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Sample records for microbial inactivation properties

  1. Effect of pulsed electric fields on microbial inactivation and physico-chemical properties of whole porcine blood.

    PubMed

    Boulaaba, Annika; Egen, Nathalie; Klein, Günter

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the lethal effectiveness of pulsed electric fields on the inactivation of the porcine blood endogenous microflora. Furthermore, the impact of pulsed electric field application on physico-chemical and sensory properties in this medium should be proved. Blood samples from a commercial abattoir in Germany were processed by a continuous pilot plant-pulsed electric field system at electric field strength of 11 kV/cm for treatment times of 163 and 209 µs. The applied pulse frequencies of 134 and 175 Hz correspond to an energy input of 91 and 114 kJ/kg, respectively. In these conditions, the effectiveness of pulsed electric field processing on microbial inactivation was limited: 1.35 log10 CFU/mL reduction of total aerobic plate count (p < 0.05), 1.0 log10 CFU/mL for Pseudomonas spp. (p < 0.05), 0.97 and 0.66 log10 CFU/mL reduction for Enterobacteriaceae and sulfite-reducing anaerobic bacteria, respectively. However, the storage experiment (14 days at +3 ) showed a significant reduced growth of total aerobic plate count (p < 0.05) and Pseudomonas spp. (p < 0.05) in the pulsed electric field-treated blood samples. Pulsed electric field processing leads to a complete hemolysis of the red blood cells, in addition significant decreased L* (lightness), a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values (p < 0.0001) were observed. Furthermore, changes in the sensory attributes color (changed from red to dark brown) and odor (changed from fresh to musty and tangy) were noticed.

  2. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  3. Bioinactivation: Software for modelling dynamic microbial inactivation.

    PubMed

    Garre, Alberto; Fernández, Pablo S; Lindqvist, Roland; Egea, Jose A

    2017-03-01

    This contribution presents the bioinactivation software, which implements functions for the modelling of isothermal and non-isothermal microbial inactivation. This software offers features such as user-friendliness, modelling of dynamic conditions, possibility to choose the fitting algorithm and generation of prediction intervals. The software is offered in two different formats: Bioinactivation core and Bioinactivation SE. Bioinactivation core is a package for the R programming language, which includes features for the generation of predictions and for the fitting of models to inactivation experiments using non-linear regression or a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm (MCMC). The calculations are based on inactivation models common in academia and industry (Bigelow, Peleg, Mafart and Geeraerd). Bioinactivation SE supplies a user-friendly interface to selected functions of Bioinactivation core, namely the model fitting of non-isothermal experiments and the generation of prediction intervals. The capabilities of bioinactivation are presented in this paper through a case study, modelling the non-isothermal inactivation of Bacillus sporothermodurans. This study has provided a full characterization of the response of the bacteria to dynamic temperature conditions, including confidence intervals for the model parameters and a prediction interval of the survivor curve. We conclude that the MCMC algorithm produces a better characterization of the biological uncertainty and variability than non-linear regression. The bioinactivation software can be relevant to the food and pharmaceutical industry, as well as to regulatory agencies, as part of a (quantitative) microbial risk assessment.

  4. Microbial inactivation properties of a new antimicrobial/antithrombotic catheter lock solution (citrate/methylene blue/parabens)

    PubMed Central

    Steczko, Janusz; Ash, Stephen R.; Nivens, David E.; Brewer, Lloyd; Winger, Roland K.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Microbial infections are the most serious complications associated with indwelling central venous catheters. A catheter lock solution that is both antibacterial and antithrombotic is needed. The goal of this study was to determine whether a new catheter lock solution containing citrate, methylene blue and parabens has antimicrobial properties against planktonic bacteria and against sessile bacteria within a biofilm. These effects were compared to the antimicrobial properties of heparin at 2500 units/ml. Methods. The tested solution (C/MB/P comprising 7% sodium citrate, 0.05% methylene blue and 0.165% parabens) and individual components were challenged against gram-positive and gram-negative organisms and fungi. Control solutions were heparin with preservatives. Studies included evaluation of eradication of planktonic bacteria and sessile organisms in a biofilm grown on polymeric and glass coupons. Biofilm samples were inspected by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and vital stains. Results. The C/MB/P solution, contrary to heparin, kills most tested planktonic microorganisms within 1 h of incubation. All tested organisms have an MIC of 25% or less of the original concentration of a new catheter lock. Bacteria strains did not develop resistance over more than 40 passages of culture suspensions. The C/MB/P solution is able to kill nearly all sessile bacteria in biofilm growth on plastic or glass discs in 1 h. Microscopic methods demonstrated extensive physical elimination of biofilm deposits from treated coupons. In contrast, heparin had a minimal effect on planktonic or biofilm organisms. Conclusions. The new multicomponent lock solution has strong antimicrobial properties against both planktonic and sessile microorganisms. By comparison, heparin with preservative has weak antibacterial properties against planktonic and biofilm bacteria. The tested catheter lock may have usefulness in preventing bacterial colonization of haemodialysis

  5. Use of Photosensitizers in Semisolid Formulations for Microbial Photodynamic Inactivation.

    PubMed

    González-Delgado, José A; Kennedy, Patrick J; Ferreira, Marta; Tomé, João P C; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-05-26

    Semisolid formulations, such as gels, creams and ointments, have recently contributed to the progression of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and microbial photodynamic inactivation (PDI) in clinical applications. The most important challenges facing this field are the physicochemical properties of photosensitizers (PSs), optimal drug release profiles, and the photosensitivity of surrounding tissues. By further integration of nanotechnology with semisolid formulations, very promising pharmaceuticals have been generated against several dermatological diseases (PDT) and (antibiotic-resistant) pathogenic microorganisms (PDI). This review focuses on the different PSs and their associated semisolid formulations currently found in both the market and clinical trials that are used in PDT/PDI. Special emphasis is placed on the advantages that the semisolid formulations bring to drug delivery in PDI. Lastly, some potential considerations for improvement in this field are also discussed.

  6. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  7. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  8. In situ studies of microbial inactivation during high pressure processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Jose Antonio; Schaffner, Donald W.; Cuitiño, Alberto M.; Karwe, Mukund V.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has been shown to reduce microbial concentration in foods. The mechanisms of microbial inactivation by HPP have been associated with damage to cell membranes. The real-time response of bacteria to HPP was measured to elucidate the mechanisms of inactivation, which can aid in designing more effective processes. Different pressure cycling conditions were used to expose Enterobacter aerogenes cells to HPP. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a probe, which fluoresces after penetrating cells with damaged membranes and binding with nucleic acids. A HPP vessel with sapphire windows was used for measuring fluorescence in situ. Membrane damage was detected during pressurization and hold time, but not during depressurization. The drop in fluorescence was larger than expected after pressure cycles at higher pressure and longer times. This indicated possible reversible disassociation of ribosomes resulting in additional binding of PI to exposed RNA under pressure and its release after depressurization.

  9. Microbial properties database editor tutorial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbialrelevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pathogens. Physical prop...

  10. Development of a log-quadratic model to describe microbial inactivation, illustrated by thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Stone, G; Chapman, B; Lovell, D

    2009-11-01

    In the commercial food industry, demonstration of microbiological safety and thermal process equivalence often involves a mathematical framework that assumes log-linear inactivation kinetics and invokes concepts of decimal reduction time (D(T)), z values, and accumulated lethality. However, many microbes, particularly spores, exhibit inactivation kinetics that are not log linear. This has led to alternative modeling approaches, such as the biphasic and Weibull models, that relax strong log-linear assumptions. Using a statistical framework, we developed a novel log-quadratic model, which approximates the biphasic and Weibull models and provides additional physiological interpretability. As a statistical linear model, the log-quadratic model is relatively simple to fit and straightforwardly provides confidence intervals for its fitted values. It allows a D(T)-like value to be derived, even from data that exhibit obvious "tailing." We also showed how existing models of non-log-linear microbial inactivation, such as the Weibull model, can fit into a statistical linear model framework that dramatically simplifies their solution. We applied the log-quadratic model to thermal inactivation data for the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum and evaluated its merits compared with those of popular previously described approaches. The log-quadratic model was used as the basis of a secondary model that can capture the dependence of microbial inactivation kinetics on temperature. This model, in turn, was linked to models of spore inactivation of Sapru et al. and Rodriguez et al. that posit different physiological states for spores within a population. We believe that the log-quadratic model provides a useful framework in which to test vitalistic and mechanistic hypotheses of inactivation by thermal and other processes.

  11. Optimization of microbial inactivation of shrimp by dense phase carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongwu; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Shucheng; Qu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Chaohua; Gao, Jialong

    2012-05-01

    Microbial inactivation of Litopenaeus vannamei by dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD) treatment was investigated and neural network was used to optimize the process parameters of microbial inactivation. The results showed that DPCD treatment had a remarkable bactericidal effect on microorganism of shrimp. A 3×5×2 three-layer neural network model was established. According to the neural network model, the inactivation effect was enhanced with pressure, temperature and exposure time increasing and temperature was the most important factor affecting microbial inactivation of shrimp. Cooked appearance of shrimp by DPCD treatment was observed and seemed to be more positively acceptable by Chinese diet custom. Therefore, color change of shrimp by DPCD treatment could have a positive effect on quality attributes. Moderate temperature 55 °C with 15 MPa for 26 min treatment time achieved a 3.5-log reduction of total aerobic plate counts (TPC). The parameters combination might be appropriate for shrimp process by DPCD.

  12. Identification of non-linear microbial inactivation kinetics under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Valdramidis, V P; Geeraerd, A H; Bernaerts, K; Van Impe, J F M

    2008-11-30

    In this study dynamic microbial inactivation experiments are exploited for performing parameter identification of a non-linear microbial model. For that purpose microbial inactivation data are produced and a differential equation exhibiting a shoulder and a loglinear phase is employed. The derived parameter estimates from this method were used to perform predictions on an independent experimental set at fluctuating temperature. Joint confidence regions and asymptotic confidence intervals of the estimated parameters were compared with previous studies originating from parameter identification under isothermal conditions. The developed approach can provide more reliable estimates for realistic conditions compared to the usual or standard two step approach.

  13. Application of response surface methodology to optimise microbial inactivation of shrimp and conch by supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Manhua; Sui, Xiao; Ma, Xixiu; Feng, Xiaomei; Han, Yuqian

    2015-03-30

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 ) has been shown to have a good pasteurising effect on food. However, very few research papers have investigated the possibility to exploit this treatment for solid foods, particularly for seafood. Considering the microbial safety of raw seafood consumption, the study aimed to explore the feasibility of microbial inactivation of shrimp (Metapenaeus ensis) and conch (Rapana venosa) by SC-CO2 treatment. Response surface methodology (RSM) models were established to predict and analyse the SC-CO2 process. A 3.69-log reduction in the total aerobic plate count (TPC) of shrimp was observed by SC-CO2 treatment at 53°C, 15 MPa for 40 min, and the logarithmic reduction in TPC of conch was 3.31 at 55°C, 14 MPa for 42 min. Sensory scores of the products achieved approximately 8 (desirable). The optimal parameters for microbial inactivation of shrimp and conch by SC-CO2 might be 55°C, 15 MPa and 40 min. SC-CO2 exerted a strong bactericidal effect on the TPC of shrimp and conch, and the products maintained good organoleptic properties. This study verified the feasibility of microbial inactivation of shrimp and conch by SC-CO2 treatment. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Role of dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size on microbial inactivation of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Manoranjan; Wu, Bing; Zhu, Liying; Jacobson, Craig; Wang, Wei-Ning; Jones, Kristen; Goyal, Yogesh; Tang, Yinjie J.; Biswas, Pratim

    2011-10-01

    The properties of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were independently controlled in a flame aerosol reactor by varying the molar feed ratios of the precursors, and by optimizing temperature and time history in the flame. The effect of the physico-chemical properties (dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size) of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles on inactivation of Mycobacterium smegmatis (a model pathogenic bacterium) was investigated under three light conditions (complete dark, fluorescent light and UV light). The survival rate of M. smegmatis (in a minimal salt medium for 2 h) exposed to the NPs varied depending on the light irradiation conditions as well as the dopant concentrations. In dark conditions, pristine TiO2 showed insignificant microbial inactivation, but inactivation increased with increasing dopant concentration. Under fluorescent light illumination, no significant effect was observed for TiO2. However, when TiO2 was doped with copper, inactivation increased with dopant concentration, reaching more than 90% (>3 wt% dopant). Enhanced microbial inactivation by TiO2 NPs was observed only under UV light. When TiO2 NPs were doped with copper, their inactivation potential was promoted and the UV-resistant cells were reduced by over 99%. In addition, the microbial inactivation potential of NPs was also crystal-phase-and size-dependent under all three light conditions. A lower ratio of anatase phase and smaller sizes of Cu-doped TiO2 NPs resulted in decreased bacterial survival. The increased inactivation potential of doped TiO2 NPs is possibly due to both enhanced photocatalytic reactions and leached copper ions.

  15. Role of dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size on microbial inactivation of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Manoranjan; Wu, Bing; Zhu, Liying; Jacobson, Craig; Wang, Wei-Ning; Jones, Kristen; Goyal, Yogesh; Tang, Yinjie J; Biswas, Pratim

    2011-10-14

    The properties of Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) were independently controlled in a flame aerosol reactor by varying the molar feed ratios of the precursors, and by optimizing temperature and time history in the flame. The effect of the physico-chemical properties (dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size) of Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles on inactivation of Mycobacterium smegmatis (a model pathogenic bacterium) was investigated under three light conditions (complete dark, fluorescent light and UV light). The survival rate of M. smegmatis (in a minimal salt medium for 2 h) exposed to the NPs varied depending on the light irradiation conditions as well as the dopant concentrations. In dark conditions, pristine TiO(2) showed insignificant microbial inactivation, but inactivation increased with increasing dopant concentration. Under fluorescent light illumination, no significant effect was observed for TiO(2). However, when TiO(2) was doped with copper, inactivation increased with dopant concentration, reaching more than 90% (>3 wt% dopant). Enhanced microbial inactivation by TiO(2) NPs was observed only under UV light. When TiO(2) NPs were doped with copper, their inactivation potential was promoted and the UV-resistant cells were reduced by over 99%. In addition, the microbial inactivation potential of NPs was also crystal-phase-and size-dependent under all three light conditions. A lower ratio of anatase phase and smaller sizes of Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs resulted in decreased bacterial survival. The increased inactivation potential of doped TiO(2) NPs is possibly due to both enhanced photocatalytic reactions and leached copper ions.

  16. [Catalase inactivation during storage in solution and its stabilization by polysaccharides of microbial origin].

    PubMed

    Shataeva, L K; Zaikina, N A; Samsonov, G V

    1976-01-01

    It has been experimentally shown that the rate of inactivation of pure catalase in solution does not obey the kinetics of the first order. The kinetics of denaturation taking into account partial stabilization of catalase due to the formation of intermolecular complexes of native molecules with denatured molecules has been derived. Using the equation, the rate of catalase inativation during storage in pure solutions has been calculated from the experimental data. Polysaccharides of microbial origin can also stabilize catalase. The kinetics of catalase inactivation in the system where the enzyme and polysaccharide forms a reversibly dissociating complex has been described.

  17. Effect of Surface Roughness in Model and Fresh Fruit Systems on Microbial Inactivation Efficacy of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Siddharth; Salvi, Deepti; Schaffner, Donald W; Karwe, Mukund V

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) on microbial inactivation as influenced by surface roughness of two types of surfaces: sandpaper and fresh fruit peel. Different grits of closed-coat sandpaper were selected, with their roughness (Pq) values ranging from 6 to 16 μm. Apple, orange, and cantaloupe peels were selected for roughness values that were similar to the sandpapers. The sandpapers and the fruit peel surfaces were spot inoculated with Enterobacter aerogenes (10(9) CFU/63.64 cm(2)) and exposed to CAPP for 492 s. Similar microbial enumeration techniques were used for both systems to quantify the microbial inactivation. The smoothest sandpaper showed a 0.52-log higher inactivation of E. aerogenes (2.08 log CFU/63.64 cm(2) sandpaper surface inactivation) than did the roughest sandpaper (1.56 log CFU/63.64 cm(2) sandpaper surface inactivation), and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The smoothest fresh fruit peel surface (apple) showed a 1.25-log higher inactivation of the microorganism (1.86 log CFU/63.64 cm(2) fruit peel surface inactivation) than did the roughest fresh fruit peel surface (cantaloupe; 0.61 log CFU/63.64 cm(2) fruit peel surface inactivation), and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). As the surface roughness increased, microbial inactivation efficacy of CAPP decreased for both systems. The results from sandpaper show that, in a scenario in which the surface roughness was the only parameter of difference, the microbial inactivation efficacy of CAPP decreased with increasing surface roughness. The results from fruit surfaces show high variability and were not directly predictable from the sandpaper data. This suggests that the microbial inactivation efficacy of CAPP in real-world food systems, such as on fresh fruit peels, is affected by factors in addition to surface roughness.

  18. The Gauss-Eyring model: A new thermodynamic model for biochemical and microbial inactivation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mastwijk, H C; Timmermans, R A H; Van Boekel, M A J S

    2017-12-15

    A new primary model has been developed, using Gaussian distributed populations and Eyrings rate constant for the transition state, to describe inactivation kinetics of enzymes and micro-organisms subjected to heat and chemical treatment. The inactivation of both enzymes and micro-organisms could be associated with the irreversible transition to an inactivated state, as suggested by the Lumry-Eyring model for protein denaturation and enzyme inactivation. The characteristic inactivation model parameters, standard activation enthalpy and entropy, are directly related to the reference temperature and Z-value commonly used for kinetic analysis in food microbiology. An essential feature of the kinetic model is that its parameters, and hence the transition temperature, are treated as stochastic variables. The characteristic line shape of the primary model is the log-normal distribution. The performance of the model was validated, using literature data for enzyme and microbial inactivation over a wide range of temperature and pH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivation of microbial arginine deiminases by L-canavanine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Li, Zhimin; Chen, Danqi; Lu, Xuefeng; Feng, Xiaohua; Wright, Elizabeth C; Solberg, Nathan O; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Mariano, Patrick S; Galkin, Andrey; Kulakova, Liudmila; Herzberg, Osnat; Green-Church, Kari B; Zhang, Liwen

    2008-02-13

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) catalyzes the hydrolytic conversion of L-arginine to ammonia and L-citrulline as part of the energy-producing L-arginine degradation pathway. The chemical mechanism for ADI catalysis involves initial formation and subsequent hydrolysis of a Cys-alkylthiouronium ion intermediate. The structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ADI-(L-arginine) complex guided the design of arginine analogs that might react with the ADIs to form inactive covalent adducts during catalytic turnover. One such candidate is L-canavanine, in which an N-methylene of L-arginine is replaced by an N-O. This substance was shown to be a slow substrate-producing O-ureido-L-homoserine. An in depth kinetic and mass spectrometric analysis of P. aeruginosa ADI inhibition by L-canavanine showed that two competing pathways are followed that branch at the Cys-alkylthiouronium ion intermediate. One pathway leads to direct formation of O-ureido-L-homoserine via a reactive thiouronium intermediate. The other pathway leads to an inactive form of the enzyme, which was shown by chemical model and mass spectrometric studies to be a Cys-alkylisothiourea adduct. This adduct undergoes slow hydrolysis to form O-ureido-L-homoserine and regenerated enzyme. In contrast, kinetic and mass spectrometric investigations demonstrate that the Cys-alkylthiouronium ion intermediate formed in the reaction of L-canavanine with Bacillus cereus ADI partitions between the product forming pathway (O-ureido-L-homoserine and free enzyme) and an inactivation pathway that leads to a stable Cys-alkylthiocarbamate adduct. The ADIs from Escherichia coli, Burkholderia mallei, and Giardia intestinalis were examined in order to demonstrate the generality of the L-canavanine slow substrate inhibition and to distinguish the kinetic behavior that defines the irreversible inhibition observed with the B. cereus ADI from the time controlled inhibition observed with the P. aeruginosa, E. coli, B. mallei, and G. intestinalis ADIs.

  20. Microbial Inactivation in the Liquid Phase Induced by Multigas Plasma Jet.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Sasaki, Yota; Hidekazu, Miyahara; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Ito, Norihiko; Kohno, Masahiro; Azuma, Takeshi; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Various gas atmospheric nonthermal plasmas were generated using a multigas plasma jet to treat microbial suspensions. Results indicated that carbon dioxide and nitrogen plasma had high sterilization effects. Carbon dioxide plasma, which generated the greatest amount of singlet oxygen than other gas plasmas, killed general bacteria and some fungi. On the other hand, nitrogen plasma, which generated the largest amount of OH radical, killed ≥ 6 log of 11 species of microorganisms, including general bacteria, fungi, acid-fast bacteria, spores, and viruses in 1-15 min. To identify reactive species responsible for bacterial inactivation, antioxidants were added to bacterial suspensions, which revealed that singlet oxygen and OH radicals had greatest inactivation effects.

  1. High pressure and freezing temperature effect on quality and microbial inactivation of cured pork carpaccio.

    PubMed

    Realini, C E; Guàrdia, M D; Garriga, M; Pérez-Juan, M; Arnau, J

    2011-07-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP: 0, 400, and 600 MPa) and freezing temperature (-15° vs. -35°C) were evaluated on the quality and microbial inactivation of cured pork carpaccio. Samples treated with HHP resulted in lighter and yellower color, higher Chroma, shear force, scores for pink color, cooked and gel appearance, incidence of iridescence, lower scores for brightness and raw meat appearance and lower levels of lactic acid bacteria and psychrotrophs during shelf life compared with untreated samples (P<0.05). Treating carpaccio at -35°C resulted in a darker color and a more tender carpaccio with a higher rating for crumbliness and lower rating for fibrousness and chewiness compared with -15°C (P<0.05). While HHP is effective in microbial inactivation and shelf life extension of pork carpaccio, product quality may be decreased due to lower tenderness and poorer appearance. However, HHP in combination with low freezing temperature can be used successfully to deliver high quality pork carpaccio with extended shelf life to the ready-to-eat market.

  2. Dynamic mathematical model to predict microbial growth and inactivation during food processing.

    PubMed Central

    Van Impe, J F; Nicolaï, B M; Martens, T; De Baerdemaeker, J; Vandewalle, J

    1992-01-01

    Many sigmoidal functions to describe a bacterial growth curve as an explicit function of time have been reported in the literature. Furthermore, several expressions have been proposed to model the influence of temperature on the main characteristics of this growth curve: maximum specific growth rate, lag time, and asymptotic level. However, as the predictive value of such explicit models is most often guaranteed only at a constant temperature within the temperature range of microbial growth, they are less appropriate in optimization studies of a whole production and distribution chain. In this paper a dynamic mathematical model--a first-order differential equation--has been derived, describing the bacterial population as a function of both time and temperature. Furthermore, the inactivation of the population at temperatures above the maximum temperature for growth has been incorporated. In the special case of a constant temperature, the solution coincides exactly with the corresponding Gompertz model, which has been validated in several recent reports. However, the main advantage of this dynamic model is its ability to deal with time-varying temperatures, over the whole temperature range of growth and inactivation. As such, it is an essential building block in (time-saving) simulation studies to design, e.g., optimal temperature-time profiles with respect to microbial safety of a production and distribution chain of chilled foods. PMID:1444404

  3. Hydrothermal treatment for inactivating some hygienic microbial indicators from food waste-amended animal feed.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yiying; Chen, Ting; Li, Huan

    2012-07-01

    To achieve the hygienic safety of food waste used as animal feed, a hydrothermal treatment process of 60-110 degrees C for 10-60 min was applied on the separated food waste from a university canteen. Based on the microbial analysis of raw waste, the inactivation of hygienic indicators of Staphylococcus aureus (SA), total coliform (TC), total aerobic plate counts (TPC), and molds and yeast (MY) were analyzed during the hydrothermal process. Results showed that indicators' concentrations were substantially reduced after hydrothermal treatment, with a greater reduction observed when the waste was treated with a higher temperature and pressure and a longer ramping time. The 110 degrees C hydrothermal treatment for 60 min was sufficient to disinfect food waste as animal feed from the viewpoint of hygienic safety. Results obtained so far indicate that hydrothermal treatment can significantly decrease microbial indicators' concentrations but does not lead to complete sterilization, because MY survived even after 60 min treatment at 110 degrees C. The information from the present study will contribute to the microbial risk control of food waste-amended animal feed, to cope with legislation on food or feed safety.

  4. Relating nanomaterial properties and microbial toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials are meeting diverse needs in consumer and industrial products. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are among the most commonly used materials and their potential for adversely affecting environmental systems raises concern. Complex microbial consortia underlie environmental processes, and the potential toxicity of nanoparticles to microbial systems, and the consequent impacts on trophic balances, is particularly worrisome. The diverse array of metal and metal oxides, the different sizes and shapes that can be prepared and the variety of possible surface coatings complicate toxicity assessments. Further complicating toxicity interpretations are the diversity of microbial systems and their metabolic capabilities. Here, we review various studies focused on nanoparticle-microbial interactions in an effort to correlate the physical-chemical properties of engineered metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to their biological response. Gaining a predictive understanding of nanoparticle toxicity, based on the physical-chemical properties of the material, will be key to the design and responsible use of nanotechnologies. General conclusions regarding the parent material of the nanoparticle and nanoparticle s size and shape on potential toxicity can be made. However, the surface coating of the material, which can be altered significantly by environmental conditions, can ameliorate or promote microbial toxicity. Understanding nanoparticle transformations and how the nanoparticle surface can be designed to control toxicity represents a key area for further study. Additionally, the vast array of microbial species and their intrinsic metabolic capabilities complicates extrapolations of nanoparticle toxicity. A molecular-based understanding of the various microbial responses to nanoparticle-induced stress is needed. Ultimately, to interpret the effect and eventual fate of engineered materials in the environment, an understanding of the relationship between nanoparticle

  5. Microbial inactivation and shelf life of apple juice treated with high pressure carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Ferrentino, Giovanna; Bruno, Mariacarmela; Ferrari, Giovanna; Poletto, Massimo; Balaban, Murat O

    2009-01-01

    Apple juice prepared from 'Annurca' apple puree was treated with a HPCD batch system. The pH, °Brix, color parameters and microbial load of the treated apple juice were compared with those of thermally processed juice. Thermal processes were carried out at 35, 50, 65, 85°C and treatment times ranging between 10 and 140 minutes. Microbial inactivation kinetics indicated that 5-log reduction of natural flora in apple juice was achieved at 85°C and 60 minutes of treatment time for conventional thermal process and at 16.0 MPa, 60°C and 40 minutes for HPCD process. Results suggested that temperature played a fundamental role on HPCD treatment efficiency, with inactivation significantly enhanced when it increased from 35 to 60°C. Less significant was the role of the pressure at the tested levels of 7.0, 13.0 and 16.0 MPa. Also, 5-log reduction of natural flora in apple juice was obtained at lower temperatures by cyclic treatments of six compression and decompression steps. There were no significant differences between treated and untreated samples in °Brix (α = 0.05). Significant differences were detected in pH values between the untreated and HPCD treated samples (α = 0.05). There was a significant decrease in 'L*' and 'b*' values and also differences were detected in 'a*' values between the untreated and the HPCD treated samples (α = 0.05). Statistical analysis for °Brix, pH and color data showed no differences between the untreated and HPCD treated samples in the first 2 weeks of storage at 4°C. These results emphasize the potential use of HPCD in industrial applications. PMID:19193225

  6. Regression model for estimating inactivation of microbial aerosols by solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Sagripanti, Jose-Luis

    2013-01-01

    The inactivation of pathogenic aerosols by solar radiation is relevant to public health and biodefense. We investigated whether a relatively simple method to calculate solar diffuse and total irradiances could be developed and used in environmental photobiology estimations instead of complex atmospheric radiative transfer computer programs. The second-order regression model that we developed reproduced 13 radiation quantities calculated for equinoxes and solstices at 35(°) latitude with a computer-intensive and rather complex atmospheric radiative transfer program (MODTRAN) with a mean error <6% (2% for most radiation quantities). Extending the application of the regression model from a reference latitude and date (chosen as 35° latitude for 21 March) to different latitudes and days of the year was accomplished with variable success: usually with a mean error <15% (but as high as 150% for some combination of latitudes and days of year). This accuracy of the methodology proposed here compares favorably to photobiological experiments where the microbial survival is usually measured with an accuracy no better than ±0.5 log10 units. The approach and equations presented in this study should assist in estimating the maximum time during which microbial pathogens remain infectious after accidental or intentional aerosolization in open environments.

  7. A Gompertz Model Approach to Microbial Inactivation Kinetics by High-Pressure Processing (HPP): Model Selection and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Serment-Moreno, Vinicio; Fuentes, Claudio; Torres, José Antonio; Welti-Chanes, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    A recently proposed Gompertz model (GMPZ) approach describing microbial inactivation kinetics by high-pressure processing (HPP) incorporated the initial microbial load (N0 ) and lower microbial quantification limit (Nlim ), and simplified the dynamic effects of come-up time (CUT). The inactivation of Listeria innocua in milk by HPP treatments at 300, 400, 500, and 600 MPa and pressure holding times (thold ) ≤10 min was determined experimentally to validate this model approach. Models based on exponential, logistic-exponential, and inverse functions were evaluated to describe the effect of pressure on the lag time (λ) and maximum inactivation rate (μmax ), whereas the asymptote difference (A) was fixed as A = log10 (N0 /Nlim ). Model performance was statistically evaluated and further validated with additional data obtained at 450 and 550 MPa. All GMPZ models adequately fitted L. innocua data according to the coefficient of determination (R(2 ) ≥ 0.95) but those including a logistic-exponential function for μmax (P) were superior (R(2 ) ≥ 0.97). These GMPZ versions predicted that approximately 597 MPa is the theoretical pressure level (Pλ ) at which microbial inactivation begins during CUT, mathematically defined as λ (P = Pλ ) = tCUT , and matching the value observed on the microbial survival curve at 600 MPa. As pressure increased, predictions tended to slightly underestimate the HPP lethality in the tail section of the survival curve. This may be overseen in practice since the observed microbial counts were below the predicted log10 N values. Overall, the modeling approach is promising, justifying further validation work for other microorganisms and food systems. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Ultrarapid delayed rectifier current inactivation in human atrial myocytes: properties and consequences.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Nattel, S

    1998-11-01

    The ultrarapid delayed rectifier current (IK,ur) plays a significant role in human atrial repolarization and is generally believed to show little rate dependence because of slow and partial inactivation. This study was designed to evaluate in detail the properties and consequences of IK,ur inactivation in isolated human atrial myocytes. IK,ur inactivated with a biexponential time course and a half-inactivation voltage of -7.5 +/- 0.6 mV (mean +/- SE), with complete inactivation during 50-s pulses to voltages positive to +10 mV (37 degreesC). Recovery from inactivation proceeded slowly, with time constants of 0.42 +/- 0.06 and 7.9 +/- 0.9 s at -80 mV (37 degreesC). Substantial frequency dependence was observed at 37 degreesC over a clinically relevant range of frequencies. Inactivation was faster and occurred at more positive voltages at 37 degreesC compared with room temperature. The voltage and time dependencies of Kv1.5 inactivation were studied in Xenopus oocytes to avoid overlapping currents and strongly resembled those of IK,ur in native myocytes. We conclude that, while IK,ur inactivation is slow, it is extensive, and slow recovery from inactivation confers important frequency dependence with significant consequences for understanding the role of IK,ur in human atrial repolarization.

  9. Optimization of supercritical carbon dioxide treatment for the inactivation of the natural microbial flora in cubed cooked ham.

    PubMed

    Ferrentino, Giovanna; Balzan, Sara; Spilimbergo, Sara

    2013-02-15

    This study aims to investigate the effects of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO₂) treatment on the inactivation of the natural microbial flora in cubed cooked ham. Response surface methodology with a central composite design was applied to determine the optimal process conditions and investigate the effect of three independent variables (pressure, temperature and treatment time). Additionally, analyses of texture, pH and color together with a storage study of the product were performed to determine its microbial and qualitative stability. Response surface analysis revealed that 12 MPa, 50 °C, 5 min were the optimal conditions to obtain about 3.0, 1.6, and 2.5 Log(CFU/g) reductions of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrophilic bacteria and lactic acid bacteria respectively. Inactivation to undetectable levels of yeasts and molds and coliforms was also obtained. A storage study of 30 days at 4 °C was carried out on the treated product (12 MPa, 50 °C, 5 min) monitoring microbial growth, pH, texture, and color parameters (L*, a*, b* and ΔE). Microbial loads slightly increased and after 30 days of storage reached the same levels detected in the fresh product. Color parameters (L*, a*, b*) showed slight variations while pH and texture did not change significantly. On the basis of the results obtained, SC-CO₂ can be considered a promising technique to microbiologically stabilize cubed cooked ham and, in general, cut/sliced meat products without affecting its quality attributes.

  10. Microbial effect on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Alex; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Rosenkranz, Hella; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Although largely ignored, the soil contains large amount of biofilms (attached microbes) that can affect many processes. While biochemical processes are studied, biophysical processes receive only little attention. Biofilms may occupy some of the pore space, and by that affect the soil hydraulic properties. This effect on unsaturated soils, however, was not intensively studied. In this research we directly measure the hydraulic properties, namely the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve, for soils containing real biofilm. To do that we inoculate soil with biofilm-forming bacteria and incubate it with sufficient amounts of nutrient until biofilm is formed. The hydraulic properties of the incubated soil are then measured using several techniques, including multi-step outflow and evaporation method. The longer measurements (evaporation method) are conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. The results show a clear effect of the biofilm, where the biofilm-affected soil (sandy loam in our case) behaves like a much finer soil. This qualitatively makes sense as the biofilm generates an effective pore size distribution that is characterized by smaller pores. However, the effect is much more complex and needs to be studied carefully considering (for example) dual porosity models. We compare our preliminary results with other experiments, including flow-through column experiments and experiments with biofilm analogues. Clearly a better understanding of the way microbial activity alters the hydraulic properties may help designing more efficient bioremediation, irrigation, and other soil-related processes.

  11. Production, purification and properties of microbial phytases.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Szakacs, G; Soccol, C R; Rodriguez-Leon, J A; Soccol, V T

    2001-05-01

    Phytases (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.8) catalyse the release of phosphate from phytate (mycoinositol hexakiphosphate). Several cereal grains, legumes and oilseeds, etc., store phosphorus as phytate. Environmental pollution due to the high-phosphate manure, resulting in the accumulation of P at various locations has raised serious concerns. Phytases appear of significant value in effectively controlling P pollution. They can be produced from a host of sources including plants, animals and micro-organisms. Microbial sources, however, are promising for their commercial exploitations. Strains of Aspergillus sp., chiefly A. ficuum and A. niger have most commonly been employed for industrial purposes. Phytases are considered as a monomeric protein, generally possessing a molecular weight between 40 and 100 kDa. They show broad substrate specificity and have generally pH and temperature optima around 4.5-6.0 and 45-60 degrees C. The crystal structure of phytase has been determined at 2.5 A resolution. Immobilization of phytase has been found to enhance its thermostability. This article reviews recent trends on the production, purification and properties of microbial phytases.

  12. Control of aerosol contaminants in indoor air: combining the particle concentration reduction with microbial inactivation.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin; Honda, Takeshi; Kim, Ki Youn; Toivola, Mika; Rao, K S Ramchander; Reponen, Tiina

    2007-01-15

    An indoor air purification technique, which combines unipolar ion emission and photocatalytic oxidation (promoted by a specially designed RCI cell), was investigated in two test chambers, 2.75 m3 and 24.3 m3, using nonbiological and biological challenge aerosols. The reduction in particle concentration was measured size selectively in real-time, and the Air Cleaning Factor and the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) were determined. While testing with virions and bacteria, bioaerosol samples were collected and analyzed, and the microorganism survival rate was determined as a function of exposure time. We observed that the aerosol concentration decreased approximately 10 to approximately 100 times more rapidly when the purifier operated as compared to the natural decay. The data suggest that the tested portable unit operating in approximately 25 m3 non-ventilated room is capable to provide CADR-values more than twice as great than the conventional closed-loop HVAC system with a rating 8 filter. The particle removal occurred due to unipolar ion emission, while the inactivation of viable airborne microorganisms was associated with photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 90% of initially viable MS2 viruses were inactivated resulting from 10 to 60 min exposure to the photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 75% of viable B. subtilis spores were inactivated in 10 min, and about 90% or greater after 30 min. The biological and chemical mechanisms that led to the inactivation of stress-resistant airborne viruses and bacterial spores were reviewed.

  13. Enzymatic inactivation and antioxidant properties of blackberry juice after thermoultrasound: Optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Elizarrarás, Alicia; Piloni-Martini, Javier; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther; Alanís-García, Ernesto; Güemes-Vera, Norma; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos Alberto; Zafra-Rojas, Quinatzin Yadira; Cruz-Cansino, Nelly Del Socorro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to optimize the thermoultrasound conditions for blackberry juice using the response surface methodology and considering juice quality parameters and antioxidant capacity. With the exception of microbial growth, the response variables showed high correlation coefficients with the mathematical model (R(2)adj>0.91). Thermoultrasound treatment inactivated all the evaluated microorganisms, and at the optimum conditions (50±1°C at 17±1min) it increased enzyme inactivation and antioxidant activity in comparison to pasteurized juice. The results demonstrated that thermoultrasound can be an alternative to pasteurization for the production of safe and high-quality juices with the added value of higher concentration of bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity.

  14. Impact of food model (micro)structure on the microbial inactivation efficacy of cold atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Smet, C; Noriega, E; Rosier, F; Walsh, J L; Valdramidis, V P; Van Impe, J F

    2017-01-02

    The large potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) for food decontamination has recently been recognized. Room-temperature gas plasmas can decontaminate foods without causing undesired changes. This innovative technology is a promising alternative for treating fresh produce. However, more fundamental studies are needed before its application in the food industry. The impact of the food structure on CAP decontamination efficacy of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes was studied. Cells were grown planktonically or as surface colonies in/on model systems. Both microorganisms were grown in lab culture media in petri dishes at 20°C until cells reached the stationary phase. Before CAP treatment, cells were deposited in a liquid carrier, on a solid(like) surface or on a filter. A dielectric barrier discharge reactor generated helium-oxygen plasma, which was used to treat samples up to 10min. Although L. monocytogenes is more resistant to CAP treatment, similar trends in inactivation behavior as for S. Typhimurium are observed, with log reductions in the range [1.0-2.9] for S. Typhimurium and [0.2-2.2] for L. monocytogenes. For both microorganisms, cells grown planktonically are easily inactivated, as compared to surface colonies. More stressing growth conditions, due to cell immobilization, result in more resistant cells during CAP treatment. The main difference between the inactivation support systems is the absence or presence of a shoulder phase. For experiments in the liquid carrier, which exhibit a long shoulder, the plasma components need to diffuse and penetrate through the medium. This explains the higher efficacies of CAP treatment on cells deposited on a solid(like) surface or on a filter. This research demonstrates that the food structure influences the cell inactivation behavior and efficacy of CAP, and indicates that food intrinsic factors need to be accounted when designing plasma treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Effects of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs) on microbial and enzyme inactivation of apple juice.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Merve Pelvan; Ünlütürk, Sevcan

    2017-11-02

    In this study, the effects of Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) on the inactivation of E. coli K12 (ATCC 25253), an indicator organism of E. coli O157:H7, and polyphneoloxidase (PPO) in cloudy apple juice (CAJ) were investigated. The clear (AJ) and cloudy apple juice were exposed to UV rays for 40min by using a UV device composed of four UV-LEDs with peak emissions at 254 and 280nm and coupled emissions as follows: 254/365, 254/405, 280/365, 280/405 and 254/280/365/405nm. UV-LEDs at 254nm achieved 1.6±0.1 log10 CFU/mL inactivation of E. coli K12 at UV dose of 707.2mJ/cm(2). The highest inactivation of E. coli K12 (2.0±0.1log10 CFU/mL and 2.0±0.4log10CFU/mL) was achieved when the cloudy apple juice was treated with both 280nm and 280/365nm UV-LEDs. For clear apple juice the highest inactivation 4.4log10CFU/mL obtained for E. coli K12 was achieved using 4 lamps emitting light at 280nm for 40min exposure time. For the same treatment time, the experiments using a combination of lamps emitting light at 280 and 365nm (2lamp/2lamp) were resulted in 3.9±0.2log10CFU/mL reductions. UV-A and UV-C rays in combination showed a better inactivation effect on PPO than UV-C rays used separately. Residual activity of PPO in CAJ was reduced to 32.58% when treated with UV-LED in combination of UV-C (280nm) and UV-A (365nm) rays. Additionally, the total color change (ΔE) of CAJ subjected to combined UV-LED irradiation at 280/365nm was the lowest compared to other studied processing conditions. This study provides key implications for the future application of UV-LEDs to fruit juice pasteurization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Light based technologies for microbial inactivation of liquids, bead surfaces and powdered infant formula.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Cristina; Dorozko, Anna; Gaston, Edurne; O'Sullivan, Michael; Whyte, Paul; Lyng, James G

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluates the potential of continuous wave Ultraviolet C light (UV-C) and broad-spectrum intense pulsed light (in this study referred to as High Intensity Light Pulses, HILP) for the inactivation of pathogens of public concern in powdered infant formula (PIF) producers. To achieve this goal a sequential set of experiments were performed, firstly in clear liquid media, secondly on the surface of spherical beads under agitation and, finally in PIF. L. innocua was the most sensitive microorganism to both technologies under all conditions studied with reductions exceeding 4 log10 cycles in PIF. In the clear liquid medium, the maximum tolerance to light was observed for C. sakazakii against UV-C light and for B. subtilis spores against HILP, with a fluence of approximately 17 mJ/cm(2) required for a 1 log10 cycle inactivation (D value) of each species. In PIF it was possible to inactivate >99% of the vegetative cell populations by HILP with a fluence of 199 mJ/cm(2) and of B. subtilis spores by doubling the fluence. By contrast, for UV-C treatments a fluence of 2853 mJ/cm(2) was needed for 99.9% reduction of C. sakazakii, which was the most light-resistant microorganism to UV-C. Results here obtained clearly show the potential for light-based interventions to improve PIF microbiological safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An insight on the relationship between food compressibility and microbial inactivation during high pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, Noor Akhmazillah; Farid, Mohammed Mehdi; Silva, Filipa

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of high pressure liquid food compressibility on S. cerevisae inactivation. Honey with various adjusted sugar with different values of compressibility was selected as a model food. S. cerevisiae cells in different honey concentrations (0-80°Brix), 600 MPa (at ambient temperature) showed an increasing resistance to inactivation with increasing °Brix. D-values of S. cerevisiae at 200, 400 and 600 MPa, for 20 min/80°Brix were 136.99 ± 7.97, 29.24 ± 6.44 and 23.47 ± 0.86 min, respectively. These D-values resulted the Z p -value of 526 ± 39 MPa. A significant correlation (p < 0.05) of cell reduction, °Brix and compressibility was found. Cell reduction in high pressure-treated samples varied linearly with °Brix suggesting that the baroprotective effect of the food was not solely due to sugar content, but also due to its compressibility. This research could have significant implications on the success of HPP (high pressure processing) preservation of foods containing high sugar content.

  18. Inactivation of conserved genes induces microbial aversion, drug detoxification, and innate immunity in C.elegans

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Justine A.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Summary The nematode C. elegans consumes benign bacteria such as E. coli and is repelled by pathogens and toxins. Here we show that RNAi and toxin-mediated disruption of core cellular activities, including translation, respiration, and protein turnover, stimulates behavioral avoidance of attractive E. coli. RNAi of such essential processes also induces expression of detoxification and innate immune response genes in the absence of toxins or pathogens. Disruption of core processes in non-neuronal tissues can stimulate aversion behavior, revealing a neuroendocrine axis of control. Microbial avoidance requires serotonergic and Jnk kinase signaling. We propose that surveillance pathways oversee critical cellular activities to detect pathogens, many of which deploy toxins and virulence factors to disrupt these same host pathways. Variation in cellular surveillance and endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification and immunity selected by past toxin or microbial interactions could underlie aberrant responses to foods, medicines, and microbes. PMID:22500807

  19. Structural model requirements to describe microbial inactivation during a mild heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Geeraerd, A H; Herremans, C H; Van Impe, J F

    2000-09-10

    The classical concept of D and z values, established for sterilisation processes, is unable to deal with the typical non-loglinear behaviour of survivor curves occurring during the mild heat treatment of sous vide or cook-chill food products. Structural model requirements are formulated, eliminating immediately some candidate model types. Promising modelling approaches are thoroughly analysed and, if applicable, adapted to the specific needs: two models developed by Casolari (1988), the inactivation model of Sapru et al. (1992), the model of Whiting (1993), the Baranyi and Roberts growth model (1994), the model of Chiruta et al. (1997), the model of Daughtry et al. (1997) and the model of Xiong et al. (1999). A range of experimental data of Bacillus cereus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactobacillus sake are used to illustrate the different models' performances. Moreover, a novel modelling approach is developed, fulfilling all formulated structural model requirements, and based on a careful analysis of literature knowledge of the shoulder and tailing phenomenon. Although a thorough insight in the occurrence of shoulders and tails is still lacking from a biochemical point of view, this newly developed model incorporates the possibility of a straightforward interpretation within this framework.

  20. Recent progress on application of UV excilamps for degradation of organic pollutants and microbial inactivation.

    PubMed

    Matafonova, Galina; Batoev, Valeriy

    2012-10-01

    Excilamps as modern mercury-free sources of narrow-band UV radiation represent an attractive alternative in environmental applications. This review focuses on recent studies on the water and surface decontamination with excilamps by means of direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes. To date, direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as UV/H(2)O(2), UV/Fenton and UV/O(3) have been applied for degradation of organic compounds (mainly, phenols, dyes and herbicides) in model aqueous solutions. Special emphasis is placed on studies combining UV irradiation (as a pre-treatment or post-treatment step) with biological treatment. In this review, the efficiencies of direct UV, UV/H(2)O(2) and UV/TiO(2) processes for inactivation of a variety of pathogenic microorganisms in water and on surfaces are discussed. The analysis of the literature shows that more works need to be done on scaling up the processes, degradation/mineralization of target pollutant(s) in real effluents and evaluation of energy requirements.

  1. Enhancement of microbial quality and inactivation of pathogenic bacteria by gamma irradiation of ready-to-cook Iranian barbecued chicken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Aziz A.; Siavash Saei-Dehkordi, S.; Rahnama, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    Ready-to-cook Iranian barbecued chicken consists of cubed chicken breast, lemon juice, salt, red pepper, onion, saffron and vegetable oil with an overall pH value of about 5.5. This product is sometimes consumed under-cooked, hence it may pose health hazards to consumers when contaminated with food-borne pathogens. In this study, the effect of gamma irradiation (0, 1.5, 3 and 4.5 kGy) on the microbial quality of ready-to-cook (RTC) barbecued chicken samples stored at 4 °C for 15 days was investigated. Moreover, the effectiveness of irradiation for inactivating Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium inoculated into the samples was also studied. Irradiation of the samples resulted in dose dependent reduction in counts of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts and molds, Enterobacteriaceae and lactic acid bacteria. Among the microbial flora, yeasts and molds and Enterobacteriaceae were more sensitive to irradiation and got completely eliminated at dose of 3 kGy. D10 values of L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. typhimurium inoculated into the samples were 0.680, 0.397 and 0.601 kGy, respectively. An irradiation dose of 3 kGy reduced the counts of E. coli O157:H7 to an undetectable level in RTC barbecued chicken but was ineffective on elimination of L. monocytogenes and S. typhimurium. However, none of the food-borne pathogens were detected in the samples irradiated at 4.5 kGy. This study showed that irradiation had no undesirable effects on the initial sensory attributes of barbecued chicken. At the end of the storage period, irradiated samples were more acceptable compared to non-irradiated ones.

  2. Marine Microbial Amylases: Properties and Applications.

    PubMed

    Suriya, J; Bharathiraja, S; Krishnan, M; Manivasagan, P; Kim, S-K

    Amylases are crucial enzymes which hydrolyze internal glycosidic linkages in starch and produce as primary products dextrins and oligosaccharides. Amylases are classified into α-amylase, β-amylase, and glucoamylase based on their three-dimensional structures, reaction mechanisms, and amino acid sequences. Amylases have innumerable applications in clinical, medical, and analytical chemistries as well as in food, detergent, textile, brewing, and distilling industries. Amylases can be produced from plants, animals, and microbial sources. Due to the advantages in microbial production, it meets commercial needs. The pervasive nature, easy production, and wide range of applications make amylase an industrially pivotal enzyme. This chapter will focus on amylases found in marine microorganisms, their potential industrial applications, and how these enzymes can be improved to the required bioprocessing conditions. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of thermal and non-thermal pasteurisation on the microbial inactivation and phenolic degradation in fruit juice: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yougui; Yu, Li Juan; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2013-03-30

    Fruit juice has been traditionally preserved by thermal pasteurisation. However, the applied heat can cause detrimental effects on health-promoting components such as phenolic compounds. Several non-thermal technologies such as membrane filtration, pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultraviolet (UV) exposure are promising methods developed for liquid food preservation. In particular, the combination of UV and PEF has proven to be more effective for microbial inactivation and maintaining nutritional quality of fruit juice compared with individual applications.

  4. Microbially safe utilization of non-inactivated oats (Avena sativa L.) for production of conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Vahvaselkä, Marjatta; Lehtinen, Pekka; Laakso, Simo

    2006-02-08

    A microbially safe process for the enrichment of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in oats was developed. The process consists of hydrolysis of oat lipids by non-inactivated oat flour, followed by propionibacterium-catalyzed isomerization of the resulting free linoleic acid to CLA. The first stage was performed at water activity (a(w)) 0.7, where hydrolysis of triacylglycerols progressed efficiently without growth of the indigenous microflora of flour. Thereafter, the flour was incubated as a 5% (w/v) aqueous, sterilized slurry with Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii. The amount of CLA produced in 20 h was 11.5 mg/g dry matter corresponding to 116 mg/g lipids or 0.57 mg/mL slurry. The oat flour had also the capability to hydrolyze exogenous oils at a(w) 0.7. Sunflower oil, added to increase linoleic acid content in triacylglycerols 2.7-fold, was hydrolyzed rapidly. Isomerization of this oil-supplemented flour as a 5% slurry gave final CLA content of 22.3 mg/g dry matter after 50 h of fermentation, corresponding to 118 mg/g lipids or 1.14 mg/mL slurry. Storage stability of CLA in fermented oat slurries at 4 degrees C was good.

  5. Soil microbial properties under different vegetation types on Mountain Han.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Qu, Laiye; Ma, Keming; Yuan, Xiu

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of broadleaf and conifer vegetation on soil microbial communities in a distinct vertical distribution belt in Northeast China. Soil samples were taken at 0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm depths from four vegetation types at different altitudes, which were characterized by poplar (Populus davidiana) (1250-1300 m), poplar (P. davidiana) mixed with birch (Betula platyphylla) (1370-1550 m), birch (B. platyphylla) (1550-1720 m), and larch (Larix principis-rupprechtii) (1840-1890 m). Microbial biomass and community structure were determined using the fumigation-extraction method and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, and soil fungal community level physiological profiles (CLPP) were characterized using Biolog FF Microplates. It was found that soil properties, especially soil organic carbon and water content, contributed significantly to the variations in soil microbes. With increasing soil depth, the soil microbial biomass, fungal biomass, and fungal catabolic ability diminished; however, the ratio of fungi to bacteria increased. The fungal ratio was higher under larch forests compared to that under poplar, birch, and their mixed forests, although the soil microbial biomass was lower. The direct contribution of vegetation types to the soil microbial community variation was 12%. If the indirect contribution through soil organic carbon was included, variations in the vegetation type had substantial influences on soil microbial composition and diversity.

  6. The effect of electrode material on the generation of oxidants and microbial inactivation in the electrochemical disinfection processes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonseon; Kim, Choonsoo; Yoon, Jeyong

    2009-03-01

    Electrochemical disinfection has gained increasing attention as an alternative for conventional drinking water treatment due to its high effectiveness and environmental compatibility. The most common method of electrochemical disinfection is the use of electro-generated oxidants, such as active chlorine and reactive oxygen species, as disinfectants. This study examined the role of electrode material on the generation of oxidants, and elucidated the different reaction pathways for generating individual oxidants by employing boron-doped diamond (BDD), Ti/RuO(2), Ti/IrO(2), Ti/Pt-IrO(2), and Pt as anode materials. The efficiency of ()OH production, as determined by para-chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA) degradation, was in the order of BDD>Ti/RuO(2) approximately Pt. No significant production of ()OH was observed at Ti/IrO(2) and Ti/Pt-IrO(2). The ()OH was found to play a key role in O(3) generation at BDD, but not at the other electrodes. The production of active chlorine was in the order of Ti/IrO(2)>Ti/RuO(2)>Ti/Pt-IrO(2)>BDD>Pt. The large difference in this order from that of ROS was attributed to the difference in the electrocatalytic activity of each electrode material toward the production of active chlorine, as evidenced by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) measurements. In addition, the characteristics of microbial inactivation as a function of electrode material were examined under the presence of an inert electrolyte, using Escherichia coli as an indicator microorganism.

  7. Inactivation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG by fixation modifies its probiotic properties.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, C; Kubiak, P; Grajek, W; Schmidt, M T

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms that have beneficial effects on the host and are safe for oral intake in a suitable dose. However, there are situations in which the administration of living microorganisms poses a risk for immunocompromised host. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of several fixation methods on selected biological properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG that are relevant to its probiotic action. Fixation of the bacterial cells with ethanol, 2-propanol, glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde, and heat treatment resulted in a significant decrease of alkaline phosphatase, peroxidase, and β-galactosidase activities. Most of the fixation procedures reduced bacterial cell hydrophobicity and increased adhesion capacity. The fixation procedures resulted in a different perception of the bacterial cells by enterocytes, which was shown as changes in gene expression in enterocytes. The results show that some procedures of inactivation allow a fraction of the enzymatic activity to be maintained. The adhesion properties of the bacterial cells were enhanced, but the response of enterocytes to fixed cells was different than to live bacteria. Inactivation allows maintenance and modification of some of the properties of the bacterial cells.

  8. High-pressure processing inactivates Listeria innocua yet compromises Queso Fresco crumbling properties.

    PubMed

    Hnosko, J; San-Martin Gonzalez, M F; Clark, S

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of high-pressure processing to inactivate Listeria innocua (a Listeria monocytogenes surrogate) in Queso Fresco, and to study the effects of the high-pressure treatment on cheese-crumbling properties. Queso Fresco was made with pasteurized, homogenized milk, lactic acid bacterial starter culture, chymosin, and flake salt. Cheeses were pressed (0.1 MPa) for 1h before crumbling and inoculation with a cocktail of 3 strains of L. innocua, and then pressed for 12 h (0.1 MPa). High-pressure processing treatments of sliced cheese rounds included pressure from 400 to 600 MPa for 1 to 25 min. Cheese sample temperatures, initially approximately 21°C, increased during pressurization and decreased gradually during the holding time. The highest temperature increase was to 23.6°C at 600 MPa. Greater than 5-log reductions occurred at set-point pressures of 500, 550, or 600 MPa when held for at least 15, 3, or 1 min, respectively. However, because inactivation was neither complete nor permanent and crumbling properties were not maintained under the conditions tested in this study, high-pressure processing is not recommended for Queso Fresco applications. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative studies on the in vitro properties of phytases from various microbial origins.

    PubMed

    Igbasan, F A; Männer, K; Miksch, G; Borriss, R; Farouk, A; Simon, O

    2000-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of six crude phytase preparations were compared. Four of these enzymes (Aspergillus A, Aspergillus R, Peniophora and Aspergillus T) were produced at commercial scale for the use as feed additives while the other two (E. coli and Bacillus) were produced at laboratory scale. The encoding genes of the enzymes were from different microbial origins (4 of fungal origin and 2 of bacterial origin, i.e., E. coli and Bacillus phytases). One of the fungal phytases (Aspergillus R) was expressed in transgenic rape. The enzymes were studied for their pH behaviour, temperature optimum and stability and resistance to protease inactivation. The phytases were found to exhibit different properties depending on source of the phytase gene and the production organism. The pH profiles of the enzymes showed that the fungal phytases had their pH optima ranging from 4.5 to 5.5. The bacterial E. coli phytase had also its pH optimum in the acidic range at pH 4.5 while the pH optimum for the Bacillus enzyme was identified at pH 7.0. Temperature optima were at 50 and 60 degrees C for the fungal and bacterial phytases, respectively. The Bacillus phytase was more thermostable in aqueous solutions than all other enzymes. In pelleting experiments performed at 60, 70 and 80 degrees C in the conditioner, Aspergillus A, Peniophora (measurement at pH 5.5) and E. coli phytases were more heat stable compared to other enzymes (Bacillus enzyme was not included). At a temperature of 70 degrees C in the conditioner, these enzymes maintained a residual activity of approximately 70% after pelleting compared to approximately 30% determined for the other enzymes. Incubation of enzyme preparations with porcine proteases revealed that only E. coli phytase was insensitive against pepsin and pancreatin. Incubation of the enzymes in digesta supernatants from various segments of the digestive tract of hens revealed that digesta from stomach inactivated the enzymes most efficiently

  10. Exploring the physicochemical properties of oxime-reactivation therapeutics for cyclosarin, sarin, tabun, and VX inactivated acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Emilio Xavier; Stouch, Terry R; Wymore, Troy; Madura, Jeffry D

    2014-01-21

    The inactivation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by organophosphorus agent (OP) compounds is a serious problem regardless of how the individual was exposed. The reactivation of OP-inactivated AChE is dependent on the OP conjugate, and commonly a specific oxime is better at reactivating a specific OP conjugate than several diverse OP conjugates. The presented research explores the physicochemical properties needed for the reactivation of OP-inactivated AChE. Four different OPs, cyclosarin, sarin, tabun, and VX, were analyzed using the same set of oxime reactivators. A trial descriptor pool of semiempirical, traditional, and molecular interaction field descriptors was used to construct an ensemble of QSAR models for each OP-conjugate pair. Based on the molecular information and the cross-validation ability, individual QSAR models were selected to be part of an OP-conjugate consensus model. The OP-conjugate specific models provide important insight into the physicochemical properties required to reactivate the OP conjugates of interest. The reactivation of AChE inactivated with either cyclosarin or tabun requires the oxime therapeutic to possess an overall polar-positive surface area. Oxime therapeutics for the reactivation of sarin-inactivated AChE are conformationally dependent while oxime reverse therapeutics for VX require a compact region with a highly hydrophilic region and two positively charged pyridine rings.

  11. Soil microbial substrate properties and microbial community responses under irrigated organic and reduced-tillage crop and forage production systems.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Rajan; Norton, Jay B; Stahl, Peter D; Norton, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Changes in soil microbiotic properties such as microbial biomass and community structure in response to alternative management systems are driven by microbial substrate quality and substrate utilization. We evaluated irrigated crop and forage production in two separate four-year experiments for differences in microbial substrate quality, microbial biomass and community structure, and microbial substrate utilization under conventional, organic, and reduced-tillage management systems. The six different management systems were imposed on fields previously under long-term, intensively tilled maize production. Soils under crop and forage production responded to conversion from monocropping to crop rotation, as well as to the three different management systems, but in different ways. Under crop production, four years of organic management resulted in the highest soil organic C (SOC) and microbial biomass concentrations, while under forage production, reduced-tillage management most effectively increased SOC and microbial biomass. There were significant increases in relative abundance of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, with two- to 36-fold increases in biomarker phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). Under crop production, dissolved organic C (DOC) content was higher under organic management than under reduced-tillage and conventional management. Perennial legume crops and organic soil amendments in the organic crop rotation system apparently favored greater soil microbial substrate availability, as well as more microbial biomass compared with other management systems that had fewer legume crops in rotation and synthetic fertilizer applications. Among the forage production management systems with equivalent crop rotations, reduced-tillage management had higher microbial substrate availability and greater microbial biomass than other management systems. Combined crop rotation, tillage management, soil amendments, and legume crops in rotations considerably influenced soil

  12. Soil Microbial Substrate Properties and Microbial Community Responses under Irrigated Organic and Reduced-Tillage Crop and Forage Production Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Rajan; Norton, Jay B.; Stahl, Peter D.; Norton, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Changes in soil microbiotic properties such as microbial biomass and community structure in response to alternative management systems are driven by microbial substrate quality and substrate utilization. We evaluated irrigated crop and forage production in two separate four-year experiments for differences in microbial substrate quality, microbial biomass and community structure, and microbial substrate utilization under conventional, organic, and reduced-tillage management systems. The six different management systems were imposed on fields previously under long-term, intensively tilled maize production. Soils under crop and forage production responded to conversion from monocropping to crop rotation, as well as to the three different management systems, but in different ways. Under crop production, four years of organic management resulted in the highest soil organic C (SOC) and microbial biomass concentrations, while under forage production, reduced-tillage management most effectively increased SOC and microbial biomass. There were significant increases in relative abundance of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, with two- to 36-fold increases in biomarker phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). Under crop production, dissolved organic C (DOC) content was higher under organic management than under reduced-tillage and conventional management. Perennial legume crops and organic soil amendments in the organic crop rotation system apparently favored greater soil microbial substrate availability, as well as more microbial biomass compared with other management systems that had fewer legume crops in rotation and synthetic fertilizer applications. Among the forage production management systems with equivalent crop rotations, reduced-tillage management had higher microbial substrate availability and greater microbial biomass than other management systems. Combined crop rotation, tillage management, soil amendments, and legume crops in rotations considerably influenced soil

  13. Microbial inactivation and shelf life comparison of 'cold' hurdle processing with pulsed electric fields and microfiltration, and conventional thermal pasteurisation in skim milk.

