved in facilitate electron transfer from cathode to electrolyte. Interestingly, hairlike structure, referred as to pili-like, was observed in the biofilm as well as in the electrolyte. Additionally, the results show that pili were prone to formation under the condition of external electron field as sole electron donor. Analysis of microbial community suggests that perchlorate reduction bacteria community was most consistent with Azospiraoryzae strain DSM 13638 in the subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. PMID:25479396

  2. Immobilized stem-loop structured probes as conformational switches for enzymatic detection of microbial 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Bockisch, Benjamin; Grunwald, Thomas; Spillner, Edzard; Bredehorst, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and evaluated novel DNA stem-loop structured probes for enzymatic detection of nucleic acid targets. These probes constitute a novel class of conformational switches for enzymatic activity, which in the absence of a target sterically shield an affinity label and upon hybridization of the target to the recognition sequence that forms the loop of the probe restore accessibility of the label for the binding of a reporter enzyme. Analysis of probe characteristics revealed stem stability as the most important parameter governing detection functionality, while other factors such as the length of linker molecules attaching the label to the stem-loop structure and the nature of the solid support proved to be less critical. Apparently, the bulky nature of the reporter enzyme facilitates shielding of the label in the absence of the target, thereby conferring considerable structural tolerance to the conformational switch system. The stem-loop structured probes allow sensitive detection of unlabeled nucleic acid targets. Employing a microtiter assay format, 4 ng of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA corresponding to 8 fmol could be detected, which can be compared favorably with current immobilized molecular beacon concepts based on fluorescence detection.

  3. Immobilization of Heparan Sulfate on Electrospun Meshes to Support Embryonic Stem Cell Culture and Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Kate A.; White, Kathryn J.; Pickford, Claire E.; Holley, Rebecca J.; Marson, Andrew; Tillotson, Donna; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Whittle, Jason D.; Day, Anthony J.; Merry, Catherine L. R.

    2013-01-01

    As our understanding of what guides the behavior of multi- and pluripotent stem cells deepens, so too does our ability to utilize certain cues to manipulate their behavior and maximize their therapeutic potential. Engineered, biologically functionalized materials have the capacity to influence stem cell behavior through a powerful combination of biological, mechanical, and topographical cues. Here, we present the development of a novel electrospun scaffold, functionalized with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) ionically immobilized onto the fiber surface. Bound GAGs retained the ability to interact with GAG-binding molecules and, crucially, presented GAG sulfation motifs fundamental to mediating stem cell behavior. Bound GAG proved to be biologically active, rescuing the neural differentiation capacity of heparan sulfate-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells and functioning in concert with FGF4 to facilitate the formation of extensive neural processes across the scaffold surface. The combination of GAGs with electrospun scaffolds creates a biomaterial with potent applicability for the propagation and effective differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23235146

  4. Preparation and performance of immobilized yeast cells in columns containing no inert carrier. [Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, H.Y.; Chiang, L.C.; Yang, C.M.; Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1983-02-01

    Schizosaccharomyes pombe was cultivated in a medium of glucose (10 g/l), malt extract (3 g/l), yeast extract (3 g/l), and bactopeptone (5 g/l) to form flocs. More than 95% of the cell population were flocculated. Variation in glucose concentration (from 10 to 11 g/l) did not affect flocculation. Yeast extract helped induce flocculation. Application of the immobilized yeast for the continuous production of ethanol was tested in a column reactor. Soft yeast flocs (50-200 mesh) underwent morphological changes to heavy particles (0.1-9.3 cm diameter) after continuously being fed with fresh substrates in the column. Productivity as high as 87 g EtOH/l/hour was obtained when a 150 g/l glucose medium was fed. The performance of this yeast reactor was stable over a two-month period. The ethanol yield was 97% of the theoretical maximum based upon glucose consumed. (Refs. 16).

  5. Yeast cells immobilized in spherical gellan particles cross-linked with magnesium acetate.

    PubMed

    Iurciuc Tincu, Camelia Elena; Alupei, Liana; Savin, Alexandru; Ibănescu, Constanța; Martin, Patrick; Popa, Marcel

    2016-10-20

    In this paper we report on the production of microbioreactors using ionically cross-linked gellan containing immobilized yeast cells with potential application in glucose fermentation. Cross-linking was achieved through a novel extrusion process in capillary by ionotropic gelation under the action of magnesium acetate. Compared to commonly used methods, this provides a host of practical advantages. The particles were physico-chemically and morphologically characterized as their mechanical stability, behavior in aqueous media, and bio-catalytic activity are influenced by the amount of cross-linker used. This demonstrated their ability to be reused in a large number of fermentation cycles without losing their bio-catalytic activity. Our results are wholly comparable with the behavior of free yeast. We show that fermentation cycles can succeed either immediately or at variable intervals, ensuring high yields of glucose transformation, comparable-if not superior-to results currently obtained using free yeast. PMID:27497758

  6. Polysaccharides immobilized in polypyrrole matrices are able to induce osteogenic differentiation in mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Judith Serra; Sabbieti, Maria Giovanna; Agas, Dimitrios; Marchetti, Luigi; Panero, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to differentiate and contribute to the regeneration of mesenchymal tissues. The present study illustrates that the proper immobilization of heparin (Hep) and hyaluronic acid (HA) into a polypyrrole (PPy) matrix by electropolymerization results in an optimal interface for MSC differentiation towards osteoblast lineage. The obtained thin films showed good thermal stability, hydrophilicity and slow controlled polysaccharide release. The in vitro tests showed the main role of the interface chemical composition. Indeed, PPyHep and PPyHA thin films were able to induce osteogenic differentiation as determined by levels of specific early osteogenic markers (Runx2 and osterix) even in the absence of differentiating medium. Increased levels of ALP and Alizarin red staining, both indicating mineralization processes, confirmed the presence of mature osteoblasts.

  7. Kinetics and mathematical model of ethanol formation by immobilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Jin, N

    1991-01-01

    Kinetics of the ethanol fermentation with the immobilized K yeast cells was studied both experimentally and theoretically. A kinetic model consisting of 6 equations was proposed. In this model the combined inhibition, i.e., glucose in uncompetitive inhibition and ethanol in noncompetitive inhibition with irreversible performance, was taken into consideration. Calculated values agreed approximately with the experimental results, and this model was found to be of practical use. The maximum average percent deviation of the model calculation was found to be 13.81% in simulation. The average percent deviation of the model prediction was shown to be 8.28% in the sweet potato hydrolysate. The concentration range of inhibition was determined to be 130-450 g/l for glucose and 3.07-16.45% (v/v) for ethanol.

  8. Performance of a magnetically stabilized bed reactor with immobilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V; Hristov, J; Dobreva, E; al-Hassan, Z; Penchev, I

    1996-05-01

    This paper is focused on the possibility to apply the magnetic stabilization technique in bioprocessing. The feasibility of a continuous ethanol fermentation process with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in a magnetically stabilized bed (MSB) was demonstrated. The fermentation processes were carried out in an external magnetic field, transverse to the fluid flow. The flexibility to change the bed expansion owing to the independent change of the fluid flow and the field intensity (the "magnetization FIRST" mode) permitted the creation of fixed beds with different particle arrangements, which affected the bed porosity, the effective fluid-particle contact area, and the mass transfer processes on the particle-fluid interface. As a result, higher ethanol concentration, ethanol production, and glucose uptake rates than in conventional packed bed reactor were reached.

  9. The influence of microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects on the performance of refinery wastewater microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuan; Zhan, Yali; Chen, Chunmao; Zhao, Lijie; Guo, Shaohui

    2014-04-01

    This study provides a preliminary investigation of the synergistic and antagonistic effects of different microbial strains and their influence on electricity generation and wastewater treatment performances in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Microbial metabolic characteristics of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are studied simultaneously to provide further insight into how microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects influence MFCs. We observed a synergistic effect between Paenibacillus sp. and Deinococcus sp. and an antagonistic effect between Microbacterium sp. and Paenibacillus sp. and Deinococcus sp. The microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects significantly influenced MFC performance directly. The best MFC performance was observed with Paenibacillus sp. + Deinococcus sp. due to their synergistic effect, where the power density output reached 102.93 mW m-3, and the oil removal rate was 85.56 ± 1.10%. However, the performances of MFCs inoculated with Microbacterium sp. were considerably poorer because of its antagonistic effect on the other microbial strains, where the lowest power density output was 24.93 mW m-3, and the oil removal rate was 65.88 ± 1.10%. The degradation characteristics of petroleum hydrocarbons differ between microbial strains; thus, the relative results can provide further insight into how microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects influence MFCs.

  10. Selective biorecognition and preservation of cell function on carbohydrate-immobilized phosphorylcholine polymers.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takami, Utae; Shinohara, Yurika; Kurita, Kimio; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2007-09-01

    PMBL contribute to make a spheroid formation of HepG2 cells. The amount of albumin secreted from a cell was compared with the chemical structure of the substrate. The spheroid shaped cells cultured on the PMBL surface secreted much more albumin than did the spreading cells that adhered to the PBMA. In conclusion, the biomembrane mimetic carbohydrate-immobilized phosphorylcholine polymers produced a suitable surface for biorecognition and preservation of cell function. PMID:17663529

  11. Characterization of an encapsulation device for the production of monodisperse alginate beads for cell immobilization.

    PubMed

    Serp, D; Cantana, E; Heinzen, C; Von Stockar, U; Marison, I W

    2000-10-01

    An encapsulation device, designed on the basis of the laminar jet break-up technique, is characterized for cell immobilization with different types of alginate. The principle of operation of the completely sterilizable encapsulator, together with techniques for the continuous production of beads from 250 microm to 1 mm in diameter, with a size distribution below 5%, at a flow rate of 1-15 mL/min, is described. A modification of the device, to incorporate an electrostatic potential between the alginate droplets and an internal electrode, results in enhanced monodispersity with no adverse effects on cell viability. The maximum cell loading capacity of the beads strongly depends on the nozzle diameter as well as the cells used. For the yeast Phaffia rhodozyma, it is possible to generate 700 microm alginate beads with an initial cell concentration of 1 x 10(8) cells/mL of alginate whereas only 1 x 10(6) cells/ml could be entrapped within 400 microm beads. The alginate beads have been characterized with respect to mechanical resistance and size distribution immediately after production and as a function of storage conditions. The beads remain stable in the presence of acetic acid, hydrochloric acid, water, basic water, and sodium ions. The latter stability applies when the ratio of sodium: calcium ions is less than 1/5. Complexing agents such as sodium citrate result in the rapid solubilization of the beads due to calcium removal. The presence of cells does not affect the mechanical resistance of the beads. Finally, the mechanical resistance of alginate beads can be doubled by treatment with 5-10 kDa chitosan, resulting in reduced leaching of cells.

  12. Carbon and nitrogen assimilation in deep subseafloor microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Manabu; Ito, Motoo; Hillion, François; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Inagaki, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable numbers of microbial cells have been observed in global shallow to deep subseafloor sediments. Accumulating evidence indicates that deep and ancient sediments harbor living microbial life, where the flux of nutrients and energy are extremely low. However, their physiology and energy requirements remain largely unknown. We used stable isotope tracer incubation and nanometer-scale secondary ion MS to investigate the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen assimilation activities in individual microbial cells from 219-m-deep lower Pleistocene (460,000 y old) sediments from the northwestern Pacific off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. Sediment samples were incubated in vitro with 13C- and/or 15N-labeled glucose, pyruvate, acetate, bicarbonate, methane, ammonium, and amino acids. Significant incorporation of 13C and/or 15N and growth occurred in response to glucose, pyruvate, and amino acids (∼76% of total cells), whereas acetate and bicarbonate were incorporated without fostering growth. Among those substrates, a maximum substrate assimilation rate was observed at 67 × 10−18 mol/cell per d with bicarbonate. Neither carbon assimilation nor growth was evident in response to methane. The atomic ratios between nitrogen incorporated from ammonium and the total cellular nitrogen consistently exceeded the ratios of carbon, suggesting that subseafloor microbes preferentially require nitrogen assimilation for the recovery in vitro. Our results showed that the most deeply buried subseafloor sedimentary microbes maintain potentials for metabolic activities and that growth is generally limited by energy but not by the availability of C and N compounds. PMID:21987801

  13. Optimization of ethanol production from carob pod extract using immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Yatmaz; Irfan, Turhan; Mustafa, Karhan

    2013-05-01

    In this study, optimization of ethanol production from carob pod extract was carried out by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that Ca-alginate concentration and the amount of immobilized cells had significant effects on yield. Optimum conditions for ethanol fermentation were determined to be 2% Ca-alginate concentration, 150 rpm agitation rate, 5% yeast cells entrapped in beads and pH 5.5. After validation experiments; ethanol concentration, yield, production rate and sugar utilization rate were respectively 40.10 g/L, 46.32%, 3.19 g/L/h and 90.66%; and the fermentation time was decreased to 24 h. In addition, the immobilized cells were shown to be reusable for five cycles, though a decrease in yield was observed. Finally, carob pod extract was used for ethanol fermentation by controlled and uncontrolled pH without any enrichment, and the results suggest that carob extract can be utilized effectively by immobilized-cell fermentation without the use of enrichments to facilitate yeast growth.

  14. Engineering microbial fuels cells: recent patents and new directions.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin C; Ringeisen, Bradley R

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental research into how microbes generate electricity within microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has far outweighed the practical application and large scale development of microbial energy harvesting devices. MFCs are considered alternatives to standard commercial polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology because the fuel supply does not need to be purified, ambient operating temperatures are maintained with biologically compatible materials, and the biological catalyst is self-regenerating. The generation of electricity during wastewater treatment using MFCs may profoundly affect the approach to anaerobic treatment technologies used in wastewater treatment as a result of developing this energy harvesting technology. However, the materials and engineering designs for MFCs were identical to commercial fuel cells until 2003. Compared to commercial fuel cells, MFCs will remain underdeveloped as long as low power densities are generated from the best systems. The variety of designs for MFCs has expanded rapidly in the last five years in the literature, but the patent protection has lagged behind. This review will cover recent and important patents relating to MFC designs and progress. PMID:19075862

  15. Design and development of synthetic microbial platform cells for bioenergy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The finite reservation of fossil fuels accelerates the necessity of development of renewable energy sources. Recent advances in synthetic biology encompassing systems biology and metabolic engineering enable us to engineer and/or create tailor made microorganisms to produce alternative biofuels for the future bio-era. For the efficient transformation of biomass to bioenergy, microbial cells need to be designed and engineered to maximize the performance of cellular metabolisms for the production of biofuels during energy flow. Toward this end, two different conceptual approaches have been applied for the development of platform cell factories: forward minimization and reverse engineering. From the context of naturally minimized genomes,non-essential energy-consuming pathways and/or related gene clusters could be progressively deleted to optimize cellular energy status for bioenergy production. Alternatively, incorporation of non-indigenous parts and/or modules including biomass-degrading enzymes, carbon uptake transporters, photosynthesis, CO2 fixation, and etc. into chassis microorganisms allows the platform cells to gain novel metabolic functions for bioenergy. This review focuses on the current progress in synthetic biology-aided pathway engineering in microbial cells and discusses its impact on the production of sustainable bioenergy. PMID:23626588

  16. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL’s osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  17. Design and development of synthetic microbial platform cells for bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The finite reservation of fossil fuels accelerates the necessity of development of renewable energy sources. Recent advances in synthetic biology encompassing systems biology and metabolic engineering enable us to engineer and/or create tailor made microorganisms to produce alternative biofuels for the future bio-era. For the efficient transformation of biomass to bioenergy, microbial cells need to be designed and engineered to maximize the performance of cellular metabolisms for the production of biofuels during energy flow. Toward this end, two different conceptual approaches have been applied for the development of platform cell factories: forward minimization and reverse engineering. From the context of naturally minimized genomes,non-essential energy-consuming pathways and/or related gene clusters could be progressively deleted to optimize cellular energy status for bioenergy production. Alternatively, incorporation of non-indigenous parts and/or modules including biomass-degrading enzymes, carbon uptake transporters, photosynthesis, CO2 fixation, and etc. into chassis microorganisms allows the platform cells to gain novel metabolic functions for bioenergy. This review focuses on the current progress in synthetic biology-aided pathway engineering in microbial cells and discusses its impact on the production of sustainable bioenergy.

  18. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Morono, Y.; Littmann, S.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Into the seafloor, a radical decline in nutrient and energy availability poses strong metabolic demands to any residing life. However, a sedimentary microbial ecosystem seems to maintain itself close to what we understand to be the energetic limit of life. Since a complex sediment matrix is interfering with the analysis of whole cells and sub-cellular compounds such as cell wall and membrane molecules, little is known about the physiological properties of cells in the deep biosphere. Here we focus on the size and carbon content of cells from a 90-m sediment drill core retrieved in October 2013 at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea, in 437 meters water depth. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via fluorescence microscopy (FM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography after cells had additionally been purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Cell-carbon turnover times were estimated using an amino acid racemization model that is based on the built-in molecular clock of aspartic acid, which due to racemization alternates between the D- and L-isomeric configurations over timescales of thousands of years at low in-situ temperatures (≈4˚C). We find that the majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or rod-shaped morphology, and that absolute values for cell volume are strongly dependent on the method used, spanning three orders of magnitude from approximately 0.001 to 1 µm3 for both coccoid and rod-shaped cells. From the surface to the deepest sample measured (≈60 mbsf), cell volume decreases by an order of magnitude, and carbon content is in the lower range (<20 fg C cell-1) of what has been reported in the literature as conversion factors. Cell-carbon is turned over approximately

  19. Development of an automated microbial sensor system.

    PubMed

    Heim, S; Schnieder, I; Binz, D; Vogel, A; Bilitewski, U

    1999-02-01

    An automated whole cell biosensor system was developed by integration of immobilized microbial cells in a flow-through system with screen-printed flow-through electrodes as detectors. The detectors used were thick-film Pt-electrodes in a 3-electrode configuration constructed as sandwich flow-through cells with a volume of about 36 microliters polarized at -900 mV. The measuring principle was the determination of oxygen consumption due to the microbial metabolism. Fructose was used as model analyte. The microorganisms were immobilized on cellulose-acetate membranes and integrated into a newly created reaction chamber (membrane reactor). The microbial cells used were Rhodococcus erythropolis and Issatchenkia orientalis known to be suitable for the determination of biological oxygen demand.

  20. Immobilization of imidazole moieties in polymer electrolyte composite membrane for elevated temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Bei; Ye, Gongbo; Pan, Mu; Zhang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    Development of membrane electrolyte with reasonable proton conductivity at elevated temperature without external humidification is essential for practical applications of elevated temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Herein, a novel polymer electrolyte composite membrane using imidazole as anhydrous proton carriers for elevated temperature fuel cells is investigated. The imidazole moieties are immobilized inside the Nafion/poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) composite membrane through in situ formation of imidazole functionalized silica nanoparticles in Nafion dispersion. The thus-formed membrane exhibits strong Coulombic interaction between negatively charged sulfonic acid groups of Nafion and protonated imidazole moieties, leading to an anhydrous proton conductivity of 0.018 S cm-1 at 180 °C. With the introduction of PTFE matrix, the mechanical strength of the membrane is greatly improved. The peak power density of a single cell assembled from the hybrid membrane is observed to be 130 mW cm-2 under 350 mA cm-2 at 110 °C without external humidification and it remains stable for 20 h continuous operation. The obtained results demonstrate that the developed composite membranes could be utilized as promising membrane electrolytes for elevated temperature fuel cells.

  1. Time-lapse electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring the cell cycle of single immobilized S. pombe cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen; Frey, Olivier; Haandbaek, Niels; Franke, Felix; Rudolf, Fabian; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    As a complement and alternative to optical methods, wide-band electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) enables multi-parameter, label-free and real-time detection of cellular and subcellular features. We report on a microfluidics-based system designed to reliably capture single rod-shaped Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells by applying suction through orifices in a channel wall. The system enables subsequent culturing of immobilized cells in an upright position, while dynamic changes in cell-cycle state and morphology were continuously monitored through EIS over a broad frequency range. Besides measuring cell growth, clear impedance signals for nuclear division have been obtained. The EIS system has been characterized with respect to sensitivity and detection limits. The spatial resolution in measuring cell length was 0.25 μm, which corresponds to approximately a 5-min interval of cell growth under standard conditions. The comprehensive impedance data sets were also used to determine the occurrence of nuclear division and cytokinesis. The obtained results have been validated through concurrent confocal imaging and plausibilized through comparison with finite-element modeling data. The possibility to monitor cellular and intracellular features of single S. pombe cells during the cell cycle at high spatiotemporal resolution renders the presented microfluidics-based EIS system a suitable tool for dynamic single-cell investigations.

