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Sample records for microbial rhodopsins restores

  1. Ectopic Expression of a Microbial-Type Rhodopsin Restores Visual Responses in Mice with Photoreceptor Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Anding; Cui, Jinjuan; Ma, Yu-Ping; Olshevskaya, Elena; Pu, Mingliang; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Pan, Zhuo-Hua

    2006-01-01

    Summary The death of photoreceptor cells caused by retinal degenerative diseases often results in a complete loss of retinal responses to light. We explore the feasibility of converting inner retinal neurons to photosensitive cells as a possible strategy for imparting light sensitivity to retinas lacking rods and cones. Using delivery by an adeno-associated viral vector, here, we show that long-term expression of a microbial-type rhodopsin, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), can be achieved in rodent inner retinal neurons in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that expression of ChR2 in surviving inner retinal neurons of a mouse with photoreceptor degeneration can restore the ability of the retina to encode light signals and transmit the light signals to the visual cortex. Thus, expression of microbial-type channelrhodopsins, such as ChR2, in surviving inner retinal neurons is a potential strategy for the restoration of vision after rod and cone degeneration. PMID:16600853

  2. The Road to Optogenetics: Microbial Rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, E G; Koppel, L A

    2016-09-01

    Optogenetics technology (using light-sensitive microbial proteins to control animal cell physiology) is becoming increasingly popular in laboratories around the world. Among these proteins, particularly important are rhodopsins that transport ions across the membrane and are used in optogenetics to regulate membrane potential by light, mostly in neurons. Although rhodopsin ion pumps transport only one charge per captured photon, channelrhodopsins are capable of more efficient passive transport. In this review, we follow the history of channelrhodopsin discovery in flagellate algae and discuss the latest addition to the channelrhodopsin family, channels with anion, rather than cation, selectivity.

  3. Microbial Rhodopsins: Diversity, Mechanisms, and Optogenetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L

    2017-06-20

    Microbial rhodopsins are a family of photoactive retinylidene proteins widespread throughout the microbial world. They are notable for their diversity of function, using variations of a shared seven-transmembrane helix design and similar photochemical reactions to carry out distinctly different light-driven energy and sensory transduction processes. Their study has contributed to our understanding of how evolution modifies protein scaffolds to create new protein chemistry, and their use as tools to control membrane potential with light is fundamental to optogenetics for research and clinical applications. We review the currently known functions and present more in-depth assessment of three functionally and structurally distinct types discovered over the past two years: (a) anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) from cryptophyte algae, which enable efficient optogenetic neural suppression; (b) cryptophyte cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs), structurally distinct from the green algae CCRs used extensively for neural activation and from cryptophyte ACRs; and (c) enzymerhodopsins, with light-gated guanylyl cyclase or kinase activity promising for optogenetic control of signal transduction.

  4. Evidence of microbial rhodopsins in Antarctic Dry Valley edaphic systems.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Leandro D; Vikram, Surendra; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Cowan, Don A

    2017-07-28

    Microorganisms able to synthesize rhodopsins have the capacity to translocate ions through their membranes, using solar energy to generate a proton motive force. Rhodopsins are the most abundant phototrophic proteins in oceanic surface waters and are key constituents in marine bacterial ecology. However, it remains unclear how rhodopsins are used in most microorganisms. Despite their abundance in marine and fresh-water systems, the presence of functional rhodopsin systems in edaphic habitats has never been reported. Here, we show the presence of several new putative H(+) , Na(+) and Cl(+) pumping rhodopsins identified by metagenomic analysis of Antarctic desert hypolithic communities. Reconstruction of two Proteobacteria genomes harboring xanthorhodopsin-like proteins and one Bacteroidetes genome with a Na-pumping-like rhodopsin indicated that these bacteria were aerobic heterotrophs possessing the apparent capacity for the functional expression of rhodopsins. The existence of these protein systems in hypolithic bacteria expands the known role of rhodopsins to include terrestrial environments and suggests a possible predominant function as heterotrophic energy supply proteins, a feasible microbial adaptation to the harsh conditions prevalent in Antarctic edaphic systems. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Optogenetic Vision Restoration Using Rhodopsin for Enhanced Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gaub, Benjamin M; Berry, Michael H; Holt, Amy E; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Flannery, John G

    2015-01-01

    Retinal disease is one of the most active areas of gene therapy, with clinical trials ongoing in the United States for five diseases. There are currently no treatments for patients with late-stage disease in which photoreceptors have been lost. Optogenetic gene therapies are in development, but, to date, have suffered from the low light sensitivity of microbial opsins, such as channelrhodopsin and halorhodopsin, and azobenzene-based photoswitches. Several groups have shown that photoreceptive G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be expressed heterologously, and photoactivate endogenous Gi/o signaling. We hypothesized such a GPCR could increase sensitivity due to endogenous signal amplification. We targeted vertebrate rhodopsin to retinal ON-bipolar cells of blind rd1 mice and observed restoration of: (i) light responses in retinal explants, (ii) visually-evoked potentials in visual cortex in vivo, and (iii) two forms of visually-guided behavior: innate light avoidance and discrimination of temporal light patterns in the context of fear conditioning. Importantly, both the light responses of the retinal explants and the visually-guided behavior occurred reliably at light levels that were two to three orders of magnitude dimmer than required for channelrhodopsin. Thus, gene therapy with native light-gated GPCRs presents a novel approach to impart light sensitivity for visual restoration in a useful range of illumination. PMID:26137852

  6. Microbial rhodopsins: wide distribution, rich diversity and great potential

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Marie; Sudo, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    One of the major topics in biophysics and physicobiology is to understand and utilize biological functions using various advanced techniques. Taking advantage of the photoreactivity of the seven-transmembrane rhodopsin protein family has been actively investigated by a variety of methods. Rhodopsins serve as models for membrane-embedded proteins, for photoactive proteins and as a fundamental tool for optogenetics, a new technology to control biological activity with light. In this review, we summarize progress of microbial rhodopsin research from the viewpoint of distribution, diversity and potential. PMID:27493861

  7. Recent Advances in Engineering Microbial Rhodopsins for Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2015-01-01

    Protein engineering of microbial rhodopsins has been successful in generating variants with improved properties for applications in optogenetics. Members of this membrane protein family can act as both actuators and sensors of neuronal activity. Chimeragenesis, structure-guided mutagenesis, and directed evolution have proven effective strategies for tuning absorption wavelength, altering ion specificity and increasing fluorescence. These approaches facilitate the development of useful optogenetic tools and, in some cases, have yielded insights into rhodopsin structure-function relationships. PMID:26038227

  8. Microbial rhodopsins on leaf surfaces of terrestrial plants

    PubMed Central

    Atamna-Ismaeel, Nof; Finkel, Omri M.; Glaser, Fabian; Sharon, Itai; Schneider, Ron; Post, Anton F.; Spudich, John L.; von Mering, Christian; Vorholt, Julia A.; Iluz, David; Béjà, Oded; Belkin, Shimshon

    2013-01-01

    Summary The above-ground surfaces of terrestrial plants, the phyllosphere, comprise the main interface between the terrestrial biosphere and solar radiation. It is estimated to host up to 1026 microbial cells that may intercept part of the photon flux impinging on the leaves. Based on 454-pyrosequencing-generated metagenome data, we report on the existence of diverse microbial rhodopsins in five distinct phyllospheres from tamarisk (Tamarix nilotica), soybean (Glycine max), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), clover (Trifolium repens) and rice (Oryza sativa). Our findings, for the first time describing microbial rhodopsins from non-aquatic habitats, point towards the potential coexistence of microbial rhodopsin-based phototrophy and plant chlorophyll-based photosynthesis, with the different pigments absorbing non-overlapping fractions of the light spectrum. PMID:21883799

  9. Recent advances in engineering microbial rhodopsins for optogenetics.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, R Scott; Bedbrook, Claire N; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-08-01

    Protein engineering of microbial rhodopsins has been successful in generating variants with improved properties for applications in optogenetics. Members of this membrane protein family can act as both actuators and sensors of neuronal activity. Chimeragenesis, structure-guided mutagenesis, and directed evolution have proven effective strategies for tuning absorption wavelength, altering ion specificity and increasing fluorescence. These approaches facilitate the development of useful optogenetic tools and, in some cases, have yielded insights into rhodopsin structure-function relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasensitive measurements of microbial rhodopsin photocycles using photochromic FRET.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Halil; Fields, Alexander P; Kralj, Joel M; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J; Cohen, Adam E

    2012-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are an important class of light-activated transmembrane proteins whose function is typically studied on bulk samples. Herein, we apply photochromic fluorescence resonance energy transfer to investigate the dynamics of these proteins with sensitivity approaching the single-molecule limit. The brightness of a covalently linked organic fluorophore is modulated by changes in the absorption spectrum of the endogenous retinal chromophore that occur as the molecule undergoes a light-activated photocycle. We studied the photocycles of blue-absorbing proteorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin II (SRII). Clusters of 2-3 molecules of SRII clearly showed a light-induced photocycle. Single molecules of SRII showed a photocycle upon signal averaging over several illumination cycles. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Comparative evaluation of the stability of seven-transmembrane microbial rhodopsins to various physicochemical stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Naoya; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Sudo, Yuki

    2017-08-01

    Rhodopsins are seven-transmembrane proteins that function as photoreceptors for a variety of biological processes. Their characteristic visible colors make rhodopsins a good model for membrane-embedded proteins. In this study, by utilizing their color changes, we performed comparative studies on the stability of five microbial rhodopsins using the same instruments, procedures and media. As denaturants, we employed four physicochemical stimuli: (i) thermal perturbation, (ii) the water-soluble reagent hydroxylamine, (iii) the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate, and (iv) the organic solvent ethanol. On the basis of the results, models for stabilization mechanisms in rhodopsins against each stimulus is proposed.

  12. MicRhoDE: a curated database for the analysis of microbial rhodopsin diversity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Boeuf, Dominique; Audic, Stéphane; Brillet-Guéguen, Loraine; Caron, Christophe; Jeanthon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photoactive transmembrane proteins found in all three domains of life and in viruses. Today, microbial rhodopsin research is a flourishing research field in which new understandings of rhodopsin diversity, function and evolution are contributing to broader microbiological and molecular knowledge. Here, we describe MicRhoDE, a comprehensive, high-quality and freely accessible database that facilitates analysis of the diversity and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Rhodopsin sequences isolated from a vast array of marine and terrestrial environments were manually collected and curated. To each rhodopsin sequence are associated related metadata, including predicted spectral tuning of the protein, putative activity and function, taxonomy for sequences that can be linked to a 16S rRNA gene, sampling date and location, and supporting literature. The database currently covers 7857 aligned sequences from more than 450 environmental samples or organisms. Based on a robust phylogenetic analysis, we introduce an operational classification system with multiple phylogenetic levels ranging from superclusters to species-level operational taxonomic units. An integrated pipeline for online sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction is also provided. With a user-friendly interface and integrated online bioinformatics tools, this unique resource should be highly valuable for upcoming studies of the biogeography, diversity, distribution and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Database URL: http://micrhode.sb-roscoff.fr. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Enlightening the life sciences: the history of halobacterial and microbial rhodopsin research.

    PubMed

    Grote, Mathias; O'Malley, Maureen A

    2011-11-01

    The history of research on microbial rhodopsins offers a novel perspective on the history of the molecular life sciences. Events in this history play important roles in the development of fields such as general microbiology, membrane research, bioenergetics, metagenomics and, very recently, neurobiology. New concepts, techniques, methods and fields have arisen as a result of microbial rhodopsin investigations. In addition, the history of microbial rhodopsins sheds light on the dynamic connections between basic and applied science, and hypothesis-driven and data-driven approaches. The story begins with the late nineteenth century discovery of microorganisms on salted fish and leads into ecological and taxonomical studies of halobacteria in hypersaline environments. These programmes were built on by the discovery of bacteriorhodopsin in organisms that are part of what is now known as the archaeal genus Halobacterium. The transfer of techniques from bacteriorhodopsin studies to the metagenomic discovery of proteorhodopsin in 2000 further extended the field. Microbial rhodopsins have also been used as model systems to understand membrane protein structure and function, and they have become the target of technological applications such as optogenetics and nanotechnology. Analysing the connections between these historical episodes provides a rich example of how science works over longer time periods, especially with regard to the transfer of materials, methods and concepts between different research fields.

  14. Of ion pumps, sensors and channels - perspectives on microbial rhodopsins between science and history.

    PubMed

    Grote, Mathias; Engelhard, Martin; Hegemann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We present a historical overview of research on microbial rhodopsins ranging from the 1960s to the present date. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR), the first identified microbial rhodopsin, was discovered in the context of cell and membrane biology and shown to be an outward directed proton transporter. In the 1970s, BR had a big impact on membrane structural research and bioenergetics, that made it to a model for membrane proteins and established it as a probe for the introduction of various biophysical techniques that are widely used today. Halorhodopsin (HR), which supports BR physiologically by transporting negatively charged Cl⁻ into the cell, is researched within the microbial rhodopsin community since the late 1970s. A few years earlier, the observation of phototactic responses in halobacteria initiated research on what are known today as sensory rhodopsins (SR). The discovery of the light-driven ion channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR), serving as photoreceptors for behavioral responses in green alga has complemented inquiries into this photoreceptor family. Comparing the discovery stories, we show that these followed quite different patterns, albeit the objects of research being very similar. The stories of microbial rhodopsins present a comprehensive perspective on what can nowadays be considered one of nature's paradigms for interactions between organisms and light. Moreover, they illustrate the unfolding of this paradigm within the broader conceptual and instrumental framework of the molecular life sciences. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of Long-Wavelength Sensitivity of Optogenetic Microbial Rhodopsins by 3,4-Dehydroretinal†

    PubMed Central

    Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Govorunova, Elena G.; Wang, Jihong; Spudich, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Electrogenic microbial rhodopsins (ion pumps and channelrhodopsins) are widely used to control activity of neurons and other cells by light (optogenetics). Long-wavelength absorption by optogenetic tools is desirable to increase the penetration depth of the stimulus light by minimizing tissue scattering and absorption by hemoglobin. A2 retinal (3,4-dehydroretinal) is a natural retinoid that serves as the chromophore in red-shifted visual pigments of several lower aquatic animals. Here we show that A2 retinal reconstitutes a fully functional archaerhodopsin-3 (AR-3) proton pump and four channelrhodopsin variants (CrChR1, CrChR2, CaChR1 and MvChR1). Substitution of A1 by A2 retinal significantly shifted the spectral sensitivity of all tested rhodopsins to longer wavelengths without altering other aspects of their function. The spectral shift upon substitution of A1 by A2 in AR-3 was close to that measured in other archaeal rhodopsins. Notably, the shifts in channelrhodopsins were larger than those measured in archaeal rhodopsins and close to those in animal visual pigments with similar absorption maxima of their A1-bound forms. Our results show that chromophore substitution provides a complementary strategy to improve the efficiency of optogenetic tools. PMID:22577956

  16. Microbial and viral-like rhodopsins present in coastal marine sediments from four polar and subpolar regions

    SciTech Connect

    López, José L.; Golemba, Marcelo; Hernández, Edgardo; Lozada, Mariana; Dionisi, Hebe; Jansson, Janet K.; Carroll, Jolynn; Lundgren, Leif; Sjöling, Sara; Mac Cormack, Walter P.; Sobecky, Patricia

    2016-11-03

    Rhodopsins are broadly distributed. In this work, we analyzed 23 metagenomes corresponding to marine sediment samples from four regions that share cold climate conditions (Norway; Sweden; Argentina and Antarctica). In order to investigate the genes evolution of viral rhodopsins, an initial set of 6224 bacterial rhodopsin sequences according to COG5524 were retrieved from the 23 metagenomes. After selection by the presence of transmembrane domains and alignment, 123 viral (51) and non-viral (72) sequences (>50 amino acids) were finally included in further analysis. Viral rhodopsin genes were homologs of Phaeocystis globosa virus and Organic lake Phycodnavirus. Non-viral microbial rhodopsin genes were ascribed to Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus and Cryptophyta and Fungi. A rescreening using Blastp, using as queries the viral sequences previously described, retrieved 30 sequences (>100 amino acids). Phylogeographic analysis revealed a geographical clustering of the sequences affiliated to the viral group. This clustering was not observed for the microbial non-viral sequences. The phylogenetic reconstruction allowed us to propose the existence of a putative ancestor of viral rhodopsin genes related to Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi. This is the first report about the existence of a phylogeographic association of the viral rhodopsin sequences from marine sediments.

  17. Cation-Specific Conformations in a Dual-Function Ion-Pumping Microbial Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Giordano F Z; Goblirsch, Brandon R; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Spudich, John L

    2015-06-30

    A recently discovered rhodopsin ion pump (DeNaR, also known as KR2) in the marine bacterium Dokdonia eikasta uses light to pump protons or sodium ions from the cell depending on the ionic composition of the medium. In cells suspended in a KCl solution, DeNaR functions as a light-driven proton pump, whereas in a NaCl solution, DeNaR conducts light-driven sodium ion pumping, a novel activity within the rhodopsin family. These two distinct functions raise the questions of whether the conformations of the protein differ in the presence of K(+) or Na(+) and whether the helical movements that result in the canonical E → C conformational change in other microbial rhodopsins are conserved in DeNaR. Visible absorption maxima of DeNaR in its unphotolyzed (dark) state show an 8 nm difference between Na(+) and K(+) in decyl maltopyranoside micelles, indicating an influence of the cations on the retinylidene photoactive site. In addition, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the dark states reveal repositioning of helices F and G when K(+) is replaced with Na(+). Furthermore, the conformational changes assessed by EPR spin-spin dipolar coupling show that the light-induced transmembrane helix movements are very similar to those found in bacteriorhodopsin but are altered by the presence of Na(+), resulting in a new feature, the clockwise rotation of helix F. The results establish the first observation of a cation switch controlling the conformations of a microbial rhodopsin and indicate specific interactions of Na(+) with the half-channels of DeNaR to open an appropriate path for ion translocation.

  18. Microbial and viral-like rhodopsins present in coastal marine sediments from four polar and subpolar regions.

    PubMed

    López, J L; Golemba, M; Hernández, E; Lozada, M; Dionisi, H M; Jansson, J; Carroll, J; Lundgren, L; Sjöling, S; Cormack, W P Mac

    2016-11-03

    Rhodopsins are broadly distributed. In this work we analyzed 23 metagenomes corresponding to marine sediment samples from four regions which share cold climate conditions (Norway; Sweden; Argentina and Antarctica). In order to investigate the genes evolution of viral-rodopsins, an initial set of 6224 bacterial rhodopsins sequences according COG5524 were retrieved from the 23 metagenomes. After selection by the presence of transmembrane domains and alignment 123 viral (51) and non-viral (72) sequences (>50 aminoacids) were finally included in further analysis. Viral rhodopsin genes were homologues of Phaeocystis globosa virus and Organic lake Phycodnavirus Non-viral microbial rhodopsin genes were ascribed to Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus as well as Cryptophyta and Fungi. A re-screening using Blastp, using as queries the viral sequences previously described, retrieved 30 sequences (>100 aminoacids). Phylogeographic analysis revealed a geographycal clustering of the sequences affiliated to the viral group. This clustering was not observed for the microbial non-viral sequences. The phylogenetic reconstruction allowed us to propose the existence of a putative ancestor of viral rhodopsins (PAVR) genes related to Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi This is the first report about the existence of a phylogeographic association of the viral rhodopsins sequences from marine sediments.

  19. Coexistence of light-driven Na(+) and H(+) transport in a microbial rhodopsin from Nonlabens dokdonensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshen; Ma, Baofu; Ji, Liangliang; Li, Longjie; Wang, Huanhuan; Chen, Deliang

    2017-07-01

    Ion pumping microbial rhodopsins are photochemically active membrane proteins, converting light energy into ion-motive-force for ATP synthesis. Nonlabens dokdonensis rhodopsin 2 (NdR2), was recently identified as a light-driven Na(+) pump. However, few functional studies on NdR2 have been conducted to elucidate its mechanism of ion transport. By reconstituting NdR2 into liposomes, we proved that NdR2 functions as a light-driven Na(+)/H(+) pump. As Na(+) concentration increased, the dominant H(+) pump activity switched to the Na(+) pump activity at neutral pH. The inversion of pH change by the addition of CCCP at low Na(+) further suggested that the transport of Na(+) and H(+) should coexist in NdR2. By increasing H(+) concentration, the affinity for Na(+) lowered, which was indicated by an increase in KM from ~31mM at pH ~7.5, to ~74mM at pH ~6.5. These results demonstrated that Na(+) transport competed with H(+) transport in NdR2, which was confirmed by the dominant H(+) pump activity at pH ~5.7. Kinetic experiments using pyranine uncovered a transient H(+) uptake, followed by an H(+) release at the millisecond time scale in both Na(+) and K(+) solutions. Therefore, these NdR2 results may provide functional and kinetic insights into the ion transport mechanism in light-driven Na(+) pumps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photochromicity of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin, an atypical microbial receptor with a cis-retinal light-adapted form.

    PubMed

    Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Trivedi, Vishwa D; Sasaki, Jun; Spudich, John L

    2005-04-15

    We characterize changes in isomeric states of the retinylidene chromophore during light-dark adaptation and photochemical reactions of Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. PCC7120 sensory rhodopsin (ASR). The results show that ASR represents a new type of microbial rhodopsin with a number of unusual characteristics. The three most striking are: (i) a primarily all-trans configuration of retinal in the dark-adapted state and (ii) a primarily 13-cis light-adapted state with a blue-shifted and lower extinction absorption spectrum, opposite of the case of bacteriorhodopsin; and (iii) efficient reversible light-induced interconversion between the 13-cis and all-trans unphotolyzed states of the pigment. The relative amount of ASR with cis and trans chromophore forms depends on the wavelength of illumination, providing a mechanism for single-pigment color sensing analogous to that of phytochrome pigments. In addition ASR exhibits unusually slow formation of L-like and M-like intermediates, with a dominant accumulation of M during the photocycle. Co-expression of ASR with its putative cytoplasmic transducer protein shifts the absorption maximum and strongly decreases the rate of dark adaptation of ASR, confirming interaction between the two proteins. Thus ASR, the first non-haloarchaeal sensory rhodopsin characterized, demonstrates the diversity of photochemistry of microbial rhodopsins. Its photochromic properties and the position of its two ground state absorption maxima suggest it as a candidate for controlling differential photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment synthesis (chromatic adaptation) or other color-sensitive physiological responses in Anabaena cells.

  1. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  2. NEUROSCIENCE. Natural light-gated anion channels: A family of microbial rhodopsins for advanced optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Janz, Roger; Liu, Xiaoqin; Spudich, John L

    2015-08-07

    Light-gated rhodopsin cation channels from chlorophyte algae have transformed neuroscience research through their use as membrane-depolarizing optogenetic tools for targeted photoactivation of neuron firing. Photosuppression of neuronal action potentials has been limited by the lack of equally efficient tools for membrane hyperpolarization. We describe anion channel rhodopsins (ACRs), a family of light-gated anion channels from cryptophyte algae that provide highly sensitive and efficient membrane hyperpolarization and neuronal silencing through light-gated chloride conduction. ACRs strictly conducted anions, completely excluding protons and larger cations, and hyperpolarized the membrane of cultured animal cells with much faster kinetics at less than one-thousandth of the light intensity required by the most efficient currently available optogenetic proteins. Natural ACRs provide optogenetic inhibition tools with unprecedented light sensitivity and temporal precision.

  3. Restoration of visual function in P23H rhodopsin transgenic rats by gene delivery of BiP/Grp78.

    PubMed

    Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Knox, Tessa; LaVail, Matthew M; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Noorwez, Syed M; Hauswirth, William W; Lin, Jonathan H; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Lewin, Alfred S

    2010-03-30

    The P23H mutation within the rhodopsin gene (RHO) causes rhodopsin misfolding, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), leading to rod photoreceptor degeneration and autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Grp78/BiP is an ER-localized chaperone that is induced by UPR signaling in response to ER stress. We have previously demonstrated that BiP mRNA levels are selectively reduced in animal models of ADRP arising from P23H rhodopsin expression at ages that precede photoreceptor degeneration. We have now overexpressed BiP to test the hypothesis that this chaperone promotes the trafficking of P23H rhodopsin to the cell membrane, reprograms the UPR favoring the survival of photoreceptors, blocks apoptosis, and, ultimately, preserves vision in ADRP rats. In cell culture, increasing levels of BiP had no impact on the localization of P23H rhodopsin. However, BiP overexpression alleviated ER stress by reducing levels of cleaved pATF6 protein, phosphorylated eIF2alpha and the proapoptotic protein CHOP. In P23H rats, photoreceptor levels of cleaved ATF6, pEIF2alpha, CHOP, and caspase-7 were much higher than those of wild-type rats. Subretinal delivery of AAV5 expressing BiP to transgenic rats led to reduction in CHOP and photoreceptor apoptosis and to a sustained increase in electroretinogram amplitudes. We detected complexes between BiP, caspase-12, and the BH3-only protein BiK that may contribute to the antiapoptotic activity of BiP. Thus, the preservation of photoreceptor function resulting from elevated levels of BiP is due to suppression of apoptosis rather than to a promotion of rhodopsin folding.

  4. Microbial Rhodopsin Optogenetic Tools: Application for Analyses of Synaptic Transmission and of Neuronal Network Activity in Behavior.

    PubMed

    Glock, Caspar; Nagpal, Jatin; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics was introduced as a new technology in the neurosciences about a decade ago (Zemelman et al., Neuron 33:15-22, 2002; Boyden et al., Nat Neurosci 8:1263-1268, 2005; Nagel et al., Curr Biol 15:2279-2284, 2005; Zemelman et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100:1352-1357, 2003). It combines optics, genetics, and bioengineering to render neurons sensitive to light, in order to achieve a precise, exogenous, and noninvasive control of membrane potential, intracellular signaling, network activity, or behavior (Rein and Deussing, Mol Genet Genomics 287:95-109, 2012; Yizhar et al., Neuron 71:9-34, 2011). As C. elegans is transparent, genetically amenable, has a small nervous system mapped with synapse resolution, and exhibits a rich behavioral repertoire, it is especially open to optogenetic methods (White et al., Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 314:1-340, 1986; De Bono et al., Optogenetic actuation, inhibition, modulation and readout for neuronal networks generating behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, In: Hegemann P, Sigrist SJ (eds) Optogenetics, De Gruyter, Berlin, 2013; Husson et al., Biol Cell 105:235-250, 2013; Xu and Kim, Nat Rev Genet 12:793-801, 2011). Optogenetics, by now an "exploding" field, comprises a repertoire of different tools ranging from transgenically expressed photo-sensor proteins (Boyden et al., Nat Neurosci 8:1263-1268, 2005; Nagel et al., Curr Biol 15:2279-2284, 2005) or cascades (Zemelman et al., Neuron 33:15-22, 2002) to chemical biology approaches, using photochromic ligands of endogenous channels (Szobota et al., Neuron 54:535-545, 2007). Here, we will focus only on optogenetics utilizing microbial rhodopsins, as these are most easily and most widely applied in C. elegans. For other optogenetic tools, for example the photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs, that drive neuronal activity by increasing synaptic vesicle priming, thus exaggerating rather than overriding the intrinsic activity of a neuron, as occurs with

  5. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Theroux, Susanna; Hartman, Wyatt; He, Shaomei; Tringe, Susannah

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  6. Microbial biotechnology as a tool to restore degraded drylands.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Fernando T; Solé, Ricard; Singh, Brajesh K

    2017-09-01

    We briefly review how microbial biotechnology can contribute to improve activities aiming to restore degraded drylands and to combat their desertification, which are an integral part of the Sustainable Development Goal 15 of the 2030 Agenda. Microbial biotechnology offers notable promise to improve restoration actions based on the use of biocrust-forming engineered cyanobacteria, which play key roles in maintaining ecosystem structure and functioning in drylands worldwide. Advances in our understanding of microbiome associated to biocrusts and of the signalling involved in the communication among their constituents can also potentially enhance the outcome of restoration activities in drylands. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Dead Sea rhodopsins revisited.