    PubMed

    Walkling-Ribeiro, M; Rodríguez-González, O; Jayaram, S; Griffiths, M W

    2011-01-05

    Thermal pasteurisation (TP) is the established food technology for commercial processing of milk. However, degradation of valuable nutrients in milk and its sensory characteristics occurs during TP due to substantial heat exposure. Pulsed electric fields (PEF) and microfiltration (MF) both represent emerging food processing technologies allowing gentle milk preservation at lower temperatures and shorter treatment times for similar, or better, microbial inactivation and shelf stability when applied in a hurdle approach compared to TP. Incubated raw milk was used as an inoculum for the enrichment of skim milk with native microorganisms before PEF, MF, and TP processing. Inoculated milk was PEF-processed at electric field strengths between 16 and 42 kV/cm for treatment times from 612 to 2105 μs; accounting for energy densities between 407 and 815 kJ/L, while MF was applied with a transmembrane flux of 660 L/h m². Milk was TP-treated at 75°C for 24 s. Comparing PEF, MF, and TP for the reduction of the native microbial load in milk led to a 4.6 log₁₀ CFU/mL reduction in count for TP, which was similar to 3.7 log₁₀ CFU/mL obtained by MF (P≥0.05), and more effective than the 2.5 log₁₀ CFU/mL inactivation achieved by PEF inactivation (at 815 kJ/L (P<0.05)). Combined processing with MF followed by PEF (MF/PEF) produced a 4.1 (at 407 and 632 kJ/L), 4.4 (at 668 kJ/L) and 4.8 (at 815 kJ/L) log₁₀ CFU/mL reduction in count of the milk microorganisms, which was comparable to that of TP (P≥0.05). Reversed processing (PEF/MF) achieved comparable reductions of 4.9, 5.3 and 5.7 log₁₀ CFU/mL (at 407, 632 and 668 kJ/L, respectively (P≥0.05)) and a higher inactivation of 7.1 log₁₀ (at 815 kJ/mL (P<0.05)) in milk than for TP. Microbial shelf life of PEF/MF-treated (815 kJ/L) and TP-treated milk stored at 4°C was analysed over 35 days for total aerobic; enterobacteria; yeasts and moulds; lactobacilli; psychrotroph; thermoduric psychrotroph, mesophilic

  14. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 μs) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of ˜ 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  15. Alpha-momorcharin: a ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, possessing DNA cleavage properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuzhen; Zheng, Yinzhen; Yan, Junjie; Zhu, Zhixuan; Wu, Zhihua; Ding, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) function to inhibit protein synthesis through the removal of specific adenine residues from eukaryotic ribosomal RNA and rending the 60S subunit unable to bind elongation factor 2. They have received much attention in biological and biomedical research due to their unique activities toward tumor cells, as well as the important roles in plant defense. Alpha-momorcharin (α-MC), a member of the type I family of RIPs, is rich in the seeds of Momordica charantia L. Previous studies demonstrated that α-MC is an effective antifungal and antibacterial protein. In this study, a detailed analysis of the DNase-like activity of α-MC was conducted. Results showed that the DNase-like activity toward plasmid DNA was time-dependent, temperature-related, and pH-stable. Moreover, a requirement for divalent metal ions in the catalytic domain of α-MC was confirmed. Additionally, Tyr(93) was found to be a critical residue for the DNase-like activity, while Tyr(134), Glu(183), Arg(186), and Trp(215) were activity-related residues. This study on the chemico-physical properties and mechanism of action of α-MC will improve its utilization in scientific research, as well as its potential industrial uses. These results may also assist in the characterization and elucidation of the DNase-like enzymatic properties of other RIPs.

  16. Influence of type of microorganism, food ingredients and food properties on high-pressure carbon dioxide inactivation of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Geeraerd, A H; Elst, K; Van Ginneken, L; Van Impe, J F; Devlieghere, F

    2009-02-28

    High pressure carbon dioxide (HPCD) treatment is currently considered as an attractive non-thermal process for preserving food. Industrial application of this technique requires, among others, systematic (quantitative) data on the inactivation of food relevant pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, and in-depth information on the effect that the composition and the properties of a food matrix have on the inactivation efficacy. The first objective of this study, therefore, is to evaluate and compare the HPCD susceptibility of several food pathogens and spoilage microorganisms under the same treatment conditions. In the second part, the influence of different food components (NaCl, oil, starch, whey protein and emulsifier) and food properties (pH, fluid viscosity and water activity) on the inactivation efficacy of HPCD was determined. For the first aim, a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, yeasts and spores were treated with pressurized CO(2) at 10.5 MPa and 35 degrees C during 20 min. Bacterial susceptibility towards HPCD treatments followed the sequence Gram-negative approximately Gram-positive>yeasts>spores and appeared to be related to the acid resistance of the organisms. To study the effect of different food compounds on HPCD inactivation, the reduction degree of Pseudomonas fluorescens was determined in media with and without these components at 10.5 MPa and 35 degrees C after 5 or 20 min, depending on the tested component. NaCl and the emulsifiers Tween 80 and sucrose stearate enhanced bacterial reduction, while oil reduced the bactericidal efficacy of HPCD. Starch and whey proteins did not influence inactivation. Finally, the influence of pH, fluid viscosity and water activity was investigated by determining the reduction of P. fluorescens at 10.5 MPa and 35 degrees C in suspensions from which the pH, viscosity and water activity were adjusted with respectively NaOH or HCl, gelatin or polyethylene glycol, and sucrose, NaCl or glycerol

  17. Inactivation disinfection property of Moringa Oleifera seed extract: optimization and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, M. A.; Jami, M. S.; Hammed, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the statistical optimization study of disinfection inactivation parameters of defatted Moringa oleifera seed extract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial cells. Three level factorial design was used to estimate the optimum range and the kinetics of the inactivation process was also carried. The inactivation process involved comparing different disinfection models of Chicks-Watson, Collins-Selleck and Homs models. The results from analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the statistical optimization process revealed that only contact time was significant. The optimum disinfection range of the seed extract was 125 mg/L, 30 minutes and 120rpm agitation. At the optimum dose, the inactivation kinetics followed the Collin-Selleck model with coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.6320. This study is the first of its kind in determining the inactivation kinetics of pseudomonas aeruginosa using the defatted seed extract.

  18. Properties, structure, and applications of microbial sterol esterases.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Maria Eugenia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Prieto, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    According to their substrate preferences, carboxylic ester hydrolases are organized in smaller clusters. Among them, sterol esterases (EC 3.1.1.13), also known as cholesterol esterases, act on fatty acid esters of cholesterol and other sterols in aqueous media, and are also able to catalyze synthesis by esterification or transesterification in the presence of organic solvents. Mammalian cholesterol esterases are intracellular enzymes that have been extensively studied since they are essential in lipid metabolism and cholesterol absorption, and the natural role of some microbial sterol esterases is supposed to be similar. However, besides these intracellular enzymes, a number of microbes produce extracellular sterol esterases, which show broad stability, selectivity, or wide substrate specificity, making them interesting for the industry. In spite of this, there is little information about microbial sterol esterases, and only a small amount of them have been characterized. Some of the most commercially exploited cholesterol esterases are produced by Pseudomonas species and by Candida rugosa, although in the last case they are usually described and named as "high substrate versatility lipases." From a structural point of view, most of them belong to the α/β-hydrolase superfamily and have a conserved "catalytic triad" formed by His, an acidic amino acid and a Ser residue that is located in a highly conserved GXSXG sequence. In this review, the information available on microbial sterol esterases has been gathered, taking into account their origin, production and purification, heterologous expression, structure, stability, or substrate specificity, which are the main properties that make them attractive for different applications. Moreover, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis on available sequences of cholesterol esterases has been done, including putative sequences deduced from public genomes.

  19. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M.; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy. PMID:27886076

  20. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-11-23

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy.

  1. Photo-catalytic inactivation of an Enterococcus biofilm: the anti-microbial effect of sulphated and europium-doped titanium dioxide nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Dworniczek, Ewa; Plesch, Gustav; Seniuk, Alicja; Adamski, Ryszard; Michal, Róbert; Čaplovičová, Mária

    2016-04-01

    The control and prevention of biofilm-related infections is an important public healthcare issue. Given the increasing antibiotic resistance among bacteria and fungi that cause serious infections in humans, promotion of new strategies combating microorganisms has been essential. One attractive approach to inactivate microorganisms is the use of semiconductor photo-catalysis, which has become the subject of extensive research. In this study, the bactericidal properties of four photo-catalysts, TiO₂, TiO₂-S, TiO₂-Eu and TiO₂-Eu-S, were investigated against established 24, 48, 72 and 96 h biofilms of Enterococcus The exposure of biofilms to the catalysts induced the production of superoxide radical anions. The best photo-catalytic inactivation was achieved with the TiO₂-Eu-S and TiO₂-S nanopowders and 24 h biofilms. Transmission electron microscopy images showed significant changes in the structure of the biofilm cells following photo-inactivation. The results suggest that doping with europium and modifying the surface with sulphate groups enhanced the bactericidal activity of the TiO₂ nanoparticles against enterococcal biofilms.

  2. Gamma irradiation of sorghum flour: Effects on microbial inactivation, amylase activity, fermentability, viscosity and starch granule structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukisa, Ivan M.; Muyanja, Charles M. B. K.; Byaruhanga, Yusuf B.; Schüller, Reidar B.; Langsrud, Thor; Narvhus, Judith A.

    2012-03-01

    Malted and un-malted sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) flour was gamma irradiated with a dose of 10 kGy and then re-irradiated with 25 kGy. The effects of irradiation on microbial decontamination, amylase activity, fermentability (using an amylolytic L. plantarum MNC 21 strain), starch granule structure and viscosity were determined. Standard methods were used during determinations. The 10 kGy dose had no effect on microbial load of un-malted flour but reduced that of malted flour by 3 log cycles. Re-irradiation resulted in complete decontamination. Irradiation of malt caused a significant ( p<0.05) reduction in alpha and beta amylase activity (22% and 32%, respectively). Irradiation of un-malted flour increased the rates of utilization of glucose and maltose by 53% and 100%, respectively, during fermentation. However, microbial growth, rate of lactic acid production, final lactic acid concentration and pH were not affected. Starch granules appeared normal externally even after re-irradiation, however, granules ruptured and dissolved easily after hydration and gelatinization. Production of high dry matter density porridge (200 g dry matter/L) with a viscosity of 3500 cP was achieved by irradiation of un-malted flout at 10 kGy. Gamma irradiation can be used to decontaminate flours and could be utilized to produce weaning porridge from sorghum.

  3. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  4. Effect of extrusion conditions and lipoxygenase inactivation treatment on the physical and nutritional properties of corn/cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) blends.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Moguel, Odri; Ruiz-Ruiz, Jorge; Martínez-Ayala, Alma; González, Rolando; Drago, Silvina; Betancur-Ancona, David; Chel-Guerrero, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The influence of lipoxygenase inactivation and extrusion cooking on the physical and nutritional properties of corn/cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) blends was studied. Corn was blended in an 80:15 proportion with cowpea flour treated to inactivate lipoxygenase (CI) or non-inactivated cowpea flour (CNI). Extrusion variables were temperature (150 degrees C, 165 degrees C and 180 degrees C) and moisture (15%, 17% and 19%). Based on their physical properties, the 165 degrees C/15% corn:CNI, and 165 degrees C/15% corn:CI, and 150 degrees C/15% corn:CI blends were chosen for nutritional quality analysis. Extrudate chemical composition indicated high crude protein levels compared with standard corn-based products. With the exception of lysine, essential amino acids content in the three treatments met FAO requirements. Extrusion and lipoxygenase inactivation are promising options for developing corn/cowpea extruded snack products with good physical properties and nutritional quality.

  5. Microbial biosurfactants with their high-value functional properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial world is a rich source for finding valuable industrial chemicals and ingredients. Specifically, many microbial metabolites are surface-active compounds that can be developed into bio-based surfactants, detergents, and emulsifiers. Techno-economic analyses for the production of bio-based ...

  6. Microbial and chemical properties of log ponds along the Oregon Coast.

    Treesearch

    Iwan Ho; Ching Yan. Li

    1987-01-01

    The microbial and chemical properties of log ponds along the Oregon coast were investigated. The log ponds were highly eutrophic, containing high concentrations of ammonium and nitrate nitrogen, phosphate, and organic compounds. Because of large microbial populations, the biochemical oxygen demand was high and dissolved oxygen was low. Bacterial species in log ponds...

  7. Pathogen Inactivating Properties and Increased Sensitivity in Molecular Diagnostics by PAXgene, a Novel Non-Crosslinking Tissue Fixative

    PubMed Central

    Loibner, Martina; Buzina, Walter; Viertler, Christian; Groelz, Daniel; Hausleitner, Anja; Siaulyte, Gintare; Kufferath, Iris; Kölli, Bettina; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Background Requirements on tissue fixatives are getting more demanding as molecular analysis becomes increasingly relevant for routine diagnostics. Buffered formaldehyde in pathology laboratories for tissue fixation is known to cause chemical modifications of biomolecules which affect molecular testing. A novel non-crosslinking tissue preservation technology, PAXgene Tissue (PAXgene), was developed to preserve the integrity of nucleic acids in a comparable way to cryopreservation and also to preserve morphological features comparable to those of formalin fixed samples. Methods Because of the excellent preservation of biomolecules by PAXgene we investigated its pathogen inactivation ability and biosafety in comparison to formalin by in-vitro testing of bacteria, human relevant fungi and human cytomegalovirus (CMV). Guidelines for testing disinfectants served as reference for inactivation assays. Furthermore, we tested the properties of PAXgene for detection of pathogens by PCR based assays. Results All microorganisms tested were similarly inactivated by PAXgene and formalin except Clostridium sporogenes, which remained viable in seven out of ten assays after PAXgene treatment and in three out of ten assays after formalin fixation. The findings suggest that similar biosafety measures can be applied for PAXgene and formalin fixed samples. Detection of pathogens in PCR-based diagnostics using two CMV assays resulted in a reduction of four to ten quantification cycles of PAXgene treated samples which is a remarkable increase of sensitivity. Conclusion PAXgene fixation might be superior to formalin fixation when molecular diagnostics and highly sensitive detection of pathogens is required in parallel to morphology assessment. PMID:26974150

  8. Polyomavirus inactivation - a review.

    PubMed

    Nims, Raymond W; Plavsic, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Polyomavirus inactivation has been studied since the 1950s when it became apparent that certain polio vaccines were contaminated with SV40. Relatively high temperatures (≥70 °C) are required to effect thermal inactivation of the polyomaviruses. The chemical inactivants that are effective (β-propiolactone, ethanol, sodium hydroxide, and formaldehyde) are those that have displayed efficacy for other small, non-enveloped viruses, such as the circoviruses. Low pH inactivation can be effective, especially at pH at or below 3 and at higher temperatures. Polyomaviruses are more resistant to UV-C irradiation than are other small non-enveloped viruses such as the parvoviruses and caliciviruses. The efficacy of photodynamic inactivation of polyomaviruses is very much dye-dependent, with toluidine blue, acridine orange, and methylene blue dyes being effective photosensitizers. Ionizing radiation can be effective, depending on the conditions employed and the inactivation matrix. Inactivation of the oncogenic properties of the polyomaviruses may require higher doses of inactivant than those required to inactivate infectivity. While the polyomaviruses are considered to be highly resistant to inactivation, the degree of resistance is dependent upon the specific approach under consideration. For certain approaches, such as UV-C and gamma-irradiation, the polyomaviruses appear to be more resistant than other small non-enveloped viruses. Copyright © 2012 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigating the impact of microbial interactions with geologic media on geophysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Caroline Ann

    The goals of this study were to investigate the effect of: (1) microbial metabolic byproducts, microbial growth, and biofilm formation on the low frequency electrical properties of porous media, (2) biofilm formation on acoustic wave properties, and (3) the natural electrical (self-potential) signatures associated with an in-situ biological permeable reactive barrier (PRB). The results suggest: (1) increases in electrolytic conductivity are consistent with increased concentrations of organic acids and biosurfactants; (2) mineral weathering promoted by organic acids causes increases in electrolytic conductivity, concomitant with increases in major cation concentrations; (3) interfacial conductivity generally parallels microbial cell concentrations and biofilm formation; (4) variations in microbial growth and biofilms causes spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the elastic properties of porous media; (5) SP signatures associated with the injection of groundwater into an in-situ biological PRB are dominated by diffusion potentials induced by the injections. The results suggest that electrolytic conductivity may be useful as an indicator of metabolism, while interfacial conductivity may be used as proxy indicator for microbial growth and biofilm formation in porous media. In addition, acoustic measurements may provide diagnostic spatiotemporal data for the validation of bioclogging models/simulations. Collectively, this study provides further evidence that geophysical measurements are sensitive to microbial-induced changes to geologic media, and may be useful for the detection and monitoring of subsurface microbial growth, activity, and distribution such as in microbial enhanced oil recovery, assessing biofilm barriers used for contaminant remediation, or as sealants for reservoirs in CO2 sequestration studies.

  10. Properties of Calanus finmarchicus biomass during frozen storage after heat inactivation of autolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bergvik, Maria; Overrein, Ingrid; Bantle, Michael; Evjemo, Jan Ove; Rustad, Turid

    2012-05-01

    Calanus finmarchicus is a marine zooplankton of interest for the aquaculture industry, as well as for nutraceuticals and the cosmetic industry. The chemical composition of C. finmarchicus rapidly changes postmortem due to autolytic processes; in particular phospholipids rapidly degrade to give free fatty acids. The aim of this study was to inactivate autolytic enzymes in C. finmarchicus by applying heat (72°C, 5-30min) through mixing with boiling, fresh water, and further to explore the effects of heat (70°C, 15min) combined with long time storage (-20°C, 12months) of treated and untreated material. Heat treatment (5min) inactivated all tested enzymes and maintained the initial amount of phospholipids, total lipids and crude protein. Storage of untreated material led to complete degradation of all phospholipids, whereas heat treatment resulted in a stable product containing the initial amount of phospholipids and astaxanthin.

  11. Effects of microbial processes on electrolytic and interfacial electrical properties of unconsolidated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aal, Gamal Z.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Slater, Lee D.; Atekwana, Eliot A.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of microbial processes on electrical properties of unconsolidated sediments was investigated in a laboratory experiment consisting of biotic and abiotic sand columns. The biotic column (nutrient, diesel and bacteria) showed (a) temporal increase in the real, imaginary, and surface conductivity, and (b) temporal decrease in the formation factor. The abiotic columns (nutrient; and nutrient and diesel) showed no significant changes. Increase in microbial population numbers, decrease in organic carbon source, nitrate, and sulfate and increase in dissolved inorganic carbon and fluid conductivity were indicative of microbial activity in the biotic column. We also measure relative increase in the interfacial electrical properties that exceed relative increase in the electrolytic conductivity. Thus changes in the real and imaginary conductivity were induced by microbial processes. These results suggest that interpretation of geoelectrical data from near surface environments should consider effects of microbial processes.

  12. Molecular and kinetic properties of sperm specific LDH after radiation inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G S; Kang, B P

    2000-03-01

    Radiation inactivation of sperm specific lactate dehydrogenase-C4 (LDH-C4) has been studied and compared with the somatic LDH in aqueous solution. D37 of C isozyme was 470 Gy and that of B isozyme was 520 Gy. Semi-log plots of log N/No versus dose suggested that the inactivation of two LDH isozymes in presence of normal saline follows a single hit kinetics. Target molecular weight calculated by radiation analysis was found as 1.52 x 10(5) gm/mole for LDH-C4 and 1.38 x 10(5) gm/mole for LDH-B4. SDS-PAGE of irradiated enzymes showed a band of 35 kDa but did not indicate the presence of any other extra band, when compared with sham-irradiated enzymes. Chemical kinetics of residual activity following irradiation at D37 showed decrease in Vmax with coenzymes and primary substrates. However, decrease in Km was seen with pyruvate as increasing substrate. Nevertheless, K did not change when NAD+ was the leading substrate for LDH-B4 or LDH-C4. A hyperchromicity in intrinsic fluorescence and a blue shift in lambdamax over sham-irradiated LDH-C4 revealed the exposure of buried tryptophan residues to the surface after radiation inactivation. Results suggest that inspite of presence of variant amino acids, the conformations of two isozymes are stabilized by similar forces which behave in a similar way for radiation inactivation in aqueous phase.

  13. Inactivation and pharmacological properties of sqKv1A homotetramers in Xenopus oocytes cannot account for behavior of the squid "delayed rectifier" K(+) conductance.

    PubMed

    Jerng, Henry H; Gilly, William F

    2002-06-01

    Considerable published evidence suggests that alpha-subunits of the cloned channel sqKv1A compose the "delayed rectifier" in the squid giant axon system, but discrepancies regarding inactivation properties of cloned versus native channels exist. In this paper we define the mechanism of inactivation for sqKv1A channels in Xenopus oocytes to investigate these and other discrepancies. Inactivation of sqKv1A in Xenopus oocytes was found to be unaffected by genetic truncation of the N-terminus, but highly sensitive to certain amino acid substitutions around the external mouth of the pore. External TEA and K(+) ions slowed inactivation of sqKv1A channels in oocytes, and chloramine T (Chl-T) accelerated inactivation. These features are all consistent with a C-type inactivation mechanism as defined for Shaker B channels. Treatment of native channels in giant fiber lobe neurons with TEA or high K(+) does not slow inactivation, nor does Chl-T accelerate it. Pharmacological differences between the two channel types were also found for 4-aminopyridine (4AP). SqKv1A's affinity for 4AP was poor at rest and increased after activation, whereas 4AP block occurred much more readily at rest with native channels than when they were activated. These results suggest that important structural differences between sqKv1A homotetramers and native squid channels are likely to exist around the external and internal mouths of the pore.

  14. Cationic, anionic and neutral dyes: effects of photosensitizing properties and experimental conditions on the photodynamic inactivation of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sabbahi, Sonia; Ben Ayed, Layla; Boudabbous, Abdellatif

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the photobactericidal effect of four photosensitizers (PSs) with different structural and physico-photochemical properties, namely mesotetracationic porphyrin (T4MPyP), dianionic rose Bengal (RB), monocationic methylene blue (MB) and neutral red (NR). Their photokilling activity was tested in vitro on pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) suspended in nutrient broth (NB) and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) through following their influence on the PSs antimicrobial efficacy. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) experiments were performed using visible light (L) and different PSs concentrations (20-70 μM). The ability of these PSs to mediate bacterial photodynamic inactivation was investigated as a function of type of PS and its concentrations, spectral and physico-chemical properties, bacterial strain, irradiation time and suspending medium. Indeed, they showed antibacterial effects against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa with significant difference in potency. Staphylococcus aureus suspended in NB showed 0.92 log units reduction in viable count in the presence of T4MPyP at 20 μM. Changing the suspending medium from NB to PBS, S. aureus was successfully photoinactivated by T4MPyP (20 μM) when suspended in PBS at least time exposure (10 and 30 min), followed by MB and RB.

  15. Soil degradation and amendment effects on soil properties, microbial communities, and plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, M.; Fehmi, J. S.; Rasmussen, C.; Gallery, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities that disrupt soil properties are fundamentally changing ecosystems. Soil degradation, caused by anthropogenic disturbance can decrease microbial abundance and activity, leading to changes in nutrient availability, soil organic matter, and plant establishment. The addition of amendments to disturbed soils have the potential ameliorate these negative consequences. We studied the effects of soil degradation, via an autoclave heat shock method, and the addition of amendments (biochar and woodchips) on microbial activity, soil carbon and nitrogen availability, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content, and plant growth of ten plant species native to the semi-arid southwestern US. Relative to non-degraded soils, microbial activity, measured via extracellular enzyme assays, was significantly lower for all seven substrates assayed. These soils also had significantly lower amounts of carbon assimilated into microbial biomass but no change in microbial biomass nitrogen. Soil degradation had no effect on plant biomass. Amendments caused changes in microbial activity: biochar-amended soils had significant increases in potential activity with five of the seven substrates measured; woodchip amended soils had significant increases with two. Soil carbon increased with both amendments but this was not reflected in a significant change in microbial biomass carbon. Biochar-amended soils had increases in soil nitrogen availability but neither amendment caused changes in microbial biomass nitrogen. Biochar amendments had no significant effect on above- or belowground plant biomass while woodchips significantly decreased aboveground plant biomass. Results show that soil degradation decreases microbial activity and changes nutrient dynamics, but these are not reflected in changes in plant growth. Amendments provide nutrient sources and change soil pore space, which cause microbial activities to fluctuate and may, in the case of woodchips, increase plant drought

  16. The properties of catalytically-inactivated Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I: Role of the cellulose binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Donner, T.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1993-12-31

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) was purified from a crude cellulase by preparative isoelectric focusing. Treatment of CBH I with 1-ethyl-3-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in its catalytic inactivation but did not abolish its ability to be absorbed to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). CBH I thus modified possessed a pI of between 8.5 and 9.3 and decreased tryptophan fluorescence compared to native CBH I. A comparison of the effect of native and modified CBH I on the morphology of crystalline cotton cellulose fibers was made using scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Antivirulence Properties of Probiotics in Combating Microbial Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Surendran Nair, M; Amalaradjou, M A; Venkitanarayanan, K

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics are nonpathogenic microorganisms that confer a health benefit on the host when administered in adequate amounts. Ample evidence is documented to support the potential application of probiotics for the prevention and treatment of infections. Health benefits of probiotics include prevention of diarrhea, including antibiotic-associated diarrhea and traveler's diarrhea, atopic eczema, dental carries, colorectal cancers, and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The cumulative body of scientific evidence that demonstrates the beneficial effects of probiotics on health and disease prevention has made probiotics increasingly important as a part of human nutrition and led to a surge in the demand for probiotics in clinical applications and as functional foods. The ability of probiotics to promote health is attributed to the various beneficial effects exerted by these microorganisms on the host. These include lactose metabolism and food digestion, production of antimicrobial peptides and control of enteric infections, anticarcinogenic properties, immunologic enhancement, enhancement of short-chain fatty acid production, antiatherogenic and cholesterol-lowering attributes, regulatory role in allergy, protection against vaginal or urinary tract infections, increased nutritional value, maintenance of epithelial integrity and barrier, stimulation of repair mechanism in cells, and maintenance and reestablishment of well-balanced indigenous intestinal and respiratory microbial communities. Most of these attributes primarily focus on the effect of probiotic supplementation on the host. Hence, in most cases, it can be concluded that the ability of a probiotic to protect the host from infection is an indirect result of promoting overall health and well-being. However, probiotics also exert a direct effect on invading microorganisms. The direct modes of action resulting in the elimination of pathogens include inhibition of pathogen replication by producing

  18. Convergence of soil microbial properties after plant colonization of an experimental plant diversity gradient.

    PubMed

    Steinauer, Katja; Jensen, Britta; Strecker, Tanja; de Luca, Enrica; Scheu, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2016-04-07

    Several studies have examined the effects of plant colonization on aboveground communities and processes. However, the effects of plant colonization on soil microbial communities are less known. We addressed this gap by studying effects of plant colonization within an experimental plant diversity gradient in subplots that had not been weeded for 2 and 5 years. This study was part of a long-term grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment) with a gradient in plant species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 60 sown species per plot). We measured plant species richness and productivity (aboveground cover and biomass) as well as soil microbial basal respiration and biomass in non-weeded subplots and compared the results with those of weeded subplots of the same plots. After 2 and 5 years of plant colonization, the number of colonizing plant species decreased with increasing plant diversity, i.e., low-diversity plant communities were most vulnerable to colonization. Plant colonization offset the significant relationship between sown plant diversity and plant biomass production. In line with plant community responses, soil basal respiration and microbial biomass increased with increasing sown plant diversity in weeded subplots, but soil microbial properties converged in non-weeded subplots and were not significantly affected by the initial plant species richness gradient. Colonizing plant species change the quantity and quality of inputs to the soil, thereby altering soil microbial properties. Thus, plant community convergence is likely to be rapidly followed by the convergence of microbial properties in the soil.

  19. Seasonal variation in functional properties of microbial communities in beech forest soil

    PubMed Central

    Koranda, Marianne; Kaiser, Christina; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Kitzler, Barbara; Sessitsch, Angela; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Substrate quality and the availability of nutrients are major factors controlling microbial decomposition processes in soils. Seasonal alteration in resource availability, which is driven by plants via belowground C allocation, nutrient uptake and litter fall, also exerts effects on soil microbial community composition. Here we investigate if seasonal and experimentally induced changes in microbial community composition lead to alterations in functional properties of microbial communities and thus microbial processes. Beech forest soils characterized by three distinct microbial communities (winter and summer community, and summer community from a tree girdling plot, in which belowground carbon allocation was interrupted) were incubated with different 13C-labeled substrates with or without inorganic N supply and analyzed for substrate use and various microbial processes. Our results clearly demonstrate that the three investigated microbial communities differed in their functional response to addition of various substrates. The winter communities revealed a higher capacity for degradation of complex C substrates (cellulose, plant cell walls) than the summer communities, indicated by enhanced cellulase activities and reduced mineralization of soil organic matter. In contrast, utilization of labile C sources (glucose) was lower in winter than in summer, demonstrating that summer and winter community were adapted to the availability of different substrates. The saprotrophic community established in girdled plots exhibited a significantly higher utilization of complex C substrates than the more plant root associated community in control plots if additional nitrogen was provided. In this study we were able to demonstrate experimentally that variation in resource availability as well as seasonality in temperate forest soils cause a seasonal variation in functional properties of soil microorganisms, which is due to shifts in community structure and physiological adaptations

  20. Hydrazine inactivates bacillus spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Wayne; Plett, G. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Barengoltz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary Protection places requirements on the maximum number of viable bacterial spores that may be delivered by a spacecraft to another solar system body. Therefore, for such space missions, the spores that may be found in hydrazine are of concern. A proposed change in processing procedures that eliminated a 0.2 um filtration step propmpted this study to ensure microbial contamination issue existed, especially since no information was found in the literature to substantiate bacterial spore inactivation by hydrazine.

  1. Interpreting and designing microbial communities for bioprocess applications, from components to interactions to emergent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Ashley; Hunt, Kristopher; Bernstein, Hans C.; Carlson, Ross

    2016-01-20

    Interest in microbial communities for bioprocessing has surged in recent years based on the potential to optimize multiple tasks simultaneously and to enhance process productivity and stability. The presence and magnitude of these desirable system properties often result from interactions between functionally distinct community members. The importance of interactions, while appreciated by some disciplines for decades, has gained interest recently due to the development of ‘omics techniques, polymicrobial culturing approaches, and computational methods which has made the systems-level analysis of interacting components more tractable. This review defines and categorizes natural and engineered system components, interactions, and emergent properties, as well as presents three ecological theories relevant to microbial communities. Case studies are interpreted to illustrate components, interactions, emergent properties and agreement with theoretical concepts. A general foundation is laid to facilitate interpretation of current systems and to aid in future design of microbial systems for the next generation of bioprocesses.

  2. Toward Linking Aboveground Vegetation Properties and Soil Microbial Communities Using Remote Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Yuki; Gilbert, Jack A.; Larsen, Peter E.; Norgaard, Madeline J.

    2014-04-01

    Despite their vital role in terrestrial ecosystem function, the distributions and dynamics of soil microbial communities (SMCs) are poorly understood. Vegetation and soil properties are the primary factors that influence SMCs. This paper discusses the potential effectiveness of remote sensing science and technologies for mapping SMC biogeography by characterizing surface biophysical properties (e.g., plant traits and community composition) strongly correlated with SMCs. Using remotely sensed biophysical properties to predict SMC distributions is extremely challenging because of the intricate interactions between biotic and abiotic factors and between above- and belowground ecosystems. However, the integration of biophysical and soil remote sensing with geospatial information about the e nvironment holds great promise for mapping SMC biogeography. Additional research needs invol ve microbial taxonomic definition, soil environmental complexity, and scaling strategies. The collaborative effort of experts from diverse disciplines is essential to linking terrestrial surface biosphere observations with subsurface microbial community distributions using remote sensing.

  3. Statistical properties predicted by the ball and chain model of channel inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Liebovitch, L S; Selector, L Y; Kline, R P

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that part of a voltage gated channel is a tethered ball and that inactivation occurs when this wandering ball binds to a site in the channel. In order to be able to quantitatively test this model by comparison to experiments we developed analytical solutions and numerical simulations of the distribution of times it takes the ball to reach the binding site when the motion of the ball is random and when it is also influenced by a directed force. If the motion of the ball is one-dimensional, at long times this distribution is a single exponential with a rate constant that is inversely proportional to the square of the length of the chain and does not depend on the starting position of the ball. This dependence on the chain length is not significantly altered if there are short range electrical forces between the ball and its binding site. These predictions suggest that to confirm the validity of this model additional experiments should be done to more precisely determine the form of this distribution and its dependence on the length of the chain. PMID:1283346

  4. Hemostatic properties and protein expression profile of therapeutic apheresis plasma treated with amotosalen and ultraviolet A for pathogen inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, Philippe; Hechler, Béatrice; Chafey, Philippe; Ravanat, Catherine; Isola, Hervé; Wiesel, Marie-Louise; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Gachet, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The INTERCEPT Blood System (IBS) using amotosalen-HCl and ultraviolet (UV)A inactivates a large spectrum of microbial pathogens and white blood cells in therapeutic plasma. Our aim was to evaluate to what extent IBS modifies the capacity of plasma to generate thrombin and induces qualitative or quantitative modifications of plasma proteins. Plasma units from four donors were collected by apheresis. Samples were taken before (control [CTRL]) and after IBS treatment and stored at -80°C until use. The activities of plasma coagulation factors and inhibitors and the thrombin generation potential were determined using assays measuring clotting times and the calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT), respectively. The proteomic profile of plasma proteins was examined using a two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) method. Nearly all of the procoagulant and antithrombotic factors tested retained at least 78% of their initial pre-IBS activity. Only FVII and FVIII displayed a lower level of conservation (67%), which nevertheless remained within the reference range for conventional plasma coagulation factors. The thrombin generation profile of plasma was conserved after IBS treatment. Among the 1331 protein spots revealed by 2D-DIGE analysis, only four were differentially expressed in IBS plasma compared to CTRL plasma and two were identified by mass spectrometric analysis as transthyretin and apolipoprotein A1. The IBS technique for plasma moderately decreases the activities of plasma coagulation factors and antithrombotic proteins, with no impact on the thrombin generation potential of plasma and very limited modifications of the proteomic profile. © 2016 AABB.

  5. Properties of two Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus isolates obtained from the microbial pesticide Gypchek

    Treesearch

    James M. Slavicek; John Podgwaite; Carita. Lanner-Herrera

    1992-01-01

    Two Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus isolates, 5-6 and A2-1, differing in the phenotypic characteristic of the number of viral occlusions in infected cells, were obtained from a production lot of the microbial pesticide Gypchek and several of their replication properties were investigated and compared. Budded virus titer produced in cell...

  6. Chemical and microbial properties in contaminated soils around a magnesite mine in northeast China

    Treesearch

    D Yang; D-H Zeng; J Zhang; L-J Li; R. Mao

    2012-01-01

    We measured soil chemical and microbial properties at a depth of 0–20 cm among mine tailings, abandoned mined land, contaminated cropland, and uncontaminated cropland around a magnesite mine near Haicheng City, Liaoning Province, China. The objective was to clarify the impact of Mg on the soils. We found that soluble Mg2+ concentration and pH...

  7. BIOGEOPHYSICS: THE EFFECTS OF MICROBIAL PROCESSES ON GEOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SHALLOW SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a brief review of how microbial interactions with the geologic media may translate to changes in the bulk physical properties of the subsurface

    which are potentially measurable by geophysical techniques. The results of select pioneering laboratory and...

  8. BIOGEOPHYSICS: THE EFFECTS OF MICROBIAL PROCESSES ON GEOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SHALLOW SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a brief review of how microbial interactions with the geologic media may translate to changes in the bulk physical properties of the subsurface

    which are potentially measurable by geophysical techniques. The results of select pioneering laboratory and...

  9. Effect of land management on soil microbial properties in agricultural terraces of Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Cerdà, Artemi; Garcia-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2014-05-01

    Soil quality is important for the sustainable development of terrestrial ecosystems. Agricultural land management is one of most important anthropogenic activities that greatly alters soil characteristics, including physical, chemical, and microbiological properties. The unsuitable land management can lead to a soil fertility loss and to a reduction in the abundance and diversity of soil microorganisms. However, ecological practices and some organic amendments can promote the activities of soil microbial communities, and increase its biodiversity. The microbial soil communities are the most sensitive and rapid indicators of perturbations in land use and soil enzyme activities are sensitive biological indicators of the effects of soil management practices. In this study, a field experiment was performed at clay-loam agricultural soil with an orchard of orange trees in Alcoleja (eastern Spain) to assess the long-term effects of inorganic fertilizers (F), intensive ploughing (P) and sustainable agriculture (S) on the soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic), enzyme activities (Urease, ß-glucosidase and phosphatase), basal soil repiration (BSR) and the relationship between them, and soil fertility in agro-ecosystems of Spain. Nine soil samples were taken from each agricultural management plot. In all the samples were determined the basal soil respiration, soil microbial biomass carbon, water holding capacity, electrical conductivity, soil organic carbon, nitrogen, available phosphorus, aggregate stability, cation exchange capacity, phosphorous, pH, texture, carbonates, active limestone and as enzimatic activities: Urease, ß-glucosidase and phosphatase. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial properties, in terms of management practices, which was highly associated with soil organic matter content. The most marked variation in the different parameters studied appears to be related to sustainable agriculture terrace. The management

  10. Effects of Microbial Transglutaminase on Physicochemical, Microbial and Sensorial Properties of Kefir Produced by Using Mixture Cow's and Soymilk.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Hasan; Dağyıldız, Kübra

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects microbial transglutaminase (m-TGs) on the physicochemical, microbial and sensory properties of kefir produced by using mix cow and soymilk. Kefir batches were prepared using 0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 Units m-TGs for per g of milk protein. Adding m-TGs to milk caused an increase in the pH and viscosity and caused a decrease in titratable acidity and syneresis in the kefir samples. Total bacteria, lactobacilli and streptococci counts decreased, while yeast counts increased in all the samples during storage. Alcohols and acids compounds have increased in all the samples except in the control samples, while carbonyl compounds have decreased in all the samples during storage (1-30 d). The differences in the percentage of alcohols, carbonyl compounds and acids in total volatiles on the 1st and the 30th d of storage were observed at 8.47-23.52%, 6.94-25.46% and 59.64-63.69%, respectively. The consumer evaluation of the kefir samples showed that greater levels of acceptability were found for samples which had been added 1.5 U m-TGs for per g of milk protein.

  11. Effect of Leaf Surface Chemical Properties on Efficacy of Sanitizer for Rotavirus Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Fuzawa, Miyu; Ku, Kang-Mo; Palma-Salgado, Sindy Paola; Nagasaka, Kenya; Feng, Hao; Juvik, John A.; Sano, Daisuke; Shisler, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of sanitizers is essential for produce safety. However, little is known about how sanitizer efficacy varies with respect to the chemical surface properties of produce. To answer this question, the disinfection efficacies of an oxidant-based sanitizer and a new surfactant-based sanitizer for porcine rotavirus (PRV) strain OSU were examined. PRV was attached to the leaf surfaces of two kale cultivars with high epicuticular wax contents and one cultivar of endive with a low epicuticular wax content and then treated with each sanitizer. The efficacy of the oxidant-based sanitizer correlated with leaf wax content as evidenced by the 1-log10 PRV disinfection on endive surfaces (low wax content) and 3-log10 disinfection of the cultivars with higher wax contents. In contrast, the surfactant-based sanitizer showed similar PRV disinfection efficacies (up to 3 log10) that were independent of leaf wax content. A statistical difference was observed with the disinfection efficacies of the oxidant-based sanitizer for suspended and attached PRV, while the surfactant-based sanitizer showed similar PRV disinfection efficacies. Significant reductions in the entry and replication of PRV were observed after treatment with either disinfectant. Moreover, the oxidant-based-sanitizer-treated PRV showed sialic acid-specific binding to the host cells, whereas the surfactant-based sanitizer increased the nonspecific binding of PRV to the host cells. These findings suggest that the surface properties of fresh produce may affect the efficacy of virus disinfection, implying that food sanitizers should be carefully selected for the different surface characteristics of fresh produce. IMPORTANCE Food sanitizer efficacies are affected by the surface properties of vegetables. This study evaluated the disinfection efficacies of two food sanitizers, an oxidant-based sanitizer and a surfactant-based sanitizer, on porcine rotavirus strain OSU adhering to the leaf epicuticular surfaces of

  12. Microbial dynamics in petroleum oilfields and their relationship with physiological properties of petroleum oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J; Gnansounou, Edgard

    2017-08-09

    Petroleum is produced by thermal decay of buried organic material over millions of years. Petroleum oilfield ecosystems represent resource of reduced carbon which favours microbial growth. Therefore, it is obvious that many microorganisms have adapted to harsh environmental conditions of these ecosystems specifically temperature, oxygen availability and pressure. Knowledge of microorganisms present in ecosystems of petroleum oil reservoirs; their physiological and biological properties help in successful exploration of petroleum. Understanding microbiology of petroleum oilfield(s) can be used to enhance oil recovery, as microorganisms in oil reservoirs produce various metabolites viz. gases, acids, solvents, biopolymers and biosurfactants. The aim of this review is to discuss characteristics of petroleum oil reservoirs. This review also provides an updated literature on microbial ecology of these extreme ecosystems including microbial origin as well as various types of microorganisms such as methanogens; iron, nitrate and sulphate reducing bacteria, and fermentative microbes present in petroleum oilfield ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial and temporal variations of microbial properties at different scales in shallow subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chuanlun; Pfiffner, S.M.; Phelps, T.J.

    1997-12-31

    Microbial abundance, activity, and community-level physiological profiles (CLPP) were examined at centimeter and meter scales in the subsurface environment at a site near Oyster, VA. At the centimeter scale, variations in aerobic culturable heterotrophs (ACH) and glucose mineralization rates (GMR) were highest in the water table zone, indicating that water availability has a major effect on variations in microbial abundance and activity. At the meter scale, ACH and microaerophiles decreased significantly with depth, whereas anaerobic GMR often increased with depth; this may indicate low redox potentials at depth caused by microbial consumption of oxygen. Data of CUP indicated that the microbial community (MC) in the soybean field exhibited greater capability to utilize multiple carbon sources than MC in the corn field. This difference may reflect nutrient availability associated with different crops (soybean vs corn). By using a regression model, significant spatial and temporal variations were observed for ACH, microaerophiles, anaerobic GMR, and CLPP. Results of this study indicated that water and nutrient availability as well as land use could have a dominant effect on spatial and temporal variations in microbial properties in shallow subsurface environments. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations of microbial properties at different scales in shallow subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Lehman, R M; Pfiffner, S M; Scarborough, S P; Palumbo, A V; Phelps, T J; Beauchamp, J J; Colwell, F S

    1997-01-01

    Microbial abundance, activity, and community-level physiological profiles (CLPP) were examined at centimeter and meter scales in the subsurface environment at a site near Oyster, VA. At the centimeter scale, variations in aerobic culturable heterotrophs (ACH) and glucose mineralization rates (GMR) were highest in the water table zone, indicating that water availability has a major effect on variations in microbial abundance and activity. At the meter scale, ACH and microaerophiles decreased significantly with depth, whereas anaerobic GMR often increased with depth; this may indicate low redox potentials at depth caused by microbial consumption of oxygen. Data of CLPP indicated that the microbial community (MC) in the soybean field exhibited greater capability to utilize multiple carbon sources than MC in the corn field. This difference may reflect nutrient availability associated with different crops (soybean vs corn). By using a regression model, significant spatial and temporal variations were observed for ACH, microaerophiles, anaerobic GMR, and CLPP. Results of this study indicated that water and nutrient availability as well as land use could have a dominant effect on spatial and temporal variations in microbial properties in shallow subsurface environments.

  15. Effect of Leaf Surface Chemical Properties on Efficacy of Sanitizer for Rotavirus Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Fuzawa, Miyu; Ku, Kang-Mo; Palma-Salgado, Sindy Paola; Nagasaka, Kenya; Feng, Hao; Juvik, John A; Sano, Daisuke; Shisler, Joanna L; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-10-15

    The use of sanitizers is essential for produce safety. However, little is known about how sanitizer efficacy varies with respect to the chemical surface properties of produce. To answer this question, the disinfection efficacies of an oxidant-based sanitizer and a new surfactant-based sanitizer for porcine rotavirus (PRV) strain OSU were examined. PRV was attached to the leaf surfaces of two kale cultivars with high epicuticular wax contents and one cultivar of endive with a low epicuticular wax content and then treated with each sanitizer. The efficacy of the oxidant-based sanitizer correlated with leaf wax content as evidenced by the 1-log10 PRV disinfection on endive surfaces (low wax content) and 3-log10 disinfection of the cultivars with higher wax contents. In contrast, the surfactant-based sanitizer showed similar PRV disinfection efficacies (up to 3 log10) that were independent of leaf wax content. A statistical difference was observed with the disinfection efficacies of the oxidant-based sanitizer for suspended and attached PRV, while the surfactant-based sanitizer showed similar PRV disinfection efficacies. Significant reductions in the entry and replication of PRV were observed after treatment with either disinfectant. Moreover, the oxidant-based-sanitizer-treated PRV showed sialic acid-specific binding to the host cells, whereas the surfactant-based sanitizer increased the nonspecific binding of PRV to the host cells. These findings suggest that the surface properties of fresh produce may affect the efficacy of virus disinfection, implying that food sanitizers should be carefully selected for the different surface characteristics of fresh produce.

  16. Impact of cold plasma on Citrobacter freundii in apple juice: inactivation kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Surowsky, Björn; Fröhling, Antje; Gottschalk, Nathalie; Schlüter, Oliver; Knorr, Dietrich

    2014-03-17

    Various studies have shown that cold plasma is capable of inactivating microorganisms located on a variety of food surfaces, food packaging materials and process equipment under atmospheric pressure conditions; however, less attention has been paid to the impact of cold plasma on microorganisms in liquid foodstuffs. The present study investigates cold plasma's ability to inactivate Citrobacter freundii in apple juice. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and temperature measurements were performed to characterise the plasma source. The plasma-related impact on microbial loads was evaluated by traditional plate count methods, while morphological changes were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Physiological property changes were obtained through flow cytometric measurements (membrane integrity, esterase activity and membrane potential). In addition, mathematical modelling was performed in order to achieve a reliable prediction of microbial inactivation and to establish the basis for possible industrial implementation. C. freundii loads in apple juice were reduced by about 5 log cycles after a plasma exposure of 480s using argon and 0.1% oxygen plus a subsequent storage time of 24h. The results indicate that a direct contact between bacterial cells and plasma is not necessary for achieving successful inactivation. The plasma-generated compounds in the liquid, such as H2O2 and most likely hydroperoxy radicals, are particularly responsible for microbial inactivation.

  17. Conjugated Polyelectrolytes with Imidazolium Solubilizing Groups. Properties and Application to Photodynamic Inactivation of Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Anand; Pappas, Harry C; Hill, Eric H; Huang, Yun; Whitten, David G; Schanze, Kirk S

    2015-12-30

    This article reports an investigation of the photophysical properties and the light- and dark-biocidal activity of two poly(phenyleneethynylene) (PPE)-based conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) bearing cationic imidazolium solubilizing groups. The two polymers feature the same PPE-type backbone, but they differ in the frequency of imidazoliums on the chains: PIM-4 features two imidazolium units on every phenylene repeat, whereas PIM-2 contains two imidazolium units on every other phenylene unit. Both polymers are very soluble in water and polar organic solvents, but their propensity to aggregate in water differs with the density of the imidazolium units. The polymers are highly fluorescent, and they exhibit the amplified quenching effect when exposed to a low concentration of anionic electron-acceptor anthraquinone disulfonate. The CPEs are also quenched by a relatively low concentration of pyrophosphate by an aggregation-induced quenching mechanism. The biocidal activity of the cationic imidazolium CPEs was studied against both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in the dark and under blue-light illumination. Both polymers are effective biocides, exhibiting greater than 3 log kill with 30-60 min of light exposure at concentrations of ≤10 μg mL(-1).

  18. Physicochemical properties and oxidative inactivation of soluble lectin from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) brain.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sabika; Banu, Naheed

    2008-03-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins present in a wide variety of plants and animals, which serve various important physiological functions. A soluble beta-galactoside binding lectin has been isolated and purified to homogeneity from buffalo brain using ammonium sulphate precipitation (40-70%) and gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G50-80 column. The molecular weight of buffalo brain lectin (BBL) as determined by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions was 14.2 kDa, however, with gel filtration it was 28.5 kDa, revealing the dimeric form of protein. The neutral sugar content of the soluble lectin was estimated to be 3.3%. The BBL showed highest affinity for lactose and other sugar moieties in glycosidic form, suggesting it to be a beta-galactoside binding lectin. The association constant for lactose binding as evidenced by Scatchard analysis was 6.6 x 10(3) M(-1) showing two carbohydrate binding sites per lectin molecule. A total inhibition of lectin activity was observed by denaturants like guanidine HCl, thiourea and urea at 6 M concentration. The treatment of BBL with oxidizing agent destroyed its agglutination activity, abolished its fluorescence, and shifted its UV absorption maxima from 282 to 250 nm. The effect of H2O2 was greatly prevented by lactose indicating that BBL is more stable in the presence of its specific ligand. The purified lectin was investigated for its brain cell aggregation properties by testing its ability to agglutinate cells isolated from buffalo and goat brains. Rate of aggregation of buffalo brain cells by purified protein was more than the goat brain cells. The data from above study suggests that the isolated lectin may belong to the galectin-1 family but is glycosylated unlike those purified till date.

  19. Photochemical and microbial alterations of DOM spectroscopic properties in the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro.

    PubMed

    Santos, L; Santos, E B H; Dias, J M; Cunha, A; Almeida, A

    2014-08-01

    The influence of photochemical transformations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on microbial communities was evaluated in the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro. Two sites, representative of the marine and brackish water zones of the estuary, were surveyed regularly in order to determine seasonal and vertical profiles of variation of CDOM properties. Optical parameters of CDOM indicative of aromaticity and molecular weight were used to establish CDOM sources, and microbial abundance and activity was characterized. Additionally, microcosm experiments were performed in order to simulate photochemical reactions of CDOM and to evaluate microbial responses to light-induced changes in CDOM composition. The CDOM of the two estuarine zones showed different spectral characteristics, with significantly higher values of the specific ultra-violet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254) (5.5 times) and of the absorption coefficient at 350 nm (a350) (12 times) and lower SR (S275-295/S350-400) ratio at brackish water compared with the marine zone, reflecting the different amounts and prevailing sources of organic matter, as well as distinct riverine and oceanic influences. At the marine zone, the abundance of bacteria and the activity of Leu-AMPase correlated with a350 and a254, suggesting a microbial contribution to the HMW CDOM pool. The irradiation of DOM resulted in a decrease of the values of a254 and a350 and an increase of the slope S275-295 and of the ratios E2 : E3 (a250/a365) and SR, which in turn increase its bioavailability. However, the extent of photoinduced transformations and microbial responses was dependent on the initial optical characteristics of CDOM. In Ria de Aveiro both photochemical and microbial processes yielded optical changes in CDOM and the overall results of these combined processes determine the fate of CDOM in the estuarine system and have an influence on local productivity and in adjacent coastal areas.

  20. Function, kinetic properties, crystallization, and regulation of microbial malate dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Íñiguez, Tóshiko; Aburto-Rodríguez, Nelly; Vilchis-González, Ana Laura; Flores, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme widely distributed among living organisms and is a key protein in the central oxidative pathway. It catalyzes the interconversion between malate and oxaloacetate using NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor. Surprisingly, this enzyme has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but there are few reports about this enzyme in prokaryotes. It is necessary to review the relevant information to gain a better understanding of the function of this enzyme. Our review of the data generated from studies in bacteria shows much diversity in their molecular properties, including weight, oligomeric states, cofactor and substrate binding affinities, as well as differences in the direction of the enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, due to the importance of its function, the transcription and activity of this enzyme are rigorously regulated. Crystal structures of MDH from different bacterial sources led to the identification of the regions involved in substrate and cofactor binding and the residues important for the dimer-dimer interface. This structural information allows one to make direct modifications to improve the enzyme catalysis by increasing its activity, cofactor binding capacity, substrate specificity, and thermostability. A comparative analysis of the phylogenetic reconstruction of MDH reveals interesting facts about its evolutionary history, dividing this superfamily of proteins into two principle clades and establishing relationships between MDHs from different cellular compartments from archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

  1. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms and the use of a RTPCR assay to detect parasite species within biofilm structures

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, M.; Coughlan, G.; Murphy, N.; Rowan, N.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pathogenic organisms namely parasite species and bacteria in biofilms in veterinary settings, is a public health concern in relation to human and animal exposure. Veterinary clinics represent a significant risk factor for the transfer of pathogens from housed animals to humans, especially in cases of wound infection and the shedding of faecal matter. This study aims to provide a means of detecting veterinary relevant parasite species in bacterial biofilms, and to provide a means of disinfecting these biofilms. A real time PCR assay was utilized to detect parasite DNA in Bacillus cereus biofilms on stainless steel and PVC surfaces. Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose. PMID:26862516

  2. Physicochemical properties influencing denitrification rate and microbial activity in denitrification bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    The use of N-based fertilizer will need to increase to meet future demands, yet existing applications have been implicated as the main source of coastal eutrophication and hypoxic zones. Producing sufficient crops to feed a growing planet will require efficient production in combination with sustainable treatment solutions. The long-term success of denitrification bioreactors to effectively remove nitrate (NO¬3), indicates this technology is a feasible treatment option. Assessing and quantifying the media properties that affect NO¬3 removal rate and microbial activity can improve predictions on bioreactor performance. It was hypothesized that denitrification rates and microbial biomass would be correlated with total C, NO¬3 concentration, metrics of organic matter quality, media surface area and laboratory measures of potential denitrification rate. NO¬3 removal rates and microbial biomass were evaluated in mesocosms filled with different wood treatments and the unique influence of these predictor variables was determined using a multiple linear regression analysis. NO3 reduction rates were independent of NO¬3 concentration indicating zero order reaction kinetics. Temperature was strongly correlated with denitrification rate (r2=0.87; Q10=4.7), indicating the variability of bioreactor performance in differing climates. Fiber quality, and media surface area were strong (R>0.50), unique predictors of rates and microbial biomass, although C:N ratio and potential denitrification rate did not predict actual denitrification rate or microbial biomass. Utilizing a stepwise multiple linear regression, indicates that the denitrification rate can be effectively (r2=0.56;p<0.0001) predicted if the groundwater temperature, neutral detergent fiber and surface area alone are quantified. These results will assist with the widespread implementation of denitrification bioreactors to achieve significant N load reductions in large watersheds. The nitrate reduction rate as a

  3. Microbial and physical properties as indicators of sandy soil quality under cropland and grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frac, Magdalena; Lipiec, Jerzy; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Oszust, Karolina; Brzezinska, Malgorzata

    2017-04-01

    Land use is one of the key factor driving changes in soil properties influencing on soil health and quality. Microbial diversity and physical properties are sensitive indicators for assessing soil health and quality. The alterations of microbial diversity and physical properties following land use changes have not been sufficiently elucidated, especially for sandy soils. We investigated microbial diversity indicators including fungal communities composition and physical properties of sandy acid soil under cropland and more than 20-yr-old grassland (after cropland) in Trzebieszów, Podlasie Region, Poland (N 51° 59' 24", E 22° 33' 37"). The study included four depths within 0-60 cm. Microbial genetic diversity was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) analysis, fungal community composition was evaluated by next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis and functional diversity was determined by Biolog EcoPlate method. Overall microbial activity was assessed by soil enzymes (dehydrogenases, β-glucosidase) and respiration test. At the same places soil texture, organic carbon content, pH, bulk density, water holding capacity were determined. Our results showed that grassland soil was characterized by higher activity of soil enzymes than cropland. The average well color development of soil microorganisms, the microbial functional diversity and the number of carbon source utilization were significantly affected by land use type and were differentiated among soil depths. In grassland compared to cropland soil a significant increase of carboxylic acids and decrease of amino acids utilization was observed. The quantitative and qualitative differences were found in community of ammonia oxidizing archaea in cropland and grassland soil. The results of fungal community composition help to explain the soil health of grassland and cropland based on the appearance of phytopathogenic and antagonistic fungi. In general bulk density and field water

  4. Effects of soil organic matter properties and microbial community composition on enzyme activities in cryoturbated arctic soils.

    PubMed

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Hofhansl, Florian; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J; Bárta, Jiří; Capek, Petr; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Hofer, Angelika; Kienzl, Sandra; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Santrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Takriti, Mounir; Urich, Tim; Weltin, Georg; Richter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is controlled, amongst other factors, by organic matter properties and by the microbial decomposer community present. Since microbial community composition and SOM properties are often interrelated and both change with soil depth, the drivers of enzymatic decomposition are hard to dissect. We investigated soils from three regions in the Siberian Arctic, where carbon rich topsoil material has been incorporated into the subsoil (cryoturbation). We took advantage of this subduction to test if SOM properties shape microbial community composition, and to identify controls of both on enzyme activities. We found that microbial community composition (estimated by phospholipid fatty acid analysis), was similar in cryoturbated material and in surrounding subsoil, although carbon and nitrogen contents were similar in cryoturbated material and topsoils. This suggests that the microbial community in cryoturbated material was not well adapted to SOM properties. We also measured three potential enzyme activities (cellobiohydrolase, leucine-amino-peptidase and phenoloxidase) and used structural equation models (SEMs) to identify direct and indirect drivers of the three enzyme activities. The models included microbial community composition, carbon and nitrogen contents, clay content, water content, and pH. Models for regular horizons, excluding cryoturbated material, showed that all enzyme activities were mainly controlled by carbon or nitrogen. Microbial community composition had no effect. In contrast, models for cryoturbated material showed that enzyme activities were also related to microbial community composition. The additional control of microbial community composition could have restrained enzyme activities and furthermore decomposition in general. The functional decoupling of SOM properties and microbial community composition might thus be one of the reasons for low decomposition rates and the persistence of 400 Gt

  5. Effects of Soil Organic Matter Properties and Microbial Community Composition on Enzyme Activities in Cryoturbated Arctic Soils

    PubMed Central

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Hofhansl, Florian; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Bárta, Jiří; Čapek, Petr; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Hofer, Angelika; Kienzl, Sandra; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Šantrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Takriti, Mounir; Urich, Tim; Weltin, Georg; Richter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is controlled, amongst other factors, by organic matter properties and by the microbial decomposer community present. Since microbial community composition and SOM properties are often interrelated and both change with soil depth, the drivers of enzymatic decomposition are hard to dissect. We investigated soils from three regions in the Siberian Arctic, where carbon rich topsoil material has been incorporated into the subsoil (cryoturbation). We took advantage of this subduction to test if SOM properties shape microbial community composition, and to identify controls of both on enzyme activities. We found that microbial community composition (estimated by phospholipid fatty acid analysis), was similar in cryoturbated material and in surrounding subsoil, although carbon and nitrogen contents were similar in cryoturbated material and topsoils. This suggests that the microbial community in cryoturbated material was not well adapted to SOM properties. We also measured three potential enzyme activities (cellobiohydrolase, leucine-amino-peptidase and phenoloxidase) and used structural equation models (SEMs) to identify direct and indirect drivers of the three enzyme activities. The models included microbial community composition, carbon and nitrogen contents, clay content, water content, and pH. Models for regular horizons, excluding cryoturbated material, showed that all enzyme activities were mainly controlled by carbon or nitrogen. Microbial community composition had no effect. In contrast, models for cryoturbated material showed that enzyme activities were also related to microbial community composition. The additional control of microbial community composition could have restrained enzyme activities and furthermore decomposition in general. The functional decoupling of SOM properties and microbial community composition might thus be one of the reasons for low decomposition rates and the persistence of 400 Gt

  6. Microbial inactivation kinetics and mechanisms of carbon-doped TiO2 (C-TiO2) under visible light.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jaehong; Seo, Young-Seok; Oh, Byung-Taek; Cho, Min

    2016-04-05

    In this study, titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with carbon (C-TiO2) were synthesized by means of sol-gel methods, and the synthesis was verified by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The nanoparticles' photocatalytic disinfection activity of Listeria monocytogenes was tested under UV and visible light. The observed inactivation levels for 150min of visible light exposure with and without UV cutoff filters were 2.10 and 2.45 log, respectively. We also found that traditional reactive oxygen species had insignificant actions on C-TiO2 photocatalysts and that L. monocytogenes inactivation in the C-TiO2 system under visible light was induced in large part by the midgap states (hmid(+)) that was produced photochemically from the visible light response. C-TiO2 was found to accelerate bacterial inactivation (of L. monocytogenes) in the presence of visible light. Our data suggests that the C-TiO2 may be useful in the development of alternative disinfectants for environmental applications.

  7. [Soil organic pollution characteristics and microbial properties in coal mining areas of Mentougou].

    PubMed

    Jia, Jian-Li; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Chen; Li, Dong; Liu, Bo-Wen; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Le; Yang, Si-Qi

    2011-03-01

    Soil micro-ecosystem including organic pollution characteristics, basic physicochemical parameters, and microbial properties was analyzed which contaminated with organic pollutants in coal mining area. Results showed that the organic pollution level in coal mining area soils distributed from 0.4 to 1.5 mg/g dry soil, which was 1. 5-6 times as much as the background sample. Furthermore, the column chromatography and GC-MS analysis revealed that content of lightly components including saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons exceeded 40%, specifically was alkenes (> C15), hydrocarbon derivatives, and a small amount aromatic hydrocarbons. Totally, the components of organic pollutants extracted in soils were similar to which in coal gangue samples, illustrating the source of soil pollution to a certain extent in coal mining areas. The physicochemical factors such as nutrient level and moisture contents were not conducive to the growth and reproduction of microbe except pH level, which might show inhibition to microbial activities. Microbial density of pollutant soils in coal mining areas was totally low, with specific amount 10(4)-10(5) cell/g dry soil and FDA activity 2.0-2.9 mg/(g x min). Generally, the microbial density and activity were decreased as the enhancing pollution level. However, in-depth analysis was needed urgently because of the complex impact of environmental conditions like pH, moisture, and nutrition.

  8. Microbial functional diversity enhances predictive models linking environmental parameters to ecosystem properties.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeff R; Welsh, Allana; Hallin, Sara

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms drive biogeochemical processes, but linking these processes to real changes in microbial communities under field conditions is not trivial. Here, we present a model-based approach to estimate independent contributions of microbial community shifts to ecosystem properties. The approach was tested empirically, using denitrification potential as our model process, in a spatial survey of arable land encompassing a range of edaphic conditions and two agricultural production systems. Soil nitrate was the most important single predictor of denitrification potential (the change in Akaike's information criterion, corrected for sample size, ΔAIC(c) = 20.29); however, the inclusion of biotic variables (particularly the evenness and size of denitrifier communities [ΔAIC(c) = 12.02], and the abundance of one denitrifier genotype [ΔAIC(c) = 18.04]) had a substantial effect on model precision, comparable to the inclusion of abiotic variables (biotic R2 = 0.28, abiotic R2 = 0.50, biotic + abiotic R2 = 0.76). This approach provides a valuable tool for explicitly linking microbial communities to ecosystem functioning. By making this link, we have demonstrated that including aspects of microbial community structure and diversity in biogeochemical models can improve predictions of nutrient cycling in ecosystems and enhance our understanding of ecosystem functionality.

  9. Probing the pH dependent optical properties of aquatic, terrestrial and microbial humic substances by sodium borohydride reduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chemically reducing humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) provides insight into spectroscopically identifiable structural moieties generating the optical properties of HA/FA from aquatic, microbial and terrestrial sources. Sodium borohydride reduction provides targeted reduction of carbonyl groups. The...

  10. Chemical, physical and microbial properties and microbial diversity in manufactured soils produced from co-composting green waste and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, O N; Haynes, R J; Sturm, E C

    2012-12-01

    The effects of adding biosolids to a green waste feedstock (100% green waste, 25% v/v biosolids or 50% biosolids) on the properties of composted products were investigated. Following initial composting, 20% soil or 20% fly ash/river sand mix was added to the composts as would be carried out commercially to produce manufactured soil. Temperatures during composting reached 50 °C, or above, for 23 days when biosolids were included as a composting feedstock but temperatures barely reached 40 °C when green waste alone was composted. Addition of biosolids to the feedstock increased total N, EC, extractable NH(4), NO(3) and P but lowered pH, macroporosity, water holding capacity, microbial biomass C and basal respiration in composts. Additions of soil or ash/sand to the composts greatly increased the available water holding capacity of the materials. Principal component analysis (PCA) of PCR-DGGE 16S rDNA amplicons separated bacterial communities according to addition of soil to the compost. For fungal ITS-RNA amplicons, PCA separated communities based on the addition of biosolids. Bacterial species richness and Shannon's diversity index were greatest for composts where soil had been added but for fungal communities these parameters were greatest in the treatments where 50% biosolids had been included. These results were interpreted in relation to soil having an inoculation effect and biosolids having an acidifying effect thereby favouring a fungal community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Maple sap predominant microbial contaminants are correlated with the physicochemical and sensorial properties of maple syrup.