  2. Time-lapse electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring the cell cycle of single immobilized S. pombe cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Frey, Olivier; Haandbaek, Niels; Franke, Felix; Rudolf, Fabian; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-11-26

    As a complement and alternative to optical methods, wide-band electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) enables multi-parameter, label-free and real-time detection of cellular and subcellular features. We report on a microfluidics-based system designed to reliably capture single rod-shaped Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells by applying suction through orifices in a channel wall. The system enables subsequent culturing of immobilized cells in an upright position, while dynamic changes in cell-cycle state and morphology were continuously monitored through EIS over a broad frequency range. Besides measuring cell growth, clear impedance signals for nuclear division have been obtained. The EIS system has been characterized with respect to sensitivity and detection limits. The spatial resolution in measuring cell length was 0.25 μm, which corresponds to approximately a 5-min interval of cell growth under standard conditions. The comprehensive impedance data sets were also used to determine the occurrence of nuclear division and cytokinesis. The obtained results have been validated through concurrent confocal imaging and plausibilized through comparison with finite-element modeling data. The possibility to monitor cellular and intracellular features of single S. pombe cells during the cell cycle at high spatiotemporal resolution renders the presented microfluidics-based EIS system a suitable tool for dynamic single-cell investigations.

  3. Time-lapse electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring the cell cycle of single immobilized S. pombe cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Frey, Olivier; Haandbaek, Niels; Franke, Felix; Rudolf, Fabian; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    As a complement and alternative to optical methods, wide-band electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) enables multi-parameter, label-free and real-time detection of cellular and subcellular features. We report on a microfluidics-based system designed to reliably capture single rod-shaped Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells by applying suction through orifices in a channel wall. The system enables subsequent culturing of immobilized cells in an upright position, while dynamic changes in cell-cycle state and morphology were continuously monitored through EIS over a broad frequency range. Besides measuring cell growth, clear impedance signals for nuclear division have been obtained. The EIS system has been characterized with respect to sensitivity and detection limits. The spatial resolution in measuring cell length was 0.25 μm, which corresponds to approximately a 5-min interval of cell growth under standard conditions. The comprehensive impedance data sets were also used to determine the occurrence of nuclear division and cytokinesis. The obtained results have been validated through concurrent confocal imaging and plausibilized through comparison with finite-element modeling data. The possibility to monitor cellular and intracellular features of single S. pombe cells during the cell cycle at high spatiotemporal resolution renders the presented microfluidics-based EIS system a suitable tool for dynamic single-cell investigations. PMID:26608589

  4. Microbial electricity generation in rice paddy fields: recent advances and perspectives in rhizosphere microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use living microbes for the conversion of organic matter into electricity. MFC systems can be applied to the generation of electricity at water/sediment interfaces in the environment, such as bay areas, wetlands, and rice paddy fields. Using these systems, electricity generation in paddy fields as high as ∼80 mW m(-2) (based on the projected anode area) has been demonstrated, and evidence suggests that rhizosphere microbes preferentially utilize organic exudates from rice roots for generating electricity. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses have been conducted to identify the microbial species and catabolic pathways that are involved in the conversion of root exudates into electricity, suggesting the importance of syntrophic interactions. In parallel, pot cultures of rice and other aquatic plants have been used for rhizosphere MFC experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. The findings from these studies have demonstrated the potential of electricity generation for mitigating methane emission from the rhizosphere. Notably, however, the presence of large amounts of organics in the rhizosphere drastically reduces the effect of electricity generation on methane production. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential of these systems for mitigating methane emission from rice paddy fields. We suggest that paddy-field MFCs represent a promising approach for harvesting latent energy of the natural world.

  5. The Effects of TiO2 Nanodot Films with RGD Immobilization on Light-Induced Cell Sheet Technology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Meng-Liu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Zhu, Li-Qin; Wang, Tian-Tian; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Hui-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Cell sheet technology is a new strategy in tissue engineering which could be possible to implant into the body without a scaffold. In order to get an integrated cell sheet, a light-induced method via UV365 is used for cell sheet detachment from culture dishes. In this study, we investigated the possibility of cell detachment and growth efficiency on TiO2 nanodot films with RGD immobilization on light-induced cell sheet technology. Mouse calvaria-derived, preosteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured on TiO2 nanodot films with (TR) or without (TN) RGD immobilization. After cells were cultured with or without 5.5 mW/cm2 UV365 illumination, cell morphology, cell viability, osteogenesis related RNA and protein expression, and cell detachment ability were compared, respectively. Light-induced cell detachment was possible when cells were cultured on TR samples. Also, cells cultured on TR samples showed better cell viability, alongside higher protein and RNA expression than on TN samples. This study provides a new biomaterial for light-induced cell/cell sheet harvesting. PMID:26417596

  6. Immobilization free electrochemical biosensor for folate receptor in cancer cells based on terminal protection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jiancong; Wang, Qingxiang; Yang, Weiqiang; Zhao, Mengmeng; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2016-12-15

    The determination of folate receptor (FR) that over expressed in vast quantity of cancerous cells frequently is significant for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Many DNA-based electrochemical biosensors have been developed for FR detection with high selectivity and sensitivity, but most of them need complicated immobilization of DNA on the electrode surface firstly, which is tedious and therefore results in the poor reproducibility. In this study, a simple, sensitive, and selective electrochemical FR biosensor in cancer cells has been proposed, which combines the advantages of the convenient immobilization-free homogeneous indium tin oxide (ITO)-based electrochemical detection strategy and the high selectivity of the terminal protection of small molecule linked DNA. The small molecule of folic acid (FA) and an electroactive molecule of ferrocence (Fc) were tethered to 3'- and 5'-end of an arbitrary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), respectively, forming the FA-ssDNA-Fc complex. In the absence of the target FR, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was degraded by exonuclease I (Exo I) from 3'-end and produced a free Fc, diffusing freely to the ITO electrode surface and resulting in strong electrochemical signal. When the target FR was present, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was bound to FR through specific interaction with FA anchored at the 3'-end, effectively protecting the ssDNA strand from hydrolysis by Exo I. The FR-FA-ssDNA-Fc could not diffuse easily to the negatively charged ITO electrode surface due to the electrostatic repulsion between the DNA strand and the negatively charged ITO electrode, so electrochemical signal reduced. The decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of FR concentration in range of 10fM to 10nM with a detection limit of 3.8fM (S/N=3). The proposed biosensor has been applied to detect FR in HeLa cancer cells, and the decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of cell concentration ranging

  7. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates.

    PubMed

    Catherine, Christy; Lee, Seung-Won; Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  8. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  9. [The effect of immobilized laminin on titanium-oxide films to the behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Ge, Shengnan; Chen, Junying; Huang, Nan

    2009-02-01

    In this study, Ti-O films were synthesized using magnetron sputtering, and were pretreated using NaOH solution for improving surface activity from hydroxyl. The laminin(LN) biomacromolecule was further immobilized to the surface through an anminosilane linker. The surface characteristics of these samples were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and the contact angle method. Finally, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were in vitro seeded to the modified and unmodified Ti-O films surface for evaluating the cell compatibility. Survey results suggested that the functional group of hydroxyl was presented onto Ti-O film surface after being pretreated, and laminin could be covalently immobilized to Ti-O film surface by anminosilane linker. The in vitro cell culture results reveal that the biological behaviors of ECs on biochemical modified Ti-O film surface are excellent. The adherence, growth and proliferation of ECs on laminin-immobilized surface were obviously improved when compared to control one. It implies that the laminin immobilizing is helpful to increasing the endothelialization of Ti-O films. PMID:19334564

  10. Design of a microbial fuel cell and its transition to microbial electrolytic cell for hydrogen production by electrohydrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratima; Parkhey, Piyush; Joshi, Komal; Mahilkar, Anjali

    2013-10-01

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from industrial wastewater and soil samples and tested for exoelectrogenic activity by current production in double chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC), which was further transitioned into a single chambered microbial electrolytic cell to test hydrogen production by electrohydrogenesis. Of all the cultures, the isolate from industrial water sample showed the maximum values for current = 0.161 mA, current density = 108.57 mA/m2 and power density = 48.85 mW/m2 with graphite electrode. Maximum voltage across the cell, however, was reported by the isolate from sewage water sample (506 mv) with copper as electrode. Tap water with KMnO4 was the best cathodic electrolyte as the highest values for all the measured MFC parameters were reported with it. Once the exoelectrogenic activity of the isolates was confirmed by current production, these were tested for hydrogen production in a single chambered microbial electrolytic cell (MEC) modified from the MFC. Hydrogen production was reported positive from co-culture of isolates of both the water samples and co-culture of one soil and one water sample. The maximum rate and yield of hydrogen production was 0.18 m3H2/m3/d and 3.2 mol H2/mol glucose respectively with total hydrogen production of 42.4 mL and energy recovery of 57.4%. Cumulative hydrogen production for a five day cycle of MEC operation was 0.16 m3H2/m3/d.

  11. Oral Vaccine Development by Molecular Display Methods Using Microbial Cells.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oral vaccines are easier to administer than injectable vaccines. To induce an adequate immune response using vaccines, antigenic proteins are usually combined with adjuvant materials. This chapter presents methodologies for the design of oral vaccines using molecular display technology. In molecular display technology, antigenic proteins are displayed on a microbial cell surface with adjuvant ability. This technology would provide a quite convenient process to produce oral vaccines when the DNA sequence of an efficient antigenic protein is available. As an example, oral vaccines against candidiasis were introduced using two different molecular display systems with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus casei. PMID:27076318

  12. Microbial fuel cells as pollutant treatment units: Research updates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are a device that can convert chemical energy in influent substances to electricity via biological pathways. Based on the consent that MFC technology should be applied as a waste/wastewater treatment unit rather than a renewable energy source, this mini-review discussed recent R&D efforts on MFC technologies for pollutant treatments and highlighted the challenges and research and development needs. Owing to the low power density levels achievable by larger-scale MFC, the MFC should be used as a device other than energy source such as being a pollutant treatment unit.

  13. Stacked microbial desalination cells to enhance water desalination efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xia, Xue; Liang, Peng; Cao, Xiaoxin; Sun, Haotian; Huang, Xia

    2011-03-15

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a new method to obtain clean water from brackish water using electricity generated from organic matters by exoelectrogenic bacteria. Anions and cations, derived from salt solution filled in the desalination chamber between the anode and cathode, move to the anode and cathode chambers under the force of electrical field, respectively. On the basis of the primitive single-desalination-chambered MDC, stacked microbial desalination cells (SMDCs) were developed in order to promote the desalination rate in the present study. The effects of desalination chamber number and external resistance were investigated. Results showed that a remarkable increase in the total desalination rate (TDR) could be obtained by means of increasing the desalination cell number and reducing the external resistance, which caused the charge transfer efficiency increased since the SMDCs enabled more pairs of ions separated while one electron passed through the external circuit. The maximum TDR of 0.0252 g/h was obtained using a two-desalination-chambered SMDC with an external resistance of 10 Ω, which was 1.4 times that of single-desalination-chambered MDC. SMDCs proved to be an effective approach to increase the total water desalination rate if provided a proper desalination chamber number and external resistance.

  14. Environmental sensing of heavy metals through whole cell microbial biosensors: a synthetic biology approach.

    PubMed

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara Tess; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley Edwin

    2015-05-15

    Whole cell microbial biosensors are offering an alternative means for rapid, on-site heavy metal detection. Based in microorganisms, biosensing constructs are designed and constructed to produce both qualitative and quantitative outputs in response to heavy metal ions. Previous microbial biosensors designs are focused on single-input constructs; however, development of multiplexed systems is resulting in more flexible designs. The movement of microbial biosensors from laboratory based designs toward on-site, functioning heavy metal detectors has been hindered by the toxic nature of heavy metals, along with the lack of specificity of heavy metals promoter elements. Applying a synthetic biology approach with alternative microbial chassis may increase the robustness of microbial biosensors and mitigate these issues. Before full applications are achieved, further consideration has to be made regarding the risk and regulations of whole cell microbial biosensor use in the environment. To this end, a standard framework for future whole cell microbial biosensor design and use is proposed.

  15. Immobilization of gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces for safe and enhanced gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Stefan; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Gentemann, Lara; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    In comparison to standard transfection methods, gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection has proven to be a versatile alternative. This is based on its minor influence on cell viability and its high efficiency, especially for the delivery of small molecules like small interfering RNA. However, in order to transfer it to routine usage, a safety aspect is of major concern: The avoidance of nanoparticle uptake by the cells is desired. The immobilization of the gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces can address this issue. In this study, we achieved this by silanization of the appropriate surfaces and the binding of gold nanoparticles to them. Comparable perforation efficiencies to the previous approaches of gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection with free gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. The uptake of the immobilized particles by the cells is unlikely. Consequently, these investigations offer the possibility of bringing gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection closer to routine usage.

  16. Distinct hippocampal time cell sequences represent odor memories in immobilized rats.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Christopher J; Carrow, Stephen; Place, Ryan; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have revealed the existence of hippocampal "time cells," principal neurons in CA1 that fire at specific moments in temporally organized experiences. However, in all these studies, animals were in motion; and so, temporal modulation might be due, at least in part, to concurrent or planned movement through space or self-generated movement (path integration). Here the activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons was recorded in head-fixed and immobile rats while they remembered odor stimuli across a delay period. Many neurons selectively and reliably activated at brief moments during the delay, as confirmed by several analyses of temporal modulation, during a strong ongoing θ rhythm. Furthermore, each odor memory was represented by a temporally organized ensemble of time cells composed mostly of neurons that were unique to each memory and some that fired at the same or different moments among multiple memories. These results indicate that ongoing or intended movement through space is not necessary for temporal representations in the hippocampus, and highlight the potential role of time cells as a mechanism for representing the flow of time in distinct memories.

  17. Design and analysis of an immobilized cell reactor with simultaneous product separation: ethanol from whey lactose

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The simultaneous separation of volatile fermentation products from product inhibited fermentations can increase the productivity of a bioreactor by reducing the product concentration in the bioreactor. In this work, a simultaneous tubular reactor separator is developed in which the volatile product is removed from the reacting broth by an inert gas phase. The immobilized cell reactor separator (ICRS) consists of two column reactors: a cocurrent enriching column followed by an countercurrent stripping column. The application of the ICRS concept to the ethanol from whey lactose fermentation was investigated using the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis 2415. An equilibrium stage model of the ICRS was developed including a surface renewal term for an adsorbed monolayer of reacting cells. This model demonstrated the effect of important operational parameters including temperature, pressure, and gas flow rates. Experimental results using yeast adsorbed to 1/4'' ceramic saddles were somewhat unsatisfactory but very high productivities, cell densities, and separation efficiency were obtained using an absorbant column packing in a gas continuous operating mode.

  18. Magnetic immobilization of Bacillus subtilis natto cells for menaquinone-7 fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Varma, Vikas; Yang, Shuyi; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Production of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) by Bacillus subtilis natto is associated with major drawbacks. To address the current challenges in MK-7 fermentation, studying the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the bacterial cells can open up a new domain for intensified bioprocesses. This article introduces the new concept of application of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) as a pioneer tool for MK-7 process intensification. In this order, IONs with the average size of 11 nm were successfully fabricated and characterized for possible in situ removal of target substances from the fermentation media. The prepared particles were used for decoration and immobilization of B. subtilis natto cells. Presence of iron oxide nanoparticles significantly enhanced the MK-7 specific yield (15 %) as compared to the control samples. In addition, fabricated IONs showed a promising ability for in situ recovery of bacterial cells from the fermentation media with more than 95 % capture efficiency. Based on the results, IONs can be implemented successfully as a novel tool for MK-7 production. This study provides a considerable interest for industrial application of magnetic nanoparticles and their future role in designing an intensified biological process.

  19. In vivo assessment of guided neural stem cell differentiation in growth factor immobilized chitosan-based hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Koenig, Andrew M; Sloan, Patricia; Leipzig, Nic D

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a unique growth factor-biomaterial system can offer spatial control of growth factors with sustained signaling to guide the specific lineage commitment of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in vivo. First, recombinant fusion proteins incorporating an N-terminal biotin tag and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), platelet derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), or bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) were immobilized to a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) based biopolymer via a streptavidin linker to specify NSPC differentiation into neurons, oligodendrocytes, or astrocytes, respectively. MAC was mixed with growth factors (immobilized or adsorbed), acrylated laminin, NSPCs, and crosslinked within chitosan conduits. This system mimics regenerative aspects of the central nervous system ECM, which is largely composed of a crosslinked polysaccharide matrix with cell-adhesive regions, and adds the new functionality of protein sequestration. We demonstrated that these growth factors are maintained at functionally significant levels for 28 d in vitro. In the main study, immobilized treatments were compared to absorbed and control treatments after 28 d in vivo (rat subcutaneous). Masson's Trichrome staining revealed that small collagen capsules formed around the chitosan conduits with an average acceptable thickness of 153.07 ± 6.02 μm for all groups. ED-1 staining showed mild macrophage clustering around the outside of chitosan conduits in all treatments with no macrophage invasion into hydrogel portions. Importantly, NSPC differentiation staining demonstrated that immobilized growth factors induced the majority of cells to differentiate into the desired cell types as compared with adsorbed growth factor treatments and controls by day 28. Interestingly, immobilized IFN-γ resulted in neural rosette-like arrangements and even structures resembling neural tubes, suggesting this treatment can lead to guided dedifferentiation and subsequent neurulation.