    PubMed

    Bodaker, Idan; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique hypersaline ecosystem with near toxic magnesium levels (∼2 M), dominance of divalent cations and a slightly acidic pH. Previously, we reported a haloarchaeon related to Halobacterium salinarum to dominate in a microbial bloom that developed in 1992 in the upper water layers of the lake following massive freshwater runoff. Whether this clade also dominated an earlier bloom in 1980-1982 cannot be ascertained as no samples for cultivation-independent analysis were preserved. The presence of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin was reported in the 1980-1982 bloom of prokaryotes that had developed in the Dead Sea. To test the hypothesis that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping may play a major role in determining what type of haloarchaea may dominate in specific bloom conditions, we compared rhodopsin genes recovered from Dead Sea biomass collected in different periods with genes coding for retinal proteins in isolated haloarchaea. Novel bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin genes were found in samples collected in 2007 and 2010. The fact that no rhodopsin genes were recovered from samples collected during the 1992 bloom, which was dominated by a single species, suggests that different clades were present in the 1980-1982 and 1992 blooms, and that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping did not necessarily play a determinative role in the dominance of specific halophiles in the blooms.

  8. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-04-29

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0-30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0-20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30-60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0-20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings.

  9. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0-30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0-20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30-60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0-20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings.

  10. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0–30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0–20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30–60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0–20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings. PMID:27126064

  11. Development of soil microbial communities during tallgrass prairie restoration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil microbial communities were examined in a chronosequence of four different land-use treatments at the Konza Prairie Biological Station, Kansas. The time series comprised a conventionally tilled cropland (CTC) developed on former prairie soils, two restored grasslands that were initiated on forme...

  12. Vision Science: Can Rhodopsin Cure Blindness?

    PubMed

    Van Gelder, Russell N; Kaur, Kuldeep

    2015-08-17

    Outer retinal degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. A new study now demonstrates that ectopic expression of human rhodopsin in the inner retina, mediated by viral gene therapy, can restore light sensitivity and some vision to mice blind from outer retinal degeneration.

  13. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6) with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7). Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins. PMID:27651995

  14. Soil microbial community structure and functionality during grassland restoration in the Texas High Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil microbial communities are an indispensable part of restoration programs due to their significant role in ecosystem functioning and sensitivity to disturbance. We evaluated soil microbial community structure using ester-linked fatty acid (EL-FAME) profiling and metabolic functioning, by measurin...

  15. Response of soil microbial community composition and function to a bottomland forest restoration intensity gradient

    Treesearch

    Michael S. Strickland; Mac A. Callaham; Emile S. Gardiner; John A. Stanturf; Jonathan W. Leff; Noah Fierer; Mark A. Bradford

    2017-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are globally under threat of loss or degradation. To compensate for the impacts incurred by loss and/or degradation, efforts to restore ecosystems are being undertaken. These efforts often focus on restoring the aboveground plant community with the expectation that the belowground microbial community will follow suit. This ‘Field of Dreams’...

  16. Transition of soil microbial communities in a tallgrass prairie restoration chronosequence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extensive agriculture since the 1830’s has led to a 82-99% decline of the tallgrass prairie ecosystem in North America. Restoration of these prairies is of great interest. Objectives were to: (1) investigate the change in soil microbial communities during grassland restoration and (2) study the in...

  17. Effect of Rhodopsin Phosphorylation on Dark Adaptation in Mouse Rods.

    PubMed

    Berry, Justin; Frederiksen, Rikard; Yao, Yun; Nymark, Soile; Chen, Jeannie; Cornwall, Carter

    2016-06-29

    Rhodopsin is a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated when its 11-cis-retinal moiety is photoisomerized to all-trans retinal. This step initiates a cascade of reactions by which rods signal changes in light intensity. Like other GPCRs, rhodopsin is deactivated through receptor phosphorylation and arrestin binding. Full recovery of receptor sensitivity is then achieved when rhodopsin is regenerated through a series of steps that return the receptor to its ground state. Here, we show that dephosphorylation of the opsin moiety of rhodopsin is an extremely slow but requisite step in the restoration of the visual pigment to its ground state. We make use of a novel observation: isolated mouse retinae kept in standard media for routine physiologic recordings display blunted dephosphorylation of rhodopsin. Isoelectric focusing followed by Western blot analysis of bleached isolated retinae showed little dephosphorylation of rhodopsin for up to 4 h in darkness, even under conditions when rhodopsin was completely regenerated. Microspectrophotometeric determinations of rhodopsin spectra show that regenerated phospho-rhodopsin has the same molecular photosensitivity as unphosphorylated rhodopsin and that flash responses measured by trans-retinal electroretinogram or single-cell suction electrode recording displayed dark-adapted kinetics. Single quantal responses displayed normal dark-adapted kinetics, but rods were only half as sensitive as those containing exclusively unphosphorylated rhodopsin. We propose a model in which light-exposed retinae contain a mixed population of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated rhodopsin. Moreover, complete dark adaptation can only occur when all rhodopsin has been dephosphorylated, a process that requires >3 h in complete darkness. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest superfamily of proteins that compose ∼4% of the mammalian genome whose members share a common membrane topology. Signaling by

  18. Effect of Rhodopsin Phosphorylation on Dark Adaptation in Mouse Rods

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Justin; Frederiksen, Rikard; Yao, Yun; Nymark, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated when its 11-cis-retinal moiety is photoisomerized to all-trans retinal. This step initiates a cascade of reactions by which rods signal changes in light intensity. Like other GPCRs, rhodopsin is deactivated through receptor phosphorylation and arrestin binding. Full recovery of receptor sensitivity is then achieved when rhodopsin is regenerated through a series of steps that return the receptor to its ground state. Here, we show that dephosphorylation of the opsin moiety of rhodopsin is an extremely slow but requisite step in the restoration of the visual pigment to its ground state. We make use of a novel observation: isolated mouse retinae kept in standard media for routine physiologic recordings display blunted dephosphorylation of rhodopsin. Isoelectric focusing followed by Western blot analysis of bleached isolated retinae showed little dephosphorylation of rhodopsin for up to 4 h in darkness, even under conditions when rhodopsin was completely regenerated. Microspectrophotometeric determinations of rhodopsin spectra show that regenerated phospho-rhodopsin has the same molecular photosensitivity as unphosphorylated rhodopsin and that flash responses measured by trans-retinal electroretinogram or single-cell suction electrode recording displayed dark-adapted kinetics. Single quantal responses displayed normal dark-adapted kinetics, but rods were only half as sensitive as those containing exclusively unphosphorylated rhodopsin. We propose a model in which light-exposed retinae contain a mixed population of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated rhodopsin. Moreover, complete dark adaptation can only occur when all rhodopsin has been dephosphorylated, a process that requires >3 h in complete darkness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest superfamily of proteins that compose ∼4% of the mammalian genome whose members share a common membrane

  19. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.; He, S.

    2013-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of below-ground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  20. Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Ion-Pumping Rhodopsins: Genetic Diversity, Physiology, and Ecology.

    PubMed

    Pinhassi, Jarone; DeLong, Edward F; Béjà, Oded; González, José M; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The recognition of a new family of rhodopsins in marine planktonic bacteria, proton-pumping proteorhodopsin, expanded the known phylogenetic range, environmental distribution, and sequence diversity of retinylidene photoproteins. At the time of this discovery, microbial ion-pumping rhodopsins were known solely in haloarchaea inhabiting extreme hypersaline environments. Shortly thereafter, proteorhodopsins and other light-activated energy-generating rhodopsins were recognized to be widespread among marine bacteria. The ubiquity of marine rhodopsin photosystems now challenges prior understanding of the nature and contributions of "heterotrophic" bacteria to biogeochemical carbon cycling and energy fluxes. Subsequent investigations have focused on the biophysics and biochemistry of these novel microbial rhodopsins, their distribution across the tree of life, evolutionary trajectories, and functional expression in nature. Later discoveries included the identification of proteorhodopsin genes in all three domains of life, the spectral tuning of rhodopsin variants to wavelengths prevailing in the sea, variable light-activated ion-pumping specificities among bacterial rhodopsin variants, and the widespread lateral gene transfer of biosynthetic genes for bacterial rhodopsins and their associated photopigments. Heterologous expression experiments with marine rhodopsin genes (and associated retinal chromophore genes) provided early evidence that light energy harvested by rhodopsins could be harnessed to provide biochemical energy. Importantly, some studies with native marine bacteria show that rhodopsin-containing bacteria use light to enhance growth or promote survival during starvation. We infer from the distribution of rhodopsin genes in diverse genomic contexts that different marine bacteria probably use rhodopsins to support light-dependent fitness strategies somewhere between these two extremes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Ion-Pumping Rhodopsins: Genetic Diversity, Physiology, and Ecology

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Edward F.; Béjà, Oded; González, José M.; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The recognition of a new family of rhodopsins in marine planktonic bacteria, proton-pumping proteorhodopsin, expanded the known phylogenetic range, environmental distribution, and sequence diversity of retinylidene photoproteins. At the time of this discovery, microbial ion-pumping rhodopsins were known solely in haloarchaea inhabiting extreme hypersaline environments. Shortly thereafter, proteorhodopsins and other light-activated energy-generating rhodopsins were recognized to be widespread among marine bacteria. The ubiquity of marine rhodopsin photosystems now challenges prior understanding of the nature and contributions of “heterotrophic” bacteria to biogeochemical carbon cycling and energy fluxes. Subsequent investigations have focused on the biophysics and biochemistry of these novel microbial rhodopsins, their distribution across the tree of life, evolutionary trajectories, and functional expression in nature. Later discoveries included the identification of proteorhodopsin genes in all three domains of life, the spectral tuning of rhodopsin variants to wavelengths prevailing in the sea, variable light-activated ion-pumping specificities among bacterial rhodopsin variants, and the widespread lateral gene transfer of biosynthetic genes for bacterial rhodopsins and their associated photopigments. Heterologous expression experiments with marine rhodopsin genes (and associated retinal chromophore genes) provided early evidence that light energy harvested by rhodopsins could be harnessed to provide biochemical energy. Importantly, some studies with native marine bacteria show that rhodopsin-containing bacteria use light to enhance growth or promote survival during starvation. We infer from the distribution of rhodopsin genes in diverse genomic contexts that different marine bacteria probably use rhodopsins to support light-dependent fitness strategies somewhere between these two extremes. PMID:27630250

  2. Binding of rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues to transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Nelson A; Sanz-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Bubis, José

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction of reconstituted rhodopsin, 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin and 13-cis-retinal-rhodopsin with transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1. METHODS: Rod outer segments (ROS) were isolated from bovine retinas. Following bleaching of ROS membranes with hydroxylamine, rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues were generated with the different retinal isomers and the concentration of the reconstituted pigments was calculated from their UV/visible absorption spectra. Transducin and arrestin-1 were purified to homogeneity by column chromatography, and an enriched-fraction of rhodopsin kinase was obtained by extracting freshly prepared ROS in the dark. The guanine nucleotide binding activity of transducin was determined by Millipore filtration using β,γ-imido-(3H)-guanosine 5’-triphosphate. Recognition of the reconstituted pigments by rhodopsin kinase was determined by autoradiography following incubation of ROS membranes containing the various regenerated pigments with partially purified rhodopsin kinase in the presence of (γ-32P) ATP. Binding of arrestin-1 to the various pigments in ROS membranes was determined by a sedimentation assay analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: Reconstituted rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal rendered an absorption spectrum showing a maximum peak at 498 nm, 486 nm and about 467 nm, respectively, in the dark; which was shifted to 380 nm, 404 nm and about 425 nm, respectively, after illumination. The percentage of reconstitution of rhodopsin and the rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal was estimated to be 88%, 81% and 24%, respectively. Although only residual activation of transducin was observed in the dark when reconstituted rhodopsin and 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin was used, the rhodopsin analogue containing the 13-cis isomer of retinal was capable of activating transducin independently of light. Moreover

  3. MICROBIAL POPULATION ANALYSIS AS A MEASURE OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a controlled oil spill study in a freshwater wetland, four methods were used to track changes in microbial populations in response to in situ remediation treatments, including nutrient amendments and the removal of surface vegetation. Most probable number (MPN) esimates o...

  4. MICROBIAL POPULATION ANALYSIS AS A MEASURE OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a controlled oil spill study in a freshwater wetland, four methods were used to track changes in microbial populations in response to in situ remediation treatments, including nutrient amendments and the removal of surface vegetation. Most probable number (MPN) esimates o...

  5. Rhodopsin/Lipid Hydrophobic Matching—Rhodopsin Oligomerization and Function

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, Olivier; Teague, Walter E.; Hines, Kirk G.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition of the membrane and rhodopsin packing density strongly modulate the early steps of the visual response of photoreceptor membranes. In this study, lipid-order and bovine rhodopsin function in proteoliposomes composed of the sn-1 chain perdeuterated lipids 14:0d27-14:1-PC, 16:0d31-16:1-PC, 18:0d35-18:1-PC, or 20:0d39-20:1-PC at rhodopsin/lipid molar ratios from 1:70 to 1:1000 (mol/mol) were investigated. Clear evidence for matching of hydrophobic regions on rhodopsin transmembrane helices and hydrophobic thickness of lipid bilayers was observed from 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter measurements at low rhodopsin concentrations. Thin bilayers stretched to match the length of transmembrane helices observed as increase of sn-1 chain order, while thicker bilayers were compressed near the protein. A quantitative analysis of lipid-order parameter changes suggested that the protein adjusts its conformation to bilayer hydrophobic thickness as well, which confirmed our earlier circular-dichroism measurements. Changes in lipid order parameters upon rhodopsin incorporation vanished for bilayers with a hydrophobic thickness of 27 ± 1 Å, suggesting that this is the bilayer thickness at which rhodopsin packs in bilayers at the lowest membrane perturbation. The lipid-order parameter studies also indicated that a hydrophobic mismatch between rhodopsin and lipids triggers rhodopsin oligomerization with increasing rhodopsin concentrations. Both hydrophobic mismatch and rhodopsin oligomerization result in substantial shifts of the equilibrium between the photointermediates metarhodopsin I and metarhodopsin II; increasing bilayer thickness favors formation of metarhodopsin II while oligomerization favors metarhodopsin I. The results highlight the importance of hydrophobic matching for rhodopsin structure, oligomerization, and function. PMID:25762324

  6. Alteration of soil microbial communities and water quality in restored wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossio, D.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Scow, K.M.; Fujii, R.

    2006-01-01

    Land usage is a strong determinant of soil microbial community composition and activity, which in turn determine organic matter decomposition rates and decomposition products in soils. Microbial communities in permanently flooded wetlands, such as those created by wetland restoration on Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta islands in California, function under restricted aeration conditions that result in increasing anaerobiosis with depth. It was hypothesized that the change from agricultural management to permanently flooded wetland would alter microbial community composition, increase the amount and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds in Delta waters; and have a predominant impact on microbial communities as compared with the effects of other environmental factors including soil type and agricultural management. Based on phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, active microbial communities of the restored wetlands were changed significantly from those of the agricultural fields, and wetland microbial communities varied widely with soil depth. The relative abundance of monounsaturated fatty acids decreased with increasing soil depth in both wetland and agricultural profiles, whereas branched fatty acids were relatively more abundant at all soil depths in wetlands as compared to agricultural fields. Decomposition conditions were linked to DOC quantity and quality using fatty acid functional groups to conclude that restricted aeration conditions found in the wetlands were strongly related to production of reactive carbon compounds. But current vegetation may have had an equally important role in determining DOC quality in restored wetlands. In a larger scale analysis, that included data from wetland and agricultural sites on Delta islands and data from two previous studies from the Sacramento Valley, an aeration gradient was defined as the predominant determinant of active microbial communities across soil types and land usage. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Activity switches of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Eglof; Elgeti, Matthias; Bartl, Franz J

    2008-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the visual pigment of the rod photoreceptor cell contains as its light-sensitive cofactor 11-cis retinal, which is bound by a protonated Schiff base between its aldehyde group and the Lys296 side chain of the apoprotein. Light activation is achieved by 11-cis to all-trans isomerization and subsequent thermal relaxation into the active, G protein-binding metarhodopsin II state. Metarhodopsin II decays via two parallel pathways, which both involve hydrolysis of the Schiff base eventually to opsin and released all-trans retinal. Subsequently, rhodopsin's dark state is regenerated by a complicated retinal metabolism, termed the retinoid cycle. Unlike other retinal proteins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, this regeneration cycle cannot be short cut by light, because blue illumination of active metarhodopsin II does not lead back to the ground state but to the formation of largely inactive metarhodopsin III. In this review, mechanistic details of activating and deactivating pathways of rhodopsin, particularly concerning the roles of the retinal, are compared. Based on static and time-resolved UV/Vis and FTIR spectroscopic data, we discuss a model of the light-induced deactivation. We describe properties and photoreactions of metarhodopsin III and suggest potential roles of this intermediate for vision.

  8. Protective effect of halothane anesthesia on retinal light damage: inhibition of metabolic rhodopsin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Keller, C; Grimm, C; Wenzel, A; Hafezi, F; Remé, C

    2001-02-01

    To determine whether the volatile anesthetic halothane protects against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the rodent retina. Albino mice and rats were anesthetized with halothane and exposed to high levels of white or blue light. Nonanesthetized animals served as controls. Retinal morphology was assessed by light microscopy, and apoptosis of photoreceptor cells was verified by detection of fragmented genomic DNA and in situ staining of apoptotic nuclei (TUNEL assay). Rhodopsin regeneration after bleaching was determined by measuring rhodopsin levels in retinas of mice or rats at different time points in darkness. Halothane anesthesia reversibly inhibited metabolic rhodopsin regeneration and thus prevented rhodopsin from absorbing high numbers of photons during light exposure. Consequently, photoreceptors of mice and rats anesthetized with halothane were completely protected against degeneration induced by white light. In remarkable contrast, however, halothane anesthesia did not protect against blue-light-induced photoreceptor cell death. After the initial bleach, halothane impeded photon absorption by rhodopsin by inhibiting metabolic rhodopsin regeneration. Apparently, the rhodopsin-mediated uptake of the critical number of photons to initiate white light-induced retinal degeneration was prevented. In contrast, halothane did not protect the retina against blue light. Blue light can efficiently restore functional rhodopsin from bleaching intermediates through a process termed photoreversal of bleaching. This process does not depend on the visual cycle via the pigment epithelium but nevertheless enables rhodopsin molecules to absorb the critical number of photons required to induce retinal degeneration.

  9. Lipid-Rhodopsin Hydrophobic Mismatch Alters Rhodopsin Helical Content

    SciTech Connect

    Soubias,O.; Niu, S.; Mitchell, D.; Gawrisch, K.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of photoactivated rhodopsin to achieve the enzymatically active metarhodopsin II conformation is exquisitely sensitive to bilayer hydrophobic thickness. The sensitivity of rhodopsin to the lipid matrix has been explained by the hydrophobic matching theory, which predicts that lipid bilayers adjust elastically to the hydrophobic length of transmembrane helices. Here, we examined if bilayer thickness adjusts to the length of the protein or if the protein alters its conformation to adapt to the bilayer. Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into a series of mono-unsaturated phosphatidylcholines with 14-20 carbons per hydrocarbon chain. Changes of hydrocarbon chain length were measured by 2H NMR, and protein helical content was quantified by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and conventional circular dichroism. Experiments were conducted on dark-adapted rhodopsin, the photo-intermediates metarhodopsin I/II/III, and opsin. Changes of bilayer thickness upon rhodopsin incorporation and photoactivation were mostly absent. In contrast, the helical content of rhodopsin increased with membrane hydrophobic thickness. Helical content did not change measurably upon photoactivation. The increases of bilayer thickness and helicity of rhodopsin are accompanied by higher metarhodopsin II/metarhodopsin I ratios, faster rates of metarhodopsin II formation, an increase of tryptophan fluorescence, and higher temperatures of rhodopsin denaturation. The data suggest a surprising adaptability of this G protein-coupled membrane receptor to properties of the lipid matrix.

  10. THE MOLAR EXTINCTION OF RHODOPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George; Brown, Paul K.

    1953-01-01

    The molar extinction of rhodopsin is 40,600 cm.2 per mole equivalent of retinene; i.e., this is the extinction of a solution of rhodopsin which is produced by, or yields on bleaching, a molar solution of retinene. The molar extinctions of all-trans retinene and all-trans retinene oxime have also been determined in ethyl alcohol and aqueous digitonin solutions. On the assumption that each chromophoric group of rhodopsin is made from a single molecule of retinene, it is concluded that the primary photochemical conversion of rhodopsin to lumi-rhodopsin has a quantum efficiency of 1; though the over-all bleaching of rhodopsin in solution to retinene and opsin may have a quantum efficiency as low as one-half. On bleaching cattle rhodopsin, about two sulfhydryl groups appear for each molecule of retinene liberated. In frog rhodopsin the —SH:retinene ratio appears to be higher, 5:2 or perhaps even 3:1. Some of this sulfhydryl appears to have been engaged in binding retinene to opsin; some may have been exposed as the result of changes in opsin which accompany bleaching, comparable with protein denaturation. PMID:13109155

  11. Extractable nitrogen and microbial community structure respond to grassland restoration regardless of historical context and soil composition

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Sara Jo M.; Allen, Edith B.; Santiago, Louis S.; Crowley, David

    2015-01-01

    Grasslands have a long history of invasion by exotic annuals, which may alter microbial communities and nutrient cycling through changes in litter quality and biomass turnover rates. We compared plant community composition, soil chemical and microbial community composition, potential soil respiration and nitrogen (N) turnover rates between invaded and restored plots in inland and coastal grasslands. Restoration increased microbial biomass and fungal : bacterial (F : B) ratios, but sampling season had a greater influence on the F : B ratio than did restoration. Microbial community composition assessed by phospholipid fatty acid was altered by restoration, but also varied by season and by site. Total soil carbon (C) and N and potential soil respiration did not differ between treatments, but N mineralization decreased while extractable nitrate and nitrification and N immobilization rate increased in restored compared with unrestored sites. The differences in soil chemistry and microbial community composition between unrestored and restored sites indicate that these soils are responsive, and therefore not resistant to feedbacks caused by changes in vegetation type. The resilience, or recovery, of these soils is difficult to assess in the absence of uninvaded control grasslands. However, the rapid changes in microbial and N cycling characteristics following removal of invasives in both grassland sites suggest that the soils are resilient to invasion. The lack of change in total C and N pools may provide a buffer that promotes resilience of labile pools and microbial community structure. PMID:25555522

  12. [Dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass in the restoration process of shrub plantations in loess hilly area].

    PubMed

    Xue, Sha; Liu, Guo-Bin; Dai, Quan-Hou; Li, Xiao-Li; Wu, Rui-Jun

    2008-03-01

    By the method of spatiotemporal substitution and taking a slope farmland and a natural Platycladus orientailis L. forest as the controls, this paper studied the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass, microbial respiration, metabolic quotient (qCO2) and physicochemical properties under the Caragana korshinkii and Hippophae rhamnoides plantations with different restoration age in loess hilly area. The results showed that with the increasing restoration age of the shrubs, soil physicochemical properties improved obviously, and soil microbial biomass had a significant increase. After 7 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation, soil microbial biomass C increased apparently, compared with that in farmland, and the increments after each 5-7 years were all significant. Microbial biomass N and P had no significant increase in the first 13 years but kept relatively stable in the 20-30 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation, and were significantly higher than those in farmland but lower than those under P. orientailis plantation after 30 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation. Soil microbial respiration was enhanced with the increasing restoration age of the shrubs, with the peak in the 20-25 years restoration. After then, it decreased rapidly, and bottomed out in the 30 years restoration. qCO2 was significantly higher under P. orientailis plantation than in farmland in the early periods of shrubs restoration, and then decreased rapidly. After 30 years restoration of C. korshinkii plantation, qCO2 was lower than that in farmland but still much higher than that under P. orientailis plantation. Different shrub plantations had different effects on soil properties. H. rhamnoides with the same restoration age of C. korshinkii contributed more to the increase of soil microbial biomass and respiration. There were significant correlations between the restoration age of test shrub plantations and the microbial biomass, qCO2, and physicochemical properties of

  13. Soil Microbial Community Successional Patterns during Forest Ecosystem Restoration ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Banning, Natasha C.; Gleeson, Deirdre B.; Grigg, Andrew H.; Grant, Carl D.; Andersen, Gary L.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Murphy, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Soil microbial community characterization is increasingly being used to determine the responses of soils to stress and disturbances and to assess ecosystem sustainability. However, there is little experimental evidence to indicate that predictable patterns in microbial community structure or composition occur during secondary succession or ecosystem restoration. This study utilized a chronosequence of developing jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) forest ecosystems, rehabilitated after bauxite mining (up to 18 years old), to examine changes in soil bacterial and fungal community structures (by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis [ARISA]) and changes in specific soil bacterial phyla by 16S rRNA gene microarray analysis. This study demonstrated that mining in these ecosystems significantly altered soil bacterial and fungal community structures. The hypothesis that the soil microbial community structures would become more similar to those of the surrounding nonmined forest with rehabilitation age was broadly supported by shifts in the bacterial but not the fungal community. Microarray analysis enabled the identification of clear successional trends in the bacterial community at the phylum level and supported the finding of an increase in similarity to nonmined forest soil with rehabilitation age. Changes in soil microbial community structure were significantly related to the size of the microbial biomass as well as numerous edaphic variables (including pH and C, N, and P nutrient concentrations). These findings suggest that soil bacterial community dynamics follow a pattern in developing ecosystems that may be predictable and can be conceptualized as providing an integrated assessment of numerous edaphic variables. PMID:21724890

  14. Technical considerations for the implementation of subsurface microbial barriers for restoration of groundwater at UMTRA sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Program is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the United States. The surface remediation phase, which has primarily focused on containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, is nearing completion. Attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase. One alternative under consideration for groundwater restoration at UMTRA sites is the use of in-situ permeable reactive subsurface barriers. In this type of a system, contaminated groundwater will be allowed to flow naturally through a barrier filled with material which will remove hazardous constituents from the water by physical, chemical or microbial processes while allowing passage of the pore water. The subject of this report is a reactive barrier which would remove uranium and other contaminants of concern from groundwater by microbial action (i.e., a microbial barrier). The purpose of this report is to assess the current state of this technology and to determine issues that must be addressed in order to use this technology at UMTRA sites. The report focuses on six contaminants of concern at UMTRA sites including uranium, arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, cadmium and chromium. In the first section of this report, the fundamental chemical and biological processes that must occur in a microbial barrier to control the migration of contaminants are described. The second section contains a literature review of research which has been conducted on the use of microorganisms to immobilize heavy metals. The third section addresses areas which need further development before a microbial barrier can be implemented at an UMTRA site.

  15. Spreading Topsoil Encourages Ecological Restoration on Embankments: Soil Fertility, Microbial Activity and Vegetation Cover

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M.; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  16. Spreading topsoil encourages ecological restoration on embankments: soil fertility, microbial activity and vegetation cover.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M; Costa-Tenorio, Marga; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  17. Feedback from rhodopsin controls rhodopsin exclusion in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Vasiliauskas, Daniel; Mazzoni, Esteban O; Sprecher, Simon G; Brodetskiy, Konstantin; Johnston, Robert J; Lidder, Preetmoninder; Vogt, Nina; Celik, Arzu; Desplan, Claude

    2011-10-09

    Sensory systems with high discriminatory power use neurons that express only one of several alternative sensory receptor proteins. This exclusive receptor gene expression restricts the sensitivity spectrum of neurons and is coordinated with the choice of their synaptic targets. However, little is known about how it is maintained throughout the life of a neuron. Here we show that the green-light sensing receptor rhodopsin 6 (Rh6) acts to exclude an alternative blue-sensitive rhodopsin 5 (Rh5) from a subset of Drosophila R8 photoreceptor neurons. Loss of Rh6 leads to a gradual expansion of Rh5 expression into all R8 photoreceptors of the ageing adult retina. The Rh6 feedback signal results in repression of the rh5 promoter and can be mimicked by other Drosophila rhodopsins; it is partly dependent on activation of rhodopsin by light, and relies on G(αq) activity, but not on the subsequent steps of the phototransduction cascade. Our observations reveal a thus far unappreciated spectral plasticity of R8 photoreceptors, and identify rhodopsin feedback as an exclusion mechanism.