    PubMed

    Filteau, Marie; Lagacé, Luc; Lapointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2012-03-01

    Maple sap processing and microbial contamination are significant aspects that affect maple syrup quality. In this study, two sample sets from 2005 and 2008 were used to assess the maple syrup quality variation and its relationship to microbial populations, with respect to processing, production site and harvesting period. The abundance of maple sap predominant bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens group and two subgroups, Rahnella spp., Janthinobacterium spp., Leuconostoc mesenteroides) and yeast (Mrakia spp., Mrakiella spp.,Guehomyces pullulans) was assessed by quantitative PCR. Maple syrup properties were analyzed by physicochemical and sensorial methods. Results indicate that P. fluorescens, Mrakia spp., Mrakiella spp. G. pullulans and Rahnella spp. are stable contaminants of maple sap, as they were found for every production site throughout the flow period. Multiple factor analysis reports a link between the relative abundance of P. fluorescens group and Mrakia spp. in maple sap with maple and vanilla odor as well as flavor of maple syrup. This evidence supports the contribution of these microorganisms or a consortium of predominant microbial contaminants to the characteristic properties of maple syrup.

  12. Influence of microbial community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiwei; Li, Ting; Wang, Qiuxu; Pan, Yu; Li, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of microbial community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules, these granules were cultivated with different seed sludge, and the variation of microbial community and dominant bacterial groups that impact the nitrogen removal efficiency of the aerobic nitrifying granules were analyzed and identified using 16s rDNA sequence and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles. The results presented here demonstrated that the influence of the community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules was remarkable, and the granules cultivated by activated sludge from a beer wastewater treatment plant showed better performance, with a stable sludge volume index (SVI) value of 20mL/g, high extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) content of 183.3mg/L, high NH4(+)-N removal rate of 89.42% and abundant microbial population with 10 dominant bacterial groups. This indicated that activated sludge with abundant communities is suitable for use as seed sludge in culturing aerobic nitrifying granules. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Relationship between Sublethal Injury and Microbial Inactivation by the Combination of High Hydrostatic Pressure and Citral or tert-Butyl Hydroquinone ▿

    PubMed Central

    Somolinos, Maria; García, Diego; Pagán, Rafael; Mackey, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to investigate (i) the occurrence of sublethal injury in Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment as a function of the treatment medium pH and composition and (ii) the relationship between the occurrence of sublethal injury and the inactivating effect of a combination of HHP and two antimicrobial compounds, tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) and citral. The three microorganisms showed a high proportion of sublethally injured cells (up to 99.99% of the surviving population) after HHP. In E. coli and L. monocytogenes, the extent of inactivation and sublethal injury depended on the pH and the composition of the treatment medium, whereas in S. cerevisiae, inactivation and sublethal injury were independent of medium pH or composition under the conditions tested. TBHQ alone was not lethal to E. coli or L. monocytogenes but acted synergistically with HHP and 24-h refrigeration, resulting in a viability decrease of >5 log10 cycles of both organisms. The antimicrobial effect of citral depended on the microorganism and the treatment medium pH. Acting alone for 24 h under refrigeration, 1,000 ppm of citral caused a reduction of 5 log10 cycles of E. coli at pH 7.0 and almost 3 log10 cycles of L. monocytogenes at pH 4.0. The combination of citral and HHP also showed a synergistic effect. Our results have confirmed that the detection of sublethal injury after HHP may contribute to the identification of those treatment conditions under which HHP may act synergistically with other preserving processes. PMID:18952869

  14. Relationship between sublethal injury and microbial inactivation by the combination of high hydrostatic pressure and citral or tert-butyl hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Somolinos, Maria; García, Diego; Pagán, Rafael; Mackey, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    The aim was to investigate (i) the occurrence of sublethal injury in Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment as a function of the treatment medium pH and composition and (ii) the relationship between the occurrence of sublethal injury and the inactivating effect of a combination of HHP and two antimicrobial compounds, tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) and citral. The three microorganisms showed a high proportion of sublethally injured cells (up to 99.99% of the surviving population) after HHP. In E. coli and L. monocytogenes, the extent of inactivation and sublethal injury depended on the pH and the composition of the treatment medium, whereas in S. cerevisiae, inactivation and sublethal injury were independent of medium pH or composition under the conditions tested. TBHQ alone was not lethal to E. coli or L. monocytogenes but acted synergistically with HHP and 24-h refrigeration, resulting in a viability decrease of >5 log(10) cycles of both organisms. The antimicrobial effect of citral depended on the microorganism and the treatment medium pH. Acting alone for 24 h under refrigeration, 1,000 ppm of citral caused a reduction of 5 log(10) cycles of E. coli at pH 7.0 and almost 3 log(10) cycles of L. monocytogenes at pH 4.0. The combination of citral and HHP also showed a synergistic effect. Our results have confirmed that the detection of sublethal injury after HHP may contribute to the identification of those treatment conditions under which HHP may act synergistically with other preserving processes.

  15. Effects of combination of ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, native microbial loads, and quality of button mushrooms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mushrooms are prone to microbial spoilage and browning during growing and processing. Ultraviolet light (UV-C) has been used as an alternative technology to chemical sanitizers for food products. Hydrogen peroxide is classified as generally recognized as safe for use in foods as a bleaching and ant...

  16. Effect of UV-C treatment on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, microbial loads, and quality of button mushrooms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated the effects of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light applied to both sides of mushrooms on microbial loads and product quality during storage for 21 days at 4 C. Microflora populations, color, antioxidant activity, total phenolics, and ascorbic acid were measured at 1, 7, 14 and 21 days...

  17. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes: an overview of source, production, properties, and thrombolytic activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2005-11-01

    Accumulation of fibrin in the blood vessels usually results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. For thrombolytic therapy, microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have now attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the undesirable side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus from traditional fermented foods. The physiochemical properties of these enzymes have been characterized, and their effectiveness in thrombolysis in vivo has been further identified. Therefore, microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases.

  18. Spatial shifts in microbial population structure within poultry litter associated with physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Lovanh, N; Cook, K L; Rothrock, M J; Miles, D M; Sistani, K

    2007-09-01

    Microbial populations within poultry litter have been largely ignored with the exception of potential human or livestock pathogens. A better understanding of the community structure and identity of the microbial populations within poultry litter could aid in the development of management practices that would reduce populations responsible for toxic air emissions and pathogen incidence. In this study, poultry litter air and physical properties were correlated to shifts in microbial community structure as analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and measured by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Litter samples were taken in a 36-point grid pattern at 5 m across and 12 m down a 146 m x 12.8 m chicken house. At each sample point, physical parameters such as litter moisture, pH, air and litter temperature, and relative humidity were recorded, and samples were taken for molecular analysis. The DGGE analysis showed that the banding pattern of samples from the back and water/feeder areas of poultry house were distinct from those of samples from other areas. There were distinct clusters of banding patterns corresponding to the front, middle front, middle back, back, and waterer/feeder areas. The PCA analysis showed similar cluster patterns, but with more distinct separation of the front and midhouse samples. The PCA analysis also showed that moisture content and litter temperature (accounting for 51.5 and 31.5% of the separation of samples, respectively) play a major role in spatial diversity of microbial community in the poultry house. Based on analysis of DGGE fingerprints and cloned DGGE band sequences, there appear to be differences in the types of microorganisms over the length of the house, which correspond to differences in the physical properties of the litter.

  19. Low Stress Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Treated Cotton Fabric Subjected to Zinc Oxide-Anti-Microbial Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Yin-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fabrics are highly popular because of their excellent properties such as regeneration, bio-degradation, softness, affinity to skin and hygroscopic properties. When in contact with the human body, cotton fabrics offer an ideal environment for microbial growth due to their ability to retain oxygen, moisture and warmth, as well as nutrients from spillages and body sweat. Therefore, an anti-microbial coating formulation (Microfresh and Microban together with zinc oxide as catalyst) was developed for cotton fabrics to improve treatment effectiveness. In addition, plasma technology was employed in the study which roughened the surface of the materials, improving the loading of zinc oxides on the surface. In this study, the low stress mechanical properties of plasma pre-treated and/or anti-microbial-treated cotton fabric were studied. The overall results show that the specimens had improved bending properties when zinc oxides were added in the anti-microbial coating recipe. Also, without plasma pre-treatment, anti-microbial-treatment of cotton fabric had a positive effect only on tensile resilience, shear stress at 0.5° and compressional energy, while plasma-treated specimens had better overall tensile properties even after anti-microbial treatment. PMID:28809311

  20. In vitro and in vivo anti-microbial activity evaluation of inactivated cells of Lactobacillus salivarius CECT 5713 against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Sañudo, Ana I; Luque, Roberto; Díaz-Ropero, Mª Paz; Fonollá, Juristo; Bañuelos, Óscar

    2017-09-19

    Defining the etiology of dental caries is a complex problem. The microbiological approach has included Streptococcus mutans as one of the bacterial species involved in this disease. This research investigates the inhibitory effects of heat-inactivated Lactobacillus salivarius CECT 5713 against S. mutans using in vitro and in vivo assays. On the one hand, the effect of non-viable L. salivarius CECT 5713 on the in vitro adhesion of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite discs was evaluated. On the other hand, levels of Streptococcus mutans, amount of salivary flow and salivary pH before and after taking the rinse with the non-viable L. salivarius CECT 5713 in healthy volunteers were assessed (self-controlled open-label pilot study). The levels of S. mutans seemed to decrease in the in vitro and in vivo assays (p<0.05). The in vitro effect of non-viable L. salivarius was maintained until 36 months of storage. In addition, the reduction of S. mutans salivary concentration in the volunteers was statistically significant from the third day until two weeks of treatment. Heat-inactivated L. salivarius CECT 5713 prevents S. mutans adhesion to hydroxyapatite and could be used as a strategy to reduce the salivary concentration of this oral pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system.

  2. Microbial properties explain temporal variation in soil respiration in a grassland subjected to nitrogen addition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Liu, Yinghui; Wu, Shanmei; Niu, Lei; Tian, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    The role of soil microbial variables in shaping the temporal variability of soil respiration has been well acknowledged but is poorly understood, particularly under elevated nitrogen (N) deposition conditions. We measured soil respiration along with soil microbial properties during the early, middle, and late growing seasons in temperate grassland plots that had been treated with N additions of 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 g N m−2 yr−1 for 10 years. Representing the averages over three observation periods, total (Rs) and heterotrophic (Rh) respiration were highest with 4 g N m−2 yr−1, but autotrophic respiration (Ra) was highest with 8 to 16 g N m−2 yr−1. Also, the responses of Rh and Ra were unsynchronized considering the periods separately. N addition had no significant impact on the temperature sensitivity (Q10) for Rs but inhibited the Q10 for Rh. Significant interactions between observation period and N level occurred in soil respiration components, and the temporal variations in soil respiration components were mostly associated with changes in microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). Further observation on soil organic carbon and root biomass is needed to reveal the long-term effect of N deposition on soil C sequestration. PMID:26678303

  3. Microbial properties explain temporal variation in soil respiration in a grassland subjected to nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Liu, Yinghui; Wu, Shanmei; Niu, Lei; Tian, Yuqiang

    2015-12-18

    The role of soil microbial variables in shaping the temporal variability of soil respiration has been well acknowledged but is poorly understood, particularly under elevated nitrogen (N) deposition conditions. We measured soil respiration along with soil microbial properties during the early, middle, and late growing seasons in temperate grassland plots that had been treated with N additions of 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 g N m(-2) yr(-1) for 10 years. Representing the averages over three observation periods, total (Rs) and heterotrophic (Rh) respiration were highest with 4 g N m(-2) yr(-1), but autotrophic respiration (Ra) was highest with 8 to 16 g N m(-2) yr(-1). Also, the responses of Rh and Ra were unsynchronized considering the periods separately. N addition had no significant impact on the temperature sensitivity (Q10) for Rs but inhibited the Q10 for Rh. Significant interactions between observation period and N level occurred in soil respiration components, and the temporal variations in soil respiration components were mostly associated with changes in microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). Further observation on soil organic carbon and root biomass is needed to reveal the long-term effect of N deposition on soil C sequestration.

  4. Effect of hydrocarbon pollution on the microbial properties of a sandy and a clay soil.

    PubMed

    Labud, Valeria; Garcia, Carlos; Hernandez, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to ascertain the effects of different types of hydrocarbon pollution on soil microbial properties and the influence of a soil's characteristics on these effects. For this, toxicity bioassays and microbiological and biochemical parameters were studied in two soils (one sandy and one clayey) contaminated at a loading rate of 5% and 10% with three types of hydrocarbon (diesel oil, gasoline and crude petroleum) differing in their volatilisation potential and toxic substance content. Soils were maintained under controlled conditions (50-70% water holding capacity, and room temperature) for six months and several microbiological and toxicity parameters were monitored 1, 60, 120 and 180 days after contamination. The toxic effects of hydrocarbon contamination were greater in the sandy soil. Hydrocarbons inhibited microbial biomass, the greatest negative effect being observed in the gasoline-polluted sandy soil. In both soils crude petroleum and diesel oil contamination increased microbial respiration, while gasoline had little effect on this parameter, especially in the sandy soil. In general, gasoline had the highest inhibitory effect on the hydrolase activities involved in N, P or C cycles in both soils. All contaminants inhibited hydrolase activities in the sandy soil, while in the clayey soil diesel oil stimulated enzyme activity, particularly at the higher concentration. In both soils, a phytotoxic effect on barley and ryegrass seed germination was observed in the contaminated soils, particularly in those contaminated with diesel or petroleum.

  5. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  6. Potential contribution of microbial communities in technical ceramics for the improvement of rheological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Bernardino; Miller, Ana Z.; Santos, Ricardo; Monteiro, Sílvia; Dias, Diamantino; Neves, Orquídia; Dionísio, Amélia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2014-05-01

    Several bacterial and fungal species naturally occurring in ceramic raw materials used in construction, such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Aureobasidium, are known to produce exopolysaccharides (EPS). These polymers excreted by the cells are of widespread occurrence and may confer unique and potentially interesting properties with potential industrial uses, such as viscosity control, gelation, and flocculation, during ceramic manufacturing. In this study, the microbial communities present in clay raw materials were identified by both cultural methods and DNA-based molecular techniques in order to appraise their potential contribution to enhance the performance of technical ceramics through the use of EPS. Mineralogical identification by X- Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the clay raw materials, as well as characterization of rheological properties of ceramic slips were also performed. Microbial EPS production and its introduction into ceramic slips will be then carried out in order to evaluate their effects on the rheological properties of the ceramic slips, powders and conformed bodies. Some positive aspects related to the use of EPS are: reduction of the environmental impact caused by synthetic organic additives, reduction of production costs, as well as the costs related with operator protection systems, gaseous effluent treatments, complex landfill, among others.

  7. Ecology and thermal inactivation of microbes in and on interplanetary space vehicle components. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, A. L.; Campbell, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Almost 600 articles and books published since 1960 about microbial and viral inactivation are listed. This bibliography is presented to facilitate literature reviews on chemical, heat, and radiation inactivation of microorganisms and viral particles.

  8. Functional Analysis of a Type-I Ribosome Inactivating Protein Balsamin from Momordica balsamina with Anti-Microbial and DNase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ajji, Parminder Kaur; Walder, Ken; Puri, Munish

    2016-09-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) have received considerable attention in biomedical research because of their unique activities towards tumor and virus-infected cells. We extracted balsamin, a type-I RIP, from Momordica balsamina. In the present study, a detailed investigation on DNase activity, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity was conducted using purified balsamin. DNase-like activity of balsamin towards plasmid DNA was pH, incubation time and temperature dependent. Moreover, the presence of Mg(2+) (10-50 mM) influenced the DNA cleavage activity. Balsamin also demonstrated reducing power and a capacity to scavenge free radicals in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli, which suggests potential utility of balsamin as a nutraceutical.

  9. Template assisted surface microstructuring of flowable dental composites and its effect on microbial adhesion properties.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Nadja; Maenz, Stefan; Sanz Beltrán, Vanesa; Völpel, Andrea; Heyder, Markus; Sigusch, Bernd W; Lüdecke, Claudia; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-03-01

    Despite their various advantages, such as good esthetic properties, absence of mercury and adhesive bonding to teeth, modern dental composites still have some drawbacks, e.g., a relatively high rate of secondary caries on teeth filled with composite materials. Recent research suggests that microstructured biomaterials surfaces may reduce microbial adhesion to materials due to unfavorable physical material-microbe interactions. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to test the hypotheses that (i) different surface microstructures can be created on composites by a novel straightforward approach potentially suitable for clinical application and (ii) that these surface structures have a statistically significant effect on microbial adhesion properties. Six different dental composites were initially tested for their suitability for microstructuring by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) templates. Each composite was light-cured between a glass slide and a microstructured PDMS template. The nano-hybrid composite Grandio Flow was the only tested composite with satisfying structurability, and was therefore used for the bacterial adhesion tests. Composites samples were structured with four different microstructures (flat, cubes, linear trapezoid structures, flat pyramids) and incubated for 4h in centrifuged saliva. The bacterial adherence was then characterized by colony forming units (CFUs) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All four microstructures were successfully transferred from the PDMS templates to the composite Grandio Flow. The CFU-test as well as the quantitative analysis of the SEM images showed the lowest bacterial adhesion on the flat composite samples. The highest bacterial adhesion was observed on the composite samples with linear trapezoid structures, followed by flat pyramids and cubes. The microstructure of dental composite surfaces statistically significantly influenced the adhesion of oral bacteria. Modifying the composite surface structure may be

  10. Cell-based detection of microbial biomaterial contaminations.

    PubMed

    Roch, Toralf; Ma, Nan; Kratz, Karl; Lendlein, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in biomaterial synthesis and functionalization is the prevention of microbial contaminations such as endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides (LPS)). In addition to LPS, which are exclusively expressed by Gram negative bacteria, also other microbial products derived from fungi or Gram positive bacteria can be found as contaminations in research laboratories. Typically, the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-test is used to determine the endotoxin levels of medical devices. However, this test fails to detect material-bound LPS and other microbial contaminations and, as demonstrated in this study, detects LPS from various bacterial species with different sensitivities.In this work, a cell-based assay using genetically engineered RAW macrophages, which detect not only soluble but also material-bound microbial contaminations is introduced.The sensitivity of this cell-line towards different LPS species and different heat-inactivated microbes was investigated. As proof of principle a soft hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) network (cPnBA), which may due to adhesive properties strongly bind microbes, was deliberately contaminated with heat-inactivated bacteria. While the LAL-test failed to detect the microbial contamination, the cell-based assay clearly detected material-bound microbial contaminations. Our data demonstrate that a cell-based detection system should routinely be used as supplement to the LAL-test to determine microbial contaminations of biomaterials.

  11. Visualization of physico-chemical properties and microbial distribution in soil and root microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickhorst, Thilo; Schmidt, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    Plant root development is influenced by soil properties and environmental factors. In turn plant roots can also change the physico-chemical conditions in soil resulting in gradients between roots and the root-free bulk soil. By releasing a variety of substances roots facilitate microbial activities in their direct vicinity, the rhizosphere. The related microorganisms are relevant for various ecosystem functions in the root-soil interface such as nutrient cycling. It is therefore important to study the impact and dynamics of microorganisms associated to different compartments in root-soil interfaces on a biologically meaningful micro-scale. The analysis of microorganisms in their habitats requires microscopic observations of the respective microenvironment. This can be obtained by preserving the complex soil structure including the root system by resin impregnation resulting in high quality thin sections. The observation of such sections via fluorescence microscopy, SEM-EDS, and Nano-SIMS will be highlighted in this presentation. In addition, we will discuss the combination of this methodological approach with other imaging techniques such as planar optodes or non-invasive 3D X-ray CT to reveal the entire spatial structure and arrangement of soil particles and roots. When combining the preservation of soil structure via resin impregnation with 16S rRNA targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) single microbial cells can be visualized, localized, and quantified in the undisturbed soil matrix including the root-soil interfaces. The simultaneous use of multiple oligonucleotide probes thereby provides information on the spatial distribution of microorganisms belonging to different phylogenetic groups. Results will be shown for paddy soils, where management induced physico-chemical dynamics (flooding and drying) as well as resulting microbial dynamics were visualized via correlative microscopy in resin impregnated samples.

  12. Effects of gamma irradiation on physicochemical properties, antioxidant and microbial activities of sour cherry juice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjeh, Edris; Barzegar, Mohsen; Ali Sahari, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Recently, due to the beneficial effects of bioactive compounds, demand for minimally processed fruits and fruit juices has increased rapidly in the world. In this study, sour cherry juice (SCJ) was exposed to gamma irradiation at 0.0, 0.5, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0 kGy and then stored at 4 °C for 60 days. Total soluble solids (TSS), total acidity (TA), color, total phenolic content (TPC), total monomeric anthocyanin content (TMC), antioxidant activity, organic acid profile, and microbial analysis were evaluated at regular intervals during the storage. Results indicated that irradiation did not have any significant effect on TSS, while level of TA increased significantly at the dose of 6 kGy (p<0.05). Furthermore, irradiation treatment and storage time led to a significant increase in L* and b* values and a decrease in a* values. Total monomeric anthocyanin content of the irradiated SCJ was lower than that of the non-irradiated one (24% at 3.0 kGy) and also changed toward a more negative direction during the storage (63% at 3.0 kGy for 60 days). There was a significant decrease in the antioxidant activity (DPPH radical scavenging and FRAP assay) in both irradiated and stored SCJs. After irradiation (0-6 kGy), the results showed that the concentration of malic and oxalic acid significantly increased; but, the concentration of ascorbic, citric, fumaric, and succinic acids significantly decreased. Gamma irradiation with doses of ≥3 kGy resulted in overall reduction in microbial loads. Based on the results obtained from the changes of physicochemical properties, antioxidant activity, and microbial analysis, irradiation of SCJ at doses of higher than 3.0 kGy is not recommended.

  13. Microbial control by packaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Catherine Nettles

    2002-03-01

    Since early man first used a variety of natural containers to store and eat foods, significant developments in food packaging materials have provided the means to suppress microbial growth as well as protect foods from external microbial contamination. Throughout this progression, packaging materials have been developed specifically to prevent the deterioration of foods resulting from exposure to air, moisture, or pH changes associated with the food or the surrounding atmosphere. Both flexible and rigid packaging materials, alone or in combination with other preservation methods, have been developed to offer the necessary barrier, inactivation, and containment properties required for successful food packaging. Examples of flexible packaging used to inactivate microorganisms associated with foods include controlled atmosphere, vacuum, modified atmosphere, active, and edible packaging. Additionally, the combination of rigid packaging materials made from metal, glass, or plastic with heat provides the most effective and widely used method for inactivating microorganisms. As with all food products, it is necessary to integrate a HACCP-based program to assure quality throughout the packaging operation. In addition to packaging improvements, other novel technologies include the development of detectors for oxygen levels, bacterial toxins, and microbial growth, or the integration of time-temperature indicators for detection of improper handling or storage.

  14. Anticariogenic and antibacterial properties of a copper varnish using an in vitro microbial caries model.

    PubMed

    Thneibat, Amenah; Fontana, Margherita; Cochran, Michael A; Gonzalez-Cabezas, Carlos; Moore, B Keith; Matis, Bruce A; Lund, Melvin R

    2008-01-01

    The antimicrobial and anticariogenic properties of a copper varnish (experimental mixture of Doc's Best Red Copper cement and Copalite varnish, Cooley and Cooley, Ltd, Houston, TX, USA: designated in this study as "Copper Seal") on the root surface were evaluated in an in vitro microbial caries model. Fifty-six human root specimens were prepared from anterior teeth and randomly divided into four groups: Groups 1 and 3-Copper Seal; Group 2-chlorhexidine varnish, the positive control (Cervitec, Ivolcar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and Group 4-a negative control that received no treatment. The varnishes were painted in Groups 1, 2 and 3, then visually removed after 24 hours in Group 1. The specimens were demineralized in a microbial caries model for five days. Plaque was collected from the specimens to obtain bacterial colonization numbers, then the specimens were sectioned and analyzed for lesion extent using Confocal Laser Scanning microscopy. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the four groups in terms of bacterial count. Regarding caries lesion development, the group with copper varnish visually removed (Group 1) and the non-treated group (Group 4) had significantly greater total area caries lesions and total lesion fluorescence than the copper varnish without removal group (Group 3) and the chlorhexidine group (Group 2). Therefore, it was concluded that copper and chlorhexidine varnishes have anticariogenic effects on root surfaces, as tested in this model.

  15. Microbial desizing using starch as model compound: enzyme properties and desizing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Feitkenhauer, Heiko; Fischer, Daniel; Fäh, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A film of sizing agents protects yarn during weaving. Its removal in a subsequent washing process causes 50% of the organic effluent load of textile finishing processes and requires large amounts of auxiliary chemicals (e.g., surfactants). Microbial desizing is a new bioprocess that uses the acidifying culture of a two-phase anaerobic digestion plant for the removal and partial degradation (acidification) of the sizing agent. Soluble starch is used in this study to characterize the enzymatic properties in the supernatant of the desizing culture and to link them to desizing efficiencies. The supernatant of the culture (grown at 37 degrees C, pH 5.5) displayed the highest enzymatic activity between pH 4 and 5 and in a broad temperature range (20-80 degrees C). Highest metabolization rates were determined with the substrate amylose. Short chain dextrins (average of 5 and 10 glucose units) and amylopectin were converted significantly more slowly. At 37 degrees C the half-life time of the enzymatic activity in the supernatant was 45 h. In a desizing test a decisive reduction of the chain length was found already after 1 h (allowing starch solubilization). A microbial desizing experiment with dyed, native maize starch demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed bioprocess.

  16. Ultrasound treatment: effect on physicochemical, microbial and antioxidant properties of cherry (Prunus avium).

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Sabeera; Ahmad, Mudasir; Wani, S M; Gani, Adil; Baba, Waqas N; Shah, Umar; Khan, Asma Ashraf; Masoodi, F A; Gani, Asir; Wani, Touseef Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    The cherry was treated with ultrasonic waves (33 kHz, 60 W) at different time intervals (10, 20, 30, 40, 60 min) and study was carried out to analyze the change in physico-chemical properties (TSS, pH, color, acidity and firmness), antioxidant potential and microbial load of the fruit during the storage period of 15 days at 4 °C. It was observed that ultrasound treatment (US) between 30 and 40 min showed better retention of color of the fruit during the storage period. The antioxidant assays (DPPH, ABTS and TPC) also increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) up to 40 min, however the firmness of the fruit was affected and it showed a significant decrease beyond 20 min of US treatment. The sample with 40 min US treatment showed significantly less microbial load than other samples. The 20-40 min US treatment time (33 kHz, 60 W) was suggested for preservation of cherry during the storage at 4 °C.

  17. Changes in Microbial Community Structure and Soil Biological Properties in Mined Dune Areas During Re-vegetation.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Indra Elena C; Santos, Vilma M; da Silva, Danielle Karla A; Fernandes, Marcelo F; Cavalcante, Uided Maaze T; Maia, Leonor C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of re-vegetation on the restoration of microbial community structure and soil microbiological properties in sand dunes that had been affected by mining activity. Soil samples were collected during the dry and rainy seasons from a chronosequence (1, 9, 21 years) of re-vegetated dunes using a single preserved dune as a reference. The composition of the fatty acid methyl esters and soil microbial properties were evaluated. The results showed that the changes in microbial community structure were related to seasonal variations: biomarkers of Gram-positive bacteria were higher than Gram-negative bacteria during the dry season, showing that this group of organisms is more tolerant to these stressful conditions. The microbial community structure in the natural dune was less affected by seasonal variation compared to the re-vegetated areas, whereas the opposite was observed for microbiological properties. Thus, in general, the proportion of saprobic fungi was higher in the natural dune, whereas Gram-negative bacteria were proportionally more common in the younger areas. Although over time the re-vegetation allows the recovery of the microbial community and the soil functions, these communities and functions are different from those found in the undisturbed areas.

  18. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organics in soil depends on the substances properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) in soil is regulated by microbial uptake from solution and following incorporation of into specific cell cycles. Various chemical properties of LMWOS, namely oxidation state, number of carbon (C) atoms, number of carboxylic (-COOH) groups, can affect their uptake from soil solution and further microbial utilization. The aim of the study was to trace the initial fate (including the uptake from soil solution and utilization by microorganisms) of three main classes of LMWOS, having contrast properties - sugars, carboxylic and amino acids. Top 10 cm of mineral soil were collected under Silver birch stands within the Bangor DIVERSE experiment, UK. Soil solution was extracted by centrifugation at 4000 rpm during 15 min. Soil was spiked with 14C glucose or fructose; malic, succinic or formic acids; alanine or glycine. No additional non-labeled LMWOS were added. 14C was traced in the dissolved organic matter (DOM), CO2, cytosol and soil organic matter (SOM) during one day. To estimate half-life times (T1 /2)of LMWOS in soil solution and in SOM pools, the single and double first order kinetic equations were fitted to the uptake and mineralization dynamics, respectively. The LMWOS T1 /2in DOM pool varied between 0.6-5 min, with the highest T1 /2for sugars (3.7 min) and the lowest for carboxylic acids (0.6-1.4 min). Thus, initial uptake of LMWOS is not a limiting step of microbial utilization. The T1 /2 of carboxylic and amino acids in DOM were closely related with oxidation state, showing that reduced substances remain in soil solution longer, than oxidized. The initial T1 /2 of LMWOS in SOM ranged between 30-80 min, with the longest T1 /2 for amino acids (50-80 min) and the shortest for carboxylic acids (30-48 min). These T1 /2values were in one-two orders of magnitude higher than LMWOS T1 /2 in soil solution, pointing that LMWOS mineralization occur with a delay after the uptake. Absence of correlations between

  19. Microbial community structure and metabolic property of biofilms in vermifiltration for liquid-state sludge stabilization using PLFA profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunhui; Xing, Meiyan; Yang, Jian; Lu, Yongsen; Lv, Baoyi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate effects of earthworms on microbial community structure and metabolic properties of biofilms in vermifiltration for liquid-state sludge stabilization, a vermifilter (VF) with earthworms and a conventional biofilter (BF) without earthworms were compared. The Shannon index of fungi in VF was 16% higher than that in BF, which indicated earthworm activities significantly enhanced fungi diversity. The ratio of monounsaturated to saturated (mono:sat) PLFAs of VF biofilms was higher than that of BF biofilms, which indicated the physiological and nutritional stress for microbial community in VF was relieved due to the increasing of soluble substances caused by the earthworm ingestion. Further investigation showed that the burrowing action of earthworms promoted the aeration condition and led to aerobic microorganisms were predominant in VF. Those results indicated earthworms improved microbial community structure and metabolic properties of biofilms and thus resulted in the overall optimization of the vermifiltration system for liquid-state sludge stabilization.

  20. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  1. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  2. Physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties of nanopowdered eggshell-supplemented yogurt during storage.

    PubMed

    Al Mijan, Mohammad; Choi, Kyung-Hoon; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the possibility of adding nanopowdered eggshell (NPES) into yogurt to improve the functionality of yogurt and the effects of adding NPES on the physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties of the products during storage. The pH and mean lactic acid bacteria counts of NPES-added (0.15-0.45%, wt/vol) yogurt ranged from 4.31 to 4.66 and from 6.56 × 10(8) to 8.56 × 10(8)cfu/mL, respectively, whereas these values ranged from 4.13 to 4.44 and 8.46 × 10(8) to 1.39 × 10(9), respectively, for the control samples during storage at 5 °C for 16d, which indicates a prolonged shelf-life with NPES-supplemented yogurt. Color analysis showed that the lightness (L*) and position between red and green (a*) values were not significantly influenced by the addition of NPES. However, the position between yellow and blue (b*) value significantly increased with the addition of the concentration (0.45%, wt/vol) of NPES at d 16 of storage. Sensory evaluation revealed that NPES-added yogurts showed a notably less sourness score and a higher astringency score than the control. An earthy flavor was higher in 0.45% NPES-supplemented yogurt compared with the control. Based on the results obtained from the current study, the concentration (0.15 to 0.30%, wt/vol) of NPES can be used to formulate NPES-supplemented yogurt without any significant adverse effects on the physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interactions between properties of amended strip mine spoils and microbial activities

    SciTech Connect

    Utsalo, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Properties of strip mine spoils before and after amendment with varying levels of carbon and nitrogen sources are characterized and compared with properties of similarly amended garden soil samples. Changes in spoils as reflected in the stimulation of microbial populations, rate of nitrate formation, the turnover of microbial biomass and the growth yields of white clover and rye grass are evaluated. Limed spoils and garden soils were fertilized and incubated at 25/sup 0/C following amendments with organic substrates. Changes in parameters related to soil fertility status were analyzed on a weekly basis. The possible identity and the toxic effects on white clover and a Rhizobium of acidity factors present in strip mine spoils were evaluated using soil experiments and pure culture studies in artificial culture media. The results indicate that acid spoils contain low numbers of viable microorganisms which readily respond to soil amendment with substrates. No nitrification occurs in acid spoils but liming and inoculation with compost infusion stimulate active nitrification. Aluminum, manganese and acidity appear to be important factors which inhibit the survival of plants and microbes in spoils. Adequate liming improves rhizobial survival and growth and nodulation of white clover in spoils. Acidity factors have greater impact on Rhizobium than on the white clover host under nutritionally independent conditions. Increase in inoculum size enhances nodulation and growth of clover at low aluminum levels. Reducing the time of exposure of rhizobia to acidity factors outside the symbiotic host does not appear to enhance the growth yield of clover under symbiotic conditions. Molds appear to contribute more to the increased aggregate stability observed in amended soils than bacteria and actinomycetes.

  4. Physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties of yogurt supplemented with nanopowdered chitosan during storage.

    PubMed

    Seo, M H; Lee, S Y; Chang, Y H; Kwak, H S

    2009-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine the possibility of adding nanopowdered chitosan (NPC) into cholesterol-reduced yogurt to improve the functionality of yogurt and the effects of adding NPC on the physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties of the products during storage. The pH values and mean lactic acid bacteria counts of NPC-added (0.3 to approximately 0.7%, wt/vol) and cholesterol-reduced yogurt ranged from 4.19 to 4.41 and from 4.75 x 10(8) to 9.70 x 10(8) cfu/mL, respectively, when stored at 4 degrees C for 20 d, thereby indicating a possibility of prolonging the shelf life of yogurt. In color, the a* and b* values for cholesterol-reduced yogurt were not significantly influenced by the addition of NPC (0.1 to approximately 0.7%, wt/vol); however, the L* values significantly decreased with the addition of the greatest concentration (0.7%, wt/vol) of NPC at 0-d storage. The sensory test revealed that the astringency scores significantly increased at 0-d storage when the greatest concentration (0.7%, wt/vol) of NPC was added into cholesterol-reduced yogurt. Based on the data obtained from the current study, it is concluded that concentrations (0.3 to ~0.5%, vol/vol) of NPC could be used to produce an NPC-added and cholesterol-reduced yogurt without significantly adverse effects on the physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties.

  5. Effects of Bacterial Inactivation Methods on Downstream Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Andy; Merkley, Eric D.; Clowers, Brian H.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2015-05-01

    Inactivation of pathogenic microbial samples is often necessary for the protection of researchers and to comply with local and federal regulations. By its nature, biological inactivation causes changes to microbial samples, potentially affecting observed experimental results. While inactivation induced damage to materials such as DNA has been evaluated, the effect of various inactivation strategies on proteomic data, to our knowledge, has not been discussed. To this end, we inactivated samples of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli by autoclave, ethanol, or irradiation treatment to determine how inactivation changes liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry data quality as well as apparent protein content of cells. Proteomic datasets obtained from aliquots of samples inactivated by different methods were highly similar, with Pearson correlation coefficients ranging from 0.822 to 0.985 and 0.816 to 0.985 for E. coli and Y. pestis, respectively, suggesting that inactivation had only slight impacts on the set of proteins identified. In addition, spectral quality metrics such as distributions of various database search algorithm scores remained constant across inactivation methods, indicating that inactivation does not appreciably degrade spectral quality. Though overall changes resulting from inactivation were small, there were detectable trends. For example, one-sided Fischer exact tests determined that periplasmic proteins decrease in observed abundance after sample inactivation by autoclaving (α = 1.71x10-2 for E. coli, α = 4.97x10-4 for Y. pestis) and irradiation (α = 9.43x10-7 for E. coli, α = 1.21x10-5 for Y. pestis) when compared to controls that were not inactivated. Based on our data, if sample inactivation is necessary, we recommend inactivation with ethanol treatment with secondary preference given to irradiation.

  6. Effects of bacterial inactivation methods on downstream proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Andy; Merkley, Eric D; Clowers, Brian H; Hutchison, Janine R; Kreuzer, Helen W

    2015-05-01

    Inactivation of pathogenic microbial samples is often necessary for the protection of researchers and to comply with local and federal regulations. By its nature, biological inactivation causes changes to microbial samples, potentially affecting observed experimental results. While inactivation-induced damage to materials such as DNA has been evaluated, the effect of various inactivation strategies on proteomic data, to our knowledge, has not been discussed. To this end, we inactivated samples of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli by autoclave, ethanol, or irradiation treatment to determine how inactivation changes liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry data quality as well as apparent protein content of cells. Proteomic datasets obtained from aliquots of samples inactivated by different methods were highly similar, with Pearson correlation coefficients ranging from 0.822 to 0.985 and 0.816 to 0.985 for E. coli and Y. pestis, respectively, suggesting that inactivation had only slight impacts on the set of proteins identified. In addition, spectral quality metrics such as distributions of various database search algorithm scores remained constant across inactivation methods, indicating that inactivation does not appreciably degrade spectral quality. Though overall changes resulting from inactivation were small, there were detectable trends. For example, one-sided Fischer exact tests determined that periplasmic proteins decrease in observed abundance after sample inactivation by autoclaving (α=1.71×10(-2) for E. coli, α=4.97×10(-4) for Y. pestis) and irradiation (α=9.43×10(-7) for E. coli, α=1.21×10(-5) for Y. pestis) when compared to controls that were not inactivated. Based on our data, if sample inactivation is necessary, we recommend inactivation with ethanol treatment with secondary preference given to irradiation.

  7. Composition, physicochemical properties and thermal inactivation kinetics of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase from coconut (Cocos nucifera) water obtained from immature, mature and overly-mature coconut.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thuan-Chew; Cheng, Lai-Hoong; Bhat, Rajeev; Rusul, Gulam; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2014-01-01

    Composition, physicochemical properties and enzyme inactivation kinetics of coconut water were compared between immature (IMC), mature (MC) and overly-mature coconuts (OMC). Among the samples studied, pH, turbidity and mineral contents for OMC water was the highest, whereas water volume, titratable acidity, total soluble solids and total phenolics content for OMC water were the lowest. Maturity was found to affect sugar contents. Sucrose content was found to increase with maturity, and the reverse trend was observed for fructose and glucose. Enzyme activity assessment showed that polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in all samples was more heat resistant than peroxidase (POD). Compared to IMC and MC, PPO and POD from OMC water showed the lowest thermal resistance, with D83.3°C=243.9s (z=27.9°C), and D83.3°C=129.9s (z=19.5°C), respectively.

  8. Plant diversity does not buffer drought effects on early-stage litter mass loss rates and microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Anja; Eisenhauer, Nico; Weigelt, Alexandra; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Human activities are decreasing biodiversity and changing the climate worldwide. Both global change drivers have been shown to affect ecosystem functioning, but they may also act in concert in a non-additive way. We studied early-stage litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties (basal respiration and microbial biomass) during the summer season in response to plant species richness and summer drought in a large grassland biodiversity experiment, the Jena Experiment, Germany. In line with our expectations, decreasing plant diversity and summer drought decreased litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties. In contrast to our hypotheses, however, this was only true for mass loss of standard litter (wheat straw) used in all plots, and not for plant community-specific litter mass loss. We found no interactive effects between global change drivers, that is, drought reduced litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties irrespective of plant diversity. High mass loss rates of plant community-specific litter and low responsiveness to drought relative to the standard litter indicate that soil microbial communities were adapted to decomposing community-specific plant litter material including lower susceptibility to dry conditions during summer months. Moreover, higher microbial enzymatic diversity at high plant diversity may have caused elevated mass loss of standard litter. Our results indicate that plant diversity loss and summer drought independently impede soil processes. However, soil decomposer communities may be highly adapted to decomposing plant community-specific litter material, even in situations of environmental stress. Results of standard litter mass loss moreover suggest that decomposer communities under diverse plant communities are able to cope with a greater variety of plant inputs possibly making them less responsive to biotic changes.

  9. Use of insertional inactivation to facilitate studies of biological properties of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA)

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    PspA is a cell surface protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae that is present on a number of clinical isolates as well as the nonencapsulated laboratory strain Rx1. In a previous report we have shown that mAbs directed against PspA can protect mice from at least some of the pneumococcal strains bearing this protein. In our present report we have produced insertional inactivation mutants that lack PspA and have used these mutants to demonstrate that PspA can play a role in pneumococcal virulence and that anti-PspA immunity can lead to protection against pneumococcal infection. PspA- mutants were obtained using derivatives of plasmid pVA891 carrying chromosomal fragments from Rx1. From one of the mutants, we cloned a 550 bp fragment of the pneumococcal gene into pVA891 and transferred this chimeric plasmid, designated pKSD300, into Escherichia coli. After transformation of pKSD300 into Rx1, PspA production is not detected. In colony hybridization experiments, the 550 bp fragment hybridizes specifically to pneumococcal isolates in a pattern consistent with the hypothesis that the fragment is a portion of the pspA structural gene that is different from the portions coding for the antigenic determinants detected by mAbs Xi64 or Xi126. When X-linked immunodeficient (xid) CBA/N mice were immunized with wild-type Rx1, they were resistant to challenge with type 3 strain WU2. However, when these mice were immunized with a PspA- mutant of Rx1, they failed to survive the subsequent challenge, indicating that immunity to PspA can contribute to the resistance to pneumococcal infection. Using pKSD300 we insertionally inactivated pspA in D39, a virulent strain of S. pneumoniae. When injected intravenously there was a 10-fold greater reduction of the mutant pneumococci in the blood, as compared to the wild-type D39. PMID:3546575

  10. Comparison of NOM removal and microbial properties in up-flow/down-flow BAC filter.

    PubMed

    Han, Lineng; Liu, Wenjun; Chen, Mo; Zhang, Minglu; Liu, Shuming; Sun, Ruilin; Fei, Xiangqin

    2013-09-15

    The removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in term of CODMn by up-flow biologically activated carbon filter (UBACF) and down-flow biologically activated carbon filter (DBACF) was investigated in a pilot-scale test. The impacts of the molecular weight distribution of NOM on its degradation by the UBACF and DBACF were evaluated. The relationship between biodegradation and the microbial properties in the UBACF and DBACF were approached as well. The feed water of the UBACF and DBACF were pumped from the effluent of the rapid sand filtration (RSF) of Chengnan Drinking Water Treatment Plant (CDWTP), Huaian, Jiangsu Province, China. When the adsorption was the dominant mechanism of NOM removal at the initial stage of operation, the CODMn removal efficiency by the UBACF was lower than the DBACF. However, with the microbes gradually accumulated and biofilm formed, the removal of CODMn by the UBACF increased correspondingly to 25.3%, at the steady-state operation and was approximately 10% higher than that by the DBACF. Heterotrophy plate count (HPC) in the finished water of the UBACF was observed 30% higher than that of the DBACF. The UBACF effluent had higher concentration of detached bacteria whereas the DBACF harbored more attached biomass. The highest attached biomass concentration of the UBACF was found in the middle of the GAC bed. On the contrary, the highest attached biomass concentration of the DBACF was found on the top of the GAC bed. Furthermore, a total of 9479 reads by pyrosequencing was obtained from samples of the UBACF and DBACF effluents. The UBACF effluent had a more diverse microbial community and more even distribution of species than the DBACF effluent did. Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in the finished water of the UBACF and DBACF. The higher organic matter removal by the UBACF was attributed to the presence of its higher biologically activity.

  11. Probing the oxidation reduction properties of terrestrially and microbially derived dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimmen, Ryan L.; Cory, Rose M.; Chin, Yu-Ping; Trouts, Tamara D.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2007-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been shown to be an integral component in biogeochemical electron transfer reactions due to its demonstrated ability to facilitate redox reactions. While the role of DOM as a facilitator of electron transfer processes has been demonstrated, greater knowledge would lead to better understanding of the structural components responsible for redox behavior, such as quinones and nitrogen and sulfur (N/S) functional groups. This investigation uses direct scan voltammetry (DSV) coupled with fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as thermochemolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to elucidate the organic moieties responsible for facilitating electron transfer reactions. We contrast electrochemical properties and structural details of three organic matter isolates from diverse sources; Great Dismal Swamp DOM (terrestrially derived, highly aromatic), Pony Lake DOM (microbially derived, highly aliphatic) and Toolik Lake (terrestrially derived, photochemically and microbially altered) with juglone (a redox-active model quinone). Aromatic and phenolic constituents were detected (by 13C NMR) and recovered (by thermochemolysis GC-MS) from all three fulvic acid samples, highlighting the ubiquity of these compounds and suggesting that the quinone-phenol redox couple is not limited to DOM derived from lignin precursors. The range of hydroxy-benzene and benzoic acid derivatives may explain the lack of a single pair of well-defined oxidation and reduction peaks in the DSV scans. The presence of a wide-range of hydroxylated benzoic acid isomers and other redox-active aromatic residues implies that native DOM possesses overlapping redox potentials analogous to their characteristic range of p Ka values.

  12. (dA·dT)-dependent inactivation of the DNA template properties by interaction with netropsin and distamycin A

    PubMed Central

    Wähnert, U.; Zimmer, Ch.; Luck, G.; Pitra, Ch.

    1975-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of the polypeptide antibiotics netropsin and distamycin A on DNA dependent nucleic acid synthesis has been shown to be related to the base composition of the template DNA. A number of natural DNA's of quite different dA·dT content as well as poly (dI-dC)·poly (dI-dC), poly (dA-dT)·poly (dA-dT), poly (dA) · poly (dT) and poly (dG)·poly(dC) has been studied as templates in DNA and in part in RNA polymerase reaction. The highest binding efficiency of netropsin existing for (dA·dT)-containing DNA polymers and the less pronounced interaction with the (dI·dC)-containing polymer shown by the melting and CD spectral behaviour of the complexes are entirely reflected in the template inactivation. The same is evident for distamycin A. However, in contrast to netropsin the antibiotic distamycin A exhibits some binding tendency to poly (dG)·poly (dC). Binding effects of a netropsin derivative to DNA and (dA·dT)-containing polymers suggest the importance of hydrogen bonds of the peptide groups in the complex formation. PMID:1093141

  13. [Research progress on microbial properties of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidising bacteria].

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-dong

    2015-03-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) is a recently discovered process that constitutes a unique association between the two major global elements essential for life, carbon and nitrogen. This process is one of the most important discoveries in the fields of environmental science and microbiology. The discovery of N-DAMO process supplements biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen in nature, extends microbial diversity and urges development of novel simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal process. The N-DAMO process is mediated by the bacterium " Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera), which belongs to the candidate phylum NC10. Currently, a series of breakthroughs have been made in the research of M. oxyfera. The properties of M. oxyfera morphology, chemical composition, enrichment culture, physiology and biochemistry, and ecology have been revealed. Most importantly, the special ultrastructure (star-like) of the cell shape and unique chemical composition (10MeC(16,1Δ7)) of M. oxyfera have been revealed. In addition, a new intra-aerobic metabolism (the fourth biological pathway to produce oxygen) was discovered in M. oxyfera. It was observed that M. oxyfera bypassed the denitrification intermediate nitrous oxide by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen gas and oxygen, which was then used to oxidise methane. The present review summarises various aspects of microbiological properties of M. oxyfera.

  14. Impact of microbial transglutaminase on gelling properties of Indian mackerel fish protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Chanarat, Sochaya; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2013-01-15

    Impacts of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) (0-0.6 units/g sample) on gel properties of Indian mackerel unwashed mince, surimi and protein isolates with and without prewashing were studied. Generally, lower myoglobin and lipid contents were found in protein isolate with and without prewashing, compared to those of unwashed mince and surimi (P<0.05). Protein isolate had the decreased Ca(2+)-ATPase and protein solubility, indicating protein denaturation. When MTGase was incorporated, breaking force and deformation of all gels markedly increased, especially as MTGase levels increased (P<0.05). At the same MTGase level, gel from protein isolate with prewashing exhibited the highest breaking force and deformation (P<0.05). The addition of MTGase could lower the expressible moisture content of most gels. No change in whiteness of gel was observed with the addition of MTGase (P>0.05), but gel from protein isolate gels had decreased whiteness as MTGase at high level was added. The microstructure of protein isolate gels without prewashing showed a similar network to unwashed mince gels, whilst a similar network was observed between surimi gel and gel from protein isolate with prewashing. Nevertheless, a larger void was noticeable in gels from protein isolates. All gels incorporated with MTGase (0.6 units/g) showed a slightly denser network than those without MTGase. Thus, gel with improved properties could be obtained from protein isolate from Indian mackerel with added MTGase.

  15. Land-use types and soil chemical properties influence soil microbial communities in the semiarid Loess Plateau region in China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qin; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Shi, Wei-Yu; Li, Guoqing; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Du, Sheng

    2017-03-28

    Similar land-use types usually have similar soil properties, and, most likely, similar microbial communities. Here, we assessed whether land-use types or soil chemical properties are the primary drivers of soil microbial community composition, and how changes in one part of the ecosystem affect another. We applied Ion Torrent sequencing to the bacterial and fungal communities of five different land-use (vegetation) types in the Loess Plateau of China. We found that the overall trend of soil quality was natural forest > plantation > bare land. Dominant bacterial phyla consisted of Proteobacteria (42.35%), Actinobacteria (15.61%), Acidobacteria (13.32%), Bacteroidetes (8.43%), and Gemmatimonadetes (6.0%). The dominant fungi phyla were Ascomycota (40.39%), Basidiomycota (38.01%), and Zygomycota (16.86%). The results of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) and Redundancy Analysis (RDA) based on land-use types displayed groups according to the land-use types. Furthermore, the bacterial communities were mainly organized by soil organic carbon (SOC). The fungal communities were mainly related to available phosphorus (P). The results suggested that the changes of land use type generated changes in soil chemical properties, controlling the composition of microbial community in the semiarid Loess Plateau region. The microbial community could be an indicator for soil quality with respect to ecological restoration.

  16. Land-use types and soil chemical properties influence soil microbial communities in the semiarid Loess Plateau region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qin; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Shi, Wei-Yu; Li, Guoqing; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Du, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Similar land-use types usually have similar soil properties, and, most likely, similar microbial communities. Here, we assessed whether land-use types or soil chemical properties are the primary drivers of soil microbial community composition, and how changes in one part of the ecosystem affect another. We applied Ion Torrent sequencing to the bacterial and fungal communities of five different land-use (vegetation) types in the Loess Plateau of China. We found that the overall trend of soil quality was natural forest > plantation > bare land. Dominant bacterial phyla consisted of Proteobacteria (42.35%), Actinobacteria (15.61%), Acidobacteria (13.32%), Bacteroidetes (8.43%), and Gemmatimonadetes (6.0%). The dominant fungi phyla were Ascomycota (40.39%), Basidiomycota (38.01%), and Zygomycota (16.86%). The results of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) and Redundancy Analysis (RDA) based on land-use types displayed groups according to the land-use types. Furthermore, the bacterial communities were mainly organized by soil organic carbon (SOC). The fungal communities were mainly related to available phosphorus (P). The results suggested that the changes of land use type generated changes in soil chemical properties, controlling the composition of microbial community in the semiarid Loess Plateau region. The microbial community could be an indicator for soil quality with respect to ecological restoration.

  17. Land-use types and soil chemical properties influence soil microbial communities in the semiarid Loess Plateau region in China

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qin; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Shi, Wei-Yu; Li, Guoqing; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Du, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Similar land-use types usually have similar soil properties, and, most likely, similar microbial communities. Here, we assessed whether land-use types or soil chemical properties are the primary drivers of soil microbial community composition, and how changes in one part of the ecosystem affect another. We applied Ion Torrent sequencing to the bacterial and fungal communities of five different land-use (vegetation) types in the Loess Plateau of China. We found that the overall trend of soil quality was natural forest > plantation > bare land. Dominant bacterial phyla consisted of Proteobacteria (42.35%), Actinobacteria (15.61%), Acidobacteria (13.32%), Bacteroidetes (8.43%), and Gemmatimonadetes (6.0%). The dominant fungi phyla were Ascomycota (40.39%), Basidiomycota (38.01%), and Zygomycota (16.86%). The results of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) and Redundancy Analysis (RDA) based on land-use types displayed groups according to the land-use types. Furthermore, the bacterial communities were mainly organized by soil organic carbon (SOC). The fungal communities were mainly related to available phosphorus (P). The results suggested that the changes of land use type generated changes in soil chemical properties, controlling the composition of microbial community in the semiarid Loess Plateau region. The microbial community could be an indicator for soil quality with respect to ecological restoration. PMID:28349918

  18. Effects of plant diversity, functional group composition, and fertilization on soil microbial properties in experimental grassland.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Tanja; Barnard, Romain L; Niklaus, Pascal A; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Weigelt, Alexandra; Scheu, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Loss of biodiversity and increased nutrient inputs are two of the most crucial anthropogenic factors driving ecosystem change. Although both received considerable attention in previous studies, information on their interactive effects on ecosystem functioning is scarce. In particular, little is known on how soil biota and their functions are affected by combined changes in plant diversity and fertilization. We investigated the effects of plant diversity, functional community composition, and fertilization on the biomass and respiration of soil microbial communities in a long-term biodiversity experiment in semi-natural grassland (Jena Experiment). Plant species richness enhanced microbial basal respiration and microbial biomass, but did not significantly affect microbial specific respiration. In contrast, the presence of legumes and fertilization significantly decreased microbial specific respiration, without altering microbial biomass. The effect of legumes was superimposed by fertilization as indicated by a significant interaction between the presence of legumes and fertilization. Further, changes in microbial stoichiometry (C-to-N ratio) and specific respiration suggest the presence of legumes to reduce N limitation of soil microorganisms and to modify microbial C use efficiency. Our study highlights the role of plant species and functional group diversity as well as interactions between plant community composition and fertilizer application for soil microbial functions. Our results suggest soil microbial stoichiometry to be a powerful indicator of microbial functioning under N limited conditions. Although our results support the notion that plant diversity and fertilizer application independently affect microbial functioning, legume effects on microbial N limitation were superimposed by fertilization, indicating significant interactions between the functional composition of plant communities and nutrient inputs for soil processes.

  19. Effects of Plant Diversity, Functional Group Composition, and Fertilization on Soil Microbial Properties in Experimental Grassland

    PubMed Central

    Strecker, Tanja; Barnard, Romain L.; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Weigelt, Alexandra; Scheu, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss of biodiversity and increased nutrient inputs are two of the most crucial anthropogenic factors driving ecosystem change. Although both received considerable attention in previous studies, information on their interactive effects on ecosystem functioning is scarce. In particular, little is known on how soil biota and their functions are affected by combined changes in plant diversity and fertilization. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the effects of plant diversity, functional community composition, and fertilization on the biomass and respiration of soil microbial communities in a long-term biodiversity experiment in semi-natural grassland (Jena Experiment). Plant species richness enhanced microbial basal respiration and microbial biomass, but did not significantly affect microbial specific respiration. In contrast, the presence of legumes and fertilization significantly decreased microbial specific respiration, without altering microbial biomass. The effect of legumes was superimposed by fertilization as indicated by a significant interaction between the presence of legumes and fertilization. Further, changes in microbial stoichiometry (C-to-N ratio) and specific respiration suggest the presence of legumes to reduce N limitation of soil microorganisms and to modify microbial C use efficiency. Conclusions/Significance Our study highlights the role of plant species and functional group diversity as well as interactions between plant community composition and fertilizer application for soil microbial functions. Our results suggest soil microbial stoichiometry to be a powerful indicator of microbial functioning under N limited conditions. Although our results support the notion that plant diversity and fertilizer application independently affect microbial functioning, legume effects on microbial N limitation were superimposed by fertilization, indicating significant interactions between the functional composition of plant communities and

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic properties and photodynamic activity of porphyrin-fullerene C60 dyads with application in the photodynamic inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, M Belén; Spesia, Mariana B; Milanesio, M Elisa; Durantini, Edgardo N

    2014-08-18

    A covalently linked porphyrin-fullerene C60 dyad 5 was synthesized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition using 5-(4-formylphenyl)-10,15,20-tris[3-(N-ethylcarbazoyl)]porphyrin, N-methylglycine and fullerene C60. Methylation of 5 was used to obtain a cationic dyad 6. Spectroscopic properties were compared in toluene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and toluene/sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/water reverse micelles. Absorption spectra of the dyads were essentially a superposition of the spectra of the porphyrin and fullerene reference compounds, indicating a very weak interaction between the chromophores in the ground state. The fluorescence emission of the porphyrin moiety in the dyads was strongly quenched by the attached fullerene C60 unit. The singlet molecular oxygen, O2((1)Δg), productions (ΦΔ) were strongly dependent on the solvent polarity. Similar ΦΔ values were obtained for 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[3-(N-ethylcarbazoyl)]porphyrin (TCP) in both solvents. Also, dyad 5 showed a high O2((1)Δg) generation in toluene. However, O2((1)Δg) production mediated by 5 considerably diminished in the more polar solvent DMF. Also, a high photodynamic activity involving O2((1)Δg) was found for both dyads in a simple biomimetic system formed by AOT reverse micelles. The photoinactivation ability of these dyads was investigated in Staphylococcus aureus cell suspensions. Photosensitized inactivation of S. aureus by dyad 6 exhibits a 4.5 log decrease of cell survival (99.997% cell inactivation), when the cultures are treated with 5 μM photosensitizer and irradiated with visible light (350-800 nm) for 30 min. Under these conditions, a lower photocytotoxic effect was found for 5 (3.2 log decrease). Furthermore, photoinactivation induced by 6 was higher than those obtained with the separate moieties of the dyad. Therefore, molecular structures formed by porphyrin-fullerene C60 dyads represent interesting photosensitizers to inactivate S. aureus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson

  1. Inactivation of a fibronectin-binding TonB-dependent protein increases adhesion properties of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Pauer, Heidi; Cavalcanti, Soraia N V; Teixeira, Felipe L; Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Vommaro, Rossiane C; Oliveira, Ana Carolina S C; Ferreira, Eliane O; Domingues, Regina R M C P

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the Gram-negative strictly anaerobic bacterium most frequently isolated from clinical infections, including intra-abdominal abscess and bacteraemia. A number of factors can contribute to its virulence, including the expression of adhesins. Some of them are already characterized and can recognize and bind to extracellular matrix components, such as fibronectin. One of the molecules responsible for fibronectin-binding is an outer-membrane protein previously described by our group, which belongs to the TonB-dependent family. The aim of the present work was to characterize this protein. Initially, it was confirmed by fluorescence and electron microscopy that the fibronectin-binding molecules were located in the bacterial surface, but the distribution of these molecules on the surface was not uniform. To further evaluate the role of this protein, the gene bf1991, responsible for encoding this protein, was inactivated by a suicide vector and the mutant strains generated were used in several experiments to verify possible phenotypical alterations. In adherence assays with fibronectin immobilized on latex beads an increased adhesion was observed with the mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain. Western blot analysis in the mutant strain revealed the absence of the 120 kDa TonB-dependent outer-membrane protein and an alteration in the expression of an unknown 30 kDa protein. Killing assays using peritoneal macrophages were performed to evaluate the role of this protein as a virulence attribute and it was observed that the mutant strains were more efficiently internalized than the wild-type strains, with more internalization in the samples covered with fibronectin than in the samples not covered with it.

  2. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pajares, Silvia; Escalante, Ana E; Noguez, Ana M; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Cram, Silke S; Eguiarte, Luis Enrique; Souza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content) at local scale (meters) occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m(2) plot and: (a) characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b) determined soil chemical parameters, and (c) identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca(2), K(+)) and anions (HCO[Formula: see text], Cl(-), SO[Formula: see text]) content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of salt and soil microbial communities.

  3. An overview on fermentation, downstream processing and properties of microbial alkaline proteases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Beg, Q K; Khan, S; Chauhan, B

    2002-12-01

    Microbial alkaline proteases dominate the worldwide enzyme market, accounting for a two-thirds share of the detergent industry. Although protease production is an inherent property of all organisms, only those microbes that produce a substantial amount of extracellular protease have been exploited commercially. Of these, strains of Bacillus sp. dominate the industrial sector. To develop an efficient enzyme-based process for the industry, prior knowledge of various fermentation parameters, purification strategies and properties of the biocatalyst is of utmost importance. Besides these, the method of measurement of proteolytic potential, the selection of the substrate and the assay protocol depends upon the ultimate industrial application. A large array of assay protocols are available in the literature; however, with the predominance of molecular approaches for the generation of better biocatalysts, the search for newer substrates and assay protocols that can be conducted at micro/nano-scale are becoming important. Fermentation of proteases is regulated by varying the C/N ratio and can be scaled-up using fed-batch, continuous or chemostat approaches by prolonging the stationary phase of the culture. The conventional purification strategy employed, involving e.g., concentration, chromatographic steps, or aqueous two-phase systems, depends on the properties of the protease in question. Alkaline proteases useful for detergent applications are mostly active in the pH range 8-12 and at temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees C, with a few exceptions of extreme pH optima up to pH 13 and activity at temperatures up to 80-90 degrees C. Alkaline proteases mostly have their isoelectric points near to their pH optimum in the range of 8-11. Several industrially important proteases have been subjected to crystallization to extensively study their molecular homology and three-dimensional structures.

  4. Application of different organic amendments in a gasoline contaminated soil: effect on soil microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Tejada, M; Gonzalez, J L; Hernandez, M T; Garcia, C

    2008-05-01

    The effects of four organic wastes, including cotton gin crushed compost (CC), poultry manure (PM), sewage sludge (SS) and organic municipal solid waste (MSW) on some biological properties of a Xerollic Calciorthid soil polluted with gasoline at two loading rates (5% and 10%) were studied in an incubation experiment. Three hundred grams of sieved soil (<2mm) were polluted with gasoline and mixed with PM at a rate of 10%, CC at a rate of 17.2%, SS at a rate of 23.1%, or MSW at a rate of 13.1%, applying to the soil the same amount of organic matter with each organic amendment. An unamended soil, non polluted (C) and polluted with gasoline at 5% (G1) and 10% (G2) rate were used as reference. Soil samples were collected after 1, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 270 d of incubation and analyzed for microbial biomass carbon, respiration and dehydrogenase, urease, beta-glucosidase, phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities. At the end of the incubation period, soil biological properties were higher in organic amended soils than in C, G1 and G2 treatments. In particular, soil microbial biomass carbon and dehydrogenase, urease, beta-glucosidase, phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities increased 87.1%, 92.9%, 88.7%, 93.2%, 78.2% and 85.3%, respectively for CC-amended soils respect to G2, 85.7%, 82.3%, 87.3%, 92.2%, 76.7% and 83.6%, respectively for PM-amended soils; 82%, 90%, 84.8%, 89.9%, 74.1% and 80%, respectively for SS-amended soils; and 71.3%, 78.3% 26.2%, 38.2%, 79.7% and 88.6%, respectively for MSW-amended soils. Since the adsorption capacity of gasoline was higher in CC than the PM, SS and MSW-amended soils, it can be concluded that the addition of organic wastes with higher humic acid concentration is more beneficial for remediation of soils polluted with gasoline.