  20. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  1. Modulation of Protein Adsorption and Cell Proliferation on Polyethylene Immobilized Graphene Oxide Reinforced HDPE Bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rahul; Naskar, Sharmistha; Bhaskar, Nitu; Bose, Suryasarathi; Basu, Bikramjit

    2016-05-18

    The uniform dispersion of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix, together with an enhancement of interfacial adhesion is indispensable toward achieving better mechanical properties in the nanocomposites. In the context to biomedical applications, the type and amount of nanoparticles can potentially influence the biocompatibility. To address these issues, we prepared high-density polyethylene (HDPE) based composites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO) by melt mixing followed by compression molding. In an attempt to tailor the dispersion and to improve the interfacial adhesion, we immobilized polyethylene (PE) onto GO sheets by nucleophilic addition-elimination reaction. A good combination of yield strength (ca. 20 MPa), elastic modulus (ca. 600 MPa), and an outstanding elongation at failure (ca. 70%) were recorded with 3 wt % polyethylene grafted graphene oxide (PE-g-GO) reinforced HDPE composites. Considering the relevance of protein adsorption as a biophysical precursor to cell adhesion, the protein adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were determined to realize three times higher equilibrium constant (Keq) for PE-g-GO-reinforced HDPE composites as compared to GO-reinforced composites. To assess the cytocompatibility, we grew osteoblast cell line (MC3T3) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on HDPE/GO and HDPE/PE-g-GO composites, in vitro. The statistically significant increase in metabolically active cell over different time periods in culture for up to 6 days in MC3T3 and 7 days for hMSCs was observed, irrespective of the substrate composition. Such observation indicated that HDPE with GO or PE-g-GO addition (up to 3 wt %) can be used as cell growth substrate. The extensive proliferation of cells with oriented growth pattern also supported the fact that tailored GO addition can support cellular functionality in vitro. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that the PE-g-GO in HDPE can effectively be utilized to enhance both mechanical and

  2. Modulation of Protein Adsorption and Cell Proliferation on Polyethylene Immobilized Graphene Oxide Reinforced HDPE Bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rahul; Naskar, Sharmistha; Bhaskar, Nitu; Bose, Suryasarathi; Basu, Bikramjit

    2016-05-18

    The uniform dispersion of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix, together with an enhancement of interfacial adhesion is indispensable toward achieving better mechanical properties in the nanocomposites. In the context to biomedical applications, the type and amount of nanoparticles can potentially influence the biocompatibility. To address these issues, we prepared high-density polyethylene (HDPE) based composites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO) by melt mixing followed by compression molding. In an attempt to tailor the dispersion and to improve the interfacial adhesion, we immobilized polyethylene (PE) onto GO sheets by nucleophilic addition-elimination reaction. A good combination of yield strength (ca. 20 MPa), elastic modulus (ca. 600 MPa), and an outstanding elongation at failure (ca. 70%) were recorded with 3 wt % polyethylene grafted graphene oxide (PE-g-GO) reinforced HDPE composites. Considering the relevance of protein adsorption as a biophysical precursor to cell adhesion, the protein adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were determined to realize three times higher equilibrium constant (Keq) for PE-g-GO-reinforced HDPE composites as compared to GO-reinforced composites. To assess the cytocompatibility, we grew osteoblast cell line (MC3T3) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on HDPE/GO and HDPE/PE-g-GO composites, in vitro. The statistically significant increase in metabolically active cell over different time periods in culture for up to 6 days in MC3T3 and 7 days for hMSCs was observed, irrespective of the substrate composition. Such observation indicated that HDPE with GO or PE-g-GO addition (up to 3 wt %) can be used as cell growth substrate. The extensive proliferation of cells with oriented growth pattern also supported the fact that tailored GO addition can support cellular functionality in vitro. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that the PE-g-GO in HDPE can effectively be utilized to enhance both mechanical and

  3. Graphitic biochar as a cathode electrocatalyst support for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Tyler M; Pietron, Jeremy J; Wang, Heming; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Biffinger, Justin C

    2015-11-01

    Graphitic biochar (BC) was generated using high temperature gasification and alkaline post-treatment (BCw) of wood-based biomass. The BCw was evaluated as a manganese oxide electrocatalytic support (MnO/BCw) and microbial fuel cell (MFC) air cathode. Nano-structured MnO2 crystals were successfully immobilized on biomass-based graphitic sheets and characterized using physical, chemical, and electrochemical analyses. Cyclic voltammetry of MnO/BCw/Nafion inks showed electrochemical features typical of β-MnO2 with a current density of 0.9 mA cm(-2). BC showed satisfactory maximum power densities of 146.7 mW m(-2) (BCw) and 187.8 W m(-2) (MnO/BCw), compared with Vulcan Carbon (VC) (156.8 mW m(-2)) and manganese oxide VC composites (MnO/VC) (606.1 mW m(-2)). These materials were also tested as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for single chamber MFCs inoculated with anaerobic sludge. Our results demonstrate that BC can serve as an effective, low cost, and scalable material for MFC application.

  4. Graphitic biochar as a cathode electrocatalyst support for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Tyler M; Pietron, Jeremy J; Wang, Heming; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Biffinger, Justin C

    2015-11-01

    Graphitic biochar (BC) was generated using high temperature gasification and alkaline post-treatment (BCw) of wood-based biomass. The BCw was evaluated as a manganese oxide electrocatalytic support (MnO/BCw) and microbial fuel cell (MFC) air cathode. Nano-structured MnO2 crystals were successfully immobilized on biomass-based graphitic sheets and characterized using physical, chemical, and electrochemical analyses. Cyclic voltammetry of MnO/BCw/Nafion inks showed electrochemical features typical of β-MnO2 with a current density of 0.9 mA cm(-2). BC showed satisfactory maximum power densities of 146.7 mW m(-2) (BCw) and 187.8 W m(-2) (MnO/BCw), compared with Vulcan Carbon (VC) (156.8 mW m(-2)) and manganese oxide VC composites (MnO/VC) (606.1 mW m(-2)). These materials were also tested as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for single chamber MFCs inoculated with anaerobic sludge. Our results demonstrate that BC can serve as an effective, low cost, and scalable material for MFC application. PMID:26141670

  5. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up.

  6. Probing Dynamic Cell-Substrate Interactions using Photochemically Generated Surface-Immobilized Gradients: Application to Selectin-Mediated Leukocyte Rolling

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Christine T.; Potts, Gregory K.; Michael, Madeline C.; Tolan, Nicole V.

    2014-01-01

    Model substrates presenting biochemical cues immobilized in a controlled and well-defined manner are of great interest for their applications in biointerface studies that elucidate the molecular basis of cell receptor-ligand interactions. Herein, we describe a direct, photochemical method to generate one-component surface-immobilized biomolecular gradients that are applied to the study of selectin-mediated leukocyte rolling. The technique employs benzophenone-modified glass substrates, which upon controlled exposure to UV light (350 – 365 nm) in the presence of protein-containing solutions facilitate the generation of covalently immobilized protein gradients. Conditions were optimized to generate gradient substrates presenting P-selectin and PSGL-1 (P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1) immobilized at site densities over a 5- to 10-fold range (from as low as ~200 molecules/μm2 to as high as 6000 molecules/μm2). The resulting substrates were quantitatively characterized via fluorescence analysis and radioimmunoassays before their use in the leukocyte rolling assays. HL-60 promyelocytes and Jurkat T lymphocytes were assessed for their ability to tether to and roll on substrates presenting immobilized P-selectin and PSGL-1 under conditions of physiologically relevant shear stress. The results of these flow assays reveal the combined effect of immobilized protein site density and applied wall shear stress on cell rolling behavior. Two-component substrates presenting P-selectin and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) were also generated to assess the interplay between these two proteins and their effect on cell rolling and adhesion. These proof-of-principle studies verify that the described gradient generation approach yields well-defined gradient substrates that present immobilized proteins over a large range of site densities that are applicable for investigation of cell-materials interactions, including multi-parameter leukocyte flow studies. Future

  7. Hydrogen peroxide photoproduction by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga Anabaena variabilis: A way to solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, I.; La Rosa, F.F. de )

    1992-07-01

    A photosystem for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction formed by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga, Anabaena variabilis and the redox mediator methyl viologen is described. Hydrogen peroxide is produced in a redox catalyst cycle in which methyl viologen is reduced by electrons from water obtained by the photosynthetic apparatus of the algae using solar energy, and reoxidized by the introduction of oxygen into the solution. Hydrogen peroxide is produced during methyl viologen re-oxidation in two steps by means of the formation of superoxide. Experimental conditions for maximum photoproduction (catalyst charge, chlorophyll, and agar final concentration for cell immobilization) have been investigated using a continuous photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis as photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis is photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem produces hydrogen peroxide at a rate of 100 {mu}moles/mg Chl{center dot}h, maintaining the production for several hours, and with an energy conversion efficiency of about 2%. Taking into account the use of hydrogen peroxide as fuel, this photosystem can be a useful tool in the storage of solar energy.

  8. Direct electron transfer with yeast cells and construction of a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Prasad, D; Arun, S; Murugesan, M; Padmanaban, S; Satyanarayanan, R S; Berchmans, Sheela; Yegnaraman, V

    2007-05-15

    The direct electron transfer exhibited by the yeast cells, Hansenula anomala has been demonstrated using the electrochemical technique cyclic voltammetry by immobilizing the microorganisms by two different methods viz., physical adsorption and covalent linkage. The analysis of redox enzymes present in the outer membrane of the microorganisms has been carried out in this work. This paper demonstrates that yeast cells with redox enzymes present in their outer membrane are capable of communicating directly with the electrode surface and contribute to current generation in a mediatorless biofuel cells. The efficiency of current generation has been evaluated using three anode materials.

  9. The Role of Soil Organic Matter, Nutrients, and Microbial Community Structure on the Performance of Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Dunaj, S. J.; Vallino, J. J.; Hines, M. E.; Gay, M.; Kobyljanec, C.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer the potential for generating electricity, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, and bioremediating pollutants through utilization of a plentiful, natural, and renewable resource: soil organic carbon. In the current study, we analyzed microbial community structure, MFC performance, and soil characteristics in different microhabitats (bulk soil, anode, and cathode) within MFCs constructed from agricultural or forest soils in order to determine how soil type and microbial dynamics influence MFC performance. MFCs were constructed with soils from agricultural and hardwood forest sites at Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA). The bulk soil characteristics were analyzed, including polyphenols, short chain fatty acids, total organic C and N, abiotic macronutrients, N and P mineralization rates, CO2 respiration rates, and MFC power output. Microbial community structure of the anodes, cathodes, and bulk soils was determined with molecular fingerprinting methods, which included terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Our results indicated that MFCs constructed from agricultural soil had power output about 17 times that of forest soil-based MFCs and respiration rates about 10 times higher than forest soil MFCs. Agricultural soil MFCs had lower C:N ratios, polyphenol content, and acetate concentrations than forest soil MFCs, suggesting that active agricultural MFC microbial communities were supported by higher quality organic carbon. Microbial community profile data indicate that the microbial communities at the anode of the high power MFCs were less diverse than in low power MFCs and were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria, Geobacter, and, to a lesser extent, Clostridia, while low-power MFC anode communities were dominated by Clostridia. These data suggest that the presence of organic carbon substrate (acetate) was not the major limiting factor in selecting for highly electrogenic microbial

  10. Organic-inorganic hybrid material for the cells immobilization: long-term viability mechanism and application in BOD sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Shang, Li; Guo, Shaojun; Li, Dan; Liu, Changyu; Qi, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, organic-inorganic hybrid material, which is composed of silica and the grafting copolymer of poly (vinyl alcohol) and 4-vinylpyridine (PVA-g-P(4-VP)), was employed to immobilize Trichosporon cutaneum strain 2.570 cells. Cells entrapped into the hybrid material were found to keep a long-term viability. The mechanism of such a long-term viability was investigated by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Our studies revealed that arthroconidia produced in the extracellular material might play an important role in keeping the long-term viability of the immobilized microorganism. After the arthroconidia were activated, an electrochemical biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor based on cell/hybrid material-modified supporting membrane was constructed for verifying the proposed mechanism. The results and insight gained from the present experiments can be widely used to various biosensor designs.

  11. Designing photobioreactors based on living cells immobilized in silica gel for carbon dioxide mitigation.

    PubMed

    Rooke, Joanna C; Léonard, Alexandre; Meunier, Christophe F; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-09-19

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels have been rising since the industrial revolution, with the most dramatic increase occurring since the end of World War II. Carbon dioxide is widely regarded as one of the major factors contributing to the greenhouse effect, which is of major concern in today's society because it leads to global warming. Photosynthesis is Nature's tool for combating elevated carbon dioxide levels. In essence, photosynthesis allows a cell to harvest solar energy and convert it into chemical energy through the assimilation of carbon dioxide and water. Therefore photosynthesis is regarded as an ideal way to harness the abundance of solar energy that reaches Earth and convert anthropologically generated carbon dioxide into useful carbohydrates, providing a much more sustainable energy source. This Minireview aims to tackle the idea of immobilizing photosynthetic unicellular organisms within inert silica frameworks, providing protection both to the fragile cells and to the external ecosystem, and to use this resultant living hybrid material in a photobioreactor. The viability and activity of various unicellular organisms are summarized alongside design issues of a photobioreactor based on living hybrid materials.

  12. Effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress on rat Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marić, D; Kostić, T; Kovacević, R

    1996-06-01

    In rats, acute immobilization (IMO) stress (2 h) induced a fall in the serum androgen concentrations (T+DHT) without detectable changes in serum luteinizing hormone (LH) values. In vitro studies, using a suspension of Leydig cells from adult rat testis, demonstrated that acute stress inhibited conversion of progesterone (P) or 17hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) to T while conversion of androstendione (delta 4 A) was not affected. Acute IMO reduced activity of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) and decreased basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone and androgen production. Chronic IMO stress (2 h daily for 10 days) induced a decrease in serum androgen level with decline in serum LH values. In vitro, hCG-stimulated progesterone and androgen production by suspension of Leydig cells, as well as conversion of P and 17OHP to T were not significantly altered. Our data demonstrates that acute IMO stress impaired testicular steroidogenesis primarily at the testicular level (decreasing the activity of certain enzymes), while chronic IMO stress exerts the effect mainly on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis; reduced serum LH levels elicit a decrease in serum androgen levels.

  13. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  14. Nitrite as a candidate substrate in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Faraghi, Neda; Ebrahimi, Sirous

    2012-08-01

    Current generation using nitrite as substrate (pH 6.9, 40 mgN l(-1)) in a nitrite-fed microbial fuel cell was investigated under anaerobic and aerobic anodic conditions as an alternative to the biological nitrite oxidation process. Cell current, coulombic efficiency (CE) and power generation of 0.04 mA, 30 ± 2 % and 19.3 ± 3.3 μW m(-2), respectively, were observed under anaerobic conditions while complete nitrite degradation (no current) was obtained under aerobic conditions. Switching from aerobic to anaerobic anode enhanced the CE and power generation (39 ± 1 % and 29 ± 4.3 μW m(-2)).

  15. Regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells on poly(ethylene terephthalate) film by O-carboxymethylchitosan surface immobilization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Feng; Fang, Ning

    2008-08-01

    Specifying the chemical environment of cells is a well-established method of controlling cellular behaviors. In this study, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film was selected as a typical biomaterial to detect the effects of chemical modifications on material surface in controlling cell behaviors. Natural biopolymer chitosan and its biocompatible derivative, O-carboxymethylchitosan (OCMCS) were surface immobilized on PET, respectively, via argon plasma followed by graft copolymerization with acrylic acid (AAc), which was exploited to covalently couple PET with chitosan (CS) and OCMCS molecules. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) displayed a surface-dependent cell spreading and cytoskeletal organization. The cells spread with a more pronounced elongated spindle shape, smaller cell area, and lower cell shape index (CSI) on OCMCS-modified PET surface than on PET, or the PAA and chitosan-immobilized PET surfaces after 24 h of culture. Cell-culture viability after 5 days showed that all the modified materials possessed good cell proliferation. Our results suggest that cell adhesion, morphology, and growth can be mediated not only by varying the functional groups, electric charge, and wettability of PET surface but also by the specific biological recognition elicited from the biomaterials. These findings strongly support the concept that the microenvironment significantly influences cell behavior, highlighting the importance of environmental material biochemistry in cell-based tissue engineering schemes. PMID:17975820

  16. Hydrogen photoproduction by nutrient-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells immobilized within thin alginate films under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey N; Seibert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for immobilizing H2-photoproducing green algae within a thin (<400 microm) alginate film has been developed. Alginate films with entrapped sulfur/phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain cc124, cells demonstrate (a) higher cell density (up to 2,000 microg Chl mL(-1) of matrix), (b) kinetics of H2 photoproduction similar to sulfur-deprived suspension cultures, (c) higher specific rates (up to 12.5 micromol mg(-1) Chl h(-1)) of H2 evolution, (d) light conversion efficiencies to H2 of over 1% and (e) unexpectedly high resistance of the H2-photoproducing system to inactivation by atmospheric O2. The algal cells, entrapped in alginate and then placed in vials containing 21% O2 in the headspace, evolved up to 67% of the H2 gas produced under anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the lower susceptibility of the immobilized algal H2-producing system to inactivation by O2 depends on two factors: (a) the presence of acetate in the medium, which supports higher rates of respiration and (b) the capability of the alginate polymer itself to effectively separate the entrapped cells from O2 in the liquid and headspace and restrict O2 diffusion into the matrix. The strategy presented for immobilizing algal cells within thin polymeric matrices shows the potential for scale-up and possible future applications. PMID:18823051

  17. Enhancement of electricity production by graphene oxide in soil microbial fuel cells and plant microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg(-1) was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg(-1) of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m(-2), which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m(-2) generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m(-2) of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs.

  18. Enhancement of Electricity Production by Graphene Oxide in Soil Microbial Fuel Cells and Plant Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg−1 was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg−1 of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m−2, which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m−2 generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m−2 of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs. PMID:25883931

  19. Cephalosporin C production by immobilized Cephalosporium acremonium cells in a repeated batch tower bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Antonio J G; Pan, Tai; Giordano, Roberto C; Araujo, Maria Lucia G C; Hokka, Carlos O

    2004-01-01

    The industrial production of antibiotics with filamentous fungi is usually carried out in conventional aerated and agitated tank fermentors. Highly viscous non-Newtonian broths are produced and a compromise must be found between convenient shear stress and adequate oxygen transfer. In this work, cephalosporin C production by bioparticles of immobilized cells of Cephalosporium acremonium ATCC 48272 was studied in a repeated batch tower bioreactor as an alternative to the conventional process. Also, gas-liquid oxygen transfer volumetric coefficients, k(L)a, were determined at various air flow-rates and alumina contents in the bioparticle. The bioparticles were composed of calcium alginate (2.0% w/w), alumina ( < 44 micra), cells, and water. A model describing the cell growth, cephalosporin C production, oxygen, glucose, and sucrose consumption was proposed. To describe the radial variation of oxygen concentration within the pellet, the reaction-diffusion model forecasting a dead core bioparticle was adopted. The k(L)a measurements with gel beads prepared with 0.0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% alumina showed that a higher k(L)a value is attained with 1.5 and 2.0%. An expression relating this coefficient to particle density, liquid density, and air velocity was obtained and further utilized in the simulation of the proposed model. Batch, followed by repeated batch experiments, were accomplished by draining the spent medium, washing with saline solution, and pouring fresh medium into the bioreactor. Results showed that glucose is consumed very quickly, within 24 h, followed by sucrose consumption and cephalosporin C production. Higher productivities were attained during the second batch, as cell concentration was already high, resulting in rapid glucose consumption and an early derepression of cephalosporin C synthesizing enzymes. The model incorporated this improvement predicting higher cephalosporin C productivity.

  20. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  1. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25 mL) connected in series to an MEC (72 mL) produced a maximum of 0.43 V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2 mmol H(2)/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3 mmol H(2)/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  3. Towards an engineering-oriented strategy for building microbial anodes for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pocaznoi, Diana; Erable, Benjamin; Etcheverry, Luc; Delia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain

    2012-10-14

    The objective of the work was to give some first insight into an engineering-oriented approach to MFC design by focusing on anode optimisation. The effect of various parameters was firstly investigated in half cell set-ups under well-controlled conditions. Microbial anodes were formed from soil leachate under polarisation at -0.2 V vs. SCE with different concentrations of substrate, salt and buffer. It was shown that non-turnover CV could be used to assess the electroactive maturity of the anodes during polarisation. This first phase resulted in the definition of a set of optimal parameter values. In the second phase, an optimal anode was formed in a half-cell under the defined optimal conditions. A numerical approach was then developed to calculate the theoretical maximum power that the anode could provide in an ideal MFC. The concept of "ideal MFC" introduced here allowed the theoretical maximum power to be calculated on the sole basis of the kinetic characteristics of the anode. Finally, a MFC designed in the aim of approaching such ideal conditions generated stable power densities of 6.0 W m(-2), which were among the highest values reported so far. The discrepancy between the theoretical maximum (8.9 W m(-2)) and the experimental results pointed out some limit due to the source of inoculum and suggested possible paths to improvement.

  4. Sorption of trivalent cerium by a mixture of microbial cells and manganese oxides: Effect of microbial cells on the oxidation of trivalent cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Jiang, Mingyu; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian; Tanaka, Kazuya; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Xia, Xiaobin; Yang, Ke; He, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Sorption of Ce by mixtures of synthetic Mn oxides and microbial cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated to elucidate the role of microorganisms on Ce(III) oxidative migration in the environment. The mixtures, upon which Ce was sorbed following exposure to solutions containing 1.0 × 10-4 or 1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1 Ce(III), were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) at synchrotron facilities. A Ce LIII-edge micro XANES spectra analysis was also performed to determine the oxidation states of Ce adsorbed to the Mn oxides and microbial cells in the mixtures. The distribution ratios (Kd) of Ce between the individual solids and solution increased with increasing pH of the solution, and was nearly the same in mixtures containing varying amounts of microbial cells. SEM-EDS and micro-XRF analyses showed that Ce was sorbed by both MnO2 and microbial cells (1.7 × 10-1 or 3.3 × 10-1 g L-1). In addition, nano-particles containing Ce and P developed on the surface of the microbial cells. XANES analysis showed that lower fractions of Ce(III) were oxidized to Ce(IV) in the mixtures containing greater amounts of microbial cells. Micro-XANES analysis revealed that Ce was present as Ce(III) on the microbial cells and as Ce(IV) on Mn oxides. These results strongly suggest that the association of Ce(III) with the microbial cell surface and the formation of Ce phosphate nano-particles are responsible for suppressing the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in the mixtures.