  18. Soil amendments improve microbial ecology parameters of "topsoil inoculum" used in post-mining restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Munoz-Rojas, Miriam; Moreira-Grez, Benjamin; Kariman, Khalil; Whiteley, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Mine operations generate substantial volumes of waste substrates, which are crushed and/or chemically treated waste rock from which ores are extracted. Establishment of rehabilitated landforms using post-mining substrates (i.e. waste rocks, tailings) that typically exhibit extreme conditions (such as high pH, nutrient deficiency, excessive salinity and metal toxicity) can be a major environmental problem and a critical issue during mine closure operations. More importantly, mine sites are located predominantly in arid or semi-arid lands where our understanding of basic ecosystem processes and microbial interactions with native plants (e.g. Eucalyptus spp., Acacia spp., Grevillea spp. in Western Australia) are limited. Despite the wide acknowledgement on the impact of microbial functional diversity on overall soil and plant health, no detailed attention has been paid to understand the role of belowground microbial functional diversity in the context of mine rehabilitation strategies. In this research, we investigated the role of nitrogen-based and microbial consortia amendments on improving the microbial ecology parameters of "topsoil inoculum" and subsequently its cascading effect on seedling establishment and plant morphology of Acacia ancistrocarpa, a legume native to the Pilbara and other regions of Western Australia and commonly used in arid zone restoration. The study was conducted under controlled environmental conditions in potted plants using topsoil retrieved from previously stockpiled material as growth media. A morphological assessment was undertaken to measure shoot length, shoot weight, root length, root area and root weight. Soil chemical properties, e.g. carbon, nitrogen and trace metals concentrations were determined Microbial activity was measured with the 1-day CO2 test, which determines soil microbial respiration rate based on the measurement of the CO2 burst produced after moistening dry soil (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2016). Bacterial and archaeal

  19. H+ -pumping rhodopsin from the marine alga Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Satoshi P; Ewers, David; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Moroni, Anna; Gradmann, Dietrich; Hegemann, Peter

    2006-08-15

    An opsin-encoding cDNA was cloned from the marine alga Acetabularia acetabulum. The cDNA was expressed in Xenopus oocytes into functional Acetabularia rhodopsin (AR) mediating H+ carried outward photocurrents of up to 1.2 microA with an action spectrum maximum at 518 nm (AR518). AR is the first ion-pumping rhodopsin found in a plant organism. Steady-state photocurrents of AR are always positive and rise sigmoidally from negative to positive transmembrane voltages. Numerous kinetic details (amplitudes and time constants), including voltage-dependent recovery of the dark state after light-off, are documented with respect to their sensitivities to light, internal and external pH, and the transmembrane voltage. The results are analyzed by enzyme kinetic formalisms using a simplified version of the known photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Blue-light causes a shunt of the photocycle under H+ reuptake from the extracellular side. Similarities and differences of AR with BR are pointed out. This detailed electrophysiological characterization highlights voltage dependencies in catalytic membrane processes of this eukaryotic, H+ -pumping rhodopsin and of microbial-type rhodopsins in general.

  20. [Effects of plateau zokor disturbance and restoration years on soil nutrients and microbial functional diversity in alpine meadow].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Ade, Lu-ji; Zi, Hong-biao; Wang, Chang-ting

    2015-09-01

    To explore the dynamic process of restoration succession in degraded alpine meadow that had been disturbed by plateau zokors in the eastern Tibetan Plateau, we examined soil nutrients and microbial functional diversity using conventional laboratory analysis and the Biolog-ECO microplate method. Our study showed that: 1) The zokors disturbance significantly reduced soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available nitrogen and phosphorus contents, but had no significant effects on soil total phosphorus and potassium contents; 2) Soil microbial carbon utilization efficiency, values of Shannon, Pielou and McIntosh indexes increased with alpine meadow restoration years; 3) Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that carbohydrates and amino acids were the main carbon sources for maintaining soil microbial community; 4) Redundancy analysis ( RDA) indicated that soil pH, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available nitrogen, and total potassium were the main factors influencing the metabolic rate of soil microbial community and microbial functional diversity. In summary, variations in soil microbial functional diversity at different recovery stages reflected the microbial response to aboveground vegetation, soil microbial composition and soil nutrients.

  1. Retinal Flip in Rhodopsin Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Brown, Michael F.; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a well-characterized structural model of a G protein-coupled receptor. Photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal triggers activation. Surprisingly, the x-ray crystal structure of the active Meta-II state has a 180° rotation about the long-axis of the retinal polyene chain. Unbiased microsecond-timescale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the retinal cofactor can flip back to the orientation observed in the inactive state of rhodopsin under conditions favoring the Meta-I state. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence from molecular dynamics simulations showing how rotation of the retinal ligand within its binding pocket can occur in the activation mechanism of rhodopsin. PMID:26083914

  2. Light-Promoted Rhodopsin Expression and Starvation Survival in the Marine Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of microbial rhodopsins in marine proteobacteria changed the dogma that photosynthesis is the only pathway to use the solar energy for biological utilization in the marine environment. Although homologs of these rhodopsins have been identified in dinoflagellates, the diversity of the encoding genes and their physiological roles remain unexplored. As an initial step toward addressing the gap, we conducted high-throughput transcriptome sequencing on Oxyrrhis marina to retrieve rhodopsin transcripts, rapid amplification of cDNA ends to isolate full-length cDNAs of dominant representatives, and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR to investigate their expression under varying conditions. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that O. marina contained both the proton-pumping type (PR) and sensory type (SR) rhodopsins, and the transcriptome data showed that the PR type dominated over the SR type. We compared rhodopsin gene expression for cultures kept under light: dark cycle and continuous darkness in a time course of 24 days without feeding. Although both types of rhodopsin were expressed under the two conditions, the expression levels of PR were much higher than SR, consistent with the transcriptomic data. Furthermore, relative to cultures kept in the dark, rhodopsin expression levels and cell survival rate were both higher in cultures grown in the light. This is the first report of light-dependent promotion of starvation survival and concomitant promotion of PR expression in a eukaryote. While direct evidence needs to come from functional test on rhodopsins in vitro or gene knockout/knockdown experiments, our results suggest that the proton-pumping rhodopsin might be responsible for the light-enhanced survival of O. marina, as previously demonstrated in bacteria. PMID:25506945

  3. A Pilot-scale Benthic Microbial Electrochemical System (BMES) for Enhanced Organic Removal in Sediment Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Henan; Tian, Yan; Qu, Youpeng; Qiu, Ye; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    A benthic microbial electrochemical systems (BMES) of 195 L (120 cm long, 25 cm wide and 65 cm height) was constructed for sediment organic removal. Sediment from a natural river (Ashi River) was used as test sediments in the present research. Three-dimensional anode (Tri-DSA) with honeycomb structure composed of carbon cloth and supporting skeleton was employed in this research for the first time. The results demonstrated that BMES performed good in organic-matter degradation and energy generation from sediment and could be considered for river sediments in situ restoration as novel method. Community analysis from the soil and anode using 16S rDNA gene sequencing showed that more electrogenic functional bacteria was accumulated in anode area when circuit connected than control system.

  4. A Pilot-scale Benthic Microbial Electrochemical System (BMES) for Enhanced Organic Removal in Sediment Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Henan; Tian, Yan; Qu, Youpeng; Qiu, Ye; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    A benthic microbial electrochemical systems (BMES) of 195 L (120 cm long, 25 cm wide and 65 cm height) was constructed for sediment organic removal. Sediment from a natural river (Ashi River) was used as test sediments in the present research. Three-dimensional anode (Tri-DSA) with honeycomb structure composed of carbon cloth and supporting skeleton was employed in this research for the first time. The results demonstrated that BMES performed good in organic-matter degradation and energy generation from sediment and could be considered for river sediments in situ restoration as novel method. Community analysis from the soil and anode using 16S rDNA gene sequencing showed that more electrogenic functional bacteria was accumulated in anode area when circuit connected than control system. PMID:28059105

  5. Site History and Edaphic Features Override the Influence of Plant Species on Microbial Communities in Restored Tidal Freshwater Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Prasse, Christine E.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Restored wetland soils differ significantly in physical and chemical properties from their natural counterparts even when plant community compositions are similar, but effects of restoration on microbial community composition and function are not well understood. Here, we investigate plant-microbe relationships in restored and natural tidal freshwater wetlands from two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Soil samples were collected from the root zone of Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Peltandra virginica, and Lythrum salicaria. Soil microbial composition was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing, and genes representing bacteria, archaea, denitrification, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation were quantified. Our analysis revealed variation in some functional gene copy numbers between plant species within sites, but intersite comparisons did not reveal consistent plant-microbe trends. We observed more microbial variations between plant species in natural wetlands, where plants have been established for a long period of time. In the largest natural wetland site, sequences putatively matching methanogens accounted for ∼17% of all sequences, and the same wetland had the highest numbers of genes coding for methane coenzyme A reductase (mcrA). Sequences putatively matching aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) were detected in all sites, suggesting that both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation are possible in these systems. Our data suggest that site history and edaphic features override the influence of plant species on microbial communities in restored wetlands. PMID:25769832

  6. Site history and edaphic features override the influence of plant species on microbial communities in restored tidal freshwater wetlands.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Christine E; Baldwin, Andrew H; Yarwood, Stephanie A

    2015-05-15

    Restored wetland soils differ significantly in physical and chemical properties from their natural counterparts even when plant community compositions are similar, but effects of restoration on microbial community composition and function are not well understood. Here, we investigate plant-microbe relationships in restored and natural tidal freshwater wetlands from two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Soil samples were collected from the root zone of Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Peltandra virginica, and Lythrum salicaria. Soil microbial composition was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing, and genes representing bacteria, archaea, denitrification, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation were quantified. Our analysis revealed variation in some functional gene copy numbers between plant species within sites, but intersite comparisons did not reveal consistent plant-microbe trends. We observed more microbial variations between plant species in natural wetlands, where plants have been established for a long period of time. In the largest natural wetland site, sequences putatively matching methanogens accounted for ∼17% of all sequences, and the same wetland had the highest numbers of genes coding for methane coenzyme A reductase (mcrA). Sequences putatively matching aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) were detected in all sites, suggesting that both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation are possible in these systems. Our data suggest that site history and edaphic features override the influence of plant species on microbial communities in restored wetlands.

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of riparian zone restoration in the southern Appalachians by assessing soil microbial populations

    Treesearch

    Guanglong Tian; James M. Vose; David C. Coleman; Christopher D. Geron; John T. Walker

    2004-01-01

    Microbial biomass, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in surface soil (0-10 cm) were quantified in a riparian zone restoration project at Coweeta, North Carolina, USA. Four treatments are included in this study: ( I ) a degraded (+N) riparian zone with continued compaction, vegetation removal, and nutrient addition (mow, roll, and nutrient addition);(2) a degraded (-N)...

  8. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RIPARIAN ZONE RESTORATION IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS BY ASSESSING SOIL MICROBIAL POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial biomass, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in surface soil (0?10 cm) were quantified in a riparian zone restoration project at Coweeta, North Carolina, USA. Four treatments are included in this study: (1) a degraded (+N) riparian zone with continued compaction, vegetation rem...

  9. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RIPARIAN ZONE RESTORATION IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS BY ASSESSING SOIL MICROBIAL POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial biomass, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in surface soil (0?10 cm) were quantified in a riparian zone restoration project at Coweeta, North Carolina, USA. Four treatments are included in this study: (1) a degraded (+N) riparian zone with continued compaction, vegetation rem...

  10. Microbial Communities as Environmental Indicators of Ecological Disturbance in Restored Carbonate Fen-Results of 10 Years of Studies.

    PubMed

    Mieczan, Tomasz; Tarkowska-Kukuryk, Monika

    2017-08-01

    Interactions between bacteria and protists are essential to the ecosystem ecology of fens. Until now, however, there has been almost no information on how restoration procedures in carbonate fens affect the functioning of microbial food webs. Changes in vegetation patterns resulting from restoration may take years to be observed, whereas microbial processes display effects even after short-term exposure to changes in environmental conditions caused by restoration. Therefore, microbial processes and patterns can be used as sensitive indicators of changes in environmental conditions. The present study attempts to verify the hypothesis that the species richness and abundance of microbial loop components would differ substantially before and after restoration. The effect of restoration processes on the functioning of the food web was investigated for a 10 years in a carbonate-rich fen, before and after restoration. The restoration procedure (particularly the improvement in hydrological conditions) distinctly modified the taxonomic composition and functioning of microbial food webs. This is reflected in the increased abundance and diversity of testate amoeba, i.e. top predators, within the microbial food web and in the pronounced increase in the abundance of bacteria. This study suggests potential use of microbial loop components as bio-indicators and bio-monitoring tools for hydrological status of fens and concentrations of nutrients. Better understanding of what regulates microbial populations and activity in fens and unravelling of these fundamental mechanisms are particularly critical in order to more accurately predict how fens will respond to global change or anthropogenic disturbances.

  11. Mechanism and specificity of rhodopsin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Frank, R N; Buzney, S M

    1975-11-18

    Partial separation of protein kinase activity from rhodopsin in isolated bovine retinal photoreceptor outer segments was accomplished by mild ultrasonic treatment followed by ultracentrifugation. Residual kinase activity in the rhodopsin-rich sediment was destroyed by chemical denaturation which did not affect the spectral properties of the rhodopsin. The retinal outer segment kinase was found to be specific for rhodopsin, since in these preparations it alone of several bovine protein kinases was capable of phosphorylating rhodopsin in the light. The phosphorylation reaction apparently requires a specific conformation of the rhodopsin molecule since it is abolished by heat denaturation of rhodopsin, and it is greatly reduced or abolished by treatment of the visual pigment protein with potassium alum after the rhodopsin has been "bleached" by light. When kinase and rhodopsin or opsin fractions were prepared from dark-adapted and bleached outer segments and the resultant fractions were mixed in various combinations of bleached and unbleached preparations, the observed pattern of light-activated phosphorylation was consistent only with the interpretation that a conformational change in the rhodopsin molecule in the light exposes a site on the visual pigment protein to the kinase and ATP. These results rule out the possibility of a direct or indirect (rhodopsin-mediated) light activation of the kinase. Finally, phosphorylation of retinal outer segment protein in monochromatic lights of various wavelengths followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that both rhodopsin and the higher molecular weight visual pigment protein reported by several laboratories have the same action spectrum for phosphorylation. This result is consistent with the suggestion that the higher molecular weight species is a rhodopsin dimer.

  12. A G protein-coupled receptor phosphatase required for rhodopsin function.

    PubMed

    Vinós, J; Jalink, K; Hardy, R W; Britt, S G; Zuker, C S

    1997-08-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors are phosphorylated by kinases that mediate agonist-dependent receptor deactivation. Although many receptor kinases have been isolated, the corresponding phosphatases, necessary for restoring the ground state of the receptor, have not been identified. Drosophila RDGC (retinal degeneration C) is a phosphatase required for rhodopsin dephosphorylation in vivo. Loss of RDGC caused severe defects in the termination of the light response as well as extensive light-dependent retinal degeneration. These phenotypes resulted from the hyperphosphorylation of rhodopsin because expression of a truncated rhodopsin lacking the phosphorylation sites restored normal photoreceptor function. These results suggest the existence of a family of receptor phosphatases involved in the regulation of G protein-coupled signaling cascades.

  13. Constitutively Active Rhodopsin and Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul Shin-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor in rod photoreceptor cells of the retina that initiates scotopic vision. In the dark, rhodopsin is bound to the chromophore 11-cis retinal, which locks the receptor in an inactive state. The maintenance of an inactive rhodopsin in the dark is critical for rod photoreceptor cells to remain highly sensitive. Perturbations by mutation or absence of 11-cis retinal can cause rhodopsin to become constitutively active, which leads to the desensitization of photoreceptor cells and, in some instances, retinal degeneration. Constitutive activity can arise in rhodopsin by various mechanisms and can cause a variety of inherited retinal diseases including Leber congenital amaurosis, congenital night blindness, and retinitis pigmentosa. In this review, the molecular and structural properties of different constitutively active forms of rhodopsin are overviewed and the possibility that constitutive activity can arise from different active-state conformations is discussed. PMID:24931191

  14. The Activation Pathway of Human Rhodopsin in Comparison to Bovine Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Szczepek, Michal; Elgeti, Matthias; Ritter, Eglof; Piechnick, Ronny; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Bartl, Franz J.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor of rod cells, absorbs light to mediate the first step of vision by activating the G protein transducin (Gt). Several human diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa or congenital night blindness, are linked to rhodopsin malfunctions. Most of the corresponding in vivo studies and structure-function analyses (e.g. based on protein x-ray crystallography or spectroscopy) have been carried out on murine or bovine rhodopsin. Because these rhodopsins differ at several amino acid positions from human rhodopsin, we conducted a comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of human rhodopsin in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. We show by FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy that the light-induced transformations of the early photointermediates are very similar. Significant differences between the pigments appear with formation of the still inactive Meta I state and the transition to active Meta II. However, the conformation of Meta II and its activity toward the G protein are essentially the same, presumably reflecting the evolutionary pressure under which the active state has developed. Altogether, our results show that although the basic activation pathways of human and bovine rhodopsin are similar, structural deviations exist in the inactive conformation and during receptor activation, even between closely related rhodopsins. These differences between the well studied bovine or murine rhodopsins and human rhodopsin have to be taken into account when the influence of point mutations on the activation pathway of human rhodopsin are investigated using the bovine or murine rhodopsin template sequences. PMID:26105054

  15. Genomic makeup of the marine flavobacterium Nonlabens (Donghaeana) dokdonensis and identification of a novel class of rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Byung Kwon; Song, Ju Yeon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin-containing marine microbes such as those in the class Flavobacteriia play a pivotal role in the biogeochemical cycle of the euphotic zone (Fuhrman JA, Schwalbach MS, Stingl U. 2008. Proteorhodopsins: an array of physiological roles? Nat Rev Microbiol. 6:488-494). Deciphering the genome information of flavobacteria and accessing the diversity and ecological impact of microbial rhodopsins are important in understanding and preserving the global ecosystems. The genome sequence of the orange-pigmented marine flavobacterium Nonlabens dokdonensis (basonym: Donghaeana dokdonensis) DSW-6 was determined. As a marine photoheterotroph, DSW-6 has written in its genome physiological features that allow survival in the oligotrophic environments. The sequence analysis also uncovered a gene encoding an unexpected type of microbial rhodopsin containing a unique motif in addition to a proteorhodopsin gene and a number of photolyase or cryptochrome genes. Homologs of the novel rhodopsin gene were found in other flavobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, a species of Cytophagia, a deinococcus, and even a eukaryote diatom. They all contain the characteristic NQ motif and form a phylogenetically distinct group. Expression analysis of this rhodopsin gene in DSW-6 indicated that it is induced at high NaCl concentrations, as well as in the presence of light and the absence of nutrients. Genomic and metagenomic surveys demonstrate the diversity of the NQ rhodopsins in nature and the prevalent occurrence of the encoding genes among microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline niches, suggesting its involvement in sodium metabolism and the sodium-adapted lifestyle.

  16. Genomic Makeup of the Marine Flavobacterium Nonlabens (Donghaeana) dokdonensis and Identification of a Novel Class of Rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Byung Kwon; Song, Ju Yeon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin-containing marine microbes such as those in the class Flavobacteriia play a pivotal role in the biogeochemical cycle of the euphotic zone (Fuhrman JA, Schwalbach MS, Stingl U. 2008. Proteorhodopsins: an array of physiological roles? Nat Rev Microbiol. 6:488–494). Deciphering the genome information of flavobacteria and accessing the diversity and ecological impact of microbial rhodopsins are important in understanding and preserving the global ecosystems. The genome sequence of the orange-pigmented marine flavobacterium Nonlabens dokdonensis (basonym: Donghaeana dokdonensis) DSW-6 was determined. As a marine photoheterotroph, DSW-6 has written in its genome physiological features that allow survival in the oligotrophic environments. The sequence analysis also uncovered a gene encoding an unexpected type of microbial rhodopsin containing a unique motif in addition to a proteorhodopsin gene and a number of photolyase or cryptochrome genes. Homologs of the novel rhodopsin gene were found in other flavobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, a species of Cytophagia, a deinococcus, and even a eukaryote diatom. They all contain the characteristic NQ motif and form a phylogenetically distinct group. Expression analysis of this rhodopsin gene in DSW-6 indicated that it is induced at high NaCl concentrations, as well as in the presence of light and the absence of nutrients. Genomic and metagenomic surveys demonstrate the diversity of the NQ rhodopsins in nature and the prevalent occurrence of the encoding genes among microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline niches, suggesting its involvement in sodium metabolism and the sodium-adapted lifestyle. PMID:23292138

  17. Rhodopsin of the larval mosquito.

    PubMed

    Brown, P K; White, R H

    1972-04-01

    Larvae of the mosquito Aedes aegypti have a cluster of four ocelli on each side of the head. The visual pigment of each ocellus of mosquitoes reared in darkness was characterized by microspectrophotometry, and found to be the same. Larval mosquito rhodopsin (lambda(max) = 515 nm) upon short irradiation bleaches to a stable photoequilibrium with metarhodopsin (lambda(max) = 480 nm). On long irradiation of glutaraldehyde-fixed tissues or in the presence of potassium borohydride, bleaching goes further, and potassium borohydride reduces the product, retinal, to retinol (vitamin A(1)). In the presence of hydroxylamine, the rhodopsin bleaches rapidly, with conversion of the chromophore to retinaldehyde oxime (lambda(max) about 365 nm).

  18. Violet Light Down-Regulates the Expression of Specific Differentiation Markers through Rhodopsin in Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung-June; Son, Eui Dong; Jung, Ji-Yong; Choi, Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2013-01-01

    Several recent reports have demonstrated that photoreceptors are expressed in human skin. The rod and cone photoreceptor-like proteins are expressed in human skin and rhodopsin, long wavelength-opsin, and short wavelength-opsin are also present in cultured murine melanocytes. Furthermore, the photopigment rhodopsin is expressed in human melanocytes and is involved in ultraviolet A phototransduction which induces early melanin synthesis. In this study, we investigated whether rhodopsin is expressed and plays any physiological roles in the normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). We found that rhodopsin was expressed and localized on the plasma membrane in NHEKs, and only violet light among several wavelengths within the visible range significantly increased the expression of rhodopsin mRNA. We further found that rhodopsin over-expression decreased the mRNA expression levels of keratinocyte differentiation markers, such as keratin-1 and keratin-10, and violet light also decreased the mRNA expression levels of keratinocyte differentiation markers and these decreased expression levels were recovered by a rhodopsin-directed siRNA. Moreover, we further demonstrated that violet light significantly decreased the phosphorylation levels of cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and that it more effectively decreased the phosphorylation of CREB when rhodopsin was over-expressed. In addition, we observed that pertussis toxin, a Gαi protein inhibitor, restored the rhodopsin-induced decrease in the differentiation markers in NHEKs. Taken together, these results suggest that rhodopsin down-regulates the expression levels of specific keratinocyte differentiation markers via the Gαi signaling pathway in NHEKs. PMID:24069221

  19. Molecular bases for the selection of the chromophore of animal rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Melaccio, Federico; Rinaldi, Silvia; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo

    2015-12-15

    The functions of microbial and animal rhodopsins are triggered by the isomerization of their all-trans and 11-cis retinal chromophores, respectively. To lay the molecular basis driving the evolutionary transition from the all-trans to the 11-cis chromophore, multiconfigurational quantum chemistry is used to compare the isomerization mechanisms of the sensory rhodopsin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 (ASR) and of the bovine rhodopsin (Rh). It is found that, despite their evolutionary distance, these eubacterial and vertebrate rhodopsins start to isomerize via distinct implementations of the same bicycle-pedal mechanism originally proposed by Warshel [Warshel A (1976) Nature 260:678-683]. However, by following the electronic structure changes of ASR (featuring the all-trans chromophore) during the isomerization, we find that ASR enters a region of degeneracy between the first and second excited states not found in Rh (featuring the 11-cis chromophore). We show that such degeneracy is modulated by the preorganized structure of the chromophore and by the position of the reactive double bond. It is argued that the optimization of the electronic properties of the chromophore, which affects the photoisomerization efficiency and the thermal isomerization barrier, provided a key factor for the emergence of the striking amino acid sequence divergence observed between the microbial and animal rhodopsins.