  5. Method for Evaluating Germicidal Ultraviolet Inactivation of Biocontaminated Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Emily L; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Willeke, Klaus; Reponen, Tiina; Moss, Clyde E; Jensen, Paul A

    1998-01-01

    Safety issues related to work-site conditions often deal with potential worker exposure to infectious airborne microorganisms due to their dissemination in indoor air and contamination of surfaces. Germicidal ultraviolet (GUV) radiation is used in health-care settings and other occupational environments for microbial inactivation. In this study, a new methodology for determining the efficiency of GUV microbial inactivation of surfaces was developed and evaluated. The method utilizes identical chambers in which test microorganisms are irradiated on agar surfaces at different humidity and irradiation intensity levels. The effects of GUV intensity and exposure time on microbial inactivation were examined for Micrococcus luteus and Serratia marcescens. It was found that at low humidity levels (20-25%) both organisms can be inactivated with at least 95% efficiency if the GUV intensity exceeds 50 μW/cm(2) for at least 3-5 min (corresponding to a dose of ~ 10 mJ/cm(2)). The radiation dose needed for effective inactivation of S. marcescens, as measured by a UV meter near the microbial sample, was found not to be affected by the humidity level, whereas that of M. luteus increased at higher humidities. The findings of this study can be used to determine sufficient GUV inactivation doses for occupational environments with various microbial contaminations.

  6. Inactivation of internalized and surface contaminated enteric viruses in green onions.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-09-02

    With increasing outbreaks of gastroenteritis associated with produce, it is important to assess interventions to reduce the risk of illness. UV, ozone and high pressure are non-thermal processing technologies that have potential to inactivate human pathogens on produce and allow the retention of fresh-like organoleptic properties. The objective of this study was to determine if UV, ozone, and high pressure are effective technologies compared to traditional chlorine spray on green onions to reduce enteric viral pathogens and to determine the effect of location of the virus (surface or internalized) on the efficacy of these processes. Mature green onion plants were inoculated with murine norovirus (MNV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and human adenovirus type 41 (Ad41) either on the surface through spot inoculation or through inoculating contaminated hydroponic solution allowing for uptake of the virus into the internal tissues. Inoculated green onions were treated with UV (240 mJ s/cm(2)), ozone (6.25 ppm for 10 min), pressure (500 MPa, for 5 min at 20°C), or sprayed with calcium hypochlorite (150 ppm, 4°C). Viral inactivation was determined by comparing treated and untreated inoculated plants using cell culture infectivity assays. Processing treatments were observed to greatly affect viral inactivation. Viral inactivation for all three viruses was greatest after pressure treatment and the lowest inactivation was observed after chlorine and UV treatment. Both surface inoculated viruses and viruses internalized in green onions were inactivated to some extent by these post-harvest processing treatments. These results suggest that ozone and high pressure processes aimed to reduce the level of microbial contamination of produce have the ability to inactivate viruses if they become localized in the interior portions of produce.

  7. Effects of Calcium Source on Biochemical Properties of Microbial CaCO3 Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Du, Yali; Jiang, Zhengwu; She, Anming

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical properties of CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii, an ureolytic type microorganism, were investigated. Effects of calcium source on the precipitation process were examined, since calcium source plays a key role in microbiologically induced mineralization. Regardless of the calcium source type, three distinct stages in the precipitation process were identified by Ca2+, NH4+, pH and cell density monitoring. Compared with stage 1 and 3, stage 2 was considered as the most critical part since biotic CaCO3 precipitation occurs during this stage. Kinetics studies showed that the microbial CaCO3 precipitation rate for calcium lactate was over twice of that for calcium nitrate, indicating that calcium lactate is more beneficial for the cell activity, which in turn determines urease production and CaCO3 precipitation. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the CaCO3 crystal as calcite, although scanning electron microscopy revealed a difference in crystal size and morphology if calcium source was different. The findings of this paper further suggest a promising application of microbiologically induced CaCO3 precipitation in remediation of surface and cracks of porous media, e.g., cement-based composites, particularly by using organic source of calcium lactate. PMID:26696978

  8. Bacterial adaptation to sublethal antibiotic gradients can change the ecological properties of multitrophic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Guzman, Laura Melissa; Reuman, Daniel C; Bell, Thomas

    2015-05-07

    Antibiotics leak constantly into environments due to widespread use in agriculture and human therapy. Although sublethal concentrations are well known to select for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, little is known about how bacterial evolution cascades through food webs, having indirect effect on species not directly affected by antibiotics (e.g. via population dynamics or pleiotropic effects). Here, we used an experimental evolution approach to test how temporal patterns of antibiotic stress, as well as migration within metapopulations, affect the evolution and ecology of microcosms containing one prey bacterium, one phage and two protist predators. We found that environmental variability, autocorrelation and migration had only subtle effects for population and evolutionary dynamics. However, unexpectedly, bacteria evolved greatest fitness increases to both antibiotics and enemies when the sublethal levels of antibiotics were highest, indicating positive pleiotropy. Crucially, bacterial adaptation cascaded through the food web leading to reduced predator-to-prey abundance ratio, lowered predator community diversity and increased instability of populations. Our results show that the presence of natural enemies can modify and even reverse the effects of antibiotics on bacteria, and that antibiotic selection can change the ecological properties of multitrophic microbial communities by having indirect effects on species not directly affected by antibiotics.

  9. Effect of phosphogypsum amendment on soil physico-chemical properties, microbial load and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Soumya; Mishra, C S K; Guru, B C; Rath, Monalisa

    2011-09-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is produced as a solid waste from phosphatic fertilizer plants. The waste slurry is disposed off in settling ponds or in heaps. This solid waste is now increasingly being used as a calcium supplement in agriculture. This study reports the effectof PG amendmenton soil physico chemical properties, bacterial and fungal count and activities of soil enzymes such as invertase, cellulase and amylase over an incubation period of 28 days. The highest mean percent carbon loss (55.98%) was recorded in 15% PG amended soil followed by (55.28%) in 10% PG amended soil and the minimum (1.68%) in control soil. The highest number of bacterial colonies (47.4 CFU g(-1) soil), fungal count (17.8 CFU g(-1) soil), highest amylase activity (38.4 microg g(-1) soil hr(-1)) and cellulase activity (38.37 microg g(-1) soil hr(-1)) were recorded in 10% amended soil. Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) has been recorded in the activities of amylase and cellulase over the period of incubation irrespective of amendments. Considering the bacterial and fungal growth and the activities of the three soil enzymes in the control and amended sets, it appears that 10% PG amendment is optimal for microbial growth and soil enzyme activities.

  10. The chemical properties and microbial community characterization of the thermophilic microaerobic pretreatment process.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shan-Fei; He, Shuai; Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Katukuri, Naveen Reddy; Dai, Meng; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2015-12-01

    Thermophilic microaerobic pretreatment (TMP) was recently reported as an efficient pretreatment method of anaerobic digestion (AD). In this study, the chemical properties and microbial community were characterized to reveal how TMP working. Compared with thermophilic treatment under anaerobic condition (TMP0), cellulase activity obviously improved under microaerobic condition (TMP1), which was 10.9-49.0% higher than that of TMP0. Reducing sugar, SCOD and VFAs concentrations of TMP1 were 2.6-8.9%, 1.8-4.8% and 13.8-24% higher than those of TMP0, respectively. TMP gave obvious rise to phylum Firmicutes, which associated with extracellular enzymes production. The proportion of class Bacilli (belongs to phylum Firmicutes and mainly acts during hydrolysis) in TMP1 was 124.89% higher than that of TMP0, which reflected the greater hydrolytic ability under microaerobic condition. The improved abundance of phylum Firmicutes (especially class Bacilli, order Bacillales) under microaerobic condition could be the fundamental reason for the improved AD performance of thermophilic microaerobic pretreated corn straw. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Unique Organic Matter and Microbial Properties in the Rhizosphere of a Wetland Soil.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Xu, Chen; Huang, Shan; Lin, Youmin; Tolić, Nikola; Roscioli-Johnson, Kristyn M; Santschi, Peter H; Jaffé, Peter R

    2016-04-19

    Wetlands attenuate the migration of many contaminants through a wide range of biogeochemical reactions. Recent research has shown that the rhizosphere, the zone near plant roots, in wetlands is especially effective at promoting contaminant attenuation. The objective of this study was to compare the soil organic matter (OM) composition and microbial communities of a rhizosphere soil (primarily an oxidized environment) to that of the bulk wetland soil (primarily a reduced environment). The rhizosphere had elevated C, N, Mn, and Fe concentrations and total bacteria, including Anaeromyxobacter, counts (as identified by qPCR). Furthermore, the rhizosphere contained several organic molecules that were not identified in the nonrhizosphere soil (54% of the >2200 ESI-FTICR-MS identified compounds). The rhizosphere OM molecules generally had (1) greater overall molecular weights, (2) less aromaticity, (3) more carboxylate and N-containing COO functional groups, and (4) a greater hydrophilic character. These latter two OM properties typically promote metal binding. This study showed for the first time that not only the amount but also the molecular characteristics of OM in the rhizosphere may in part be responsible for the enhanced immobilization of contaminants in wetlands. These finding have implications on the stewardship and long-term management of contaminated wetlands.

  12. By passing microbial resistance: xylitol controls microorganisms growth by means of its anti-adherence property.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aline S; Silva-Paes-Leme, Annelisa F; Raposo, Nádia R B; da Silva, Sílvio S

    2015-01-01

    Xylitol is an important polyalcohol suitable for use in odontological, medical and pharmaceutical products and as an additive in food. The first studies on the efficacy of xylitol in the control and treatment of infections started in the late 1970s and it is still applied for this purpose, with safety and very little contribution to resistance. Xylitol seems to act against microorganisms exerting an anti-adherence effect. Some research studies have demonstrated its action against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. However, a clear explanation of how xylitol is effective has not been completely established yet. Some evidence shows that xylitol acts on gene expression, down-regulating the ones which are involved in the microorganisms' virulence, such as capsule formation. Another possible clarification is that xylitol blocks lectin-like receptors. The most important aspect is that, over time, xylitol bypasses microbial resistance and succeeds in controlling infection, either alone or combined with another compound. In this review, the effect of xylitol in inhibiting the growth of a different microorganism is described, focusing on studies in which such an anti-adherent property was highlighted. This is the first mini-review to describe xylitol as an anti-adherent compound and take into consideration how it exerts such action.

  13. Bacterial adaptation to sublethal antibiotic gradients can change the ecological properties of multitrophic microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Guzman, Laura Melissa; Reuman, Daniel C.; Bell, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics leak constantly into environments due to widespread use in agriculture and human therapy. Although sublethal concentrations are well known to select for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, little is known about how bacterial evolution cascades through food webs, having indirect effect on species not directly affected by antibiotics (e.g. via population dynamics or pleiotropic effects). Here, we used an experimental evolution approach to test how temporal patterns of antibiotic stress, as well as migration within metapopulations, affect the evolution and ecology of microcosms containing one prey bacterium, one phage and two protist predators. We found that environmental variability, autocorrelation and migration had only subtle effects for population and evolutionary dynamics. However, unexpectedly, bacteria evolved greatest fitness increases to both antibiotics and enemies when the sublethal levels of antibiotics were highest, indicating positive pleiotropy. Crucially, bacterial adaptation cascaded through the food web leading to reduced predator-to-prey abundance ratio, lowered predator community diversity and increased instability of populations. Our results show that the presence of natural enemies can modify and even reverse the effects of antibiotics on bacteria, and that antibiotic selection can change the ecological properties of multitrophic microbial communities by having indirect effects on species not directly affected by antibiotics. PMID:25833854

  14. Some microbial, chemical and sensorial properties of gamma irradiated sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Al-Bachir, Mahfouz

    2016-04-15

    The effect on microbial, chemical and sensorial properties of sesame seeds was determined after irradiation and storage. The sesame seeds were analyzed before and after irradiation with 3, 6 and 9 kGy of gamma irradiation, and after 6 and 12 months of storage. The results showed that gamma irradiation had no significant (p>0.05) effect on the moisture, ash and fat content on sesame seeds. While, small differences, but sometimes significant (p<0.05), on protein and sugar contents were recorded between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. Total acidity percentage decreased significantly (p<0.05), while total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) increased significantly (p<0.05) due to irradiation. During storage, total acidity increased (p<0.05) and TVBN decreased (p<0.05). Gamma irradiation reduced the microorganisms of sesame seeds. Samples treated with 3 kGy or more remained completely free of fungi throughout the storage. While, only the samples treated with 9 kGy remained completely free of bacteria at the end of storage period (after 12 months). The scores for taste, flavor, color and texture of irradiated samples were higher, but not significantly (p>0.05) than those of non-irradiated samples.

  15. Unique Organic Matter and Microbial Properties in the Rhizosphere of a Wetland Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Xu, Chen; Huang, Shan; Lin, Youmin; Tolic, Nikola; Roscioli, Kristyn M.; Santschi, Peter H.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2016-04-19

    Wetlands attenuate the migration of many contaminants through a wide range of biogeochemical reactions. Recent research has shown that the rhizosphere, the zone near plant roots, in wetlands is especially effective at promoting contaminant attenuation. The objective of this study was to compare the soil organic matter (OM) composition and microbial communities of a rhizosphere soil (primarily an oxidized environment) to that of the bulk wetland soil (primarily a reduced environment). The rhizosphere had elevated C, N, Mn, and Fe concentrations and total bacteria, including Anaeromyxobacter, counts (as identified by qPCR). Furthermore, the rhizosphere contained several organic molecules that were not identified in the nonrhizosphere soil (54% of the >2200 ESI-FTICR-MS identified compounds). The rhizosphere OM molecules generally had (1) greater overall molecular weights, (2) less aromaticity, (3) more carboxylate and N-containing COO functional groups, and (4) a greater hydrophilic character. These latter two OM properties typically promote metal binding. This study showed for the first time that not only the amount but also the molecular characteristics of OM in the rhizosphere may in part be responsible for the enhanced immobilization of contaminants in wetlands. These finding have implications on the stewardship and long-term management of contaminated wetlands

  16. In silico investigation of lactoferrin protein characterizations for the prediction of anti-microbial properties

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Seyyed Mohsen; Niazi, Ali; Chahardoli, Mahmood; Hortamani, Ali; Setoodeh, Payam

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding multi-functional glycoprotein which has numerous physiological functions such as iron transportation, anti-microbial activity and immune response. In this study, different in silico approaches were exploited to investigate Lf protein properties in a number of mammalian species. Results showed that the iron-binding site, DNA and RNA-binding sites, signal peptides and transferrin motifs in the Lf structure were highly conserved. Examined sequences showed three conserved motifs which were repeated twice in the Lf structure, demonstrating ancient duplication events in its gene. Also, results suggest that the functional domains in mammalian Lf proteins are Zinc finger, Tubulin/FtsZ, GTPase, α/β hydrolase and Zinc knuckle. The potential site for nucleic acid binding and the major DNA and RNA- binding sites in this protein were found in the lactoferricin (Lfc) fragment. Due to its high positive charge, Lf is able to bind a large number of compounds. Our analysis also revealed that the interactions between Lf and ITLN1, LYZ, CSN2, and CD14 proteins played an important role in the protective activities of Lf. Analysis for the prediction of secondary structures indicated that high amounts of α-helix, β-strand and β-sheet were present in Lf. The high degree of conservation among mammalian Lf proteins indicates that there is a close relationship between these proteins, reflecting their important role. PMID:27843978

  17. Effects of Calcium Source on Biochemical Properties of Microbial CaCO3 Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Du, Yali; Jiang, Zhengwu; She, Anming

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical properties of CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii, an ureolytic type microorganism, were investigated. Effects of calcium source on the precipitation process were examined, since calcium source plays a key role in microbiologically induced mineralization. Regardless of the calcium source type, three distinct stages in the precipitation process were identified by Ca(2+), NH4 (+), pH and cell density monitoring. Compared with stage 1 and 3, stage 2 was considered as the most critical part since biotic CaCO3 precipitation occurs during this stage. Kinetics studies showed that the microbial CaCO3 precipitation rate for calcium lactate was over twice of that for calcium nitrate, indicating that calcium lactate is more beneficial for the cell activity, which in turn determines urease production and CaCO3 precipitation. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the CaCO3 crystal as calcite, although scanning electron microscopy revealed a difference in crystal size and morphology if calcium source was different. The findings of this paper further suggest a promising application of microbiologically induced CaCO3 precipitation in remediation of surface and cracks of porous media, e.g., cement-based composites, particularly by using organic source of calcium lactate.

  18. Microbial-Induced Heterogeneity in the Acoustic Properties of Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acoustic wave data were acquired over a two-dimensional region of a microbial-stimulated sand column and an unstimulated sand column to assess the spatiotemporal changes in a porous medium caused by microbial growth and biofilm formation. The acoustic signals from the unstimulate...

  19. Microbial-Induced Heterogeneity in the Acoustic Properties of Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acoustic wave data were acquired over a two-dimensional region of a microbial-stimulated sand column and an unstimulated sand column to assess the spatiotemporal changes in a porous medium caused by microbial growth and biofilm formation. The acoustic signals from the unstimulate...

  20. Long-term reactive nitrogen loading alters soil carbon and microbial community properties in a subalpine forest ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boot, Claudia M; Hall, Ed K.; Denef, Karolien; Baron, Jill S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition due to increased fossil fuel combustion and agricultural practices has altered global carbon (C) cycling. Additions of reactive N to N-limited environments are typically accompanied by increases in plant biomass. Soil C dynamics, however, have shown a range of different responses to the addition of reactive N that seem to be ecosystem dependent. We evaluated the effect of N amendments on biogeochemical characteristics and microbial responses of subalpine forest organic soils in order to develop a mechanistic understanding of how soils are affected by N amendments in subalpine ecosystems. We measured a suite of responses across three years (2011–2013) during two seasons (spring and fall). Following 17 years of N amendments, fertilized soils were more acidic (control mean 5.09, fertilized mean 4.68), and had lower %C (control mean 33.7% C, fertilized mean 29.8% C) and microbial biomass C by 22% relative to control plots. Shifts in biogeochemical properties in fertilized plots were associated with an altered microbial community driven by reduced arbuscular mycorrhizal (control mean 3.2 mol%, fertilized mean 2.5 mol%) and saprotrophic fungal groups (control mean 17.0 mol%, fertilized mean 15.2 mol%), as well as a decrease in N degrading microbial enzyme activity. Our results suggest that decreases in soil C in subalpine forests were in part driven by increased microbial degradation of soil organic matter and reduced inputs to soil organic matter in the form of microbial biomass.

  1. Study of toxic properties of prototypes of photo inactivated vaccines against tularemia and brucellosis by speckle microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianova, Onega V.; Ulyanov, Sergey

    2010-10-01

    Testing of prototypes of vaccines against extremely dangerous diseases, such as tularemia and brucellosis has been performed using speckle-microscopy. Changes of microcirculation caused by effect of toxins at applications of suspension of photoinactivated bacteria have been studied. Toxic properties of prototypes of vaccines against tularemia and brucellosis have been analyzed.

  2. Study of toxic properties of prototypes of photo inactivated vaccines against tularemia and brucellosis by speckle microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianova, Onega V.; Ulyanov, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    Testing of prototypes of vaccines against extremely dangerous diseases, such as tularemia and brucellosis has been performed using speckle-microscopy. Changes of microcirculation caused by effect of toxins at applications of suspension of photoinactivated bacteria have been studied. Toxic properties of prototypes of vaccines against tularemia and brucellosis have been analyzed.

  3. Kinetics of Hydrothermal Inactivation of Endotoxins ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixiong; Wilbur, Chris L.; Mintz, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model was established for the inactivation of endotoxins in water at temperatures ranging from 210°C to 270°C and a pressure of 6.2 × 106 Pa. Data were generated using a bench scale continuous-flow reactor system to process feed water spiked with endotoxin standard (Escherichia coli O113:H10). Product water samples were collected and quantified by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. At 250°C, 5-log endotoxin inactivation was achieved in about 1 s of exposure, followed by a lower inactivation rate. This non-log-linear pattern is similar to reported trends in microbial survival curves. Predictions and parameters of several non-log-linear models are presented. In the fast-reaction zone (3- to 5-log reduction), the Arrhenius rate constant fits well at temperatures ranging from 120°C to 250°C on the basis of data from this work and the literature. Both biphasic and modified Weibull models are comparable to account for both the high and low rates of inactivation in terms of prediction accuracy and the number of parameters used. A unified representation of thermal resistance curves for a 3-log reduction and a 3 D value associated with endotoxin inactivation and microbial survival, respectively, is presented. PMID:21193667

  4. Filtration properties of activated sludge in municipal MBR wastewater treatment plants are related to microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Bugge, Thomas V; Larsen, Poul; Saunders, Aaron M; Kragelund, Caroline; Wybrandt, Lisbeth; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten L; Nielsen, Per H

    2013-11-01

    In the conventional activated sludge process, a number of important parameters determining the efficiency of settling and dewatering are often linked to specific groups of bacteria in the sludge--namely floc size, residual turbidity, shear sensitivity and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). In membrane bioreactors (MBRs) the nature of solids separation at the membrane has much in common with sludge dewaterability but less is known about the effect of specific microbial groups on the sludge characteristics that affect this process. In this study, six full-scale MBR plants were investigated to identify correlations between sludge filterability, sludge characteristics, and microbial community structure. The microbial community structure was described by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization and sludge filterability by a low-pressure filtration method. A strong correlation between the degree of flocculation (ratio between floc size and residual turbidity) and sludge filterability at low pressure was found. A good balance between EPS and cations in the sludge correlated with good flocculation, relatively large sludge flocs, and low amounts of small particles and single cells in the bulk phase (measured as residual turbidity), all leading to a good filterability. Floc properties could also be linked to the microbial community structure. Bacterial species forming strong microcolonies such as Nitrospira and Accumulibacter were present in plants with good flocculation and filtration properties, while few strong microcolonies and many filamentous bacteria in the plants correlated with poor flocculation and filtration problems. In conclusion this study extends the hitherto accepted perception that plant operation affects floc properties which affects fouling. Additionally, plant operation also affects species composition, which affects floc properties and in the end fouling propensity.

  5. Effects of Microbial Transglutaminase on Physicochemical, Microbial and Sensorial Properties of Kefir Produced by Using Mixture Cow’s and Soymilk

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects microbial transglutaminase (m-TGs) on the physicochemical, microbial and sensory properties of kefir produced by using mix cow and soymilk. Kefir batches were prepared using 0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 Units m-TGs for per g of milk protein. Adding m-TGs to milk caused an increase in the pH and viscosity and caused a decrease in titratable acidity and syneresis in the kefir samples. Total bacteria, lactobacilli and streptococci counts decreased, while yeast counts increased in all the samples during storage. Alcohols and acids compounds have increased in all the samples except in the control samples, while carbonyl compounds have decreased in all the samples during storage (1-30 d). The differences in the percentage of alcohols, carbonyl compounds and acids in total volatiles on the 1st and the 30th d of storage were observed at 8.47-23.52%, 6.94-25.46% and 59.64-63.69%, respectively. The consumer evaluation of the kefir samples showed that greater levels of acceptability were found for samples which had been added 1.5 U m-TGs for per g of milk protein. PMID:28943774

  6. Soil biochemical properties and microbial resilience in agroforestry systems: effects on wheat growth under controlled drought and flooding conditions.

    PubMed

    Rivest, David; Lorente, Miren; Olivier, Alain; Messier, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Agroforestry is increasingly viewed as an effective means of maintaining or even increasing crop and tree productivity under climate change while promoting other ecosystem functions and services. This study focused on soil biochemical properties and resilience following disturbance within agroforestry and conventional agricultural systems and aimed to determine whether soil differences in terms of these biochemical properties and resilience would subsequently affect crop productivity under extreme soil water conditions. Two research sites that had been established on agricultural land were selected for this study. The first site included an 18-year-old windbreak, while the second site consisted in an 8-year-old tree-based intercropping system. In each site, soil samples were used for the determination of soil nutrient availability, microbial dynamics and microbial resilience to different wetting-drying perturbations and for a greenhouse pot experiment with wheat. Drying and flooding were selected as water stress treatments and compared to a control. These treatments were initiated at the beginning of the wheat anthesis period and maintained over 10 days. Trees contributed to increase soil nutrient pools, as evidenced by the higher extractable-P (both sites), and the higher total N and mineralizable N (tree-based intercropping site) found in the agroforestry compared to the conventional agricultural system. Metabolic quotient (qCO2) was lower in the agroforestry than in the conventional agricultural system, suggesting higher microbial substrate use efficiency in agroforestry systems. Microbial resilience was higher in the agroforestry soils compared to soils from the conventional agricultural system (windbreak site only). At the windbreak site, wheat growing in soils from agroforestry system exhibited higher aboveground biomass and number of grains per spike than in conventional agricultural system soils in the three water stress treatments. At the tree

  7. Biotic and abiotic properties mediating plant diversity effects on soil microbial communities in an experimental grassland.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Habekost, Maike; Eisenhauer, Nico; Roscher, Christiane; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christof; Oelmann, Yvonne; Scheu, Stefan; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Plant diversity drives changes in the soil microbial community which may result in alterations in ecosystem functions. However, the governing factors between the composition of soil microbial communities and plant diversity are not well understood. We investigated the impact of plant diversity (plant species richness and functional group richness) and plant functional group identity on soil microbial biomass and soil microbial community structure in experimental grassland ecosystems. Total microbial biomass and community structure were determined by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. The diversity gradient covered 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 60 plant species and 1, 2, 3 and 4 plant functional groups (grasses, legumes, small herbs and tall herbs). In May 2007, soil samples were taken from experimental plots and from nearby fields and meadows. Beside soil texture, plant species richness was the main driver of soil microbial biomass. Structural equation modeling revealed that the positive plant diversity effect was mainly mediated by higher leaf area index resulting in higher soil moisture in the top soil layer. The fungal-to-bacterial biomass ratio was positively affected by plant functional group richness and negatively by the presence of legumes. Bacteria were more closely related to abiotic differences caused by plant diversity, while fungi were more affected by plant-derived organic matter inputs. We found diverse plant communities promoted faster transition of soil microbial communities typical for arable land towards grassland communities. Although some mechanisms underlying the plant diversity effect on soil microorganisms could be identified, future studies have to determine plant traits shaping soil microbial community structure. We suspect differences in root traits among different plant communities, such as root turnover rates and chemical composition of root exudates, to structure soil microbial communities.

  8. Biotic and Abiotic Properties Mediating Plant Diversity Effects on Soil Microbial Communities in an Experimental Grassland

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Markus; Habekost, Maike; Eisenhauer, Nico; Roscher, Christiane; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christof; Oelmann, Yvonne; Scheu, Stefan; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Plant diversity drives changes in the soil microbial community which may result in alterations in ecosystem functions. However, the governing factors between the composition of soil microbial communities and plant diversity are not well understood. We investigated the impact of plant diversity (plant species richness and functional group richness) and plant functional group identity on soil microbial biomass and soil microbial community structure in experimental grassland ecosystems. Total microbial biomass and community structure were determined by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. The diversity gradient covered 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 60 plant species and 1, 2, 3 and 4 plant functional groups (grasses, legumes, small herbs and tall herbs). In May 2007, soil samples were taken from experimental plots and from nearby fields and meadows. Beside soil texture, plant species richness was the main driver of soil microbial biomass. Structural equation modeling revealed that the positive plant diversity effect was mainly mediated by higher leaf area index resulting in higher soil moisture in the top soil layer. The fungal-to-bacterial biomass ratio was positively affected by plant functional group richness and negatively by the presence of legumes. Bacteria were more closely related to abiotic differences caused by plant diversity, while fungi were more affected by plant-derived organic matter inputs. We found diverse plant communities promoted faster transition of soil microbial communities typical for arable land towards grassland communities. Although some mechanisms underlying the plant diversity effect on soil microorganisms could be identified, future studies have to determine plant traits shaping soil microbial community structure. We suspect differences in root traits among different plant communities, such as root turnover rates and chemical composition of root exudates, to structure soil microbial communities. PMID:24816860

  9. Soil microbial properties after long-term swine slurry application to conventional and no-tillage systems in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Balota, Elcio L; Machineski, Oswaldo; Hamid, Karima I A; Yada, Ines F U; Barbosa, Graziela M C; Nakatani, Andre S; Coyne, Mark S

    2014-08-15

    Swine waste can be used as an agricultural fertilizer, but large amounts may accumulate excess nutrients in soil or contaminate the surrounding environment. This study evaluated long-term soil amendment (15 years) with different levels of swine slurry to conventional (plow) tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT) soils. Long-term swine slurry application did not affect soil organic carbon. Some chemical properties, such as calcium, base saturation, and aluminum saturation were significantly different within and between tillages for various application rates. Available P and microbial parameters were significantly affected by slurry addition. Depending on tillage, soil microbial biomass and enzyme activity increased up to 120 m(3) ha(-1) year(-1) in all application rates. The NT system had higher microbial biomass and activity than CT at all application levels. There was an inverse relationship between the metabolic quotient (qCO2) and MBC, and the qCO2 was 53% lower in NT than CT. Swine slurry increased overall acid phosphatase activity, but the phosphatase produced per unit of microbial biomass decreased. A comparison of data obtained in the 3rd and 15th years of swine slurry application indicated that despite slurry application the CT system degraded with time while the NT system had improved values of soil quality indicators. For these Brazilian oxisols, swine slurry amendment was insufficient to maintain soil quality parameters in annual crop production without additional changes in tillage management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Soil microbial properties and plant growth responses to carbon and water addition in a temperate steppe: the importance of nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Linna; Huang, Wenwen; Guo, Chengyuan; Wang, Renzhong; Xiao, Chunwang

    2012-01-01

    Global climatic change is generally expected to stimulate net primary production, and consequently increase soil carbon (C) input. The enhanced C input together with potentially increased precipitation may affect soil microbial processes and plant growth. To examine the effects of C and water additions on soil microbial properties and plant growth, we conducted an experiment lasting two years in a temperate steppe of northeastern China. We found that soil C and water additions significantly affected microbial properties and stimulated plant growth. Carbon addition significantly increased soil microbial biomass and activity but had a limited effect on microbial community structure. Water addition significantly increased soil microbial activity in the first year but the response to water decreased in the second year. The water-induced changes of microbial activity could be ascribed to decreased soil nitrogen (N) availability and to the shift in soil microbial community structure. However, no water effect on soil microbial activity was visible under C addition during the two years, likely because C addition alleviated nutrient limitation of soil microbes. In addition, C and water additions interacted to affect plant functional group composition. Water addition significantly increased the ratio of grass to forb biomass in C addition plots but showed only minor effects under ambient C levels. Our results suggest that soil microbial activity and plant growth are limited by nutrient (C and N) and water availability, and highlight the importance of nutrient availability in modulating the responses of soil microbes and plants to potentially increased precipitation in the temperate steppe. Increased soil C input and precipitation would show significant effects on soil microbial properties and plant growth in the temperate steppe. These findings will improve our understanding of the responses of soil microbes and plants to the indirect and direct climate change effects.

  11. Response of Soil Properties and Microbial Communities to Agriculture: Implications for Primary Productivity and Soil Health Indicators.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Anderson, Ian C; Singh, Brajesh K

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is placing tremendous pressure on the soil's capacity to maintain its functions leading to large-scale ecosystem degradation and loss of productivity in the long term. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find early indicators of soil health degradation in response to agricultural management. In recent years, major advances in soil meta-genomic and spatial studies on microbial communities and community-level molecular characteristics can now be exploited as 'biomarker' indicators of ecosystem processes for monitoring and managing sustainable soil health under global change. However, a continental scale, cross biome approach assessing soil microbial communities and their functional potential to identify the unifying principles governing the susceptibility of soil biodiversity to land conversion is lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis from a dataset generated from 102 peer-reviewed publications as well as unpublished data to explore how properties directly linked to soil nutritional health (total C and N; C:N ratio), primary productivity (NPP) and microbial diversity and composition (relative abundance of major bacterial phyla determined by next generation sequencing techniques) are affected in response to agricultural management across the main biomes of Earth (arid, continental, temperate and tropical). In our analysis, we found strong statistical trends in the relative abundance of several bacterial phyla in agricultural (e.g., Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi) and natural (Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria) systems across all regions and these trends correlated well with many soil properties. However, main effects of agriculture on soil properties and productivity were biome-dependent. Our meta-analysis provides evidence on the predictable nature of the microbial community responses to vegetation type. This knowledge can be exploited in future for developing a new set of indicators for primary productivity and soil

  12. Response of Soil Properties and Microbial Communities to Agriculture: Implications for Primary Productivity and Soil Health Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Anderson, Ian C.; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is placing tremendous pressure on the soil’s capacity to maintain its functions leading to large-scale ecosystem degradation and loss of productivity in the long term. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find early indicators of soil health degradation in response to agricultural management. In recent years, major advances in soil meta-genomic and spatial studies on microbial communities and community-level molecular characteristics can now be exploited as ‘biomarker’ indicators of ecosystem processes for monitoring and managing sustainable soil health under global change. However, a continental scale, cross biome approach assessing soil microbial communities and their functional potential to identify the unifying principles governing the susceptibility of soil biodiversity to land conversion is lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis from a dataset generated from 102 peer-reviewed publications as well as unpublished data to explore how properties directly linked to soil nutritional health (total C and N; C:N ratio), primary productivity (NPP) and microbial diversity and composition (relative abundance of major bacterial phyla determined by next generation sequencing techniques) are affected in response to agricultural management across the main biomes of Earth (arid, continental, temperate and tropical). In our analysis, we found strong statistical trends in the relative abundance of several bacterial phyla in agricultural (e.g., Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi) and natural (Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria) systems across all regions and these trends correlated well with many soil properties. However, main effects of agriculture on soil properties and productivity were biome-dependent. Our meta-analysis provides evidence on the predictable nature of the microbial community responses to vegetation type. This knowledge can be exploited in future for developing a new set of indicators for primary productivity and

  13. From genes to genomes: universal scale-invariant properties of microbial chromosome organisation.

    PubMed

    Audit, Benjamin; Ouzounis, Christos A

    2003-09-19

    The availability of complete genome sequences for a large variety of organisms is a major advance in understanding genome structure and function. One attribute of genome structure is chromosome organisation in terms of gene localisation and orientation. For example, bacterial operons, i.e. clusters of co-oriented genes that form transcription units, enable functionally related genes to be expressed simultaneously. The description of genome organisation was pioneered with the study of the distribution of genes of the Escherichia coli partial genetic map before the full genome sequence was known. Deploying powerful techniques from circular statistics and signal processing, we revisit the issue of gene localisation and orientation using 89 complete microbial chromosomes from the eubacterial and archaeal domains. We demonstrate that there is no characteristic size pertinent to the description of chromosome structure, e.g. there does not exist any single length appropriate to describe gene clustering. Our results show that, for all 89 chromosomes, gene positions and gene orientations share a common form of scale-invariant correlations known as "long-range correlations" that we can reveal for distances from the gene length, up to the chromosome size. This observation indicates that genes tend to assemble and to co-orient over any scale of observation greater than a few kilobases. This unexpected property of chromosome structure can be portrayed as an operon-like organisation at all scales and implies that a complete scale range extending over more than three orders of magnitudes of chromosome segment lengths is necessary to properly describe prokaryotic genome organisation. We propose that this pattern results from the effects of the superhelical context on gene expression coupled with the structure and dynamics of the nucleoid, possibly accommodating the diverse gene expression profiles needed during the different stages of cellular life.

  14. Electricity producing property and bacterial community structure in microbial fuel cell equipped with membrane electrode assembly.

    PubMed

    Rubaba, Owen; Araki, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Sakamoto, Hisatoshi; Matsuda, Atsunori; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    It is important for practical use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to not only develop electrodes and proton exchange membranes but also to understand the bacterial community structure related to electricity generation. Four lactate fed MFCs equipped with different membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were constructed with paddy field soil as inoculum. The MEAs significantly affected the electricity-generating properties of the MFCs. MEA-I was made with Nafion 117 solution and the other MEAs were made with different configurations of three kinds of polymers. MFC-I equipped with MEA-I exhibited the highest performance with a stable current density of 55 ± 3 mA m⁻². MFC-III equipped with MEA-III with the highest platinum concentration, exhibited the lowest performance with a stable current density of 1.7 ± 0.1 mA m⁻². SEM observation revealed that there were cracks on MEA-III. These results demonstrated that it is significantly important to prevent oxygen-intrusion for improved MFC performance. By comparing the data of DGGE and phylogenetic analyzes, it was suggested that the dominant bacterial communities of MFC-I were constructed with lactate-fermenters and Fe(III)-reducers, which consisted of bacteria affiliated with the genera of Enterobacter, Dechlorosoma, Pelobacter, Desulfovibrio, Propioniferax, Pelosinus, and Firmicutes. A bacterium sharing 100% similarity to one of the DGGE bands was isolated from MFC-I. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate shared 98% similarity to gram-positive Propioniferax sp. P7 and it was confirmed that the isolate produced electricity in an MFC. These results suggested that these bacteria are valuable for constructing the electron transfer network in MFC.

  15. Properties and use of botulinum toxin and other microbial neurotoxins in medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Schantz, E J; Johnson, E A

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline botulinum toxin type A was licensed in December 1989 by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of certain spasmodic muscle disorders following 10 or more years of experimental treatment on human volunteers. Botulinum toxin exerts its action on a muscle indirectly by blocking the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at the nerve ending, resulting in reduced muscle activity or paralysis. The injection of only nanogram quantities (1 ng = 30 mouse 50% lethal doses [U]) of the toxin into a spastic muscle is required to bring about the desired muscle control. The type A toxin produced in anaerobic culture and purified in crystalline form has a specific toxicity in mice of 3 x 10(7) U/mg. The crystalline toxin is a high-molecular-weight protein of 900,000 Mr and is composed of two molecules of neurotoxin (ca. 150,000 Mr) noncovalently bound to nontoxic proteins that play an important role in the stability of the toxic unit and its effective toxicity. Because the toxin is administered by injection directly into neuromuscular tissue, the methods of culturing and purification are vital. Its chemical, physical, and biological properties as applied to its use in medicine are described. Dilution and drying of the toxin for dispensing causes some detoxification, and the mouse assay is the only means of evaluation for human treatment. Other microbial neurotoxins may have uses in medicine; these include serotypes of botulinum toxins and tetanus toxin. Certain neurotoxins produced by dinoflagellates, including saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin, cause muscle paralysis through their effect on the action potential at the voltage-gated sodium channel. Saxitoxin used with anaesthetics lengthens the effect of the anaesthetic and may enhance the effectiveness of other medical drugs. Combining toxins with drugs could increase their effectiveness in treatment of human disease. PMID:1579114

  16. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nims, Raymond; Plavsic, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses) display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus) are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses. PMID:24276023

  17. Inactivation of the Antifungal and Immunomodulatory Properties of Human Cathelicidin LL-37 by Aspartic Proteases Produced by the Pathogenic Yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Bochenska, Oliwia; Zawrotniak, Marcin; Wolak, Natalia; Trebacz, Grzegorz; Gogol, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Dominika; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kozik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Constant cross talk between Candida albicans yeast cells and their human host determines the outcome of fungal colonization and, eventually, the progress of infectious disease (candidiasis). An effective weapon used by C. albicans to cope with the host defense system is the release of 10 distinct secreted aspartic proteases (SAPs). Here, we validate a hypothesis that neutrophils and epithelial cells use the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 to inactivate C. albicans at sites of candidal infection and that C. albicans uses SAPs to effectively degrade LL-37. LL-37 is cleaved into multiple products by SAP1 to -4, SAP8, and SAP9, and this proteolytic processing is correlated with the gradual decrease in the antifungal activity of LL-37. Moreover, a major intermediate of LL-37 cleavage—the LL-25 peptide—is antifungal but devoid of the immunomodulatory properties of LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, LL-25 did not affect the generation of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils upon treatment with phorbol esters. Stimulating neutrophils with LL-25 (rather than LL-37) significantly decreased calcium flux and interleukin-8 production, resulting in lower chemotactic activity of the peptide against neutrophils, which may decrease the recruitment of neutrophils to infection foci. LL-25 also lost the function of LL-37 as an inhibitor of neutrophil apoptosis, thereby reducing the life span of these defense cells. This study indicates that C. albicans can effectively use aspartic proteases to destroy the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties of LL-37, thus enabling the pathogen to survive and propagate. PMID:25847962

  18. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Silvia; Noguez, Ana M.; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Cram, Silke S.; Eguiarte, Luis Enrique; Souza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content) at local scale (meters) occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m2 plot and: (a) characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b) determined soil chemical parameters, and (c) identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca2, K+) and anions (HCO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${}_{3}^{-}$\\end{document}3−, Cl−, SO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${}_{4}^{2-}$\\end{document}42−) content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of

  19. Effects of Background Fluid on the Efficiency of Inactivating Yeast with Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Young-Hyo; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Jin-Young; Shim, Gun-Bo; Uhm, Han-Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure has been actively applied to sterilization. However, its efficiency for inactivating microorganisms often varies depending on microbial species and environments surrounding the microorganisms. We investigated the influence of environmental factors (surrounding media) on the efficiency of microbial inactivation by plasma using an eukaryotic model microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to elucidate the mechanisms for differential efficiency of sterilization by plasma. Yeast cells treated with plasma in water showed the most severe damage in viability and cell morphology as well as damage to membrane lipids, and genomic DNA. Cells in saline were less damaged compared to those in water, and those in YPD (Yeast extract, Peptone, Dextrose) were least impaired. HOG1 mitogen activated protein kinase was activated in cells exposed to plasma in water and saline. Inactivation of yeast cells in water and saline was due to the acidification of the solutions by plasma, but higher survival of yeast cells treated in saline may have resulted from the additional effect related to salt strength. Levels of hydroxyl radical (OH.) produced by plasma were the highest in water and the lowest in YPD. This may have resulted in differential inactivation of yeast cells in water, saline, and YPD by plasma. Taken together, our data suggest that the surrounding media (environment) can crucially affect the outcomes of yeast cell plasma treatment because plasma modulates vital properties of media, and the toxic nature of plasma can also be altered by the surrounding media. PMID:23799081

  20. Inactivation of bacterial and viral biothreat agents on metallic copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bleichert, Pauline; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Hanczaruk, Matthias; Meyer, Hermann; Grass, Gregor

    2014-12-01

    In recent years several studies in laboratory settings and in hospital environments have demonstrated that surfaces of massive metallic copper have intrinsic antibacterial and antiviral properties. Microbes are rapidly inactivated by a quick, sharp shock known as contact killing. The underlying mechanism is not yet fully understood; however, in this process the cytoplasmic membrane is severely damaged. Pathogenic bacterial and viral high-consequence species able to evade the host immune system are among the most serious lethal microbial challenges to human health. Here, we investigated contact-killing mediated by copper surfaces of Gram-negative bacteria (Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis tularensis and Yersinia pestis) and of Gram-positive endospore-forming Bacillus anthracis. Additionally, we also tested inactivation of monkeypox virus and vaccinia virus on copper. This group of pathogens comprises biothreat species (or their close relatives) classified by the Center for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC) as microbial select agents posing severe threats to public health and having the potential to be deliberately released. All agents were rapidly inactivated on copper between 30 s and 5 min with the exception of B. anthracis endospores. For vegetative bacterial cells prolonged contact to metallic copper resulted in the destruction of cell structure.

  1. [Soil microbial properties under different vegetation types in Loess hilly region].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Yan; Qu, Lai-Ye; Chen, Li-Ding; Wei, Wei

    2010-01-01

    By using fumigation-extract (FE) method and Biolog Ecoplate, this paper investigated the microbial biomass and diversity in 0-20 cm soil layer under five vegetation types, including artificial woodland, shrubland, cropland, abandoned farmland, and natural grassland, in Dingxi of Gansu Province. In the meanwhile, the relationships between soil microbes and soil nutrients were studied by path analysis, and the five typical vegetation types were evaluated from the aspect of soil microbes. Relative to cropland, "grain for green" project played a key role in improving soil microbial resources. Microbial biomass carbon was the highest in ridge grassland, abandoned farmland, and pine woodland, followed by in Caragana korshinskii land, Medicago sativa land, restored land, and roadside land, and in wheat field and potato field. Microbial biomass nitrogen was the highest in ridge land, abandoned farmland, Pinus tabulaeformis woodland, Caragana korshinskii land, and Medicago sativa land, followed by in restored land and roadside land, and in wheat field and potato field. Caragana korshinskii land and Medicago sativa land, due to the existence of N-fixing rhizobium, had the highest ratio of soil microbial biomass nitrogen to soil total nitrogen. Owing to the continual biomass loss and rare feedback, cropland had the lowest quantity and activity of soil microbes. Through planting trees, shrubs and grasses or through fallowing, soil microbial biomass and activity were recovered, and the effect was increased with time. In 20-year old Caragana korshinskii land, the quantity and activity of soil microbes were similar to those in 50-year old Pinus tabulaeformis woodland, and the microbial community catabolic activity and soil nutrient use efficiency were higher. Considering the features of soil microbes under test vegetation types, Caragana korshinskii would be a good choice for local vegetation restoration.

  2. Long-Term Application of Bioorganic Fertilizers Improved Soil Biochemical Properties and Microbial Communities of an Apple Orchard Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Fang; E, Yaoyao; Yuan, Jun; Raza, Waseem; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Soil biochemical properties and microbial communities are usually considered as important indicators of soil health because of their association with plant nutrition. In this study, we investigated the impact of long-term application of bioorganic fertilizer (BOF) on soil biochemical properties and microbial communities in the apple orchard soil of the Loess Plateau. The experiment included three treatments: (1) control without fertilization (CK); (2) chemical fertilizer application (CF); and (3) bioorganic fertilizer application (BOF). The high throughput sequencing was used to examine the bacterial and fungal communities in apple orchard soil. The results showed that the BOF treatment significantly increased the apple yield during the experimental time (2009–2015). The application of BOF significantly increased the activities of catalase and invertase compared to those in CK and CF treatments. The high throughput sequencing data showed that the application of BOF changed the microbial community composition of all soil depths considered (0–20 cm, 20–40 cm, and 40–60 cm), e.g., the relative abundance of bio-control bacteria (Xanthomonadales, Lysobacter, Pseudomonas, and Bacillus), Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Ohtaekwangia, Ilyonectria, and Lecanicillium was increased while that of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gp4, Gp6 and Sphaerobacter was decreased. The increase in apple yield after the application of BOF might be due to increase in organic matter, total nitrogen and catalase and invertase activities of soil and change in the bacterial community composition by enriching Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Lysobacter, and Ohtaekwangia. These results further enhance the understanding on how BOFs alter soil microbial community composition to stimulate soil productivity. PMID:27965631

  3. Long-Term Application of Bioorganic Fertilizers Improved Soil Biochemical Properties and Microbial Communities of an Apple Orchard Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Fang; E, Yaoyao; Yuan, Jun; Raza, Waseem; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Soil biochemical properties and microbial communities are usually considered as important indicators of soil health because of their association with plant nutrition. In this study, we investigated the impact of long-term application of bioorganic fertilizer (BOF) on soil biochemical properties and microbial communities in the apple orchard soil of the Loess Plateau. The experiment included three treatments: (1) control without fertilization (CK); (2) chemical fertilizer application (CF); and (3) bioorganic fertilizer application (BOF). The high throughput sequencing was used to examine the bacterial and fungal communities in apple orchard soil. The results showed that the BOF treatment significantly increased the apple yield during the experimental time (2009-2015). The application of BOF significantly increased the activities of catalase and invertase compared to those in CK and CF treatments. The high throughput sequencing data showed that the application of BOF changed the microbial community composition of all soil depths considered (0-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and 40-60 cm), e.g., the relative abundance of bio-control bacteria (Xanthomonadales, Lysobacter, Pseudomonas, and Bacillus), Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Ohtaekwangia, Ilyonectria, and Lecanicillium was increased while that of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gp4, Gp6 and Sphaerobacter was decreased. The increase in apple yield after the application of BOF might be due to increase in organic matter, total nitrogen and catalase and invertase activities of soil and change in the bacterial community composition by enriching Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Lysobacter, and Ohtaekwangia. These results further enhance the understanding on how BOFs alter soil microbial community composition to stimulate soil productivity.

  4. Variability of soil microbial properties: effects of sampling, handling and storage.

    PubMed

    Cernohlávková, Jitka; Jarkovský, Jirí; Nesporová, Michala; Hofman, Jakub

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the effect of soil spatial variability within the sampling site scale, the effects of sample sieving (1, 2 and 4mm), and storage conditions up to 32 weeks (wet at 4 degrees C, -20 degrees C and air dried) on microbial biomass C, respiration, ammonification and nitrification activities in arable, grassland and forest soil. In general, all results were dependent on soil type. Arable soil showed the highest spatial variability, followed by grassland and forest soil. Sieving did not cause large differences; however, higher biomass C and respiration activity were observed in the 1mm than in the 4mm fraction. Storage at 4 degrees C seemed to be the most appropriate up to 8 weeks showing only minor changes of microbial parameters. Freezing of soils resulted in large increase of respiration. Dried storage indicated disruption of microbial communities even after 2 weeks.

  5. Plasma inactivation of microorganisms on sprout seeds in a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Butscher, Denis; Van Loon, Hanne; Waskow, Alexandra; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp; Schuppler, Markus

    2016-12-05

    Fresh produce is frequently contaminated by microorganisms, which may lead to spoilage or even pose a threat to human health. In particular sprouts are considered to be among the most risky foods sold at retail since they are grown in an environment practically ideal for growth of bacteria and usually consumed raw. Because heat treatment has a detrimental effect on the germination abilities of sprout seeds, alternative treatment technologies need to be developed for microbial inactivation purposes. In this study, non-thermal plasma decontamination of sprout seeds is evaluated as a promising option to enhance food safety while maintaining the seed germination capabilities. In detail, investigations focus on understanding the efficiency of non-thermal plasma inactivation of microorganisms as influenced by the type of microbial contamination, substrate surface properties and moisture content, as well as variations in the power input to the plasma device. To evaluate the impact of these parameters, we studied the reduction of native microbiota or artificially applied E. coli on alfalfa, onion, radish and cress seeds exposed to non-thermal plasma in an atmospheric pressure pulsed dielectric barrier discharge streamed with argon. Plasma treatment resulted in a maximum reduction of 3.4 logarithmic units for E. coli on cress seeds. A major challenge in plasma decontamination of granular food products turned out to be the complex surface topology, where the rough surface with cracks and crevices can shield microorganisms from plasma-generated reactive species, thus reducing the treatment efficiency. However, improvement of the inactivation efficiency was possible by optimizing substrate characteristics such as the moisture level and by tuning the power supply settings (voltage, frequency) to increase the production of reactive species. While the germination ability of alfalfa seeds was considerably decreased by harsh plasma treatment, enhanced germination was observed under

  6. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by citral.

    PubMed

    Somolinos, M; García, D; Condón, S; Mackey, B; Pagán, R

    2010-06-01

    The aim was to evaluate (i) the resistance of Escherichia coli BJ4 to citral in a buffer system as a function of citral concentration, treatment medium pH, storage time and initial inoculum size, (ii) the role of the sigma factor RpoS on citral resistance of E. coli, (iii) the role of the cell envelope damage in the mechanism of microbial inactivation by citral and (iiii) possible synergistic effects of mild heat treatment and pulsed electric fields (PEF) treatment combined with citral. The initial inoculum size greatly affected the efficacy of citral against E. coli cells. Exposure to 200 microl l(-1) of citral at pH 4.0 for 24 h at 20 degrees C caused the inactivation of more than 5 log(10) cycles of cells starting at an inoculum size of 10(6) or 10(7) CFU ml(-1), whereas increasing the cell concentration to 10(9) CFU ml(-1) caused <1 log(10) cycle of inactivation. Escherichia coli showed higher resistance to citral at pH 4.0 than pH 7.0. The rpoS null mutant strain E. coli BJ4L1 was less resistant to citral than the wild-type strain. Occurrence of sublethal injury to both the cytoplasmic and outer membranes was demonstrated by adding sodium chloride or bile salts to the recovery media. The majority of sublethally injured cells by citral required energy and lipid synthesis for repair. A strongly synergistic lethal effect was shown by mild heat treatment combined with citral but the presence of citral during the application of a PEF treatment did not show any advantage. This work confirms that cell envelope damage is an important event in citral inactivation of bacteria, and it describes the key factors on the inactivation of E. coli cells by citral. Knowledge about the mechanism of microbial inactivation by citral helps establish successful combined preservation treatments.

  7. Emulsion properties of pork myofibrillar protein in combination with microbial transglutaminase and calcium alginate under various pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Hong, Geun Pyo; Min, Sang-Gi; Chin, Koo Bok

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTG) and calcium alginate (CA) systems in combination with soybean oil on the emulsion properties of porcine myofibrillar protein (MP) were evaluated under various pH conditions. MTG was shown to improve emulsifying capacity and creaming stability, which increased with increasing pH values up to 6.5. The CA did not influence emulsifying capacity, but it improved the creaming stability of the MP-stabilized emulsions. Both MTG and CA enhanced the rheological properties, but their effects on the physical characteristics of the protein evidenced an opposite trend in relation to pH, i.e., the MTG system improved both the emulsion and gelling properties with increasing pH, whereas the CA system was effective when the pH was lowered. By combining the two MP gelling systems, a stable and pH-insensible emulsion could be produced.

  8. Effect of Inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with Mycorrhiza and Rhizobia on soil properties and microbial community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assigbetsé, K.; Ciss, I.; Bakhoum, N.; Dieng, L.

    2012-04-01

    Inoculation of legume plants with symbiotic microorganisms is widely used to improve their development and productivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (G. mosseae, G. fasciculatum, G. intraradices) either singly or in combination, on soil properties, activity and the genetic structure of soil microbial communities. The experiment set up in Southern Senegal consisted of 4 randomized blocks of A. senegal mature trees with 4 treatments including inoculated trees with Rhizobium (R), mycorrhizal fungus (M) and with Rhizobium+mycorhizal fungus (RM) and non-inoculated control (CON). Soil were sampled 2 years after the inoculation. Soil pH, C and N and available P contents were measured. The microbial abundance and activity were measured in terms of microbial biomass C (MBC) and basal soil respiration. The community structure of the total bacterial, diazotrophic and denitrifying communities was assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA, nifH and nirK genes respectively. Inoculations with symbiont under field conditions have increased soil pH. The C and N contents were enhanced in the dual-inoculated treatments (RM). The mycorrhized treatment have displayed the lowest available P contents while RM and R treatments exhibited higher contents rates. The microbial biomass C rates were higher in treatments co-inoculated with AM fungi and Rhizobium than in those inoculated singly with AM fungi or Rhizobium strains. The basal soil respiration were positively correlated to MBC, and the highest rates were found in the co-inoculated treatments. Fingerprints of 16S rDNA gene exhibited similar patterns between inoculated treatments and the control showing that the inoculation of mature trees have not impacted the total bacterial community structure. In contrast, the inoculated treatments have displayed individually different

  9. Cobop: Microbial Biofilms: A Parameter Altering the Apparent Optical Properties of Sediments, Seagrasses and Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    investigators (see above). The collaborative experiment was held at RSMAS (Miami) during April 2001. Quantitative imaging, generated by nanoplast -embedded...1999. Confocal Imaging of in situ natual microbial communities and their extracellular polymeric secretions using Nanoplast resin. BioTechniques 27

  10. COBOP: Microbial Biofilms: A Parameter Altering the Apparent Optical Properties of Sediments, Seagrasses and Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    nanoplast -embedded natural sediments, were generated by scanning confocal laser microscopy. RESULTS Results show that certain sediment sites, which contain an...Imaging of in situ natual microbial communities and their extracellular polymeric secretions using Nanoplast resin. BioTechniques 27: (in press) Decho

  11. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES AS PREDICTORS OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON SOIL MICROBIAL RESPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the effects of 19 hazardous organic chemicals on microbial respiration in two slightly acidic soils (a Captina silt loam from Roane County Tennessee, and a McLaurin sandy loam from Stone County, Mississippi), both low in organic ca...

  12. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES AS PREDICTORS OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON SOIL MICROBIAL RESPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the effects of 19 hazardous organic chemicals on microbial respiration in two slightly acidic soils (a Captina silt loam from Roane County Tennessee, and a McLaurin sandy loam from Stone County, Mississippi), both low in organic ca...

  13. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, V.; Khun, J.; Soušková, H.; Čeřovský, M.

    2015-07-01

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  14. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, V. Khun, J.; Soušková, H.; Čeřovský, M.

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  15. Key Edaphic Properties Largely Explain Temporal and Geographic Variation in Soil Microbial Communities across Four Biomes

    PubMed Central

    Borton, Hannah M.; Espinosa, Noelle; Gebhardt, Martha; Gil-Loaiza, Juliana; Gutknecht, Jessica L. M.; Maes, Patrick W.; Mott, Brendon M.; Parnell, John Jacob; Purdy, Gayle; Rodrigues, Pedro A. P.; Stanish, Lee F.; Walser, Olivia N.

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play a critical role in nutrient transformation and storage in all ecosystems. Quantifying the seasonal and long-term temporal extent of genetic and functional variation of soil microorganisms in response to biotic and abiotic changes within and across ecosystems will inform our understanding of the effect of climate change on these processes. We examined spatial and seasonal variation in microbial communities based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition across four biomes: a tropical broadleaf forest (Hawaii), taiga (Alaska), semiarid grassland-shrubland (Utah), and a subtropical coniferous forest (Florida). In this study, we used a team-based instructional approach leveraging the iPlant Collaborative to examine publicly available National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) 16S gene and PLFA measurements that quantify microbial diversity, composition, and growth. Both profiling techniques revealed that microbial communities grouped strongly by ecosystem and were predominately influenced by three edaphic factors: pH, soil water content, and cation exchange capacity. Temporal variability of microbial communities differed by profiling technique; 16S-based community measurements showed significant temporal variability only in the subtropical coniferous forest communities, specifically through changes within subgroups of Acidobacteria. Conversely, PLFA-based community measurements showed seasonal shifts in taiga and tropical broadleaf forest systems. These differences may be due to the premise that 16S-based measurements are predominantly influenced by large shifts in the abiotic soil environment, while PLFA-based analyses reflect the metabolically active fraction of the microbial community, which is more sensitive to local disturbances and biotic interactions. To address the technical issue of the response of soil microbial communities to sample storage temperature, we compared 16S-based community

  16. Key Edaphic Properties Largely Explain Temporal and Geographic Variation in Soil Microbial Communities across Four Biomes.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kathryn M; Borton, Hannah M; Espinosa, Noelle; Gebhardt, Martha; Gil-Loaiza, Juliana; Gutknecht, Jessica L M; Maes, Patrick W; Mott, Brendon M; Parnell, John Jacob; Purdy, Gayle; Rodrigues, Pedro A P; Stanish, Lee F; Walser, Olivia N; Gallery, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play a critical role in nutrient transformation and storage in all ecosystems. Quantifying the seasonal and long-term temporal extent of genetic and functional variation of soil microorganisms in response to biotic and abiotic changes within and across ecosystems will inform our understanding of the effect of climate change on these processes. We examined spatial and seasonal variation in microbial communities based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition across four biomes: a tropical broadleaf forest (Hawaii), taiga (Alaska), semiarid grassland-shrubland (Utah), and a subtropical coniferous forest (Florida). In this study, we used a team-based instructional approach leveraging the iPlant Collaborative to examine publicly available National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) 16S gene and PLFA measurements that quantify microbial diversity, composition, and growth. Both profiling techniques revealed that microbial communities grouped strongly by ecosystem and were predominately influenced by three edaphic factors: pH, soil water content, and cation exchange capacity. Temporal variability of microbial communities differed by profiling technique; 16S-based community measurements showed significant temporal variability only in the subtropical coniferous forest communities, specifically through changes within subgroups of Acidobacteria. Conversely, PLFA-based community measurements showed seasonal shifts in taiga and tropical broadleaf forest systems. These differences may be due to the premise that 16S-based measurements are predominantly influenced by large shifts in the abiotic soil environment, while PLFA-based analyses reflect the metabolically active fraction of the microbial community, which is more sensitive to local disturbances and biotic interactions. To address the technical issue of the response of soil microbial communities to sample storage temperature, we compared 16S-based community

  17. Microbial properties of mine spoil materials in the initial stages of soil development

    SciTech Connect

    Machulla, G.; Bruns, M.A.; Scow, K.M.

    2005-08-01

    The early years of soil genesis during mine spoil reclamation are critical for vegetative establishment and may help predict reclamation success. Mine spoils in the Halle-Leipzig region of Germany were analyzed for microbial changes following a hay mulch-seeding treatment without topsoil or fertilizer application. Microbial biomass carbon (C{sub mic}) and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of spoils were measured each year in the first 3 yr after treatment. In the third year, bacterial community DNA fingerprints were compared with those from a reference soil. Microbial indicators were measured at three depths in the upper 10 cm of spoils at three sites with contrasting parent materials: glacial till (sandy loam), limnic tertiary sediments (high-lignite sandy clay loam), and quaternary sand and gravel (loamy sand). Before reclamation, C{sub mic} means and standard deviations of surface spoils (0-1 cm) were 9{+-}6, 39{+-}11, and 38{+-}16 mg kg{sup -1} for the loamy sand, high-lignite sandy clay loam, and sandy loam spoils, respectively. Within one year, mean C{sub mic} at the surface increased to 148{+-}70, 229{+-}64, and 497{+-}167 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively, and was significantly higher at 0 to 1 cm than at lower depths. Highest DHA and DNA yields were obtained in the 0- to 1-cm depth of the sandy loam spoils. Microbial biomass C values exhibited significant correlations with DHA, DNA yield, and extractable C for all three mine spoils. Soil microbial indices were more responsive than plant measurements to differences in parent materials.