  5. Flow cytometry and cell sorting of heterogeneous microbial populations: the importance of single-cell analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, H M; Kell, D B

    1996-01-01

    The most fundamental questions such as whether a cell is alive, in the sense of being able to divide or to form a colony, may sometimes be very hard to answer, since even axenic microbial cultures are extremely heterogeneous. Analyses that seek to correlate such things as viability, which is a property of an individual cell, with macroscopic measurements of culture variables such as ATP content, respiratory activity, and so on, must inevitably fail. It is therefore necessary to make physiological measurements on individual cells. Flow cytometry is such a technique, which allows one to analyze cells rapidly and individually and permits the quantitative analysis of microbial heterogeneity. It therefore offers many advantages over conventional measurements for both routine and more exploratory analyses of microbial properties. While the technique has been widely applied to the study of mammalian cells, is use in microbiology has until recently been much more limited, largely because of the smaller size of microbes and the consequently smaller optical signals obtainable from them. Since these technical barriers no longer hold, flow cytometry with appropriate stains has been used for the rapid discrimination and identification of microbial cells, for the rapid assessment of viability and of the heterogeneous distributions of a wealth of other more detailed physiological properties, for the analysis of antimicrobial drug-cell interactions, and for the isolation of high-yielding strains of biotechnological interest. Flow cytometric analyses provide an abundance of multivariate data, and special methods have been devised to exploit these. Ongoing advances mean that modern flow cytometers may now be used by nonspecialists to effect a renaissance in our understanding of microbial heterogeneity. PMID:8987359

  6. Stimulating sediment bioremediation with benthic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and sustainable technologies for cleaning up of contaminated sediments are under urgent demand. Bioremediation by utilizing the natural metabolic activities of sediment-inhabited microorganisms has been widely accepted as a viable option, but the relatively low efficiency and poor controllability severely limite its application. Here, we bring out the concept that electrochemical approaches may be used as an efficient means to stimulate sediment bioremediation. Although still at the very beginning, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFC) as a remediation technology show many potential benefits, such as accelerated decontamination, self-sustained operation, relatively easy deployment and control, and environmental benignity. The unique features of BMFC setup and operation also give rise to substantially different challenges compared to conventional MFCs. In this review, we present a critical overview on the characteristics, possible application niches, and state-of-the-art progress of this technology. Especially, the current limitations in respect of system design, electrode selection, microbial control and selection of deployment environment are discussed in details, and the needed future research endeavors to promote its practical application are highlighted.

  7. Electricity generation from tetrathionate in microbial fuel cells by acidophiles.

    PubMed

    Sulonen, Mira L K; Kokko, Marika E; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2015-03-01

    Inorganic sulfur compounds, such as tetrathionate, are often present in mining process and waste waters. The biodegradation of tetrathionate was studied under acidic conditions in aerobic batch cultivations and in anaerobic anodes of two-chamber flow-through microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All four cultures originating from biohydrometallurgical process waters from multimetal ore heap bioleaching oxidized tetrathionate aerobically at pH below 3 with sulfate as the main soluble metabolite. In addition, all cultures generated electricity from tetrathionate in MFCs at pH below 2.5 with ferric iron as the terminal cathodic electron acceptor. The maximum current and power densities during MFC operation and in the performance analysis were 79.6 mA m(-2) and 13.9 mW m(-2) and 433 mA m(-2) and 17.6 mW m(-2), respectively. However, the low coulombic efficiency (below 5%) indicates that most of the electrons were directed to other processes, such as aerobic oxidation of tetrathionate and unmeasured intermediates. The microbial community analysis revealed that the dominant species both in the anolyte and on the anode electrode surface of the MFCs were Acidithiobacillus spp. and Ferroplasma spp. This study provides a proof of concept that tetrathionate serves as electron donor for biological electricity production in the pH range of 1.2-2.5.

  8. Screening bioactive compounds from Ligusticum chuanxiong by high density immobilized human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Guangxin; Sun, Huanmei; Bian, Liujiao; Zhao, Xinfeng; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2015-07-01

    High throughput screening methodologies play a very important role in screening bioactive compounds from complex media. In this work, a new strategy for attaching cells onto amino microspheres using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a probe was developed. The immobilization depended on the specific affinity between integrin on the cells and the RGD peptide, which was coated on poly[oligo (ethylene glycol) methacrylate] by atom transfer radical polymerization. Validated application of the stationary phase was performed in the analysis of Ligusticum chuanxiong extraction by high performance affinity chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three compounds were screened as the bioactive compounds of Ligusticum chuanxiong. Two of them were identified as 3-butyl-hexahydroisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), whereas the other one remains indistinct. The association constant of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and TMP binding to VEGF receptor (VEGFR) on HUVECs were calculated to be (1.04 ± 0.08) × 10(11) M(-1) and (9.84 ± 1.11) × 10(8) M(-1) by zonal elution. Molecular docking showed that one hydrogen bond was formed between N atom of TMP and 3-N atom of imidazole group in histidine(223) of VEGFR. Both zonal elution and molecular docking indicated that TMP and VEGF bind to the same site of VEGFR on HUVECs. It is possible to become a promising tool for high throughput screening of the bioactive compounds binding to HUVECs through broad application of the stationary phase. PMID:26018629

  9. New biosensor for detection of copper ions in water based on immobilized genetically modified yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Vopálenská, Irena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-10-15

    Contamination of water by heavy metals represents a potential risk for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, including humans. Heavy metals in water resources can come from various industrial activities, and drinking water can be ex-post contaminated by heavy metals such as Cu(2+) from house fittings (e.g., water reservoirs) and pipes. Here, we present a new copper biosensor capable of detecting copper ions at concentrations of 1-100 μM. This biosensor is based on cells of a specifically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain immobilized in alginate beads. Depending on the concentration of copper, the biosensor beads change color from white, when copper is present in concentrations below the detection limit, to pink or red based on the increase in copper concentration. The biosensor was successfully tested in the determination of copper concentrations in real samples of water contaminated with copper ions. In contrast to analytical methods or other biosensors based on fluorescent proteins, the newly designed biosensor does not require specific equipment and allows the quick detection of copper in many parallel samples.

  10. New biosensor for detection of copper ions in water based on immobilized genetically modified yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Vopálenská, Irena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-10-15

    Contamination of water by heavy metals represents a potential risk for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, including humans. Heavy metals in water resources can come from various industrial activities, and drinking water can be ex-post contaminated by heavy metals such as Cu(2+) from house fittings (e.g., water reservoirs) and pipes. Here, we present a new copper biosensor capable of detecting copper ions at concentrations of 1-100 μM. This biosensor is based on cells of a specifically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain immobilized in alginate beads. Depending on the concentration of copper, the biosensor beads change color from white, when copper is present in concentrations below the detection limit, to pink or red based on the increase in copper concentration. The biosensor was successfully tested in the determination of copper concentrations in real samples of water contaminated with copper ions. In contrast to analytical methods or other biosensors based on fluorescent proteins, the newly designed biosensor does not require specific equipment and allows the quick detection of copper in many parallel samples. PMID:25982723

  11. A new technological approach proposed for distillate production using immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Loukatos, Paul; Kanellaki, Maria; Komaitis, Michael; Athanasiadis, Ilias; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2003-01-01

    A new technological approach to distillate production using immobilized cells was investigated. The effect of temperature on the main volatile by-products in distillates was determined. Wines produced by delignified cellulose-, gluten- and kissiris-supported biocatalysis were used as starting materials. The produced distillates were analyzed for ethanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, propanol-1, isobutanol and amyl alcohol content. The results showed that distillates from delignified cellulosic material (DCM) at 16 degrees C contained smaller amounts of amyl alcohols, 57% of that produced by gluten and 32% of that produced by kissiris. The ethyl acetate content of distillates from DCM improved the aroma of distillates. These results agree with those of sensory evaluation. Subsequently, the scale-up for low-temperature distillate production at 16 degrees C using DCM was further investigated. A new version of an industrial multi-stage fixed bed tower (MFBT) bioreactor with a capacity of 11,000 l proved to be suitable for continuous fermentation by DCM-supported biocatalysis. Economic analysis showed a reduction in the cost of almost 30% for distillate production and 78% for wine production.

  12. Immobilization of electroporated cells for fabrication of cellular biosensors: physiological effects of the shape of calcium alginate matrices and foetal calf serum.

    PubMed

    Katsanakis, Nikos; Katsivelis, Andreas; Kintzios, Spiridon

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effect of transfected cell immobilization in calcium alginate gels, we immobilized electroporated Vero cells in gels shaped either as spherical beads or as thin membrane layers. In addition, we investigated whether serum addition had a positive effect on cell proliferation and viability in either gel configuration. The gels were stored for four weeks in a medium supplemented or not with 20% (v/v) foetal calf serum. Throughout a culture period of four weeks, cell proliferation and cell viability were assayed by optical microscopy after provision of Trypan Blue. Non-elaborate culture conditions (room temperature, non-CO(2) enriched culture atmosphere) were applied throughout the experimental period in order to evaluate cell viability under less than optimal storage conditions. Immobilization of electroporated cells was associated with an initially reduced cell viability, which was gradually increased. Immobilization was associated with maintenance of cell growth for the duration of the experimental period, whereas electroporated cells essentially died after a week in suspension culture. Considerable proliferation of immobilized cells was observed in spherical alginate beads. In both gel configurations, addition of serum was associated with increased cell proliferation. The results of the present study could contribute to an improvement of the storability of biosensors based on electroporated, genetically or membrane-engineered cells.

  13. A comparative evaluation of different types of microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangli; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Haiping; Cheng, Xing; Zhang, Renduo; Teng, Wenkai

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate different microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production. The systems included microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC), microbial electrolysis desalination cell (MEDC) with bipolar membrane and anion exchange membrane (BP-A MEDC), MEDC with bipolar membrane and cation exchange membrane (BP-C MEDC), and modified microbial desalination cell (M-MDC). The microbial electrolysis desalination cells performed differently in terms of malic acid production and energy consumption. The MEDCC performed best with the highest malic acid production rate (18.4 ± 0.6 mmol/Lh) and the lowest energy consumption (0.35 ± 0.14 kWh/kg). The best performance of MEDCC was attributable to the neutral pH condition in the anode chamber, the lowest internal resistance, and the highest Geobacter percentage of the anode biofilm population among all the reactors.

  14. A comparative evaluation of different types of microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangli; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Haiping; Cheng, Xing; Zhang, Renduo; Teng, Wenkai

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate different microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production. The systems included microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC), microbial electrolysis desalination cell (MEDC) with bipolar membrane and anion exchange membrane (BP-A MEDC), MEDC with bipolar membrane and cation exchange membrane (BP-C MEDC), and modified microbial desalination cell (M-MDC). The microbial electrolysis desalination cells performed differently in terms of malic acid production and energy consumption. The MEDCC performed best with the highest malic acid production rate (18.4 ± 0.6 mmol/Lh) and the lowest energy consumption (0.35 ± 0.14 kWh/kg). The best performance of MEDCC was attributable to the neutral pH condition in the anode chamber, the lowest internal resistance, and the highest Geobacter percentage of the anode biofilm population among all the reactors. PMID:26367771

  15. Microbial linguistics: perspectives and applications of microbial cell-to-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert J; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung; Ghim, Cheol-Min

    2011-01-01

    Inter-cellular communication via diffusible small molecules is a defining character not only of multicellular forms of life but also of single-celled organisms. A large number of bacterial genes are regulated by the change of chemical milieu mediated by the local population density of its own species or others. The cell density-dependent "autoinducer" molecules regulate the expression of those genes involved in genetic competence, biofilm formation and persistence, virulence, sporulation, bioluminescence, antibiotic production, and many others. Recent innovations in recombinant DNA technology and micro-/nano-fluidics systems render the genetic circuitry responsible for cell-to-cell communication feasible to and malleable via synthetic biological approaches. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular biology of bacterial intercellular communication and the novel experimental protocols and platforms used to investigate this phenomenon. A particular emphasis is given to the genetic regulatory circuits that provide the standard building blocks which constitute the syntax of the biochemical communication network. Thus, this review gives focus to the engineering principles necessary for rewiring bacterial chemo-communication for various applications, ranging from population-level gene expression control to the study of host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Time-Course Changes of Steroidogenic Gene Expression and Steroidogenesis of Rat Leydig Cells after Acute Immobilization Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Yuan, Kai-ming; Zhou, Hong-yu; Bu, Tiao; Su, Huina; Liu, Shiwen; Zhu, Qiqi; Wang, Yiyan; Hu, Yuanyuan; Shan, Yuanyuan; Lian, Qing-quan; Wu, Xiao-yun; Ge, Ren-shan

    2014-01-01

    Leydig cells secrete testosterone, which is essential for male fertility and reproductive health. Stress increases the secretion of glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT; in rats), which decreases circulating testosterone levels in part through a direct action by binding to the glucocorticoid receptors (NR3C1) in Leydig cells. The intratesticular CORT level is dependent on oxidative inactivation of glucocorticoid by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1) in Leydig cells. In the present study, we investigated the time-course changes of steroidogenic gene expression levels after acute immobilization stress in rats. The plasma CORT levels were significantly increased 0.5, 1, 3 and 6 h after immobilization stress, while plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced 3 and 6 h, after stress and luteinizing hormone (LH) did not change. Immobilization stress caused the down-regulation of Scarb1, Star and Cyp17a1 expression levels in the rat testis starting at the first hour of stress, ahead of the significant decreases of plasma testosterone levels. Other mRNA levels, including Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1 and Hsd17b3, began to decline after 3 h. Hsd11b1 and Nos2 mRNA levels did not change during the course of stress. Administration of glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 significantly restored plasma testosterone levels. In conclusion, Scarb1, Star and Cyp17a1 expression levels are more sensitive to acute stress, and acute immobilization stress causes the decline of the steroidogenic pathway via elevating the levels of glucocorticoid, which binds to NR3C1 in Leydig cells to inhibit steroidogenic gene expression. PMID:25405735

  17. COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; He, Weihua; Ren, Lijiao; Stager, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick J; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    Exoelectrogenic microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compete with other microorganisms for substrate. In order to understand how this affects removal rates, current generation, and coulombic efficiencies (CEs), substrate removal rates were compared in MFCs fed a single, readily biodegradable compound (acetate) or domestic wastewater (WW). Removal rates based on initial test conditions fit first-order kinetics, but rate constants varied with circuit resistance. With filtered WW (100Ω), the rate constant was 0.18h(-)(1), which was higher than acetate or filtered WW with an open circuit (0.10h(-)(1)), but CEs were much lower (15-24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100Ω), COD removal proceeded in two stages: a fast removal stage with high current production, followed by a slower removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary processes will be needed to reduce COD to levels suitable for discharge.

  18. Fade to Green: A Biodegradable Stack of Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D; Rossiter, Jonathan; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Walter, X Alexis; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-08-24

    The focus of this study is the development of biodegradable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) able to produce useful power. Reactors with an 8 mL chamber volume were designed using all biodegradable products: polylactic acid for the frames, natural rubber as the cation-exchange membrane and egg-based, open-to-air cathodes coated with a lanolin gas diffusion layer. Forty MFCs were operated in various configurations. When fed with urine, the biodegradable stack was able to power appliances and was still operational after six months. One useful application for this truly sustainable MFC technology includes onboard power supplies for biodegradable robotic systems. After operation in remote ecological locations, these could degrade harmlessly into the surroundings to leave no trace when the mission is complete.

  19. Percarbonate as a naturally buffering catholyte for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Forrestal, Casey; Huang, Zhe; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-11-01

    Sustainable cathode development has been a challenge for the emerging microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology. This study presents a simple catholyte called sodium percarbonate to serve as a new type of electron acceptor for MFCs. Lab scale comparisons showed sodium percarbonate cathode obtained comparable power density (9.6W/m(3)) with traditional air-cathode and potassium ferricyanide, but percarbonate showed multiple additional benefits that no other catholyte had demonstrated. Percarbonate has a sustaining natural buffering capacity that can counter pH fluctuations seen in many other systems, and the peroxide produced prevents bio-fouling problems associated with air-cathodes. It is also safer to use and has the lowest cost among popular cathode options based on per mole of electron transferred, which makes it a good candidate for modular system scale up.

  20. Performance of Denitrifying Microbial Fuel Cell with Biocathode over Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huimin; Zhao, Jianqiang; Li, Fenghai; Li, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 54.80 ± 0.01 g m−3 d−1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode. PMID:27047462

  1. Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2012-06-05

    The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

  2. Scaling up microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce E

    2010-02-01

    Scientific research has advanced on different microbial fuel cell (MFC) technologies in the laboratory at an amazing pace, with power densities having reached over 1 kW/m(3) (reactor volume) and to 6.9 W/m(2) (anode area) under optimal conditions. The main challenge is to bring these technologies out of the laboratory and engineer practical systems for bioenergy production at larger scales. Recent advances in new types of electrodes, a better understanding of the impact of membranes and separators on performance of these systems, and results from several new pilot-scale tests are all good indicators that commercialization of the technology could be possible within a few years. Some of the newest advances and future challenges are reviewed here with respect to practical applications of these MFCs for renewable energy production and other applications.

  3. Long-term operation of manure-microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Zhao, Qingliang; Jiao, Yan; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to produce electricity using dairy manure as a fuel. Since the way MFC utilizes manure as a fuel and the long-term operation stability of manure-MFC remains unclear, this study examined the evolution of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in anodic chamber and power generation by MFC in a 171days test. The tested MFC can produce electricity over the entire testing period by single feed of manure, with stable power output and total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal rate in the period of day 30-140. The hydrophobic acid (HPO-A) and hydrophilic (HPI) fractions of manure were the principal components of anolyte DOM, with the concentrations of both being reduced over MFC operation. The degradable organic matters were converted to compounds with high aromaticity.

  4. Experimental study of the microbial fuel cell internal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei-Yuan; Liu, Zhong-Liang

    The internal resistance, including activation loss internal resistance (AIR), ohmic loss internal resistance (OIR) and concentration loss internal resistance (CIR), is an important parameter that determines the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The experimental investigations were completed to estimate the contributions of these three components to the internal resistance. The internal resistance is found to vary with electric current, although it is almost a constant for the current is within a certain region. The largest component of the internal resistance is CIR except for small currents. The AIR decreases quickly for small current and reduces its decreasing rate as the current increases and approaches to a constant. The OIR is constant over the whole current range. The experiments also disclose that increasing the limiting current and reducing the concentration loss are both important for improving the MFC performance.

  5. Microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption for ion migration control.

    PubMed

    Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2012-09-01

    A new microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption capability (cMDC) was developed to solve the ion migration problem facing current MDC systems. Traditional MDCs remove salts by transferring ions to the anode and cathode chambers, which may prohibit wastewater beneficial reuse due to increased salinity. The cMDC uses adsorptive activated carbon cloth (ACC) as the electrodes and utilizes the formed capacitive double layers for electrochemical ion adsorption. The cMDC removed an average of 69.4% of the salt from the desalination chamber through electrode adsorption during one batch cycle, and it did not add salts to the anode or cathode chamber. It was estimated that 61-82.2mg of total dissolved solids (TDS) was adsorbed to 1g of ACC electrode. The cMDC provides a new approach for salt management, organic removal, and energy production. Further studies will be conducted to optimize reactor configuration and achieve in situ electrode regeneration.

  6. Microfluidic microbial fuel cells: from membrane to membrane free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic microbial fuel cells (MMFCs) are small carbon-neutral devices that use self-organized bacteria to degrade organic substrates and harness energy from the waste water. Conventional MMFCs have made great strides in the past decade and have overcome some limitations, such as high capital costs and low energy output. A co-laminar flow MFC has been first proposed in 2011 with the potential to be an attractively power source to niche applications. Co-laminar MFCs typically operate without any physical membranes separating the reactants, and bacterial ecosystems can be easily manipulated by regulating the inlet conditions. This paper highlights recent accomplishments in the development of co-laminar MFCs, emphasizing basic principles, mass transport and fluid dynamics including boundary layer theory, entrance conditions and mixing zone issues. Furthermore, the development of current techniques, major challenges and the potential research directions are discussed.