  20. Molecular bases for the selection of the chromophore of animal rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Melaccio, Federico; Rinaldi, Silvia; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The functions of microbial and animal rhodopsins are triggered by the isomerization of their all-trans and 11-cis retinal chromophores, respectively. To lay the molecular basis driving the evolutionary transition from the all-trans to the 11-cis chromophore, multiconfigurational quantum chemistry is used to compare the isomerization mechanisms of the sensory rhodopsin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 (ASR) and of the bovine rhodopsin (Rh). It is found that, despite their evolutionary distance, these eubacterial and vertebrate rhodopsins start to isomerize via distinct implementations of the same bicycle-pedal mechanism originally proposed by Warshel [Warshel A (1976) Nature 260:678–683]. However, by following the electronic structure changes of ASR (featuring the all-trans chromophore) during the isomerization, we find that ASR enters a region of degeneracy between the first and second excited states not found in Rh (featuring the 11-cis chromophore). We show that such degeneracy is modulated by the preorganized structure of the chromophore and by the position of the reactive double bond. It is argued that the optimization of the electronic properties of the chromophore, which affects the photoisomerization efficiency and the thermal isomerization barrier, provided a key factor for the emergence of the striking amino acid sequence divergence observed between the microbial and animal rhodopsins. PMID:26607446

  1. Effects of organic amendments and mulches on soil microbial communities in quarry restoration under semiarid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Pastorelli, Roberta; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Fabiani, Arturo; Bastida López, Felipe; Hernández Fernández, María Teresa; García Izquierdo, Carlos; Solé Benet, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Mining activities generate loss of the quality of the environment and landscape specially in arid and semiarid Mediterranean regions. A precondition for ecosystem reclamation in such highly disturbed mining areas is the development of functional soils with appropriate levels of organic matter. In an experimental soil restoration in limestone quarries from Sierra de Gádor (Almería), SE Spain, 9 plots 15 x 5 m were prepared to test organic amendments (compost from solid urban residues-DOW-, sludge from urban water treatment-SS-, control-NA-) and different mulches (fine gravel-GM-, wood chips-WM-, control-NM-) with the aim to improve soil/substrate properties and to reduce evaporation and erosion. In each experimental plot, 75 native plants (Macrochloa tenacissima, Anthyllis terniflora and Anthyllis cytisoides) were planted. After 5 years from the start of the experiment, we evaluated how microbial community composition responded to the organic amendments and mulches. Microbial community composition of both bacteria and fungi was determined by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprinting. The results of the two-way ANOVA showed that PLFAs were significantly affected by organic amendments but not by the mulches or interaction of both factors. Experimental plots with DOW showed significantly higher level of fungal PLFAs than those with SS and NA, even higher than the reference undisturbed soil. However, any plot with organic amendments did not reach the content of bacterial PLFAs of the reference soils. The bacterial diversity (evaluated by diversity indices calculated from DGGE profiles) was greater in soil samples taken under NA and GM. Comparing these indices in fungal DGGE, we found greater values for soil samples taken under DOW and without mulches. Results from UPGMA analysis showed significant differences in the structure of soil bacterial communities from the different treatments

  2. Changes in microbial activity of soils during the natural restoration of abandoned lands in central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsepyan, Lilit; Mostovaya, Anna; Lopes de Gerenyu, Valentin; Kurganova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Most changes in land use affect significantly the amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) and alter the nutrition status of soil microbial community. The arable lands withdrawal induced usually the carbon sequestration in soil, the significant shifts in quality of soil organic matter and structure of microbial community. This study was aimed to determine the microbial activity of the abandoned lands in Central Russia due to the process of natural self-restoration. For the study, two representative chronosequences were selected in Central Russia: (1) deciduous forest area, DFA (Moscow region, 54o49N'; 37o34'E; Haplic Luvisols) and (2) forest steppe area, FSA (Belgorod region 50o36'N, 36o01'E Luvic Phaeozems). Each chronosequence included current arable, abandoned lands of different age, and forest plots. The total soil organic carbon (Corg, automatic CHNS analyzer), carbon immobilized in microbial biomass (Cmic, SIR method), and respiratory activity (RA) were determined in the topsoil (0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm layers) for each plots. Relationships between Corg, Cmic, and RA were determined by liner regression method. Our results showed that the conversion of croplands to the permanent forest induced the progressive accumulation Corg, Cmic and acceleration of RA in the top 10-cm layer for both chronosequences. Carbon stock increased from 24.1 Mg C ha-1 in arable to 45.3 Mg C ha-1 in forest soil (Luvic Phaeozems, Belgorod region). In Haplic Luvisols (Moscow region), SOC build up was 2 time less: from 13.5 Mg C ha-1 in arable to 27.9 Mg C ha-1 in secondary forest. During post-agrogenic evolution, Cmic also increased significantly: from 0.34 to 1.43 g C kg-1 soil in Belgorod region and from 0.34 to 0.64 g C kg-1 soil in Moscow region. RA values varied widely in soils studied: from 0.54-0.63 mg C kg-1h-1 in arable plots to 2.02-3.4 mg C kg-1h-1 in forest ones. The close correlations between Cmic, RA and Corg in the top 0-5cm layer (R2 = 0.81-0.90; P<0.01-0.05) were

  3. Directed evolution of Gloeobacter violaceus rhodopsin spectral properties.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Martin K M; McIsaac, R Scott; Dollinger, Peter; Flytzanis, Nicholas C; Abrams, Michael; Schor, Stanford; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-01-16

    Proton-pumping rhodopsins (PPRs) are photoactive retinal-binding proteins that transport ions across biological membranes in response to light. These proteins are interesting for light-harvesting applications in bioenergy production, in optogenetics applications in neuroscience, and as fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. Little is known, however, about how the protein sequence determines the considerable variation in spectral properties of PPRs from different biological niches or how to engineer these properties in a given PPR. Here we report a comprehensive study of amino acid substitutions in the retinal-binding pocket of Gloeobacter violaceus rhodopsin (GR) that tune its spectral properties. Directed evolution generated 70 GR variants with absorption maxima shifted by up to ±80nm, extending the protein's light absorption significantly beyond the range of known natural PPRs. While proton-pumping activity was disrupted in many of the spectrally shifted variants, we identified single tuning mutations that incurred blue and red shifts of 42nm and 22nm, respectively, that did not disrupt proton pumping. Blue-shifting mutations were distributed evenly along the retinal molecule while red-shifting mutations were clustered near the residue K257, which forms a covalent bond with retinal through a Schiff base linkage. Thirty eight of the identified tuning mutations are not found in known microbial rhodopsins. We discovered a subset of red-shifted GRs that exhibit high levels of fluorescence relative to the WT (wild-type) protein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultraviolet Chromophore Transitions in the Rhodopsin Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Ebrey, Thomas G.; Honig, Barry

    1972-01-01

    Difference spectra measured at -105° show two decreases in the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of rhodopsin upon bleaching that cannot be attributed to changes in protein conformation. These absorbancy decreases in rhodopsin are consistent with a cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore. PMID:4505668

  5. Microbial Biomass and Activity in Geomorphic Features in Forested and Urban Restored and Degraded Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geomorphic spatial heterogeneity affects sediment denitrification, an anaerobic microbial process that results in the loss of nitrogen (N), and other anaerobic microbial processes such as methanogenesis in urban streams. We measured sediment denitrification potential (DEA), metha...

  6. Microbial Biomass and Activity in Geomorphic Features in Forested and Urban Restored and Degraded Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geomorphic spatial heterogeneity affects sediment denitrification, an anaerobic microbial process that results in the loss of nitrogen (N), and other anaerobic microbial processes such as methanogenesis in urban streams. We measured sediment denitrification potential (DEA), metha...

  7. Four of the six Drosophila rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment in low light.

    PubMed

    Saint-Charles, Alexandra; Michard-Vanhée, Christine; Alejevski, Faredin; Chélot, Elisabeth; Boivin, Antoine; Rouyer, François

    2016-10-01

    Light is the major stimulus for the synchronization of circadian clocks with day-night cycles. The light-driven entrainment of the clock that controls rest-activity rhythms in Drosophila relies on different photoreceptive molecules. Cryptochrome (CRY) is expressed in most brain clock neurons, whereas six different rhodopsins (RH) are present in the light-sensing organs. The compound eye includes outer photoreceptors that express RH1 and inner photoreceptors that each express one of the four rhodopsins RH3-RH6. RH6 is also expressed in the extraretinal Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet, whereas RH2 is only found in the ocelli. In low light, the synchronization of behavioral rhythms relies on either CRY or the canonical rhodopsin phototransduction pathway, which requires the phospholipase C-β encoded by norpA (no receptor potential A). We used norpA(P24) cry(02) double mutants that are circadianly blind in low light and restored NORPA function in each of the six types of photoreceptors, defined as expressing a particular rhodopsin. We first show that the NORPA pathway is less efficient than CRY for synchronizing rest-activity rhythms with delayed light-dark cycles but is important for proper phasing, whereas the two light-sensing pathways can mediate efficient adjustments to phase advances. Four of the six rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment, and all are more efficient for advancing than for delaying the behavioral clock. In contrast, neither RH5-expressing retinal photoreceptors nor RH2-expressing ocellar photoreceptors are sufficient to mediate synchronization through the NORPA pathway. Our results thus reveal different contributions of rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors and suggest the existence of several circuits for rhodopsin-dependent circadian entrainment. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2828-2844, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Evidence from Chlamydomonas on the photoactivation of rhodopsins without isomerization of their chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kenneth W.; Saranak, Jureepan; Krane, Sonja; Johnson, Randy L.; Nakanishi, Koji

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Attachment of retinal to opsin forms the chromophore N-retinylidene which isomerizes during photoactivation of rhodopsins. To test whether isomerization is crucial, custom-tailored chromophores lacking the β-ionone ring and any isomerizable bonds were incorporated in vivo into the opsin of a blind mutant of the eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analogues restored phototaxis with the anticipated action spectra, ruling out the need for isomerization in photoactivation. To further elucidate photoactivation, responses to chromophores formed from naphthalene aldehydes were studied. The resulting action spectral shifts suggest that charge separation within the excited chromophore leads to electric field induced polarization of nearby amino-acid residues and altered hydrogen bonding. This redistribution of charge faciliates the reported multiple bond rotations and protein rearrangements of rhodopsin activation. These results provide new insight into the activation of rhodopsins and related GPCRs. PMID:21700209

  9. Relevance of rhodopsin studies for GPCR activation.

    PubMed

    Deupi, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Rhodopsin, the dim-light photoreceptor present in the rod cells of the retina, is both a retinal-binding protein and a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Due to this conjunction, it benefits from an arsenal of spectroscopy techniques that can be used for its characterization, while being a model system for the important family of Class A (also referred to as "rhodopsin-like") GPCRs. For instance, rhodopsin has been a crucial player in the field of GPCR structural biology. Until 2007, it was the only GPCR for which a high-resolution crystal structure was available, so all structure-activity analyses on GPCRs, from structure-based drug discovery to studies of structural changes upon activation, were based on rhodopsin. At present, about a third of currently available GPCR structures are still from rhodopsin. In this review, I show some examples of how these structures can still be used to gain insight into general aspects of GPCR activation. First, the analysis of the third intracellular loop in rhodopsin structures allows us to gain an understanding of the structural and dynamic properties of this region, which is absent (due to protein engineering or poor electron density) in most of the currently available GPCR structures. Second, a detailed analysis of the structure of the transmembrane domains in inactive, intermediate and active rhodopsin structures allows us to detect early conformational changes in the process of ligand-induced GPCR activation. Finally, the analysis of a conserved ligand-activated transmission switch in the transmembrane bundle of GPCRs in the context of the rhodopsin activation cycle, allows us to suggest that the structures of many of the currently available agonist-bound GPCRs may correspond to intermediate active states. While the focus in GPCR structural biology is inevitably moving away from rhodopsin, in other aspects rhodopsin is still at the forefront. For instance, the first studies of the structural basis of disease mutants in

  10. Photo-induced Regulation of the Chromatic Adaptive Gene Expression by Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Irieda, Hiroki; Morita, Teppei; Maki, Kimika; Homma, Michio; Aiba, Hiroji; Sudo, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin molecules are photochemically reactive membrane-embedded proteins, with seven transmembrane α-helices, which bind the chromophore retinal (vitamin A aldehyde). They are roughly divided into two groups according to their basic functions: (i) ion transporters such as proton pumps, chloride pumps, and cation channels; and (ii) photo-sensors such as sensory rhodopsin from microbes and visual pigments from animals. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), found in 2003 in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, is categorized as a microbial sensory rhodopsin. To investigate the function of ASR in vivo, ASR and the promoter sequence of the pigment protein phycocyanin were co-introduced into Escherichia coli cells with the reporter gene crp. The result clearly showed that ASR functions as a repressor of the CRP protein expression and that this is fully inhibited by the light activation of ASR, suggesting that ASR would directly regulate the transcription of crp. The repression is also clearly inhibited by the truncation of the C-terminal region of ASR, or mutations on the C-terminal Arg residues, indicating the functional importance of the C-terminal region. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel function of rhodopsin molecules and raise the possibility that the membrane-spanning protein ASR could work as a transcriptional factor. In the future, the ASR activity could be utilized as a tool for arbitrary protein expression in vivo regulated by visible light. PMID:22872645

  11. Characterization of an Unconventional Rhodopsin from the Freshwater Actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola

    PubMed Central

    Keffer, J. L.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopsin-encoding microorganisms are common in many environments. However, knowing that rhodopsin genes are present provides little insight into how the host cells utilize light. The genome of the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola encodes a rhodopsin of the uncharacterized actinorhodopsin family. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by heterologously expressing R. lacicola actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. However, cultures of R. lacicola did not pump protons, even though actinorhodopsin mRNA and protein were both detected. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced by providing exogenous retinal, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. We used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and oxidation of accessory pigments to confirm that R. lacicola does not synthesize retinal. These results suggest that in some organisms, the actinorhodopsin gene is constitutively expressed, but rhodopsin-based light capture may require cofactors obtained from the environment. IMPORTANCE Up to 70% of microbial genomes in some environments are predicted to encode rhodopsins. Because most microbial rhodopsins are light-activated proton pumps, the prevalence of this gene suggests that in some environments, most microorganisms respond to or utilize light energy. Actinorhodopsins were discovered in an analysis of freshwater metagenomic data and subsequently identified in freshwater actinobacterial cultures. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin from the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by expressing actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced only after both light and retinal were provided, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. These results indicate that photoheterotrophy in this organism and others may require cofactors obtained from the

  12. Changes in the soil microbial community with a pine plantation restoration in a dry valley of the upper reaches of the Minjiang River, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanfeng; Liu, Guohua; Fu, Bojie; Wu, Yaqiong; Hu, Huifeng; Fu, Shenglei

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in soil microbial biomass C, microbial metabolic activity, functional diversity, and metabolic diversity pattern during the restoration process of a pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation. In this study, a chronosequence approach was adopted. Three sites of pine plantations along a restoration chronosequence (12 years old (PF12), 25 years old (PF25), 35 years old (PF35)), and their paired reference sites of natural shrub community (Shrub1, Shrub2, and Shrub3) were selected. Soil microbial biomass C increased and microbial quotient declined with pine plantation age. Microbial metabolic activity, as measured by average well color development (using Biolog GN(2) plates), exhibited a decline along the restoration chronosequence with values ranked as PF12 > PF35 > PF25 in topsoil and PF12 > PF25 > PF35 in subsoil. Functional diversity, as estimated by substrate diversity and substrate richness, exhibited a pattern similar to the metabolic activity. Principal component analysis indicated that metabolic diversity followed recognized patterns along the restoration chronosequence with PF12 significantly different from PF25 and PF35. There was an apparent reduction of microbial metabolic activity and functional diversity during pine plantation restoration, which can be explained by a general decline in soil nutrient availability, particularly C availability, and soil pH associated with the establishment of a coniferous species.

  13. The Activation Pathway of Human Rhodopsin in Comparison to Bovine Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Szczepek, Michal; Elgeti, Matthias; Ritter, Eglof; Piechnick, Ronny; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W; Bartl, Franz J

    2015-08-14

    Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor of rod cells, absorbs light to mediate the first step of vision by activating the G protein transducin (Gt). Several human diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa or congenital night blindness, are linked to rhodopsin malfunctions. Most of the corresponding in vivo studies and structure-function analyses (e.g. based on protein x-ray crystallography or spectroscopy) have been carried out on murine or bovine rhodopsin. Because these rhodopsins differ at several amino acid positions from human rhodopsin, we conducted a comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of human rhodopsin in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. We show by FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy that the light-induced transformations of the early photointermediates are very similar. Significant differences between the pigments appear with formation of the still inactive Meta I state and the transition to active Meta II. However, the conformation of Meta II and its activity toward the G protein are essentially the same, presumably reflecting the evolutionary pressure under which the active state has developed. Altogether, our results show that although the basic activation pathways of human and bovine rhodopsin are similar, structural deviations exist in the inactive conformation and during receptor activation, even between closely related rhodopsins. These differences between the well studied bovine or murine rhodopsins and human rhodopsin have to be taken into account when the influence of point mutations on the activation pathway of human rhodopsin are investigated using the bovine or murine rhodopsin template sequences. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zong-Sheng; Fu, Yu-Hong; Yu, Li-Fei

    2012-10-01

    By the method of taking space instead of time, an incubation test was conducted to study the characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest in Maolan Nature Reserve, Guizhou Province of Southwest China. The soil microbial biomass carbon content and soil basal respiration decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with the process of the natural restoration, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and with the process of restoration, and soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased with increasing soil depth. In the process of the natural restoration, surface soil water soluble organic carbon content increased, while sublayer soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase. The ratio of soil water soluble organic carbon to total soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with the process of restoration. Soil quality increased with the process of restoration. Also, the quality and quantity of soil organic carbon increased with the process of restoration, in which, soil microbial biomass carbon content had the greatest change, while soil water soluble organic carbon content had less change.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodopsins: Insights and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Farrens, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has become an established tool at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics because of its exquisite sensitivity and recent technical advancements. However, rhodopsin proteins present the fluorescence spectroscopist with a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to the presence of the light-sensitive retinal chromophore. This review briefly summarizes some approaches that have successfully met these challenges and the novel insights they have yielded about rhodopsin structure and function. We start with a brief overview of fluorescence fundamentals and experimental methodologies, followed by more specific discussions of technical challenges rhodopsin proteins present to fluorescence studies. Finally, we end by discussing some of the unique insights that have been gained specifically about visual rhodopsin and its interactions with affiliate proteins through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24183695

  16. Infrared studies of octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Satoshi; Morita, Eugene H.; Tasumi, Mitsuo; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Tsuda, Motoyuki

    1993-08-01

    The infrared difference spectra between octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin have been observed at 210 K under irradiation of blue and orange light under neutral conditions. The CN stretching frequencies of the protonated Schiff-base linkage shift upon H/D exchange. The H/D shifts observed in this study for octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin are 25 and 23 cm -1, respectively, whereas those for bovine rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin have been reported to be about 30 and 4cm -1, respectively. These results indicate that environments around the Schiff-base linkage differ between octopus and bovine lumirhodopsin, whereas those of octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin are similar. The relationship between the H/D shift of the CN stretching band and the hydrogen bond involving the protonated Schiff base is discussed.

  17. Intermediate Excited States in Rhodopsin Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, L. J.; Yan, M.; Jedju, T. M.; Callender, R. H.; Chao, H.; Alfano, R. R.

    1996-03-01

    Recent work by Wang et.al. footnote Q. Wang et.al., Science 266, 422 (1994) reports rapid coherent photoisomerization in rhodopsin. The bathorhodopsin photoproduct appears in 200 fs and exhibits torsional oscillations which remain synchronized with the initial photoexcitation. We report transient absorption experiments which suggest that the fraction of excited rhodopsin molecules which does not isomerize in this fashion (approximately 1/3) remains in an electronically excited state, probably the twisted state described by Birge and Hubbard,footnote R. R. Birge and L. M. Hubbard, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 102, 2195 (1980) for ~ 3 ps and then reforms rhodopsin. This picture explains the long bleaching recovery time for rhodopsin and the controversial spectral dynamics which are observed in the red.

  18. Irreversible trimer to monomer transition of thermophilic rhodopsin upon thermal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Takashi; Demura, Makoto; Sudo, Yuki

    2014-10-30

    Assembly is one of the keys to understand biological molecules, and it takes place in spatial and temporal domains upon stimulation. Microbial rhodopsin (also called retinal protein) is a membrane-embedded protein that has a retinal chromophore within seven-transmembrane α-helices and shows homo-, di-, tri-, penta-, and hexameric assemblies. Those assemblies are closely related to critical physiological properties such as stabilizing the protein structure and regulating their photoreaction dynamics. Here we investigated the assembly and disassembly of thermophilic rhodopsin (TR), which is a novel proton-pumping rhodopsin derived from a thermophile living at 75 °C. TR was characterized using size-exclusion chromatography and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and formed a trimer at 25 °C, but irreversibly dissociated into monomers upon thermal stimulation. The transition temperature was estimated to be 68 °C. The irreversible nature made it possible to investigate the photochemical properties of both the trimer and the monomer independently. Compared with the trimer, the absorption maximum of the monomer is blue-shifted by 6 nm without any changes in the retinal composition, pKa value for the counterion or the sequence of the proton movement. The photocycling rate of the monomeric TR was similar to that of the trimeric TR. A similar trimer-monomer transition upon thermal stimulation was observed for another eubacterial rhodopsin GR but not for the archaeal rhodopsins AR3 and HwBR, suggesting that the transition is conserved in bacterial rhodopsins. Thus, the thermal stimulation of TR induces the irreversible disassembly of the trimer.

  19. Structural elements of the signal propagation pathway in squid rhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Minoru; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Suwa, Makiko

    2011-05-19

    Squid and bovine rhodopsins are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate Gq- and Gt-type G-proteins, respectively. To understand the structural elements of the signal propagation pathway, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of squid and bovine rhodopsins plus a detailed sequence analysis of class A GPCRs. The computations indicate that although the geometry of the retinal is similar in bovine and squid rhodopsins, the important interhelical hydrogen bond networks are different. In squid rhodopsin, an extended hydrogen bond network that spans ∼13 Å to Tyr315 on the cytoplasmic site is present regardless of the protonation state of Asp80. In contrast, the extended hydrogen bond network is interrupted at Tyr306 in bovine rhodopsin. Those differences in the hydrogen bond network may play significant functional roles in the signal propagation from the retinal binding site to the cytoplasmic site, including transmembrane helix (TM) 6 to which the G-protein binds. The MD calculations demonstrate that the elongated conformation of TM6 in squid rhodopsin is stabilized by salt bridges formed with helix (H) 9. Together with the interhelical hydrogen bonds, the salt bridges between TM6 and H9 stabilize the protein conformation of squid rhodopsin and may hinder the occurrence of large conformational changes that are observed upon activation of bovine rhodopsin.

  20. THE RHODOPSIN-TRANSDUCIN COMPLEX HOUSES TWO DISTINCT RHODOPSIN MOLECULES

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Ringler, Philipe; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Upon illumination the visual receptor rhodopsin (Rho) transitions to the activated form Rho*, which binds the heterotrimeric G protein, transducin (Gt) causing GDP to GTP exchange and Gt dissociation. Using succinylated concanavalin A (sConA) as a probe, we visualized native Rho dimers solubilized in 1 mM n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM) and Rho monomers 5 mM in DDM. By nucleotide depletion and affinity chromatography together with crosslinking and size exclusion chromatography, we trapped and purified nucleotide-free Rho*•Gt and sConA-Rho*•Gt complexes kept in solution by either DDM or lauryl-maltose-neopentyl-glycol (LMNG). The 3-D envelope calculated from projections of negatively stained Rho*•Gt-LMNG complexes accommodated two Rho molecules, one Gt heterotrimer and a detergent belt. Visualization of triple sConA-Rho*•Gt complexes unequivocally demonstrated a pentameric assembly of the Rho*•Gt complex in which the photoactivated Rho* dimer serves as a platform for binding the Gt heterotrimer. Importantly, individual monomers of the Rho* dimer in the heteropentameric complex exhibited different capabilities to be regenerated with either 11-cis or 9-cis-retinal. PMID:23458690

  1. FTIR difference and resonance Raman spectroscopy of rhodopsins with applications to optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Clair, Erica C.

    or absent. Structural changes of internal water molecules and possible bands associated with the interaction with beta-arrestins were also detected in photoactivated squid rhodopsin when transformed to the acid Meta intermediate. Near-IR confocal resonance Raman measurements were performed both on AR3 reconstituted into E. coli polar lipids and in vivo in E. coli expressing AR3 in the absence and presence of a negative transmembrane potential. On the basis of these measurements, a model is proposed which provides a possible explanation for the observed fluorescence dependence of AR3 and other microbial rhodopsins on transmembrane potential.

  2. Electrophysiological study of Drosophila rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Electrophysiological investigations were carried out on several independently isolated mutants of the ninaE gene, which encodes opsin in R1-6 photoreceptors, and a mutant of the ninaD gene, which is probably important in the formation of the rhodopsin chromophore. In these mutants, the rhodopsin content in R1-6 photoreceptors is reduced by 10(2)-10(6)-fold. Light-induced bumps recorded from even the most severely affected mutants are physiologically normal. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis shows that photoreceptor responses of both a ninaE mutant and a ninaD mutant follow the adapting bump model. Since any extensive rhodopsin-rhodopsin interactions are not likely in these mutants, the above results suggest that such interactions are not needed for the generation and adaptation of light-induced bumps. Mutant bumps are strikingly larger in amplitude than wild-type bumps. This difference is observed both in ninaD and ninaE mutants, which suggests that it is due to severe depletion of rhodopsin content, rather than to any specific alterations in the opsin protein. Lowering or buffering the intracellular calcium concentration by EGTA injection mimics the effects of the mutations on the bump amplitude, but, unlike the mutations, it also affects the latency and kinetics of light responses. PMID:3097245

  3. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis.

  4. A Rhodopsin-Guanylyl Cyclase Gene Fusion Functions in Visual Perception in a Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Avelar, Gabriela M.; Schumacher, Robert I.; Zaini, Paulo A.; Leonard, Guy; Richards, Thomas A.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sensing light is the fundamental property of visual systems, with vision in animals being based almost exclusively on opsin photopigments [1]. Rhodopsin also acts as a photoreceptor linked to phototaxis in green algae [2, 3] and has been implicated by chemical means as a light sensor in the flagellated swimming zoospores of the fungus Allomyces reticulatus [4]; however, the signaling mechanism in these fungi remains unknown. Here we use a combination of genome sequencing and molecular inhibition experiments with light-sensing phenotype studies to examine the signaling pathway involved in visual perception in the closely related fungus Blastocladiella emersonii. Our data show that in these fungi, light perception is accomplished by the function of a novel gene fusion (BeGC1) of a type I (microbial) rhodopsin domain and guanylyl cyclase catalytic domain. Photobleaching of rhodopsin function prevents accumulation of cGMP levels and phototaxis of fungal zoospores exposed to green light, whereas inhibition of guanylyl cyclase activity negatively affects fungal phototaxis. Immunofluorescence microscopy localizes the BeGC1 protein to the external surface of the zoospore eyespot positioned close to the base of the swimming flagellum [4, 5], demonstrating this is a photoreceptive organelle composed of lipid droplets. Taken together, these data indicate that Blastocladiomycota fungi have a cGMP signaling pathway involved in phototaxis similar to the vertebrate vision-signaling cascade but composed of protein domain components arranged as a novel gene fusion architecture and of distant evolutionary ancestry to type II rhodopsins of animals. PMID:24835457

  5. Monomeric Rhodopsin Is Sufficient for Normal Rhodopsin Kinase (GRK1) Phosphorylation and Arrestin-1 Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Bayburt, Timothy H.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; McLean, Mark A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Huang, Chih-chin; Tesmer, John J. G.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization has been observed in a wide variety of experimental contexts, but the functional significance of this phenomenon at different stages of the life cycle of class A GPCRs remains to be elucidated. Rhodopsin (Rh), a prototypical class A GPCR of visual transduction, is also capable of forming dimers and higher order oligomers. The recent demonstration that Rh monomer is sufficient to activate its cognate G protein, transducin, prompted us to test whether the same monomeric state is sufficient for rhodopsin phosphorylation and arrestin-1 binding. Here we show that monomeric active rhodopsin is phosphorylated by rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) as efficiently as rhodopsin in the native disc membrane. Monomeric phosphorylated light-activated Rh (P-Rh*) in nanodiscs binds arrestin-1 essentially as well as P-Rh* in native disc membranes. We also measured the affinity of arrestin-1 for P-Rh* in nanodiscs using a fluorescence-based assay and found that arrestin-1 interacts with monomeric P-Rh* with low nanomolar affinity and 1:1 stoichiometry, as previously determined in native disc membranes. Thus, similar to transducin activation, rhodopsin phosphorylation by GRK1 and high affinity arrestin-1 binding only requires a rhodopsin monomer. PMID:20966068

  6. The influence of salinity and restoration on wetland soil microbial communities and carbon cycling in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; He, S.; Windham-Myers, L.; Tringe, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the average salinity of the San Francisco Bay-Delta watershed as sea levels rise and alpine snow volume decreases. Wetland soil microbial communities are responsible for cycling greenhouse gases and their response to climate change will heavily influence whether increasing salinity will have a negative or positive effect on the net greenhouse gas budgets of wetlands. To better understand the underlying factors determining the balance of greenhouse gas flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater to full seawater in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range of wetland plant types and restoration states. We determined a suite of soil biogeochemical parameters including moisture, carbon and nutrient contents, pH, sulfate, chloride, and trace metal concentrations. The results of our microbial diversity survey (16S rRNA gene Illumina tag sequencing) showed that salinity and sampling location were the primary drivers of belowground microbial community composition. Freshwater wetland soils, with lower sulfate concentrations, produced more methane than saline sites and we found a parallel increase in the relative abundance of methanogen populations in the high-methane samples. Surprisingly, wetland restoration status did not significantly alter microbial community composition, despite orders of magnitude greater methane flux in restored wetlands compared to reference sites. Deeper metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing in a restored wetland allowed us to further evaluate the roles of methanogen abundance and activity in shaping soil methane production. Our study links belowground microbial communities with their greenhouse gas production, providing a mechanistic microbial framework for assessing climate change feedbacks in wetland soils resulting from sea

  7. Molecular physiology of rhodopsin: Computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'Dman, T. B.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Computer simulation is used for comparative investigation of the molecular dynamics of rhodopsin containing the chromophore group (11- cis-retinal) and free opsin. Molecular dynamics is traced within a time interval of 3000 ps; 3 × 106 discrete conformational states of rhodopsin and opsin are obtained and analyzed. It is demonstrated that the presence of the chromophore group in the chromophore center of opsin influences considerably the nearest protein environment of 11- cis-retinal both in the region of the β-ionone ring and in the region of the protonated Schiff base bond. Based on simulation results, a possible intramolecular mechanism of keeping rhodopsin as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the inactive state, i.e., the chromophore function as an efficient ligand antagonist, is discussed.