  18. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  19. Effect of amendment of bauxite processing sand with organic materials on its chemical, physical and microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Jones, B E H; Haynes, R J; Phillips, I R

    2010-11-01

    The effects of addition of a range of organic amendments (biosolids, spent mushroom compost, green waste compost and green waste-derived biochar), at two rates, on some key chemical, physical and microbial properties of bauxite-processing residue sand were studied in a laboratory incubation study. Levels of exchangeable cations were not greatly affected by additions of amendments but extractable P was increased significantly by mushroom and green waste composts and massively (i.e. from 11.8 to 966 mg P kg(-1)) by biosolids applications. Levels of extractable NO(3)(-)-N were also greatly elevated by biosolids additions and there was a concomitant decrease in pH. Addition of all amendments decreased bulk density and increased mesoporosity, available water holding capacity and water retention at field capacity (-10 kPa), with the higher rate having a greater effect. Addition of biosolids, mushroom compost and green waste compost all increased soluble organic C, microbial biomass C, basal respiration and the activities of beta-glucosidase, L-asparaginase and alkali phosphatase enzymes. The germination index of watercress grown in the materials was greatly reduced by biosolids application and this was attributed to the combined effects of a high EC and high concentrations of extractable P and NO(3)(-). It was concluded that the increases in water storage and retention and microbial activity induced by additions of the composts is likely to improve the properties of bauxite-processing residue sand as a growth medium but that allowing time for soluble salts, originating from the organic amendments, to leach out may be an important consideration before sowing seeds. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of UV-C treatment on inactivation of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tomato surface and steam scars, native microbial loads, and quality of grape tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated the effectiveness of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light inactivation as affected by the location of pathogens on the smooth surface and at stem scars of Grape tomatoes. A bacterial cocktail containing three strains of E. coli O157:H7 (C9490, E02128 and F00475) and a three serotypes o...

  1. Anti-microbial properties of histone H2A from skin secretions of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Jorge M O; Kemp, Graham D; Molle, M Gerard; Smith, Valerie J

    2002-01-01

    Skin exudates of rainbow trout contain a potent 13.6 kDa anti-microbial protein which, from partial internal amino acid sequencing, peptide mass fingerprinting, matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization MS and amino acid analysis, seems to be histone H2A, acetylated at the N-terminus. The protein, purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography, exhibits powerful anti-bacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with minimal inhibitory concentrations in the submicromolar range. Kinetic analysis revealed that at a concentration of 0.3 microM all test bacteria lose viability after 30 min incubation. Weaker activity is also displayed against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The protein is salt-sensitive and has no haemolytic activity towards trout erythrocytes at concentrations below 0.3 microM. Reconstitution of the protein in a planar lipid bilayer strongly disturbs the membrane but does not form stable ion channels, indicating that its anti-bacterial activity is probably not due to pore-forming properties. This is the first report to show that, in addition to its classical function in the cell, histone H2A has extremely strong anti-microbial properties and could therefore help contribute to protection against bacterial invasion. PMID:12164782

  2. Estimation of Antimicrobial Properties of Aqueous and Alcoholic Extracts of Salvadora Persica (Miswak) on Oral Microbial Pathogens - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Siddeeqh, Salman; Jose, Maji; Pai, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Twigs of Salvadora persica (Miswak) plant are being used as a means of oral hygiene since ages for brushing teeth. Though clinical research and trials have shown promising results on effectiveness of Miswak, but some reports are conflicting. Aim To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of crude aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Salvadora persica (Miswak) against the common microbial pathogens causing dental caries and periodontitis. Materials and Methods A prospective study of one year duration was conducted in Yenopoya dental and medical college, Mangalore. The twigs of Salvadora persica were collected and alcoholic and aqueous extracts were prepared using standard techniques. The antimicrobial properties of the extracts against common oral pathogens like Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Prevotella intermedia, & Peptostreptococcus were performed by agar well diffusion method and two fold broth dilution method. Results No significant results was obtained when water extracts of Salvadora persica was tested except for minimum inhibitory effect against Streptococcus mutans, Prevotella intermedia & Peptostreptococcus and Candida albicans. Relatively significant inhibitory effect was noted with respect to alcoholic extract of Salvadora persica. Conclusion Although comparatively less than chlorhexidine which is a known antimicrobial agent, the alcoholic extracts of Salvadora persica showed antimicrobial effect against the common microbial pathogens causing dental caries and periodontitis indicating a potential beneficial effect of this plant. However, further research with more standardized extraction procedure and advanced techniques is required to find out the exact chemicals responsible for the antimicrobial properties of the plant extract. PMID:27790459

  3. Influence of Sedimentary and Seagrass Microbial Communities on Shallow-Water Benthic Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    Similarly, determine the biomass, composition, and temporal variation of microorganisms epiphytic on seagrass blades at Lee Stocking Island (turtle...following section. 1) In October, we will submit a manuscript, authored by Drake, Dobbs, and Zimmerman, and entitled “Effects of epiphyte load on... epiphytes collected from LSI and Monterey Bay. There are two types of lipid analyses we have performed. The first yields a microbial biomass value

  4. Control of geometrical properties of carbon nanotube electrodes towards high-performance microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbay, Celal; Pu, Xiong; Choi, Woongchul; Choi, Mi-Jin; Ryu, Yeontack; Hou, Huijie; Lin, Furong; de Figueiredo, Paul; Yu, Choongho; Han, Arum

    2015-04-01

    In microbial fuel cells (MFCs), physical and electrochemical interactions between microbes and electrode surfaces are critical to performance. Nanomaterial-based electrodes have shown promising performances, however their unique characteristics have not been fully utilized. The developed electrodes here consist of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) directly grown in the radial direction from the wires of stainless steel (SS) meshes, providing extremely large three-dimensional surfaces while ensuring minimal ohmic loss between CNTs and SS meshes, fully utilizing the advantages of CNTs. Systematic studies on how different lengths, packing densities, and surface conditions of CNTs affect MFC power output revealed that long and loosely packed CNTs without any amorphous carbon show the highest power production performance. The power density of this anode is 7.4-fold higher compared to bare carbon cloth, which is the highest reported improvement for MFCs with nanomaterial-decorated electrodes. The results of this study offer great potential for advancing the development of microbial electrochemical systems by providing a highly efficient nanomaterial-based electrode that delivers large surface area, high electrochemical activity, and minimum ohmic loss, as well as provide design principles for next-generation nanomaterial-based electrodes that can be broadly applicable for highly efficient microbial electrochemical cells.

  5. Development of predictive modelling approaches for surface temperature and associated microbiological inactivation during hot dry air decontamination.

    PubMed

    Valdramidis, V P; Belaubre, N; Zuniga, R; Foster, A M; Havet, M; Geeraerd, A H; Swain, M J; Bernaerts, K; Van Impe, J F; Kondjoyan, A

    2005-04-15

    This research deals with the development of predictive modelling approaches in the field of heat transfer and microbial inactivation. Upon making some backstage microbiological considerations, surface temperature predictions during hot dry air decontaminations are incorporated in a microbial inactivation model, in order to describe inactivation kinetics under realistic (time-varying) temperature conditions. In the present study, the following parts are presented. (i) First, a one-dimensional heat transfer model is developed taking into account exchanges by convection, radiation and evaporation. The model is subsequently validated on a laboratory setup and on a test rig, assuming no water activity changes. This test rig is developed for studying-at a later stage-surface pasteurisation treatment on food products with the use of hot dry air. (ii) Isothermal inactivation data of Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 have been collected and inactivation parameters are accurately estimated by using a primary and a secondary model in a global modelling approach. (iii) Microbiological considerations such as microbial growth effects during come-up times, initial temperature of inactivation, and heat resistance effects, based on experimental observations and on literature studies, are formulated in order to evaluate possible microbial effects arising under the dynamic temperature conditions modelled in step (i). (iv) Microbial inactivation simulations with the incorporation of surface temperature predictions are presented. (v) Finally, the level of the microbial decontamination in an example based on the design of an industrial installation is presented, outlining the importance of the combination of surface temperature and microbial inactivation modelling approaches.

  6. Molecular Viability Testing of UV-Inactivated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Kris M; Nguyen, Felicia K; Kearney, Moira R; Meschke, John S; Cangelosi, Gerard A

    2017-03-10

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is effective at detecting bacterial DNA in samples, but it is unable to differentiate viable bacteria from inactivated cells or free DNA fragments. New PCR-based analytical strategies have been developed to address this limitation. Molecular viability testing (MVT) correlates bacterial viability with the ability to rapidly synthesize species-specific ribosomal RNA precursor (pre-rRNA) in response to brief nutritional stimulation. Previous studies demonstrated that MVT can assess bacterial inactivation by chlorine, serum, and low-temperature pasteurization. Here, we demonstrate that MVT can detect inactivation of Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Enterococcus faecalis cells by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Some UV-inactivated E. coli cells transiently retained the ability to synthesize pre-rRNA post-irradiation (generating false-positive MVT results), but this activity ceased within one hour following UV exposure. Viable but transiently undetectable (by culture) E. coli cells were consistently detected by MVT. An alternative viability testing method, viability PCR (vPCR), correlates viability with cell envelope integrity. This method did not distinguish viable from UV-inactivated bacteria under some conditions, indicating that the inactivated cells retained intact cell envelopes. MVT holds promise as a means to rapidly assess microbial inactivation by UV treatment.IMPORTANCE Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is increasingly used to disinfect water, food, and other materials for human use. Confirming the effectiveness of UV disinfection remains a challenging task. In particular, microbiological methods that rely on rapid detection of microbial DNA can yield misleading results. This is due to the detection of "remnant" DNA associated with dead microbial cells. This report describes a novel method that rapidly distinguishes living from dead microbial cells after UV disinfection.

  7. Macquarimicins, microbial metabolites from Micromonospora. I. Discovery, taxonomy, fermentation and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M; Karwowski, J P; Theriault, R J; Rasmussen, R R; Hensey, D M; Humphrey, P E; Swanson, S J; Barlow, G J; Premachandran, U; McAlpine, J B

    1995-06-01

    A novel series of microbial metabolites were discovered in fermentation broths of two soil isolates. Both cultures were identified as strains of Micromonospora chalcea. Production of the metabolites, named macquarimicins, was monitored by an HPLC assay. A seven-day fermentation yielded 27 mg/liter of macquarimicin A. With MICs of 50 to 100 micrograms/ml, macquarimicin A has only very low activity against strains of Bacteroides and other anaerobes. Macquarimicin B has inhibitory activity against the leukemia cell line P-388.

  8. Low-temperature STM studies of electronic properties of microbial nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Kathy; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens expresses pili that act as electrically conductive nanowires. These microbial nanowires transport metabolically generated electrons outside the cell body to electron acceptors in the organism's environment. We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on these pili in an endeavor to elucidate the mechanism of conductivity. In particular, we will discuss spectroscopy curves acquired at a temperature of 77 K. This work supported by the NSF-MCB Grant No. 1021948 and a Strategic Partnership Grant from the Michigan State University Foundation. K.W. acknowledges support from a U.S. Department of Education GAANN fellowship.

  9. Application of manures to mitigate the harmful effects of electrokinetic remediation of heavy metals on soil microbial properties in polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbian, Iman; Safari Sinegani, Ali Akbar; Nguyen, Thi Thu Nhan; Che, Rongxiao; Phan, Thuc D; Hosseini Bai, Shahla

    2017-09-26

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) used with electrokinetic (EK) to remediate heavy metal-polluted soils is a toxic chelate for soil microorganisms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of alternative organic chelates to EDTA on improving the microbial properties of a heavy metal-polluted soil subjected to EK. Cow manure extract (CME), poultry manure extract (PME) and EDTA were applied to a lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn)-polluted calcareous soil which were subjected to two electric intensities (1.1 and 3.3 v/cm). Soil carbon pools, microbial activity, microbial abundance (e.g., fungal, actinomycetes and bacterial abundances) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Pb and Zn (available forms) were assessed in both cathodic and anodic soils. Applying the EK to soil decreased all the microbial variables in the cathodic and anodic soils in the absence or presence of chelates. Both CME and PME applied with two electric intensities decreased the negative effect of EK on soil microbial variables. The lowest values of soil microbial variables were observed when EK was combined with EDTA. The following order was observed in values of soil microbial variables after treating with EK and chelates: EK + CME or EK + PME > EK > EK + EDTA. The CME and PME could increase the concentrations of available Pb and Zn, although the increase was less than that of EDTA. Overall, despite increasing soil available Pb and Zn, the combination of EK with manures (CME or PME) mitigated the negative effects of using EK on soil microbial properties. This study suggested that the synthetic chelates such as EDTA could be replaced with manures to alleviate the environmental risks of EK application.

  10. Mechanism-based inactivators as probes of cytochrome P450 structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kent, U M; Juschyshyn, M I; Hollenberg, P F

    2001-09-01

    The cytochromes P450 superfamily of enzymes is a group of hemeproteins that catalyze the metabolism of an extensive series of compounds including drugs, chemical carcinogens, fatty acids, and steroids. They oxidize substrates ranging in size from ethylene to cyclosporin. Although significant efforts have been made to obtain structural information on the active sites of the microbial P450s, relatively little is currently known regarding the identities of the critical amino acid residues in the P450 active sites that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. Since information on the crystal structures of the eukaryotic P450s has been relatively limited, investigators have used a variety of other techniques in attempts to elucide the structural features that play a role in the catalytic properties and substrate specificity at the enzyme active site. These include site-directed mutagenesis, natural mutations, homology modeling, mapping with aryl-iron complexes, affinity and photoaffinity labeling, and mechanism-based inactivators. A variety of different mechanism-based inactivators have proven to be useful in identifiying active site amino acid residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis. In this review we present a sampling of the types of studies that can be conducted using mechanism-based inactivators and highlight studies with several classes of compounds including acetylenes, isothiocyanates, xanthates, aminobenzotriazoles, phencyclidine, and furanocoumarins. Labeled peptides isolated from the inactivated proteins have been analyzed by N-terminal amino acid sequencing in conjunction with mass spectrometry to determine the sites of covalent modification. Mechanistic studies aimed at identifying the basis for the inactivation following adduct formation are also presented.

  11. [Variation of soil physicochemical and microbial properties in degraded steppes in Hulunbeir of China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Wu, Yun-Na; Kenji, Tamura; Huo, Guang-Wei; Luo, Wen-Tao; Lü, Jian-Zhou

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the influence of degradation on grassland, we sampled soil and plants at three sites respectively under light, moderate and severe degradation in Hulunbeir Grassland in northern China and analyzed the differences and relationships among soil physicochemical characters, enzyme activity, soil microorganism quantity and aboveground biomass. The results showed that species richness of the moderately degraded site was highest while the aboveground biomass at the lightly degraded site was significantly higher than at the severely degraded site. Soil moisture content, nutrients (organic matter and total nitrogen) concentrations, soil microorganism quantity and enzyme activity were all decreased significantly in the degraded sites, whereas both the soil hardness and bulk density showed an opposite trend. The soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen contents ranged from 128 to 185 g x kg(-1) and from 5.6 to 13.6 g x kg(-1), respectively. The soil dehydrogenase and urease activities negatively correlated with soil bulk density but positively correlated with total nitrogen, organic matter, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. The aboveground biomass showed significantly positive correlation with the number of soil bacteria and fungi.

  12. Characterization of the cell surface properties of drinking water pathogens by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon and electrophoretic mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Jonathan; White, Colin P; Hoelle, Jill; Kinkle, Brian K; Lytle, Darren A

    2014-06-01

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregation, adhesion to surfaces, and stability of the cells within the aqueous environments. These cell characteristics are unique to the bacterial species and are a reflection of the large diversity of surface structures, proteins, and appendages of microorganisms. CSH and EPM of bacterial cells contribute substantially to the effectiveness of drinking water treatment to remove them, and therefore an investigation of these properties will be useful in predicting their removal through drinking water treatment processes and transport through drinking water distribution systems. EPM and CSH measurements of six microbiological pathogen or surrogate species suspended in phosphate-buffered water are reported in this work. Two strains of Vibrio cholerae were hydrophobic, while three strains of Escherichia coli were hydrophilic. Bacillus cereus was categorized as moderately hydrophobic. The strains of E. coli had the highest (most negative) EPM. Based on the measurements, E. coli species is predicted to be most difficult to remove from water while V. cholerae will be the easiest to remove.

  13. Evaluation the effect of gamma irradiation on microbial, chemical and sensorial properties of peanut (Arachis hypogaea l.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Al-Bachir, Mahfouz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility to apply gamma radiation treatment for decontaminating and assuring the quality of peanut seeds. The radiation processing was carried out at dose levels of 3, 6 and 9 kGy. The irradiated and non-irradiated (control) samples were stored at room temperature for 12 months, and analyzed for microbial load, proximate composition, sensorial acceptance and chemical properties. The results indicated that gamma irradiation treatment significantly (p < 0.05) reduced microbial load and enhanced the safety of the irradiated samples. The irradiated samples were also acceptable sensorically. The total acidity and total volatile nitrogen (TVBN) contents increased with the increase of radiation dose. Furthermore, in general, no substantial change in proximate constituents was observed amongst the samples. No significant (p > 0.05) differences in the taste, flavor, color and texture score were observed among treatments (0, 3, 6 and 9 kGy). Irradiation protected again bacterial and fungal growth and retained the nutritional components of samples during long-term storage.

  14. Changes of microbial spoilage, lipid-protein oxidation and physicochemical properties during post mortem refrigerated storage of goat meat.

    PubMed

    Sabow, Azad Behnan; Sazili, Awis Qurni; Aghwan, Zeiad Amjad; Zulkifli, Idrus; Goh, Yong Meng; Ab Kadir, Mohd Zainal Abidin; Nakyinsige, Khadijah; Kaka, Ubedullah; Adeyemi, Kazeem Dauda

    2016-06-01

    Examined was the effect of post mortem refrigerated storage on microbial spoilage, lipid-protein oxidation and physicochemical traits of goat meat. Seven Boer bucks were slaughtered, eviscerated and aged for 24 h. The Longissimus lumborum (LL) and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles were excised and subjected to 13 days post mortem refrigerated storage. The pH, lipid and protein oxidation, tenderness, color and drip loss were determined in LL while microbiological analysis was performed on ST. Bacterial counts generally increased with increasing aging time and the limit for fresh meat was reached at day 14 post mortem. Significant differences were observed in malondialdehyde (MDA) content at day 7 of storage. The thiol concentration significantly reduced as aging time increased. The band intensities of myosin heavy chain (MHC) and troponin-T significantly decreased as storage progressed, while actin remained relatively stable. After 14 days of aging, tenderness showed significant improvement while muscle pH and drip loss reduced with increase in storage time. Samples aged for 14 days had higher lightness (P < 0.05) and lower (P < 0.05) yellowness and redness. Post mortem refrigerated storage influenced oxidative and microbial stability and physico-chemical properties of goat meat. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A

    2007-05-01

    X chromosome inactivation is most commonly studied in the context of female mammalian development, where it performs an essential role in dosage compensation. However, another form of X-inactivation takes place in the male, during spermatogenesis, as germ cells enter meiosis. This second form of X-inactivation, called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has emerged as a novel paradigm for studying the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. New studies have revealed that MSCI is a special example of a more general mechanism called meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), which silences chromosomes that fail to pair with their homologous partners and, in doing so, may protect against aneuploidy in subsequent generations. Furthermore, failure in MSCI is emerging as an important etiological factor in meiotic sterility.

  16. Biofilms: A microbial home

    PubMed Central

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  17. Feedback-Based, System-Level Properties of Vertebrate-Microbial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Ariel L.; Jankowski, Mark D.; Piccinini, Renata; Leitner, Gabriel; Schwarz, Daniel; Anderson, Kevin L.; Fair, Jeanne M.; Hoogesteijn, Almira L.; Wolter, Wilfried; Chaffer, Marcelo; Blum, Shlomo; Were, Tom; Konah, Stephen N.; Kempaiah, Prakash; Ong’echa, John M.; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S.; Pilla, Rachel; Czerny, Claus-Peter; Hittner, James B.; Hyman, James M.; Perkins, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Improved characterization of infectious disease dynamics is required. To that end, three-dimensional (3D) data analysis of feedback-like processes may be considered. Methods To detect infectious disease data patterns, a systems biology (SB) and evolutionary biology (EB) approach was evaluated, which utilizes leukocyte data structures designed to diminish data variability and enhance discrimination. Using data collected from one avian and two mammalian (human and bovine) species infected with viral, parasite, or bacterial agents (both sensitive and resistant to antimicrobials), four data structures were explored: (i) counts or percentages of a single leukocyte type, such as lymphocytes, neutrophils, or macrophages (the classic approach), and three levels of the SB/EB approach, which assessed (ii) 2D, (iii) 3D, and (iv) multi-dimensional (rotating 3D) host-microbial interactions. Results In all studies, no classic data structure discriminated disease-positive (D+, or observations in which a microbe was isolated) from disease-negative (D–, or microbial-negative) groups: D+ and D– data distributions overlapped. In contrast, multi-dimensional analysis of indicators designed to possess desirable features, such as a single line of observations, displayed a continuous, circular data structure, whose abrupt inflections facilitated partitioning into subsets statistically significantly different from one another. In all studies, the 3D, SB/EB approach distinguished three (steady, positive, and negative) feedback phases, in which D– data characterized the steady state phase, and D+ data were found in the positive and negative phases. In humans, spatial patterns revealed false-negative observations and three malaria-positive data classes. In both humans and bovines, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were discriminated from non-MRSA infections. Conclusions More information can be extracted, from the same data, provided that data are

  18. Effects of earthworms on physicochemical properties and microbial profiles during vermicomposting of fresh fruit and vegetable wastes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kui; Li, Fusheng; Wei, Yongfen; Fu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xuemin

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of earthworms on physicochemical and microbial properties during vermicomposting of fresh fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW) by contrasting two decomposing systems of FVW with and without earthworms for 5weeks. Compared to control treatment (without earthworms), vermicomposting treatment resulted in a rapid decrease of electrical conductivity and losses of total carbon and nitrogen from the 2nd week. Quantitative PCR displayed that earthworms markedly enhanced bacterial and fungal densities, showing the higher values than control, during the whole decomposition process. In addition, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis combined with sequencing analysis revealed that earthworms pronouncedly modified bacterial and fungal community structures, through broadening the community diversities of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Ascomycotina. These results suggest that the presence of earthworms promoted the activity and population of bacteria and fungi, and modified their communities, thus altering the decomposition pathway of fresh FVW. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative Metagenomics of Gut and Ocean: Identification of Microbial Marker Genes for Complex Environmental Properties(2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Bork, Peer

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Peer Bork of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory on "Comparative Metagenomics of Gut and Ocean: Identification of Microbial Marker Genes for Complex Environmental Properties" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  20. Inactivation kinetics of anaerobic wastewater biofilms by free nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that free nitrous acid (FNA) is biocidal to a broad range of microorganisms. Microorganisms residing in anaerobic sewer biofilms were found to be inactivated after a short (6-24 h) exposure to FNA. In this study, we investigate the inactivation kinetics of anaerobic sewer biofilms grown in real wastewater. Microbial viability of biofilms was determined using LIVE/DEAD staining. A two-fraction kinetic model was developed to simulate the inactivation of mixed culture in biofilms. The kinetic parameters were estimated by using Bayesian statistics. Model simulation found that a fraction (85 %) of the biofilm community was highly sensitive to FNA with a high inactivation rate, and a fraction (15 %) was tolerant to FNA and persisted after FNA treatment. This different susceptibility to FNA treatment was likely due to the diverse microbial community and biofilm protection. The fact that nearly 85 % microbes were inactivated confirmed that FNA is a strong biocide to mixed-culture biofilms. It was found that the inactivation rate constant was not affected by pH levels. The kinetic model was successfully used to optimize FNA dosage for sulfide control in sewer biofilms. Also, results suggest that a high FNA concentration is preferred than long exposure time to reduce the total chemical consumption.

  1. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  2. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  3. Impact of Enzymatic and Microbial Bioprocessing on Protein Modification and Nutritional Properties of Wheat Bran.

    PubMed

    Arte, Elisa; Rizzello, Carlo G; Verni, Michela; Nordlund, Emilia; Katina, Kati; Coda, Rossana

    2015-10-07

    Besides providing dietary fiber, wheat bran is a recognized source of protein and is considered a very valuable substitute for other protein-rich sources in the food and feed industry. Nonetheless, several factors affect protein bioavailability, including bran's layered structure. This study showed the influence on the release and protein modification of wheat bran of different bioprocessing methods involving the activation of endogenous enzymes of bran, the addition of an enzyme mixture having carbohydrase activity, and microbial fermentation. Bioprocessing in acidic conditions significantly enhanced the solubilization of protein from wheat bran, reaching the highest value in the treatment where the sole endogenous protease activity was activated. Bioprocessing through controlled fermentation allowed a more intense proteolysis and strongly impacted the in vitro digestibility of proteins. The combined use of starter cultures and cell-wall-degrading enzymes was characterized by the highest increase of phytase activity and total phenols.

  4. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil CO2 release to substrate, environmental and microbial properties across alpine permafrost ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Ding, J.; Yang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Our knowledge on fundamental drivers of temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) release is crucial for improving the predictability of soil carbon dynamics among Earth System Models. However, patterns and determinants of Q10 over a broad geographic scale have not been fully understood, especially in alpine permafrost ecosystems. Here we addressed this issue by incubating surface soils (0-10 cm) obtained from 156 sites across Tibetan alpine permafrost region. Q10 was estimated from the dynamics of soil CO2 release rate under varying temperatures of 5-25 oC. Structure equation modeling (SEM) was performed to evaluate the relative importance of substrate, environmental and microbial properties in regulating soil CO2 release rate and Q10. Our results indicated that steppe soils had significantly lower CO2 release rate but higher Q10 than meadow soils. The combination of substrate properties and environmental variables could predict 52% of the variation in soil CO2 release rate across all grassland sites, and explained 37% and 58% of the variation in Q10 across the steppe and meadow sites, respectively. Of them, precipitation was the best predictor of soil CO2 release rate. Basal microbial respiration rate (B) was the most important predictor of Q10 in steppe soils, while soil pH outweighed B as the major regulator in meadow soils. These results demonstrate that carbon quality and environmental variables co-regulate Q10 across alpine permafrost region, implying that modelers can rely on `carbon-quality temperature' hypothesis for estimating apparent temperature sensitivities, but relevant environmental factors, especially soil pH should be considered in higher productivity alpine regions.

  5. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil CO2 release to substrate, environmental, and microbial properties across alpine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jinzhi; Chen, Leiyi; Zhang, Beibei; Liu, Li; Yang, Guibiao; Fang, Kai; Chen, Yongliang; Li, Fei; Kou, Dan; Ji, Chengjun; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-09-01

    Our knowledge of fundamental drivers of the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) release is crucial for improving the predictability of soil carbon dynamics in Earth System Models. However, patterns and determinants of Q10 over a broad geographic scale are not fully understood, especially in alpine ecosystems. Here we addressed this issue by incubating surface soils (0-10 cm) obtained from 156 sites across Tibetan alpine grasslands. Q10 was estimated from the dynamics of the soil CO2 release rate under varying temperatures of 5-25°C. Structure equation modeling was performed to evaluate the relative importance of substrate, environmental, and microbial properties in regulating the soil CO2 release rate and Q10. Our results indicated that steppe soils had significantly lower CO2 release rates but higher Q10 than meadow soils. The combination of substrate properties and environmental variables could predict 52% of the variation in soil CO2 release rate across all grassland sites and explained 37% and 58% of the variation in Q10 across the steppe and meadow sites, respectively. Of these, precipitation was the best predictor of soil CO2 release rate. Basal microbial respiration rate (B) was the most important predictor of Q10 in steppe soils, whereas soil pH outweighed B as the major regulator in meadow soils. These results demonstrate that carbon quality and environmental variables coregulate Q10 across alpine ecosystems, implying that modelers can rely on the "carbon-quality temperature" hypothesis for estimating apparent temperature sensitivities, but relevant environmental factors, especially soil pH, should be considered in higher-productivity alpine regions.

  6. Microbial exopolysaccharides as determinants of geomorphological, hydrological and optical properties of soil crusts from the Precambrian till today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.

    2012-04-01

    The presence of microbial extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) in the soil solution and/or in association with particular microbial types can impart novel properties to biological soil crust (BSC), and hence to soil surfaces. For the most part these properties are of a geobiological relevance that exceeds what one could surmise from its relatively low specific mass content. I will review some examples that range from the mundane to the unexpected. EPS associated with filamentous cyanobacteria can effectively and in the long term stabilize the soil surface against erosive forces, even after the microbes are long gone. Electrostatic interactions between EPS and blowing dust may help retain dust particles, enriching the soil with new nutrient sources. In a telltale sign of BSC presence, EPS is the agent that allows sandy soils to fold and curl-up, to form pee-tee's and elephant-skin surfaces, and to crack into polygons like clays would. EPS in large quantities in flat crusts can retain fluids (both liquid and gaseous) resulting in the alteration of hydrological flow and in the formation of internal vesicular horizons, gas bubbles, pock-marked surfaces and other characteristic structures. Yet, in some settings, EPS plays an architectural role in creating a "spongy" texture that increases hydraulic conductivity. This architectural role can indirectly result in significant increases of a crust's albedo. While the diversity of consequences of EPS presence is far from understood, evidence for its sustained role through Earth's history can be found in the form of sedimentary bio-signatures as far back as the Proterozoic.

  7. The Amplitude and Inactivation Properties of the Delayed Potassium Currents Are Regulated by Protein Kinase Activity in Hair Cells of the Frog Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Marta; Canella, Rita; Fesce, Riccardo; Rossi, Maria Lisa

    2013-01-01

    In hair cells dissected from the frog crista ampullaris, the combination of a calcium-dependent (IKCa) and a purely voltage-dependent component (IKV) gives rise to the delayed potassium current complex (IKD). These currents have been recently reported to display slow depolarization-induced inactivation and biphasic inactivation removal by hyperpolarization. The amplitude and inactivation kinetics of both IKCa and IKV are drastically modulated by a previously unrecognized mechanism of protein phosphorylation (sensitive to kinase inhibitors H89 and KT5823), which does not interfere with the transient potassium current (IA) or the calcium current (ICa). IKD amplitude was stable in cells patched with pipettes containing 8 mM ATP or under perforated-patch; under these conditions, a 10 min treatment with 10 µM H89 or 1–10 µM KT5823 reduced IKD amplitude by a mean of 67% at +40 mV. Similarly affected was the isolated IKV component (ICa blocked with Cd2+). Thus, a large potassium conductance can be activated by depolarization, but it is made available to the cell to a variable extent that depends on membrane potential and protein kinase activity. The total gKD ranged 4.6–44.0 nS in control cells, according to the level of steady-state inactivation, and was reduced to 1.4–2.7 nS after protein kinase inhibition. When sinusoidal membrane potential changes in the −70/−10 mV range were applied, to mimic receptor response to hair bundle deflection, IKD proved the main current dynamically activated and the only one regulated by PK: H89 decreased the total outward charge during each cycle by 60%. Phosphorylation appears to control both the amount of IKCa and IKV conductance activated by depolarization and the fraction thereof which can be rescued by removal of inactivation. The balance between the depolarizing transduction current and the repolarizing potassium current, and eventually the transmitter release at the cytoneural junction, are therefore modulated by a

  8. Dynamic substrate preferences predict metabolic properties of a simple microbial consortium

    DOE PAGES

    Erbilgin, Onur; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Kosina, Suzanne M.; ...

    2017-01-23

    Mixed cultures of different microbial species are increasingly being used to carry out a specific biochemical function in lieu of engineering a single microbe to do the same t ask. However, knowing how different species' metabolisms will integrate to reach a desired outcome is a difficult problem that has been studied in great detail using steady-state models. However, many biotechnological processes, as well as natural habitats, represent a more dynamic system. Examining how individual species use resources in their growth medium or environment (exometabolomics) over time in batch culture conditions can provide rich phenotypic data that encompasses regulation and transporters,more » creating an opportunity to integrate the data into a predictive model of resource use by a mixed community. Here we use exometabolomic profiling to examine the time-varying substrate depletion from a mixture of 19 amino acids and glucose by two Pseudomonas and one Bacillus species isolated from ground water. Contrary to studies in model organisms, we found surprisingly few correlations between resource preferences and maximal growth rate or biomass composition. We then modeled patterns of substrate depletion, and used these models to examine if substrate usage preferences and substrate depletion kinetics of individual isolates can be used to predict the metabolism of a co-culture of the isolates. We found that most of the substrates fit the model predictions, except for glucose and histidine, which were depleted more slowly than predicted, and proline, glycine, glutamate, lysine and arginine, which were all consumed significantly faster. Our results indicate that a significant portion of a model community's overall metabolism can be predicted based on the metabolism of the individuals. Based on the nature of our model, the resources that significantly deviate from the prediction highlight potential metabolic pathways affected by species-species interactions, which when further

  9. Metal contamination disturbs biochemical and microbial properties of calcareous agricultural soils of the Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    de Santiago-Martín, Ana; Cheviron, Natalie; Quintana, Jose R; González, Concepción; Lafuente, Antonio L; Mougin, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean climate characteristics and carbonate are key factors governing soil heavy-metal accumulation, and low organic matter (OM) content could limit the ability of microbial populations to cope with resulting stress. We studied the effects of metal contamination on a combination of biological parameters in soils having these characteristics. With this aim, soils were spiked with a mixture of cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc, at the two limit values proposed by current European legislation, and incubated for ≤12 months. Then we measured biochemical (phosphatase, urease, β-galactosidase, arylsulfatase, and dehydrogenase activities) and microbial (fungal and bacterial DNA concentration by quantitative polymerase chain reaction) parameters. All of the enzyme activities were strongly affected by metal contamination and showed the following inhibition sequence: phosphatase (30-64 %) < arylsulfatase (38-97 %) ≤ urease (1-100 %) ≤ β-galactosidase (30-100 %) < dehydrogenase (69-100 %). The high variability among soils was attributed to the different proportion of fine mineral fraction, OM, crystalline iron oxides, and divalent cations in soil solution. The decrease of fungal DNA concentration in metal-spiked soils was negligible, whereas the decrease of bacterial DNA was ~1-54 % at the lowest level and 2-69 % at the highest level of contamination. The lowest bacterial DNA decrease occurred in soils with the highest OM, clay, and carbonate contents. Finally, regarding the strong inhibition of the biological parameters measured and the alteration of the fungal/bacterial DNA ratio, we provide strong evidence that disturbance on the system, even within the limiting values of contamination proposed by the current European Directive, could alter key soil processes. These limiting values should be established according to soil characteristics and/or revised when contamination is produced by a mixture of heavy metals.

  10. Dynamic substrate preferences predict metabolic properties of a simple microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Erbilgin, Onur; Bowen, Benjamin P; Kosina, Suzanne M; Jenkins, Stefan; Lau, Rebecca K; Northen, Trent R

    2017-01-23

    Mixed cultures of different microbial species are increasingly being used to carry out a specific biochemical function in lieu of engineering a single microbe to do the same task. However, knowing how different species' metabolisms will integrate to reach a desired outcome is a difficult problem that has been studied in great detail using steady-state models. However, many biotechnological processes, as well as natural habitats, represent a more dynamic system. Examining how individual species use resources in their growth medium or environment (exometabolomics) over time in batch culture conditions can provide rich phenotypic data that encompasses regulation and transporters, creating an opportunity to integrate the data into a predictive model of resource use by a mixed community. Here we use exometabolomic profiling to examine the time-varying substrate depletion from a mixture of 19 amino acids and glucose by two Pseudomonas and one Bacillus species isolated from ground water. Contrary to studies in model organisms, we found surprisingly few correlations between resource preferences and maximal growth rate or biomass composition. We then modeled patterns of substrate depletion, and used these models to examine if substrate usage preferences and substrate depletion kinetics of individual isolates can be used to predict the metabolism of a co-culture of the isolates. We found that most of the substrates fit the model predictions, except for glucose and histidine, which were depleted more slowly than predicted, and proline, glycine, glutamate, lysine and arginine, which were all consumed significantly faster. Our results indicate that a significant portion of a model community's overall metabolism can be predicted based on the metabolism of the individuals. Based on the nature of our model, the resources that significantly deviate from the prediction highlight potential metabolic pathways affected by species-species interactions, which when further studied can

  11. Response of aerobic granular sludge to the long-term presence to nanosilver in sequencing batch reactors: reactor performance, sludge property, microbial activity and community.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiangchun; Cen, Yan; Lu, Fang; Gu, Lingyun; Ma, Jingyun

    2015-02-15

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. Granular shape sludge is a special type of microbial aggregate. The response of aerobic granular sludge (AGS) to the long-term presence of Ag NPs has not been well studied. In this study, AGS was exposed to 5 and 50mg/L Ag NPs in sequence batch reactors (SBRs) for 69 days, and its response was evaluated based on the sludge properties, microbial activity and community, and reactor performance. The results showed that Ag NPs caused inhibition to microbial activities of AGS from Day 35. At the end of 69 days of Ag NPs exposure, the microbial activity of AGS was significantly inhibited in terms of inhibitions of the ammonia oxidizing rate (33.0%), respiration rate (17.7% and 45.6%) and denitrification rate (6.8%), as well as decreases in the ammonia mono-oxygenase and nitrate reductase activities. During the long-term exposure, the AGS maintained its granular shape and large granule size (approximately 900 μm); the microbial community of AGS slightly changed, but the dominant microbial population remained. Overall, the AGS tolerated the toxicity of Ag NPs well, but a long-term exposure may produce chronic toxicity to the AGS, which is concerning.

  12. Microbial biomass at land water interface and its role in regulating ecosystem properties of a fresh water dry tropical woodland lake.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J

    2008-05-01

    This study was aimed at determining microbial biomass at land water interface and the role it plays in regulating ecosystem properties of a fresh water dry tropical woodland lake. Four microbial variables namely biomass-C (Cmic), fumigated CO2-C, substrate induced respiration (SIR) and basal respiration (BR) were measured in humus samples collected from land water interface over a period of one year Microbial biomass (Cmic) was maximum during February (718 micorg CO2-C g(-1)). Similar was the case of fumigated CO2-C (560 microg CO2-C g(-1) 10 d(-1)), SIR (2900 microg CO2-C g(-1)) and BR (480 microg CO2-C g(-1)). Humus-N appeared maximum (1.60%) during November and phenolics (204 microg g(-1)) during December Gross primary productivity (GPP) was found maximum (3.30 g Cm(-2)d(-1)) during March. Almost similar trend appeared for chlorophyll and phytoplankton density. Variation in microbial biomass at land water interface can be explained by seasonality and the quality of substrate material. Asynchrony in the peaks of microbial variables with phytoplankton pulsation and GPP suggested that the microbial biomass through nutrient mineralization regulates ecosystem functioning of a fresh water woodland lake. This has relevance for evaluating the nature of anthropogenic perturbations and for maintenance of fresh water lakes void of human disturbances.

  13. Responses of plant species diversity and soil physical-chemical-microbial properties to Phragmites australis invasion along a density gradient.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M D Nazim; Robinson, Randall William

    2017-09-08

    The invasion of ecosystems by strongly colonising plants such as Phragmites australis is viewed as one of the greatest threats to plant diversity and soil properties. This study compared a range of diversity measures including soil properties and mycorrhizal potential under different degrees of Phragmites density among three populations in coastal wetland, Victoria, Australia. Species richness, evenness and Shanon-Wiener index had significantly higher values in low degree of Phragmites density in all populations. Higher densities had the lowest diversity, with Shannon-Wiener index = 0 and Simpson's index = 1 indicating its mono-specificity. Significant alterations in soil properties associated with different degrees of Phragmites density were noticed. These had interactive effects (population × density) on water content, dehydrogenase activity, microbial biomass (C, N and P) but not on pH, electrical conductivity, phenolics, organic carbon, and spore density. Furthermore, the study elucidated decrease of competitive abilities of native plants, by interfering with formation of mycorrhizal associations and biomass. Overall, our results suggest that significant ecological alterations in vegetation and soil variables (including mycorrhizal potential) were strongly dependent on Phragmites density. Such changes may lead to an important role in process of Phragmites invasion through disruption of functional relationships amongst those variables.

  14. Influence of organic waste and residue mud additions on chemical, physical and microbial properties of bauxite residue sand.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benjamin E H; Haynes, Richard J; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-02-01

    In an alumina refinery, bauxite ore is treated with sodium hydroxide at high temperatures and pressures and for every tone of alumina produced, about 2 tones of alkaline, saline bauxite processing waste is also produced. At Alcoa, a dry stacking system of disposal is used, and it is the sand fraction of the processing waste that is rehabilitated. There is little information available regarding the most appropriate amendments to add to the processing sand to aid in revegetation. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the addition of organic wastes (biosolids and poultry manure), in the presence or absence of added residue mud, would affect the properties of the residue sand and its suitability for revegetation. Samples of freshly deposited residue sand were collected from Alcoa's Kwinana refinery. Samples were treated with phosphogypsum (2% v/v), incubated, and leached. A laboratory experiment was then set up in which the two organic wastes were applied at 0 or the equivalent to 60 tones ha(-1) in combination with residue mud added at rates of 0%, 10% and 20% v/v. Samples were incubated for 8 weeks, after which, key chemical, physical and microbial properties of the residue sand were measured along with seed germination. Additions of residue mud increased exchangeable Na(+), ESP and the pH, and HCO (3) (-) and Na(+) concentrations in saturation paste extracts. Additions of biosolids and poultry manure increased concentrations of extractable P, NH (4) (+) , K, Mg, Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe. Addition of residue mud, in combination with organic wastes, caused a marked decrease in macroporosity and a concomitant increase in mesoporosity, available water holding capacity and the quantity of water held at field capacity. With increasing residue mud additions, the percentage of sample present as sand particles (<1 mm diameter) decreased, and the percentage present in aggregated form (>2 mm diameter) increased; greatest aggregation occurred where a combination of residue

  15. Phospholipids fatty acids of drinking water reservoir sedimentary microbial community: Structure and function responses to hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bei-Bei; Huang, Ting-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Guang; Li, Ya-Jiao

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities in three drinking water reservoirs, with different depth in Xi'an city, were quantified by phospholipids fatty acids analysis and multivariate statistical analysis was employed to interpret their response to different hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties of sediment and overlying water. Principle component analyses of sediment characteristics parameters showed that hydrostatic pressure was the most important effect factor to differentiate the overlying water quality from three drinking water reservoirs from each other. NH4+ content in overlying water was positive by related to hydrostatic pressure, while DO in water-sediment interface and sediment OC in sediment were negative by related with it. Three drinking water reservoir sediments were characterized by microbial communities dominated by common and facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, as well as, by sulfur oxidizing bacteria. Hydrostatic pressure and physico-chemical properties of sediments (such as sediment OC, sediment TN and sediment TP) were important effect factors to microbial community structure, especially hydrostatic pressure. It is also suggested that high hydrostatic pressure and low dissolved oxygen concentration stimulated Gram-positive and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) bacterial population in drinking water reservoir sediment. This research supplied a successful application of phospholipids fatty acids and multivariate analysis to investigate microbial community composition response to different environmental factors. Thus, few physico-chemical factors can be used to estimate composition microbial of community as reflected by phospholipids fatty acids, which is difficult to detect.

  16. Direct and Indirect Contribution of Microbial Metabolic Byproducts to the Electrical Properties of Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Wagner, B. H.

    2006-05-01

    Organic acids and biosurfactants are common intermediates of microbial mineralization of organic carbon in natural environments, and both have the potential to impact electrical measurements by directly contributing to the ionic strength of an aqueous solution. Organic acids impact electrical measurements indirectly by mineral dissolution which increases the pore water conductivity and/or secondary porosity. We present results of laboratory sand-packed column experiments designed to simulate the effect of common microbial metabolic byproducts on electrical measurements. We collected low frequency (0.1-1000 Hz) electrical measurements of silica sand-packed columns saturated with organic acids or biosurfactants of varying concentration. The electrolytic (bulk and fluid) conductivity increased with increasing concentrations of organic acids or biosurfactants, while the interfacial (imaginary) conductivity remained relatively steady. The contribution to ionic strength by dissolution by organic acids was also investigated by collecting low frequency electrical measurements on natural sand-packed columns saturated with organic acids for a period of 120 days. Background measurements were collected from columns saturated with tap water, and compared to the columns with organic acids. Both columns saturated with organic acid and tap water showed a steady increase in the imaginary, real, and fluid conductivities for the first 60 days. The pH increased rapidly for the first 10 days, after which it remained nearly constant. After ~60 days, the organic acid and tap water columns appeared to reach equilibrium in the electrical parameters, and remained relatively constant for the duration of the experiment. The similar trend in both acid and tap water treated columns suggests that increases in electrical parameters and pH are enhanced by more than the presence of organic acids. The results of this study show that although the direct presence of metabolic byproducts increased the

  17. Modeling of inactivation of surface borne microorganisms occurring on seeds by cold atmospheric plasma (CAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Anindita; Li, Y.-F.; Shimizu, T.; Klämpfl, Tobias; Zimmermann, J. L.; Morfill, G. E.

    2012-10-01

    Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) is a fast, low cost, simple, easy to handle technology for biological application. Our group has developed a number of different CAP devices using the microwave technology and the surface micro discharge (SMD) technology. In this study, FlatPlaSter2.0 at different time intervals (0.5 to 5 min) is used for microbial inactivation. There is a continuous demand for deactivation of microorganisms associated with raw foods/seeds without loosing their properties. This research focuses on the kinetics of CAP induced microbial inactivation of naturally growing surface microorganisms on seeds. The data were assessed for log- linear and non-log-linear models for survivor curves as a function of time. The Weibull model showed the best fitting performance of the data. No shoulder and tail was observed. The models are focused in terms of the number of log cycles reduction rather than on classical D-values with statistical measurements. The viability of seeds was not affected for CAP treatment times up to 3 min with our device. The optimum result was observed at 1 min with increased percentage of germination from 60.83% to 89.16% compared to the control. This result suggests the advantage and promising role of CAP in food industry.

  18. Improvement of bioelectrochemical property and energy recovery by acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Anzhou; Ren, Ge; Li, Zhiling; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Wang, Aijie

    2015-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been extensively studied as a cell-cell communication system, where small chemical signal molecules (acylhomoserine lactones, AHLs) can regulate the bacterial communications in bioelectrochemical systems via chemical signaling and electric signaling. In this study, electrochemical activity of bio-anode is substantially promoted by adding two kinds of AHLs with different chain length at the stage of community formation in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Hydrogen yield increase is observed by adding of two chain length AHLs, 3-oxo-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL) and 3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL). A higher MEC current is acquired with addition of 3OC6-HSL than 3OC12-HSL at a fixed voltage of 0.8 V (vs. SHE). The highest yield is up to 3.8 ± 0.2 mol H2 mol-1 acetate at 10 μM 3OC6-HSL, which is increased 29% over control MECs. Evaluated on applied voltage, energy efficiency is increased to 171.6 ± 21.3% with short chain AHL, however, no significant improvement is performed on energy efficiency and coulombic efficiency with long-chain AHL. The study shows that bioelectrochemical characteristics of MECs varied on the chain length of AHL signal molecules and short-chain AHLs have a more positive effect on electron transfer and energy recovery in MECs.

  19. Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Gastrointestinal Microbial Community Dynamics in Relation to Digesta Properties and Diet.

    PubMed

    Zarkasi, Kamarul Zaman; Taylor, Richard S; Abell, Guy C J; Tamplin, Mark L; Glencross, Brett D; Bowman, John P

    2016-04-01

    To better understand salmon GI tract microbial community dynamics in relation to diet, a feeding trial was performed utilising diets with different proportions of fish meal, protein, lipid and energy levels. Salmon gut dysfunction has been associated with the occurrence of casts, or an empty hind gut. A categorical scoring system describing expressed digesta consistency was evaluated in relation to GI tract community structure. Faster growing fish generally had lower faecal scores while the diet cohorts showed minor differences in faecal score though the overall lowest scores were observed with a low protein, low energy diet. The GI tract bacterial communities were highly dynamic over time with the low protein, low energy diet associated with the most divergent community structure. This included transiently increased abundance of anaerobic (Bacteroidia and Clostridia) during January and February, and facultatively anaerobic (lactic acid bacteria) taxa from February onwards. The digesta had enriched populations of these groups in relation to faecal cast samples. The majority of samples (60-86 %) across all diet cohorts were eventually dominated by the genus Aliivibrio. The results suggest that an interaction between time of sampling and diet is most strongly related to community structure. Digesta categorization revealed microbes involved with metabolism of diet components change progressively over time and could be a useful system to assess feeding responses.

  20. Bioactive mesoporous silica nanostructures with anti-microbial and anti-biofilm properties.

    PubMed

    Balaure, Paul Cătălin; Boarca, Bianca; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Savu, Diana; Trusca, Roxana; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Bolocan, Alexandra; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2017-10-05

    The increasing rate of antibiotic resistant bacteria associated with nosocomial infections in severely ill patients has urged the need for new antibacterial therapies. Nanostructured materials represent emerging innovative approaches to controlled delivery of different antimicrobial drugs. Delivery systems encapsulating natural compounds with antibacterial effects, such as essential oils have shown a great potential. Herein we report the development of SiO2 mesoporous nanosystems loaded with eucalyptus (EUC), orange (ORA), and cinnamon (CIN) essential oils. These systems were characterized with respect to morphology (using scanning electron microscopy, SEM, and transmission electron microscopy, TEM), porosity (by BET and TEM analysis), chemical composition (by X-ray diffraction, XRD, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, FTIR) and loading capacity (by thermogravimetric analysis, TGA). The anti-bacterial and anti-adherence effects were tested against clinically relevant microbial species (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923; Escherichia coli ATCC 25922; and Candida albicans ATCC 10231), while the biocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro tests with L929 mouse fibroblast cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancing anti-microbial properties of wood-plastic composites produced from timber and plastic wastes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi Sun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-03-28

    Considering the resource waste and environmental burden for timber and plastic materials ending up at landfills, this study proposed upcycling wood and plastic waste into value-added wood-plastic composites (WPCs), complying with the standard requirements of flexural strength, thickness swelling, water absorption and thermal insulation. Biological deterioration is a major concern of WPCs. Bacterial survival, fungal attack and algal growth of bactericide-treated WPCs were holistically analysed. Melamine resin was adopted for impregnating anti-microbial agents on the surface. All the agents showed excellent bactericidal rate (Escherichia coli), yet poly-diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride (PolyDADMAC) and silver had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations. In terms of weight loss and strength reduction due to fungal decay (Coriolus versicolor), PolyDADMAC, silver and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) imparted the highest resistance on the WPCs. Moreover, PolyDADMAC and copper provided the most protection against algal growth (Chlorella vulgaris), and the former presented durable inhibitory effect. This study presents a value-added solution to wood/plastic waste recycling.

  2. Comparison of the chemical, physical and microbial properties of composts produced by conventional composting or vermicomposting using the same feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Haynes, R J; Zhou, Y-F

    2016-06-01

    The chemical, physical and microbial properties of thermophilic composts and vermicomposts were compared using the same municipal green waste-based feedstocks: (i) municipal green waste alone, (ii) 75 % municipal green waste/25 % green garden waste and (iii) 75 % municipal green waste/25 % cattle manure. Temperatures reached 37 °C during composting of municipal green waste alone but when garden waste or cattle manure were added, temperatures reached 47 and 52 °C, respectively. At the end of vermicomposting (using Eisenia fetida), the number of earthworms present was greater than that added for the cattle manure-amended feedstock but much less for both the garden waste and municipal green waste alone treatments. The products formed in all treatments generally fell within suggested maturity indices for composts. Greater organic matter decomposition occurred during composting than vermicomposting resulting in composts having a significantly lower organic C content and a greater content of total N, extractable Mg, K, Na, P, and mineral N, a higher EC and a lower C/N ratio than the vermicomposts. For all three feedstocks, vermicomposts had a lower bulk density and greater total porosity and macroporosity than composts. For the garden waste- and cattle manure-amended feedstocks, vermicomposts had a higher microbial biomass C than the composts and for all three feedstocks, basal respiration and metabolic quotient were greatest for vermicomposts. It was concluded that composting is a robust process suitable for treatment of a range of organic wastes but, because of the nutritional requirements of the earthworms, vermicomposting is a much less robust and was only suitable for the cattle manure-amended feedstock.

  3. Effects of temperature and supplementation with skim milk powder on microbial and proteolytic properties during storage of cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Hyun Ah; Myung, Jae Hee; Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Shin, Yong Kook; Baick, Seung Chun

    2014-06-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of temperature and supplementation with skim milk powder (SMP) on the microbial and proteolytic properties during the storage of cottage cheese. Cottage cheese was manufactured using skim milk with 2% SMP and without SMP as the control, and then stored at 5°C or 12°C during 28 days. The chemical composition of the cottage cheese and the survival of the cheese microbiota containing starter lactic acid bacteria (SLAB) and non-starter culture lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) were evaluated. In addition, changes in the concentration of lactose and lactic acid were analyzed, and proteolysis was evaluated through the measurement of acid soluble nitrogen (ASN) and nonprotein nitrogen (NPN), as well as electrophoresis profile analysis. The counts of SLAB and NSLAB increased through the addition of SMP and with a higher storage temperature (12°C), which coincided with the results of the lactose decrease and lactic acid production. Collaborating with these microbial changes, of the end of storage for 28 days, the level of ASN in samples at 12°C was higher than those at 5°C. The NPN content was also progressively increased in all samples stored at 12°C. Taken together, the rate of SLAB and NSLAB proliferation during storage at 12°C was higher than at 5°C, and consequently it led to increased proteolysis in the cottage cheese during storage. However, it was relatively less affected by SMP fortification. These findings indicated that the storage temperature is the important factor for the quality of commercial cottage cheese.

  4. Effects of heavy metals and soil physicochemical properties on wetland soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Nie, Shuang; Liang, Jie; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Haipeng; Hua, Shanshan; Liu, Jiayu; Yuan, Yujie; Xiao, Haibing; Deng, Linjing; Xiang, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    Heavy metals (HMs) contamination is a serious environmental issue in wetland soil. Understanding the micro ecological characteristic of HMs polluted wetland soil has become a public concern. The goal of this study was to identify the effects of HMs and soil physicochemical properties on soil microorganisms and prioritize some parameters that contributed significantly to soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure. Bacterial community structure was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Relationships between soil environment and microorganisms were analyzed by correlation analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA). The result indicated relationship between SMB and HMs was weaker than SMB and physicochemical properties. The RDA showed all eight parameters explained 74.9% of the variation in the bacterial DGGE profiles. 43.4% (contain the variation shared by Cr, Cd, Pb and Cu) of the variation for bacteria was explained by the four kinds of HMs, demonstrating HMs contamination had a significant influence on the changes of bacterial community structure. Cr solely explained 19.4% (p<0.05) of the variation for bacterial community structure, and Cd explained 17.5% (p<0.05), indicating Cr and Cd were the major factors related to bacterial community structure changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biochemical Properties and Biological Function of a Monofunctional Microbial Biotin Protein Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Beckett, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Biotin protein ligases constitute a family of enzymes that catalyze biotin linkage to biotin-dependent carboxylases. In bacteria these enzymes are functionally divided into two classes; the monofunctional enzymes that only catalyze biotin addition and the bifunctional enzymes that also bind to DNA to regulate transcription initiation. Biochemical and biophysical studies of the bifunctional Escherichia coli ligase suggest that several properties of the enzyme have evolved to support its additional regulatory role. Included among these properties are the order of substrate binding and linkage between oligomeric state and ligand binding. PMID:20499837

  6. [Production and study of the immunogenic properties of a bivalent inactivated vaccine against mucosal disease (bovine viral diarrhea and infectious rhinotracheitis)].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, P; Petkova, K; Bachiĭski, L; Kharalambiev, Kh E

    1979-01-01

    Bivalent inactivated vaccine against mucous disease (MD) and infectious rhinotracheitis (IR) in cattle was produced from cell cultural MD and IR virus suspensions. The vaccine was concentrated on aluminium hydroxide, inactivated by ethanol and is without residual virus. Saponine in final 1:1500 dilution is added as supplementary adjuvant. Immunogeneity of the vaccine was tested on 10-month-old calves, which had shown full resistance against experimental infection with virulent strains of both viruses. Testing on calves for harmlessness by use of a five-fold higher vaccine dose indicated complete tolerance of the vaccine. The prophylactic effect of the vaccine applied in practical work to directly threatened with immediate MD and IR infection cows, including pregnant ones, consisted in reduced number of cases of abortion, of inborn malformations, in lower neonatal calf death-rate, etc. No disturbances were observed following two-fold vaccination of the animals, a fact proving its harmlessness. The positive results of the studied vaccine allow its further application in the combined prophylaxis of MD and IR in calf fattening and breeding complexes.

  7. Impact of microbial activity on the hydraulic properties of fractured chalk.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shai; Adar, Eilon; Ronen, Zeev; Yakirevich, Alexander; Nativ, Ronit

    2005-02-01

    The impact of microbial activity on fractured chalk transmissivity was investigated on a laboratory scale. Long-term experiments were conducted on six fractured chalk cores (20 cm diameter, 23-44 cm long) containing a single natural fracture embedded in a porous matrix. Biodegradation experiments were conducted under various conditions, including several substrate and oxygen concentrations and flow rates. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) was used as a model contaminant (substrate). TBP biodegradation efficiency depended mainly on the amount of oxygen. However, under constant oxygen concentration at the core inlet, elevating the flow rates increased the removal rate of TBP. Transmissivity reduction was clearly related to TBP removal rate, following an initial slow decline and a further sharp decrease with time. The fracture's transmissivity was reduced by as much as 97% relative to the initial value, with no leveling off of the clogging process. For the most extreme cases, reductions of 262 and 157 microm in the equivalent hydraulic apertures were recorded for fractures with initial apertures of 495 and 207 microm, respectively. The reductions in fracture transmissivity occurred primarily because of clogging by bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by the bacteria. Most of the biodegradation activity was concentrated near the fracture inlet, where the most suitable biodegradation conditions (nutrients and oxygen) prevailed, suggesting that the clogging had occurred in that vicinity. The clogging must have changed the structure of the fracture void, thereby reducing the active volume participating in flow and transport processes. This phenomenon caused accelerated transport of non-reactive tracers and doubled the fracture's dispersivity under constant flow rates.

  8. Effect of pretreatments on microbial growth and sensory properties of dry-salted olives.

    PubMed

    Değirmencioğlu, Nurcan; Gürbüz, Ozan; Değirmencioğlu, Ali; Yildiz, Semanur

    2014-09-01

    The effect of various washing solutions (acetic acid, lactic acid, and chlorine dioxide) and NaCl concentrations (2.5, 5.0, and 10.0%) on the stability of dry-salted olives (cultivars Gemlik and Edincik) during storage was studied. Vacuum-packed olives were stored at 4°C for 7 months and monitored for microbiological changes that occurred in the dry-salted olives during the dry-salting process and for their stability during storage. Microbial populations were enumerated using pour plating (for aerobic plate counts) and spread plating (for counts of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts and molds). Aerobic plate counts were <2.5 log CFU/g for olive samples washed in chlorine dioxide at all NaCl concentrations. At 4°C, the population of yeasts and molds increased steadily during the shelf life in Gemlik olive samples washed with all of the solutions, except chlorine dioxide, whereas yeast and mold counts in Edincik olives decreased depending on the increase in salt concentration. Therefore, different combinations of organic acids, NaCl, and vacuum packaging can be successfully used to control the growth of yeasts and molds in these olives. The combination of vacuum sealing (with a 10-ppm chlorine dioxide wash) and storage at 4°C was the most effective approach for controlling the growth of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts and molds. Members of the sensory panel considered saltiness to be appropriate at 2.5 and 5.0% NaCl. Softness and bitterness scores increased with reduced NaCl concentrations, but rancidity and hardness scores increased as NaCl concentration increased.

  9. Mechanistic insight into digoxin inactivation by Eggerthella lenta augments our understanding of its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Haiser, Henry J; Seim, Kristen L; Balskus, Emily P; Turnbaugh, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a key role in pharmacology, yet the mechanisms responsible remain unclear, impeding efforts toward personalized medicine. We recently identified a cytochrome-encoding operon in the common gut Actinobacterium Eggerthella lenta that is transcriptionally activated by the cardiac drug digoxin. These genes represent a predictive microbial biomarker for the inactivation of digoxin. Gnotobiotic mouse experiments revealed that increased protein intake can limit microbial drug inactivation. Here, we present a biochemical rationale for how the proteins encoded by this operon might inactivate digoxin through substrate promiscuity. We discuss digoxin signaling in eukaryotic systems, and consider the possibility that endogenous digoxin-like molecules may have selected for microbial digoxin inactivation. Finally, we highlight the diverse contributions of gut microbes to drug metabolism, present a generalized approach to studying microbe-drug interactions, and argue that mechanistic studies will pave the way for the clinical application of this work.

  10. Wastewater disinfection by peracetic acid: assessment of models for tracking residual measurements and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Gehr, Ronald; Bartrand, Timothy A; Liberti, Lorenzo; Notarnicola, Michele; Dell'Erba, Adele; Falsanisi, Dario; Haas, Charles N

    2007-07-01

    With its potential for low (if any) disinfection byproduct formation and easy retrofit for chlorine contactors, peracetic acid (PAA) or use of PAA in combination with other disinfectant technologies may be an attractive alternative to chlorine-based disinfection. Examples of systems that might benefit from use of PAA are water reuse schemes or plants discharging to sensitive receiving water bodies. Though PAA is in use in numerous wastewater treatment plants in Europe, its chemical kinetics, microbial inactivation rates, and mode of action against microorganisms are not thoroughly understood. This paper presents results from experimental studies of PAA demand, PAA decay, and microbial inactivation, with a complementary modeling analysis. Model results are used to evaluate techniques for measurement of PAA concentration and to develop hypotheses regarding the mode of action of PAA in bacterial inactivation. Kinetic and microbial inactivation rate data were collected for typical wastewaters and may be useful for engineers in evaluating whether to convert from chlorine to PAA disinfection.

  11. Changes in microbial properties and nutrient dynamics in bagasse and coir during vermicomposting: quantification of fungal biomass through ergosterol estimation in vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, P

    2010-05-01

    In this experiment, different microorganisms viz., Trichoderma viridae, Aspergillus niger and Bacillus megaterium were inoculated in bagasse and coir with the objective to study their effect on nutrient dynamics and microbial properties, specially effect on fungal status in these waste materials. Fungal biomass (FBC) was calculated from the ergosterol content in the vermicompost samples. Inoculation of B. megaterium registered comparatively higher TP content in the final stabilized product. Vermicomposting increased microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) content in bagasse and coir. Microbial biomass carbon to nitrogen ratio (MBC/ MBN) was comparatively narrower in fungi inoculated vermicomposts and FBC/MBC ratio was increased up to 11.69 from 9.51 of control during vermicomposting.

  12. Comparison of contact angle measurement and microbial adhesion to solvents for assaying electron donor-electron acceptor (acid-base) properties of bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Hamadi, Fatima; Latrache, Hassan

    2008-08-01

    The electron donor-electron acceptor (acid-base properties) of cell surfaces of a series of bacteria were determined by two methods, namely, Microbial Adhesion to Solvents (MATS) and Contact Angle Measurements (CAM) combined with equation of Van Oss. The efficiency of these two methods was then compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Bacillus subtilis ILP 142B, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and four Escherichia coli strains including HB101, AL52, O128B12 and ATCC 25922, acid-base properties were examined under the two different conditions mentioned above. The results showed that the correlation between acid-base properties determined by MATS and CAM was very weak. We have also found that when the microbial cell surface was electron donor by CAM method, similar result was found by MATS, but the reverse was not always true. In contrast, a good correlation between the two methods was obtained when the four E. coli strains were examined.