  7. Practical energy harvesting for microbial fuel cells: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heming; Park, Jae-Do; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-03-17

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology offers sustainable solutions for distributed power systems and energy positive wastewater treatment, but the generation of practically usable power from MFCs remains a major challenge for system scale up and application. Commonly used external resistors will not harvest any usable energy, so energy-harvesting circuits are needed for real world applications. This review summarizes, explains, and discusses the different energy harvesting methods, components, and systems that can extract and condition the MFC energy for direct utilization. This study aims to assist environmental scientists and engineers to gain fundamental understandings of these electronic systems and algorithms, and it also offers research directions and insights on how to overcome the barriers, so the technology can be further advanced and applied in larger scale.

  8. Carbon nanotube modification of microbial fuel cell electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Alireza Ahmadian; D'Angelo, Lorenzo; Omer, Nada; Windiasti, Gracia; Lu, Xiaonan; Xu, Jie

    2016-11-15

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for energy harvesting devices is preferable due to their unique mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. On the other hand, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising devices to recover carbon-neutral energy from the organic matters, and have been hindered with major setbacks towards commercialization. Nanoengineered CNT-based materials show remarkable electrochemical properties, and therefore have provided routes towards highly effective modification of MFC compartments to ultimately reach the theoretical limits of biomass energy recovery, low-cost power production, and thus the commercialization of MFCs. Moreover, these CNT-based composites offer significant flexibility in the design of MFCs that enable their use for a broad spectrum of applications ranging from scaled-up power generation to medically related devices. This article reviews the recent advances in the modification of MFCs using CNTs and CNT-based composites, and the extent to which each modification route impacts MFC power and current generation. PMID:27213269

  9. Fade to Green: A Biodegradable Stack of Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D; Rossiter, Jonathan; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Walter, X Alexis; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-08-24

    The focus of this study is the development of biodegradable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) able to produce useful power. Reactors with an 8 mL chamber volume were designed using all biodegradable products: polylactic acid for the frames, natural rubber as the cation-exchange membrane and egg-based, open-to-air cathodes coated with a lanolin gas diffusion layer. Forty MFCs were operated in various configurations. When fed with urine, the biodegradable stack was able to power appliances and was still operational after six months. One useful application for this truly sustainable MFC technology includes onboard power supplies for biodegradable robotic systems. After operation in remote ecological locations, these could degrade harmlessly into the surroundings to leave no trace when the mission is complete. PMID:26212495

  10. Effect of concentration and substrate flow rate on isomaltulose production from sucrose by Erwinia sp. cells immobilized in calcium-alginate using packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Kawaguti, Haroldo Yukio; Harumi Sato, Hélia

    2010-09-01

    Isomaltulose was obtained from sucrose solution by immobilized cells of Erwinia sp. D12 using a batch and a continuous process. Parameters for sucrose conversion into isomaltulose were evaluated using both experimental design and response surface methodology. Erwinia sp. D12 cells were immobilized in different alginates, and the influence of substrate flow rate and concentration parameters to produce isomaltulose from sucrose were observed. Response surface methodology demonstrated that packed bed columns containing cells immobilized in low-viscosity sodium alginate (250 cP) presented a mean isomaltulose conversion rate of 47%. In a continuous process, both sucrose substrate concentration and substrate flow rate parameters had a significant effect (p < 0.05) and influenced the conversion of sucrose into isomaltulose. Higher conversion rates of sucrose into isomaltulose, from 53-75% were obtained using 75 g of immobilized cells at a substrate flow rate of 0.6 mL/min.

  11. Changes in mast cells and in permeability of mesenteric microvessels under the effect of immobilization and electrostimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorizontova, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    It was shown that a reduction in the amount of mast cells in the mesentery and an increase in their degranulation was accompanied by an increase in vascular permeability of rat mesentery. It is supposed that immobilization and electrostimulation causing degranulation of mast cells prompted histamine and serotonin release from them, thus increasing the permeability of the venular portion of the microvascular bed. Prophylactic use of esculamin preparation with P-vitaminic activity decreased mast cell degranulation, which apparently prolonged the release of histamine and serotonin from them and normalized vascular permeability.

  12. Biosynthesis of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by New Klebsiella oxytoca Free and Immobilized Cells on Inorganic Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Celloto, Valéria R.; Oliveira, Arildo J. B.; Gonçalves, José E.; Watanabe, Cecília S. F.; Matioli, Graciette; Gonçalves, Regina A. C.

    2012-01-01

    While many natural and synthetic compounds exhibit auxin-like activity in bioassays, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is recognized as the key auxin in most plants. IAA has been implicated in almost all aspects of plant growth and development and a large array of bacteria have been reported to enhance plant growth. Cells of Klebsiella oxytoca isolated from the rhizosphere of Aspidosperma polyneuron and immobilized by adsorption on different inorganic matrices were used for IAA production. The matrices were prepared by the sol-gel method and the silica-titanium was the most suitable matrix for effective immobilization. In operational stability assays, IAA production was maintained after four cycles of production, obtaining 42.80 ± 2.03 μg mL−1 of IAA in the third cycle, which corresponds to a 54% increase in production in relation to the first cycle, whereas free cells began losing activity after the first cycle. After 90 days of storage at 4°C the immobilized cells showed the slight reduction of IAA production without significant loss of activity. PMID:22623901

  13. A new method for water desalination using microbial desalination cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoxin; Huang, Xia; Liang, Peng; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Yingjun; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-09-15

    Current water desalination techniques are energy intensive and some use membranes operated at high pressures. It is shown here that water desalination can be accomplished without electrical energy input or high water pressure by using a source of organic matter as the fuel to desalinate water. A microbial fuel cell was modified by placing two membranes between the anode and cathode, creating a middle chamber for water desalination between the membranes. An anion exchange membrane was placed adjacent to the anode, and a cation exchange membrane was positioned next to the cathode. When current was produced by bacteria on the anode, ionic species in the middle chamber were transferred into the two electrode chambers, desalinating the water in the middle chamber. Proof-of-concept experiments for this approach, using what we call a microbial desalination cell (MDC), was demonstrated using water at different initial salt concentrations (5, 20, and 35 g/L) with acetate used as the substrate for the bacteria. The MDC produced a maximum of 2 W/m2 (31 W/m3) while at the same time removing about 90% of the salt in a single desalination cycle. As the salt was removed from the middle chamber the ohmic resistance of the MDC (measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) increased from 25 Omega to 970 Omega at the end of the cycle. This increased resistance was reflected by a continuous decrease in the voltage produced over the cycle. These results demonstrate for the first time the possibility for a new method for water desalination and power production that uses only a source of biodegradable organic matter and bacteria.

  14. Microbial fuel cells for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Clara; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    Clogging in HSSF CW may result in a reduction of system's life-span or treatment efficiency. Current available techniques to assess the degree of clogging in HSSF CW are time consuming and cannot be applied on a continuous basis. Main objective of this work was to assess the potential applicability of microbial fuel cells for continuous clogging assessment in HSSF CW. To this aim, two replicates of a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) were built up and operated under laboratory conditions for five weeks. The MFC anode was gravel-based to simulate the filter media of HSSF CW. MFC were weekly loaded with sludge that had been accumulating for several years in a pilot HSSF CW treating domestic wastewater. Sludge loading ranged from ca. 20kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the beginning of the study period up to ca. 250kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the end of the study period. Sludge loading applied resulted in sludge accumulated within the MFC equivalent to a clogging degree ranging from 0.2years (ca. 0.5kgTS·m(-3)CW) to ca. 5years (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). Results showed that the electric charge was negatively correlated to the amount of sludge accumulated (degree of clogging). Electron transference (expressed as electric charge) almost ceased when accumulated sludge within the MFC was equivalent to ca. 5years of clogging (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). This result suggests that, although longer study periods under more realistic conditions shall be further performed, HSSF CW operated as a MFC has great potential for clogging assessment. PMID:27392579

  15. Microbial fuel cells for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Clara; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    Clogging in HSSF CW may result in a reduction of system's life-span or treatment efficiency. Current available techniques to assess the degree of clogging in HSSF CW are time consuming and cannot be applied on a continuous basis. Main objective of this work was to assess the potential applicability of microbial fuel cells for continuous clogging assessment in HSSF CW. To this aim, two replicates of a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) were built up and operated under laboratory conditions for five weeks. The MFC anode was gravel-based to simulate the filter media of HSSF CW. MFC were weekly loaded with sludge that had been accumulating for several years in a pilot HSSF CW treating domestic wastewater. Sludge loading ranged from ca. 20kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the beginning of the study period up to ca. 250kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the end of the study period. Sludge loading applied resulted in sludge accumulated within the MFC equivalent to a clogging degree ranging from 0.2years (ca. 0.5kgTS·m(-3)CW) to ca. 5years (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). Results showed that the electric charge was negatively correlated to the amount of sludge accumulated (degree of clogging). Electron transference (expressed as electric charge) almost ceased when accumulated sludge within the MFC was equivalent to ca. 5years of clogging (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). This result suggests that, although longer study periods under more realistic conditions shall be further performed, HSSF CW operated as a MFC has great potential for clogging assessment.

  16. Application of conductive polymers in biocathode of microbial fuel cells and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ding, Lili; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2012-07-01

    Four kinds of conductive polymers, polyaniline (PANI) and its co-polymers poly (aniline-co-o-aminophenol) (PANOA), poly (aniline-co-2, 4-diaminophenol) (PANDAP) and poly (aniline-1, 8-diaminonaphthalene) (PANDAN) were applied to modify carbon felts as the aerobic abiotic cathodes and biocathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFC). Compare to unmodified, all the four polymers can significantly improve the power densities for both abiotic cathodes (increased by 300%) and biocathodes (increased by 180%). The co-polymers with different functional groups introduction had further special advantages in MFC performance: PANOA and PANDAP with -OH showed less sensitivity to DO and pH change in cathode; PANDAP and PANDAN with -NH(3) provided better attachment condition for biofilm which endowed them higher power output. With the help of conductive polymer coats, the cathode biofilm became thicker, and according to biodiversity analysis, the predominated phyla changed from β-Proteobacteria (unmodified) to α, γ-Proteobacteria (modified), which may be responsible for the superiority of the modified MFCs.

  17. Interaction between immobilized polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles and human mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Woltmann, Beatrice; Torger, Bernhard; Müller, Martin; Hempel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Background Implant loosening or deficient osseointegration is a major problem in patients with systemic bone diseases (eg, osteoporosis). For this reason, the stimulation of the regional cell population by local and sustained drug delivery at the bone/implant interface to induce the formation of a mechanical stable bone is promising. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of polymer-based nanoparticles with human bone marrow-derived cells, considering nanoparticles’ composition and surface net charge. Materials and methods Polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PECNPs) composed of the polycations poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI), poly(L-lysine) (PLL), or (N,N-diethylamino)ethyldextran (DEAE) in combination with the polyanions dextran sulfate (DS) or cellulose sulfate (CS) were prepared. PECNPs’ physicochemical properties (size, net charge) were characterized by dynamic light scattering and particle charge detector measurements. Biocompatibility was investigated using human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on immobilized PECNP films (5–50 nmol·cm−2) by analysis for metabolic activity of hMSCs in dependence of PECNP surface concentration by MTS (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-5-[3-carboxymethoxyphenyl]-2-[4-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) assay, as well as cell morphology (phase contrast microscopy). Results PECNPs ranging between ~50 nm and 150 nm were prepared. By varying the ratio of polycations and polyanions, PECNPs with a slightly positive (PEC+NP) or negative (PEC−NP) net charge were obtained. The PECNP composition significantly affected cell morphology and metabolic activity, whereas the net charge had a negligible influence. Therefore, we classified PECNPs into “variant systems” featuring a significant dose dependency of metabolic activity (DEAE/CS, PEI/DS) and “invariant systems” lacking such a dependency (DEAE/DS, PEI/CS). Immunofluorescence imaging of fluorescein isothiocyanate isomer I (FITC

  18. Immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in mesoporous silica-based material: An efficiency continuous cell-recycle fermentation system for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zijian; Xie, Xiaona; Wang, Zhi; Tao, Yanchun; Niu, Xuedun; Huang, Xuri; Liu, Li; Li, Zhengqiang

    2016-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria immobilization methods have been widely used for lactic acid production. Until now, the most common immobilization matrix used is calcium alginate. However, Ca-alginate gel disintegrated during lactic acid fermentation. To overcome this deficiency, we developed an immobilization method in which Lactobacillus rhamnosus cells were successfully encapsulated into an ordered mesoporous silica-based material under mild conditions with a high immobilization efficiency of 78.77% by using elemental analysis. We also optimized the cultivation conditions of the immobilized L. rhamnosus and obtained a high glucose conversion yield of 92.4%. Furthermore, L. rhamnosus encapsulated in mesoporous silica-based material exhibited operational stability during repeated fermentation processes and no decrease in lactic acid production up to 8 repeated batches.

  19. Energy accumulation and improved performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Hart, John

    The mechanisms for electron transfer from the microorganisms found in anaerobic sludge to the anode electrode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been investigated. In doing so, both the energy accumulation and improved performance were observed as a result of the addition of exogenous Na 2SO 4. Treatment of anaerobic sludge by centrifugation and washing can provide samples devoid of sulphide/sulphate. Addition of exogenous sulphate can give matched samples of S-deplete and S-replete suspensions. When these are compared in an experimental MFC, the power output of the S-deplete is only 20% that of the S-replete system. Moreover, repeat washing of the anodic chamber to remove suspended cells (leaving only cells attached to the electrode) and addition of buffer substrate gives MFC that produce an output between 10 and 20% that of control. We conclude that anaerobic sludge MFCs are a hybrid incorporating both natural mediator and anodophillic properties. We have also shown that disconnected MFC (open circuit) continue to produce sulphide and when reconnected gives an initial burst of power output demonstrating accumulator-type activity.

  20. Evaluation of Osteoblast-Like Cell Viability and Differentiation on the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser Peptide Immobilized Titanium Dioxide Nanotube via Chemical Grafting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Kim, Il-Shin; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Ji, Min-Kyung; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the effect of the immobilization of the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) peptide on titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube via chemical grafting on osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) viability and differentiation. The specimens were divided into two groups; TiO2 nanotubes and GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes. The surface characteristics of GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes were observed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The morphology of cells on specimens was observed by FE-SEM after 2 hr and 24 hr. The level of cell viability was investigated via a tetrazolium (XTT) assay after 2 and 4 days. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was evaluated to measure the cell differentiation after 4 and 7 days. The presence of nitrogen up-regulation or C==O carbons con- firmed that TiO2 nanotubes were immobilized with GRGDS peptides. Cell adhesion was enhanced on the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes compared to TiO2 nanotubes. Furthermore, significantly increased cell spreading and proliferation were observed with the cells grown on GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes (P < .05). However, there was no significant difference in ALP activity between GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes and TiO2 nanotubes. These results suggest that the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes might be effective in improving the osseointegration of dental implants.

  1. Evaluation of Osteoblast-Like Cell Viability and Differentiation on the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser Peptide Immobilized Titanium Dioxide Nanotube via Chemical Grafting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Kim, Il-Shin; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Ji, Min-Kyung; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the effect of the immobilization of the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) peptide on titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube via chemical grafting on osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) viability and differentiation. The specimens were divided into two groups; TiO2 nanotubes and GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes. The surface characteristics of GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes were observed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The morphology of cells on specimens was observed by FE-SEM after 2 hr and 24 hr. The level of cell viability was investigated via a tetrazolium (XTT) assay after 2 and 4 days. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was evaluated to measure the cell differentiation after 4 and 7 days. The presence of nitrogen up-regulation or C==O carbons con- firmed that TiO2 nanotubes were immobilized with GRGDS peptides. Cell adhesion was enhanced on the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes compared to TiO2 nanotubes. Furthermore, significantly increased cell spreading and proliferation were observed with the cells grown on GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes (P < .05). However, there was no significant difference in ALP activity between GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes and TiO2 nanotubes. These results suggest that the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes might be effective in improving the osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:27433593

  2. From microbial fuel cell (MFC) to microbial electrochemical snorkel (MES): maximizing chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Erable, Benjamin; Etcheverry, Luc; Bergel, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The paper introduces the concept of the microbial electrochemical snorkel (MES), a simplified design of a "short-circuited" microbial fuel cell (MFC). The MES cannot provide current but it is optimized for wastewater treatment. An electrochemically active biofilm (EAB) was grown on graphite felt under constant polarization in an urban wastewater. Controlling the electrode potential and inoculating the bioreactor with a suspension of an established EAB improved the performance and the reproducibility of the anodes. Anodes, colonized by an EAB were tested for the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from urban wastewater using a variety of bio-electrochemical processes (microbial electrolysis, MFC, MES). The MES technology, as well as a short-circuited MFC, led to a COD removal 57% higher than a 1000 Ω-connected MFC, confirming the potential for wastewater treatment.

  3. Expansion of engrafting human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in three-dimensional scaffolds with surface-immobilized fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qi; Chai, Chou; Jiang, Xue-Song; Leong, Kam W.; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2008-01-01

    An efficient and practical ex vivo expansion methodology for human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) is critical in realizing the potential of HSPC transplantation in treating a variety of hematologic disorders and as a supportive therapy for malignant diseases. We report here an expansion strategy using a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold conjugated with an extracellular matrix molecule, fibronectin (FN), to partially mimic the hematopoietic stem cell niche. FN-immobilized 3D polyethylene terephthalate (PET) scaffold was synthesized and evaluated for HSPC expansion efficiency, in comparison with a FN-immobilized 2D PET substrate and a 3D scaffold with FN supplemented in the medium. Covalent conjugation of FN produced substrate and scaffold with higher cell expansion efficiency than that on their unmodified counterparts. After 10 days of culture in serum-free medium, human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells cultured in FN-conjugated scaffold yielded the highest expansion of CD34+ cells (∼100 fold) and long-term culture initiating cells (∼47-fold). The expanded human CD34+ cells successfully reconstituted hematopoiesis in NOD/SCID mice. This study demonstrated the synergistic effect between the three-dimensionality of the scaffold and surface-conjugated FN, and the potential of this FN-conjugated 3D scaffold for ex vivo expansion of HSPCs. PMID:16739181

  4. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs.