  8. [Effects of vegetation restoration on soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in hilly areas of Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Hu, Chan-juan; Fu, Bo-jie; Jin, Tian-tian; Liu, Guo-hua

    2009-01-01

    Aimed to explore the effects of different vegetations and of the years of vegetation restoration on soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, a comparative study was conducted, with the 5 year old Robinia pseudoacacia, Hippophae reamnoide and Prunus armeniaca plantations and the 5, 15 and 25 years old R. pseudoacacia plantation in the Yangjuangou catchment of Yanan City of Shaanxi Province, a typical hilly area of the Loess Plateau, as test objects. The results showed that among the three 5-year old plantations, H. reamnoides plantation had the highest soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents, while R. pseudoacacia plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) (99.56 mg x kg(-1)) and nitrogen (MBN) (28.81 mg x kg(-1)). The MBC was in the order of R. pseudoacacia > H. reamnoides > P. armeniaca, and that of MBN was of R. pseudoacacia > P. armeniaca > H. reamnoides. The MBC/SOC was in the order of R. pseudoacacia > H. reamnoides > P. armeniaca, and that of MBN/TN was of R. pseudoacacia > P. armeniaca > H. reamnoides, with the differences being significant (P < 0.05). With the increasing years of vegetation restoration, the soil pH in R. pseudoacacia plantation decreased, while the SOC, TN, electricity conductance (EC), MBC, and MBN all had an increasing trend, which illustrated that in the hilly area of Loess Plateau, planting R. pseudoacacia was more beneficial to the increase of soil MBC and MBN, and, with the increasing years of this planting, soil MBC, MBN, SOC and TN tended to be increasing.

  9. A first principles study of rhodopsin photoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Carla; Frank, Irmgard; Parrinello, Michele

    1998-03-01

    Rhodopsin is the protein responsible for converting light during the process of vision. It consists of the apoprotein opsin and the protonated Schiff base of the chromophore 11-cis retinal. In the first step of vision the chromophore undergoes a photoinduced 11-cis→all-trans isomerisation. We have studied the mechanism of rhodopsin photoactivation with a recently-developed method (Frank, Hutter, Marx and Parrinello 1997), that allows us to investigate the potential surface of excited states efficiently within a density functional based formalism. In particular, we have explored the influence of relevant aminoacids in the retinal binding pocket on the photoreaction.

  10. Carbon Cycling in Restored Wisconsin Grasslands: Examining Linkages Between Plant Diversity, Microbial Communities and Ecosystem Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, K. N.; Kucharik, C. J.; Balser, T. C.; Foley, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    It is important to characterize the variability of carbon (C) fluxes and stocks and the relationship between biotic and abiotic factors and C sequestration, a proposed strategy to help mitigate climate change. An observation site to study C cycling was established on land enrolled in the USDA Conservation Reserve Program in southwestern Wisconsin in spring 2002 on silt-loam soil. The site was converted from intensive row-crop agriculture in 1987 to three adjacent land cover types: an assortment of native C4 grasses, two C3 grasses and a nitrogen-fixer, and a disk planted, no-tillage food plot rotation of maize and soybeans. Key goals of the study were to characterize the effect of plant species composition and microbial community characteristics on carbon cycling in an attempt to link above- and below-ground processes. Measurements of soil surface CO2 efflux were made on a near-weekly basis during the growing season using a LICOR-6400, concurrently with soil surface moisture adjacent to the CO2 collars. Thermocouples were installed to record hourly average air temperature and soil temperature at 5 depths, from 2 to 70 cm, and water content sensors made hourly average measurements at 15 and 30 cm. Leaf area index measurements were made weekly, aboveground vegetation biomass was collected monthly, and belowground root biomass was collected bimonthly. Monthly microbial measurements included an assessment of community physiological profiles using BiOLOG, and assays of community composition (lipid analysis) and activity. Preliminary results suggest that land cover types significantly altered carbon cycling and microbial community structure and function, leading to different rates of C sequestration.

  11. Modulation of molecular interactions and function by rhodopsin palmitylation†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul S.-H.; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Jastrzebska, Beata; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Pulawski, Wojciech; Kono, Masahiro; Lem, Janis; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Filipek, Slawomir; Müller, Daniel J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Rhodopsin is palmitylated at two cysteine residues in its carboxyl terminal region. We have looked at the effects of palmitylation on the molecular interactions formed by rhodopsin using single-molecule force spectroscopy and the function of rhodopsin using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. A knockin mouse model expressing palmitate-deficient rhodopsin was used for live animal in vivo studies and to obtain native tissue samples for in vitro assays. We specifically looked at the effects palmitylation has on the chromophore-binding pocket, interactions of rhodopsin with transducin, and molecular interactions stabilizing the receptor structure. The structure of rhodopsin is largely unperturbed by the absence of palmitate linkage. The binding pocket for the chromophore 11-cis-retinal is minimally altered as palmitate-deficient rhodopsin exhibited the same absorbance spectrum as wild-type rhodopsin. Similarly, the rate of release of all-trans-retinal after light activation was the same both in the presence and absence of palmitylation. Significant differences were observed in the rate of transducin activation by rhodopsin and in the force required to unfold the last stable structural segment in rhodopsin at its carboxyl terminal region. A 1.3-fold reduction in the rate of transducin activation by rhodopsin was observed in the absence of palmitylation. Single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed a 2.1-fold reduction in normalized force required to unfold the carboxyl terminal end of rhodopsin. The absence of palmitylation in rhodopsin therefore destabilizes the molecular interactions formed in the carboxyl terminal end of the receptor, which appears to hinder the activation of transducin by light-activated rhodopsin. PMID:19348429

  12. Partial restoration of the microbiota of cesarean-born infants via vaginal microbial transfer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Bello, Maria G; De Jesus-Laboy, Kassandra M; Shen, Nan; Cox, Laura M; Amir, Amnon; Gonzalez, Antonio; Bokulich, Nicholas A; Song, Se Jin; Hoashi, Marina; Rivera-Vinas, Juana I; Mendez, Keimari; Knight, Rob; Clemente, Jose C

    2016-03-01

    Exposure of newborns to the maternal vaginal microbiota is interrupted with cesarean birthing. Babies delivered by cesarean section (C-section) acquire a microbiota that differs from that of vaginally delivered infants, and C-section delivery has been associated with increased risk for immune and metabolic disorders. Here we conducted a pilot study in which infants delivered by C-section were exposed to maternal vaginal fluids at birth. Similarly to vaginally delivered babies, the gut, oral and skin bacterial communities of these newborns during the first 30 d of life was enriched in vaginal bacteria--which were underrepresented in unexposed C-section-delivered infants--and the microbiome similarity to those of vaginally delivered infants was greater in oral and skin samples than in anal samples. Although the long-term health consequences of restoring the microbiota of C-section-delivered infants remain unclear, our results demonstrate that vaginal microbes can be partially restored at birth in C-section-delivered babies.

  13. Toward Automatic Rhodopsin Modeling as a Tool for High-Throughput Computational Photobiology.

    PubMed

    Melaccio, Federico; Del Carmen Marín, María; Valentini, Alessio; Montisci, Fabio; Rinaldi, Silvia; Cherubini, Marco; Yang, Xuchun; Kato, Yoshitaka; Stenrup, Michael; Orozco-Gonzalez, Yoelvis; Ferré, Nicolas; Luk, Hoi Ling; Kandori, Hideki; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-13

    We report on a prototype protocol for the automatic and fast construction of congruous sets of QM/MM models of rhodopsin-like photoreceptors and of their mutants. In the present implementation the information required for the construction of each model is essentially a crystallographic structure or a comparative model complemented with information on the protonation state of ionizable side chains and distributions of external counterions. Starting with such information, a model formed by a fixed environment system, a flexible cavity system, and a chromophore system is automatically generated. The results of the predicted vertical excitation energy for 27 different rhodopsins including vertebrate, invertebrate, and microbial pigments indicate that such basic models could be employed for predicting trends in spectral changes and/or correlate the spectral changes with structural variations in large sets of proteins.

  14. Microbial Nursery Production of High-Quality Biological Soil Crust Biomass for Restoration of Degraded Dryland Soils.

    PubMed

    Velasco Ayuso, Sergio; Giraldo Silva, Ana; Nelson, Corey; Barger, Nichole N; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2017-02-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are slow-growing, phototroph-based microbial assemblages that develop on the topsoils of drylands. Biocrusts help maintain soil fertility and reduce erosion. Because their loss through human activities has negative ecological and environmental health consequences, biocrust restoration is of interest. Active soil inoculation with biocrust microorganisms can be an important tool in this endeavor. We present a culture-independent, two-step process to grow multispecies biocrusts in open greenhouse nursery facilities, based on the inoculation of local soils with local biocrust remnants and incubation under seminatural conditions that maintain the essence of the habitat but lessen its harshness. In each of four U.S. Southwest sites, we tested and deployed combinations of factors that maximized growth (gauged as chlorophyll a content) while minimizing microbial community shifts (assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing and bioinformatics), particularly for crust-forming cyanobacteria. Generally, doubling the frequency of natural wetting events, a 60% reduction in sunlight, and inoculation by slurry were optimal. Nutrient addition effects were site specific. In 4 months, our approach yielded crusts of high inoculum quality reared on local soil exposed to locally matched climates, acclimated to desiccation, and containing communities minimally shifted in composition from local ones. Our inoculum contained abundant crust-forming cyanobacteria and no significant numbers of allochthonous phototrophs, and it was sufficient to treat ca. 6,000 m(2) of degraded dryland soils at 1 to 5% of the typical crust biomass concentration, having started from a natural crust remnant as small as 6 to 30 cm(2) IMPORTANCE: Soil surface crusts can protect dryland soils from erosion, but they are often negatively impacted by human activities. Their degradation causes a loss of fertility, increased production of fugitive dust and intensity of dust storms with associated

  15. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structural Study of the Retinal-Binding Pocket in Sodium Ion Pump Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Arisu; Ito, Shota; Inoue, Keiichi; Okitsu, Takashi; Wada, Akimori; Kandori, Hideki; Kawamura, Izuru

    2017-01-31

    The recently identified Krokinobacter rhodopsin 2 (KR2) functions as a light-driven sodium ion pump. The structure of the retinal-binding pocket of KR2 offers important insights into the mechanisms of KR2, which has motif of Asn112, Asp116, and Gln123 (NDQ) that is common among sodium ion pump rhodopsins but is unique among other microbial rhodopsins. Here we present solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) characterization of retinal and functionally important residues in the vicinity of retinal in the ground state. We assigned chemical shifts of retinal C14 and C20 atoms, and Tyr218Cζ, Lys255Cε, and the protonated Schiff base of KR2 in lipid environments at acidic and neutral pH. (15)N NMR signals of the protonated Schiff base showed a twist around the N-Cε bond under neutral conditions, compared with other microbial rhodopsins. These data indicated that the location of the counterion Asp116 is one helical pitch toward the cytoplasmic side. In acidic environments, the (15)N Schiff base signal was shifted to a lower field, indicating that protonation of Asp116 induces reorientation during interactions between the Schiff base and Asp116. In addition, the Tyr218 residue in the vicinity of retinal formed a weak hydrogen bond with Asp251, a temporary Na(+)-binding site during the photocycle. These features may indicate unique mechanisms of sodium ion pumps.

  16. Incorporating H2 Dynamics and Inhibition into a Microbially Based Methanogenesis Model for Restored Wetland Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, David; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Estimates of global CH4 emissions from wetlands indicate that wetlands are the largest natural source of CH4 to the atmosphere. In this paper, we propose that there is a missing component to these models that should be addressed. CH4 is produced in wetland sediments from the microbial degradation of organic carbon through multiple fermentation steps and methanogenesis pathways. There are multiple sources of carbon for methananogenesis; in vegetated wetland sediments, microbial communities consume root exudates as a major source of organic carbon. In many methane models propionate is used as a model carbon molecule. This simple sugar is fermented into acetate and H2, acetate is transformed to methane and CO2, while the H2 and CO2 are used to form an additional CH4 molecule. The hydrogenotrophic pathway involves the equilibrium of two dissolved gases, CH4 and H2. In an effort to limit CH4 emissions from wetlands, there has been growing interest in finding ways to limit plant transport of soil gases through root systems. Changing planted species, or genetically modifying new species of plants may control this transport of soil gases. While this may decrease the direct emissions of methane, there is little understanding about how H2 dynamics may feedback into overall methane production. The results of an incubation study were combined with a new model of propionate degradation for methanogenesis that also examines other natural parameters (i.e. gas transport through plants). This presentation examines how we would expect this model to behave in a natural field setting with changing sulfate and carbon loading schemes. These changes can be controlled through new plant species and other management practices. Next, we compare the behavior of two variations of this model, with or without the incorporation of H2 interactions, with changing sulfate, carbon loading and root volatilization. Results show that while the models behave similarly there may be a discrepancy of nearly

  17. Gut microbial profile is altered in primary biliary cholangitis and partially restored after UDCA therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ruqi; Wei, Yiran; Li, Yanmei; Chen, Weihua; Chen, Haoyan; Wang, Qixia; Yang, Fan; Miao, Qi; Xiao, Xiao; Zhang, Haiyan; Lian, Min; Jiang, Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Cao, Qin; Fan, Zhuping; Wu, Maoying; Qiu, Dekai; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Ansari, Aftab; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2017-02-17

    A close relationship between gut microbiota and some chronic liver disorders has recently been described. Herein, we systematically performed a comparative analysis of the gut microbiome in primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and healthy controls. We first conducted a cross-sectional study of 60 ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment-naïve patients with PBC and 80 matched healthy controls. Second, an independent cohort composed of 19 treatment-naïve patients and 34 controls was used to validate the results. Finally, a prospective study was performed in a subgroup of 37 patients with PBC who underwent analysis before and after 6 months of UDCA treatment. Faecal samples were collected, and microbiomes were analysed by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. A significant reduction of within-individual microbial diversity was noted in PBC (p=0.03). A signature defined by decreased abundance of four genera and increased abundance of eight genera strongly correlated with PBC (area under curve=0.86, 0.84 in exploration and validation data, respectively). Notably, the abundance of six PBC-associated genera was reversed after 6 months of UDCA treatment. In particular, Faecalibacterium, enriched in controls, was further decreased in gp210-positive than gp210-negative patients (p=0.002). Of interest was the finding that the increased capacity for the inferred pathway, bacterial invasion of epithelial cells in PBC, highly correlated with the abundance of bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae. This study presents a comprehensive landscape of gut microbiota in PBC. Dysbiosis was found in the gut microbiome in PBC and partially relieved by UDCA. Our study suggests that gut microbiota is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic biomarker for PBC. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Conservation of molecular interactions stabilizing bovine and mouse rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Müller, Daniel J.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor that initiates phototransduction in rod photoreceptor cells. The structure and function of rhodopsin is tightly linked to molecular interactions that stabilize and determine the receptor's functional state. Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to localize and quantify molecular interactions that structurally stabilize bovine and mouse rhodopsin from native disc membranes of rod photoreceptor cells. The mechanical unfolding of bovine and mouse rhodopsin revealed nine major unfolding intermediates, each intermediate defining a structurally stable segment in the receptor. These stable structural segments had similar localization and occurrence in both bovine and mouse samples. For each structural segment, parameters describing their unfolding energy barrier were determined by dynamic SMFS. No major differences were observed between bovine and mouse rhodopsin thereby implying that the structures of both rhodopsins are largely stabilized by similar molecular interactions. PMID:21038881

  19. Targeting the Proteostasis Network in Rhodopsin Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin are one of the most common causes of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Misfolding of rhodopsin can result in disruptions in cellular protein homeostasis, or proteostasis. There is currently no available treatment for RP. In this review, we discuss the different approaches currently being investigated for treatment of rhodopsin RP, focusing on the potential of manipulation of the proteostasis network as a therapeutic approach to combat retinal degeneration.

  20. N-fixing trees in wetland restoration plantings: effects on nitrogensupply and soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Chen, XuePing; Yang, JunNa; Zhu, XiE; Liang, Xia; Lei, YanRu; He, ChiQuan

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the impact of an exotic Frankia nodulated tree (Alnus trabeculosa) on soil nitrogen content, soil microbial composition, and the abundance of N turnover-related functional microorganism community, we compared the community structure and abundance of key functional genes (nifH, bacterial/archaeal amoA, and nosZ) in the rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere of monoculture of Phragmites australis and A.trabeculosa-P.australis mixed communities by MiSeq Illumina sequencing and real-time PCR, respectively. The introduction of Frankia nodulated tree to recover degraded wetland was effective in the accumulation of soil organic carbon and nitrogen, which was the key factor to impact on the bacterial community composition revealed by canonical correspondence analysis. Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria were the dominant bacterial phylums while seven rare phyla appeared the most phylogenetically different among the investigated soil of two vegetations, including Chlorobi, Cyanobacteria, OD1, OP11, TM6, TM7, and GN02. The gene copy numbers of nifH were ranged from 2.28 × 10(8) to 2.96 × 10(9) copies g(-1) dry soil in the wetland, and which were significantly higher in soil samples from P. australis than that from A.trabeculosa. While the abundance of nosZ in both rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere soils of A.trabeculosa-P.australis mixed communities was significantly lower compared with P.australis monoculture. The potential nitrification (PNA) (0.15-0.41 mg NOx-N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1)) in the rhizosphere of A. trabeculosa was significantly higher than that of P. australis, and the soil denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) (0.42-0.90 nmol N2O-N g(-1) dry soil h(-1)) was lower in the mixed community compared with monoculture of P. australis. The introduced planting of Frankia nodulated tree effectively accumulated soil organic carbon and nitrogen and reduce the relative abundance and activity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria and denitrification bacteria.

  1. Dark regeneration of rhodopsin in crayfish photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The eyes of crayfish were exposed to lights of known spectral composition, and the course of regeneration was followed in the dark by measuring the content of rhodopsin and metarhodopsin in single rhabdoms isolated at various times after the adaptation, using an assay that is based on the fluorescence of metarhodopsin. Complete recovery requires several days in the dark after intense adaptation to orange light, but requires less than 2 d after blue light exposure. Following an orange light exposure with blue produces recovery kinetics characteristic of the blue light exposure alone. This quickening of recovery occurs whether the receptors are exposed to blue light either immediately or many hours after the original exposure to orange. Conversely, following blue light adaptation with orange leads to slow recovery, which is characteristic of orange alone. Recovery from long-wavelength adaptation is slower principally because many rhabdoms seem to delay the onset of regeneration. We suggest that the regeneration system is itself photosensitive, and after orange light adaptation the supply of active chromophore (presumably 11-cis retinal) limits the rate of recovery. Once started, recovery proceeds slowly and continuously, and the total pigment concentration (rhodopsin plus metarhodopsin) in the rhabdomeric membrane remains approximately constant. Within hours after intense adapting exposures, the rhabdoms become altered in appearance, the surfaces become coated with accessory pigment, and the bands of microvilli are less distinct. These changes persist until recovery of rhodopsin proceeds, which suggests that visual pigment regeneration results from addition of newly synthesized rhodopsin associated with membrane turn-over. PMID:6747600

  2. Rhodopsin bleaching signals in essential night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M.; Holland, M. G.; Ohba, N.

    1972-01-01

    1. The dark-adaptation curves of two subjects with essential night blindness revealed no evidence for functioning rod vision. Cone vision was normal. 2. The photopupillomotor dark adaptation, and flash intensity response amplitude curves on one of these subjects confirmed the absence of rod function. 3. However, there is the normal amount of rhodopsin in their rods with normal kinetics. 4. Cone pigment kinetics are also nearly normal. After a full bleach, log threshold elevation of the foveal cones is linearly related to pigment regeneration. The constant of proportionality is about 3·0 as it is in the normal retina. 5. After a full rhodopsin bleach, the contralateral pupil size recovered its full dark value along a curve which followed the regeneration of rhodopsin. 6. The results in (5) are identical to those previously found on normal subjects. 7. With the exception of a very small response attributed to the contribution of cones, no significant changes in pupil size were evoked by uniform ganzfeld steady backgrounds until the intensity of retinal illuminance was so high that appreciable rhodopsin was bleached. This contrast to the changes evoked by weak steady backgrounds in the normal eye. 8. Therefore, rod bleaching signals are normal in such retinas but rod signals evoked by real lights are not functional. This supports Rushton's concept as to how bleaching signals influence retinal sensitivity as opposed to the view of Barlow. 9. The defect in essential night blindness very probably involves the rod automatic gain control, but because of (4) the cone gain control must be normal. 10. Therefore, rod and cone gain control mechanisms must be independent in these night blind retinas and, by analogy, in the normal retina as well. PMID:4538549

  3. Regulation of Arrestin Binding by Rhodopsin Phosphorylation Level

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Raman, Dayanidhi; Wei, Junhua; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Hurley, James B.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2008-01-01

    Arrestins ensure the timely termination of receptor signaling. The role of rhodopsin phosphorylation in visual arrestin binding was established more than 20 years ago, but the effects of the number of receptor-attached phosphates on this interaction remain controversial. Here we use purified rhodopsin fractions with carefully quantified content of individual phosphorylated rhodopsin species to elucidate the impact of phosphorylation level on arrestin interaction with three biologically relevant functional forms of rhodopsin: light-activated and dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. We found that a single receptor-attached phosphate does not facilitate arrestin binding, two are necessary to induce high affinity interaction, and three phosphates fully activate arrestin. Higher phosphorylation levels do not increase the stability of arrestin complex with light-activated rhodopsin but enhance its binding to the dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. The complex of arrestin with hyperphosphorylated light-activated rhodopsin is less sensitive to high salt and appears to release retinal faster. These data suggest that arrestin likely quenches rhodopsin signaling after the third phosphate is added by rhodopsin kinase. The complex of arrestin with heavily phosphorylated rhodopsin, which appears to form in certain disease states, has distinct characteristics that may contribute to the phenotype of these visual disorders. PMID:17848565

  4. The rhodopsins: structure and function. Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    Nature makes use of the propensity of retinal for light-dependent double-bond isomerization in a number of systems and in a variety of ways. The common theme for light receptors based on this kind of chemistry is that (1) the retinal is bound in most cases to a small membrane protein via a protonated lysine-retinal Schiff base, (2) the absorption maximum in the visible is tuned to a suitable wavelength largely by electrostatic interaction with polar protein residues, and (3) the light-induced bond rotations and strains in the retinal set off reaction chains during which at least part of the excess free energy acquired is transferred to the protein and causes pK shifts of acidic residues and/or backbone conformational changes. The physiological consequence of the process initiated by absorption of light is either the activation of an information transfer chain (sensory and visual rhodopsins) or energy transduction which drives the electrogenic movement of ions across the membrane (ion-motive rhodopsins). Rhodopsins with these functions occur in bacteria and in higher organisms; from an evolutionary standpoint they are not related to one another. Nevertheless, all of these proteins are remarkably similar and form a distinct family.

  5. The rhodopsins: structure and function. Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    Nature makes use of the propensity of retinal for light-dependent double-bond isomerization in a number of systems and in a variety of ways. The common theme for light receptors based on this kind of chemistry is that (1) the retinal is bound in most cases to a small membrane protein via a protonated lysine-retinal Schiff base, (2) the absorption maximum in the visible is tuned to a suitable wavelength largely by electrostatic interaction with polar protein residues, and (3) the light-induced bond rotations and strains in the retinal set off reaction chains during which at least part of the excess free energy acquired is transferred to the protein and causes pK shifts of acidic residues and/or backbone conformational changes. The physiological consequence of the process initiated by absorption of light is either the activation of an information transfer chain (sensory and visual rhodopsins) or energy transduction which drives the electrogenic movement of ions across the membrane (ion-motive rhodopsins). Rhodopsins with these functions occur in bacteria and in higher organisms; from an evolutionary standpoint they are not related to one another. Nevertheless, all of these proteins are remarkably similar and form a distinct family.

  6. Legacy effects overwhelm the short-term effects of exotic plant invasion and restoration on soil microbial community structure, enzyme activities, and nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Elgersma, Kenneth J; Ehrenfeld, Joan G; Yu, Shen; Vor, Torsten

    2011-11-01

    Plant invasions can have substantial consequences for the soil ecosystem, altering microbial community structure and nutrient cycling. However, relatively little is known about what drives these changes, making it difficult to predict the effects of future invasions. In addition, because most studies compare soils from uninvaded areas to long-established dense invasions, little is known about the temporal dependence of invasion impacts. We experimentally manipulated forest understory vegetation in replicated sites dominated either by exotic Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), native Viburnums, or native Vacciniums, so that each vegetation type was present in each site-type. We compared the short-term effect of vegetation changes to the lingering legacy effects of the previous vegetation type by measuring soil microbial community structure (phospholipid fatty acids) and function (extracellular enzymes and nitrogen mineralization). We also replaced the aboveground litter in half of each plot with an inert substitute to determine if changes in the soil microbial community were driven by aboveground or belowground plant inputs. We found that after 2 years, the microbial community structure and function was largely determined by the legacy effect of the previous vegetation type, and was not affected by the current vegetation. Aboveground litter removal had only weak effects, suggesting that changes in the soil microbial community and nutrient cycling were driven largely by belowground processes. These results suggest that changes in the soil following either invasion or restoration do not occur quickly, but rather exhibit long-lasting legacy effects from previous belowground plant inputs.

  7. Characterizing rhodopsin signaling by EPR spectroscopy: from structure to dynamics.

    PubMed

    Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N; Morizumi, Takefumi; Ernst, Oliver P

    2015-09-26

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, together with spin labeling techniques, has played a major role in the characterization of rhodopsin, the photoreceptor protein and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in rod cells. Two decades ago, these biophysical tools were the first to identify transmembrane helical movements in rhodopsin upon photo-activation, a critical step in the study of GPCR signaling. EPR methods were employed to identify functional loop dynamics within rhodopsin, to measure light-induced millisecond timescale changes in rhodopsin conformation, to characterize the effects of partial agonists on the apoprotein opsin, and to study lipid interactions with rhodopsin. With the emergence of advanced pulsed EPR techniques, the stage was set to determine the amplitude of structural changes in rhodopsin and the dynamics in the rhodopsin signaling complexes. Work in this area has yielded invaluable information about mechanistic properties of GPCRs. Using EPR techniques, receptors are studied in native-like membrane environments and the effects of lipids on conformational equilibria can be explored. This perspective addresses the impact of EPR methods on rhodopsin and GPCR structural biology, highlighting historical discoveries made with spin labeling techniques, and outlining exciting new directions in the field.

  8. Crystallographic Study of the LUMI Intermediate of Squid Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Midori; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Upon absorption of light, the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin isomerizes from the 11-cis to the trans configuration, initiating a photoreaction cycle. The primary photoreaction state, bathorhodopsin (BATHO), relaxes thermally through lumirhodopsin (LUMI) into a photoactive state, metarhodopsin (META), which stimulates the conjugated G-protein. Previous crystallographic studies of squid and bovine rhodopsins have shown that the structural change in the primary photoreaction of squid rhodopsin is considerably different from that observed in bovine rhodopsin. It would be expected that there is a fundamental difference in the subsequent thermal relaxation process between vertebrate and invertebrate rhodopsins. In this work, we performed crystallographic analyses of the LUMI state of squid rhodopsin using the P62 crystal. When the crystal was illuminated at 100 K with blue light, a half fraction of the protein was converted into BATHO. This reaction state relaxed into LUMI when the illuminated crystal was warmed in the dark to 170 K. It was found that, whereas trans retinal is largely twisted in BATHO, it takes on a more planar configuration in LUMI. This relaxation of retinal is accompanied by reorientation of the Schiff base NH bond, the hydrogen-bonding partner of which is switched to Asn185 in LUMI. Unlike bovine rhodopsin, the BATHO-to-LUMI transition in squid rhodopsin was accompanied by no significant change in the position/orientation of the beta-ionone ring of retinal.