  13. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Lactobacillus brevis in Low-fat Milk by Pulsed Electric Field Treatment: A Pilot-scale Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Joon; Han, Bok Kung; Choi, Hyuk Joon; Kang, Shin Ho; Baick, Seung Chun; Lee, Dong-Un

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on microbial inactivation and the physical properties of low-fat milk. Milk inoculated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Lactobacillus brevis was supplied to a pilot-scale PEF treatment system at a flow rate of 30 L/h. Pulses with an electric field strength of 10 kV/cm and a pulse width of 30 μs were applied to the milk with total pulse energies of 50-250 kJ/L achieved by varying the pulse frequency. The inactivation curves of the test microorganisms were biphasic with an initial lag phase (or shoulder) followed by a phase of rapid inactivation. PEF treatments with a total pulse energy of 200 kJ/L resulted in a 4.5-log reduction in E. coli, a 4.4-log reduction in L. brevis, and a 6.0-log reduction in S. cerevisiae. Total pulse energies of 200 and 250 kJ/L resulted in greater than 5-log reductions in microbial counts in stored PEF-treated milk, and the growth of surviving microorganisms was slow during storage for 15 d at 4℃. PEF treatment did not change milk physical properties such as pH, color, or particle-size distribution (p<0.05). These results indicate that a relatively low electric-field strength of 10 kV/cm can be used to pasteurize low-fat milk.

  14. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Lactobacillus brevis in Low-fat Milk by Pulsed Electric Field Treatment: A Pilot-scale Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bok Kung; Choi, Hyuk Joon; Kang, Shin Ho; Baick, Seung Chun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on microbial inactivation and the physical properties of low-fat milk. Milk inoculated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Lactobacillus brevis was supplied to a pilot-scale PEF treatment system at a flow rate of 30 L/h. Pulses with an electric field strength of 10 kV/cm and a pulse width of 30 μs were applied to the milk with total pulse energies of 50-250 kJ/L achieved by varying the pulse frequency. The inactivation curves of the test microorganisms were biphasic with an initial lag phase (or shoulder) followed by a phase of rapid inactivation. PEF treatments with a total pulse energy of 200 kJ/L resulted in a 4.5-log reduction in E. coli, a 4.4-log reduction in L. brevis, and a 6.0-log reduction in S. cerevisiae. Total pulse energies of 200 and 250 kJ/L resulted in greater than 5-log reductions in microbial counts in stored PEF-treated milk, and the growth of surviving microorganisms was slow during storage for 15 d at 4℃. PEF treatment did not change milk physical properties such as pH, color, or particle-size distribution (p<0.05). These results indicate that a relatively low electric-field strength of 10 kV/cm can be used to pasteurize low-fat milk. PMID:26877640

  15. Investigating the structure and dynamics of microbial communities in zones of anomalous geophysical signatures and the effect of these communities on electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. P.; Atekwana, E. A.; Davis, C.; Slater, L.; Eversole, R. R.; Rossbach, S.

    2005-05-01

    It has been recently recognized that microorganisms can impact both the electrolytic and interfacial electrical properties of subsurface geologic media and thereby influencing geoelectrical measurements. We hypothesize that geoelectrical methods in turn, can be used to delineate subsurface zones containing maximal microbial activity allowing for a better understanding of geomicrobiological processes and characterization of the microbial community. To investigate the structure and dynamics of microbial communities in zones of anomalous geophysical signatures, we used traditional culture-based microbiological and non-culture-based molecular methods. The employment of culture-based enrichment techniques at a hydrocarbon-polluted study site resulted in the isolation of multiple strains of the bacterial Rhodococcus species. Since it is known that only a fraction of the microbial soil community is amenable to enrichment cultures, we chose a non-culture-based approach as well. We constructed two clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria, one from the hydrocarbon-contaminated study site and one from a non-contaminated background site. The comparison of the two clone libraries will reveal whether there is any significant difference in microbial community composition associated with areas of anomalous geoelectrical measurements. Moreover, to study the effects of microbial biofilm formation on the physical properties of sediments, we inoculated sterile sand with known bacterial cultures and monitored the biofilm formation over time using colorimetric dyes and microscopic methods. Increased biofilm formation was observed between 3 and 6 days after inoculation. Resulting changes in the porosity and surface area of the sands will be measured by induced polarization methods. This interdisciplinary project between geophysicists and microbiologists will enhance our understanding of the effects of microorganisms on geologic media and their influence on geoelectrical

  16. Photocatalytic bacterial inactivation by polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eunyoung; Lee, Jae Won; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yeo, Jiman; Yoon, Jeyong; Cha, Hyung Joon; Choi, Wonyong

    2008-05-01

    The photocatalytic inactivation (PCI) of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) was performed using polyoxometalate (POM) as a homogeneous photocatalyst and compared with that of heterogeneous TiO2 photocatalyst. Aqueous suspensions of the microorganisms (10(7)-10(8)cfu ml(-1)) and POM (or TiO2) were irradiated with black light lamps. The POM-PCI was faster than (or comparable to) TiO2-PCI under the experimental conditions employed in this study. The relative efficiency of POM-PCI was species-dependent. Among three POMs (H(3)PW(12)O(40), H(3)PMo(12)O(40), and H(4)SiW(12)O(40)) tested in this study, the inactivation of E. coli was fastest with H(4)SiW(12)O(40) while that of B. subtilis was the most efficient with H(3)PW(12)O(40). Although the biocidal action of TiO2 photocatalyst has been commonly ascribed to the role of photogenerated reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals and superoxides, the cell death mechanism with POM seems to be different from TiO2-PCI. While TiO2 caused the cell membrane disruption, POM did not induce the cell lysis. When methanol was added to the POM solution, not only the PCI of E. coli was enhanced (contrary to the case of TiO2-PCI) but also the dark inactivation was observed. This was ascribed to the in situ production of formaldehyde from the oxidation of methanol. The interesting biocidal property of POM photocatalyst might be utilized as a potential disinfectant technology.

  17. Inactivated infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) vaccines.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E; Clouthier, S; Shewmaker, W; Weighall, A; LaPatra, S

    2008-10-01

    The inactivation dynamics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by b-propiolactone (BPL), binary ethylenimine (BEI), formaldehyde or heat and the antigenic and immunogenic properties of the inactivated vaccines were evaluated. Chemical treatment of IHNV with 2.7 mm BPL, 1.5 mm BEI or 50 mm formaldehyde abolished virus infectivity within 48 h whereas heat treatment at 50 or 100 degrees C rendered the virus innocuous within 30 min. The inactivated IHNV vaccines were recognized by rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, IHNV-specific antibodies and were differentially recognized by antigenic site I or antigenic site II IHNV glycoprotein-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The BPL inactivated whole virus vaccine was highly efficacious in vaccinated rainbow trout challenged by waterborne exposure to IHNV 7, 28, 42 or 56 days (15 degrees C) after immunization. The formaldehyde inactivated whole virus vaccine was efficacious 7 or 11 days after vaccination of rainbow trout but performed inconsistently when tested at later time points. The other vaccines tested were not efficacious.

  18. Development and rheological properties of ecological emulsions formulated with a biosolvent and two microbial polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Cayado, L A; Alfaro, M C; Muñoz, J; Raymundo, A; Sousa, I

    2016-05-01

    The influence of gum concentration and rhamsan/welan gum ratio on rheological properties, droplet size distribution and physical stability of eco-friendly O/W emulsions stabilized by an ecological surfactant were studied in the present work. The emulsions were prepared with 30wt% α-pinene, a terpenic solvent and an ecological alternative for current volatile organic compounds. Rheological properties of emulsions showed an important dependence on the two studied variables. Flow curves were fitted to the Cross model and no synergistic effect between rhamsan and welan gums was demonstrated. Emulsions with submicron mean diameters were obtained regardless of the gum concentration or the rhamsan/welan ratio used. Multiple light scattering illustrated that creaming was practically eliminated by the incorporation of polysaccharides. The use of rhamsan and welan gums as stabilizers lead to apparent enhancements in emulsion rheology and physical stability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Effect of addition of Versagel on microbial, chemical, and physical properties of low-fat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Ramchandran, L; Shah, N P

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of Versagel on the growth and proteolytic activity of Streptococcus thermophilus 1275 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus 1368 and angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of the peptides generated thereby as well as on the physical properties of low-fat yogurt during a storage period of 28 d at 4 degrees C. Three different types of low-fat yogurts, YV0, YV1, and YV2, were prepared using Versagel as a fat replacer. The fermentation time of the low-fat yogurts containing Versagel was less than that of the control yogurt (YV0). The starter cultures maintained their viability (8.68 to 8.81 log CFU/g of S. thermophilus and 8.51 to 8.81 log CFU/g of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus) in all the yogurts throughout the storage period. There was some decrease in the pH of the yogurts during storage and an increase in the concentration of lactic acid. However, the proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory potential of the starter cultures was suppressed in the presence of Versagel. On the other hand, the addition of Versagel had a positive impact on the physical properties of the low-fat yogurt, namely, spontaneous whey separation, firmness, and pseudoplastic properties.

  20. Inactivation of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanghui; Selden, David; Fooks, Anthony R; Banyard, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    Rabies virus is a notifiable pathogen that must be handled in high containment facilities where national and international guidelines apply. For the effective inactivation of rabies virus, a number of reagents were tested. Virkon S (1%) solution caused more than 4log reduction of rabies virus in culture medium supplemented with 10% foetal calf serum within 1min. Isopropyl alcohol (70%) treatment resulted in >3log reduction of rabies virus within 20s when applied at a ratio of 19:1, making it a suitable agent for surface decontamination whereas 70% ethanol was ineffective. Rabies virus (from 10(2.33) to 10(3)ffu/ml) was also inactivated when cell cultures were fixed with 3% or 4% paraformaldehyde for 30min. Regardless of inactivation procedure, when taking inactivated virus preparations out of a biological containment envelope, proof of inocuity must be demonstrated to cover any possible error/deviation from procedure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  2. New insights in mechanisms of bacterial inactivation by carvacrol.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ouazzou, A; Espina, L; Gelaw, T K; de Lamo-Castellví, S; Pagán, R; García-Gonzalo, D

    2013-01-01

    To study the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by carvacrol and the influence of genetic and environmental factors in its antimicrobial activity. In general, bacterial inactivation by carvacrol was higher in the Gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes than in the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and at acidic pH. At pH 4.0, 25 μl l(-1) of carvacrol for 5 h inactivated 1 and more than 5 log(10) cycles of E. coli and L. monocytogenes populations, respectively. Genetic and environmental factors also influenced cell resistance to carvacrol: rpoS and sigB deletion decreased carvacrol resistance in E. coli and L. monocytogenes, respectively; a heat shock induced a phenomenon of cross-protection to carvacrol treatments. Repair of sublethal injuries in cell envelopes suggested that carvacrol targets lipid fractions and proteins of these structures. This result was corroborated by attenuated total reflectance infrared microspectroscopy analysis. This study shows critical genetic and environmental factors, such as rpoS or sigB and heat shocks, and reveals new microbial structures involved in the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by carvacrol. A better understanding of the mechanisms of microbial inactivation is of great relevance to design more appropriate carvacrol treatments with high antimicrobial effects. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Inactivation of template-directed misfolding of infectious prion protein by ozone.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Neumann, Norman F; Price, Luke M; Braithwaite, Shannon L; Balachandran, Aru; Belosevic, Miodrag; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2012-02-01

    Misfolded prions (PrP(Sc)) are well known for their resistance to conventional decontamination processes. The potential risk of contamination of the water environment, as a result of disposal of specified risk materials (SRM), has raised public concerns. Ozone is commonly utilized in the water industry for inactivation of microbial contaminants and was tested in this study for its ability to inactivate prions (263K hamster scrapie = PrP(Sc)). Treatment variables included initial ozone dose (7.6 to 25.7 mg/liter), contact time (5 s and 5 min), temperature (4°C and 20°C), and pH (pH 4.4, 6.0, and 8.0). Exposure of dilute suspensions of the infected 263K hamster brain homogenates (IBH) (0.01%) to ozone resulted in the in vitro destruction of the templating properties of PrP(Sc), as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay. The highest levels of prion inactivation (≥4 log(10)) were observed with ozone doses of 13.0 mg/liter, at pH 4.4 and 20°C, resulting in a CT (the product of residual ozone concentration and contact time) value as low as 0.59 mg · liter(-1) min. A comparison of ozone CT requirements among various pathogens suggests that prions are more susceptible to ozone degradation than some model bacteria and protozoa and that ozone treatment may be an effective solution for inactivating prions in water and wastewater.

  4. Inactivation of Template-Directed Misfolding of Infectious Prion Protein by Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Price, Luke M.; Braithwaite, Shannon L.; Balachandran, Aru; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    Misfolded prions (PrPSc) are well known for their resistance to conventional decontamination processes. The potential risk of contamination of the water environment, as a result of disposal of specified risk materials (SRM), has raised public concerns. Ozone is commonly utilized in the water industry for inactivation of microbial contaminants and was tested in this study for its ability to inactivate prions (263K hamster scrapie = PrPSc). Treatment variables included initial ozone dose (7.6 to 25.7 mg/liter), contact time (5 s and 5 min), temperature (4°C and 20°C), and pH (pH 4.4, 6.0, and 8.0). Exposure of dilute suspensions of the infected 263K hamster brain homogenates (IBH) (0.01%) to ozone resulted in the in vitro destruction of the templating properties of PrPSc, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay. The highest levels of prion inactivation (≥4 log10) were observed with ozone doses of 13.0 mg/liter, at pH 4.4 and 20°C, resulting in a CT (the product of residual ozone concentration and contact time) value as low as 0.59 mg · liter−1 min. A comparison of ozone CT requirements among various pathogens suggests that prions are more susceptible to ozone degradation than some model bacteria and protozoa and that ozone treatment may be an effective solution for inactivating prions in water and wastewater. PMID:22138993

  5. Detergent-compatible proteases: microbial production, properties, and stain removal analysis.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois Niyongabo; More, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are one of the most important commercial enzymes used in various industrial domains such as detergent and leather industries. The alkaline proteases as well as other detergent-compatible enzymes such as lipases and amylases serve now as the key components in detergent formulations. They break down various stains during fabric washing. The search for detergent-compatible proteases with better properties is a continuous exercise. The current trend is to use detergent-compatible proteases that are stable over a wide temperature range. Although the proteases showing stability at elevated pH have the capacity to be used in detergent formulations, their usage can be significant if they are also stable and compatible with detergent and detergent ingredients, and also able to remove protein stains. Despite the existence of some reviews on alkaline proteases, there is no specification for the use of alkaline proteases as detergent additives. The present review describes the detergent-compatible proteases tested as detergent additives. An overview was provided for screening, optimization, purification, and properties of detergent compatible proteases, with an emphasis on the stability and compatibility of the alkaline proteases with the detergent and detergent compounds, as well as stain removal examination methods.

  6. Microbial synthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate from glycerol: gluconeogenesis, molecular weight and material properties of biopolyester.

    PubMed

    Tanadchangsaeng, Nuttapol; Yu, Jian

    2012-11-01

    Glycerol is considered as an ideal feedstock for producing bioplastics via bacterial fermentation due to its ubiquity, low price, and high degree of reduction substrate. In this work, we study the yield and cause of limitation in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) production from glycerol. Compared to glucose-based PHB production, PHB produced by Cupriavidus necator grown on glycerol has a low productivity (0.92 g PHB/L/h) with a comparably low maximum specific growth rate of 0.11 h(-1) . We found that C. necator can synthesize glucose from glycerol and that the lithotrophical utilization of glycerol (non-fermentative substrate) or gluconeogenesis is an essential metabolic pathway for biosynthesis of cellular components. Here, we show that gluconeogenesis affects the reduction of cell mass, the productivity of biopolymer product, and the molecular chain size of intracellular PHB synthesized from glycerol by C. necator. We use NMR spectroscopy to show that the isolated PHB is capped by glycerol. We then characterized the physical properties of the isolated glycerol-based PHB with differential scanning calorimetry and tensile tests. We found that although the final molecular weight of the glycerol-based PHB is lower than those of glucose-based and commercial PHB, the thermal and mechanical properties of the biopolymers are similar.

  7. [Microbial alpha-amylases: physicochemical properties, substrate specificity and domain structure].

    PubMed

    Avdiiuk, K V; Varbanets', L D

    2013-01-01

    The current literature data on producers, physico-chemical properties and substrate specificity of a-amylases produced by microbes from different taxonomic groups such as bacteria, fungi and yeasts are discussed in the survey. Synthesis of alpha-amylase majority is an inducible process which is stimulated in the presence of starch or products of its hydrolysis. It is possible to increase enzymes activity level by optimization of cultivation conditions of strains-producers. alpha-Amylases, isolated from different sources are distinguished in their physico-chemical properties, particularly in their molecular weights, pH- and thermooptimums, inhibitors and activators. The enzymes hydrolyse soluble starch, amylose, amylopectin, glycogen, maltodextrins, alpha- and beta3-cyclodextrins and other carbohydrate substrates. It is well known that alpha-amylases belong to GH-13 family of glycosyl-hydrolases, which contain the catalytic domain A as (beta/alpha)8-barrel. In addition to domain A, alpha-amylases contain two other domains: B and C, which are localized approximately on opposite sides of (beta/alpha)8-barrel. Most of the known alpha-amylases contain calcium ion, which is located on the surface between domains A and B and plays an important role in stability and activity of the enzyme.

  8. Microbial production of amino acid-modified spider dragline silk protein with intensively improved mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Zhou, Fengli; Jiang, Xinglin; Cao, Mingle; Wang, Shilu; Zou, Huibin; Cao, Yujin; Xian, Mo; Liu, Huizhou

    2016-08-17

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber with impressive mechanical properties, which were thought to result from the specific structures of the underlying proteins and their molecular size. In this study, silk protein 11R26 from the dragline silk protein of Nephila clavipes was used to analyze the potential effects of the special amino acids on the function of 11R26. Three protein derivatives, ZF4, ZF5, and ZF6, were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, based on the sequence of 11R26, and among these derivatives, serine was replaced with cysteine, isoleucine, and arginine, respectively. After these were expressed and purified, the mechanical performance of the fibers derived from the four proteins was tested. Both hardness and average elastic modulus of ZF4 fiber increased 2.2 times compared with those of 11R26. The number of disulfide bonds in ZF4 protein was 4.67 times that of 11R26, which implied that disulfide bonds outside the poly-Ala region affect the mechanical properties of spider silk more efficiently. The results indicated that the mechanical performances of spider silk proteins with small molecular size can be enhanced by modification of the amino acids residues. Our research not only has shown the feasibility of large-scale production of spider silk proteins but also provides valuable information for protein rational design.

  9. Salt tolerant SUV3 overexpressing transgenic rice plants conserve physicochemical properties and microbial communities of rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Ranjan K; Ansari, Mohammad W; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Key concerns in the ecological evaluation of GM crops are undesirably spread, gene flow, other environmental impacts, and consequences on soil microorganism's biodiversity. Numerous reports have highlighted the effects of transgenic plants on the physiology of non-targeted rhizospheric microbes and the food chain via causing adverse effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop transgenics with insignificant toxic on environmental health. In the present study, SUV3 overexpressing salt tolerant transgenic rice evaluated in New Delhi and Cuttack soil conditions for their effects on physicochemical and biological properties of rhizosphere. Its cultivation does not affect soil properties viz., pH, Eh, organic C, P, K, N, Ca, Mg, S, Na and Fe(2+). Additionally, SUV3 rice plants do not cause any change in the phenotype, species characteristics and antibiotic sensitivity of rhizospheric bacteria. The population and/or number of soil organisms such as bacteria, fungi and nematodes were unchanged in the soil. Also, the activity of bacterial enzymes viz., dehydrogenase, invertase, phenol oxidases, acid phosphatases, ureases and proteases was not significantly affected. Further, plant growth promotion (PGP) functions of bacteria such as siderophore, HCN, salicylic acid, IAA, GA, zeatin, ABA, NH3, phosphorus metabolism, ACC deaminase and iron tolerance were, considerably, not influenced. The present findings suggest ecologically pertinent of salt tolerant SUV3 rice to sustain the health and usual functions of the rhizospheric organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Properties of alternative microbial hosts used in synthetic biology: towards the design of a modular chassis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juhyun; Salvador, Manuel; Saunders, Elizabeth; González, Jaime; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The chassis is the cellular host used as a recipient of engineered biological systems in synthetic biology. They are required to propagate the genetic information and to express the genes encoded in it. Despite being an essential element for the appropriate function of genetic circuits, the chassis is rarely considered in their design phase. Consequently, the circuits are transferred to model organisms commonly used in the laboratory, such as Escherichia coli, that may be suboptimal for a required function. In this review, we discuss some of the properties desirable in a versatile chassis and summarize some examples of alternative hosts for synthetic biology amenable for engineering. These properties include a suitable life style, a robust cell wall, good knowledge of its regulatory network as well as of the interplay of the host components with the exogenous circuits, and the possibility of developing whole-cell models and tuneable metabolic fluxes that could allow a better distribution of cellular resources (metabolites, ATP, nucleotides, amino acids, transcriptional and translational machinery). We highlight Pseudomonas putida, widely used in many different biotechnological applications as a prominent organism for synthetic biology due to its metabolic diversity, robustness and ease of manipulation. PMID:27903818

  11. Enhanced Microbial, Functional and Sensory Properties of Herbal Yogurt Fermented with Korean Traditional Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Ha, Young Sik; Shin, Yong Kook; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun; Oh, Nam Su

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two Korean traditional plant extracts (Diospyros kaki THUNB. leaf; DK, and Nelumbo nucifera leaf; NN) on the fermentation, functional and sensory properties of herbal yogurts. Compared to control fermentation, all plant extracts increased acidification rate and reduced the time to complete fermentation (pH 4.5). Supplementation of plant extracts and storage time were found to influence the characteristics of the yogurts, contributing to increased viability of starter culture and phenolic compounds. In particular, the increase in the counts of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was highest (2.95 and 1.14 Log CFU/mL respectively) in DK yogurt. Furthermore, supplementation of the plant extracts significantly influenced to increase the antioxidant activity and water holding capacity and to produce volatile compounds. The higher antioxidant activity and water holding capacity were observed in NN yogurt than DK yogurt. Moreover, all of the sensory characteristics were altered by the addition of plant extracts. Addition of plant extracts increased the scores related to flavor, taste, and texture from plain yogurt without a plant extract, as a result of volatile compounds analysis. Thus, the overall preference was increased by plant extracts. Consequently, supplementation of DK and NN extracts in yogurt enhanced the antioxidant activity and physical property, moreover increased the acceptability of yogurt. These findings demonstrate the possibility of using plant extracts as a functional ingredient in the manufacture of herbal yogurt. PMID:27499669

  12. In vitro antimicrobial activity on clinical microbial strains and antioxidant properties of Artemisia parviflora

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemisia parviflora leaf extracts were evaluated for potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Antimicrobial susceptibility assay was performed against ten standard reference bacterial strains. Antioxidant activity was analyzed using the ferric thiocyanate and 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content were compared. Phytochemical analyses were performed to identify the major bioactive constitution of the plant extract. Results Hexane, methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of A. parviflora leaves exhibited good activity against the microorganisms tested. The n-hexane extract of A. parviflora showed high inhibition of the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri. Methanol extract showed strong radical scavenging and antioxidant activity, other extracts showed moderate antioxidant activity. The major derivatives present in the extracts are of terpenes, steroids, phenols, flavonoids, tannins and volatile oil. Conclusions The results obtained with n-hexane extract were particularly significant as it strongly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa, E. coli and S. flexneri. The major constituent of the n-hexane extract was identified as terpenes. Strong antioxidant activity could be observed with all the individual extracts. The antimicrobial and antioxidant property of the extracts were attributed to the secondary metabolites, terpenes and phenolic compounds present in A. parviflora and could be of considerable interest in the development of new drugs. PMID:23171441

  13. Enhanced Microbial, Functional and Sensory Properties of Herbal Yogurt Fermented with Korean Traditional Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Ha, Young Sik; Shin, Yong Kook; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun; Oh, Nam Su

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two Korean traditional plant extracts (Diospyros kaki THUNB. leaf; DK, and Nelumbo nucifera leaf; NN) on the fermentation, functional and sensory properties of herbal yogurts. Compared to control fermentation, all plant extracts increased acidification rate and reduced the time to complete fermentation (pH 4.5). Supplementation of plant extracts and storage time were found to influence the characteristics of the yogurts, contributing to increased viability of starter culture and phenolic compounds. In particular, the increase in the counts of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was highest (2.95 and 1.14 Log CFU/mL respectively) in DK yogurt. Furthermore, supplementation of the plant extracts significantly influenced to increase the antioxidant activity and water holding capacity and to produce volatile compounds. The higher antioxidant activity and water holding capacity were observed in NN yogurt than DK yogurt. Moreover, all of the sensory characteristics were altered by the addition of plant extracts. Addition of plant extracts increased the scores related to flavor, taste, and texture from plain yogurt without a plant extract, as a result of volatile compounds analysis. Thus, the overall preference was increased by plant extracts. Consequently, supplementation of DK and NN extracts in yogurt enhanced the antioxidant activity and physical property, moreover increased the acceptability of yogurt. These findings demonstrate the possibility of using plant extracts as a functional ingredient in the manufacture of herbal yogurt.

  14. Photo-inactivation of Bacillus endospores: inter-specific variability of inactivation efficiency.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Raquel N; Tomé, Augusto C; Tomé, João P C; Neves, Maria G P M S; Faustino, Maria A F; Cavaleiro, José A S; Oliveira, Anabela; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this work were to (a) evaluate the susceptibility of endospores of Bacillus cereus, B. licheniformis, B. sphaericus and B. subtilis to photodynamic inactivation using a tricationic porphyrin as photosensitizer, (b) assess the efficiency of adsorption of the photosensitizer in endospore material as a determinant of the susceptibility of endospores of different Bacillus species to photo-inactivation, (c) determine the value of B. cereus as a model organism for studies of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores. The results of irradiation experiments with endospores of four species of Bacillus showed that B. cereus was the only species for which efficient endospore photo-inactivation (> 3 log reduction) could be achieved. Endospores of B. licheniformis, B. sphaericus and B. subtilis were virtually resistant to photo-inactivation with tricationic porphyrin. The amount of porphyrin bound to endospore material was not significantly different between species, regardless of the presence of an exosporium or exosporium-like outer layer. The sensitivity of endospores to photodynamic inactivation with a tricationic porphyrin is highly variable among different species of the genus Bacillus. The presence of an exosporium in endospores of B. cereus and B. sphaericus, or an exosporium-like glycoprotein layer in endospores of B. subtilis, did not affect the amount of bound photosensitizer and did not explain the inter-species variability in susceptibility to photodynamic inactivation. The results imply that the use of B. cereus as a more amenable surrogate of the exosporium-producing B. anthracis must be carefully considered when testing new photosensitizers for their antimicrobial photo-inactivation properties.

  15. Effects of DO levels on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si-Jia; Ding, Li-Li; Huang, Hui; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we employ atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and MiSeq analysis to study the effects of traditional dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.71-1.32mg/L, 2.13-3.02mg/L and 4.31-5.16mg/L) on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge. Results showed that low DO level enhanced the surface force and roughness of activated sludge; the medium DO level decreased cell membrane fluidity by reducing the synthesis of branched fatty acids in the cell membrane; high DO level resulted in the highest protein content in the effluent by EEM scanning. Abundance of Micropruina, Zoogloea and Nakamurella increased and Paracoccus and Rudaea decreased with the increase of DO levels. RDA analysis suggested that saturated fatty acids (SFA), anteiso-fatty acids (AFA) and iso-fatty acids (IFA) were closely related to effluent quality as well as some genera. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Effects of microbial transglutaminase, fibrimex and alginate on physicochemical properties of cooked ground meat with reduced salt level.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Esra; Kilic, Birol

    2017-02-01

    Effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase), fibrin/thrombin combination (fibrimex), alginate or combination of these binding agents on physicochemical parameters of cooked ground beef with reduced salt level were investigated. Seventeen treatments included three control (no binding agent) groups incorporated with varying concentrations of salt (0.5, 1, 2%, w/w) and fourteen treatment groups produced with MTGase or fibrimex or alginate or their combinations at 0.5 or 1% salt levels. The samples were analyzed for cooking loss (CL), pH, color, moisture, fat, protein, ash, salt, texture and TBARS. The results indicated that the use of MTGase or fibrimex or MTGase/fibrimex combination had significant effect on preventing textural deterioration caused by salt reduction. Even though the use of MTGase resulted in higher CL values, formulation of ground beef with fibrimex or alginate or MTGase/fibrimex/alginate combinations reduced CL when compared with the control groups. The use of fibrimex in ground beef resulted in a decrease in TBARS, lightness, redness and pH values. However, the use of alginate caused an increase in pH, lightness and redness values of ground beef. Based on the present study, the use of fibrimex or a combination of fibrimex with MTGase in the product formulation can be an effective strategy to reduce cooking loss, to improve or maintain the textural properties and to extend shelf life of cooked ground beef with reduced salt level.

  17. The influence of different metal ions on light scattering properties of pattern microbial fuel cells' bacteria Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Olexsandr I.; Getman, Vasyl'B.; Ferensovyich, Yaroslav P.; Yaremyk, Roman Y.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2011-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technologies represent the newest approach for generating electricity - bioelectricity generation from biomass using bacteria. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans are aquatic obligatory anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacteria that possess an ability to produce electric current in the processes of organic matter oxidation and Fe3+- or Mn4+- reduction. These are pattern objects for MFC systems. They could be applied as a highly effective and self-sustaining model of wastewater treatment which contains energy in the form of biodegradable organic matter. But wastewaters contain high concentrations of xenobiotics, such as different heavy metals that have a detrimental effect towards all living organisms. The influence of different concentrations of MnCl2×4H2O, FeSO4 CuSO4, CdSO4, ZnSO4 and PbNO3 on light scattering properties of aquatic D. acetoxidans bacteria on the base of their cells' size distribution and relative content has been investigated by the new method of measurement. The cell distribution curve was in the range of 0.4 - 1.4 μm. The most crucial changes of cell concentration dependences, compared with other investigated metal ions, have been observed under the influence of copper ions. The ability of D. acetoxidans bacteria to produce electric current upon the specific cultivation conditions and the influence of Fe2+ and Mn2+ has been verified.

  18. The use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the evaluation of the electrochemical properties of a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Aswin K; Bretschger, Orianna; Nealson, Kenneth H; Mansfeld, Florian

    2008-04-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to determine several electrochemical properties of the anode and cathode of a mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) under different operational conditions. These operational conditions included a system with and without the bacterial catalyst and EIS measurements at the open-circuit potential of the anode and the cathode or at an applied cell voltage. In all cases the impedance spectra followed a simple one-time-constant model (OTCM) in which the solution resistance is in series with a parallel combination of the polarization resistance and the electrode capacitance. Analysis of the impedance spectra showed that addition of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to a solution of buffer and lactate greatly increased the rate of the lactate oxidation at the anode under open-circuit conditions. The large decrease of open-circuit potential of the anode increased the cell voltage of the MFC and its power output. Measurements of impedance spectra for the MFC at different cell voltages resulted in determining the internal resistance (R(int)) of the MFC and it was found that R(int) is a function of cell voltage. Additionally, R(int) was equal to R(ext) at the cell voltage corresponding to maximum power, where R(ext) is the external resistance that must be applied across the circuit to obtain the maximum power output.

  19. Effects of harvester ant (Messor spp.) activity on soil properties and microbial communities in a Negev Desert ecosystem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Harvester ants (Messor spp.) function as an essential link between aboveground resources and belowground biota such as the microbial community. We examined changes in soil microbial biomass and functional diversity resulting from harvester ant (Messor spp.) activity in the Negev Desert, Israel. Abi...

  20. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  1. Enhanced catalytic activity and inhibited biofouling of cathode in microbial fuel cells through controlling hydrophilic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Liu, Jia; Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Yujie

    2016-11-01

    The hydrophilicity of activated carbon cathode directly determines the distribution of three-phase interfaces where oxygen reduction occurs. In this study, activated carbon cathodes are fabricated by using hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and amphiphilic LA132 at various weight ratio to investigate the effect of hydrophilic property on cathode performance. Contact angle tests confirm the positive impact of LA132 content on hydrophilicity. Cathode with 67 wt% LA132 content shows the highest electrochemical activity as exchange current density increases by 71% and charge transfer resistance declines by 44.6% compared to that of PTFE cathode, probably due to the extended reaction interfaces by optimal hydrophilicity of cathode so that oxygen reduction is facilitated. As a result, the highest power density of 1171 ± 71 mW m-2 is obtained which is 14% higher than PTFE cathode. In addition to the hydrophilicity, this cathode had more negative charged surface of catalyst layer, therefore the protein content of cathodic biofilm decreased by 47.5%, indicating the effective bacterial inhibition when 67 wt% LA132 is used. This study shows that the catalytic activity of cathode is improved by controlling proper hydrophilicity of cathode, and that biofilm can be reduced by increasing hydrophilicity and lowering the surface potential.

  2. Microbial production of 1-octanol: A naturally excreted biofuel with diesel-like properties

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Dandapani, Hariharan; Thiel, Kati; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of sustainable, bio-based technologies to convert solar energy and carbon dioxide into fuels is a grand challenge. A core part of this challenge is to produce a fuel that is compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure. This task is further compounded by the commercial desire to separate the fuel from the biotechnological host. Based on its fuel characteristics, 1-octanol was identified as an attractive metabolic target with diesel-like properties. We therefore engineered a synthetic pathway specifically for the biosynthesis of 1-octanol in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) by over-expression of three enzymes (thioesterase, carboxylic acid reductase and aldehyde reductase) and one maturation factor (phosphopantetheinyl transferase). Induction of this pathway in a shake flask resulted in 4.4 mg 1-octanol L−1 h−1 which exceeded the productivity of previously engineered strains. Furthermore, the majority (73%) of the fatty alcohol was localised within the media without the addition of detergent or solvent overlay. The deletion of acrA reduced the production and excretion of 1-octanol by 3-fold relative to the wild-type, suggesting that the AcrAB–TolC complex may be responsible for the majority of product efflux. This study presents 1-octanol as a potential fuel target that can be synthesised and naturally accumulated within the media using engineered microbes. PMID:27066394

  3. Investigation of the Properties of Sand Tubules, a Biomineralization Product, and their Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weilian; Dai, Dehui

    2016-02-01

    Sand tubules, made up of sand grains cemented by microbe-induced calcium carbonate precipitation, have been found in China's Ningxia Province. Sand tubules grow like a tree's roots about 40-60 cm below the surface. The properties of sand tubules and their bacterial community were examined. X-Ray diffraction analysis revealed that the sand tubules were associated with crystalline calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the crystalline solid had a lamellar structure and lacked the presence of cells, suggesting that no bacteria acted as nucleation sites, nor that the crystalline solid was formed by the aggregation of bacteria. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed 11 of the 12 detectable bands were uncultured bacteria by BLAST analysis in the GenBank database, and the rest were closely related to Paenibacillus sp. (100% identity). By cultivation techniques, the only strain isolated from the sand tubule was suggested to be related to Paenibacillus sp.; no archaea were found. Furthermore, Paenibacillus sp. was demonstrated to induce calcium carbonate precipitation in vitro.

  4. Properties of hydrogel materials used for entrapment of microbial cells in production of fermented beverages.

    PubMed

    Navrátil, Marián; Gemeiner, Peter; Klein, Jaroslav; Sturdík, Ernest; Malovíková, Anna; Nahálka, Jozef; Vikartovská, Alica; Dömény, Zoltán; Smogrovicová, Daniela

    2002-05-01

    Approaches using immobilized biological materials are very promising for application in different branches of the food industry, especially in the production of fermented beverages. Materials tested by our team for the process of entrapment belong to the family of charged polysaccharides able to form beaded hydrogels by ionotropic gelation (e.g. alginate, pectate, kappa-carrageenan) and synthetic polymers (e.g. polyvinyl alcohol) forming bead- and lens-shaped hydrogels by thermal sol/gel transition. Concentration of a gel, conditions and instrumentation of gelation process, bead and size distribution, porosity, diffusion properties, mechanical, storage and operational stability, and many other parameters were followed and optimized. Our work has been oriented especially to practical applications of immobilized cells. Brewing yeast cells were successfully immobilized by entrapment materials and used in a process of batch and continual production of beer, including primary and secondary fermentation of wort. Other applications include continual production of ethanol by fermentation of different saccharide substrates (molasses, glucose syrup, wheat hydrolysate), mead and non-alcoholic beverages production.

  5. Screening methods used to determine the anti-microbial properties of Aloe vera inner gel.

    PubMed

    Habeeb, Fatema; Shakir, Eisin; Bradbury, Fiona; Cameron, Pamela; Taravati, Mohamad R; Drummond, Allan J; Gray, Alexander I; Ferro, Valerie A

    2007-08-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains is a growing problem and is an important concern for patients, physicians, healthcare managers, and policymakers as it results in poorer health and economic outcomes. This has led to an urgent global call for new antimicrobial drugs, particularly from natural resources. We have been studying the antimicrobial properties of the inner leaf gel component of Aloe barbadensis Miller and have used a number of different, simple in vitro assays to establish a scientific basis for the potential use of Aloe vera on a range of clinically relevant bacteria. The bacteria used include Shigella flexneri, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterobacter cloacae and Enterococcus bovis. In this paper, we compare standard methods recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) with a microtitre assay using a metabolic colour indicator Alamar blue. All the techniques described have shown that Aloe vera has an antimicrobial effect, however, the microtitre assay enables high throughput screening, under similar conditions and is less wasteful of plant material.

  6. Enterovirus inactivation in soil.

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, J G; O'Brien, R T

    1979-01-01

    The inactivation of radioactively labeled poliovirus type 1 and coxsackievirus B 1 in soils saturated with surface water, groundwater, and septic tank liquor was directly proportional to temperature. Virus persistence was also related to soil type and the liquid amendment in which viruses were suspended. At 37 degrees C, no infectivity was recovered from saturated soil after 12 days; at 4 degrees C, viruses persisted for at least 180 days. No infectivity was recovered from dried soil regardless of temperature, soil type, or liquid amendment. Additional experiments showed that evaporation of soil water was largely responsible for the decreased recovery of infectivity from drying soil. Increased rates of virus inactivation at low soil moisture levels were also demonstrated. PMID:44178

  7. Thermal Inactivation of Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    Hammon. 1966. Studies on Japanese B encephalitis virus vaccines from tissue culture. VI. Development of a hamster kidney tissue culture inactivated... tissue culture passage, storage, temperature and drying on viability of SE polyoma virus. Exper. Biol. and Hed. Proc. of the Soc. for Exper. Biol...studies of heated tissue suspensions containing foot- and-mouth disease virus. Amer. J. Vet. Res. 20:510-521. Dupre’, M. V., and M. Frobisher. 1966

  8. Flexible thin-layer plasma inactivation of bacteria and mold survival in beef jerky packaging and its effects on the meat's physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hae In; Lee, Haelim; Park, Sanghoo; Park, Jooyoung; Choe, Wonho; Jung, Samooel; Jo, Cheorun

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the use of a flexible thin-layer plasma system in inactivating bacteria and mold on beef jerky in a commercial package and to evaluate the physicochemical changes of the jerky. After plasma treatment for 10min, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Aspergillus flavus populations on the beef jerky were reduced by approximately 2 to 3Log CFU/g. No significant changes in metmyoglobin content, shear force, and myofibrillar fragmentation index were found in the plasma-treated beef jerky. On the other hand, the peroxide content and L(⁎) value were decreased whereas the a(⁎) and ΔE value were increased in the plasma-treated sample. Sensory evaluation indicated negative effects of plasma treatment on flavor, off-odor, and overall acceptability of the beef jerky. In conclusion, the flexible thin-layer plasma system could be employed as a means for decontamination of beef jerky, with slight changes to the physicochemical quality of the product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pregabalin Modulation of Neurotransmitter Release Is Mediated by Change in Intrinsic Activation/Inactivation Properties of Cav2.1 Calcium ChannelsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Di Guilmi, Mariano N.; Urbano, Francisco J.; Inchauspe, Carlota Gonzalez

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the effects of the anticonvulsant and analgesic drug pregabalin (PGB) on excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at principal neurons of the mouse medial nucleus of the trapezoid body and on presynaptic calcium currents at the calyx of Held. We found that the acute application of PGB reduced the amplitude of EPSCs in a dose-dependent manner with a maximal blocking effect of approximately 30%. A clinical high-concentration dose of PGB (e.g., 500 μM) blocked Cav2.1 channel-mediated currents and decreased their facilitation during a 100-Hz train, without changing their voltage-dependent activation. Furthermore, PGB also removed the inactivation of Cav2.1 channels at a clinically relevant low concentration of 100 μM. These results suggest novel modulatory mechanisms mediated by the acute administration of PGB on fast excitatory synaptic transmission and might contribute to better understanding PGB anticonvulsant/analgesic clinical effects. PMID:21177783

  10. A review on the application of inorganic nano-structured materials in the modification of textiles: focus on anti-microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Dastjerdi, Roya; Montazer, Majid

    2010-08-01

    Textiles can provide a suitable substrate to grow micro-organisms especially at appropriate humidity and temperature in contact to human body. Recently, increasing public concern about hygiene has been driving many investigations for anti-microbial modification of textiles. However, using many anti-microbial agents has been avoided because of their possible harmful or toxic effects. Application of inorganic nano-particles and their nano-composites would be a good alternative. This review paper has focused on the properties and applications of inorganic nano-structured materials with good anti-microbial activity potential for textile modification. The discussed nano-structured anti-microbial agents include TiO(2) nano-particles, metallic and non-metallic TiO(2) nano-composites, titania nanotubes (TNTs), silver nano-particles, silver-based nano-structured materials, gold nano-particles, zinc oxide nano-particles and nano-rods, copper nano-particles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), nano-clay and its modified forms, gallium, liposomes loaded nano-particles, metallic and inorganic dendrimers nano-composite, nano-capsules and cyclodextrins containing nano-particles. This review is also concerned with the application methods for the modification of textiles using nano-structured materials.

  11. EFFECTS OF PHOTOCHEMICAL, MICROBIAL AND SORPTION PROCESSES ON THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND DEGRADATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FROM COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from rivers and intertidal marshes to coastal oceans is rich in light-absorbing, fluorescent constituents, including humic substances and other polyphenolic moieties. Interactions between microbial and photochemical processes have impor...

  12. EFFECTS OF PHOTOCHEMICAL, MICROBIAL AND SORPTION PROCESSES ON THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND DEGRADATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FROM COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from rivers and intertidal marshes to coastal oceans is rich in light-absorbing, fluorescent constituents, including humic substances and other polyphenolic moieties. Interactions between microbial and photochemical processes have impor...

  13. Chemical inactivation of HIV on surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, P. J.; Gor, D.; Jeffries, D. J.; Collins, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    To assess whether alcohol and glutaraldehyde are effective disinfectants against dried HIV the virucidal effects of 70% alcohol (ethanol and industrial methylated spirit) and 1% and 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde were tested against cell associated and cell free HIV dried on to a surface. Virus stock (100 microliters) or 10,000 cultured C8166 T lymphocytes infected with HIV were dried onto sterile coverslips and immersed in 2% and 1% alkaline glutaraldehyde and 70% ethanol for 30 seconds and one, two, four, and 10 minutes, there being an additional time point of 20 minutes for cell free virus disinfected with 70% industrial methylated spirit. In addition, virus stock in neat serum was tested with 1% and 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde to see whether the fixative properties of glutaraldehyde impair its virucidal properties. Virus activity after disinfection was tested by incubating the coverslips (cell associated virus) or the coverslips and sonicated cell free virus with C8166 T lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were examined for the formation of syncytia and HIV antigens were assayed in the culture fluid. Both 2% and 1% alkaline glutaraldehyde inactivated cell free HIV within one minute; 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde also inactivated cell free virus in serum within two minutes, but a 1% solution was ineffective after 15 minutes' immersion. Cell associated HIV was inactivated by 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde within two minutes. Seventy per cent industrial methylated spirit failed to inactivate cell free and cell associated HIV within 20 and 15 minutes, respectively, and 70% ethanol did not inactivate cell free virus within 10 minutes. Seventy per cent industrial methylated spirit and ethanol are not suitable for surface disinfection of HIV. Fresh 2% solutions of alkaline glutaraldehyde are effective, but care should be taken that they are not too dilute or have not become stale when used for disinfecting HIV associated with organic matter. PMID:2497825

  14. The role of inactivation in open-channel block of the sodium channel: studies with inactivation-deficient mutant channels.

    PubMed

    Grant, A O; John, J E; Nesterenko, V V; Starmer, C F; Moorman, J R

    1996-12-01

    Inactivation has been implicated as an important determinant of the block of Na+ channel by local anesthetic-class drugs. This proposition has been difficult to examine because agents used to modify inactivation change other channel properties and both inactivated and blocked channels do not conduct. We used site-directed mutagenesis of Phe1304 to glutamine in the linker between the third and fourth domains of the mu-1 Na+ channel to slow inactivation. Wild-type and mutant channels were expressed in frog oocytes. Macropatch and single-channel currents were recorded in cell-attached membrane patches. The F1304Q mutation increased mean open time (1.7 fold at -20 mV) and reduced the probability that the channel would fail to open. Closed times were best fit by a double-exponential function, suggesting that the inactivated state transitions were no longer absorbing. In wild-type channels, 100 microM disopyramide decreased mean open time from 1.64 +/- 0.08 to 0.34 +/- 0.04 msec. Total open time per trial was decreased 2-fold. There also was a marked increase in the fraction of null sweeps. In the inactivation-deficient mutant channel, mean and total open times were also reduced. These data indicate that even when inactivation is slowed by a localized specific mutation, open-channel block by disopyramide persists. Inactivation may not be a necessary requirement for open-channel block.

  15. BK channel inactivation gates daytime excitability in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Joshua P.; Montgomery, Jenna R.; Meredith, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation is an intrinsic property of several voltage-dependent ion channels, closing the conduction pathway during membrane depolarization and dynamically regulating neuronal activity. BK K+ channels undergo N-type inactivation via their β2 subunit, but the physiological significance is not clear. Here, we report that inactivating BK currents predominate during the day in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the brain's intrinsic clock circuit, reducing steady-state current levels. At night inactivation is diminished, resulting in larger BK currents. Loss of β2 eliminates inactivation, abolishing the diurnal variation in both BK current magnitude and SCN firing, and disrupting behavioural rhythmicity. Selective restoration of inactivation via the β2 N-terminal ‘ball-and-chain' domain rescues BK current levels and firing rate, unexpectedly contributing to the subthreshold membrane properties that shift SCN neurons into the daytime ‘upstate'. Our study reveals the clock employs inactivation gating as a biophysical switch to set the diurnal variation in suprachiasmatic nucleus excitability that underlies circadian rhythm. PMID:26940770

  16. BK channel inactivation gates daytime excitability in the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Joshua P; Montgomery, Jenna R; Meredith, Andrea L

    2016-03-04

    Inactivation is an intrinsic property of several voltage-dependent ion channels, closing the conduction pathway during membrane depolarization and dynamically regulating neuronal activity. BK K(+) channels undergo N-type inactivation via their β2 subunit, but the physiological significance is not clear. Here, we report that inactivating BK currents predominate during the day in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the brain's intrinsic clock circuit, reducing steady-state current levels. At night inactivation is diminished, resulting in larger BK currents. Loss of β2 eliminates inactivation, abolishing the diurnal variation in both BK current magnitude and SCN firing, and disrupting behavioural rhythmicity. Selective restoration of inactivation via the β2 N-terminal 'ball-and-chain' domain rescues BK current levels and firing rate, unexpectedly contributing to the subthreshold membrane properties that shift SCN neurons into the daytime 'upstate'. Our study reveals the clock employs inactivation gating as a biophysical switch to set the diurnal variation in suprachiasmatic nucleus excitability that underlies circadian rhythm.

  17. Effect of a residue after evaporation from industrial vitamin C fermentation on chemical and microbial properties of alkali-saline soil.

    PubMed

    Kong, Tao; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zhenyu; Sun, Hao; Wang, Lihua

    2014-07-01

    Residue after evaporation (RAE) from industrial vitamin C fermentation is emitted as a waste product at an amount of 60,000 tons per year in China. The disposal of RAE is difficult because of its high chemical oxygen demand (1.17×10(6) mg/l) and low pH (0.27). We hypothesized that RAE could be used as an ameliorant for alkali-saline soils, and tried to verify it by carrying out a pot experiment of pakchoi cultivation and to explore its effect on soil chemical and microbial properties. The results showed that pakchoi yield was increased by 28.13% and pakchoi quality was also enhanced under RAE treatment. The improved chemical and microbial properties of treated soil were also observed: soil pH was decreased from 9.19 to 9.03; total organic carbon, available phosphorus and available potassium were increased by 49.15%, 34.91% and 42.02%, respectively; number of culturable bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi, microbial biomass carbon and enzyme activity number were improved by 52.97%, 104.05%, 79.09%, 57.82% and 31.16%, respectively. These results suggested the residue application led to an improved soil quality and subsequently a higher yield and quality of pakchoi. This study provided a strong evidence for the feasibility of RAE as an ameliorant for alkali-saline soil.

  18. Inactivation of the biofilm by the air plasma containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi; Yasuoka Takeuchi lab Team

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factory and medical facilities. Inactivation of biofilm has the method of making it react to chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Although inactivation by chemicals has the problem that hazardous property of a residual substance and hydrogen peroxide have slow reaction velocity. We achieved advanced oxidation process (AOP) with air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were able to be generated selectively by adjusting the amount of water supplied to the plasma. We inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in five minutes with OH radicals generated by using hydrogen peroxide and ozone.

  19. Microbial communities on glacier surfaces in Svalbard: impact of physical and chemical properties on abundance and structure of cyanobacteria and algae.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Sabacká, Marie; Kastovská, Klára

    2006-11-01

    Microbial communities occurring in three types of supraglacial habitats--cryoconite holes, medial moraines, and supraglacial kames--at several glaciers in the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard were investigated. Abundance, biovolume, and community structure were evaluated by using epifluorescence microscopy and culturing methods. Particular emphasis was laid on distinctions in the chemical and physical properties of the supraglacial habitats and their relation to the microbial communities, and quantitative multivariate analyses were used to assess potential relationships. Varying pH (4.8 in cryoconite; 8.5 in a moraine) and texture (the proportion of coarse fraction 2% of dry weight in cryoconite; 99% dw in a kame) were found, and rather low concentrations of organic matter (0.3% of dry weight in a kame; 22% dw in cryoconite) and nutrients (nitrogen up to 0.4% dw, phosphorus up to 0.8% dw) were determined in the samples. In cryoconite sediment, the highest numbers of bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae were found, whereas relatively low microbial abundances were recorded in moraines and kames. Cyanobacterial cells were significantly more abundant than microalgal ones in cryoconite and supraglacial kames. Different species of the cyanobacterial genus Leptolyngbya were by far the most represented in all samples, and cyanobacteria of the genera Phormidium and Nostoc prevailed in cultures isolated from cryoconite samples. These species are considered opportunistic organisms with wide ecological valency and strong colonizing potential rather than glacial specialists. Statistical analyses suggest that fine sediment with higher water content is the most suitable condition for bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae. Also, a positive impact of lower pH on microbial growth was found. The fate of a microbial cell deposited on the glacier surface seems therefore predetermined by the physical and chemical factors such as texture of sediment and water content rather than spatial factors

  20. [Microbial biofilms in the food industry].

    PubMed

    Schlegelová, J; Karpísková, S

    2007-02-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities whose architecture includes microorganisms, biotic substances produced by these microorganisms and attached organic and inorganic substances from the environment. They pose a serious problem in human medicine. Microbial biofilm communities are also cause for concern in the food industry since pathogenic microorganisms released from the biofilm may contaminate food and raw materials for food production. Not only the microbial community as a whole but also particular cells exhibit increased resistance to sanitation measures and disinfectants which makes it difficult to remove the biofilm or to inactivate particular built up microorganisms. Mainly model studies and molecular genetic and microscopy methods can contribute to better understanding of this issue, and thus to prevention and inactivation of microbial communities on food contact surfaces of equipment in the food production plants. Such studies would be of benefit to both health care and food processing and production.

  1. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  2. C. botulinum inactivation kinetics implemented in a computational model of a high-pressure sterilization process.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Pablo; Knoerzer, Kai; Fryer, Peter J; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) processing is effective for microbial spore inactivation using mild preheating, followed by rapid volumetric compression heating and cooling on pressure release, enabling much shorter processing times than conventional thermal processing for many food products. A computational thermal fluid dynamic (CTFD) model has been developed to model all processing steps, including the vertical pressure vessel, an internal polymeric carrier, and food packages in an axis-symmetric geometry. Heat transfer and fluid dynamic equations were coupled to four selected kinetic models for the inactivation of C. botulinum; the traditional first-order kinetic model, the Weibull model, an nth-order model, and a combined discrete log-linear nth-order model. The models were solved to compare the resulting microbial inactivation distributions. The initial temperature of the system was set to 90 degrees C and pressure was selected at 600 MPa, holding for 220 s, with a target temperature of 121 degrees C. A representation of the extent of microbial inactivation throughout all processing steps was obtained for each microbial model. Comparison of the models showed that the conventional thermal processing kinetics (not accounting for pressure) required shorter holding times to achieve a 12D reduction of C. botulinum spores than the other models. The temperature distribution inside the vessel resulted in a more uniform inactivation distribution when using a Weibull or an nth-order kinetics model than when using log-linear kinetics. The CTFD platform could illustrate the inactivation extent and uniformity provided by the microbial models. The platform is expected to be useful to evaluate models fitted into new C. botulinum inactivation data at varying conditions of pressure and temperature, as an aid for regulatory filing of the technology as well as in process and equipment design.

  3. Variability of geochemical properties in a microbially dominated coalbed gas system from the eastern margin of the Illinois Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hedges, S.

    2008-01-01

    This study outlines gas characteristics along the southeastern margins of the Illinois Basin and evaluates regional versus local gas variations in Seelyville and Springfield coal beds. Our findings suggest that high permeability and shallow (100-250??m) depths of these Indiana coals allowed inoculation with methanogenic microbial consortia, thus leading to widespread microbial methane generation along the eastern marginal part of the Illinois Basin. Low maturity coals in the Illinois Basin with a vitrinite reflectance Ro ~ 0.6% contain significant amounts of coal gas (~ 3??m3/t, 96??scf/t) with ??? 97??vol.% microbial methane. The amount of coal gas can vary significantly within a coal seam both in a vertical seam section as well as laterally from location to location. Therefore sampling of an entire core section is required for accurate estimates of coal gas reserves. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy-Compatible Inactivation Method for Pathogenic Endospores▿

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, S.; Schumacher, W.; Meisel, S.; Elschner, M.; Rösch, P.; Popp, J.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a fast and sensitive tool for the detection, classification, and identification of biological organisms. The vibrational spectrum inherently serves as a fingerprint of the biochemical composition of each bacterium and thus makes identification at the species level, or even the subspecies level, possible. Therefore, microorganisms in areas susceptible to bacterial contamination, e.g., clinical environments or food-processing technology, can be sensed. Within the scope of point-of-care-testing also, detection of intentionally released biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) agents, such as Bacillus anthracis endospores, or their products is attainable. However, no Raman spectroscopy-compatible inactivation method for the notoriously resistant Bacillus endospores has been elaborated so far. In this work we present an inactivation protocol for endospores that permits, on the one hand, sufficient microbial inactivation and, on the other hand, the recording of Raman spectroscopic signatures of single endospores, making species-specific identification by means of highly sophisticated chemometrical methods possible. Several physical and chemical inactivation methods were assessed, and eventually treatment with 20% formaldehyde proved to be superior to the other methods in terms of sporicidal capacity and information conservation in the Raman spectra. The latter fact has been verified by successfully using self-learning machines (such as support vector machines or artificial neural networks) to identify inactivated B. anthracis-related endospores with adequate accuracies within the range of the limited model database employed. PMID:20208030

  5. E.coli inactivation by high frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2013-04-01

    A very important stage in water and wastewater treatment processes is disinfection, which protects the public from pathogenic biocolloids (microorganisms). Several quite different disinfection technologies have been proposed and tested throughout the years, each possessing unique advantages and drawbacks. Microbial inactivation by ultrasound provides a unique combination of simultaneously acting mechanisms including mechanical effects capable of disrupting cell membranes, chemical effects (including generation of active free radicals), and heat effects (i.e. generation of local hot spots). The aim of this work is to examine the efficiency of ultrasound irradiation on the inactivation of model bacteria. The strain of E.coli CN13 was selected for this purpose, because E. coli is a bacterium, which is usually found in raw and secondary treated municipal wastewater. Numerous E.coli CN13 inactivation experiments were conducted with different initial concentrations using an ultrasound frequency of 582 kHz. The experimental data were analyzed by various previously developed kinetic models. The results showed that bacteria inactivation was depended on the initial concentration and the rate of inactivation decreases with decreasing initial bacterial concentration.

  6. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis, Zizania aquatica, and Acorus calamus. The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants. A. calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils, as compared with Z. aquatica and P. australis. Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P. australis, Z. aquatica, and A. calamus were 7.5, 9.8 and 5.4 days, respectively. Residual butachlor concentration in A. calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z. aquatica and P. australis rhizosphere soils, respectively, indicating that A. calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant. In general, microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition, despite the riparian plant types. However, rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P < 0.05) differed between riparian plant species. Compared to Z. aquatica and P. australis, A. calamus showed significantly larger microbial number, higher enzyme activities and soil respiration rates in the rhizosphere soils. The results indicated that A. calamus have a better alleviative effect on inhibition of microbial growth due to butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butachlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  7. Microbial metropolis.

    PubMed

    Wimpenny, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms can form tightly knit communities such as biofilms. Many others include marine snow, anaerobic digester granules, the ginger beer plant and bacterial colonies. This chapter is devoted to a survey of the main properties of these communities, with an emphasis on biofilms. We start with attachment to surfaces and the nature of adhesion. The growing community then forms within a matrix, generally of organic macromolecules. Inevitably the environment within such a matrix is different from that outside. Organisms respond by forming crowd-detection and response units; these quorum sensing systems act as switches between planktonic life and the dramatically altered conditions found inside microbial aggregates. The community then matures and changes and may even fail and disappear. Antimicrobial resistance is discussed as an example of multicellular behavior. The multicellular lifestyle has been modeled mathematically and responded to powerful molecular biological techniques. Latterly, microbial systems have been used as models for fundamental evolutionary processes, mostly because of their high rates of reproduction and the ease of genetic manipulation. The life of most microbes is a duality between the yin of the community and the yang of planktonic existence. Sadly far less research has been devoted to adaptation to free-living forms than in the opposite direction. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inactivation of Bacteria using Combined Effects of Magnetic Field, Low Pressure and Ultra Low Frequency Plasma Discharges (ULFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaly, A. R.; Zahran, H. H.

    2013-04-01

    Inactivating viable cells at very short application times has been studied using Ultra Low Frequency Plasma (ULFP) at one Kilo Hertz, using an RF source. The targeted fashion is to inactivate Escherichia coli (E. coli) in the absence and in the presence of magnetic field. Adding oxygen (O2) to argon (Ar) in the discharge leads to a complete bacterial inactivation, where the inactivation rate increased as the concentration of O2 increases. Analyses of the experimental data of the initial and final densities of viable cells, using survival curves, showed a dramatic inhibitory effect of plasma discharge to the residual survival of microbial ratio due to the influence of the magnetic field.

  9. Probabilistic Model of Microbial Cell Growth, Division, and Mortality ▿

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Joseph; Normand, Mark D.; Corradini, Maria G.; Peleg, Micha

    2010-01-01

    After a short time interval of length δt during microbial growth, an individual cell can be found to be divided with probability Pd(t)δt, dead with probability Pm(t)δt, or alive but undivided with the probability 1 − [Pd(t) + Pm(t)]δt, where t is time, Pd(t) expresses the probability of division for an individual cell per unit of time, and Pm(t) expresses the probability of mortality per unit of time. These probabilities may change with the state of the population and the habitat's properties and are therefore functions of time. This scenario translates into a model that is presented in stochastic and deterministic versions. The first, a stochastic process model, monitors the fates of individual cells and determines cell numbers. It is particularly suitable for small populations such as those that may exist in the case of casual contamination of a food by a pathogen. The second, which can be regarded as a large-population limit of the stochastic model, is a continuous mathematical expression that describes the population's size as a function of time. It is suitable for large microbial populations such as those present in unprocessed foods. Exponential or logistic growth with or without lag, inactivation with or without a “shoulder,” and transitions between growth and inactivation are all manifestations of the underlying probability structure of the model. With temperature-dependent parameters, the model can be used to simulate nonisothermal growth and inactivation patterns. The same concept applies to other factors that promote or inhibit microorganisms, such as pH and the presence of antimicrobials, etc. With Pd(t) and Pm(t) in the form of logistic functions, the model can simulate all commonly observed growth/mortality patterns. Estimates of the changing probability parameters can be obtained with both the stochastic and deterministic versions of the model, as demonstrated with simulated data. PMID:19915038

  10. Safety of the production process of SURFACEN(®) to inactivate and remove virus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Yordank; Noa, Enrique; Alfonso, Wilma; Dubed, Marta; Alvarez, Giselle; Navea, Leonor; Montes de Oca, Nivian; Lobaina, Leonor; Díaz, Elaine

    2013-07-01

    SURFACEN(®) is a biological product produced from pig lungs. Since these animals can be potential sources of microbial pathogens such as viruses, the manufacturing process of this product should guarantee safety from health hazards. The SURFACEN(®) production procedure is capable of effective viral clearance (inactivation/removal) by involving two stages of organic solvent extraction followed by acetone precipitation and heat treatment. In this study, we evaluated the clearance capacity of these four stages for a wide range of viruses by performing spiking experiments. Residual contamination was assessed using a Tissue Culture Infectious Dose assay (log10 TCID50). The validation study demonstrated that, for all viruses tested, the TCID50 titers were reduced by more than 2 log10 in each stage. Total log reduction values achieved were between ≥17.82 log10 and ≥27.93 log10, depending on the virus physical properties, titer, and the number of processing stages applied. Results indicated that the production procedure of SURFACEN(®) can inactivate or remove contaminant viruses from the raw material.