  5. Convergent development of anodic bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Matthew D; Kiely, Patrick D; Call, Douglas F; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Bibby, Kyle; Peccia, Jordan; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are often inoculated from a single wastewater source. The extent that the inoculum affects community development or power production is unknown. The stable anodic microbial communities in MFCs were examined using three inocula: a wastewater treatment plant sample known to produce consistent power densities, a second wastewater treatment plant sample, and an anaerobic bog sediment. The bog-inoculated MFCs initially produced higher power densities than the wastewater-inoculated MFCs, but after 20 cycles all MFCs on average converged to similar voltages (470±20 mV) and maximum power densities (590±170 mW m−2). The power output from replicate bog-inoculated MFCs was not significantly different, but one wastewater-inoculated MFC (UAJA3 (UAJA, University Area Joint Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant)) produced substantially less power. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling showed a stable exoelectrogenic biofilm community in all samples after 11 cycles. After 16 cycles the predominance of Geobacter spp. in anode communities was identified using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (58±10%), fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) (63±6%) and pyrosequencing (81±4%). While the clone library analysis for the underperforming UAJA3 had a significantly lower percentage of Geobacter spp. sequences (36%), suggesting that a predominance of this microbe was needed for convergent power densities, the lower percentage of this species was not verified by FISH or pyrosequencing analyses. These results show that the predominance of Geobacter spp. in acetate-fed systems was consistent with good MFC performance and independent of the inoculum source. PMID:22572637

  6. Cathodic oxygen reduction catalyzed by bacteria in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rabaey, Korneel; Read, Suzanne T; Clauwaert, Peter; Freguia, Stefano; Bond, Philip L; Blackall, Linda L; Keller, Jurg

    2008-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to combine wastewater treatment efficiency with energetic efficiency. One of the major impediments to MFC implementation is the operation of the cathode compartment, as it employs environmentally unfriendly catalysts such as platinum. As recently shown, bacteria can facilitate sustainable and cost-effective cathode catalysis for nitrate and also oxygen. Here we describe a carbon cathode open to the air, on which attached bacteria catalyzed oxygen reduction. The bacteria present were able to reduce oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor using electrons provided by the solid-phase cathode. Current densities of up to 2.2 A m(-2) cathode projected surface were obtained (0.303+/-0.017 W m(-2), 15 W m(-3) total reactor volume). The cathodic microbial community was dominated by Sphingobacterium, Acinetobacter and Acidovorax sp., according to 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Isolates of Sphingobacterium sp. and Acinetobacter sp. were obtained using H(2)/O(2) mixtures. Some of the pure culture isolates obtained from the cathode showed an increase in the power output of up to three-fold compared to a non-inoculated control, that is, from 0.015+/-0.001 to 0.049+/-0.025 W m(-2) cathode projected surface. The strong decrease in activation losses indicates that bacteria function as true catalysts for oxygen reduction. Owing to the high overpotential for non-catalyzed reduction, oxygen is only to a limited extent competitive toward the electron donor, that is, the cathode. Further research to refine the operational parameters and increase the current density by modifying the electrode surface and elucidating the bacterial metabolism is warranted. PMID:18288216

  7. Optimizing immobilized enzyme performance in cell-free environments to produce liquid fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanat

    2015-02-05

    The overall goal of this project was to optimize enzyme performance for the production of bio-diesel fuel. Enzyme immobilization has attracted much attention as a means to increase productivity. Mesorporous silica materials have been known to be best suited for immobilizing enzymes. A major challenge is to ensure that the enzymatic activity is retained after immobilization. Two major factors which drive enzymatic deactivation are protein-surface and inter-protein interactions. Previously, we studied protein stability inside pores and how to optimize protein-surface interactions to minimize protein denaturation. In this work we studied eh effect of surface curvature and chemistry on inter-protein interactions. Our goal was to find suitable immobilization supports which minimize these inter-protein interactions. Our studies carried out in the frame work of Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model showed that enzymes immobilized inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are best suited to minimize these inter-protein interactions. Besides, this study is also of biological importance to understand the role of chaperonins in protein disaggregation. Both of these aspects profited immensely with collaborations with our experimental colleague, Prof. Georges Belfort (RPI), who performed the experimental analog of our theoretical works.

  8. Microbial Translocation and B Cell Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosal barrier disrupted in HIV disease, resulting in increased systemic exposure to microbial products such as Lipo Polys Accharide (LPS). The association of enhanced microbial translocation and B cell dysfunction in HIV disease is not fully understood. High dose and short term exposure of microbial Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) agonists were used as vaccine adjuvants, however, low dose and long term exposure of TLR agonists could be harmful. The characteristics of B cell dysfunction in HIV disease included B cell, especially memory B cell depletion, enhanced levels of autoimmune antibodies and impaired vaccine or antigen responsiveness. This review discusses and explores the possibility of the effect of microbial translocation on memory B cell depletion and impaired vaccine responses in HIV infection. By determining the mechanisms of B cell depletion and perturbations in HIV disease, it may be possible to design interventions that can improve immune responses to vaccines, reduce selected opportunistic infections and perhaps slow disease progression. PMID:23869197

  9. Quantitation of residual trypsin in cell-based therapeutics using immobilized α-1-antitrypsin or SBTI in an ELISA format.

    PubMed

    Braatz, James A; Elias, Christopher; Finny, Joseph G; Tran, Huan; McCaman, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) has been developed for the quantitation of porcine trypsin as a process residual in cell therapy products based on its capture by either of two immobilized anti-trypsins, α-1-antitrypsin (α1AT) or soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) followed by detection with a polyclonal goat anti-porcine trypsin-IgG conjugated with peroxidase. It was demonstrated that an extended range of antigen quantitation could be achieved that covered nearly three orders of magnitude of trypsin concentration. The utility of the assay was demonstrated by its application to samples generated in a cell-based therapeutic manufacturing setting.

  10. Determination of Microbial Growth by Protein Assay in an Air-Cathode Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Kakarla, Ramesh; Moon, Jung Mi; Min, Booki

    2015-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gathered attention as a novel bioenergy technology to simultaneously treat wastewater with less sludge production than the conventional activated sludge system. In two different operations of the MFC and aerobic process, microbial growth was determined by the protein assay method and their biomass yields using real wastewater were compared. The biomass yield on the anode electrode of the MFC was 0.02 g-COD-cell/g- COD-substrate and the anolyte planktonic biomass was 0.14 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate. An MFC without anode electrode resulted in the biomass yield of 0.07 ± 0.03 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, suggesting that oxygen diffusion from the cathode possibly supported the microbial growth. In a comparative test, the biomass yield under aerobic environment was 0.46 ± 0.07 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, which was about 3 times higher than the total biomass value in the MFC operation.

  11. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Franz J. J.; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J.; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  12. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M A; Yoshitake, J; Bushra, Q S; Hyodo, M; Omine, K; Strik, David

    2015-02-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) in soil mixed with compost. A total of six buckets filled with the same soil were used with carbon fiber as the electrodes for the test. Rice plants were planted in five of the buckets, with the sixth bucket containing only soil and an external resistance of 100 ohm was used for all cases. It was observed that the cells with rice plants and compost showed higher values of voltage and power density with time. The highest value of voltage showed around 700 mV when a rice plant with 1% compost mixed soil was used, however it was more than 95% less in the case of no rice plant and without compost. Comparing cases with and without compost but with the same number of rice plants, cases with compost depicted higher voltage to as much as 2 times. The power density was also 3 times higher when the compost was used in the paddy PMFCs which indicated the influence of compost on bio-electricity generation.

  13. Microbial fuel cells with highly active aerobic biocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Edward M.; Popescu, Dorin; Curtis, Tom; Head, Ian M.; Scott, Keith; Yu, Eileen H.

    2016-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which convert organic waste to electricity, could be used to make the wastewater infrastructure more energy efficient and sustainable. However, platinum and other non-platinum chemical catalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of MFCs are unsustainable due to their high cost and long-term degradation. Aerobic biocathodes, which use microorganisms as the biocatalysts for cathode ORR, are a good alternative to chemical catalysts. In the current work, high-performing aerobic biocathodes with an onset potential for the ORR of +0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl were enriched from activated sludge in electrochemical half-cells poised at -0.1 and + 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Gammaproteobacteria, distantly related to any known cultivated gammaproteobacterial lineage, were identified as dominant in these working electrode biofilms (23.3-44.3% of reads in 16S rRNA gene Ion Torrent libraries), and were in very low abundance in non-polarised control working electrode biofilms (0.5-0.7%). These Gammaproteobacteria were therefore most likely responsible for the high activity of biologically catalysed ORR. In MFC tests, a high-performing aerobic biocathode increased peak power 9-fold from 7 to 62 μW cm-2 in comparison to an unmodified carbon cathode, which was similar to peak power with a platinum-doped cathode at 70 μW cm-2.

  14. Microbial fuel cells with highly active aerobic biocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Edward M.; Popescu, Dorin; Curtis, Tom; Head, Ian M.; Scott, Keith; Yu, Eileen H.

    2016-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which convert organic waste to electricity, could be used to make the wastewater infrastructure more energy efficient and sustainable. However, platinum and other non-platinum chemical catalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of MFCs are unsustainable due to their high cost and long-term degradation. Aerobic biocathodes, which use microorganisms as the biocatalysts for cathode ORR, are a good alternative to chemical catalysts. In the current work, high-performing aerobic biocathodes with an onset potential for the ORR of +0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl were enriched from activated sludge in electrochemical half-cells poised at -0.1 and + 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Gammaproteobacteria, distantly related to any known cultivated gammaproteobacterial lineage, were identified as dominant in these working electrode biofilms (23.3-44.3% of reads in 16S rRNA gene Ion Torrent libraries), and were in very low abundance in non-polarised control working electrode biofilms (0.5-0.7%). These Gammaproteobacteria were therefore most likely responsible for the high activity of biologically catalysed ORR. In MFC tests, a high-performing aerobic biocathode increased peak power 9-fold from 7 to 62 μW cm-2 in comparison to an unmodified carbon cathode, which was similar to peak power with a platinum-doped cathode at 70 μW cm-2.

  15. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-08-19

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations.

  16. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  17. Bacterial Immobilization for Imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, David P; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    AFM is a high-resolution (nm scale) imaging tool that mechanically probes a surface. It has the ability to image cells and biomolecules, in a liquid environment, without the need to chemically treat the sample. In order to accomplish this goal, the sample must sufficiently adhere to the mounting surface to prevent removal by forces exerted by the scanning AFM cantilever tip. In many instances, successful imaging depends on immobilization of the sample to the mounting surface. Optimally, immobilization should be minimally invasive to the sample such that metabolic processes and functional attributes are not compromised. By coating freshly cleaved mica surfaces with porcine (pig) gelatin, negatively charged bacteria can be immobilized on the surface and imaged in liquid by AFM. Immobilization of bacterial cells on gelatin-coated mica is most likely due to electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged bacteria and the positively charged gelatin. Several factors can interfere with bacterial immobilization, including chemical constituents of the liquid in which the bacteria are suspended, the incubation time of the bacteria on the gelatin coated mica, surface characteristics of the bacterial strain and the medium in which the bacteria are imaged. Overall, the use of gelatin-coated mica is found to be generally applicable for imaging microbial cells.

  18. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. The present study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the ...

  19. Hydrogen Photoproduction by Nutrient-Deprived Chalamydomonas reinhardtii Cells Immobilized Within Thin Alginate Films Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kosourov, S. N.; Seibert, M.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for immobilizing H{sub 2}-photoproducing green algae within a thin (<400 {micro}m) alginate film has been developed. Alginate films with entrapped sulfur/phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain cc124, cells demonstrate (a) higher cell density (up to 2,000 {micro}g Chl mL{sup -1} of matrix), (b) kinetics of H{sub 2} photoproduction similar to sulfur-deprived suspension cultures, (c) higher specific rates (up to 12.5 {micro}mol mg{sup -1} Chl h{sup -1}) of H{sub 2} evolution, (d) light conversion efficiencies to H{sub 2} of over 1% and (e) unexpectedly high resistance of the H{sub 2}-photoproducing system to inactivation by atmospheric O{sub 2}. The algal cells, entrapped in alginate and then placed in vials containing 21% O{sub 2} in the headspace, evolved up to 67% of the H{sub 2} gas produced under anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the lower susceptibility of the immobilized algal H{sub 2}-producing system to inactivation by O{sub 2} depends on two factors: (a) the presence of acetate in the medium, which supports higher rates of respiration and (b) the capability of the alginate polymer itself to effectively separate the entrapped cells from O{sub 2} in the liquid and headspace and restrict O{sub 2} diffusion into the matrix. The strategy presented for immobilizing algal cells within thin polymeric matrices shows the potential for scale-up and possible future applications.

  20. Soluble, but not immobilized, anti-IgM antibody inhibits post-activation events leading to T-cell-dependent B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, J; Rivas, D; Gayo, A; Mozo, L; Gutiérrez, C

    1995-01-01

    The potential for surface immunoglobulin-binding ligands to modify B-cell differentiation responses induced by activated T cells has been investigated. Activated T cells in human splenic mononuclear cells cultured on anti-CD3-coated plates induced B cells to produce large amounts of IgM and IgG. In this experimental system, cross-linking of B-cell antigen receptors by soluble, bivalent monoclonal or polyclonal anti-IgM antibodies completely inhibited IgM production, and greatly diminished IgG production, in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained using a F(ab')2 fragment of a goat anti-IgM antibody. Inhibition of B-cell differentiation by bivalent cross-linking reagents did not require the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC), as comparable results were obtained in co-cultures of purified T and B cells. In contrast, enhanced immunoglobulin secretion was seen when surface IgM was cross-linked using anti-IgM antibody immobilized on the culture plate. Interestingly, activated T cells induced similar levels of expression on B cells of the activation antigens CD23, CD25 and CD71, and of class II molecules, irrespective of any treatment with soluble or immobilized anti-IgM antibody. This indicates that soluble anti-IgM specifically inhibits B-cell differentiation without altering initial events of T-cell-dependent B-cell activation. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7642212

  1. Effects of immobilization on spermiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of immobilization stress on spermiogenesis in rats was investigated. After 96 hour immobilization, histological changes began to manifest themselves in the form of practically complete disappearance of cell population of the wall of seminiferous tubule as well as a markedly increased number of cells with pathologic mitoses. Enzymological investigations showed various changes of activity (of acid and alkaline phosphatase and nonspecific esterase) in the 24, 48, and 96 hour immobilization groups.

  2. Effect of UV irradiation and magnetic field on immunometabolic effects of antibiotics immobilized in cell carriers.

    PubMed

    Lazarev, A I; Siplivyi, G V; Kukureka, A V; Siplivaya, L E

    2008-06-01

    The effects of UV and magnetic radiation on the immunometabolic activity of ampicillin and cephazolin immobilized in erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers were studied in intact Wistar rats and animals infected with staphylococci. Erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers with antibiotics were obtained. Injection of free antibiotics stimulated the immunosuppressive, pro-oxidant, and hepatotoxic effects, associated with staphylococcal infection. Treatment with antibiotics in erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers stimulated (to different degrees) the activity of the immune system and stabilized the parameters of LPO, antioxidant defense, cytolysis, and cholestasis. Ultraviolet irradiation and magnetic field modified (to different measures) the immunometabolic effects of ampicillin and cephazolin, immobilized in erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers, in animals with staphylococcal infection.

  3. Hemicellulosic Ethanol Production by Immobilized Wild Brazilian Yeast Scheffersomyces shehatae UFMG-HM 52.2: Effects of Cell Concentration and Stirring Rate.

    PubMed

    Antunes, F A F; Santos, J C; Chandel, A K; Milessi, T S S; Peres, G F D; da Silva, S S

    2016-02-01

    The use of sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates presents an interesting alternative to second generation (2G) ethanol production. Techniques to enhance the fermentation process, e.g., the use of immobilized cells, is one of the key factors for efficient production. Here, the effect of two important parameters (cell concentration in immobilized system and stirring rate) on the 2G ethanol production using the wild Brazilian yeast S. shehatae UFMG-HM 52.2 immobilized in calcium alginate matrix are presented. A 2(2) full factorial design of experiments was carried out to evaluate the effect of cell concentrations in sodium alginate solution for immobilized bead production (3.0, 6.0, and 9.0 g/L) and stirring rate (150, 200, and 250 rpm) for 2G ethanol production. Statistical analysis showed that the use of both variables at low levels enhanced ethanol yield (YP/S). Under these process conditions, YP/S of 0.31 g/g and ethanol productivity (Qp) of 0.12 g/L h were achieved. Results showed the potential of this immobilized yeast in 2G ethanol production from C5 sugars and demonstrate the importance of adequate cell concentration in immobilized systems, a finding that stands to increase bioprocesses yields and productivity.

  4. From immobilized cells to motile cells on a bed-of-nails: effects of vertical nanowire array density on cell behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Henrik; Li, Zhen; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Oredsson, Stina; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2015-01-01

    The field of vertical nanowire array-based applications in cell biology is growing rapidly and an increasing number of applications are being explored. These applications almost invariably rely on the physical properties of the nanowire arrays, creating a need for a better understanding of how their physical properties affect cell behaviour. Here, we investigate the effects of nanowire density on cell migration, division and morphology for murine fibroblasts. Our results show that few nanowires are sufficient to immobilize cells, while a high nanowire spatial density enables a ”bed-of-nails” regime, where cells reside on top of the nanowires and are fully motile. The presence of nanowires decreases the cell proliferation rate, even in the “bed-of-nails” regime. We show that the cell morphology strongly depends on the nanowire density. Cells cultured on low (0.1 μm−2) and medium (1 μm−2) density substrates exhibit an increased number of multi-nucleated cells and micronuclei. These were not observed in cells cultured on high nanowire density substrates (4 μm−2). The results offer important guidelines to minimize cell-function perturbations on nanowire arrays. Moreover, these findings offer the possibility to tune cell proliferation and migration independently by adjusting the nanowire density, which may have applications in drug testing. PMID:26691936

  5. Aquifer Microbial Diversity Represented by Whole Cell and Dissolved DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, M. S.; Briggs, B.

    2004-12-01

    Microbial diversity measurements of aquifers are faced with two major sources of bias. These are a reflection of molecular (caused by amplification, labeling and extraction dissimilarities) and sampling aspects. Sampling of aquifers represents a considerable and often insurmountable bias since almost all evaluations rely on water samples where free living bacteria will predominate. This highly problematic when one desires to know the metagenomic potential of zone of well influence. We present a method designed to avoid cellular collection biases imposed by the difficulty in collecting attached biomass. Dissolved DNA (d-DNA) and whole bacterial cells were concentrated from Snake River Plain aquifer water. 96% of dDNA was recovered from DNA spiked surrogates using an anion-exchange membrane method. Approximately 2,000 ng DNA was recovered per liter of water. Total DNA turnover rate was measured at 49.3 ng/ml/day, at DNA concentrations above 1 mg/l, indicating that aquifer dDNA represents a dynamic steady state balanced between dDNA release and native DNA degradation activities. 16s, dual labeled T-RFLP analysis was used analyze the genomic complexity of whole bacterial cells collected via filtration versus d-DNA sources of bacterial DNA from 16 l of water. Highly similar T-RFLP profiles (with two restriction endonucleases) were obtained for both dDNA (200 nm filtrate) and the whole cells harvested from the same filter. This demonstrates that dDNA was an accurate reflection of the total bacterial community found within the well volume. We present evaluations of the anion-exchange system with respect to DNA recovery parameters, and demonstrate the suitability of this DNA template for PCR amplification reactions.

  6. Enhanced production of alkaline thermostable keratinolytic protease from calcium alginate immobilized cells of thermoalkalophilic Bacillus halodurans JB 99 exhibiting dehairing activity.

    PubMed

    Shrinivas, Dengeti; Kumar, Raghwendra; Naik, G R

    2012-01-01

    The thermoalkalophilic Bacillus halodurans JB 99 cells known for production of novel thermostable alkaline keratinolytic protease were immobilized in calcium alginate matrix. Batch and repeated batch cultivation using calcium alginate immobilized cells were studied for alkaline protease production in submerged fermentation. Immobilized cells with 2.5% alginate and 350 beads/flask of initial cell loading showed enhanced production of alkaline protease by 23.2% (5,275 ± 39.4 U/ml) as compared to free cells (4,280 ± 35.4 U/ml) after 24 h. In the semicontinuous mode of cultivation, immobilized cells under optimized conditions produced an appreciable level of alkaline protease in up to nine cycles and reached a maximal value of 5,975 U/ml after the seventh cycle. The enzyme produced from immobilized cells efficiently degraded chicken feathers in the presence of a reducing agent which can help the poultry industry in the management of keratin-rich waste and obtaining value-added products.

  7. Microbial desalination cells for improved performance in wastewater treatment, electricity production, and desalination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiping; Xu, Pei; Roane, Timberley M; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2012-02-01

    The low conductivity and alkalinity in municipal wastewater significantly limit power production from microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study integrated desalination with wastewater treatment and electricity production in a microbial desalination cell (MDC) by utilizing the mutual benefits among the above functions. When using wastewater as the sole substrate, the power output from the MDC (8.01 W/m(3)) was four times higher than a control MFC without desalination function. In addition, the MDC removed 66% of the salts and improved COD removal by 52% and Coulombic efficiency by 131%. Desalination in MDCs improved wastewater characteristics by increasing the conductivity by 2.5 times and stabilizing anolyte pH, which therefore reduced system resistance and maintained microbial activity. Microbial community analysis revealed a more diverse anode microbial structure in the MDC than in the MFC. The results demonstrated that MDC can serve as a viable option for integrated wastewater treatment, energy production, and desalination.