  9. New insights into the evolutionary history of type 1 rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Mario X; Marín, Ignacio

    2004-03-01

    Type 1 (archaeal) rhodopsins and related rhodopsin-like proteins had been described in a few halophile archaea, gamma-proteobacteria, a single cyanobacteria, some fungi, and a green alga. In exhaustive database searches, we detected rhodopsin-related sequences derived not only from additional fungal species but also from organisms belonging to three groups in which opsins had hitherto not been described: the alpha-proteobacterium Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, the cryptomonad alga Guillardia theta, and the dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula. Putative plant and human type 1 rhodopsin sequences found in the databases are demonstrated to be contaminants of fungal origin. However, a highly diverged sequence supposedly from the plant Oryza sativa was found that is, together with the Pyrocystis sequence, quite similar to gamma-proteobacterial rhodopsins. These close relationships suggest that at least one horizontal gene transfer event involving rhodopsin genes occurred between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Alternative hypotheses to explain the current phylogenetic range of type 1 rhodopsins are suggested. The broader phylogenetic range found is compatible with an ancient origin of type 1 rhodopsins, their patchy distribution being caused by losses in multiple lineages. However, the possibility of ancient horizontal transfer events between distant relatives cannot be dismissed.

  10. Retinitis pigmentosa mutants provide insight into the role of the N-terminal cap in rhodopsin folding, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Opefi, Chikwado A; South, Kieron; Reynolds, Christopher A; Smith, Steven O; Reeves, Philip J

    2013-11-22

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) mutants (T4K, N15S, T17M, V20G, P23A/H/L, and Q28H) in the N-terminal cap of rhodopsin misfold when expressed in mammalian cells. To gain insight into the causes of misfolding and to define the contributions of specific residues to receptor stability and function, we evaluated the responses of these mutants to 11-cis-retinal pharmacological chaperone rescue or disulfide bond-mediated repair. Pharmacological rescue restored folding in all mutants, but the purified mutant pigments in all cases were thermo-unstable and exhibited abnormal photobleaching, metarhodopsin II decay, and G protein activation. As a complementary approach, we superimposed this panel of ADRP mutants onto a rhodopsin background containing a juxtaposed cysteine pair (N2C/D282C) that forms a disulfide bond. This approach restored folding in T4K, N15S, V20G, P23A, and Q28H but not T17M, P23H, or P23L. ADRP mutant pigments obtained by disulfide bond repair exhibited enhanced stability, and some also displayed markedly improved photobleaching and signal transduction properties. Our major conclusion is that the N-terminal cap stabilizes opsin during biosynthesis and contributes to the dark-state stability of rhodopsin. Comparison of these two restorative approaches revealed that the correct position of the cap relative to the extracellular loops is also required for optimal photochemistry and efficient G protein activation.

  11. Thermal Stability of Rhodopsin and Progression of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Monica Yun; Liu, Jian; Mehrotra, Devi; Liu, Yuting; Guo, Ying; Baldera-Aguayo, Pedro A.; Mooney, Victoria L.; Nour, Adel M.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Over 100 point mutations in the rhodopsin gene have been associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of inherited visual disorders. Among these, we focused on characterizing the S186W mutation. We compared the thermal properties of the S186W mutant with another RP-causing mutant, D190N, and with WT rhodopsin. To assess thermal stability, we measured the rate of two thermal reactions contributing to the thermal decay of rhodopsin as follows: thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal and hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base linkage between the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and opsin protein. We used UV-visible spectroscopy and HPLC to examine the kinetics of these reactions at 37 and 55 °C for WT and mutant rhodopsin purified from HEK293 cells. Compared with WT rhodopsin and the D190N mutant, the S186W mutation dramatically increases the rates of both thermal isomerization and dark state hydrolysis of the Schiff base by 1–2 orders of magnitude. The results suggest that the S186W mutant thermally destabilizes rhodopsin by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the receptor's active site. The decrease in the thermal stability of dark state rhodopsin is likely to be associated with higher levels of dark noise that undermine the sensitivity of rhodopsin, potentially accounting for night blindness in the early stages of RP. Further studies of the thermal stability of additional pathogenic rhodopsin mutations in conjunction with clinical studies are expected to provide insight into the molecular mechanism of RP and test the correlation between rhodopsin's thermal stability and RP progression in patients. PMID:23625926

  12. Repression of Six3 by a corepressor regulates rhodopsin expression

    PubMed Central

    Manavathi, Bramanandam; Peng, Shaohua; Rayala, Suresh K.; Talukder, Amjad H.; Wang, Minhua H.; Wang, Rui-An; Balasenthil, Seetharaman; Agarwal, Neeraj; Frishman, Laura J.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    Here, we provide gain-of-function, loss-of function, and molecular evidence supporting genetic interactions between metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) and Six3 and between Six3 and rhodopsin. We discovered that MTA1 physically interacts with the Six3 chromatin in a histone deacetylase-dependent manner, leading to transcriptional suppression of the Six3 gene. MTA1 is also a Six3-interacting corepressor that contributes to a self-negative regulation of Six3 transcription by Six3. In contrast, deletion of the MTA1 alleles in murine embryonic fibroblasts or its knockdown in rat retinal ganglion cells stimulates Six3 expression. MTA1 inactivation in the MTA1-null mice results in an elevated Six3 level and proliferation of the retina cells with no obvious abnormities in eye formation. However, unexpectedly, we discovered an enhanced recruitment of Six3 to the rhodopsin chromatin in retina from the MTA1-null mice; Six3's homeodomain interacts with specific DNA elements in the rhodopsin promoter to stimulate its transcription, resulting in increased rhodopsin expression. Further, in holoprosencephaly patients, Six3 protein with a naturally occurring deletion mutation in the helix 3 of the homeodomain does not bind to rhodopsin DNA or stimulate rhodopsin transcription, implying a potential defective rhodopsin pathway in the affected holoprosencephaly patients. Further Six3 cooperates with Crx or NRL in stimulating transcription from the rhodopsin-luc. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for the MTA1 as an upstream modifier of Six3 and indicate that Six3 is a direct stimulator of rhodopsin expression, thus revealing a putative role for the MTA1/Six3/rhodopsin pathway in vertebrate eye. PMID:17666527

  13. Directed evolution of a far-red fluorescent rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, R. Scott; Engqvist, Martin K. M.; Wannier, Timothy; Rosenthal, Adam Z.; Herwig, Lukas; Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Lanyi, Janos K.; Balashov, Sergei P.; Gradinaru, Viviana; Arnold, Frances H.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photoactive transmembrane proteins found in all three domains of life. A member of this protein family, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) of halobacterium Halorubrum sodomense, was recently shown to function as a fluorescent indicator of membrane potential when expressed in mammalian neurons. Arch fluorescence, however, is very dim and is not optimal for applications in live-cell imaging. We used directed evolution to identify mutations that dramatically improve the absolute brightness of Arch, as confirmed biochemically and with live-cell imaging (in Escherichia coli and human embryonic kidney 293 cells). In some fluorescent Arch variants, the pKa of the protonated Schiff-base linkage to retinal is near neutral pH, a useful feature for voltage-sensing applications. These bright Arch variants enable labeling of biological membranes in the far-red/infrared and exhibit the furthest red-shifted fluorescence emission thus far reported for a fluorescent protein (maximal excitation/emission at ∼620 nm/730 nm). PMID:25157169

  14. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  15. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B.; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A.; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2016-01-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilize receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily, using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 are found to stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released facilitating H5 and H7 repacking onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles prolines play in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  16. The Rhodopsin-Arrestin-1 Interaction in Bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuyan; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Cho, Min-Kyu; Thaker, Tarjani M.; Sanders, Charles R.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Iverson, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are essential mediators of information transfer in eukaryotic cells. Interactions between GPCRs and their binding partners modulate the signaling process. For example, the interaction between GPCR and cognate G protein initiates the signal, while the interaction with cognate arrestin terminates G-protein-mediated signaling. In visual signal transduction, arrestin-1 selectively binds to the phosphorylated light-activated GPCR rhodopsin to terminate rhodopsin signaling. Under physiological conditions, the rhodopsin-arrestin-1 interaction occurs in highly specialized disk membrane in which rhodopsin resides. This membrane is replaced with mimetics when working with purified proteins. While detergents are commonly used as membrane mimetics, most detergents denature arrestin-1, preventing biochemical studies of this interaction. In contrast, bicelles provide a suitable alternative medium. An advantage of bicelles is that they contain lipids, which have been shown to be necessary for normal rhodopsin-arrestin-1 interaction. Here we describe how to reconstitute rhodopsin into bicelles, and how bicelle properties affect the rhodopsin-arrestin-1 interaction. PMID:25697518

  17. Functional Expression of Gloeobacter Rhodopsin in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Chen, Que; Arents, Jos; Ganapathy, Srividya; de Grip, Willem J; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2017-05-01

    Proteorhodopsins are light-driven proton pumps that occur widespread in Nature, where they function predominantly in environments with high incident irradiance. Their maximal absorbance is usually in the blue range, but can be extended into the (far)red range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Because they can be expressed heterologously, they may be exploited in studies aimed at increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Here we report further studies toward this goal, by comparing the expression of two different bacterial rhodopsins (Proteorhodopsin and Gloeobacter rhodopsin) in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In particular, we investigated the pigments bound by the respective apo-opsins, and the oligomeric state of the corresponding holo-rhodopsins, both in Escherichia coli and in the cyanobacterial membranes. We conclude that the two proton-pumping rhodopsins are predominantly present in an oligomeric state (hexamers for Proteorhodopsin and trimers for Gloeobacter rhodopsin). Furthermore, Gloeobacter rhodopsin is able to bind an antenna carotenoid (in addition to retinal) and has the highest pumping rate at given light intensity. However, its lower expression level will decrease its physiological effectiveness. It remains to be established which of these two bacterial rhodopsins is best in stimulating the growth rate of its cyanobacterial host. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. Lateral diffusion of rhodopsin in photoreceptor membrane: a reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Korenyak, Darya A.; Shukolyukov, Sergei A.; Zueva, Lidia V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In a series of works between 1972 and 1984, it was established that rhodopsin undergoes rotational and lateral Brownian motion in the plane of photoreceptor membrane. The concept of free movement of proteins of phototransduction cascade is an essential principle of the present scheme of vertebrate phototransduction. This has recently been challenged by findings that show that in certain conditions rhodopsin in the membrane may be dimeric and form extended areas of paracrystalline organization. Such organization seems incompatible with earlier data on free rhodopsin diffusion. Thus we decided to reinvestigate lateral diffusion of rhodopsin and products of its photolysis in photoreceptor membrane specifically looking for indications of possible oligomeric organization. Methods Diffusion exchange by rhodopsin and its photoproducts between bleached and unbleached halves of rod outer segment was traced using high-speed dichroic microspectrophotometer. Measurements were conducted on amphibian (frog, toad, and salamander) and gecko rods. Results We found that the curves that are supposed to reflect the process of diffusion equilibration of rhodopsin in nonuniformly bleached outer segment largely show production of long-lived bleaching intermediate, metarhodopsin III (Meta III). After experimental elimination of Meta III contribution, we observed rhodopsin equilibration time constant was threefold to tenfold longer than estimated previously. However, after proper correction for the geometry of rod discs, it translates into generally accepted value of diffusion constant of approximately 5×10−9 cm2 s−1. Yet, we found that there exists an immobile rhodopsin fraction whose size can vary from virtually zero to 100%, depending on poorly defined factors. Controls suggest that the formation of the immobile fraction is not due to fragmentation of rod outer segment discs but supposedly reflects oligomerization of rhodopsin. Conclusions Implications of the new findings

  19. Efficient femtosecond energy transfer from carotenoid to retinal in gloeobacter rhodopsin-salinixanthin complex.

    PubMed

    Iyer, E Siva Subramaniam; Gdor, Itay; Eliash, Tamar; Sheves, Mordechai; Ruhman, Sanford

    2015-02-12

    The retinal proton pump xanthorhodopsin (XR) was recently found to function with an attached carotenoid light harvesting antenna, salinixanthin (SX). It is intriguing to discover if this departure from single chromophore architecture is singular or if it has been adopted by other microbial rhodopsins. In search of other cases, retinal protein encoding genes in numerous bacteria have been identified containing sequences corresponding to carotenoid binding sites like that in XR. Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR), exhibiting particularly close homology to XR, has been shown to attach SX, and fluorescence measurements suggest SX can function as a light harvesting (LH) antenna in GR as well. In this study, we test this suggestion in real time using ultrafast transient absorption. Results show that energy transfer indeed occurs from S2 of SX to retinal in the GR-SX composite with an efficiency of ∼40%, even higher than that in XR. This validates the earlier fluorescence study, and supports the notion that many microbial retinal proteins use carotenoid antennae to harvest light.

  20. Voltage imaging in vivo with a new class of rhodopsin-based indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Reliable, optical detection of single action potentials in an intact brain is one of the longest-standing challenges in neuroscience. We have recently shown that a number of microbial rhodopsins exhibit intrinsic fluorescence that is sensitive to transmembrane potential. One class of indicator, derived from Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), responds to voltage transients with a speed and sensitivity that enable near-perfect identification of single action potentials in cultured neurons [Nat Methods. (2011). 9:90-5]. We have extended the use of these indicators to an in vivo context through the application of advanced imaging techniques to the larval zebrafish. Using planar-illumination, spinning-disk confocal, and epifluorescence imaging modalities, we have successfully recorded electrical activity in a variety of fish structures, including the brain and heart, in a completely noninvasive manner. Transgenic lines expressing Arch variants in defined cells enable comprehensive measurements to be made from specific target populations. In parallel, we have also extended the capabilities of our indicators by improving their multiphoton excitability and overall brightness. Microbial rhodopsin-based voltage indicators now enable optical interrogation of complex neural circuits, and electrophysiology in systems for which electrode-based techniques are challenging.

  1. Genome sequence of the marine flavobacterium Croceitalea dokdonensis DOKDO 023 that contains proton- and sodium-pumping rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Lee, Hyun Gwon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Kim, Jihyun F

    2016-04-01

    Bacteroidetes are considered as efficient degraders of the high-molecular-weight particulate organic matter that is present in the marine environment. Here, we report the first genome sequence of the genus Croceitalea that belongs to Flavobacteriia. Gratifying the reputation, the genome of Croceitalea dokdonensis DOKDO 023 encodes many hydrolytic enzymes for utilizing biopolymers, mainly polysaccharides and proteins. The genome also harbors two genes for microbial rhodopsins, proteorhodopsin and a recently discovered sodium pump. This research provides a genetic basis for better understanding of Croceitalea, as well as insights into the strategies adapted by a rhodopsin-containing photoheterotroph to thrive in the marine environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The G Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Lukas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a key light-sensitive protein expressed exclusively in rod photoreceptor cells of the retina. Failure to express this transmembrane protein causes a lack of rod outer segment formation and progressive retinal degeneration, including the loss of cone photoreceptor cells. Molecular studies of rhodopsin have paved the way to understanding a large family of cell-surface membrane proteins called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Work started on rhodopsin over 100 years ago still continues today with substantial progress made every year. These activities underscore the importance of rhodopsin as a prototypical GPCR and receptor required for visual perception—the fundamental process of translating light energy into a biochemical cascade of events culminating in vision. PMID:25697513

  3. [Peculiarities of rhodopsin photoconversion at the early stages of photolysis].

    PubMed

    Fel'dman, T B; Fedorovich, I B; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2003-02-01

    The primary stages of rhodopsin photolysis were studied with the low temperature absorption spectroscopy technique. Digitonin extract of bovine rhodopsin was irradiated at -155 degrees C with blue light (436 nm). The following changes of the dark spectrum were recorded in the course of slow rise of the temperature in 1-3 degrees C steps. Simultaneous appearance of more than one spectral product was revealed throughout the batho- to lumirhodopsin transition. An intermediate product transformed along with bathorhodopsin to a next product known as a "blue-shifted intermediate", was observed. The data suggest that appearance of more than one intermediate at each stage of the rhodopsin photolysis reflects existence of multiple conformation states of the rhodopsin molecule in the course of its photoconversion.

  4. Primary Processes in Photolysis of Octopus Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    1988-01-01

    The photolysis of octopus rhodopsin was studied by picosecond time-resolved spectroscopy at physiological temperature (8°C) and by steady-state spectroscopy at very low temperature (10 K). Both hypsorhodopsin and bathorhodopsin were formed from a bathorhodopsin-like red-shifted intermediate “primerhodopsin,” which was the primary photoproduct with our time resolution (36 ps). Though it was proposed that hypsorhodopsin is formed solely by a multiphoton process, the present results obtained by using blue light pulses (461 nm) of low intensity showed that hypsorhodopsin is formed by a single photon mechanism via thermal decay from primerhodopsin. When the excitation intensity is increased, a channel for the photochemical formation of hypsorhodopsin from primerhodopsin is opened. There are two thermal pathways leading from primerhodopsin. One process is the formation of hypsorhodopsin, which is later thermally converted to bathorhodopsin, and the other is the direct formation of bathorhodopsin from primerhodopsin. The formation efficiencies at room temperature of hypsorhodopsin and bathorhodopsin at very low excitation intensity were estimated to be larger than 0.6 and smaller than 0.4, respectively. The formation of hypsorhodopsin was also found in the early stages of the irradiation of octopus rhodopsin with weak continuous light at 10 K. However bathorhodopsin is formed three times more efficiently than hypsorhodopsin at 10 K. At physiological temperatures the formation of hypsorhodopsin in D2O takes place more slowly than in H2O. This indicates that the lifetime of primerhodopsin is decreased by H2O/D2O exchange. The rate constant for the primerhodopsin → bathorhodopsin conversion is more sensitive than that for the primerhodopsin → hypsorhodopsin conversion. The transformation of hypsorhodopsin to bathorhodopsin shows no deuterium effect at low temperature. PMID:19431715

  5. Vitamin A activates rhodopsin and sensitizes it to ultraviolet light

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Sadaharu; Isayama, Tomoki; Delori, François C.; Makino, Clint L.

    2013-01-01

    The visual pigment, rhodopsin, consists of opsin protein with 11-cis retinal chromophore, covalently bound. Light activates rhodopsin by isomerizing the chromophore to the all-trans conformation. The activated rhodopsin sets in motion a biochemical cascade that evokes an electrical response by the photoreceptor. All-trans retinal is eventually released from the opsin and reduced to vitamin A. Rod and cone photoreceptors contain vast amounts of rhodopsin, so after exposure to bright light, the concentration of vitamin A can reach relatively high levels within their outer segments. Since a retinal analog, β-ionone, is capable of activating some types of visual pigments, we tested whether vitamin A might produce a similar effect. In single-cell recordings from isolated dark-adapted salamander green-sensitive rods, exogenously applied vitamin A decreased circulating current and flash sensitivity and accelerated flash response kinetics. These changes resembled those produced by exposure of rods to steady light. Microspectrophotometric measurements showed that vitamin A accumulated in the outer segments and binding of vitamin A to rhodopsin was confirmed in in vitro assays. In addition, vitamin A improved the sensitivity of photoreceptors to ultraviolet (UV) light. Apparently, the energy of a UV photon absorbed by vitamin A transferred by a radiationless process to the 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin, which subsequently isomerized. Therefore, our results suggest that vitamin A binds to rhodopsin at an allosteric binding site distinct from the chromophore binding pocket for 11-cis retinal to activate the rhodopsin, and that it serves as a sensitizing chromophore for UV light. PMID:22192505

  6. Vitamin A activates rhodopsin and sensitizes it to ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Miyazono, Sadaharu; Isayama, Tomoki; Delori, François C; Makino, Clint L

    2011-11-01

    The visual pigment, rhodopsin, consists of opsin protein with 11-cis retinal chromophore, covalently bound. Light activates rhodopsin by isomerizing the chromophore to the all-trans conformation. The activated rhodopsin sets in motion a biochemical cascade that evokes an electrical response by the photoreceptor. All-trans retinal is eventually released from the opsin and reduced to vitamin A. Rod and cone photoreceptors contain vast amounts of rhodopsin, so after exposure to bright light, the concentration of vitamin A can reach relatively high levels within their outer segments. Since a retinal analog, β-ionone, is capable of activating some types of visual pigments, we tested whether vitamin A might produce a similar effect. In single-cell recordings from isolated dark-adapted salamander green-sensitive rods, exogenously applied vitamin A decreased circulating current and flash sensitivity and accelerated flash response kinetics. These changes resembled those produced by exposure of rods to steady light. Microspectrophotometric measurements showed that vitamin A accumulated in the outer segments and binding of vitamin A to rhodopsin was confirmed in in vitro assays. In addition, vitamin A improved the sensitivity of photoreceptors to ultraviolet (UV) light. Apparently, the energy of a UV photon absorbed by vitamin A transferred by a radiationless process to the 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin, which subsequently isomerized. Therefore, our results suggest that vitamin A binds to rhodopsin at an allosteric binding site distinct from the chromophore binding pocket for 11-cis retinal to activate the rhodopsin, and that it serves as a sensitizing chromophore for UV light.

  7. Methyl-accepting protein associated with bacterial sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, E N; Hasselbacher, C A; Spudich, J L

    1988-01-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of Halobacterium halobium phototaxis mutants and revertants with L-[methyl-3H] methionine implicated seven methyl-accepting protein bands with apparent molecular masses from 65 to 150 kilodaltons (kDa) in adaptation of the organism to chemo and photo stimuli, and one of these (94 kDa) was specifically implicated in phototaxis. The lability of the radiolabeled bands to mild base treatment indicated that the methyl linkages are carboxylmethylesters, as is the case in the eubacterial chemotaxis receptor-transducers. The 94-kDa protein was present in increased amounts in an overproducer of the apoprotein of sensory rhodopsin I, one of two retinal-containing phototaxis receptors in H. halobium. It was absent in a strain that contained sensory rhodopsin II and that lacked sensory rhodopsin I and was also absent in a mutant that lacked both photoreceptors. Based on the role of methyl-accepting proteins in chemotaxis in other bacteria, we suggest that the 94-kDa protein is the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. By [3H]retinal labeling studies, we previously identified a 25-kDa retinal-binding polypeptide that was derived from photochemically reactive sensory rhodopsin I. When H. halobium membranes containing sensory rhodopsin I were treated by a procedure that stably reduced [3H]retinal onto the 25-kDa apoprotein, a 94-kDa protein was also found to be radiolabeled. Protease digestion confirmed that the 94-kDa retinal-labeled protein was the same as the methyl-accepting protein that was suggested above to be the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. Possible models are that the 25- and 94-kDa proteins are tightly interacting components of the photosensory signaling machinery or that both are forms of sensory rhodopsin I. Images PMID:3410829

  8. Uncovering the effects of Arundo invasion & forest restoration on riparian soils: Plant controls on microbial processes & trace gas flux in a California watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, K. L.; Dudley, T.; Schimel, J.

    2016-12-01

    The opportunistic reed Arundo donax has invaded riparian zones in many California watersheds, altering hydrological and ecological processes. There have been intense efforts to restore these watersheds to native vegetation. How the shifts in communities—native to invaded to restored—affect soil conditions and processes, however, remains unclear. Because riparian zones are hotspots of nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas flux, it is critical to understand how plant community composition (and associated litter contributions) governs riparian biogeochemistry. How do organic matter inputs in invaded and restored plant communities alter soil microbial processes and trace gas dynamics? In this study, we use laboratory incubations to compare microbial cycling of C and nitrogen (N) and trace gas flux between the soils and litter of the invasive Arundo and three native riparian species: Populus tricocarpa, Salix laevigata, and Baccharis salicifolia (or, black cotton wood, red willow, and mulefat). Soils beneath Arundo and Salix produced CO2 at a similar rate ( 250 ug CO2 g dry soil-1 hour-1), while Populus and Baccharis produced less ( 170 ug CO2 g dry soil-1 hour-1). All soils consumed CH4; however, Arundo soils consumed more than native-restored species, which consumed similar quantities (-0.013 CH4 g dry soil-1 hour-1 in Arundo vs. -0.009 CH4 g dry soil-1 hour-1 in native). Arundo soils also produced less N2O (0.02 ug N2O g dry soil-1 hour-1) than all native species ( 0.09 ug N2O g dry soil-1 hour-1). Arundo contributed far less litter inputs than native-restored species, as Arundo leaves senesce and remain on the stalk; furthermore, Arundo litter has been shown to have a higher C:N (40.2) than Salix and Baccharis (30.9). Greater CH4 consumption and lower N2O production in Arundo soils may be the result of enhanced porosity compared to restored soils, leading to more aeration and less methanogenesis and denitrification, or it may be that there is lower N availability

  9. IRE1 directs proteasomal and lysosomal degradation of misfolded rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Messah, Carissa; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is responsible for folding of secreted and membrane proteins in eukaryotic cells. Disruption of ER protein folding leads to ER stress. Chronic ER stress can cause cell death and is proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) directs a key unfolded protein response signaling pathway that controls the fidelity of ER protein folding. IRE1 signaling may be particularly helpful in preventing chronic ER stress and cell injury by alleviating protein misfolding in the ER. To examine this, we used a chemical-genetic approach to selectively activate IRE1 in mammalian cells and tested how artificial IRE1 signaling affected the fate of misfolded P23H rhodopsin linked to photoreceptor cell death. We found that IRE1 signaling robustly promoted the degradation of misfolded P23H rhodopsin without affecting its wild-type counterpart. We also found that IRE1 used both proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways to remove P23H rhodopsin. Surprisingly, when one degradation pathway was compromised, IRE1 signaling could still promote misfolded rhodopsin degradation using the remaining pathway. Last, we showed that IRE1 signaling also reduced levels of several other misfolded rhodopsins with lesser effects on misfolded cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Our findings reveal the diversity of proteolytic mechanisms used by IRE1 to eliminate misfolded rhodopsin. PMID:22219383

  10. The molecular basis for the high photosensitivity of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Robert S H; Colmenares, Leticia U

    2003-12-09

    Based on structural information derived from the F NMR data of labeled rhodopsins, rhodopsin crystal structure, and excited-state properties of model polyenes, we propose a molecular mechanism that accounts specifically for the causes of the well-known enhanced photoreactivity of rhodopsin (increased rates and quantum yield of isomerization). It involves the key features of close proximity of C-187 to H-12 and chromophore bond lengthening upon light absorption. The resultant "sudden punch" to H-12 triggers dual processes of decay of the Franck-Condon-excited rhodopsin, a productive directed photoisomerization and a nonproductive decay returning to the ground state as two separate molecular pathways [based on real-time fluorescence results of Chosrowjan, H., Mataga, N., Shibata, Y., Tachibanaki, S., Kandori, H., Shichida, Y., Okada, T. & Kouyama, T. (1998) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 9706-9707]. The two processes are controlled by the local protein structure: an empty space provided by the intradiscal loop connecting transmembrane helices 4 and 5 and a protein wall composed of amino acid units in transmembrane 3. Suggestions, involving retinal analogs and rhodopsin mutants, to improve the unusually high photosensitivity of rhodopsin are proposed.

  11. Photochemistry of Acetabularia rhodopsin II from a marine plant, Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Kikukawa, Takashi; Shimono, Kazumi; Tamogami, Jun; Miyauchi, Seiji; Kim, So Young; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kamo, Naoki

    2011-10-18

    Acetabularia rhodopsins are the first microbial rhodopsins discovered in a marine plant organism, Acetabularia acetabulum. Previously, we expressed Acetabularia rhodopsin II (ARII) by a cell-free system from one of two opsin genes in A. acetabulum cDNA and showed that ARII is a light-driven proton pump [Wada, T., et al. (2011) J. Mol. Biol. 411, 986-998]. In this study, the photochemistry of ARII was examined using the flash-photolysis technique, and data were analyzed using a sequential irreversible model. Five photochemically defined intermediates (P(i)) were sufficient to simulate the data. Noticeably, both P(3) and P(4) contain an equilibrium mixture of M, N, and O. Using a transparent indium tin oxide electrode, the photoinduced proton transfer was measured over a wide pH range. Analysis of the pH-dependent proton transfer allowed estimation of the pK(a) values of some amino acid residues. The estimated values were 2.6, 5.9 (or 6.3), 8.4, 9.3, 10.5, and 11.3. These values were assigned as the pK(a) of Asp81 (Asp85(BR)) in the dark, Asp92 (Asp96(BR)) at N, Glu199 (Glu204(BR)) at M, Glu199 in the dark, an undetermined proton-releasing residue at the release, and the pH to start denaturation, respectively. Following this analysis, the proton transfer of ARII is discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zongchao; Banworth, Marcellus J.; Makkia, Rasha; Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause retinal degeneration and clinical phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital stationary night blindness. Effective gene therapies have been difficult to develop, however, because generating precise levels of rhodopsin expression is critical; overexpression causes toxicity, and underexpression would result in incomplete rescue. Current gene delivery strategies routinely use cDNA-based vectors for gene targeting; however, inclusion of noncoding components of genomic DNA (gDNA) such as introns may help promote more endogenous regulation of gene expression. Here we test the hypothesis that inclusion of genomic sequences from the rhodopsin gene can improve the efficacy of rhodopsin gene therapy in the rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of RP. We utilize our compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), which have the ability to transfer larger and more complex genetic constructs, to deliver murine rhodopsin cDNA or gDNA. We show functional and structural improvements in RKO eyes for up to 8 months after NP-mediated gDNA but not cDNA delivery. Importantly, in addition to improvements in rod function, we observe significant preservation of cone function at time points when cones in the RKO model are degenerated. These results suggest that inclusion of native expression elements, such as introns, can significantly enhance gene expression and therapeutic efficacy and may become an essential option in the array of available gene delivery tools.— Han, Z., Banworth, M. J., Makkia, R., Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Cooper, M. J., Naash, M. I. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype. PMID:25713057

  13. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Pande, A.; Yue, K.T.; Callender, R.; Ebrey, T.G.; Tsuda, M.