  11. Kinetics of Ozone Inactivation of Infectious Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Price, Luke M.; Braithwaite, Shannon L.; Balachandran, Aru; Mitchell, Gordon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics of ozone inactivation of infectious prion protein (PrPSc, scrapie 263K) was investigated in ozone-demand-free phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Diluted infectious brain homogenates (IBH) (0.01%) were exposed to a predetermined ozone dose (10.8 ± 2.0 mg/liter) at three pHs (pH 4.4, 6.0, and 8.0) and two temperatures (4°C and 20°C). The inactivation of PrPSc was quantified by determining the in vitro destruction of PrPSc templating properties using the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay and bioassay, which were shown to correlate well. The inactivation kinetics were characterized by both Chick-Watson (CW) and efficiency factor Hom (EFH) models. It was found that the EFH model fit the experimental data more appropriately. The efficacy of ozone inactivation of PrPSc was both pH and temperature dependent. Based on the EFH model, CT (disinfectant concentration multiplied by contact time) values were determined for 2-log10, 3-log10, and 4-log10 inactivation at the conditions under which they were achieved. Our results indicated that ozone is effective for prion inactivation in ozone-demand-free water and may be applied for the inactivation of infectious prion in prion-contaminated water and wastewater. PMID:23416994

  12. Inactivation of microorganisms by low-frequency high-power ultrasound: 1. Effect of growth phase and capsule properties of the bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shengpu; Lewis, Gillian D; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Hemar, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity low-frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound treatment on the viability of bacteria suspension. More specifically, we have investigated the relationship between the deactivation efficiency and the physical (size, hydrophobicity) and biological (gram-status, growth phase) properties of the microbes. Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. epidermidis SK and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius were chosen for this study owing to their varying physical and biological properties. The survival ratio of the bacteria suspension was measured as a function of the ultrasound power (up to 13 W) for a constant sonication time of 20 min. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate the ultrasound-induced damages to the microbes. Ultrasound treatment resulted in lethal damage to E. aerogenes and B. subtilis (up to 4.5-log reduction), whereas Staphylococcus spp. were not affected noticeably. Further, E. aerogenes suspensions were more sensitive to ultrasonication in exponential growth phase than when they were in stationary phase. The results of this study demonstrate that the main reason for bacterial resistance to ultrasonic deactivation is due to the properties of the bacterial capsule. Microbes with a thicker and "soft" capsule are highly resistant to ultrasonic deactivation process.

  13. CoBOP: Microbial Biofilms: A Parameter Altering the Apparent Optical Properties of Sediments, Seagrasses and Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    light scattering and refractive index measurements, were conducted. Quantitative imaging of in-situ sediment, generated by nanoplast -embedded natural...natual microbial communities and their extracellular polymeric secretions using Nanoplast resin. BioTechniques 27: 1246-1252. Decho, A.W. 1999

  14. CoBOP: Microbial Biofilms: A Parameter Altering the Apparent Optical Properties of Sediments, Seagrasses and Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    light scattering and refractive index measurements, were conducted. Quantitative imaging of in-situ sediment, generated by nanoplast -embedded natural...polymeric secretions using Nanoplast resin. BioTechniques 27: 1246-1252. Decho, A.W. 1999. Microbial biofilms in intertidal systems: an overview

  15. Microbial properties and litter and soil nutrients after two prescribed fires in developing savannas in an upland Missouri Ozark Forest

    Treesearch

    Felix, Jr. Ponder; Mahasin Tadros; Edward F. Loewenstein

    2009-01-01

    On some landscapes periodic fire may be necessary to develop and maintain oak-dominated savannas. We studied the effects of two annual prescribed burns to determine their effect on microbial activity and soil and litter nutrients 1 year after the last burn. Surface litter and soil from the upper 0?5 cm soil layer in three developing savannas (oak-hickory, ...

  16. Impact of poplar-based phytomanagement on soil properties and microbial communities in a metal-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Foulon, Julie; Zappelini, Cyril; Durand, Alexis; Valot, Benoit; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2016-10-01

    Despite a long history of use in phytomanagement strategies, the impacts of poplar trees on the structure and function of microbial communities that live in the soil remain largely unknown. The current study combined fungal and bacterial community analyses from different management regimes using Illumina-based sequencing with soil analysis. The poplar phytomanagement regimes led to a significant increase in soil fertility and a decreased bioavailability of Zn and Cd, in concert with changes in the microbial communities. The most notable changes in the relative abundance of taxa and operational taxonomic units unsurprisingly indicated that root and soil constitute distinct ecological microbial habitats, as exemplified by the dominance of Laccaria in root samples. The poplar cultivar was also an important driver, explaining 12% and 6% of the variance in the fungal and bacterial data sets, respectively. The overall dominance of saprophytic fungi, e.g. Penicillium canescens, might be related to the decomposition activities needed at the experimental site. Our data further highlighted that the mycorrhizal colonization of poplar cultivars varies greatly between the species and genotypes, which is exemplified by the dominance of Scleroderma under Vesten samples. Further interactions between fungal and bacterial functional groups stressed the potential of high-throughput sequencing technologies in uncovering the microbial ecology of disturbed environments. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Effects of biochar on CO2 and N2O emissions and microbial properties of tea garden soils].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun-fei; Li, Rong-lin; Yang, Yi-yang

    2015-07-01

    To clarify the effects of biochar addition (0.5%, 1.5%, 2.5%, 3.5%) on the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O), pH and microbial communities of the tea garden soil, an indoor incubation experiment was conducted using the acidulated tea-planted soil. Results showed that the emissions of CO2 and N2O and the rate of C, N mineralization were increased in a short term after the addition of biochar compared with the control, while the promoting effect was weakened along with increasing the addition of biochar. The pH, dehydrogenase activity and microbial biomass carbon were increased in the biochar treatments. Phospholi-pid fatty acid (PLFA) with different markers was measured and the most PLFA was detected in the group in the 1.5% biochar treatment with significant differences (P<0.05) compared with the control. In addition, the higher levels of 16:0, 14:0 (bacteria), 18:lω9c (fungi), l0Me18:0 (actinomycetes) groups were observed and there were significant differences (P <0.05) in individual phospholipid fatty acid among the different treatments. Taken together, the acidulated tea-planted soil, soil microbial biomass and microbial number were improved after addition of biochar.

  18. Impacts of forest harvest on active carbon and microbial properties of a volcanic ash cap soil in northern Idaho

    Treesearch

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Matt D. Busse; Steven T. Overby; Brian D. Gardner; Joanne M. Tirocke

    2015-01-01

    Soil quality assessments are essential for determining impacts on belowground microbial community structure and function. We evaluated the suitability of active carbon (C), a rapid field test, as an indicator of soil biological quality in five paired forest stands (clear cut harvested 40 years prior and unharvested) growing on volcanic ash-cap soils in northern Idaho....

  19. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  20. N-type calcium channel inactivation probed by gating-current analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L P; DeMaria, C D; Yue, D T

    1999-01-01

    N-type calcium channels inactivate most rapidly in response to moderate, not extreme depolarization. This behavior reflects an inactivation rate that bears a U-shaped dependence on voltage. Despite this apparent similarity to calcium-dependent inactivation, N-type channel inactivation is insensitive to the identity of divalent charge carrier and, in some reports, to the level of internal buffering of divalent cations. Hence, the inactivation of N-type channels fits poorly with the "classic" profile for either voltage-dependent or calcium-dependent inactivation. To investigate this unusual inactivation behavior, we expressed recombinant N-type calcium channels in mammalian HEK 293 cells, permitting in-depth correlation of ionic current inactivation with potential alterations of gating current properties. Such correlative measurements have been particularly useful in distinguishing among various inactivation mechanisms in other voltage-gated channels. Our main results are the following: 1) The degree of gating charge immobilization was unchanged by the block of ionic current and precisely matched by the extent of ionic current inactivation. These results argue for a purely voltage-dependent mechanism of inactivation. 2) The inactivation rate was fastest at a voltage where only approximately (1)/(3) of the total gating charge had moved. This unusual experimental finding implies that inactivation occurs most rapidly from intermediate closed conformations along the activation pathway, as we demonstrate with novel analytic arguments applied to coupled-inactivation schemes. These results provide strong, complementary support for a "preferential closed-state" inactivation mechanism, recently proposed on the basis of ionic current measurements of recombinant N-type channels (Patil et al., . Neuron. 20:1027-1038). PMID:10233069

  1. Microbial melanins for radioprotection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Radames J B; Vij, Raghav; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-09-01

    Microbial melanins provide a biocompatible and scalable approach for bioremediation and radioprotection technologies due to their physicochemical properties. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Effect of PLA films containing propolis ethanolic extract, cellulose nanoparticle and Ziziphora clinopodioides essential oil on chemical, microbial and sensory properties of minced beef.

    PubMed

    Shavisi, Nassim; Khanjari, Ali; Basti, Afshin Akhondzadeh; Misaghi, Ali; Shahbazi, Yasser

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of polylactic acid (PLA) film containing propolis ethanolic extract (PE), cellulose nanoparticle (CN) and Ziziphora clinopodioides essential oil (ZEO) on chemical, microbial and sensory properties of minced beef during storage at refrigerated temperature for 11days. The initial total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N) was 8.2mg/100g and after 7days reached to 29.1mg/100g in control, while it was lower than 25mg/100g for treated samples. At the end of storage time in control samples peroxide value (PV) reached to 2.01meqperoxide/1000g lipid, while the values for the treated samples remained lower than 2meqperoxide/1000g lipid. Final microbial population decreased approximately 1-3logCFU/g in treated samples compared to control (P<0.05). Films containing 2% ZEO alone and in combination with different concentrations of PE and CN extended the shelf life of minced beef during storage in refrigerated condition for at least 11days without any unfavorable organoleptic properties.

  3. Effect of thyme/cumin essential oils and butylated hydroxyl anisole/butylated hydroxyl toluene on physicochemical properties and oxidative/microbial stability of chicken patties.

    PubMed

    Sariçoban, Cemalettin; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin

    2014-02-01

    In this study, effects of thyme/cumin essential oils (EO) and butylated hydroxyl anisole (BHA)/butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT) on physicochemical properties and storage stability of chicken patties were compared in different storage periods (0, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 d). It was found that there were significant (P < 0.05) differences between physicochemical properties of patty samples treated with EO and the synthetic antioxidants. The EO showed similar performance to those of BHA and BHT in limiting TBARS values of chicken patty samples. Similarity in performance was also the case for microbial stability (total aerobic mesophilic, psychrotrophic, lactic acid, and coliform bacteria as well as molds and yeasts); namely, their effects were significant (P < 0.05). Effect of thyme EO was significant (P < 0.05) and remarkable, not allowing any coliform bacteria to grow in the samples. Given that EO were obtained from natural sources, the data suggested that the EO might be more useful than their synthetic counterparts, BHA and BHT, as additives for chicken patties to maintain oxidative/microbial stability and increase shelf life.

  4. Effect of salinity tolerant PDH45 transgenic rice on physicochemical properties, enzymatic activities and microbial communities of rhizosphere soils

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    The effect of genetically modified (GM) plants on environment is now major concern worldwide. The plant roots of rhizosphere soil interact with variety of bacteria which could be influenced by the transgene in GM plants. The antibiotic resistance genes in GM plants may be transferred to soil microbes. In this study we have examined the effect of overexpression of salinity tolerant pea DNA helicase 45 (PDH45) gene on microbes and enzymatic activities in the rhizosphere soil of transgenic rice IR64 in presence and absence of salt stress in two different rhizospheric soils (New Delhi and Odisha, India). The diversity of the microbial community and soil enzymes viz., dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, urease and nitrate reductase was assessed. The results revealed that there was no significant effect of transgene expression on rhizosphere soil of the rice plants. The isolated bacteria were phenotyped both in absence and presence of salt and no significant changes were found in their phenotypic characters as well as in their population. Overall, the overexpression of PDH45 in rice did not cause detectable changes in the microbial population, soil enzymatic activities and functional diversity of the rhizosphere soil microbial community. PMID:23733066

  5. Effect of salinity tolerant PDH45 transgenic rice on physicochemical properties, enzymatic activities and microbial communities of rhizosphere soils.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-08-01

    The effect of genetically modified (GM) plants on environment is now major concern worldwide. The plant roots of rhizosphere soil interact with variety of bacteria which could be influenced by the transgene in GM plants. The antibiotic resistance genes in GM plants may be transferred to soil microbes. In this study we have examined the effect of overexpression of salinity tolerant pea DNA helicase 45 (PDH45) gene on microbes and enzymatic activities in the rhizosphere soil of transgenic rice IR64 in presence and absence of salt stress in two different rhizospheric soils (New Delhi and Odisha, India). The diversity of the microbial community and soil enzymes viz., dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, urease and nitrate reductase was assessed. The results revealed that there was no significant effect of transgene expression on rhizosphere soil of the rice plants. The isolated bacteria were phenotyped both in absence and presence of salt and no significant changes were found in their phenotypic characters as well as in their population. Overall, the overexpression of PDH45 in rice did not cause detectable changes in the microbial population, soil enzymatic activities and functional diversity of the rhizosphere soil microbial community.

  6. Hyaluronan decreases surfactant inactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Goerke, Jon; Clements, John A; Taeusch, H William

    2005-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an anionic polymer and a constituent of alveolar fluid that can bind proteins, phospholipids, and water. Previous studies have established that nonionic polymers improve the surface activity of pulmonary surfactants by decreasing inactivation of surfactant. In this work, we investigate whether HA can also have beneficial effects when added to surfactants. We used a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer to measure mixtures of several commercially available pulmonary surfactants or native calf surfactant with and without serum inactivation. Surface properties such as equilibrium surface tension, minimum and maximum surface tensions on compression and expansion of a surface film, and degree of surface area reduction required to reach a surface tension of 10 mN/m were measured. In the presence of serum, addition of HA dramatically improved the surface activities of all four surfactants and in some cases in the absence of serum as well. These results indicate that HA reduces inactivation of surfactants caused by serum and add evidence that endogenous HAs may interact with alveolar surfactant under normal and abnormal conditions.

  7. Kinetics of UV inactivation of wastewater bioflocs.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Y; Allen, D G; Farnood, R R

    2012-08-01

    Ultraviolet disinfection is a physical method of disinfecting secondary treated wastewaters. Bioflocs formed during secondary treatment harbor and protect microbes from exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and significantly decrease the efficiency of disinfection at high UV doses causing the tailing phenomena. However, the exact mechanism of tailing and the role of biofloc properties and treatment conditions are not widely understood. It is hypothesized that sludge bioflocs are composed of an easily disinfectable loose outer shell, and a physically stronger compact core inside that accounts for the tailing phenomena. Hydrodynamic shear stress was applied to the bioflocs to peel off the looser outer shell to isolate the cores. Biofloc and core samples were fractionated into narrow size distributions by sieving and their UV disinfection kinetics were determined and compared. The results showed that for bioflocs, the tailing level elevates as the biofloc size increases, showing greater resistance to disinfection. However, for the cores larger than 45μm, it was found that the UV inactivation curves overlap, and show very close to identical inactivation kinetics. Comparing bioflocs and cores of similar size fraction, it was found that in all cases cores were harder to disinfect with UV light, and showed a higher tailing level. This study suggests that physical structure of bioflocs plays a significant role in the UV inactivation kinetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trends in microbial control techniques for poultry products.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena; Domingues, Fernanda C; Nerín, Cristina

    2016-07-20

    Fresh poultry meat and poultry products are highly perishable foods and high potential sources of human infection due to the presence of several foodborne pathogens. Focusing on the microbial control of poultry products, the food industry generally implements numerous preventive measures based on the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) food safety management system certification together with technological steps, such as refrigeration coupled to modified atmosphere packaging that are able to control identified potential microbial hazards during food processing. However, in recent years, to meet the demand of consumers for minimally processed, high-quality, and additive-free foods, technologies are emerging associated with nonthermal microbial inactivation, such as high hydrostatic pressure, irradiation, and natural alternatives, such as biopreservation or the incorporation of natural preservatives in packaging materials. These technologies are discussed throughout this article, emphasizing their pros and cons regarding the control of poultry microbiota and their effects on poultry sensory properties. The discussion for each of the preservation techniques mentioned will be provided with as much detail as the data and studies provided in the literature for poultry meat and products allow. These new approaches, on their own, have proved to be effective against a wide range of microorganisms in poultry meat. However, since some of these emergent technologies still do not have full consumer's acceptability and, taking into consideration the hurdle technology concept for poultry processing, it is suggested that they will be used as combined treatments or, more frequently, in combination with modified atmosphere packaging.

  9. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  10. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  11. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  12. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  13. Studies on the thermal inactivation of immobilized enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbrich, R.; Schellenberger, A.; Damerau, W.

    1986-04-01

    The thermal inactivation of a great number of immobilized enzymes shows a biphasic kinetics, which distinctly differs from the first-order inactivation kinetics of the corresponding soluble enzymes. As shown for ..cap alpha..-amylase, chymotrypsin, and trypsin covalently bound to silica, polystyrene, or polyacrylamide, the dependence of the remaining activities on the heating time can be well described by the sum of two exponential terms. To interpret this mathematical model function, the catalytic properties of immobilized enzymes (number of active sites in silica-bound trypsin, Km and Ea values in silica-bound ..cap alpha..-amylase and chymotrypsin) at different stages of inactivation and the influence of various factors (coupling conditions, addition of denaturants or stabilizers, etc.) on the thermal inactivation of silica-bound ..cap alpha..-amylase were studied. Furthermore, conformational alterations in the thermal denaturation of spin-labeled soluble and silica-bound ..beta..-amylase were compared by electron spin resonance (ESR) studies. The results suggest that the biphasic inactivation kinetics reflects two different pathways according to which catalytically identical enzyme molecules are predominantly inactivated. 45 references.

  14. High pressure inactivation of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red wine.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Sanelle; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-05-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis ("Brett") is a major spoilage concern for the wine industry worldwide, leading to undesirable sensory properties. Sulphur dioxide, is currently the preferred method for wine preservation. However, due to its negative effects on consumers, the use of new alternative non-thermal technologies are increasingly being investigated. The aim of this study was to determine and model the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) conditions and yeast strain on the inactivation of "Brett" in Cabernet Sauvignon wine. Processing at 200 MPa for 3 min resulted in 5.8 log reductions. However higher pressure is recommended to achieve high throughput in the wine industry, for example >6.0 log reductions were achieved after 400 MPa for 5 s. The inactivation of B. bruxellensis is pressure and time dependent, with increased treatment time and pressure leading to increased yeast inactivation. It was also found that yeast strain had a significant effect on HPP inactivation, with AWRI 1499 being the most resistant strain. The Weibull model successfully described the HPP "Brett" inactivation. HPP is a viable alternative for the inactivation of B. bruxellensis in wine, with the potential to reduce the industry's reliance on sulphur dioxide.

  15. Slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, J E; Featherstone, D E; Hartmann, H A; Ruben, P C

    1998-01-01

    The available pool of sodium channels, and thus cell excitability, is regulated by both fast and slow inactivation. In cardiac tissue, the requirement for sustained firing of long-duration action potentials suggests that slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels may differ from slow inactivation in skeletal muscle sodium channels. To test this hypothesis, we used the macropatch technique to characterize slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Slow inactivation was isolated from fast inactivation kinetically (by selectively recovering channels from fast inactivation before measurement of slow inactivation) and structurally (by modification of fast inactivation by mutation of IFM1488QQQ). Time constants of slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels were larger than previously reported for skeletal muscle sodium channels. In addition, steady-state slow inactivation was only 40% complete in cardiac sodium channels, compared to 80% in skeletal muscle channels. These results suggest that cardiac sodium channel slow inactivation is adapted for the sustained depolarizations found in normally functioning cardiac tissue. Complete slow inactivation in the fast inactivation modified IFM1488QQQ cardiac channel mutant suggests that this impairment of slow inactivation may result from an interaction between fast and slow inactivation. PMID:9635748

  16. Human PIEZO1: Removing Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Chilman; Gottlieb, Philip A.; Sachs, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    PIEZO1 is an inactivating eukaryotic cation-selective mechanosensitive ion channel. Two sites have been located in the channel that when individually mutated lead to xerocytotic anemia by slowing inactivation. By introducing mutations at two sites, one associated with xerocytosis and the other artificial, we were able to remove inactivation. The double mutant (DhPIEZO1) has a substitution of arginine for methionine (M2225R) and lysine for arginine (R2456K). The loss of inactivation was accompanied by ∼30-mmHg shift of the activation curve to lower pressures and slower rates of deactivation. The slope sensitivity of gating was the same for wild-type and mutants, indicating that the dimensional changes between the closed and open state are unaffected by the mutations. The unitary channel conductance was unchanged by mutations, so these sites are not associated with pore. DhPIEZO1 was reversibly inhibited by the peptide GsMTx4 that acted as a gating modifier. The channel kinetics were solved using complex stimulus waveforms and the data fit to a three-state loop in detailed balance. The reaction had two pressure-dependent rates, closed to open and inactivated to closed. Pressure sensitivity of the opening rate with no sensitivity of the closing rate means that the energy barrier between them is located near the open state. Mutant cycle analysis of inactivation showed that the two sites interacted strongly, even though they are postulated to be on opposite sides of the membrane. PMID:23972840

  17. Taxonomic and functional characteristics of microbial communities and their correlation with physicochemical properties of four geothermal springs in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Badhai, Jhasketan; Ghosh, Tarini S; Das, Subrata K

    2015-01-01

    This study describes microbial diversity in four tropical hot springs representing moderately thermophilic environments (temperature range: 40-58°C; pH: 7.2-7.4) with discrete geochemistry. Metagenome sequence data showed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea; the most abundant phyla were Chloroflexi and Proteobacteria, although other phyla were also present, such as Acetothermia, Nitrospirae, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota, Verrucomicrobia, Ignavibacteriae, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, Armatimonadetes, Crenarchaeota, and Aquificae. The distribution of major genera and their statistical correlation analyses with the physicochemical parameters predicted that the temperature, aqueous concentrations of ions (such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate), total hardness, dissolved solids and conductivity were the main environmental variables influencing microbial community composition and diversity. Despite the observed high taxonomic diversity, there were only little variations in the overall functional profiles of the microbial communities in the four springs. Genes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates and carbon fixation were the most abundant functional class of genes present in these hot springs. The distribution of genes involved in carbon fixation predicted the presence of all the six known autotrophic pathways in the metagenomes. A high prevalence of genes involved in membrane transport, signal transduction, stress response, bacterial chemotaxis, and flagellar assembly were observed along with genes involved in the pathways of xenobiotic degradation and metabolism. The analysis of the metagenomic sequences affiliated to the candidate phylum Acetothermia from spring TB-3 provided new insight into the metabolism and physiology of yet-unknown members of this lineage of bacteria.

  18. Taxonomic and functional characteristics of microbial communities and their correlation with physicochemical properties of four geothermal springs in Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Badhai, Jhasketan; Ghosh, Tarini S.; Das, Subrata K.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes microbial diversity in four tropical hot springs representing moderately thermophilic environments (temperature range: 40–58°C; pH: 7.2–7.4) with discrete geochemistry. Metagenome sequence data showed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea; the most abundant phyla were Chloroflexi and Proteobacteria, although other phyla were also present, such as Acetothermia, Nitrospirae, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota, Verrucomicrobia, Ignavibacteriae, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, Armatimonadetes, Crenarchaeota, and Aquificae. The distribution of major genera and their statistical correlation analyses with the physicochemical parameters predicted that the temperature, aqueous concentrations of ions (such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate), total hardness, dissolved solids and conductivity were the main environmental variables influencing microbial community composition and diversity. Despite the observed high taxonomic diversity, there were only little variations in the overall functional profiles of the microbial communities in the four springs. Genes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates and carbon fixation were the most abundant functional class of genes present in these hot springs. The distribution of genes involved in carbon fixation predicted the presence of all the six known autotrophic pathways in the metagenomes. A high prevalence of genes involved in membrane transport, signal transduction, stress response, bacterial chemotaxis, and flagellar assembly were observed along with genes involved in the pathways of xenobiotic degradation and metabolism. The analysis of the metagenomic sequences affiliated to the candidate phylum Acetothermia from spring TB-3 provided new insight into the metabolism and physiology of yet-unknown members of this lineage of bacteria. PMID:26579081

  19. Investigating the effects of microbial communities on electrical properties of soils: preliminary results from a pilot scale column experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E.; Atekwana, E.; Werkema, D.; Duris, J.; Rossbach, S.; Sauck, W.; Koretsky, C.; Cassidy, D.; Means, J.; Sherrod, L.

    2003-04-01

    In this study, we describe the results of a mesoscale pilot experiment designed to investigate the influence of biogeochemical processes on electrical conductivity of soils impacted by hydrocarbons. This is an interdisciplinary study integrating geophysics, geochemistry, and microbiology which was undertaken to: 1) verify microbial hydrocarbon degradation by monitoring changes in microbial types, population, and community structure, 2) document temporal changes in the electrical conductivity of soils, and 3) document changes in pore fluid geochemistry using major ions and stable carbon isotopes. We constructed duplicate soil columns as follows: Columns 1 and 2 had no bacteria, no diesel; columns 3 and 4 had diesel and no bacteria; columns 5 and 6 had bacteria and no diesel; and columns 7 and 8 had bacteria and diesel. Soil cores were sampled at 5 cm intervals and analyzed for bacteria using the most probable number (MPN) and the rDNA intergenic spacer region analyses (RISA) techniques. The MPN method showed an increase in the percentage of alkane degraders with time, and accounted for 1.2x (120%) the number of heterotrophic bacteria in colums 7 and 8 compared to less than 15% for the other columns. The RISA analysis of the communities in columns 7 and 8 showed a shift towards less diversity over time in response to the contaminant stress to a composition that is more capable of the utilization of an alkane as a carbon source. These results confirm microbial mineralization of diesel within contaminated columns. Electrical conductivity measurements were made using a Wenner array at 2 cm spacing. The electrical measurements show an initial decrease in conductivity. This is consistent with the diesel replacing the more conductive pore waters and changes in water saturation, especially within the unsaturated zone. However, a slow increase in conductivity was observed in column 7 overtime compared to the other columns. The slight increase in electrical conductivity for

  20. Shiga toxin Stx2 is heat-stable and not inactivated by pasteurization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shiga toxins are expressed by Escherichia coli (STEC) and are associated with food-borne diseases. Pasteurization is used to retard microbial growth in milk, and an open question is whether milk pasteurization inactivates shiga toxins. To answer this question we measure shiga toxin’s inhibition effe...

  1. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. in ground chicken using High Pressure Processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High pressure processing (HPP) is a safe and effective process for improving the microbial safety and shelf-life of foods. Salmonella is a common contaminant in poultry meat and is frequently responsible for foodborne illness associated with contaminated poultry meat. In this study the inactivation...

  2. Effect of single- and two-cycle high hydrostatic pressure treatments on water properties, physicochemical and microbial qualities of minimally processed squids (todarodes pacificus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Jiao, Shunshan; Lian, Zixuan; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of single- and two-cycle high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments on water properties, physicochemical, and microbial qualities of squids (Todarodes pacificus) during 4 °C storage for up to 10 d. Single-cycle treatments were applied at 200, 400, or 600 MPa for 20 min (S-200, S-400, and S-600), and two-cycle treatments consisted of two 10 min cycles at 200, 400, or 600 MPa, respectively (T-200, T-400, and T-600). HHP-treated samples had higher (P < 0.05) content of P2b (immobilized water) and P21 (myofibril water), but lower P22 (free water) than those of control. The single- and two-cycle HHP treatments at the same pressure level caused no significant difference in water state of squids. The two-cycle HHP treatment was more effective in controlling total volatile basic nitrogen, pH, and total plate counts (TPC) of squids during storage, in which TPC of S-600 and T-600 was 2.9 and 1.8 log CFU/g at 10 d, respectively, compared with 7.5 log CFU/g in control. HHP treatments delayed browning discoloration of the squids during storage, and the higher pressure level and two-cycle HHP were more effective. Water properties highly corresponded with color and texture indices of squids. This study demonstrated that the two-cycle HHP treatment was more effective in controlling microbial growth and quality deterioration while having similar impact on the physicochemical and water properties of squids in comparison with the single-cycle treatment, thus more desirable for extending shelf-life of fresh squids. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiyong; Ramasamy, Ramaraja P; Cloud-Owen, Susan Red; Yan, Hengjing; Mench, Matthew M; Regan, John M

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between anode microbial characteristics and electrochemical parameters in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was analyzed by time-course sampling of parallel single-bottle MFCs operated under identical conditions. While voltage stabilized within 4days, anode biofilms continued growing during the six-week operation. Viable cell density increased asymptotically, but membrane-compromised cells accumulated steadily from only 9% of total cells on day 3 to 52% at 6weeks. Electrochemical performance followed the viable cell trend, with a positive correlation for power density and an inverse correlation for anode charge transfer resistance. The biofilm architecture shifted from rod-shaped, dispersed cells to more filamentous structures, with the continuous detection of Geobacter sulfurreducens-like 16S rRNA fragments throughout operation and the emergence of a community member related to a known phenazine-producing Pseudomonas species. A drop in cathode open circuit potential between weeks two and three suggested that uncontrolled biofilm growth on the cathode deleteriously affects system performance.

  4. Selection of Bacteria with Favorable Transport Properties Through Porous Rock for the Application of Microbial-Enhanced Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Long-Kuan; Chang, Philip W.; Findley, John E.; Yen, Teh Fu

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a bench-scale study on the transport in highly permeable porous rock of three bacterial species—Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas putida, and Clostridium acetobutylicum—potentially applicable in microbial-enhanced oil recovery processes. The transport of cells during the injection of bacterial suspension and nutrient medium was simulated by a deep bed filtration model. Deep bed filtration coefficients and the maximum capacity of cells in porous rock were measured. Low to intermediate (∼106/ml) injection concentrations of cellular suspensions are recommended because plugging of inlet surface is less likely to occur. In addition to their resistance to adverse environments, spores of clostridia are strongly recommended for use in microbial-enhanced oil recovery processes since they are easiest among the species tested to push through porous rock. After injection, further transport of bacteria during incubation can occur by growth and mobility through the stagnant nutrient medium which fills the porous rock. We have developed an apparatus to study the migration of bacteria through a Berea sandstone core containing nutrient medium. PMID:16346414

  5. Influence of powdered activated carbon addition on water quality, sludge properties, and microbial characteristics in the biological treatment of commingled industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Yuan; Li, Meng; Wang, Can; Ji, Min

    2015-09-15

    A powdered activated carbon-activated sludge (PAC-AS) system, a traditional activated sludge (AS) system, and a powdered activated carbon (PAC) system were operated to examine the insights into the influence of PAC addition on biological treatment. The average COD removal efficiencies of the PAC-AS system (39%) were nearly double that of the AS system (20%). Compared with the average efficiencies of the PAC system (7%), COD removal by biodegradation in the PAC-AS system was remarkably higher than that in the AS system. The analysis of the influence of PAC on water quality and sludge properties showed that PAC facilitated the removal of hydrophobic matter and metabolic acidic products, and also enhanced the biomass accumulation, sludge settleability, and specific oxygen uptake rate inside the biological system. The microbial community structures in the PAC-AS and AS systems were monitored. The results showed that the average well color development in the PAC-AS system was higher than that in the AS system. The utilization of various substrates by microorganisms in the two systems did not differ. The dissimilarity index was far less than one; thus, showing that the microbial community structures of the two systems were the same. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cellular inactivation by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Li, G C; Hahn, G M; Tolmach, L J

    1977-05-12

    The lethal effect of ultrasound (US) on mammalian cells has received relatively little attention. Understandably, potential genetic aspects of US have been of prime concern to physicians who use US as a diagnostic tool; at the average power densities involved (<1 W cm(-2)) little, if any cell killing is to be expected. There have been sporadic attempts to use higher intensities ( approximately 1 W cm(-2)) as a treatment modality in cancer therapy, but those experiments seem to have been based on inadequate cellular studies. The effects of US usually were evaluated in terms of morphological criteria rather than on quantitative determination of the loss of viability as measured by colony formation. There are few reports of the effects of US on survival of mammalian cells, and none specifically examine hyperthermic interaction. With the increased interest in hyperthermia for tumour therapy, attention has been directed towards the use of ultrasound to achieve tumour heating. In preliminary experiments in which US was used to heat the EMT6 sarcoma and KHJJ carcinoma in mice, we found a high percentage of tumour cures with short (approximately 30 min) treatments at temperatures (43-44 degrees C) where in vitro results of hyperthermia-induced cell killing would not have led to a prediction of any cures. We therefore initiated an investigation of the effects of US on survival of Chinese hamster cells to see if direct cell killing by US could explain our in vivo results, or, as in the case of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic heating, we would be forced to invoke host response(8). In particular, we examined the thermal and non-thermal components of cellular inactivation by US. We report here that there is a definite non-thermal cytotoxic effect of US. Its relative contribution to cell killing is a highly nonlinear function of the temperature of the cellular milieu. The survival curves show clearly that, beyond an initial threshold, small changes in temperature and/or US

  7. Theoretical constraints of physical and chemical properties of hydrothermal fluids on variations in chemolithotrophic microbial communities in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Takai, Ken

    2014-12-01

    In the past few decades, chemosynthetic ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal vents have received attention as plausible analogues to the early ecosystems of Earth, as well as to extraterrestrial ecosystems. These ecosystems are sustained by chemical energy obtained from inorganic redox substances (e.g., H2S, CO2, H2, CH4, and O2) in hydrothermal fluids and ambient seawater. The chemical and isotope compositions of the hydrothermal fluid are, in turn, controlled by subseafloor physical and chemical processes, including fluid-rock interactions, phase separation and partitioning of fluids, and precipitation of minerals. We hypothesized that specific physicochemical principles describe the linkages among the living ecosystems, hydrothermal fluids, and geological background in deep-sea hydrothermal systems. We estimated the metabolic energy potentially available for productivity by chemolithotrophic microorganisms at various hydrothermal vent fields. We used a geochemical model based on hydrothermal fluid chemistry data compiled from 89 globally distributed hydrothermal vent sites. The model estimates were compared to the observed variability in extant microbial communities in seafloor hydrothermal environments. Our calculations clearly show that representative chemolithotrophic metabolisms (e.g., thiotrophic, hydrogenotrophic, and methanotrophic) respond differently to geological and geochemical variations in the hydrothermal systems. Nearly all of the deep-sea hydrothermal systems provide abundant energy for organisms with aerobic thiotrophic metabolisms; observed variations in the H2S concentrations among the hydrothermal fluids had little effect on the energetics of thiotrophic metabolism. Thus, these organisms form the base of the chemosynthetic microbial community in global deep-sea hydrothermal environments. In contrast, variations in H2 concentrations in hydrothermal fluids significantly impact organisms with aerobic and anaerobic hydrogenotrophic metabolisms

  8. Does nitrogen fertilization history affects short-term microbial responses and chemical properties of soils submitted to different glyphosate concentrations?

    PubMed Central

    Nivelle, Elodie; Chabot, Amélie; Roger, David; Spicher, Fabien; Lacoux, Jérôme; Nava-Saucedo, Jose-Edmundo; Catterou, Manuella; Tétu, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    The use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide, with agriculture holding the largest market share. The agronomic and socioeconomic utilities of glyphosate are well established; however, our knowledge of the potential effects of glyphosate applied in the presence or absence of long-term N fertilization on microbial functional activities and the availability of soil nutrients remains limited. Using an ex situ approach with soils that did (N+) or did not (N0) receive synthetic N fertilization for 6 years, we assessed the impact of different rates (no glyphosate, CK; field rate, FR; 100 × field rate, 100FR) of glyphosate application on biological and chemical parameters. We observed that, after immediate application (1 day), the highest dose of glyphosate (100FR) negatively affected the alkaline phosphatase (AlP) activity in soils without N fertilization history and decreased the cation exchange capacity (CEC) in N0 compared to CK and FR treatments with N+. Conversely, the 100FR application increased nitrate (NO3-) and available phosphorus (PO43-) regardless of N fertilization history. Then, after 8 and 15 days, the N+\\100FR and N+\\FR treatments exhibited the lowest values for dehydrogenase (DH) and AlP activities, respectively, while urease (URE) activity was mainly affected by N fertilization. After 15 days and irrespective of N fertilization history, the FR glyphosate application negatively affected the degradation of carbon substrates by microbial communities (expressed as the average well color development, AWCD). By contrast, the 100FR treatment positively affected AWCD, increasing PO43- by 5 and 16% and NO3- by 126 and 119% in the N+ and N0 treatments, respectively. In addition, the 100FR treatment resulted in an increase in the average net nitrification rate. Principal component analysis revealed that the 100FR glyphosate treatment selected microbial communities that were able to metabolize amine substrates

  9. Does nitrogen fertilization history affects short-term microbial responses and chemical properties of soils submitted to different glyphosate concentrations?

    PubMed

    Nivelle, Elodie; Verzeaux, Julien; Chabot, Amélie; Roger, David; Spicher, Fabien; Lacoux, Jérôme; Nava-Saucedo, Jose-Edmundo; Catterou, Manuella; Tétu, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    The use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide, with agriculture holding the largest market share. The agronomic and socioeconomic utilities of glyphosate are well established; however, our knowledge of the potential effects of glyphosate applied in the presence or absence of long-term N fertilization on microbial functional activities and the availability of soil nutrients remains limited. Using an ex situ approach with soils that did (N+) or did not (N0) receive synthetic N fertilization for 6 years, we assessed the impact of different rates (no glyphosate, CK; field rate, FR; 100 × field rate, 100FR) of glyphosate application on biological and chemical parameters. We observed that, after immediate application (1 day), the highest dose of glyphosate (100FR) negatively affected the alkaline phosphatase (AlP) activity in soils without N fertilization history and decreased the cation exchange capacity (CEC) in N0 compared to CK and FR treatments with N+. Conversely, the 100FR application increased nitrate (NO3-) and available phosphorus (PO43-) regardless of N fertilization history. Then, after 8 and 15 days, the N+\\100FR and N+\\FR treatments exhibited the lowest values for dehydrogenase (DH) and AlP activities, respectively, while urease (URE) activity was mainly affected by N fertilization. After 15 days and irrespective of N fertilization history, the FR glyphosate application negatively affected the degradation of carbon substrates by microbial communities (expressed as the average well color development, AWCD). By contrast, the 100FR treatment positively affected AWCD, increasing PO43- by 5 and 16% and NO3- by 126 and 119% in the N+ and N0 treatments, respectively. In addition, the 100FR treatment resulted in an increase in the average net nitrification rate. Principal component analysis revealed that the 100FR glyphosate treatment selected microbial communities that were able to metabolize amine substrates

  10. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  11. Short-time effect of salvage harvesting on microbial soil properties in a Mediterranean area affected by a wildfire: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moltó, Jorge; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Victoria; Morugan, Alicia; Girona, Antonio; Garcia-orenes, Fuensanta

    2014-05-01

    In the Mediterranean region, wildfires are considered one of the main ecological factors, which, in addition to and in relation to changes in soil use, may cause soil loss and degradation, one of the most important environmental problems that humanity must face up to. As is well known, the soil-plant system is one of the key factors determining ecological recovery after the occurrence of a wildfire. Traditionally, a variety of forestry practices have been implemented on spanish sites after the incidence of a wildfire. Among them stands out the complete extraction of the burned wood, which consist in getting rid of the branches and other wooden debris using small controlled bonfires, splintering or mechanical extraction. This set of post-fire management practices is known as salvage logging or salvage harvesting. Despite the remarkable relevance and influence that this conjunction of techniques has on land management after a wildfire, very little experimental research focused on assessing the impact of salvage logging on the vegetal community has been done. Furthermore, even less research inquiring into the mode and grade of incidence that the salvage logging produces on soil properties has taken place. The aim of this research is to assess the effects that the salvage harvesting has on different soil microbial properties and other related properties. The study area is located in the Natural Park of the "Sierra de Mariola" in the province of Alicante, southeastern Spain. This location was affected by a wildfire whose extension reached more than 500 Ha in July 2012. Different post-fire treatments were proposed by the authorities, including salvage harvesting in some areas. Two different treatments were distinguished for the study, "control" (without any kind of burned wood removal) and "harvest" (where salvage logging was carried out), in each area three 4 m2 sampling plots were set up. These two treatments were established on the same slope with the same orography

  12. Microbial pesticides

    Treesearch

    Michael L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Interest in the use of microbial pesticides has intensified because of public concern about the safety of chemical pesticides and their impact in the environment. Characteristics of the five groups of entomopathogens that have potential as microbial pesticides are briefly discussed and an update is provided on research and development activities underway to enhance the...

  13. Inhibition of microbial growth on chitosan membranes by plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Cardoso Macêdo, Marina; de Macêdo, Haroldo Reis Alves; Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; de Freitas Daudt, Natália; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira; Alves, Clodomiro

    2013-11-01

    The use of polymeric medical devices has stimulated the development of new sterilization methods. The traditional techniques rely on ethylene oxide, but there are many questions concerning the carcinogenic properties of the ethylene oxide residues adsorbed on the materials after processing. Another common technique is the gamma irradiation process, but it is costly, its safe operation requires an isolated site, and it also affects the bulk properties of the polymers. The use of gas plasma is an elegant alternative sterilization technique. The plasma promotes efficient inactivation of the microorganisms, minimizes damage to the materials, and presents very little danger for personnel and the environment. In this study we used plasma for microbial inhibition of chitosan membranes. The membranes were treated with oxygen, methane, or argon plasma for different time periods (15, 30, 45, or 60 min). For inhibition of microbial growth with oxygen plasma, the time needed was 60 min. For the methane plasma, samples were successfully treated after 30, 45, and 60 min. For argon plasma, all treatment periods were effective. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  14. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Ritter, David M; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na(+) channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  15. A full-scale study of treatment of pig slurry by composting: kinetic changes in chemical and microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Ros, M; García, C; Hernández, T

    2006-01-01

    Since the indiscriminate disposal of pig slurry can cause not only air pollution and bad odours but also nutrient pollution of ground waters and superficial waters, composting is sometimes used as one environmentally acceptable method for recycling pig manure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of composting pig slurry on its sanitation (evaluated by ecotoxicity assays and pathogen content determination), as well as to determine the effect of a carbon-rich bulking agent (wood shavings, WS) and the starting C/N ratio on the changes undergone by different chemical (volatile organic matter, C and N fractions) and microbiological (microbial biomass C, ATP, dehydrogenase activity, urease, protease, phosphatase, and beta-glucosidase activities) parameters during composting. Pig slurry mixed with bulking agent (P+WS) and the solid faction separated from it, both with (PSF+WS) and without bulking agent (PSF), were composted for 13 weeks. Samples for analysis were taken from composting piles at the start of the process and at 3, 6, 9, and 13 weeks after the beginning of composting. The total organic carbon, water soluble C and ammonium content decreased with composting, while Kjeldahl N and nitrate content increased. The nitrification process in the PSF+WS pile was more intense than in the PSF or P+WS composting piles. The pathogen content decreased with composting, as did phytotoxic compounds, while the germination index increased with compost age. Piles with bulking agent showed higher values of basal respiration, microbial biomass carbon, ATP and hydrolase activities during the composting process than piles without bulking agent.

  16. Persistence of Soil Organic Carbon can be Explained as an Emergent Property of Microbial Ecology and Population Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, D.; Lehmann, J.

    2016-12-01

    The exchange of carbon between soils and the atmosphere represents an important uncertainty in climate predictions. Current Earth system models apply soil organic matter (SOM) models based on independent carbon pools with 1st order decomposition dynamics. It has been widely argued over the last decade that such models do not accurately describe soil processes and mechanisms. For example, the long term persistence of soil organic carbon (SOC) is only adequately described by such models by the post hoc assumption of passive or inert carbon pools. Further, such 1st order models also fail to account for microbially-mediated dynamics such as priming interactions. These shortcomings may limit their applicability to long term predictions under conditions of global environmental change. In addition to incorporating recent conceptual advances in the mechanisms of SOM decomposition and protection, next-generation SOM models intended for use in Earth system models need to meet further quality criteria. Namely, that they should (a) accurately describe historical data from long term trials and the current global distribution of soil organic carbon, (b) be computationally efficient for large number of iterations involved in climate modeling, and (c) have sufficiently simple parameterization that they can be run on spatially-explicit data available at global scale under varying conditions of global change over long time scales. Here we show that linking fundamental ecological principles and microbial population dynamics to SOC turnover rates results in a dynamic model that meets all of these quality criteria. This approach simultaneously eliminates the need to postulate biogeochemically-implausible passive or inert pools, instead showing how SOM persistence emerges from ecological principles, while also reproducing observed priming interactions.

  17. Inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes by high-pressure processing: pressure and temperature variation.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Ross, Edward W; Kustin, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The enhanced quasi-chemical kinetics (EQCK) model is presented as a methodology to evaluate the nonlinear inactivation kinetics of baro-resistant Listeria monocytogenes in a surrogate protein food system by high-pressure processing (HPP) for various combinations of pressure (P= 207 to 414 MPa) and temperature (T= 20 to 50 °C). The EQCK model is based on ordinary differential equations derived from 6 "quasi-chemical reaction" steps. The EQCK model continuously fits the conventional stages of the microbial lifecycle: lag, growth, stationary phase, and death; and tailing. Depending on the conditions, the inactivation kinetics of L. monocytogenes by HPP show a lag, inactivation, and tailing. Accordingly, we developed a customized, 4-step subset version of the EQCK model sufficient to evaluate the HPP inactivation kinetics of L. monocytogenes and obtain values for the model parameters of lag (λ), inactivation rate (μ), rate constants (k), and "processing time" (tp). This latter parameter was developed uniquely to evaluate kinetics data showing tailing. Secondary models are developed by interrelating the fitting parameters with experimental parameters, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to evaluate parameter reproducibility. This 4-step model is also compared with the empirical Weibull and Polylog models. The success of the EQCK model (as its 4-step subset) for the HPP inactivation kinetics of baro-resistant L. monocytogenes showing tailing establishes several advantages of the EQCK modeling approach for investigating nonlinear microbial inactivation kinetics, and it has implications for determining mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by HPP. Results of this study will be useful to the many segments of the food processing industry (ready-to-eat meats, fresh produce, seafood, dairy) concerned with ensuring the safety of consumers from the health hazards of Listeria monocytogenes, particularly through the use of emerging food preservation technologies such as

  18. Weed seed inactivation in soil mesocosms via biosolarization with mature compost and tomato processing waste amendments.

    PubMed

    Achmon, Yigal; Fernández-Bayo, Jesús D; Hernandez, Katie; McCurry, Dlinka G; Harrold, Duff R; Su, Joey; Dahlquist-Willard, Ruth M; Stapleton, James J; VanderGheynst, Jean S; Simmons, Christopher W

    2017-05-01

    Biosolarization is a fumigation alternative that combines passive solar heating with amendment-driven soil microbial activity to temporarily create antagonistic soil conditions, such as elevated temperature and acidity, that can inactivate weed seeds and other pest propagules. The aim of this study was to use a mesocosm-based field trial to assess soil heating, pH, volatile fatty acid accumulation and weed seed inactivation during biosolarization. Biosolarization for 8 days using 2% mature green waste compost and 2 or 5% tomato processing residues in the soil resulted in accumulation of volatile fatty acids in the soil, particularly acetic acid, and >95% inactivation of Brassica nigra and Solanum nigrum seeds. Inactivation kinetics data showed that near complete weed seed inactivation in soil was achieved within the first 5 days of biosolarization. This was significantly greater than the inactivation achieved in control soils that were solar heated without amendment or were amended but not solar heated. The composition and concentration of organic matter amendments in soil significantly affected volatile fatty acid accumulation at various soil depths during biosolarization. Combining solar heating with organic matter amendment resulted in accelerated weed seed inactivation compared with either approach alone. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Bacteria Inactivation during the Drying of Struvite Fertilizers Produced from Stored Urine.

    PubMed

    Bischel, Heather N; Schindelholz, Simon; Schoger, Manfred; Decrey, Loïc; Buckley, Christopher A; Udert, Kai M; Kohn, Tamar

    2016-12-06

    Human urine can be processed into market-attractive fertilizers like struvite; however, concerns regarding the microbial safety of such products remain. The present study evaluated the inactivation of in situ heterotrophs, total bacteria as observed by flow cytometry, and inoculated Enterococcus spp. and Salmonella typhimurium during the drying of struvite under controlled temperature (from 5 to 35 °C) and relative humidity (approximately 40 and 80%) as well as dynamic field conditions. Bacteria accumulated in the struvite cake during struvite filtration. Despite the use of sublethal temperatures, all bacteria types were subsequently inactivated to some degree during struvite drying, and the inactivation typically increased with increasing drying temperature for a given relative humidity. Heterotrophic bacteria inactivation mirrored the trend in total bacteria during struvite drying. A linear relationship was observed between inactivation and sample moisture content. However, bacteria survivor curves were typically nonlinear when struvite was dried at low relative humidity, indicating bacterial persistence. Weibull model survivor curve fits indicated that a shift in the mechanism of inactivation may occur with changing humidity. For increased efficiency of bacterial inactivation during the production of struvite, initial heating under moist conditions is recommended followed by desiccation.

  20. Human PIEZO1: removing inactivation.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chilman; Gottlieb, Philip A; Sachs, Frederick

    2013-08-20

    PIEZO1 is an inactivating eukaryotic cation-selective mechanosensitive ion channel. Two sites have been located in the channel that when individually mutated lead to xerocytotic anemia by slowing inactivation. By introducing mutations at two sites, one associated with xerocytosis and the other artificial, we were able to remove inactivation. The double mutant (DhPIEZO1) has a substitution of arginine for methionine (M2225R) and lysine for arginine (R2456K). The loss of inactivation was accompanied by ∼30-mmHg shift of the activation curve to lower pressures and slower rates of deactivation. The slope sensitivity of gating was the same for wild-type and mutants, indicating that the dimensional changes between the closed and open state are unaffected by the mutations. The unitary channel conductance was unchanged by mutations, so these sites are not associated with pore. DhPIEZO1 was reversibly inhibited by the peptide GsMTx4 that acted as a gating modifier. The channel kinetics were solved using complex stimulus waveforms and the data fit to a three-state loop in detailed balance. The reaction had two pressure-dependent rates, closed to open and inactivated to closed. Pressure sensitivity of the opening rate with no sensitivity of the closing rate means that the energy barrier between them is located near the open state. Mutant cycle analysis of inactivation showed that the two sites interacted strongly, even though they are postulated to be on opposite sides of the membrane. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inactivated smallpox vaccine. A comparison of inactivation methods

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G. S.; Squires, E. J.; Murray, H. G. S.

    1970-01-01

    Vaccines were prepared from a single pool of high-titred vaccinia virus and inactivated by six methods, namely heat, formalin, hydroxylamine, β-propiolactone, ultraviolet irradiation, and visible light and methylene blue. Large doses of the vaccines were required to protect mice against intracerebral challenge. Differences in protection were not attributable to the method of their inactivation. The vaccines also induced similar degrees of skin immunity in rabbits which showed no severe dermal reactions when challenged with either homologous killed vaccine or live virus. The virus-neutralizing, haemagglutinin-inhibiting and complement fixing antibody responses to the vaccines differed; heat-inactivation preserved these antigens least well and β-propiolactone apparently the best. In both rabbits and mice there was little association between the different antibody responses to each vaccine or between the degrees of antibody response and the protection they induced. The relation of these findings to pox-virus immunity and the use of inactivated smallpox vaccine in man is discussed. PMID:4988047

  2. Potential application of microbial iron redox cycles in nitrate removal and their effects on clay mineral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Dong, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Briggs, B. R.; Zeng, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Phyllosilicates that are ubiquitous in subsurface can serve as an iron source for microbial respiration. The objective of this research is to determine the ability of the phyllosilicate Fe to remove nitrate in subsurface undergoing microbial-driven redox cycles. In this study, thus, a well-characterized reference clay (NAu-2; nontronite), was subjected to redox cycles in a system containing dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002. Three redox cycles were conducted in bicarbonate- and PIPES-buffered medium. The extents of Fe(III) reduction, Fe(II) oxidation, nitrate reduction, and its various intermediate products were measured by wet chemical methods. For each cycle, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Mossbauer spectroscopy confirmed Fe oxidation state. Mineralogical changes were identified by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. For all three cycles, nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both bicarbonate- and PIPES- buffered conditions. As redox cycle increased, bio-reduction extents of Fe(III) in NAu-2 decreased by 33% and 48% in PIPES- and bicarbonate-buffered medium, respectively; however, bio-oxidation extents increased by 66% and 55% in the same medium, respectively. Despite the change of OH-stretching vibration band and OH-bending vibration bands in NAu-2 structure along Fe redox cycles, XRD data showed interlayer spacing of NAu-2 to be constant along the same Fe redox cycle. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated complex reduction and re-oxidation pathways. For example, a distinct Fe(II) doublet and a Fe2.5+ feature due to interfacial Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron transfer on clay mineral are prominent in their RT spectra. Both these Fe(II) are partially oxidized by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The result of this study shows that Fe in biogenically reduced or oxidized NAu-2

  3. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    PubMed

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  4. Influence of chemical and physical properties of activated carbon powders on oxygen reduction and microbial fuel cell performance.

    PubMed

    Watson, Valerie J; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-06-18

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders made from different precursor materials (coal, peat, coconut shell, hardwood, and phenolic resin) were electrochemically evaluated as oxygen reduction catalysts and tested as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). AC powders were characterized in terms of surface chemistry and porosity, and their kinetic activities were compared to carbon black and platinum catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) tests. Cathodes using the coal-derived AC had the highest power densities in MFCs (1620 ± 10 mW m(-2)). Peat-based AC performed similarly in MFC tests (1610 ± 100 mW m(-2)) and had the best catalyst performance, with an onset potential of E(onset) = 0.17 V, and n = 3.6 electrons used for oxygen reduction. Hardwood based AC had the highest number of acidic surface functional groups and the poorest performance in MFC and catalysis tests (630 ± 10 mW m(-2), E(onset) = -0.01 V, n = 2.1). There was an inverse relationship between onset potential and quantity of strong acid (pKa < 8) functional groups, and a larger fraction of microporosity was negatively correlated with power production in MFCs. Surface area alone was a poor predictor of catalyst performance, and a high quantity of acidic surface functional groups was determined to be detrimental to oxygen reduction and cathode performance.

  5. A High-Throughput Screening Platform of Microbial Natural Products for the Discovery of Molecules with Antibiofilm Properties against Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Paytubi, Sonia; de La Cruz, Mercedes; Tormo, Jose R.; Martín, Jesús; González, Ignacio; González-Menendez, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando; Vicente, Francisca; Madrid, Cristina; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we describe a High-Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify compounds that inhibit biofilm formation or cause the disintegration of an already formed biofilm using the Salmonella Enteritidis 3934 strain. Initially, we developed a new methodology for growing Salmonella biofilms suitable for HTS platforms. The biomass associated with biofilm at the solid-liquid interface was quantified by staining both with resazurin and crystal violet, to detect living cells and total biofilm mass, respectively. For a pilot project, a subset of 1120 extracts from the Fundación MEDINA's collection was examined to identify molecules with antibiofilm activity. This is the first validated HTS assay of microbial natural product extracts which allows for the detection of four types of activities which are not mutually exclusive: inhibition of biofilm formation, detachment of the preformed biofilm and antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells or biofilm embedded cells. Currently, several extracts have been selected for further fractionation and purification of the active compounds. In one of the natural extracts patulin has been identified as a potent molecule with antimicrobial activity against both, planktonic cells and cells within the biofilm. These findings provide a proof of concept that the developed HTS can lead to the discovery of new natural compounds with antibiofilm activity against Salmonella and its possible use as an alternative to antimicrobial therapies and traditional disinfectants. PMID:28303128

  6. Microbial respiration with chlorine oxyanions: diversity and physiological and biochemical properties of chlorate- and perchlorate-reducing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Oosterkamp, Margreet J; Stams, Alfons J M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorine oxyanions are valuable electron acceptors for microorganisms. Recent findings have shed light on the natural formation of chlorine oxyanions in the environment. These suggest a permanent introduction of respective compounds on Earth, long before their anthropogenic manufacture. Microorganisms that are able to grow by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate are affiliated with phylogenetically diverse lineages, spanning from the Proteobacteria to the Firmicutes and archaeal microorganisms. Microbial reduction of chlorine oxyanions can be found in diverse environments and different environmental conditions (temperature, salinities, pH). It commonly involves the enzymes perchlorate reductase (Pcr) or chlorate reductase (Clr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld). Horizontal gene transfer seems to play an important role for the acquisition of functional genes. Novel and efficient Clds were isolated from microorganisms incapable of growing on chlorine oxyanions. Archaea seem to use a periplasmic Nar-type reductase (pNar) for perchlorate reduction and lack a functional Cld. Chlorite is possibly eliminated by alternative (abiotic) reactions. This was already demonstrated for Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which uses reduced sulfur compounds to detoxify chlorite. A broad biochemical diversity of the trait, its environmental dispersal, and the occurrence of relevant enzymes in diverse lineages may indicate early adaptations of life toward chlorine oxyanions on Earth.

  7. Abrogation of Immunogenic Properties of Gliadin Peptides through Transamidation by Microbial Transglutaminase Is Acyl-Acceptor Dependent

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Wheat gluten confers superior baking quality to wheat based products but elicits a pro-inflammatory immune response in patients with celiac disease. Transamidation of gluten by microbial transglutaminase (mTG) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) reduces the immunogenicity of gluten; however, little information is available on the minimal modification sufficient to eliminate gliadin immunogenicity nor has the effectiveness of transamidation been studied with T-cell clones from patients. Here we demonstrate that mTG can efficiently couple three different acyl-acceptor molecules, l-lysine, glycine ethyl ester, and hydroxylamine, to gliadin peptides and protein. While all three acyl-acceptor molecules were cross-linked to the same Q-residues, not all modifications were equally effective in silencing T-cell reactivity. Finally, we observed that tTG can partially reverse the mTG-catalyzed transamidation by its isopeptidase activity. These results set the stage to determine the impact of these modifications on the baking quality of gluten proteins and in vivo immunogenicity of such food products. PMID:28771001

  8. Modeling of the thermal influence of fires on the physicochemical properties and microbial activity of litter in cryogenic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masyagina, O. V.; Tokareva, I. V.; Prokushkin, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    Periodic surface fires in the cryolithozone (the northern taiga subzone) are the main factor determining the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the soil organic matter. The specific features of the changes in the physicochemical parameters and microbial activity of the organic horizons in the cryogenic soils under larch forests of the northern taiga after the impact of high temperatures were revealed. The temperatures of fires of different intensity were simulated in laboratory conditions. The thermal impact on the litter organic matter during the surface fires may increase the CO2 emission from the surface of the soil in the postfire communities due to the destruction of organic compounds only for a short time. After fires of high intensity with strong mineralization of the litters, during a period of more than 1 month, the pyrogenic effect on the organic horizons of the soils under the larch forests of the cryolithozone determined the reduction of the CO2 emissions in the freshly burned areas as compared to the intact stands.

  9. Chemical, microbial and physical properties of manufactured soils produced by co-composting municipal green waste with coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, O N; Haynes, R J

    2009-11-01

    Increasing proportions of coal fly ash were co-composted with municipal green waste to produce manufactured soil for landscaping use. Only the 100% green waste treatment reached a thermophilic composting phase (50 degrees C) which lasted for 6 days. The 25% and 50% ash treatments reached 36-38 degrees C over the same period while little or no self-heating occurred in the 75% and 100% ash treatments. Composted green waste had a low bulk density and high total and macro-porosity. Addition of 25% ash to green waste resulted in a 75% increase in available water holding capacity. As the proportions of added ash in the composts increased, the organic C, soluble C, microbial biomass C, basal respiration and activities of beta-glucosidase, L-asparaginase, alkali phosphatase and arylsulphatase enzymes in the composted products all decreased. It could be concluded that addition of fly ash to green waste at a proportion higher than 25% did not improve the quality parameters of manufactured soil.

  10. A High-Throughput Screening Platform of Microbial Natural Products for the Discovery of Molecules with Antibiofilm Properties against Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Paytubi, Sonia; de La Cruz, Mercedes; Tormo, Jose R; Martín, Jesús; González, Ignacio; González-Menendez, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando; Vicente, Francisca; Madrid, Cristina; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we describe a High-Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify compounds that inhibit biofilm formation or cause the disintegration of an already formed biofilm using the Salmonella Enteritidis 3934 strain. Initially, we developed a new methodology for growing Salmonella biofilms suitable for HTS platforms. The biomass associated with biofilm at the solid-liquid interface was quantified by staining both with resazurin and crystal violet, to detect living cells and total biofilm mass, respectively. For a pilot project, a subset of 1120 extracts from the Fundación MEDINA's collection was examined to identify molecules with antibiofilm activity. This is the first validated HTS assay of microbial natural product extracts which allows for the detection of four types of activities which are not mutually exclusive: inhibition of biofilm formation, detachment of the preformed biofilm and antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells or biofilm embedded cells. Currently, several extracts have been selected for further fractionation and purification of the active compounds. In one of the natural extracts patulin has been identified as a potent molecule with antimicrobial activity against both, planktonic cells and cells within the biofilm. These findings provide a proof of concept that the developed HTS can lead to the discovery of new natural compounds with antibiofilm activity against Salmonella and its possible use as an alternative to antimicrobial therapies and traditional disinfectants.

  11. An inactivation gate in the selectivity filter of KCNQ1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Gibor, Gilad; Yakubovich, Daniel; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Peretz, Asher; Schottelndreier, Hella; Seebohm, Guiscard; Dascal, Nathan; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Paas, Yoav; Attali, Bernard

    2007-12-15

    Inactivation is an inherent property of most voltage-gated K(+) channels. While fast N-type inactivation has been analyzed in biophysical and structural details, the mechanisms underlying slow inactivation are yet poorly understood. Here, we characterized a slow inactivation mechanism in various KCNQ1 pore mutants, including L273F, which hinders entry of external Ba(2+) to its deep site in the pore and traps it by slowing its egress. Kinetic studies, molecular modeling, and dynamics simulations suggest that this slow inactivation involves conformational changes that converge to the outer carbonyl ring of the selectivity filter, where the backbone becomes less flexible. This mechanism involves acceleration of inactivation kinetics and enhancement of Ba(2+) trapping at elevated external K(+) concentrations. Hence, KCNQ1 slow inactivation considerably differs from C-type inactivation where vacation of K(+) from the filter was invoked. We suggest that trapping of K(+) at s(1) due to filter rigidity and hindrance of the dehydration-resolvation transition underlie the slow inactivation of KCNQ1 pore mutants.

  12. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in male mice with targeted disruptions of Xist.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Elliott, David J; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Pehrson, John R; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2002-11-01

    X chromosome inactivation occurs twice during the life cycle of placental mammals. In normal females, one X chromosome in each cell is inactivated early in embryogenesis, while in the male, the X chromosome is inactivated together with the Y chromosome in spermatogenic cells shortly before or during early meiotic prophase. Inactivation of one X chromosome in somatic cells of females serves to equalise X-linked gene dosage between males and females, but the role of male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) is unknown. The inactive X-chromosome of somatic cells and male meiotic cells share similar properties such as late replication and enrichment for histone macroH2A1.2, suggesting a common mechanism of inactivation. This possibility is supported by the fact that Xist RNA that mediates somatic X-inactivation is expressed in the testis of male mice and humans. In the present study we show that both Xist RNA and Tsix RNA, an antisense RNA that controls Xist function in the soma, are expressed in the testis in a germ-cell-dependent manner. However, our finding that MSCI and sex-body formation are unaltered in mice with targeted mutations of Xist that prevent somatic X inactivation suggests that somatic X-inactivation and MSCI occur by fundamentally different mechanisms.