  8. Is resistance futile? Changing external resistance does not improve microbial fuel cell performance.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Delina Y; Buret, Francois; Vogel, Timothy M; Monier, Jean-Michel

    2010-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) show promise as an alternative to conventional batteries for point source electricity generation. A better understanding of the relationship between the microbiological and electrical aspects of fuels cells is needed prior to successful MFC application. Here, we observed the effects of external resistance on power production and the anodic biofilm community structure. Large differences in the external resistance affected both power production and microbial community structure. After the establishment of the anodic microbial community, change in external resistance (from low to high and vice versa) changed the anodic microbial community structure, but the resulting community did not resemble the communities established at that same external resistance. Different microbial community structures, established under different external resistances, resulted in similar power production, demonstrating the flexibility of the MFC system.

  9. Bioelectricity production from soil using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wolińska, Agnieszka; Stępniewska, Zofia; Bielecka, Arletta; Ciepielski, Jakub

    2014-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a device using microorganisms as biocatalysts for transforming chemical energy into bioelectricity. As soil is an environment with the highest number of microorganisms and diversity, we hypothesized that it should have the potential for energy generation. The soil used for the study was Mollic Gleysol collected from the surface layer (0-20 cm). Four combinations of soil MFC differing from each other in humidity (full water holding capacity [WHC] and flooding) and the carbon source (glucose and straw) were constructed. Voltage (mV) and current intensity (μA) produced by the MFCs were recorded every day or at 2-day intervals. The fastest and the most effective MFCs in voltage generation (372.2 ± 5 mV) were those constructed on the basis of glucose (MFC-G). The efficiency of straw MFCs (MFC-S) was noticeable after 2 weeks (319.3 ± 4 mV). Maximal power density (P max = 32 mW m(-2)) was achieved by the MFC-G at current density (CD) of 100 mA m(-2). Much lower values of P max (10.6-10.8 mW m(-2)) were noted in the MFC-S at CD of ca. 60-80 mA m(-2). Consequently, soil has potential for production of renewable energy.

  10. Carbon Material Optimized Biocathode for Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Performance.

    PubMed

    Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Abro, Rashid; Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the biocathode electrode material of double-chamber was optimized. Alongside the basic carbon fiber brush, three carbon materials namely graphite granules, activated carbon granules (ACG) and activated carbon powder, were added to the cathode-chambers to improve power generation. The result shows that the addition of carbon materials increased the amount of available electroactive microbes on the electrode surface and thus promote oxygen reduction rate, which improved the generation performance of the MFCs. The Output current (external resistance = 1000 Ω) greatly increased after addition of the three carbon materials and maximum power densities in current stable phase increased by 47.4, 166.1, and 33.5%, respectively. Additionally, coulombic efficiencies of the MFC increased by 16.3, 64.3, and 20.1%, respectively. These results show that MFC when optimized with ACG show better power generation, higher chemical oxygen demands removal rate and coulombic efficiency. PMID:26858695

  11. Cathodic and anodic biofilms in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, P; Carvalho, M L; Guerrini, E; Daghio, M; Santoro, C; Li, B

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen reduction due to microaerophilic biofilms grown on graphite cathodes (biocathodes) in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (SCMFCs) is proved and analysed in this paper. Pt-free cathode performances are compared with those of different platinum-loaded cathodes, before and after the biofilm growth. Membraneless SCMFCs were operating in batch-mode, filled with wastewater. A substrate (fuel) of sodium acetate (0.03 M) was periodically added and the experiment lasted more than six months. A maximum of power densities, up to 0.5 W m(-2), were reached when biofilms developed on the electrodes and the cathodic potential decreased (open circuit potential of 50-200 mV vs. SHE). The power output was almost constant with an acetate concentration of 0.01-0.05 M and it fell down when the pH of the media exceeded 9.5, independently of the Pt-free/Pt-loading at the cathodes. Current densities varied in the range of 1-5 Am(-2) (cathode area of 5 cm(2)). Quasi-stationary polarization curves performed with a three-electrode configuration on cathodic and anodic electrodes showed that the anodic overpotential, more than the cathodic one, may limit the current density in the SCMFCs for a long-term operation. PMID:23474690

  12. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation. PMID:27162144

  13. Capacitive bioanodes enable renewable energy storage in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Deeke, Alexandra; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2012-03-20

    We developed an integrated system for storage of renewable electricity in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The system contained a capacitive electrode that was inserted into the anodic compartment of an MFC to form a capacitive bioanode. This capacitive bioanode was compared with a noncapacitive bioanode on the basis of performance and storage capacity. The performance and storage capacity were investigated during polarization curves and charge-discharge experiments. During polarization curves the capacitive electrode reached a maximum current density of 1.02 ± 0.04 A/m(2), whereas the noncapacitive electrode reached a current density output of only 0.79 ± 0.03 A/m(2). During the charge-discharge experiment with 5 min of charging and 20 min of discharging, the capacitive electrode was able to store a total of 22,831 C/m(2), whereas the noncapacitive electrode was only able to store 12,195 C/m(2). Regarding the charge recovery of each electrode, the capacitive electrode was able to recover 52.9% more charge during each charge-discharge experiment compared with the noncapacitive electrode. The capacitive electrode outperformed the noncapacitive electrode throughout each charge-discharge experiment. With a capacitive electrode it is possible to use the MFC simultaneously for production and storage of renewable electricity.

  14. Tubular bamboo charcoal for anode in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jun; Ye, Dingding; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2014-12-01

    The anode material plays a significant role in determining the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, the bamboo charcoal tube is proposed as a novel anode substrate by carbonizing the natural bamboo. Its surface functional groups, biocompatibility and internal resistance are thoroughly investigated. Performance of the MFCs with a conventional graphite tube anode and a bamboo charcoal tube anode is also compared. The results indicate that the tubular bamboo charcoal anode exhibits advantages over the graphite tube anode in terms of rougher surface, superior biocompatibility and smaller total internal resistance. Moreover, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis for the bamboo charcoal reveals that the introduced C-N bonds facilitate the electron transfer between the biofilm and electrodes. As a result, the MFC with a bamboo charcoal tube anode achieves a 50% improvement in the maximum power density over the graphite tube case. Furthermore, scale-up of the bamboo charcoal tube anode is demonstrated by employing a bundle of tubular bamboo charcoal to reach higher power output.

  15. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was utilized to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously generate electricity. Stable power generation (145 +/- 5 mW/m2, 470 omega) was produced continuously from raw sewage sludge for 5.5 days. The maximum power density reached 190 +/- 5 mW/m2. The corresponding total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency was 78.1 +/- 0.2% with initial TCOD of 49.7 g/L. The power generation of SMFC was depended on the sludge concentration, while dilution of the raw sludge resulted in higher power density. The maximum power density was saturated at sludge concentration of 17 g-TCOD/L, where 290 mw/m2 was achieved. When effluents from an anaerobic digester that was fed with raw sludge were used as substrate in the SMFC, a maximum power density of 318 mW/m2, and a final TCOD removal of 71.9 +/- 0.2% were achieved. These results have practical implications for development of an effective system to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously recover energy.

  16. Electricity generation from rapeseed straw hydrolysates using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Milena A; Rybarczyk, Maria K; Lieder, Marek

    2016-05-01

    Rapeseed straw is an attractive fuel material for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) due to its high content of carbohydrates (more than 60% carbohydrates). This study has demonstrated that reducing sugars can be efficiently extracted from raw rapeseed straw by combination of hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis followed by utilization as a fuel in two-chamber MFCs for electrical power generation. The most efficient method of saccharification of this lignocellulosic biomass (17%) turned out hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. Electricity was produced using hydrolysate concentrations up to 150 mg/dm(3). The power density reached 54 mW/m(2), while CEs ranged from 60% to 10%, corresponding to the initial reducing sugar concentrations of 10-150 mg/dm(3). The COD degradation rates based on charge calculation increased from 0.445 g COD/m(2)/d for the hydrolysate obtained with the microwave treatment to 0.602 g COD/m(2)/d for the most efficient combination of hydrothermal treatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis.

  17. High performance spiral wound microbial fuel cell with hydraulic characterization.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Alexander; Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-12-01

    The understanding and development of functioning systems are crucial steps for microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology advancement. In this study, a compact spiral wound MFC (swMFC) was developed and hydraulic residence time distribution (RTD) tests were conducted to investigate the flow characteristics in the systems. Results show that two-chamber swMFCs have high surface area to volume ratios of 350-700m(2)/m(3), and by using oxygen cathode without metal-catalysts, the maximum power densities were 42W/m(3) based on total volume and 170W/m(3) based on effective volume. The hydraulic step-input tracer study identified 20-67% of anodic flow dead space, which presents new opportunities for system improvement. Electrochemical tools revealed very low ohmic resistance but high charge transfer and diffusion resistance due to catalyst-free oxygen reduction. The spiral wound configuration combined with RTD tool offers a holistic approach for MFC development and optimization.

  18. Shift of voltage reversal in stacked microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Chang, In Seop; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-03-01

    We proved that sluggish kinetics on the cathode and the imbalance of cathode kinetics cause voltage reversal in a stacked microbial fuel cell (MFC) equipped with a non-Pt cathode. Catholyte aeration to a unit MFC against passive air diffusion to the cathode in the other unit MFC shifted voltage reversal between the two units, due to improved mass transport and O2 concentration effects in the aerated MFC. The shifted voltage reversal returned to an original status when catholyte aeration was stopped. A Pt-coated cathode increased the rate of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by a factor of ∼20, as compared to the non-Pt cathode. As a result, the anodic reaction rate that became slower than the rate on the Pt-cathode limited current density to overpotential in the stacked MFC equipped with the Pt-cathode. This work shows that dominant kinetic bottlenecks, which are the primary cause of voltage reversal, can be shifted between individual MFCs of stacked MFCs or electrodes depending on relative kinetics.

  19. Cadmium recovery by coupling double microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chansoo; Hu, Naixu; Lim, Bongsu

    2014-10-01

    Cr(VI)-MFC of the double microbial fuel cell (d-MFC) arrangement could successfully complement the insufficient voltage and power needed to recover cadmium metal from Cd(II)-MFC, which operated as a redox-flow battery. It was also possible to drain electrical energy from the d-MFC by an additional passage. The highest maximum utilization power density (22.5Wm(-2)) of Cr(VI)-MFC, with the cathode optimized with sulfate buffer, was 11.3times higher than the highest power density directly supplied to Cd(II)-MFC (2.0Wm(-2)). Cr(VI)-MFC could generate 3times higher power with the additional passage than without it; and the current density for the former was 4.2times higher than the latter at the same maximum power point (38.0Am(-2) vs. 9.0Am(-2)). This boosting phenomenon could be explained by the Le Chatelier's principle, which addresses the rate of electron-hole pair formation that can be accelerated by quickly removing electrons generated by microorganisms. PMID:25151082

  20. Carbon Material Optimized Biocathode for Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    PubMed Central

    Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Abro, Rashid; Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the biocathode electrode material of double-chamber was optimized. Alongside the basic carbon fiber brush, three carbon materials namely graphite granules, activated carbon granules (ACG) and activated carbon powder, were added to the cathode-chambers to improve power generation. The result shows that the addition of carbon materials increased the amount of available electroactive microbes on the electrode surface and thus promote oxygen reduction rate, which improved the generation performance of the MFCs. The Output current (external resistance = 1000 Ω) greatly increased after addition of the three carbon materials and maximum power densities in current stable phase increased by 47.4, 166.1, and 33.5%, respectively. Additionally, coulombic efficiencies of the MFC increased by 16.3, 64.3, and 20.1%, respectively. These results show that MFC when optimized with ACG show better power generation, higher chemical oxygen demands removal rate and coulombic efficiency. PMID:26858695

  1. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production.

  2. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation.

  3. Microbial fuel cell energy harvesting using synchronous flyback converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaraj, Muhannad; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Park, Jae-Do

    2014-02-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) use biodegradable substrates, such as wastewater and marine sediments to generate electrical energy. To harvest more energy from an MFC, power electronic converters have recently been used to replace resistors or charge pumps, because they have superior controllability on MFC's operating point and higher efficiency in energy storage for different applications. Conventional diode-based energy harvesters suffer from low efficiency because of the energy losses through the diode. Replacing the diode with a MOSFET can reduce the conduction loss, but it requires an isolated gate signal to control the floating secondary MOSFET, which makes the control circuitry complex. This study presents a new MFC energy harvesting regime using a synchronous flyback converter, which implements a transformer-based harvester with much simpler configuration and improves harvesting efficiency by 37.6% compared to a diode based boost converter, from 33.5% to 46.1%. The proposed harvester was able to store 2.27 J in the output capacitor out of 4.91 J generated energy from the MFC, while the boost converter can capture 1.67 J from 4.95 J.

  4. Microbial fuel cells for robotics: energy autonomy through artificial symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis A; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Horsfield, Ian

    2012-06-01

    The development of the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has seen an enormous growth over the last hundred years since its inception by Potter in 1911. The technology has reached a level of maturity that it is now considered to be a field in its own right with a growing scientific community. The highest level of activity has been recorded over the last decade and it is perhaps considered commonplace that MFCs are primarily suitable for stationary, passive wastewater treatment applications. Sceptics have certainly not considered MFCs as serious contenders in the race for developing renewable energy technologies. Yet this is the only type of alternative system that can convert organic waste-widely distributed around the globe-directly into electricity, and therefore, the only technology that will allow artificial agents to autonomously operate in a plethora of environments. This Minireview describes the history and current state-of-the-art regarding MFCs in robotics and their vital role in artificial symbiosis and autonomy. Furthermore, the article demonstrates how pursuing practical robotic applications can provide insights of the core MFC technology in general.

  5. High performance spiral wound microbial fuel cell with hydraulic characterization.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Alexander; Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-12-01

    The understanding and development of functioning systems are crucial steps for microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology advancement. In this study, a compact spiral wound MFC (swMFC) was developed and hydraulic residence time distribution (RTD) tests were conducted to investigate the flow characteristics in the systems. Results show that two-chamber swMFCs have high surface area to volume ratios of 350-700m(2)/m(3), and by using oxygen cathode without metal-catalysts, the maximum power densities were 42W/m(3) based on total volume and 170W/m(3) based on effective volume. The hydraulic step-input tracer study identified 20-67% of anodic flow dead space, which presents new opportunities for system improvement. Electrochemical tools revealed very low ohmic resistance but high charge transfer and diffusion resistance due to catalyst-free oxygen reduction. The spiral wound configuration combined with RTD tool offers a holistic approach for MFC development and optimization. PMID:25463810

  6. Bioelectricity production from soil using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wolińska, Agnieszka; Stępniewska, Zofia; Bielecka, Arletta; Ciepielski, Jakub

    2014-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a device using microorganisms as biocatalysts for transforming chemical energy into bioelectricity. As soil is an environment with the highest number of microorganisms and diversity, we hypothesized that it should have the potential for energy generation. The soil used for the study was Mollic Gleysol collected from the surface layer (0-20 cm). Four combinations of soil MFC differing from each other in humidity (full water holding capacity [WHC] and flooding) and the carbon source (glucose and straw) were constructed. Voltage (mV) and current intensity (μA) produced by the MFCs were recorded every day or at 2-day intervals. The fastest and the most effective MFCs in voltage generation (372.2 ± 5 mV) were those constructed on the basis of glucose (MFC-G). The efficiency of straw MFCs (MFC-S) was noticeable after 2 weeks (319.3 ± 4 mV). Maximal power density (P max = 32 mW m(-2)) was achieved by the MFC-G at current density (CD) of 100 mA m(-2). Much lower values of P max (10.6-10.8 mW m(-2)) were noted in the MFC-S at CD of ca. 60-80 mA m(-2). Consequently, soil has potential for production of renewable energy. PMID:24980749

  7. Influence of anode surface chemistry on microbial fuel cell operation.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Cornejo, Jose A; Ista, Linnea; Bretschger, Orianna; Marsili, Enrico; Atanassov, Plamen; Schuler, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified gold anodes are used in single chamber microbial fuel cells for organic removal and electricity generation. Hydrophilic (N(CH3)3(+), OH, COOH) and hydrophobic (CH3) SAMs are examined for their effect on bacterial attachment, current and power output. The different substratum chemistry affects the community composition of the electrochemically active biofilm formed and thus the current and power output. Of the four SAM-modified anodes tested, N(CH3)3(+) results in the shortest start up time (15 days), highest current achieved (225 μA cm(-2)) and highest MFC power density (40 μW cm(-2)), followed by COOH (150 μA cm(-2) and 37 μW cm(-2)) and OH (83 μA cm(-2) and 27 μW cm(-2)) SAMs. Hydrophobic SAM decreases electrochemically active bacteria attachment and anode performance in comparison to hydrophilic SAMs (CH3 modified anodes 7 μA cm(-2) anodic current and 1.2 μW cm(-2) MFC's power density). A consortium of Clostridia and δ-Proteobacteria is found on all the anode surfaces, suggesting a synergistic cooperation under anodic conditions.

  8. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was utilized to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously generate electricity. Stable power generation (145 +/- 5 mW/m2, 470 omega) was produced continuously from raw sewage sludge for 5.5 days. The maximum power density reached 190 +/- 5 mW/m2. The corresponding total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency was 78.1 +/- 0.2% with initial TCOD of 49.7 g/L. The power generation of SMFC was depended on the sludge concentration, while dilution of the raw sludge resulted in higher power density. The maximum power density was saturated at sludge concentration of 17 g-TCOD/L, where 290 mw/m2 was achieved. When effluents from an anaerobic digester that was fed with raw sludge were used as substrate in the SMFC, a maximum power density of 318 mW/m2, and a final TCOD removal of 71.9 +/- 0.2% were achieved. These results have practical implications for development of an effective system to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously recover energy. PMID:22053457

  9. Cadmium recovery by coupling double microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chansoo; Hu, Naixu; Lim, Bongsu

    2014-10-01

    Cr(VI)-MFC of the double microbial fuel cell (d-MFC) arrangement could successfully complement the insufficient voltage and power needed to recover cadmium metal from Cd(II)-MFC, which operated as a redox-flow battery. It was also possible to drain electrical energy from the d-MFC by an additional passage. The highest maximum utilization power density (22.5Wm(-2)) of Cr(VI)-MFC, with the cathode optimized with sulfate buffer, was 11.3times higher than the highest power density directly supplied to Cd(II)-MFC (2.0Wm(-2)). Cr(VI)-MFC could generate 3times higher power with the additional passage than without it; and the current density for the former was 4.2times higher than the latter at the same maximum power point (38.0Am(-2) vs. 9.0Am(-2)). This boosting phenomenon could be explained by the Le Chatelier's principle, which addresses the rate of electron-hole pair formation that can be accelerated by quickly removing electrons generated by microorganisms.

  10. Voltage balancing strategies for serial connection of microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, Firas; Ondel, Olivier; Allard, Bruno; Buret, François

    2015-07-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) converts electrochemically organic matter into electricity by means of metabolisms of bacteria. The MFC power output is limited by low voltage and low current characteristics in the range of microwatts or milliwatts per litre. In order to produce a sufficient voltage level (>1.5 V) and sufficient power to supply real applications such as autonomous sensors, it is necessary to either scale-up one single unit or to connect multiple units together. Many topologies of connection are possible as the serial association to improve the output voltage, or the parallel connection to improve the output current or the series/parallel connection to step-up both voltage and current. The association of MFCs in series is a solution to increase the voltage to an acceptable value and to mutualize the unit's output power. The serial association of a large number of MFCs presents several issues. The first one is the hydraulic coupling among MFCs when they share the same substrate. The second one is the dispersion between generators that lead to a non-optimal stack efficiency because the maximum power point (MPP) operation of all MFCs is not permitted. Voltage balancing is a solution to compensate non-uniformities towards MPP. This paper presents solutions to improve the efficiency of a stack of serially connected MFCs through a voltage-balancing circuit. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014)", edited by Adel Razek

  11. Importance of solute partitioning in biphasic oxidation of benzyl alcohol by free and immobilized whole cells of Pichia pastoris

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Koei; Nakahara, Takehiko . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-04-25

    Using free and immobilized whole cells of Pichia pastoris, the biocatalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol was investigated in different two-phase systems. This reaction was strongly influenced by both the substrate and product inhibitions, and the production rate of benzaldehyde in the aqueous system became maximum at the initial substrate concentration of ca. 29 g/L with the aldehyde formation less than 4 to 5 g/L even after a longer reaction period. The reaction rates in the two-liquid phase systems were predominantly determined by the partitioning behaviors of the substrate and the product between the two phases rather than by enzyme deactivation by the organic solvents. In the two-liquid phase systems, consequently, the organic solvent acted as a reservoir to reduce these inhibitory effects, and it was essential to select the organic solvent providing the optimal partitioning of the substrate into the aqueous phase as well as the preferential extraction of the product into the organic phase. The whole cells immobilized in a mixed matrix composed of silicone polymer and Ca alginate gel worked well in the xylene and decane media, providing comparable activities with the free cells. The production rate of aldehyde was also influenced by the solute partitioning into the hydrophilic alginate phase where the cells existed.