    1987-08-11

    The authors report here the resonance Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin. These studies were undertaken in order to make comparisons with the well-studied bovine pigments, so as to understand the similarities and the differences in pigment structure and photochemical processes between vertebrates and invertebrates. The flow method was used to obtain the Raman spectrum of rhodopsin at 13 /sup 0/C. The bathorhodopsin spectrum was obtained by computer subtraction of the spectra containing different photostationary mixtures of rhodopsin, isorhodopsin, hypsorhodopsin, and bathorhodopsin, obtained at 12 K using the pump-probe technique and from measurements at 80 K. Like their bovine counterparts, the Schiff base vibrational mode appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in octopus rhodopsin and the photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin, suggesting a proteonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. Differences between the Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin indicate that the formation of bathorhodopsin is associated with chromophore isomerization. This inference is substantiated by the chromophore chemical extraction data which show that, like the bovine system, octopus rhodopsin is an 11-cis pigment, while the photoproducts contain an all-trans pigment, in agreement with the previous work. The octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin spectra show marked differences from their bovine counterparts in other respects, however. The differences are most dramatic in the structure-sensitive fingerprint and the HOOP regions. Thus, it appears that although the two species differ in the specific nature of the chromophore-protein interactions, the general process of visual transduction is the same.

  14. Proton movement and photointermediate kinetics in rhodopsin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James W; Szundi, Istvan; Kazmi, Manija A; Sakmar, Thomas P; Kliger, David S

    2006-05-02

    The role of ionizable amino acid side chains in the bovine rhodopsin activation mechanism was studied in mutants E134Q, E134R/R135E, H211F, and E122Q. All mutants exhibited bathorhodopsin stability on the 30 ns to 1 micros time scale similar to that of the wild type. Lumirhodopsin decay was also similar to that of the wild type except for the H211F mutant where early decay (20 micros) to a second form of lumirhodopsin was seen, followed by formation of an extremely long-lived Meta I(480) product (34 ms), an intermediate which forms to a much reduced extent, if at all, in dodecyl maltoside suspensions of wild-type rhodopsin. A smaller amount of a similar long-lived Meta I(480) product was seen after photolysis of E122Q, but E134Q and E134R/R135Q displayed kinetics much more similar to those of the wild type under these conditions (i.e., no Meta I(480) product). These results support the idea that specific interaction of His211 and Glu122 plays a significant role in deprotonation of the retinylidene Schiff base and receptor activation. Proton uptake measurements using bromcresol purple showed that E122Q was qualitatively similar to wild-type rhodopsin, with at least one proton being released during lumirhodopsin decay per Meta I(380) intermediate formed, followed by uptake of at least two protons per rhodopsin bleached on a time scale of tens of milliseconds. Different results were obtained for H211F, E134Q, and E134R/R135E, which all released approximately two protons per rhodopsin bleached. These results show that several ionizable groups besides the Schiff base imine are affected by the structural changes involved in rhodopsin activation. At least two proton uptake groups and probably at least one proton release group in addition to the Schiff base are present in rhodopsin.

  15. The rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii enables fast optical control of cGMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Ulrike; Stehfest, Katja; Gee, Christine E; Körschen, Heinz G; Fudim, Roman; Oertner, Thomas G; Hegemann, Peter

    2015-08-11

    Blastocladiomycota fungi form motile zoospores that are guided by sensory photoreceptors to areas of optimal light conditions. We showed that the microbial rhodopsin of Blastocladiella emersonii is a rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase (RhGC), a member of a previously uncharacterized rhodopsin class of light-activated enzymes that generate the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Upon application of a short light flash, recombinant RhGC converted within 8 ms into a signaling state with blue-shifted absorption from which the dark state recovered within 100 ms. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, Chinese hamster ovary cells, or mammalian neurons, RhGC generated cGMP in response to green light in a light dose-dependent manner on a subsecond time scale. Thus, we propose RhGC as a versatile tool for the optogenetic analysis of cGMP-dependent signaling processes in cell biology and the neurosciences. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Characterization of a Cyanobacterial Chloride-pumping Rhodopsin and Its Conversion into a Proton Pump.

    PubMed

    Hasemi, Takatoshi; Kikukawa, Takashi; Kamo, Naoki; Demura, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Light-driven ion-pumping rhodopsins are widely distributed in microorganisms and are now classified into the categories of outward H(+) and Na(+) pumps and an inward Cl(-) pump. These different types share a common protein architecture and utilize the photoisomerization of the same chromophore, retinal, to evoke photoreactions. Despite these similarities, successful pump-to-pump conversion had been confined to only the H(+) pump bacteriorhodopsin, which was converted to a Cl(-) pump in 1995 by a single amino acid replacement. In this study we report the first success of the reverse conversion from a Cl(-) pump to a H(+) pump. A novel microbial rhodopsin (MrHR) from the cyanobacterium Mastigocladopsis repens functions as a Cl(-) pump and belongs to a cluster that is far distant from the known Cl(-) pumps. With a single amino acid replacement, MrHR is converted to a H(+) pump in which dissociable residues function almost completely in the H(+) relay reactions. MrHR most likely evolved from a H(+) pump, but it has not yet been highly optimized into a mature Cl(-) pump.

  17. His166 is the Schiff base proton acceptor in attractant phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Jun; Takahashi, Hazuki; Furutani, Yuji; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-09-23

    Photoactivation of attractant phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) in Halobacterium salinarum entails transfer of a proton from the retinylidene chromophore's Schiff base (SB) to an unidentified acceptor residue on the cytoplasmic half-channel, in sharp contrast to other microbial rhodopsins, including the closely related repellent phototaxis receptor SRII and the outward proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, in which the SB proton acceptor is an aspartate residue salt-bridged to the SB in the extracellular (EC) half-channel. His166 on the cytoplasmic side of the SB in SRI has been implicated in the SB proton transfer reaction by mutation studies, and mutants of His166 result in an inverted SB proton release to the EC as well as inversion of the protein's normally attractant phototaxis signal to repellent. Here we found by difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy the appearance of Fermi-resonant X-H stretch modes in light-minus-dark difference spectra; their assignment with (15)N labeling and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that His166 is the SB proton acceptor during the photochemical reaction cycle of the wild-type SRI-HtrI complex.

  18. Molecular genetics of rhodopsin and phototrans duction in the visual system of Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zuker, C.; Cowman, A.; Montell, C.; Rubin, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated the genes encoding four Drosophila visual pigments. Each of these opsins is expressed in a set of functionally and anatomically distinct photoreceptor cells of the eye. One is expressed in the six outer photoreceptor cells (R1-R6), the second in the central R8 photoreceptor cell, and the other two in the UV sensitive R7 photoreceptor cells. They have determined the structure and nucleotide sequence of each of these genes. They have used P element-mediated gene transfer to introduce the cloned structural gene for the R1-R6 opsin in the Drosophila germline and restored the ninaE mutant phenotype to wild-type. In an attempt to study the contribution of the various opsins to the specific functional properties of the different photoreceptor cell types, they have genetically engineered Drosophila lines that express R8 opsin in the R1-R6 photoreceptor cells. In collaboration with Drs. Ozaki and Pak at Purdue University, they have used oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to mutate selected amino acids and regions of the rhodopsin molecule and reintroduced the mutated genes into Drosophila to analyze structure-function relationships in the rhodopsin molecule.

  19. Responses of soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure to closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures): A case study of Dongting Lake wetland, middle China.

    PubMed

    Dai, Juan; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liang, Jie; Guo, Shenglian; Li, Xiaodong; Huang, Lu; Lu, Lunhui; Yuan, Yujie

    2016-09-01

    Soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure, which are critical to global ecosystem and fundamental ecological processes, are sensitive to anthropogenic activities and environmental conditions. In this study, we examined the possible effects of closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures, ban on anthropogenic activity, widely employed for many important wetlands) on SMB, soil bacterial community structure and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling in Dongting Lake wetland. Soil samples were collected from management area (MA) and contrast area (CA: human activities, such as hunting, fishing and draining, are permitted) in November 2013 and April 2014. Soil properties, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and bacterial community structure were investigated. Comparison of the values of MA and CA showed that SMB and bacterial community diversity of the MA had a significant increase after 7 years closed-off management. The mean value of Shannon-Weiner diversity index of MA and CA respectively were 2.85 and 2.07. The gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nosZ of MA were significant higher than those of CA. the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nirK of MA were significant lower than those of CA. However, there was no significant change in the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nirS. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Atomistic insights into rhodopsin activation from a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Irina G; Best, Robert B; Engel, Stanislav; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Hummer, Gerhard; Costanzi, Stefano

    2008-08-06

    Rhodopsin, the light sensitive receptor responsible for blue-green vision, serves as a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Upon light absorption, it undergoes a series of conformational changes that lead to the active form, metarhodopsin II (META II), initiating a signaling cascade through binding to the G protein transducin (G(t)). Here, we first develop a structural model of META II by applying experimental distance restraints to the structure of lumi-rhodopsin (LUMI), an earlier intermediate. The restraints are imposed by using a combination of biased molecular dynamics simulations and perturbations to an elastic network model. We characterize the motions of the transmembrane helices in the LUMI-to-META II transition and the rearrangement of interhelical hydrogen bonds. We then simulate rhodopsin activation in a dynamic model to study the path leading from LUMI to our META II model for wild-type rhodopsin and a series of mutants. The simulations show a strong correlation between the transition dynamics and the pharmacological phenotypes of the mutants. These results help identify the molecular mechanisms of activation in both wild type and mutant rhodopsin. While static models can provide insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and predict ligand affinity, a dynamic model of activation could be applicable to study the pharmacology of other GPCRs and their ligands, offering a key to predictions of basal activity and ligand efficacy.

  1. Distribution of rhodopsin and retinochrome in the squid retina

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The cephalopod retina contains two kinds of photopigments, rhodopsin and retinochrome. For many years retinochrome has been thought to be localized in the inner segments of the visual cells, whereas rhodopsin is in the outer segments. However, it is now clear that retinochrome can be extracted also from fragments of outer segments. In the dark- adapted retina of Loligo pealei retinochrome is distributed half-and- half in the inner and outer segments. Todarodes pacificus contains much more retinochrome than Loligo, and it is more abundant in the outer than in the inner segments. The outer segments of Loligo contain retinochrome and metarhodopsin in addition to rhodopsin, whether squids are kept in the dark or in the light. But there is extremely little metarhodopsin (about 3% of rhodopsin) even in light-adapted eyes. The inner segments contain only retinochrome, and much less in the light than in the dark. On the other hand, retinochrome in the outer segments increases markedly during light adaptation. These facts suggest the possibility that some retinochrome moves forward from the inner to the outer segments during light adaptation and there reacts with metarhodopsin to promote regeneration of rhodopsin. PMID:6620

  2. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations—F45L, V209M and F220C—yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5. PMID:27694816

  3. Dynamics of the internal water molecules in squid rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Tobias, Douglas J

    2009-04-08

    Understanding the mechanism of G-protein coupled receptors action is of major interest for drug design. The visual rhodopsin is the prototype structure for the family A of G-protein coupled receptors. Upon photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal chromophore, visual rhodopsins undergo a large-scale conformational change that prepares the receptor for a productive interaction with the G-protein. The mechanism by which the local perturbation of the retinal cis-trans isomerization is transmitted throughout the protein is not well understood. The crystal structure of the visual rhodopsin from squid solved recently suggests that a chain of water molecules extending from the retinal toward the cytoplasmic side of the protein may play a role in the signal transduction from the all-trans retinal geometry to the activated receptor. As a first step toward understanding the role of water in rhodopsin function, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation of squid rhodopsin embedded in a hydrated bilayer of polyunsaturated lipid molecules. The simulation indicates that the water molecules present in the crystal structure participate in favorable interactions with side chains in the interhelical region and form a persistent hydrogen-bond network in connecting Y315 to W274 via D80.

  4. Quantitation of the Effect of Hydroxylamine on Rhodopsin Palmitylation†

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Wesley; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodopsin (the photosensitive rod visual pigment) has been a model for photobiologic studies of the opsins as well as a structural model for G-protein-coupled receptors. The two palmitate groups attached to cysteines 322 and 323 are thought to serve as membrane anchors for the rhodopsin C-terminus, but the absence of the palmitates does not alter membrane localization. However, removal of the palmitates affects rhodopsin function. Therefore, it is important to quantitate the stability of rhodopsin palmitates to hydroxylamine, which is a widely utilized reagent in biochemical preparations of the apoprotein. We have developed a mass spectrometric method to quantitate the resulting opsin palmitylation. Our data show that both of the bovine rhodopsin palmitates are labile to hydroxylamine, with significant depalmitylation occurring at concentrations of ≥100 mM, with an EC50 of 220 mM L−1. The palmitate at position 322 is the more stable to hydroxylamine. Samples prepared in the presence of >50 mM should therefore be considered to be at least partially depalmitylated and the results interpreted accordingly. PMID:18399918

  5. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations--F45L, V209M and F220C--yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5.

  6. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants Provide Insight into the Role of the N-terminal Cap in Rhodopsin Folding, Structure, and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Opefi, Chikwado A.; South, Kieron; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Smith, Steven O.; Reeves, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) mutants (T4K, N15S, T17M, V20G, P23A/H/L, and Q28H) in the N-terminal cap of rhodopsin misfold when expressed in mammalian cells. To gain insight into the causes of misfolding and to define the contributions of specific residues to receptor stability and function, we evaluated the responses of these mutants to 11-cis-retinal pharmacological chaperone rescue or disulfide bond-mediated repair. Pharmacological rescue restored folding in all mutants, but the purified mutant pigments in all cases were thermo-unstable and exhibited abnormal photobleaching, metarhodopsin II decay, and G protein activation. As a complementary approach, we superimposed this panel of ADRP mutants onto a rhodopsin background containing a juxtaposed cysteine pair (N2C/D282C) that forms a disulfide bond. This approach restored folding in T4K, N15S, V20G, P23A, and Q28H but not T17M, P23H, or P23L. ADRP mutant pigments obtained by disulfide bond repair exhibited enhanced stability, and some also displayed markedly improved photobleaching and signal transduction properties. Our major conclusion is that the N-terminal cap stabilizes opsin during biosynthesis and contributes to the dark-state stability of rhodopsin. Comparison of these two restorative approaches revealed that the correct position of the cap relative to the extracellular loops is also required for optimal photochemistry and efficient G protein activation. PMID:24106275

  7. Rhodopsin management during the light-dark cycle of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Min; Metoxen, Alexander J; Leming, Matthew T; Whaley, Michelle A; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2014-11-01

    The tropical disease vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae possesses 11 rhodopsin genes. Three of these, GPROP1, GPROP3, and GPROP4, encode rhodopsins with >99% sequence identity. We created antisera against these rhodopsins and used immunohistology to show that one or more of these rhodopsins are expressed in the major R1-6 photoreceptor class of the adult A.gambiae eye. Under dark conditions, rhodopsin accumulates within the light-sensitive rhabdomere of the photoreceptor. Light treatment, however, causes extensive movement of rhodopsin to the cytoplasmic compartment. Protein electrophoresis showed that the rhodopsin is present in two different forms. The larger form is an immature species that is deglycosylated during the posttranslational maturation process to generate the smaller, mature form. The immature form is maintained at a constant level regardless of lighting conditions. These results indicate that rhodopsin biosynthesis and movement into the rhabdomere occurs at a constant rate. In contrast, the mature form increases in abundance when animals are placed in dark conditions. Light-triggered internalization and protein degradation counteracts this rhodopsin increase and keeps rhabdomeric rhodopsin levels low in light conditions. The interplay of the constant maturation rate with light-triggered degradation causes rhodopsin to accumulate within the rhabdomere only in dark conditions. Thus, Anopheles photoreceptors possess a mechanism for adjusting light sensitivity through light-dependent control of rhodopsin levels and cellular location. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rhodopsin management during the light-dark cycle of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Min; Metoxen, Alexander J.; Leming, Matthew T.; Whaley, Michelle A.; O’Tousa, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The tropical disease vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae possesses 11 rhodopsin genes. Three of these, GPROP1, GPROP3, and GPROP4, encode rhodopsins with >99% sequence identity. We created antisera against these rhodopsins and used immunohistology to show that one or more of these rhodopsins are expressed in the major R1-6 photoreceptor class of the adult Anopheles gambiae eye. Under dark conditions, rhodopsin accumulates within the light-sensitive rhabdomere of the photoreceptor. Light treatment, however, causes extensive movement of rhodopsin to the cytoplasmic compartment. Protein electrophoresis showed that the rhodopsin is present in two different forms. The larger form is an immature species that is deglycosylated during the posttranslational maturation process to generate the smaller, mature form. The immature form is maintained at a constant level regardless of lighting conditions. These results indicate that rhodopsin biosynthesis and movement into the rhabdomere occurs at a constant rate. In contrast, the mature form increases in abundance when animals are placed in dark conditions. Light-triggered internalization and protein degradation counteracts this rhodopsin increase and keeps rhabdomeric rhodopsin levels low in light conditions. The interplay of the constant maturation rate with light-triggered degradation causes rhodopsin to accumulate within the rhabdomere only in dark conditions. Thus, Anopheles photoreceptors possess a mechanism for adjusting light sensitivity through light-dependent control of rhodopsin levels and cellular location. PMID:25260623

  9. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-10-03

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process.

  10. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process. PMID:27694882

  11. Repair of Rhodopsin mRNA by Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-Splicing: A New Approach for Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  12. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission.

  13. Determining the role of a probiotic in the restoration of intestinal microbial balance by molecular and cultural techniques.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Affhan; Dachang, W; Xin, Y

    2015-02-20

    The human intestine has a vast variety of microorganisms, and their balance is dependent on several factors. Antibiotics affect microfloral balance and allow naturally opportunistic organisms to multiply. Azithromycin is the most widely used macrolide antibiotic, active against a wide number of pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. It is currently used in the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients. The use of probiotics has advantages in gastrointestinal conditions, including infectious diarrhea and imbalance due to antibiotic use. In this research, the effect of azithromycin on the intestinal microbiota of Sprague Dawley rats and the role of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the restoration of the balance by employing molecular and cultural techniques was investigated. PCR with universal primers targeting the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene followed by DGGE was used to characterize the overall intestinal microbiota composition. Cultivable fecal bacteria count using microbiological media and semi-quantitative PCR with group-specific primers were also utilized to analyze the effects of antibiotic and probiotic on microflora. We found that the total amount of 16S rRNA gene and fecal aerobic bacterial count was reduced following azithromycin administration along with elimination of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli, but it was restored by the use of the probiotic. The results from PCR with group-specific primers showed that Bacteroides sp was present in the control and probiotic groups, but it was nearly eliminated in the antibiotic group. Moreover, semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the numbers of Enterobacteriaceae were nearly the same in the probiotic group and decreased in the antibiotic group, while Bifidobacterium was significantly increased in the probiotic group and decreased in the antibiotic group (P < 0.05) as compared with that in the control group. Azithromycin-induced dysbiosis can result in prolonged deleterious effects on the

  14. The Cytoplasmic Rhodopsin-Protein Interface: Potential for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Gardner, Eric; Riciutti, Alec; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin is a prototypic G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), interacting with the G protein, transducin, rhodopsin kinase, and arrestin. All of these proteins interact with rhodopsin at its cytoplasmic surface. Structural and modeling studies have provided in-depth descriptions of the respective interfaces. Overlap and thus competition for binding surfaces is a major regulatory mechanism for signal processing. Recently, it was found that the same surface is also targeted by small molecules. These ligands can directly interfere with the binding and activation of the proteins of the signal transduction cascade, but they can also allosterically modulate the retinal ligand binding pocket. Because the pocket that is targeted contains residues that are highly conserved across Class A GPCRs, these findings imply that it may be possible to target multiple GPCRs with the same ligand(s). This is desirable for example in complex diseases such as cancer where multiple GPCRs participate in the disease networks. PMID:21777183

  15. Transmembrane signaling by GPCRs: insight from rhodopsin and opsin structures.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hui-Woog; Park, Jung Hee; Kim, Yong Ju; Ernst, Oliver P

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), also known as seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, are the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. As versatile signaling molecules, they mediate cellular responses to extracellular signals. Diffusible ligands like hormones and neurotransmitters bind to GPCRs to modulate GPCR activity. An extraordinary and highly specialized GPCR is the photoreceptor rhodopsin which contains the chromophore retinal as its covalently bound ligand. For receptor activation the configuration of retinal is altered by photon absorption. To date, rhodopsin is the only GPCR for which crystal structures of inactive, active and ligand-free conformations are known. Although the photochemical activation is unique to rhodopsin, many mechanistic insights from this receptor can be generalized for GPCRs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rhodopsin photoactivation dynamics revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchithranga M.d.c.; ...

    2015-01-27

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision under dim light conditions. During rhodopsin photoactivation, the chromophore retinal undergoes cis-trans isomerization, and subsequently dissociates from the protein yielding the opsin apoprotein [1]. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the rhodopsin photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks the individual hydrogen atom motions in the protein molecules, because the neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen is much higher than other atoms [2-4]. We used protein (rhodopsin/opsin) samples with CHAPSmore » detergent hydrated with heavy water. The solvent signal is suppressed due to the heavy water, so that only the signals from proteins and detergents are detected. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by the mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. Our QENS experiments conducted at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate that the protein dynamic behavior increases with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin was longer compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which forms a band around the protein molecule in the micelle. Unlike the protein, the CHAPS detergent manifests localized motions that are the same as in the bulk empty micelles. Furthermore QENS provides unique understanding of the key dynamics involved in the activation of the GPCR involved in the visual process.« less

  17. Rhodopsin photoactivation dynamics revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchithranga M.d.c.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang -Qiang

    2015-01-27

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision under dim light conditions. During rhodopsin photoactivation, the chromophore retinal undergoes cis-trans isomerization, and subsequently dissociates from the protein yielding the opsin apoprotein [1]. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the rhodopsin photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks the individual hydrogen atom motions in the protein molecules, because the neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen is much higher than other atoms [2-4]. We used protein (rhodopsin/opsin) samples with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The solvent signal is suppressed due to the heavy water, so that only the signals from proteins and detergents are detected. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by the mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. Our QENS experiments conducted at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate that the protein dynamic behavior increases with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin was longer compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which forms a band around the protein molecule in the micelle. Unlike the protein, the CHAPS detergent manifests localized motions that are the same as in the bulk empty micelles. Furthermore QENS provides unique understanding of the key dynamics involved in the activation of the GPCR involved in the visual process.

  18. Photoenergetics of octopus rhodopsin. Convergent evolution of biological photon counters?

    PubMed

    Cooper, A; Dixon, S F; Tsuda, M

    1986-01-01

    The enthalpy changes associated with each of the major steps in the photoconversion of octopus rhodopsin have been measured by direct photocalorimetry. Formation of the primary photoproduct (bathorhodopsin) involves energy uptake of about 130 kJ/mol, corresponding to storage of over 50% of the exciting photon energy, and is comparable to the energy storage previously observed in bovine rhodopsin. Subsequent intermediates involve the step-wise dissipation of this energy to give the physiological end-product (acid metarhodopsin) at a level only slightly above the parent rhodopsin. No significant differences in energetics are observed between rhodopsin in microvilli membrane suspensions or detergent dispersions. Use of different buffer systems in the calorimetric experiments shows that conversion of rhodopsin to acid metarhodopsin involves no light-induced protonation change, whereas alkali metarhodopsin photoproduction occurs with the release of one proton per molecule and an additional enthalpy increase of about 50 kJ/mol. Van't Hoff analysis of the effect of temperature on the reversible metarhodopsin equilibrium gives an enthalpy for the acid----alkali transition consistent with this calorimetric result, and the proton release is confirmed by direct observation of light-induced pH changes. Acid-base titration of metarhodopsin yields an apparent pK of 9.5 for this transition, though the pH profile deviates slightly from ideal titration behaviour. We suggest that a high energy primary photoproduct is an obligatory feature of efficient biological photo-detectors, as opposed to photon energy transducers, and that the similarity at this stage between cephalopod and vertebrate rhodopsins represents either convergent evolution at the molecular level or strong conservation of a crucial functional characteristic.

  19. Photoreverse Reaction Dynamics of Octopus Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Keiichi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Terazima, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    Photoreverse reactions of octopus rhodopsin (Rh) from acid-metarhodopsin (Acid-Meta), which is the final product of the photoreaction of Rh, to Rh were studied by the time-resolved transient absorption and transient grating methods. The time course of the absorption signal showed a rapid change within 500 ns followed by one phase with a time constant of ∼470 μs, whereas the transient grating signal indicates three phases with time constants of <500 ns, ∼490 μs, and 2.6 ms. The faster two phases indicate the conformational change in the vicinity of the chromophore, and the slowest one represents conformational change far from the chromophore. The absorption spectrum of the first intermediate created just after the laser excitation (<500 ns) is already very similar to the final product, Rh. This behavior is quite different from that of the forward reaction from Rh to Acid-Meta, in which several intermediates with different absorption spectra are involved within 50 ns–500 μs. This result indicates that the conformation around the chromophore is easily adjusted from all-trans to 11-cis forms compared with that from 11-cis to all-trans forms. Furthermore, it was found that the protein energy is quickly relaxed after the excitation. One of the significantly different properties between Rh and Acid-Meta is the diffusion coefficient (D). D is reduced by about half the transformation from Rh to Acid-Meta. This large reduction was interpreted in terms of the helix opening of the Rh structure. PMID:17325000

  20. Interaction of rhodopsin, G-protein and kinase in octopus photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Hirata, H; Tsuda, T

    1992-12-01

    Light induced phosphorylation of octopus rhodopsin was greatly enhanced by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S), suggesting that the kinases are involved in regulating interaction between rhodopsin and G-protein. We determined phosphorylated peptides of octopus rhodopsin in the presence or absence of GTP gamma S. Possible phosphorylation sites for octopus rhodopsin enhanced by GTP gamma S were Thr329, Thr330 and/or Thr336, which suggest that the G-protein associates with cytoplasmic loops including C-terminal peptide in the seventh helix of octopus rhodopsin.