  13. Inactivation and reactivation of B. megatherium phage.

    PubMed

    NORTHROP, J H

    1955-11-20

    Preparation of Reversibly Inactivated (R.I.) Phage.- If B. megatherium phage (of any type, or in any stage of purification) is suspended in dilute salt solutions at pH 5-6, it is completely inactivated; i.e., it does not form plaques, or give rise to more phage when mixed with a sensitive organism (Northrop, 1954). The inactivation occurs when the phage is added to the dilute salt solution. If a suspension of the inactive phage in pH 7 peptone is titrated to pH 5 and allowed to stand, the activity gradually returns. The inactivation is therefore reversible. Properties of R.I. Phage.- The R.I. phage is adsorbed by sensitive cells at about the same rate as the active phage. It kills the cells, but no active phage is produced. The R.I. phage therefore has the properties of phage "ghosts" (Herriott, 1951) or of colicines (Gratia, 1925), or phage inactivated by ultraviolet light (Luria, 1947). The R.I. phage is sedimented in the centrifuge at the same rate as active phage. It is therefore about the same size as the active phage. The R.I. phage is most stable in pH 7, 5 per cent peptone, and may be kept in this solution for weeks at 0 degrees C. The rate of digestion of R.I. phage by trypsin, chymotrypsin, or desoxyribonuclease is about the same as that of active phage (Northrop, 1955 a). Effect of Various Substances on the Formation of R.I. Phage.- There is an equilibrium between R.I. phage and active phage. The R.I. form is the stable one in dilute salt solution, pH 5 to 6.5 and at low temperature (<20 degrees C.). At pH >6.5, in dilute salt solution, the R.I. phage changes to the active form. The cycle, active right harpoon over left harpoon inactive phage, may be repeated many times at 0 degrees C. by changing the pH of the solution back and forth between pH 7 and pH 6. Irreversible inactivation is caused by distilled water, some heavy metals, concentrated urea or quanidine solutions, and by l-arginine. Reversible inactivation is prevented by all salts tested (except

  14. Fast Inactivation of Delayed Rectifier K Conductance in Squid Giant Axon and Its Cell Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, Chris; Rosenthal, Joshua J.C.; Armstrong, Clay M.; Gilly, William F.

    1997-01-01

    Inactivation of delayed rectifier K conductance (gK) was studied in squid giant axons and in the somata of giant fiber lobe (GFL) neurons. Axon measurements were made with an axial wire voltage clamp by pulsing to VK (∼−10 mV in 50–70 mM external K) for a variable time and then assaying available gK with a strong, brief test pulse. GFL cells were studied with whole-cell patch clamp using the same prepulse procedure as well as with long depolarizations. Under our experimental conditions (12–18°C, 4 mM internal MgATP) a large fraction of gK inactivates within 250 ms at −10 mV in both cell bodies and axons, although inactivation tends to be more complete in cell bodies. Inactivation in both preparations shows two kinetic components. The faster component is more temperature-sensitive and becomes very prominent above 12°C. Contribution of the fast component to inactivation shows a similar voltage dependence to that of gK, suggesting a strong coupling of this inactivation path to the open state. Omission of internal MgATP or application of internal protease reduces the amount of fast inactivation. High external K decreases the amount of rapidly inactivating IK but does not greatly alter inactivation kinetics. Neither external nor internal tetraethylammonium has a marked effect on inactivation kinetics. Squid delayed rectifier K channels in GFL cell bodies and giant axons thus share complex fast inactivation properties that do not closely resemble those associated with either C-type or N-type inactivation of cloned Kv1 channels studied in heterologous expression systems. PMID:9101403

  15. Effects of Red Bean (Vigna angularis) Protein Isolates on Rheological Properties of Microbial Transglutaminase Mediated Pork Myofibrillar Protein Gels as Affected by Fractioning and Preheat Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Fractioning and/or preheating treatment on the rheological properties of myofibrillar protein (MP) gels induced by microbial transglutaminase (MTG) has been reported that they may improve the functional properties. However, the optimum condition was varied depending on the experimental factors. This study was to evaluate the effect of red bean protein isolate (RBPI) on the rheological properties of MP gels mediated by MTG as affected by modifications (fractioning: 7S-globulin of RBPI and/or preheat treatment (pre-heating; 95℃/30 min): pre-heating RBPI or pre-heating/7S-globulin). Cooking yields (CY, %) of MP gels was increased with RBPI (p<0.05), while 7S-globulin decreased the effect of RBPI (p<0.05); however, preheating treatments did not affect the CY (p>0.05). Gel strength of MP was decreased when RBPI or 7S-globulin added, while preheat treatments compensated for the negative effects of those in MP. This effect was entirely reversed by MTG treatment. Although the major band of RBPI disappeared, the preheated 7S globulin band was remained. In scanning electron microscopic (SEM) technique, the appearance of more cross-linked structures were observed when RBPI was prepared with preheating at 95℃ to improve the protein-protein interaction during gel setting of MP mixtures. Thus, the effects of RBPI and 7S-globulin as a substrate, and water and meat binder for MTG-mediated MP gels were confirmed to improve the rheological properties. However, preheat treatment of RBPI should be optimized. PMID:27857544

  16. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  17. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  18. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone inactivation rates for Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts were determined with an in-vitro excystation method based on excysted sporozoite counts. Results were consistent with published animal infectivity data for the same C. parvum strain. The inactivation kinetics...

  19. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone inactivation rates for Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts were determined with an in-vitro excystation method based on excysted sporozoite counts. Results were consistent with published animal infectivity data for the same C. parvum strain. The inactivation kinetics...

  20. Determination of Time Dependent Virus Inactivation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Vogler, E. T.

    2003-12-01

    A methodology is developed for estimating temporally variable virus inactivation rate coefficients from experimental virus inactivation data. The methodology consists of a technique for slope estimation of normalized virus inactivation data in conjunction with a resampling parameter estimation procedure. The slope estimation technique is based on a relatively flexible geostatistical method known as universal kriging. Drift coefficients are obtained by nonlinear fitting of bootstrap samples and the corresponding confidence intervals are obtained by bootstrap percentiles. The proposed methodology yields more accurate time dependent virus inactivation rate coefficients than those estimated by fitting virus inactivation data to a first-order inactivation model. The methodology is successfully applied to a set of poliovirus batch inactivation data. Furthermore, the importance of accurate inactivation rate coefficient determination on virus transport in water saturated porous media is demonstrated with model simulations.

  1. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  2. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. NVC-422 inactivates Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    PubMed

    Jekle, Andreas; Yoon, Jungjoo; Zuck, Meghan; Najafi, Ramin; Wang, Lu; Shiau, Timothy; Francavilla, Charles; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Eitzinger, Christian; Nagl, Markus; Anderson, Mark; Debabov, Dmitri

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens have specific virulence factors (e.g., toxins) that contribute significantly to the virulence and infectivity of microorganisms within the human hosts. Virulence factors are molecules expressed by pathogens that enable colonization, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression, obtaining nutrients from the host or gaining entry into host cells. They can cause pathogenesis by inhibiting or stimulating certain host functions. For example, in systemic Staphylococcus aureus infections, virulence factors such as toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) cause sepsis or toxic shock by uncontrolled stimulation of T lymphocytes and by triggering a cytokine storm. In vitro, these superantigens stimulate the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the release of many cytokines. NVC-422 (N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine) is a broad-spectrum, fast-acting topical anti-infective agent against microbial pathogens, including antibiotic-resistant microbes. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrate here that NVC-422 oxidizes methionine residues of TSST-1, SEA, SEB, and exfoliative toxin A (ETA). Exposure of virulence factors to 0.1% NVC-422 for 1 h prevented TSST-1-, SEA-, SEB-, and ETA-induced cell proliferation and cytokine release. Moreover, NVC-422 also delayed and reduced the protein A- and clumping factor-associated agglutination of S. aureus cultures. These results show that, in addition to its well-described direct microbicidal activity, NVC-422 can inactivate S. aureus virulence factors through rapid oxidation of methionines.

  4. Conventional freezing plus high pressure-low temperature treatment: Physical properties, microbial quality and storage stability of beef meat.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pedro P; Sanz, Pedro D; Molina-García, Antonio D; Otero, Laura; Guignon, Bérengère; Vaudagna, Sergio R

    2007-12-01

    Meat high-hydrostatic pressure treatment causes severe decolouration, preventing its commercialisation due to consumer rejection. Novel procedures involving product freezing plus low-temperature pressure processing are here investigated. Room temperature (20°C) pressurisation (650MPa/10min) and air blast freezing (-30°C) are compared to air blast freezing plus high pressure at subzero temperature (-35°C) in terms of drip loss, expressible moisture, shear force, colour, microbial quality and storage stability of fresh and salt-added beef samples (Longissimus dorsi muscle). The latter treatment induced solid water transitions among ice phases. Fresh beef high pressure treatment (650MPa/20°C/10min) increased significantly expressible moisture while it decreased in pressurised (650MPa/-35°C/10min) frozen beef. Salt addition reduced high pressure-induced water loss. Treatments studied did not change fresh or salt-added samples shear force. Frozen beef pressurised at low temperature showed L, a and b values after thawing close to fresh samples. However, these samples in frozen state, presented chromatic parameters similar to unfrozen beef pressurised at room temperature. Apparently, freezing protects meat against pressure colour deterioration, fresh colour being recovered after thawing. High pressure processing (20°C or -35°C) was very effective reducing aerobic total (2-log(10) cycles) and lactic acid bacteria counts (2.4-log(10) cycles), in fresh and salt-added samples. Frozen+pressurised beef stored at -18°C during 45 days recovered its original colour after thawing, similarly to just-treated samples while their counts remain below detection limits during storage.

  5. Microbial manipulation of the rat dam changes bacterial colonization and alters properties of the gut in her offspring.

    PubMed

    Fåk, Frida; Ahrné, Siv; Molin, Göran; Jeppsson, Bengt; Weström, Björn

    2008-01-01

    The impact of an altered bacterial colonization on gut development has not been thoroughly studied, despite the increased risk of certain diseases with a disturbed microbiota after birth. This study was conducted to determine the effect of microbial manipulation, i.e., antibiotic treatment or Escherichia coli exposure, of the dam on bacterial colonization and gut development in the offspring. Pregnant rats were administered either broad-spectrum antibiotics 3 days before parturition or live nonpathogenic E. coli Culture Collection of University of Göteborg, Sweden type strain (CCUG 29300(T)) 1 wk before parturition and up to 14 days of lactation in the drinking water. Cecal bacterial levels, gut growth, intestinal permeability, digestive enzyme levels, and intestinal inflammation were studied in 2-wk-old rats. Pups from dams that were antibiotic-treated had higher densities of Enterobacteriaceae, which correlated with a decreased stomach growth and function, lower pancreatic protein levels, higher intestinal permeability, and increased plasma levels of the acute phase protein, haptoglobin, compared with pups from untreated mothers. Exposure of pregnant/lactating mothers to E. coli CCUG 29300(T), also resulting in increased Enterobacteriaceae levels, gave in the offspring similar results on the stomach and an increased small intestinal growth compared with the control pups. Furthermore, E. coli pups showed increased mucosal disaccharidase activities, increased liver, spleen, and adrenal weights, as well as increased plasma concentrations of haptoglobin. These findings indicate that disturbing the normal bacterial colonization after birth, by increasing the densities of cecal Enterobacteriaceae, appears to have lasting effects on the postnatal microflora, which affects gut growth and function.

  6. Prawn Shell Chitosan Has Anti-Obesogenic Properties, Influencing Both Nutrient Digestibility and Microbial Populations in a Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Egan, Áine M; Sweeney, Torres; Hayes, Maria; O'Doherty, John V

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural products to prevent obesity have been investigated, with evidence to suggest that chitosan has anti-obesity effects. The current experiment investigated the anti-obesity potential of prawn shell derived chitosan on a range of variables relevant to obesity in a pig model. The two dietary treatment groups included in this 63 day study were: T1) basal diet and T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group (70 ± 0.90 kg). The parameter categories which were assessed included: performance, nutrient digestibility, serum leptin concentrations, nutrient transporter and digestive enzyme gene expression and gut microbial populations. Pigs offered chitosan had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001), lower ileal digestibility of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE) (P< 0.05) and reduced coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of gross energy and nitrogen (P<0.05) when compared to the basal group. Fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) gene expression was down-regulated in pigs offered chitosan (P = 0.05) relative to the basal diet. Serum leptin concentrations increased (P< 0.05) in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to pigs offered the basal diet. Fatness traits, back-fat depth (mm), fat content (kg), were significantly reduced while lean meat (%) was increased (P<0.05) in chitosan supplemented pigs. Pigs offered chitosan had decreased numbers of Firmicutes in the colon (P <0.05), and Lactobacillus spp. in both the caecum (P <0.05) and colon (P <0.001). Bifidobacteria populations were increased in the caecum of animals offered the chitosan diet (P <0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that prawn shell chitosan has potent anti-obesity/body weight control effects which are mediated through multiple biological systems in vivo.

  7. Prawn Shell Chitosan Has Anti-Obesogenic Properties, Influencing Both Nutrient Digestibility and Microbial Populations in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Áine M.; Sweeney, Torres; Hayes, Maria; O’Doherty, John V.

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural products to prevent obesity have been investigated, with evidence to suggest that chitosan has anti-obesity effects. The current experiment investigated the anti-obesity potential of prawn shell derived chitosan on a range of variables relevant to obesity in a pig model. The two dietary treatment groups included in this 63 day study were: T1) basal diet and T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group (70 ± 0.90 kg). The parameter categories which were assessed included: performance, nutrient digestibility, serum leptin concentrations, nutrient transporter and digestive enzyme gene expression and gut microbial populations. Pigs offered chitosan had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001), lower ileal digestibility of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE) (P< 0.05) and reduced coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of gross energy and nitrogen (P<0.05) when compared to the basal group. Fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) gene expression was down-regulated in pigs offered chitosan (P = 0.05) relative to the basal diet. Serum leptin concentrations increased (P< 0.05) in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to pigs offered the basal diet. Fatness traits, back-fat depth (mm), fat content (kg), were significantly reduced while lean meat (%) was increased (P<0.05) in chitosan supplemented pigs. Pigs offered chitosan had decreased numbers of Firmicutes in the colon (P <0.05), and Lactobacillus spp. in both the caecum (P <0.05) and colon (P <0.001). Bifidobacteria populations were increased in the caecum of animals offered the chitosan diet (P <0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that prawn shell chitosan has potent anti-obesity/body weight control effects which are mediated through multiple biological systems in vivo. PMID:26636332

  8. Inactivation of anthracyclines by serum heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Brett A; Teesch, Lynn M; Buettner, Garry R; Britigan, Bradley E; Burns, C Patrick; Reszka, Krzysztof J

    2007-06-01

    We have previously shown that the anticancer agent doxorubicin undergoes oxidation and inactivation when exposed to myeloperoxidase-containing human leukemia HL-60 cells, or to isolated myeloperoxidase, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. In the current study we report that commercial fetal bovine serum (FBS) alone oxidizes doxorubicin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and that nitrite accelerates this oxidation. The efficacy of inactivation was dependent on the concentration of serum present; no reaction was observed when hydrogen peroxide or serum was omitted. Peroxidase activity assays, based on oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, confirmed the presence of a peroxidase in the sera from several suppliers. The peroxidative activity was contained in the >10000 MW fraction. We also found that hemoglobin, a heme protein likely to be present in commercial FBS, is capable of oxidizing doxorubicin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and that nitrite further stimulates the reaction. In contrast to intact doxorubicin, the serum + hydrogen peroxide + nitrite treated drug appeared to be nontoxic for PC3 human prostate cancer cells. Together, this study shows that (pseudo)peroxidases present in sera catalyze oxidation of doxorubicin by hydrogen peroxide and that this diminishes the tumoricidal activity of the anthracycline, at least in in vitro settings. Finally, this study also points out that addition of H2O2 to media containing FBS will stimulate peroxidase-type of reactions, which may affect cytotoxic properties of studied compounds.

  9. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  10. Bacteria, mould and yeast spore inactivation studies by scanning electron microscope observations.

    PubMed

    Rozali, Siti N M; Milani, Elham A; Deed, Rebecca C; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-10-04

    Spores are the most resistant form of microbial cells, thus difficult to inactivate. The pathogenic or food spoilage effects of certain spore-forming microorganisms have been the primary basis of sterilization and pasteurization processes. Thermal sterilization is the most common method to inactivate spores present on medical equipment and foods. High pressure processing (HPP) is an emerging and commercial non-thermal food pasteurization technique. Although previous studies demonstrated the effectiveness of thermal and non-thermal spore inactivation, the in-depth mechanisms of spore inactivation are as yet unclear. Live and dead forms of two food spoilage bacteria, a mould and a yeast were examined using scanning electron microscopy before and after the inactivation treatment. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Geobacillus stearothermophilus bacteria are indicators of acidic foods pasteurization and sterilization processes, respectively. Neosartorya fischeri is a phyto-pathogenic mould attacking fruits. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast with various applications for winemaking, brewing, baking and the production of biofuel from crops (e.g. sugar cane). Spores of the four microbial species were thermally inactivated. Spores of S. cerevisiae were observed in the ascus and free form after thermal and HPP treatments. Different forms of damage and cell destruction were observed for each microbial spore. Thermal treatment inactivated bacterial spores of A. acidoterrestris and G. stearothermophilus by attacking the inner core of the spore. The heat first altered the membrane permeability allowing the release of intracellular components. Subsequently, hydration of spores, physicochemical modifications of proteins, flattening and formation of indentations occurred, with subsequent spore death. Regarding N. fischeri, thermal inactivation caused cell destruction and leakage of intracellular components. Both thermal and HPP treatments of S. cerevisiae free spores attacked

  11. Contrasting genomic properties of free-living and particle-attached microbial assemblages within a coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maria W; Zeigler Allen, Lisa; Allen, Andrew E; Herfort, Lydie; Simon, Holly M

    2013-01-01

    The Columbia River (CR) is a powerful economic and environmental driver in the US Pacific Northwest. Microbial communities in the water column were analyzed from four diverse habitats: (1) an estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM), (2) a chlorophyll maximum of the river plume, (3) an upwelling-associated hypoxic zone, and (4) the deep ocean bottom. Three size fractions, 0.1-0.8, 0.8-3, and 3-200 μm were collected for each habitat in August 2007, and used for DNA isolation and 454 sequencing, resulting in 12 metagenomes of >5 million reads (>1.6 Gbp). To characterize the dominant microorganisms and metabolisms contributing to coastal biogeochemistry, we used predicted peptide and rRNA data. The 3- and 0.8-μm metagenomes, representing particulate fractions, were taxonomically diverse across habitats. The 3-μm size fractions contained a high abundance of eukaryota with diatoms dominating the hypoxic water and plume, while cryptophytes were more abundant in the ETM. The 0.1-μm metagenomes represented mainly free-living bacteria and archaea. The most abundant archaeal hits were observed in the deep ocean and hypoxic water (19% of prokaryotic peptides in the 0.1-μm metagenomes), and were homologous to Nitrosopumilus maritimus (ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota). Bacteria dominated metagenomes of all samples. In the euphotic zone (estuary, plume and hypoxic ocean), the most abundant bacterial taxa (≥40% of prokaryotic peptides) represented aerobic photoheterotrophs. In contrast, the low-oxygen, deep water metagenome was enriched with sequences for strict and facultative anaerobes. Interestingly, many of the same anaerobic bacterial families were enriched in the 3-μm size fraction of the ETM (2-10X more abundant relative to the 0.1-μm metagenome), indicating possible formation of anoxic microniches within particles. Results from this study provide a metagenome perspective on ecosystem-scale metabolism in an upwelling-influenced river-dominated coastal margin.

  12. [Effects of reforestation on soil chemical properties and microbial communities in a severely degraded sub-tropical red soil region].

    PubMed

    Gong, Xia; Niu, De-kui; Zhao, Xiao-rui; Lu, Sun-bao; Liu, Yuan-qiu; Wei, Xiao-hua; Guo, Xiao-min

    2013-04-01

    Taking the long-term reforestation experimental base established in a severely degraded sub-tropical hilly red soil region in Taihe County of Jiangxi Province in 1991 as the object, this paper studied the changes of soil nutrients and microbial communities after 19 years reforestation of Pinus elliottii forest, Liquidambarformosana forest, and P. elliotti-L. formosana forest, with the naturally restored grassland as the control. The soil organic carbon content in the L. formosana and P. elliottii-L. formosana forests (15.16+/-3.53 and 16.42+/-0.49 g kg-1, respectively) was significantly higher than that in the control (9.30+/-1.13 g kg-1), the soil total phosphorus content was in the order of the control (0.30+/-0.02 g kg-1) > P. elliottii-L. formosana forest (0.22+/-0.04 g kg-1 ) > L. formosana forest (0.14+/-0.01 g kg-1 ), while the soil available phosphorus content was 1.66+/-0.02 mg kg-1 in L. formosana forest, 2.47+/-0. 27 mg kg- in P. elliottii-L. formosana forest, and 1. 15+/-0.71 mg kg-1 in P. elliottii forest, being significantly higher than that in the control (0.01+/-0.00 mg kg-1). The total amounts of soil microbes, the amount and percentage of soil bacteria, and the amount of inorganic and organic phosphate-solubilizing microbes in L. formosana forest and P. elliottii-L. formosana forest were all significantly higher than those in P. elliottii forest and the control, while the amount and percentage of soil fungi and the percentage of soil actinomycetes in L. formosana forest and P. elliottii-L. formosana forest were significantly lower than those in the control. The soil organic carbon content was significantly positively correlated with the percentage of soil bactera, but negatively correlated with the percentage of soil fungi and actinomycetes, while the soil available phosphorus content was significantly positively correlated with the amount of organic phosphate-solubilizing microes, but not with the amount of inorganic phosphate

  13. Contrasting genomic properties of free-living and particle-attached microbial assemblages within a coastal ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maria W.; Zeigler Allen, Lisa; Allen, Andrew E.; Herfort, Lydie; Simon, Holly M.

    2013-01-01

    The Columbia River (CR) is a powerful economic and environmental driver in the US Pacific Northwest. Microbial communities in the water column were analyzed from four diverse habitats: (1) an estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM), (2) a chlorophyll maximum of the river plume, (3) an upwelling-associated hypoxic zone, and (4) the deep ocean bottom. Three size fractions, 0.1–0.8, 0.8–3, and 3–200 μm were collected for each habitat in August 2007, and used for DNA isolation and 454 sequencing, resulting in 12 metagenomes of >5 million reads (>1.6 Gbp). To characterize the dominant microorganisms and metabolisms contributing to coastal biogeochemistry, we used predicted peptide and rRNA data. The 3- and 0.8-μm metagenomes, representing particulate fractions, were taxonomically diverse across habitats. The 3-μm size fractions contained a high abundance of eukaryota with diatoms dominating the hypoxic water and plume, while cryptophytes were more abundant in the ETM. The 0.1-μm metagenomes represented mainly free-living bacteria and archaea. The most abundant archaeal hits were observed in the deep ocean and hypoxic water (19% of prokaryotic peptides in the 0.1-μm metagenomes), and were homologous to Nitrosopumilus maritimus (ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota). Bacteria dominated metagenomes of all samples. In the euphotic zone (estuary, plume and hypoxic ocean), the most abundant bacterial taxa (≥40% of prokaryotic peptides) represented aerobic photoheterotrophs. In contrast, the low-oxygen, deep water metagenome was enriched with sequences for strict and facultative anaerobes. Interestingly, many of the same anaerobic bacterial families were enriched in the 3-μm size fraction of the ETM (2–10X more abundant relative to the 0.1-μm metagenome), indicating possible formation of anoxic microniches within particles. Results from this study provide a metagenome perspective on ecosystem-scale metabolism in an upwelling-influenced river-dominated coastal margin

  14. Effects of Physical Properties of Feed on Microbial Ecology and Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Pig Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Lene Lind; Naughton, Patrick J.; Hedemann, Mette S.; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2004-01-01

    A two-by-two factorial experiment with pigs was conducted to study the effect of feed grinding (fine and coarse) and feed processing (pelleted and nonpelleted) on physicochemical properties, microbial populations, and survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in the gastrointestinal tracts of pigs. Results demonstrated a strong effect of diet on parameters measured in the stomachs of the pigs, whereas the effect was less in the other parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Pigs fed the coarse nonpelleted (C-NP) diet showed more solid gastric content with higher dry matter content than pigs fed the fine nonpelleted (F-NP), coarse pelleted (C-P), or fine pelleted (F-P) diet. Pigs fed the C-NP diet also showed significantly increased number of anaerobic bacteria (P < 0.05), increased concentrations of organic acids, and reduced pH in the stomach. In addition, pigs fed the C-NP diet showed increased in vitro death rate of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 in content from the stomach (P < 0.001). Pigs fed the C-NP diet had a significantly higher concentration of undissociated lactic acid in gastric content than pigs fed the other diets (P < 0.001). A strong correlation between the concentration of undissociated lactic acid and the death rate of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 was found. In the distal small intestine, cecum, and midcolon, significantly lower numbers of coliform bacteria were observed in pigs fed the coarse diets than in pigs fed the fine diets (P < 0.01). Pigs fed the C-NP diet showed the lowest number of coliform bacteria in these segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Pigs fed the coarse diets showed increased concentration of butyric acid in the cecum (P < 0.05) and colon (P < 0.10) compared with pigs fed the fine diets. It was concluded that feeding a coarsely ground meal feed to pigs changes the physicochemical and microbial properties of content in the stomach, which decreases the survival of Salmonella during passage through

  15. Effects of high amylose corn starch and microbial transglutaminase on the textural and microstructural properties of wheat flour composite gels at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani Mojarrad, Lida; Rafe, Ali; Sadeghian, Alireza; Niazmand, Razieh

    2017-05-29

    Textural and microstructural properties of composite gels (CGs), along with wheat flour and high amylose corn starch (Hylon VII) mixed with microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) at different levels and temperatures were investigated. The results showed by increasing Hylon starch content, the firmness increased and adhesiveness decreased. Indeed, high level of amylose and cross-linking formed by MTGase enhanced the gel elasticity and reduced adhesiveness. Moreover, MTGase had more effect on the firmness and provided more cross-linked intermolecular gel structures at high temperatures. By adding MTGase to the CG, the lowest peak viscosity and final viscosity were found for 15% of Hylon starch. As the more Hylon content in the CG, the more water solubility index was particularly obtained at high temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that MTGase and Hylon starch addition enhanced the structure. The differences in SEM of CG were reflected the pasting properties of the gels. Consequently, MTGase treated gels can withstand high temperature as well as maintain the overall structure of the samples gels. Therefore, the increment of Hylon to the CG gels supplied tighter, stronger, and denser protein network which were formed by MTGase cross-linking within the network of starch and proteins. Although, transglutaminase was practically used in the production of noodles and pasta in Japan, but there is little academic and industrial knowledge concerning its utilization in the pasta or noodles. Moreover, long shelf-life noodle/pasta products have become popular in the Japanese market and in the emergency conditions like as floods or earthquake, but they can be stored for at least 5 months by applying heat treatment at 95C. Here, high amylose corn starch as a resistant starch, wheat flour, and microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) were selected as the main components in the composite gel (CG) systems to elucidate the effects of MTGase and Hylon on the texture

  16. Bacteria and fungi inactivation by photocatalysis under UVA irradiation: liquid and gas phase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Miranda, Sandra M; Lopes, Filipe V S; Silva, Mário; Dezotti, Márcia; Silva, Adrián M T; Faria, Joaquim L; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pinto, Eugénia

    2016-06-29

    In the last decade, environmental risks associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become a concern in the scientific community due to the absence of specific legislation governing the occupational exposure limits (OEL) for microorganisms present in indoor air. Thus, it is necessary to develop techniques to effectively inactivate microorganisms present in the air of WWTPs facilities. In the present work, ultraviolet light A radiation was used as inactivation tool. The microbial population was not visibly reduced in the bioaerosol by ultraviolet light A (UVA) photolysis. The UVA photocatalytic process for the inactivation of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi, ATCC strains and isolates from indoor air samples of a WWTP) using titanium dioxide (TiO2 P25) and zinc oxide (ZnO) was tested in both liquid-phase and airborne conditions. In the slurry conditions at liquid phase, P25 showed a better performance in inactivation. For this reason, gas-phase assays were performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolithic structures coated with P25. The survival rate of microorganisms under study decreased with the catalyst load and the UVA exposure time. Inactivation of fungi was slower than resistant bacteria, followed by Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Graphical abstract Inactivation of fungi and bacteria in gas phase by photocatalitic process performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolith structures coated with TiO2.

  17. Protonation of the Human PIEZO1 Ion Channel Stabilizes Inactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Chilman; Sachs, Frederick; Gottlieb, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    PIEZO1 is a recently cloned eukaryotic cation-selective channel that opens with mechanical force. We found that extracellular protonation inhibits channel activation by ≈90% by increased occupancy in the closed or the inactivated state. Titration between pH 6.3 and 8.3 exhibited a pK of ≈6.9. The steepness of the titration data suggests positive cooperativity, implying the involvement of at least two protonation sites. Whole-cell recordings yielded results similar to patches, and pH 6.5 reduced whole-cell currents by >80%. The effects were reversible. To assess whether pH acts on the open or the inactivated state, we tested a double-mutant PIEZO1 that does not inactivate. Cell-attached patches and whole-cell currents from this mutant channel were pH-insensitive. Thus, protonation appears to be associated with domain(s) of the channel involved with inactivation. pH also did not affect mutant channels with point mutations at position 2456 that are known to exhibit slow inactivation. To determine whether the physical properties of the membrane are altered by pH and thereby affect channel gating, we measured patch capacitance during mechanical stimuli at pH 6.5 and 7.3. The rate constants for changes in patch capacitance were independent of pH, suggesting that bilayer mechanics are not involved. In summary, low pH stabilizes the inactivated state. This effect may be important when channels are activated under pathological conditions in which the pH is reduced, such as during ischemia. PMID:25561736

  18. Bacterial inactivation of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Westman, Erin L; Canova, Marc J; Radhi, Inas J; Koteva, Kalinka; Kireeva, Inga; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard D

    2012-10-26

    Microbes are exposed to compounds produced by members of their ecological niche, including molecules with antibiotic or antineoplastic activities. As a result, even bacteria that do not produce such compounds can harbor the genetic machinery to inactivate or degrade these molecules. Here, we investigated environmental actinomycetes for their ability to inactivate doxorubicin, an aminoglycosylated anthracycline anticancer drug. One strain, Streptomyces WAC04685, inactivates doxorubicin via a deglycosylation mechanism. Activity-based purification of the enzymes responsible for drug inactivation identified the NADH dehydrogenase component of respiratory electron transport complex I, which was confirmed by gene inactivation studies. A mechanism where reduction of the quinone ring of the anthracycline by NADH dehydrogenase leads to deglycosylation is proposed. This work adds anticancer drug inactivation to the enzymatic inactivation portfolio of actinomycetes and offers possibilities for novel applications in drug detoxification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivation technology for pitch doubling lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Jun; Ohashi, Masaki; Ohsawa, Youichi; Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kawai, Yoshio

    2010-04-01

    We propose novel inactivation technologies which improve resolution. Base generators have been developed, which inactivate acid by thermal treatment or exposure. This thermal inactivation technology realizes simple litho-inactivation-litho-etch (LILE) process with good fidelity. After 1st patterning, acid is inactivated by amine released from the thermal base generator under low temperature baking of less than 150°C. Just adding one simple low temperature bake process, LILE has two advantages; i) keeping high throughput, and ii) avoidance of pattern deformation. 32nm line and space (l&s) pattern is successfully delineated. The inactivation technology has been expanded to frequency doubling patterning. Photo base generator (PBG) is used to inactivate acid generated by exposure. Acid concentration in both of low and high exposed area is precisely controlled by base generation efficiency of PBG. The dual tone resist successfully delineates 32.5nm l&s pattern using 65nm l&s mask patterns with single exposure.

  20. Cefoxitin inactivation by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Cuchural, G J; Tally, F P; Jacobus, N V; Marsh, P K; Mayhew, J W

    1983-12-01

    We have surveyed the susceptibility of 1,575 clinical isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group of organisms to cefoxitin and eight other antimicrobial agents. Eleven isolates, 0.7% of the total, were highly cefoxitin resistant and had minimum inhibitory concentrations of greater than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml. These isolates were also resistant to other beta-lactam antibiotics. Of 11 isolates, 4 were able to inactivate cefoxitin in broth cultures, as measured by microbiological and high-pressure liquid chromatography assays. Two distinct patterns of cefoxitin breakdown products were detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The beta-lactamase inhibitors clavulanic acid and sulbactam failed to show synergism with cefoxitin. These data demonstrate that members of the B. fragilis group have acquired a novel resistance mechanism enabling them to inactivate cefoxitin.

  1. Biosynthesis of fluorescent CdS nanocrystals with semiconductor properties: Comparison of microbial and plant production systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Shalabi, Zahwa; Doran, Pauline M

    2016-04-10

    This study investigated fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and hairy roots of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) as in vitro production vehicles for biological synthesis of CdS quantum dots. Cd added during the mid-growth phase of the cultures was detoxified within the biomass into inorganic sulphide-containing complexes with the quantum confinement properties of semiconductor nanocrystals. Significant differences were found between the two host systems in terms of nanoparticle production kinetics, yield and quality. The much slower growth rate of hairy roots compared with yeast is a disadvantage for commercial scaled-up production. Nanoparticle extraction from the biomass was less effective for the roots: 19% of the Cd present in the hairy roots was recovered after extraction compared with 34% for the yeast. The overall yield of CdS quantum dots was also lower for the roots: relative to the amount of Cd taken up into the biomass, 8.5% was recovered in yeast gel filtration fractions exhibiting quantum dot properties whereas the result for hairy roots was only 0.99%. Yeast-produced CdS crystallites were somewhat smaller with diameters of approximately 2-6 nm compared with those of 4-10nm obtained from the roots. The average ratio of inorganic sulphide to Cd for the purified and size-fractionated particles was 0.44 for the yeast and 1.6 for the hairy roots. Despite the limitations associated with hairy roots in terms of culture kinetics and product yield, this system produced CdS nanoparticles with enhanced photostability and 3.7-13-fold higher fluorescence quantum efficiency compared with those generated by yeast. This work demonstrates that the choice of cellular host can have a significant effect on nanoparticle functional properties as well as on the bioprocessing aspects of biological quantum dot synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inactivation of allergens and toxins.

    PubMed

    Morandini, Piero

    2010-11-30

    Plants are replete with thousands of proteins and small molecules, many of which are species-specific, poisonous or dangerous. Over time humans have learned to avoid dangerous plants or inactivate many toxic components in food plants, but there is still room for ameliorating food crops (and plants in general) in terms of their allergens and toxins content, especially in their edible parts. Inactivation at the genetic rather than physical or chemical level has many advantages and classical genetic approaches have resulted in significant reduction of toxin content. The capacity, offered by genetic engineering, of turning off (inactivating) specific genes has opened up the possibility of altering the plant content in a far more precise manner than previously available. Different levels of intervention (genes coding for toxins/allergens or for enzymes, transporters or regulators involved in their metabolism) are possible and there are several tools for inactivating genes, both direct (using chemical and physical mutagens, insertion of transposons and other genetic elements) and indirect (antisense RNA, RNA interference, microRNA, eventually leading to gene silencing). Each level/strategy has specific advantages and disadvantages (speed, costs, selectivity, stability, reversibility, frequency of desired genotype and regulatory regime). Paradigmatic examples from classical and transgenic approaches are discussed to emphasize the need to revise the present regulatory process. Reducing the content of natural toxins is a trade-off process: the lesser the content of natural toxins, the higher the susceptibility of a plant to pests and therefore the stronger the need to protect plants. As a consequence, more specific pesticides like Bt are needed to substitute for general pesticides.

  3. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Ellen A. Spotts; Beatty, Mark E.; Taylor, Thomas H.; Weyant, Robbin; Sobel, Jeremy; Arduino, Matthew J.

    2003-01-01

    After the intentional release of Bacillus anthracis through the U.S. Postal Service in the fall of 2001, many environments were contaminated with B. anthracis spores, and frequent inquiries were made regarding the science of destroying these spores. We conducted a survey of the literature that had potential application to the inactivation of B. anthracis spores. This article provides a tabular summary of the results. PMID:12780999

  4. Inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli by pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Chalise, P R; Hotta, E; Matak, K E; Jaczynski, J

    2007-09-01

    A novel and compact low-energy (keV) high-power pulsed electron beam (e-beam) that utilizes a secondary emission electron gun (SEEG) was designed and constructed. Escherichia coli JM 109 at a concentration of 10(6) CFU/mL was spread-plated on Luria-Bertani (LB) medium and subjected to the SEEG e-beam. The e-beam was administered as 1 or 5 pulses. The duration of a single pulse was constant at 5 micros, e-beam current density was constant at 25 mA/cm2, and e-beam energy varied between 60 and 82.5 keV. Following treatment with the SEEG e-beam, survivors of the irradiated E. coli samples were enumerated by a standard 10-fold dilution and spread-plated. The survivor curves were plotted on logarithmic scale as a function of e-beam dose. The D10-values were calculated as a negative reciprocal of the slope of the survivor curves. The D10-values for E. coli inactivated with 1- and 5-pulse SEEG e-beam were 0.0026 and 0.0217 Gy, respectively. These D10-values were considerably lower than published D10-values for E. coli inactivated with conventional high-energy continuous e-beam, likely due to shorter exposure time (t), greater current density (J), and a pulse mode of the SEEG e-beam. The SEEG e-beam showed promising results for microbial inactivation in a nonthermal manner; however, due to low energy of the SEEG e-beam, current applications are limited to surface decontamination. The SEEG e-beam may be an efficient processing step for surface inactivation of food-borne pathogens on ready-to-eat products, including fresh and leafy vegetables.

  5. Chemical Profiling and Evaluation of Antioxidant and Anti-Microbial Properties of Selected Commercial Essential Oils: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Ângelo; Duarte, Ana Paula; Pereira, Luísa; Domingues, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    Background: The last decades have seen an increased awareness by the scientific community of the extent of resistance to conventional antibiotics, particularly with respect to the emerging multidrug-resistant pathogenic microbes. Additionally, natural antioxidants have received significant attention among food professionals and consumers because of their assumed safety and potential therapeutic value. The aim of this work was to assess the antioxidant activities of eight selected commercial essential oils (EOs), together with the evaluation of their antibacterial and anti-quorum sensing properties. Methods: The chemical profiling of the EOs was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The antioxidant properties of the EOs were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and by β-carotene bleaching test. Disc diffusion assays were employed to evaluate the anti-bacterial and anti-quorum sensing activities of the EOs. Results: It was observed that EOs from three Eucalyptus species are rich in eucalyptol. Generally, linalool is abundant in EOs from four Lavandula species. The oil of Cymbopogon citratus is the one with the best capacity to scavenge the DPPH free radicals and presented great antibacterial activity. Conclusions: The geographical origins of the plant species are determinant factors in the EO composition and in the corresponding biological activities. PMID:28930251

  6. Chemical Profiling and Evaluation of Antioxidant and Anti-Microbial Properties of Selected Commercial Essential Oils: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Luís, Ângelo; Duarte, Ana Paula; Pereira, Luísa; Domingues, Fernanda

    2017-06-05

    Background: The last decades have seen an increased awareness by the scientific community of the extent of resistance to conventional antibiotics, particularly with respect to the emerging multidrug-resistant pathogenic microbes. Additionally, natural antioxidants have received significant attention among food professionals and consumers because of their assumed safety and potential therapeutic value. The aim of this work was to assess the antioxidant activities of eight selected commercial essential oils (EOs), together with the evaluation of their antibacterial and anti-quorum sensing properties. Methods: The chemical profiling of the EOs was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The antioxidant properties of the EOs were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and by β-carotene bleaching test. Disc diffusion assays were employed to evaluate the anti-bacterial and anti-quorum sensing activities of the EOs. Results: It was observed that EOs from three Eucalyptus species are rich in eucalyptol. Generally, linalool is abundant in EOs from four Lavandula species. The oil of Cymbopogon citratus is the one with the best capacity to scavenge the DPPH free radicals and presented great antibacterial activity. Conclusions: The geographical origins of the plant species are determinant factors in the EO composition and in the corresponding biological activities.

  7. Properties and applications of microbial beta-D-xylosidases featuring the catalytically efficient enzyme from Selenomonas ruminantium.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Wagschal, Kurt

    2010-05-01

    Xylan 1,4-beta-D-xylosidase catalyzes hydrolysis of non-reducing end xylose residues from xylooligosaccharides. The enzyme is currently used in combination with beta-xylanases in several large-scale processes for improving baking properties of bread dough, improving digestibility of animal feed, production of D-xylose for xylitol manufacture, and deinking of recycled paper. On a grander scale, the enzyme could find employment alongside cellulases and other hemicellulases in hydrolyzing lignocellulosic biomass so that reaction product monosaccharides can be fermented to biofuels such as ethanol and butanol. Catalytically efficient enzyme, performing under saccharification reactor conditions, is critical to the feasibility of enzymatic saccharification processes. This is particularly important for beta-xylosidase which would catalyze breakage of more glycosidic bonds of hemicellulose than any other hemicellulase. In this paper, we review applications and properties of the enzyme with emphasis on the catalytically efficient beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium and its potential use in saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass for producing biofuels.

  8. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  9. Nanoscale structural and mechanical analysis of Bacillus anthracis spores inactivated with rapid dry heating.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yun; Li, Alex; Felker, Daniel L; Burggraf, Larry W

    2014-03-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating.

  10. Nanoscale Structural and Mechanical Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Spores Inactivated with Rapid Dry Heating

    PubMed Central

    Felker, Daniel L.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating. PMID:24375142

  11. Vermicomposting of toxic weed--Lantana camara biomass: chemical and microbial properties changes and assessment of toxicity of end product using seed bioassay.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Surindra; Sharma, Priyanka

    2013-09-01

    This work illustrates the results of vermicomposting trials of noxious weed - Lantana camara (LL) leaf litter spiked with cow dung (CD) in different ratios (0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80%) using Eisenia fetida. A total of five treatments were established and changes in chemical and microbial properties of vermibeds have been observed for 60 days. In all treatments, a decrease in pH (19.5-30.7%), total organic carbon (TOC) (12-23%) and C:N ratio (25-35%), but increase in ash content (16-40%), total N(N(tot)) (11-32%), available phosphorous (P(avail)) (445-629%), exchangeable potassium (K(exch)) (63-156%) exchangeable calcium (Ca(exch)) (67-94%),and N-NO3(-) (164-499%) was recorded. Vermibeds with 40-60% LL (T2 and T3) showed better mineralization rate. The number of fungi, bacteria and actinomycetes showed 0.33-1.67-fold, 0.72-2.33-fold and 2.03-2.99-fold increase, respectively after vermicomposting process. The germination index (GI) was between 47% and 83% in all vermicomposts as indicated by seed bioassay test. Results thus suggested that Lantana may be a potential source for vermicompost production for sustainable agriculture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of pH-treated Fish Sarcoplasmic Proteins on the Functional Properties of Chicken Myofibrillar Protein Gel Mediated by Microbial Transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Hemung, Bung-Orn; Chin, Koo Bok

    2014-01-01

    pH adjustment would be of advantage in improving the water holding capacity of muscle proteins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the addition of fish sarcoplasmic protein (SP) solution, which was adjusted to pH 3.0 or 12.0, neutralized to pH 7.0, and lyophilized to obtain the acid- and alkaline-treated SP samples, on the functional properties of the chicken myofibrillar protein induced by microbial transglutaminase (MTG). The solubility of alkaline-treated SP was higher than that of the acid counterpart; however, those values of the two pH-treated samples were lower than that of normal SP (p<0.05). All SP solutions were mixed with myofibrillar proteins (MP) extracted from chicken breast, and incubated with MTG. The shear stresses of MP with acid- and alkaline-treated SP were higher than that of normal SP. The thermal stability of MP mixture reduced upon adding SP, regardless of the pH treatment. The breaking force of MP gels with acid-treated SP increased more than those of alkaline-treated SP, while normal SP showed the highest value. The MP gel lightness increased, but cooking loss reduced, with the addition of SP. Smooth microstructure of the gel surface was observed. These results indicated that adjusting the pH of SP improved the water holding capacity of chicken myofibrillar proteins induced by MTG.

  13. Biogeochemical Processes in Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life, and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and, potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial populations and their metabolic properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Biogeochemical Processes in Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life, and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and, potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial populations and their metabolic properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Calcium-binding parameter of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase determined by inactivation kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Hoshino, Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    The irreversible thermal inactivation and the thermodynamics of calcium ion binding of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase in the absence of substrates were studied. The enzyme inactivation on heating was apparently followed by first-order kinetics. The enzyme was stabilized with an increased concentration of calcium ion and thus the inactivation was highly dependent on the state of calcium binding. The activation parameter for the inactivation suggests an unfolding of the enzyme protein upon heating. Values of both the activation enthalpy and entropy were increased with a higher calcium ion concentration. An inactivation kinetic model is based on the assumption of a two-stage unfolding transition in which the bivalent ion dissociation occurs in the first step followed by the secondary structural unfolding. This simple kinetic model provides both a qualitative and quantitative interpretation of calcium ion binding to the enzyme and its effect on the inactivation properties. The specific approximations of the kinetic model were strictly followed in the analysis to calculate the apparent inactivation rate at each calcium ion concentration in terms of the calcium-binding parameters. The enthalpy and entropy changes for the calcium ion binding were calculated to be -149 kJ/mol and -360 J.mol(-1).K(-1) respectively and these values suggest a strong enthalpic affinity for the bivalent ion binding to the enzyme protein. The thermodynamical interpretation attempts to provide clear relations between the terms of an apparent inactivation rate and the calcium binding. PMID:12049626

  16. Impact of UV disinfection on microbially available phosphorus, organic carbon, and microbial growth in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Markku J; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Vartiainen, Terttu; Rantakokko, Panu; Hirvonen, Arja; Martikainen, Pertti J

    2003-03-01

    UV irradiation at a wavelength of 253.7 nm (UV(254)) is commonly used for drinking water disinfection. UV radiation is known to convert organically combined phosphorus to orthophosphate and to degrade natural organic matter. We studied if UV disinfection increases the amount of microbially available forms of organic carbon and phosphorus in drinking waters with different characteristics, and if these changes in water chemical quality could enhance the microbial growth in drinking water. The UV(254) dose (15-50 mWs/cm(2)) used in waterworks reduced the concentration of assimilable organic carbon and the sum of the molecular size fractions. The release of microbially available phosphorus needed higher doses (204 mWs/cm(2)) of UV(254) radiation. Of bacteria in drinking water, 90% were inactivated with UV(254)-irradiation doses below 50 mWs/cm(2). A high dose (501 mWs/cm(2)) of UV(254) radiation inhibited the microbial growth in water.

  17. Inactivation of bacterial pathogens in yoba mutandabota, a dairy product fermented with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba.

    PubMed

    Mpofu, Augustine; Linnemann, Anita R; Nout, Martinus J R; Zwietering, Marcel H; Smid, Eddy J; den Besten, Heidy M W

    2016-01-18

    Mutandabota is a dairy product consumed as a major source of proteins and micronutrients in Southern Africa. In this study the microbial safety of traditional and a variant of mutandabota fermented with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba (yoba mutandabota) was investigated by challenging the products with five important food pathogens: Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Bacillus cereus. Pasteurized full-fat cow's milk was used for producing traditional and yoba mutandabota, and was inoculated with a cocktail of strains of the pathogens at an inoculum level of 5.5 log cfu/mL. Survival of the pathogens was monitored over a potential consumption time of 24h for traditional mutandabota, and over 24h of fermentation followed by 24h of potential consumption time for yoba mutandabota. In traditional mutandabota (pH3.4 ± 0.1) no viable cells of B. cereus and C. jejuni were detected 3h after inoculation, while L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. significantly declined (P<0.05), but could still be detected (<3.5 log inactivation) at the end of the potential consumption time. This indicated that consumption of traditional mutandabota exposes consumers to the risk of food-borne microbial infections. In yoba mutandabota, L. rhamnosus yoba grew from 5.5 ± 0.1 log cfu/mL to 9.1 ± 0.4 log cfu/mL in the presence of pathogens. The pH of yoba mutandabota dropped from 4.2 ± 0.1 to 3.3 ± 0.1 after 24h of fermentation, mainly due to organic acids produced during fermentation. Only Salmonella spp. was able to grow in yoba mutandabota during the first 9h of fermentation, but then decreased in viable plate count. None of the tested pathogens were detected (>3.5 log inactivation) after 3h into potential consumption time of yoba mutandabota. Inactivation of pathogens in mutandabota is of public health significance because food-borne pathogens endanger public health upon consumption of contaminated food

  18. Dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite for enzymatic browning inhibition and Escherichia coli inactivation on fresh-cut apples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated the dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite (SC) for browning inhibition and microbial inactivation on fresh-cut apples. The SC treatment exhibited a strong inhibition on browning reaction of fresh-cut Red Delicious apples during cold storage. Test results from examination of t...

  19. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-05-15

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  20. GEOELECTRICAL EVIDENCE OF MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF DIESEL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alteration of physical properties by microbial activity in petroleum contaminated sediments was investigated using geophysical techniques in laboratory column experiments. Microbial population growth was determined by the Most Probable Number technique (MPN), community dynami...

  1. GEOELECTRICAL EVIDENCE OF MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF DIESEL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alteration of physical properties by microbial activity in petroleum contaminated sediments was investigated using geophysical techniques in laboratory column experiments. Microbial population growth was determined by the Most Probable Number technique (MPN), community dynami...

  2. Efficacy of ultraviolet radiation as an alternative technology to inactivate microorganisms in grape juices and wines.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Ilse N; du Toit, Maret; Krügel, Maricel

    2011-05-01

    Since sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) is associated with health risks, the wine industry endeavours to reduce SO(2) levels in wines with new innovative techniques. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the efficacy of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-C (254 nm) as an alternative technology to inactivate microorganisms in grape juices and wines. A pilot-scale UV-C technology (SurePure, South Africa) consisting of an UV-C germicidal lamp (100 W output; 30 W UV-C output) was used to apply UV-C dosages ranging from 0 to 3672 J l(-1), at a constant flow rate of 4000 l h(-1) (Re > 7500). Yeasts, lactic and acetic acid bacteria were singly and co-inoculated into 20 l batches of Chenin blanc juice, Shiraz juice, Chardonnay wine and Pinotage wine, respectively. A dosage of 3672 J l(-1), resulted in an average log(10) microbial reduction of 4.97 and 4.89 in Chardonnay and Pinotage, respectively. In Chenin blanc and Shiraz juice, an average log(10) reduction of 4.48 and 4.25 was obtained, respectively. UV-C efficacy may be influenced by liquid properties such as colour and turbidity. These results had clearly indicated significant (p < 0.05) germicidal effect against wine-specific microorganisms; hence, UV-C radiation may stabilize grape juice and wine microbiologically in conjunction with reduced SO(2) levels.

  3. Inactivation of Bacteria in Oil Field Injected Water by a Pulsed Plasma Discharge Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qing; Li, Zhongjian; Lei, Lecheng; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed plasma discharge was employed to inactivate bacteria in the injection water for an oil field. The effects of water conductivity and initial concentration of bacteria on elimination efficiency were investigated in the batch and continuous flow modes. It was demonstrated that Fe2+ contained in injection water could enhance the elimination efficiency greatly. The addition of reducing agent glutathione (GSH) indicated that active radicals generated by pulsed plasma discharges played an important role in the inactivation of bacteria. Moreover, it was found that the microbial inactivation process for both batch and continuous flow mode well fitted the model based on the Weibull's survival function. supported by Zhejiang Province Welfare Technology Applied Research Project of China (No. 2014C31137), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 21436007 and U1462201), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 2015QNA4032)

  4. Structure and property modification of an oligochitosan-glycosylated and crosslinked soybean protein generated by microbial transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Song, Chun-Li; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2014-11-15

    The impacts of oligochitosan glycosylation and crosslinking on the structure and properties of a soybean protein were investigated. The reaction was carried out by transglutaminase with 10 kU kg(-1) protein at pH 7.5 and 37°C for 3h, under a protein content of 40 gl(-1) and a molar ratio of acyl donor to oligochitosan acceptor of 1:3. The modified protein contained glucosamine at a concentration of 12.1 g kg(-1) protein. Electrophoresis and infrared spectroscopy analysis confirmed the modified protein to be crosslinked and glycosylated. Circular dichroism analysis showed the modified protein possessed a decreased α-helix and β-structure. The modified protein exhibited lower surface hydrophobicity and emulsifying activity but higher emulsion stability than the soybean protein, it also had better water and oil binding capacity (12.2g and 3.5 ml g(-1) protein, respectively), and could form a thicker protein outer layer in the oil droplets in emulsion. Transglutaminase-induced oligochitosan glycosylation and crosslinking is thus able to modify soybean proteins.

  5. Effects of indigenous yeasts on physicochemical and microbial properties of Korean soy sauce prepared by low-salt fermentation.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Ran; Jeong, Do-Youn; Baik, Sang-Ho

    2015-10-01

    This study deals with understanding the effects of salt reduction on both the physicochemical and microbiological properties of soy sauce fermentation and also the application of indigenous yeast starters to compensate for undesirable changes occurring in salt-reduced processes. Fermentation was tested in situ at a Korean commercial soy sauce processing unit. Salt reduction resulted in higher acidity as well as lower pH and contents of residual sugar and ethanol. Moreover, undesired flavor characteristics, due to a lack of distinctive compounds, was observed. In addition, putrefactive Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. were present only during salt-reduced fermentation. To control these adverse effects, a single or mixed culture of two indigenous yeasts, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Pichia guilliermondii, producing high ethanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol, respectively, were tested. Overall, all types of yeast applications inhibited undesirable bacterial growth despite salt reduction. Of the starter cultures tested, the mixed culture resulted in a balance of more complex and richer flavors with an identical flavor profile pattern to that obtained from high salt soy sauce. Hence, this strategy using functional yeast cultures offers a technological option to manufacture salt-reduced soy sauce while preserving its typical sensory characteristics without affecting safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Polyethylene Films Containing Silver Nanoparticles for Applications in Food Packaging: Characterization of Physico-Chemical and Anti-Microbial Properties.

    PubMed

    Becaro, Aline A; Puti, Fernanda C; Correa, Daniel S; Paris, Elaine C; Marconcini, José M; Ferreira, Marcos D

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports the antibacterial effect and physico-chemical characterization of films containing silver nanoparticles for use as food packaging. Two masterbatches (named PEN and PEC) con- taining silver nanoparticles embedded in distinct carriers (silica and titanium dioxide) were mixed with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in different compositions and extruded to produce plain films. These films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The morphology of the films showed the formation of agglomerates of nanoparticles in both PEN and PEC composites. X-ray analyses confirmed the presence of SiO2 in PEN samples and TiO2 in PEC samples. Thermal analyses indicated an increase in thermal stability of the PEC compositions. The antimicrobial efficacy was determined by applying the test strain for Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, according to the Japanese Industrial Standard Method (JIS Z 2801:2000). The films analyzed showed antimicrobial properties against the tested microorganisms, presenting better activity against the S. aureus than E. Coli. These findings suggest that LDPE films with silver nanoparticles are promising to provide a significant contribution to the quality and safety of packaged food.

  7. Structural correlates of selectivity and inactivation in potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jason G.; Nimigean, Crina M.

    2011-01-01

    Potassium channels are involved in a tremendously diverse range of physiological applications requiring distinctly different functional properties. Not surprisingly, the amino acid sequences for these proteins are diverse as well, except for the region that has been ordained the “selectivity filter”. The goal of this review is to examine our current understanding of the role of the selectivity filter and regions adjacent to it in specifying selectivity as well as its role in gating/inactivation and possible mechanisms by which these processes are coupled. Our working hypothesis is that an amino acid network behind the filter modulates selectivity in channels with the same signature sequence while at the same time affecting channel inactivation properties. PMID:21958666

  8. NMR structure of inactivation gates from mammalian voltage-dependent potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Antz, C; Geyer, M; Fakler, B; Schott, M K; Guy, H R; Frank, R; Ruppersberg, J P; Kalbitzer, H R

    1997-01-16

    The electrical signalling properties of neurons originate largely from the gating properties of their ion channels. N-type inactivation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels is the best-understood gating transition in ion channels, and occurs by a 'ball-and-chain' type mechanism. In this mechanism an N-terminal domain (inactivation gate), which is tethered to the cytoplasmic side of the channel protein by a protease-cleavable chain, binds to its receptor at the inner vestibule of the channel, thereby physically blocking the pore. Even when synthesized as a peptide, ball domains restore inactivation in Kv channels whose inactivation domains have been deleted. Using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analysed the three-dimensional structure of the ball peptides from two rapidly inactivating mammalian K. channels (Raw3 (Kv3.4) and RCK4 (Kv1.4)). The inactivation peptide of Raw3 (Raw3-IP) has a compact structure that exposes two phosphorylation sites and allows the formation of an intramolecular disulphide bridge between two spatially close cysteine residues. Raw3-IP exhibits a characteristic surface charge pattern with a positively charged, a hydrophobic, and a negatively charged region. The RCK4 inactivation peptide (RCK4-IP) shows a similar spatial distribution of charged and uncharged regions, but is more flexible and less ordered in its amino-terminal part.

  9. Advances in antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashef, Nasim; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2017-08-01

    The alarming worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance amongst microbial pathogens necessitates a search for new antimicrobial techniques, which will not be affected by, or indeed cause resistance themselves. Light-mediated photoinactivation is one such technique that takes advantage of the whole spectrum of light to destroy a broad spectrum of pathogens. Many of these photoinactivation techniques rely on the participation of a diverse range of nanoparticles and nanostructures that have dimensions very similar to the wavelength of light. Photodynamic inactivation relies on the photochemical production of singlet oxygen from photosensitizing dyes (type II pathway) that can benefit remarkably from formulation in nanoparticle-based drug delivery vehicles. Fullerenes are a closed-cage carbon allotrope nanoparticle with a high absorption coefficient and triplet yield. Their photochemistry is highly dependent on microenvironment, and can be type II in organic solvents and type I (hydroxyl radicals) in a biological milieu. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles act as a large band-gap semiconductor that can carry out photo-induced electron transfer under ultraviolet A light and can also produce reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. We discuss some recent studies in which quite remarkable potentiation of microbial killing (up to six logs) can be obtained by the addition of simple inorganic salts such as the non-toxic sodium/potassium iodide, bromide, nitrite, and even the toxic sodium azide. Interesting mechanistic insights were obtained to explain this increased killing.

  10. Inactivation of Prions and Amyloid Seeds with Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Allison; Phillips, Katie; Contreras, Luis; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Caughey, Byron

    2016-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is produced naturally by neutrophils and other cells to kill conventional microbes in vivo. Synthetic preparations containing HOCl can also be effective as microbial disinfectants. Here we have tested whether HOCl can also inactivate prions and other self-propagating protein amyloid seeds. Prions are deadly pathogens that are notoriously difficult to inactivate, and standard microbial disinfection protocols are often inadequate. Recommended treatments for prion decontamination include strongly basic (pH ≥~12) sodium hypochlorite bleach, ≥1 N sodium hydroxide, and/or prolonged autoclaving. These treatments are damaging and/or unsuitable for many clinical, agricultural and environmental applications. We have tested the anti-prion activity of a weakly acidic aqueous formulation of HOCl (BrioHOCl) that poses no apparent hazard to either users or many surfaces. For example, BrioHOCl can be applied directly to skin and mucous membranes and has been aerosolized to treat entire rooms without apparent deleterious effects. Here, we demonstrate that immersion in BrioHOCl can inactivate not only a range of target microbes, including spores of Bacillus subtilis, but also prions in tissue suspensions and on stainless steel. Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assays showed that BrioHOCl treatments eliminated all detectable prion seeding activity of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, cervine chronic wasting disease, sheep scrapie and hamster scrapie; these findings indicated reductions of ≥103- to 106-fold. Transgenic mouse bioassays showed that all detectable hamster-adapted scrapie infectivity in brain homogenates or on steel wires was eliminated, representing reductions of ≥~105.75-fold and >104-fold, respectively. Inactivation of RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated with free chlorine concentration and higher order aggregation or destruction of proteins generally, including prion protein. Brio

  11. Inactivation of Prions and Amyloid Seeds with Hypochlorous Acid.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Andrew G; Race, Brent; Kraus, Allison; Sangaré, Laura R; Robins, Lori; Groveman, Bradley R; Saijo, Eri; Phillips, Katie; Contreras, Luis; Dhaliwal, Virkamal; Manca, Matteo; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Terry, Daniel; Williams, Jeffrey F; Caughey, Byron

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is produced naturally by neutrophils and other cells to kill conventional microbes in vivo. Synthetic preparations containing HOCl can also be effective as microbial disinfectants. Here we have tested whether HOCl can also inactivate prions and other self-propagating protein amyloid seeds. Prions are deadly pathogens that are notoriously difficult to inactivate, and standard microbial disinfection protocols are often inadequate. Recommended treatments for prion decontamination include strongly basic (pH ≥~12) sodium hypochlorite bleach, ≥1 N sodium hydroxide, and/or prolonged autoclaving. These treatments are damaging and/or unsuitable for many clinical, agricultural and environmental applications. We have tested the anti-prion activity of a weakly acidic aqueous formulation of HOCl (BrioHOCl) that poses no apparent hazard to either users or many surfaces. For example, BrioHOCl can be applied directly to skin and mucous membranes and has been aerosolized to treat entire rooms without apparent deleterious effects. Here, we demonstrate that immersion in BrioHOCl can inactivate not only a range of target microbes, including spores of Bacillus subtilis, but also prions in tissue suspensions and on stainless steel. Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assays showed that BrioHOCl treatments eliminated all detectable prion seeding activity of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, cervine chronic wasting disease, sheep scrapie and hamster scrapie; these findings indicated reductions of ≥103- to 106-fold. Transgenic mouse bioassays showed that all detectable hamster-adapted scrapie infectivity in brain homogenates or on steel wires was eliminated, representing reductions of ≥~105.75-fold and >104-fold, respectively. Inactivation of RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated with free chlorine concentration and higher order aggregation or destruction of proteins generally, including prion protein. Brio

  12. Inactivation of polyphenoloxidase by pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Manzocco, Lara; Panozzo, Agnese; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2013-08-01

    The effect of pulsed light on the inactivation of polyphenoloxidase (PPO) in model solutions was investigated focusing on the effect of enzyme concentration and total energy dose of the treatment. PPO inactivation increased with the dose of the treatment. Complete enzyme inactivation was achieved by pulsed light doses higher than 8.75 J cm(-2) . At low PPO concentrations (4 to 10 U), the enzyme resulted highly inactivated by pulsed light treatment. Further increase in enzyme units determined a progressive decrease in PPO inactivation. The latter was attributed to protein structural modifications including cleavage and unfolding/aggregation phenomena. PPO amounts higher than 10 U probably favoured enzyme conformations that were less prone to intermolecular rearrangements leading to inactivation. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Pressure Inactivation of Bacillus Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Margosch, Dirk; Gänzle, Michael G.; Ehrmann, Matthias A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of bacterial endospores by hydrostatic pressure requires the combined application of heat and pressure. We have determined the resistance of spores of 14 food isolates and 5 laboratory strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, and B. licheniformis to treatments with pressure and temperature (200 to 800 MPa and 60 to 80°C) in mashed carrots. A large variation in the pressure resistance of spores was observed, and their reduction by treatments with 800 MPa and 70°C for 4 min ranged from more than 6 log units to no reduction. The sporulation conditions further influenced their pressure resistance. The loss of dipicolinic acid (DPA) from spores that varied in their pressure resistance was determined, and spore sublethal injury was assessed by determination of the detection times for individual spores. Treatment of spores with pressure and temperature resulted in DPA-free, phase-bright spores. These spores were sensitive to moderate heat and exhibited strongly increased detection times as judged by the time re