  12. Aerobic decolorization and degradation of Acid Orange G (AOG) by suspended growing cells and immobilized cells of a yeast strain Candida tropicalis TL-F1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liang; Li, Hua; Ning, Shuxiang; Hao, Jia

    2014-10-01

    In this study, aerobic decolorization and degradation of azo dye Acid Orange G (AOG) by both suspended growing cells and immobilized cells of a yeast strain Candida tropicalis TL-F1 were studied. The effects of different parameters on decolorization of AOG by both growing suspended and immobilized strain TL-F1 were investigated. Furthermore, a possible decolorization mechanism of AOG was proposed through analyzing metabolic intermediates using UV-vis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) methods. Strain TL-F1 could decolorize AOG in both liquid and solid mediums through degradation. The optimal conditions for decolorization with suspended growing cells of strain TL-F1 were as follows: 6-10 g/L sucrose, 5-7 g/L urea, ≥6 % (v/v) inoculation size, ≥160 rpm, 35-40 °C, and pH 5.0-6.0; and those for immobilized cells, the conditions were as follows: 4-6 g/L glucose, 0.2-0.4 g/L urea, 6-10 g/L (wet cell pellets) inoculation size, ≥160 rpm, 35-40 °C, and pH 5.0-7.0. Results of UV-vis scanning spectra suggested that AOG was decolorized through biodegradation, and the possible pathway was proposed through the results of HPLC-MS analysis and related literature. This is a systematic research on aerobic decolorization and degradation of AOG by both suspended and immobilized cells of a C. tropicalis strain.

  13. The effect of VEGF-immobilized nickel-free high-nitrogen stainless steel on viability and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Makoto; Inoue, Motoki; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-04-01

    Using ester bonds, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) was immobilized on the surface of a novel biometal, nickel-free high-nitrogen stainless steel (HNS). The biological activity of immobilized VEGF-A was investigated after the culture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on the substrate. Immobilization of VEGF-A onto the HNS surface was performed using trisuccinimidyl citrate (TSC) as a linker. Firstly, UV irradiation was employed to amplify hydroxyl groups on the HNS surface. Next, the HNS was dipped into TSC/dimethyl sulfoxide solution at room temperature. From the results of water contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, TSC was found to be immobilized on the HNS surface via ester bonds. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that immobilized VEGF-A remained even after immersion in culture medium for 7 days; however, it was gradually deimmobilized by hydrolysis of the ester bonds at the TSC-metal interface. As a result, VEGF-A-immobilized HNS significantly contributed to the stimulation of HUVEC growth for the initial stage of culture, even though the gradual reduction in growth stimulation of HUVECs occurred by the sequential deimmobilization of VEGF-A, which was caused by the hydrolysis of the ester groups. Therefore, VEGF-A-immobilized HNS could be applied as a basic material for coronary stents. PMID:22154009

  14. The effect of VEGF-immobilized nickel-free high-nitrogen stainless steel on viability and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Makoto; Inoue, Motoki; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-04-01

    Using ester bonds, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) was immobilized on the surface of a novel biometal, nickel-free high-nitrogen stainless steel (HNS). The biological activity of immobilized VEGF-A was investigated after the culture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on the substrate. Immobilization of VEGF-A onto the HNS surface was performed using trisuccinimidyl citrate (TSC) as a linker. Firstly, UV irradiation was employed to amplify hydroxyl groups on the HNS surface. Next, the HNS was dipped into TSC/dimethyl sulfoxide solution at room temperature. From the results of water contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, TSC was found to be immobilized on the HNS surface via ester bonds. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that immobilized VEGF-A remained even after immersion in culture medium for 7 days; however, it was gradually deimmobilized by hydrolysis of the ester bonds at the TSC-metal interface. As a result, VEGF-A-immobilized HNS significantly contributed to the stimulation of HUVEC growth for the initial stage of culture, even though the gradual reduction in growth stimulation of HUVECs occurred by the sequential deimmobilization of VEGF-A, which was caused by the hydrolysis of the ester groups. Therefore, VEGF-A-immobilized HNS could be applied as a basic material for coronary stents.

  15. Enhanced power production from microbial fuel cells with high cell density culture.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dan-Dan; Li, Bing; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Sun, De-Zhen; Si, Rong-Wei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of power production in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a high cell density culture strategy was developed. By using high cell density culture, the voltage output and power density output of the MFC were enhanced about 0.6 and 1.6 times compared to the control, respectively. Further analysis showed that riboflavin concentration in the MFC was dramatically increased from 0.1 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L by high cell density culture. Moreover, the biofilm formation on the anode surface was significantly enhanced by this new strategy. The increased accumulation of electron shuttle (riboflavin) as well as enhanced biofilm formation contributed to the improvement in anodic electrochemical activity and these factors were the underlying mechanism for MFC performance improvement by high cell density culture. This work demonstrated that high cell density culture would be a simple and practical strategy for MFC manipulation.

  16. Scale-up of phosphate remobilization from sewage sludge in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Happe, Manuel; Sugnaux, Marc; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Stauffer, Marc; Zufferey, Géraldine; Kahoun, Thomas; Salamin, Paul-André; Egli, Thomas; Comninellis, Christos; Grogg, Alain-François; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate remobilization from digested sewage sludge containing iron phosphate was scaled-up in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). A 3litre triple chambered MFC was constructed. This reactor was operated as a microbial fuel cell and later as a microbial electrolysis cell to accelerate cathodic phosphate remobilization. Applying an additional voltage and exceeding native MFC power accelerated chemical base formation and the related phosphate remobilization rate. The electrolysis approach was extended using a platinum-RVC cathode. The pH rose to 12.6 and phosphate was recovered by 67% in 26h. This was significantly faster than using microbial fuel cell conditions. Shrinking core modelling particle fluid kinetics showed that the reaction resistance has to move inside the sewage sludge particle for considerable rate enhancement. Remobilized phosphate was subsequently precipitated as struvite and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated low levels of cadmium, lead, and other metals as required by law for recycling fertilizers. PMID:26519694

  17. Scale-up of phosphate remobilization from sewage sludge in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Happe, Manuel; Sugnaux, Marc; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Stauffer, Marc; Zufferey, Géraldine; Kahoun, Thomas; Salamin, Paul-André; Egli, Thomas; Comninellis, Christos; Grogg, Alain-François; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate remobilization from digested sewage sludge containing iron phosphate was scaled-up in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). A 3litre triple chambered MFC was constructed. This reactor was operated as a microbial fuel cell and later as a microbial electrolysis cell to accelerate cathodic phosphate remobilization. Applying an additional voltage and exceeding native MFC power accelerated chemical base formation and the related phosphate remobilization rate. The electrolysis approach was extended using a platinum-RVC cathode. The pH rose to 12.6 and phosphate was recovered by 67% in 26h. This was significantly faster than using microbial fuel cell conditions. Shrinking core modelling particle fluid kinetics showed that the reaction resistance has to move inside the sewage sludge particle for considerable rate enhancement. Remobilized phosphate was subsequently precipitated as struvite and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated low levels of cadmium, lead, and other metals as required by law for recycling fertilizers.

  18. Immobilization of Microbes for Bioremediation of Crude Oil Polluted Environments: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Zeynab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Cappello, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are the most common environmental pollutants in the world and oil spills pose a great hazard to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Oil pollution may arise either accidentally or operationally whenever oil is produced, transported, stored and processed or used at sea or on land. Oil spills are a major menace to the environment as they severely damage the surrounding ecosystems. To improve the survival and retention of the bioremediation agents in the contaminated sites, bacterial cells must be immobilized. Immobilized cells are widely tested for a variety of applications. There are many types of support and immobilization techniques that can be selected based on the sort of application. In this review article, we have discussed the potential of immobilized microbial cells to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. In some studies, enhanced degradation with immobilized cells as compared to free living bacterial cells for the treatment of oil contaminated areas have been shown. It was demonstrated that immobilized cell to be effective and is better, faster, and can be occurred for a longer period PMID:26668662

  19. Immobilization of Microbes for Bioremediation of Crude Oil Polluted Environments: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Zeynab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Cappello, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are the most common environmental pollutants in the world and oil spills pose a great hazard to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Oil pollution may arise either accidentally or operationally whenever oil is produced, transported, stored and processed or used at sea or on land. Oil spills are a major menace to the environment as they severely damage the surrounding ecosystems. To improve the survival and retention of the bioremediation agents in the contaminated sites, bacterial cells must be immobilized. Immobilized cells are widely tested for a variety of applications. There are many types of support and immobilization techniques that can be selected based on the sort of application. In this review article, we have discussed the potential of immobilized microbial cells to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. In some studies, enhanced degradation with immobilized cells as compared to free living bacterial cells for the treatment of oil contaminated areas have been shown. It was demonstrated that immobilized cell to be effective and is better, faster, and can be occurred for a longer period. PMID:26668662

  20. Silicon-based microfabricated microbial fuel cell toxicity sensor.

    PubMed

    Dávila, D; Esquivel, J P; Sabaté, N; Mas, J

    2011-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used for several years as biosensors for measuring environmental parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand and water toxicity. The present study is focused on the detection of toxic matter using a novel silicon-based MFC. Like other existing toxicity sensors based on MFCs, this device is capable of detecting the variation on the current produced by the cell when toxic compounds are present in the medium. The MFC approach presented in this work aims to obtain a simple, compact and planar device for its further application as a biosensor in the design and fabrication of equipment for toxicity monitoring. It consists on a proton exchange membrane placed between two microfabricated silicon plates that act as current collectors. An array of square 80 μm × 80 μm vertical channels, 300 μm deep, have been defined trough the plates over an area of 6 mm × 6 mm. The final testing assembly incorporates two perspex pieces positioned onto the plates as reservoirs with a working volume of 144 μL per compartment. The operation of the microdevice as a direct electron transfer MFC has been validated by comparing its performance against a larger scale MFC, run under the same conditions. The device has been tested as a toxicity sensor by setting it at a fixed current while monitoring changes in the output power. A drop in the power production is observed when a toxic compound is added to the anode compartment. The compact design of the device makes it suitable for its incorporation into measurement equipment either as an individual device or as an array of sensors for high throughput processing.

  1. Microbial reduction of uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Landa, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    REDUCTION of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores1-10. U(VI) reduction has generally been regarded as an abiological reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant1,2,5,11. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction1,12,13. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium.

  2. Biodegradation of benzidine based azodyes Direct red and Direct blue by the immobilized cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens D41.

    PubMed

    Puvaneswari, N; Muthukrishnan, J; Gunasekaran, P

    2002-10-01

    Benzidine based azodyes are proven carcinogens, mutagens and have been linked to bladder cancer of human beings and laboratory animals. The textile and dyestuff manufacturing industry are the two major sources that released azodyes in their effluents. The dye, Direct blue contains two carcinogenic compounds namely benzidine (BZ), 4-amino biphenyl (4-ABP), while the dye Direct red has benzidine (BZ). Among 40 isolates of Pseudomonas fluorescens screened, one isolate designated as D41 was found to be capable of extensively degrading the dyes Direct blue and Direct red. Immobilized cells of P. fluorescens D41 efficiently degraded Direct red (82%) and Direct blue (71%) in the presence of glucose.

  3. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-25

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales.

  4. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales. PMID:27572161

  5. Surface modification of silicone tubes by functional carboxyl and amine, but not peroxide groups followed by collagen immobilization improves endothelial cell stability and functionality.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mottaghy, Khosrow; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz

    2015-03-02

    Surface modification by functional groups promotes endothelialization in biohybrid artificial lungs, but whether it affects endothelial cell stability under fluid shear stress, and the release of anti-thrombotic factors, e.g. nitric oxide (NO), is unknown. We aimed to test whether surface-modified silicone tubes containing different functional groups, but similar wettability, improve collagen immobilization, endothelialization, cell stability and cell-mediated NO-release. Peroxide, carboxyl, and amine-groups increased collagen immobilization (41-76%). Only amine-groups increased ultimate tensile strength (2-fold). Peroxide and amine enhanced (1.5-2.5 fold), but carboxyl-groups decreased (2.9-fold) endothelial cell number after 6 d. After collagen immobilization, cell numbers were enhanced by all group-modifications (2.8-3.8 fold). Cells were stable under 1 h-fluid shear stress on amine, but not carboxyl or peroxide-group-modified silicone (>50% cell detachment), while cells were also stable on carboxyl-group-modified silicone with immobilized collagen. NO-release was increased by peroxide and amine (1.1-1.7 fold), but decreased by carboxyl-group-modification (9.8-fold), while it increased by all group-modifications after collagen immobilization (1.8-2.8 fold). Only the amine-group-modification changed silicone stiffness and transparency. In conclusion, silicone-surface modification of blood-contacting parts of artificial lungs with carboxyl and amine, but not peroxide-groups followed by collagen immobilization allows the formation of a stable functional endothelial cell layer. Amine-group-modification seems undesirable since it affected silicone's physical properties.

  6. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyue; Zheng, Yunfei; Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications.

  7. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyue; Zheng, Yunfei; Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26930062

  8. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26930062

  9. Characterization and kinetics of sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Moraes, B S; Souza, T S O; Foresti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification is an advantageous alternative over heterotrophic denitrification, and may have potential for nitrogen removal of low-strength wastewaters, such as anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. This study evaluated the fundamentals and kinetics of this process in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells. Batch tests were performed for different NOx-/S2- ratios and using nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors. Autotrophic denitrification was observed for both electron acceptors, and NOx-/S2- ratios defined whether sulfide oxidation was complete or not. Kinetic parameter values obtained for nitrate were higher than for nitrite as electron acceptor. Zero-order models were better adjusted to profiles obtained for suspended cell reactors, whereas first-order models were more adequate for immobilized cell reactors. However, in the latter, mass transfer physical phenomena had a significant effect on kinetics based on biochemical reactions. Results showed that sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification can be successfully established for low-strength wastewaters and have potential for nitrogen removal from anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. PMID:22097054

  10. Polymer separators for high-power, high-efficiency microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Wei, Bin; Luo, Yong; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with hydrophilic poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) separators showed higher Coulombic efficiencies (94%) and power densities (1220 mW m(-2)) than cells with porous glass fiber separators or reactors without a separator after 32 days of operation. These remarkable increases in both the coublomic efficiency and the power production of the microbial fuel cells were made possible by the separator's unique characteristics of fouling mitigation of the air cathode without a large increase in ionic resistance in the cell. This new type of polymer gel-like separator design will be useful for improving MFC reactor performance by enabling compact cell designs.

  11. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C; Hanson, Buck T; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M; Fowler, Patrick W; Huang, Wei E; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-13

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics.

  12. A novel integration system of magnetically immobilized cells and a pair of graphite plate-stainless iron mesh electrodes for the bioremediation of coking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Tan, Liang; Ning, Shuxiang; Shi, Shengnan

    2016-09-01

    Magnetically immobilized cells of Comamonas sp. JB coupling with electrode reaction was developed to enhance the treatment efficiency of coking wastewater containing phenol, carbazole (CA), dibenzofuran (DBF), and dibenzothiophene (DBT). The pair of graphite plate-stainless iron mesh electrodes was chosen as the most suitable electrodes. Magnetically immobilized cells coupling with graphite plate-stainless iron mesh electrodes (coupling system) exhibited high degradation activity for all the compounds, which were significantly higher than the sum by single magnetically immobilized cells and electrode reaction at the optimal voltage. Recycling experiments demonstrated that the degradation activity of coupling system increased gradually during eight recycles, indicating that there was a coupling effect between the biodegradation and electrode reaction. Phenol hydroxylase and qPCR assays confirmed that appropriate electrical stimulation could improve phenol hydroxylase activity and promote cells growth. Toxicity assessment suggested the treatment of the coking wastewater by coupling system led to less toxicity than untreated wastewater. PMID:27289060

  13. Antimicrobial and cell viability measurement of bovine serum albumin capped silver nanoparticles (Ag/BSA) loaded collagen immobilized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) film.

    PubMed

    Bakare, Rotimi; Hawthrone, Samantha; Vails, Carmen; Gugssa, Ayele; Karim, Alamgir; Stubbs, John; Raghavan, Dharmaraj

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection of orthopedic devices has been a major concern in joint replacement procedures. Therefore, this study is aimed at formulating collagen immobilized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) film loaded with bovine serum albumin capped silver nanoparticles (Ag/BSA NPs) to inhibit bacterial growth while retaining/promoting osteoblast cells viability. The nanoparticles loaded collagen immobilized PHBV film was characterized for its composition by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry. The extent of loading of Ag/BSA NPs on collagen immobilized PHBV film was found to depend on the chemistry of the functionalized PHBV film and the concentration of Ag/BSA NPs solution used for loading nanoparticles. Our results showed that more Ag/BSA NPs were loaded on higher molecular weight collagen immobilized PHEMA-g-PHBV film. Maximum loading of Ag/BSA NPs on collagen immobilized PHBV film was observed when 16ppm solution was used for adsorption studies. Colony forming unit and optical density measurements showed broad antimicrobial activity towards Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at significantly lower concentration i.e., 0.19 and 0.31μg/disc, compared to gentamicin and sulfamethoxazole trimethoprim while MTT assay showed that released nanoparticles from Ag/BSA NPs loaded collagen immobilized PHBV film has no impact on MCTC3-E1 cells viability.

  14. Analysis of long-term performance and microbial community structure in bio-cathode microbial desalination cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huichao; Wen, Qinxue; An, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhiqiang; Nan, Jun

    2016-03-01

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) could desalinate salt water without energy consumption and simultaneously generate bioenergy. Compared with an abiotic cathode MDC, an aerobic bio-cathode MDC is more sustainable and is less expensive to operate. In this study, the long-term operation (5500 h) performance of a bio-cathode MDC was investigated in which the power density, Coulombic efficiency, and salt removal rate were decreased by 71, 44, and 27 %, respectively. The primary reason for the system performance decrease was biofouling on the membranes, which increased internal resistance and reduced the ionic transfer and energy conversion efficiency. Changing membranes was an effective method to recover the MDC performance. The microbial community diversity in the MDC anode was low compared with that of the reported microbial fuel cell (MFC), while the abundance of Proteobacteria was 30 % higher. The content of Planctomycetes in the cathode biofilm sample was much higher than that in biofouling on the cation exchange membrane (CEM), indicating that Planctomycetes were relevant to cathode oxygen reduction.

  15. Electron flux and microbial community in microbial fuel cells (open-circuit and closed-circuit modes) and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaecheul; Park, Youghyun; Lee, Taeho

    2015-07-01

    A closed-circuit microbial fuel cell (C-MFC) was operated to investigate the electron flux under fed-batch mode, and the results were compared to those of open-circuit MFC (O-MFC) and a fermentation reactor (F-reactor). The current was the largest electron sink (52.7% of influent SCOD) in C-MFC, whereas biomass and methane gas were the most significant electron sinks in O-MFC and F-reactor. Interestingly, some of the unknown sink may have accumulated in the electrode of O-MFC. Principal component analysis based on gradient gel electrophoresis profiles showed that the microbial communities were significantly affected by the growth conditions and the presence of electrode, regardless of the circuit connection. Therefore, the electrode and circuit mode might help to control the amount of biomass and enhance the MFC performance.

  16. Microbial community analysis in a long-term membrane-less microbial electrolysis cell with hydrogen and methane production.