  1. Rhodopsin coexpression in UV photoreceptors of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaobang; Leming, Matthew T; Whaley, Michelle A; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2014-03-15

    Differential rhodopsin gene expression within specialized R7 photoreceptor cells divides the retinas of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes into distinct domains. The two species express the rhodopsin orthologs Aaop8 and Agop8, respectively, in a large subset of these R7 photoreceptors that function as ultraviolet receptors. We show here that a divergent subfamily of mosquito rhodopsins, Aaop10 and Agop10, is coexpressed in these R7 photoreceptors. The properties of the A. aegypti Aaop8 and Aaop10 rhodopsins were analyzed by creating transgenic Drosophila expressing these rhodopsins. Electroretinogram recordings, and spectral analysis of head extracts, obtained from the Aaop8 strain confirmed that Aaop8 is an ultraviolet-sensitive rhodopsin. Aaop10 was poorly expressed and capable of eliciting only small and slow light responses in Drosophila photoreceptors, and electroretinogram analysis suggested that it is a long-wavelength rhodopsin with a maximal sensitivity near 500 nm. Thus, coexpression of Aaop10 rhodopsin with Aaop8 rhodopsin has the potential to modify the spectral properties of mosquito ultraviolet receptors. Retention of Op10 rhodopsin family members in the genomes of Drosophila species suggests that this rhodopsin family may play a conserved role in insect vision.

  2. The Bilayer Enhances Rhodopsin Kinetic Stability in Bovine Rod Outer Segment Disk Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Scott C.; Sprangers, Peter; Albert, Arlene D.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a kinetically stable protein constituting >90% of rod outer segment disk membrane protein. To investigate the bilayer contribution to rhodopsin kinetic stability, disk membranes were systematically disrupted by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. Rhodopsin kinetic stability was examined under subsolubilizing (rhodopsin in a bilayer environment perturbed by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside) and under fully solubilizing conditions (rhodopsin in a micelle with cosolubilized phospholipids). As determined by DSC, rhodopsin exhibited a scan-rate-dependent irreversible endothermic transition at all stages of solubilization. The transition temperature (Tm) decreased in the subsolubilizing stage. However, once the rhodopsin was in a micelle environment there was little change of the Tm as the phospholipid/rhodopsin ratio in the mixed micelles decreased during the fully solubilized stage. Rhodopsin thermal denaturation is consistent with the two-state irreversible model at all stages of solubilization. The activation energy of denaturation (Eact) was calculated from the scan rate dependence of the Tm and from the rate of rhodopsin thermal bleaching at all stages of solubilization. The Eact as determined by both techniques decreased in the subsolubilizing stage, but remained constant once fully solubilized. These results indicate the bilayer structure increases the Eact to rhodopsin denaturation. PMID:21689528

  3. Robust Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Rhodopsin Precedes Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Kroeger, Heike; Sakami, Sanae; Messah, Carissa; Yasumura, Douglas; Matthes, Michael T.; Coppinger, Judith A.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; LaVail, Matthew M.; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor essential for vision and rod photoreceptor viability. Disease-associated rhodopsin mutations, such as P23H rhodopsin, cause rhodopsin protein misfolding and trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, activating the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The pathophysiologic effects of ER stress and UPR activation on photoreceptors are unclear. Here, by examining a P23H rhodopsin knock-in mouse, we found that the UPR IRE1 signaling pathway is strongly activated in misfolded rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors. IRE1 significantly upregulated ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD), triggering pronounced P23H rhodopsin degradation. Rhodopsin protein loss occurred as soon as photoreceptors developed, preceding photoreceptor cell death. By contrast, IRE1 activation did not affect JNK signaling or rhodopsin mRNA levels. Interestingly, pro-apoptotic signaling from the PERK UPR pathway was also not induced. Our findings reveal that an early and significant pathophysiologic effect of ER stress in photoreceptors is the highly efficient elimination of misfolded rhodopsin protein. We propose that early disruption of rhodopsin protein homeostasis in photoreceptors could contribute to retinal degeneration. PMID:25270370

  4. pH dependence of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin: retinal isomer composition, rate of dark adaptation, and photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rozin, Rinat; Wand, Amir; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Ruhman, Sanford; Sheves, Mordechai

    2014-07-31

    Microbial rhodopsins are photoactive proteins, and their binding site can accommodate either all-trans or 13-cis retinal chromophore. The pH dependence of isomeric composition, dark-adaptation rate, and primary events of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), a microbial rhodopsin discovered a decade ago, are presented. The main findings are: (a) Two pKa values of 6.5 and 4.0 assigned to two different protein residues are observed using spectroscopic titration experiments for both ground-state retinal isomers: all-trans, 15-anti (AT) and 13-cis, 15-syn (13C). The protonation states of these protein residues affect the absorption spectrum of the pigment and most probably the isomerization process of the retinal chromophore. An additional pKa value of 8.5 is observed only for 13C-ASR. (b) The isomeric composition of ASR is determined over a wide pH range and found to be almost pH-independent in the dark (>96% AT isomer) but highly pH-dependent in the light-adapted form. (c) The kinetics of dark adaptation is recorded over a wide pH range, showing that the thermal isomerization from 13C to AT retinal occurs much faster at high pH rather than under acidic conditions. (d) Primary photochemical events of ASR at pH 5 are recorded using VIS hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy with <100 fs resolution and compared with the previously recorded results at pH 7.5. For AT-ASR, these are shown to be almost pH-independent. However, photochemistry of 13C-ASR is pH-dependent and slowed down in acidic environments.

  5. Transmembrane channel formation in rhodopsin-containing bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Montal, M; Darszon, A; Trissl, H W

    1977-05-19

    Rhodopsin has been incorporated into planar lipid bilayer membranes. The effect of light is to increase the bilayer permeability in a pattern consistent with the formation of a transmembrane channel of about 10 A diameter. A model of visual excitation based on a light-activated and voltage-sensitive channel is presented.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Thermally Stable Rhodopsin Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Standfuss, Jörg; Xie, Guifu; Edwards, Patricia C.; Burghammer, Manfred; Oprian, Daniel D.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.

    2007-01-01

    We determined the structure of the rhodopsin mutant N2C/D282C expressed in mammalian cells; the first structure of a recombinantly produced G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The mutant was designed to form a disulfide bond between the N-terminus and loop E3 which allows handling of opsin in detergent solution and increases thermal stability of rhodopsin by 10°C. It furthermore allowed us to crystallize a fully deglycosylated rhodopsin (N2C/N15D/D282C). N15 mutations are normally misfolding and cause retinitis pigmentosa in humans. Microcrystallographic techniques and a 5μm x-ray beam were used to collect data along a single needle measuring 5x5x90μm3. The disulfide introduces only minor changes but fixes the N-terminal cap over the β-sheet lid covering the ligand binding site, a likely explanation for the increased stability. This work allows structural investigation of rhodopsin mutants and shows the problems encountered during structure determination of GPCRs and other mammalian membrane proteins. PMID:17825322

  7. Rhodopsin mutants that bind but fail to activate transducin

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, R.R.; Sakmar, T.P.; Khorana, H.G. ); Koenig, B.; Hofmann, K.P. )

    1990-10-05

    Rhodopsin is a member of a family of receptors that contain seven transmembrane helices and are coupled to G proteins. The nature of the interactions between rhodopsin mutants and the G protein, transducin (G{sub t}), was investigated by flash photolysis in order to monitor directly G{sub t} binding and dissociation. Three mutant opsins with alterations in their cytoplasmic loops bound 11-cis-retinal to yield pigments with native rhodopsin absorption spectra, but they failed to stimulate the guanosine triphosphatase activity of G{sub t}. The opsin mutations included reversal of a charged pair conserved in all G protein-coupled receptors at the cytoplasmic border to the third transmembrane helix (mutant CD1), replacement of 13 amino acids in the second cytoplasmic loop (mutant CD2), and deletion of 13 amino acids from the third cytoplasmic loop (mutant EF1). Whereas mutant CD1 failed to bind G{sub t}, mutants CD2 and EF1 showed normal G{sub t} binding but failed to release G{sub t} in the presence of guanosine triphosphate. Therefore, it appears that at least the second and third cytoplasmic loops of rhodopsin are required for activation of bound G{sub t}.

  8. Rhodopsin Molecular Evolution in Mammals Inhabiting Low Light Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabin; Ru, Binghua; Teeling, Emma C.; Faulkes, Christopher G.; Zhang, Shuyi; Rossiter, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The ecological radiation of mammals to inhabit a variety of light environments is largely attributed to adaptive changes in their visual systems. Visual capabilities are conferred by anatomical features of the eyes as well as the combination and properties of their constituent light sensitive pigments. To test whether evolutionary switches to different niches characterized by dim-light conditions coincided with molecular adaptation of the rod pigment rhodopsin, we sequenced the rhodopsin gene in twenty-two mammals including several bats and subterranean mole-rats. We compared these to thirty-seven published mammal rhodopsin sequences, from species with divergent visual ecologies, including nocturnal, diurnal and aquatic groups. All taxa possessed an intact functional rhodopsin; however, phylogenetic tree reconstruction recovered a gene tree in which rodents were not monophyletic, and also in which echolocating bats formed a monophyletic group. These conflicts with the species tree appear to stem from accelerated evolution in these groups, both of which inhabit low light environments. Selection tests confirmed divergent selection pressures in the clades of subterranean rodents and bats, as well as in marine mammals that live in turbid conditions. We also found evidence of divergent selection pressures among groups of bats with different sensory modalities based on vision and echolocation. Sliding window analyses suggest most changes occur in transmembrane domains, particularly obvious within the pinnipeds; however, we found no obvious pattern between photopic niche and predicted spectral sensitivity based on known critical amino acids. This study indicates that the independent evolution of rhodopsin vision in ecologically specialised groups of mammals has involved molecular evolution at the sequence level, though such changes might not mediate spectral sensitivity directly. PMID:20016835

  9. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H.; Schwemer, J.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to the octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.

  10. Rhodopsin 5- and Rhodopsin 6-mediated clock synchronization in Drosophila melanogaster is independent of retinal phospholipase C-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Szular, Joanna; Sehadova, Hana; Gentile, Carla; Szabo, Gisela; Chou, Wen-Hai; Britt, Steven G; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2012-02-01

    Circadian clocks of most organisms are synchronized with the 24-hour solar day by the changes of light and dark. In Drosophila, both the visual photoreceptors in the compound eyes as well as the blue-light photoreceptor Cryptochrome expressed within the brain clock neurons contribute to this clock synchronization. A specialized photoreceptive structure located between the retina and the optic lobes, the Hofbauer-Buchner (H-B) eyelet, projects to the clock neurons in the brain and also participates in light synchronization. The compound eye photoreceptors and the H-B eyelet contain Rhodopsin photopigments, which activate the canonical invertebrate phototransduction cascade after being excited by light. We show here that 2 of the photopigments present in these photoreceptors, Rhodopsin 5 (Rh5) and Rhodopsin 6 (Rh6), contribute to light synchronization in a mutant (norpA(P41) ) that disrupts canonical phototransduction due to the absence of Phospholipase C-β (PLC-β). We reveal that norpA(P41) is a true loss-of-function allele, resulting in a truncated PLC-β protein that lacks the catalytic domain. Light reception mediated by Rh5 and Rh6 must therefore utilize either a different (nonretinal) PLC-β enzyme or alternative signaling mechanisms, at least in terms of clock-relevant photoreception. This novel signaling mode may distinguish Rhodopsin-mediated irradiance detection from image-forming vision in Drosophila.

  11. Cyanobacterial Light-Driven Proton Pump, Gloeobacter Rhodopsin: Complementarity between Rhodopsin-Based Energy Production and Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah Reum; Shi, Lichi; Brown, Leonid S.; Jung, Kwang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A homologue of type I rhodopsin was found in the unicellular Gloeobacter violaceus PCC7421, which is believed to be primitive because of the lack of thylakoids and peculiar morphology of phycobilisomes. The Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR) gene encodes a polypeptide of 298 amino acids. This gene is localized alone in the genome unlike cyanobacterium Anabaena opsin, which is clustered together with 14 kDa transducer gene. Amino acid sequence comparison of GR with other type I rhodopsin shows several conserved residues important for retinal binding and H+ pumping. In this study, the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and bound all-trans retinal to form a pigment (λmax  = 544 nm at pH 7). The pKa of proton acceptor (Asp121) for the Schiff base, is approximately 5.9, so GR can translocate H+ under physiological conditions (pH 7.4). In order to prove the functional activity in the cell, pumping activity was measured in the sphaeroplast membranes of E. coli and one of Gloeobacter whole cell. The efficient proton pumping and rapid photocycle of GR strongly suggests that Gloeobacter rhodopsin functions as a proton pumping in its natural environment, probably compensating the shortage of energy generated by chlorophyll-based photosynthesis without thylakoids. PMID:25347537

  12. Purification of visual arrestin from squid photoreceptors and characterization of arrestin interaction with rhodopsin and rhodopsin kinase.

    PubMed

    Swardfager, Walter; Mitchell, Jane

    2007-04-01

    Invertebrate visual signal transduction involves photoisomerization of rhodopsin, activating a guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) of the G(q) class, iG(q), which stimulates a phospholipase C, increasing intracellular Ca2+. Arrestin binding to photoactivated rhodopsin is a key mechanism of desensitization. We have previously reported the cloning of a retina-specific arrestin cDNA from Loligo pealei displaying 56-64% sequence similarity to other reported arrestin sequences. Here, we report the purification of the 55-kDa squid visual arrestin. Purified squid visual arrestin is able to inhibit light-activated GTPase activity dose-dependently in arrestin-depleted rhabdomeric membranes and associate with the membrane in a light-dependent manner. Membrane association can be partially inhibited by inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate (IP6), a soluble analog of the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. In reconstitution assays, we demonstrate arrestin phosphorylation by squid rhodopsin kinase, a novel function among the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family. Phosphorylation of purified arrestin requires squid rhodopsin kinase, membranes, light-activation, and the presence of Ca2+. This is the first large-scale purification of an invertebrate arrestin and biochemical demonstration of arrestin function in the invertebrate visual system.

  13. Structural, Energetic, and Mechanical Perturbations in Rhodopsin Mutant That Causes Congenital Stationary Night Blindness*

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Ge, Lin; Müller, Daniel J.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Several point mutations in rhodopsin cause retinal diseases including congenital stationary night blindness and retinitis pigmentosa. The mechanism by which a single amino acid residue substitution leads to dysfunction is poorly understood at the molecular level. A G90D point mutation in rhodopsin causes constitutive activity and leads to congenital stationary night blindness. It is unclear which perturbations the mutation introduces and how they can cause the receptor to be constitutively active. To reveal insight into these mechanisms, we characterized the perturbations introduced into dark state G90D rhodopsin from a transgenic mouse model expressing exclusively the mutant rhodopsin in rod photoreceptor cells. UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy revealed hydroxylamine accessibility to the chromophore-binding pocket of dark state G90D rhodopsin, which is not detected in dark state wild-type rhodopsin but is detected in light-activated wild-type rhodopsin. Single-molecule force spectroscopy suggested that the structural changes introduced by the mutation are small. Dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed that, compared with dark state wild-type rhodopsin, the G90D mutation decreased energetic stability and increased mechanical rigidity of most structural regions in the dark state mutant receptor. The observed structural, energetic, and mechanical changes in dark state G90D rhodopsin provide insights into the nature of perturbations caused by a pathological point mutation. Moreover, these changed properties observed for dark state G90D rhodopsin are consistent with properties expected for an active state. PMID:22549882

  14. Signals governing the trafficking and mistrafficking of a ciliary GPCR, rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, Kerrie H; Lee, Richard; Ropelewski, Philip; Nemet, Ina; Tian, Guilian; Imanishi, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-21

    Rhodopsin is a cilia-specific GPCR essential for vision. Rhodopsin mislocalization is associated with blinding diseases called retinal ciliopathies. The mechanism by which rhodopsin mislocalizes in rod photoreceptor neurons is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin mislocalization. Rhodopsin and its truncation mutants were fused to a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, Dendra2, and expressed in Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors. Photoconversion of Dendra2 causes a color change from green to red, enabling visualization of the dynamic events associated with rhodopsin trafficking and renewal. We found that rhodopsin mislocalization is a facilitated process for which a signal located within 322-326 aa (CCGKN) is essential. An additional signal within 327-336 aa further facilitated the mislocalization. This collective mistrafficking signal confers toxicity to rhodopsin and causes mislocalization when the VXPX cilia-targeting motif is absent. We also determined that the VXPX motif neutralizes this mistrafficking signal, enhances ciliary targeting at least 10-fold, and accelerates trafficking of post-Golgi vesicular structures. In the absence of the VXPX motif, mislocalized rhodopsin is actively cleared through secretion of vesicles into the extracellular milieu. Therefore, this study unveiled the multiple roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin localization and renewal.

  15. Signals Governing the Trafficking and Mistrafficking of a Ciliary GPCR, Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Lodowski, Kerrie H.; Lee, Richard; Ropelewski, Philip; Nemet, Ina; Tian, Guilian

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a cilia-specific GPCR essential for vision. Rhodopsin mislocalization is associated with blinding diseases called retinal ciliopathies. The mechanism by which rhodopsin mislocalizes in rod photoreceptor neurons is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin mislocalization. Rhodopsin and its truncation mutants were fused to a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, Dendra2, and expressed in Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors. Photoconversion of Dendra2 causes a color change from green to red, enabling visualization of the dynamic events associated with rhodopsin trafficking and renewal. We found that rhodopsin mislocalization is a facilitated process for which a signal located within 322–326 aa (CCGKN) is essential. An additional signal within 327–336 aa further facilitated the mislocalization. This collective mistrafficking signal confers toxicity to rhodopsin and causes mislocalization when the VXPX cilia-targeting motif is absent. We also determined that the VXPX motif neutralizes this mistrafficking signal, enhances ciliary targeting at least 10-fold, and accelerates trafficking of post-Golgi vesicular structures. In the absence of the VXPX motif, mislocalized rhodopsin is actively cleared through secretion of vesicles into the extracellular milieu. Therefore, this study unveiled the multiple roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin localization and renewal. PMID:23966685

  16. Rhodopsin molecular contrast imaging by optical coherence tomography for functional assessment of photoreceptors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafra, Zahra; Liu, Tan; Jiao, Shuliang

    2016-03-01

    Rhodopsin, the light-sensing molecule in the outer segments of rod photoreceptors, is responsible for converting light into neuronal signals in a process known as phototransduction. Rhodopsin is thus a functional biomarker for rod photoreceptors. We developed a novel technology based on visible-light optical coherence tomography (VIS-OCT) for in vivo molecular imaging of rhodopsin. The depth resolution of OCT allows the visualization of the location where the change of optical absorption occurs and provides a potentially accurate assessment of rhodopsin content by segmentation of the image at the location. A broadband supercontinuum laser, whose filtered output was centered at 520 nm, was used as the illuminating light source. To test the capabilities of the system on rhodopsin mapping we imaged the retina of albino rats. The rats were dark adapted before imaging. An integrated near infrared OCT was used to guide the alignment in dark. VIS-OCT three-dimensional images were then acquired under dark- and light- adapted states sequentially. Rhodopsin distribution was calculated from the differential image. The rhodopsin distributions can be displayed in both en face view and depth-resolved cross-sectional image. Rhodopsin OCT can be used to quantitatively image rhodopsin distribution and thus assess the distribution of functional rod photoreceptors in the retina. Rhodopsin OCT can bring significant impact into ophthalmic clinics by providing a tool for the diagnosis and severity assessment of a variety of retinal conditions.

  17. Schiff-base deprotonation is mandatory for light-dependent rhodopsin phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Seckler, B; Rando, R R

    1989-01-01

    The absorption of light by rhodopsin leads to the formation of an activated intermediate (R*) capable of catalysing the exchange of GTP for GDP in a retinal guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (transducin). The ability of R* to function as a catalyst is terminated by the rhodopsin kinase. The 10 nonactive-site lysine residues of rhodopsin can be reductively dimethylated to form permethylated rhodopsin (PMRh). This derivative is phosphorylated to the same extent as rhodopsin after photolysis. The monomethylation of the active-site lysine residue of PMRh yields active-site-methylated rhodopsin (AMRh). It had previously been shown, by using AMRh, that the formation of R* and its spectroscopic signature metarhodopsin II requires the photochemically induced deprotonation of the active-site Schiff base [Longstaff, Calhoon & Rando (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 4209-4213]. Here it is demonstrated that active-site Schiff-base deprotonation is also mandatory in the formation of the form of photolyzed rhodopsin that is susceptible to phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. In terms of the spectroscopically defined rhodopsin intermediates, this means that only metarhodopsin II and possibly metarhodopsin III are the actual substrates for rhodopsin kinase. PMID:2604728

  18. FTIR spectroscopy of a light-driven compatible sodium ion-proton pumping rhodopsin at 77 K.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hikaru; Inoue, Keiichi; Abe-Yoshizumi, Rei; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-05-08

    Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2 (KR2) is a light-driven sodium ion pump that was discovered in marine bacteria. Although KR2 is able to pump lithium ions similarly, it is converted into a proton pump in potassium chloride or salts of larger cations. In this paper, we applied light-induced difference Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to KR2, a compatible sodium ion-proton pump, at 77 K. The first structural study of the functional cycle showed that the structure and structural changes in the primary processes of KR2 are common to all microbial rhodopsins. The red shifted K formation (KR2K) was accompanied by retinal photoisomerization from an all-trans to a 13-cis form, resulting in a distorted retinal chromophore. The observed hydrogen out-of-plane vibrations were H/D exchangeable, indicating that the chromophore distortion by retinal isomerization is located near the Schiff base region in KR2. This tendency was also the case for bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin but not the case for sensory rhodopsin I and II. Therefore, ion pumps such as proton, chloride, and sodium pumps exhibit local structural perturbations of retinal at the Schiff base moiety, while photosensors show more extended structural perturbations of retinal. The retinal Schiff base of KR2 forms a hydrogen bond that is stronger than in BR. KR2 possesses more protein-bound water molecules than other microbial rhodopsins and contains strongly hydrogen-bonded water (O-D stretch at 2333 cm(-1) in D2O). The light-induced difference FTIR spectra at 77 K were identical between the two states functioning as light-driven sodium ion and proton pumps, indicating that the structural changes in the primary processes are identical between different ion pump functions in KR2. In other words, it is unknown which ions are transported by molecules when they absorb photons and photoisomerize. It is likely that the relaxation processes from the K state lead to an alternative function, namely a sodium

  19. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods

    PubMed Central

    Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Berry, Justin D.; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Cornwall, M. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1−/−), Arr1-deficient (Arr1−/−), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1ox) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1−/− rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1ox rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1−/− rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. PMID:27353443

  20. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. © 2016 Frederiksen et al.

  1. Spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in retinal rod outer segment membranes studied by spin-labeling and pulsed electron double resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Hara, Hideyuki; Tokunaga, Fumio; Arata, Toshiaki

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of spin labeling and PELDOR to measure inter-rhodopsin distance in ROS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong decay of PELDOR signal indicated a high density (mM range) of rhodopsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decay was modeled by rhodopsin monomers dispersed in a planar membrane. -- Abstract: We have determined the spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in the retinal rod outer segment (ROS) membrane by measuring the distances between rhodopsin molecules in which native cysteines were spin-labeled at {approx}1.0 mol/mol rhodopsin. The echo modulation decay of pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) from spin-labeled ROS curved slightly with strong background decay. This indicated that the rhodopsin was densely packed in the retina and that the rhodopsin molecules were not aligned well. The curve was simulated by a model in which rhodopsin is distributed randomly as monomers in a planar membrane.

  2. A unique choanoflagellate enzyme rhodopsin exhibits light-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuho; Tsunoda, Satoshi P; Brown, Leonid S; Kandori, Hideki

    2017-05-05

    Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) and guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin increase the concentrations of intracellular cyclic nucleotides upon illumination, serving as promising second-generation tools in optogenetics. To broaden the arsenal of such tools, it is desirable to have light-activatable enzymes that can decrease cyclic nucleotide concentrations in cells. Here, we report on an unusual microbial rhodopsin that may be able to meet the demand. It is found in the choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta and contains a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain. We examined the enzymatic activity of the protein (named Rh-PDE) both in HEK293 membranes and whole cells. Although Rh-PDE was constitutively active in the dark, illumination increased its hydrolytic activity 1.4-fold toward cGMP and 1.6-fold toward cAMP, as measured in isolated crude membranes. Purified full-length Rh-PDE displayed maximal light absorption at 492 nm and formed the M intermediate with the deprotonated Schiff base upon illumination. The M state decayed to the parent spectral state in 7 s, producing long-lasting activation of the enzyme domain with increased activity. We discuss a possible mechanism of the Rh-PDE activation by light. Furthermore, Rh-PDE decreased cAMP concentration in HEK293 cells in a light-dependent manner and could do so repeatedly without losing activity. Thus, Rh-PDE may hold promise as a potential optogenetic tool for light control of intracellular cyclic nucleotides (e.g. to study cyclic nucleotide-associated signal transduction cascades). © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. QM/MM Study of Dehydro and Dihydro β-Ionone Retinal Analogues in Squid and Bovine Rhodopsins: Implications for Vision in Salamander Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Altun, Ahmet; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Visual pigment rhodopsin provides a decisive crossing point for interaction between organisms and environment. Naturally occurring visual pigments contain only PSB11 and 3,4-dehydro-PSB11 as chromophores. Therefore, the ability of visual opsin to discriminate between the retinal geometries is investigated by means of QM/MM incorporation of PSB11, 6-s-cis and 6-s-trans forms of 3,4-dehydro-PSB11, 3,4-dehydro-5,6-dihydro-PSB11, 5,6-dihydro-PSB11 analogues into squid and bovine rhodopsin environments. The analogue-protein interaction reveals the binding site of squid rhodopsin to be malleable and ductile, while that of bovine rhodopsin to be rigid and stiff. On the basis of these studies, a tentative model of salamander rhodopsin binding site is also proposed. PMID:20964383

  4. Rhodopsin Forms Nanodomains in Rod Outer Segment Disc Membranes of the Cold-Blooded Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Tatini; Senapati, Subhadip; Sinha, Satyabrata; Whited, A M; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin forms nanoscale domains (i.e., nanodomains) in rod outer segment disc membranes from mammalian species. It is unclear whether rhodopsin arranges in a similar manner in amphibian species, which are often used as a model system to investigate the function of rhodopsin and the structure of photoreceptor cells. Moreover, since samples are routinely prepared at low temperatures, it is unclear whether lipid phase separation effects in the membrane promote the observed nanodomain organization of rhodopsin from mammalian species. Rod outer segment disc membranes prepared from the cold-blooded frog Xenopus laevis were investigated by atomic force microscopy to visualize the organization of rhodopsin in the absence of lipid phase separation effects. Atomic force microscopy revealed that rhodopsin nanodomains form similarly as that observed previously in mammalian membranes. Formation of nanodomains in ROS disc membranes is independent of lipid phase separation and conserved among vertebrates.

  5. Flash photolysis and low temperature photochemistry of bovine rhodopsin with a fixed 11-ene.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, B; Tsuda, M; Ebrey, T G; Akita, H; Balogh-Nair, V; Nakanishi, K

    1981-01-01

    Nonbleachable rhodopsins containing retinal moieties with fixed 11-ene structures have been prepared. When the nonbleachable rhodopsin analogue corresponding to the natural pigment was flash-photolysed at 20.8 degrees C, no absorption changes occurred at the monitoring wavelengths of 380, 480, and 580 nm for the time range of 2 microseconds--10 s. This observation is in contrast to that of natural rhodopsin which showed the formation of metarhodopsin I and its decay to meta II. Irradiation of the artificial rhodopsin, 77 K, with light of 460 and 540 nm, also gave no spectral changes; in the case of natural rhodopsin, however, the irradiation leads to formation of the red-shifted intermediate bathorhodopsin. The absence of photochemistry in the artificial pigment shows that an 11-cis to trans photoisomerization of the retinal moiety is a crucial step in inducing the chain of events in te photolysis of rhodopsin. PMID:7272450

  6. Spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in retinal rod outer segment membranes studied by spin-labeling and pulsed electron double resonance.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Hara, Hideyuki; Tokunaga, Fumio; Arata, Toshiaki

    2012-08-24

    We have determined the spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in the retinal rod outer segment (ROS) membrane by measuring the distances between rhodopsin molecules in which native cysteines were spin-labeled at ~1.0 mol/mol rhodopsin. The echo modulation decay of pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) from spin-labeled ROS curved slightly with strong background decay. This indicated that the rhodopsin was densely packed in the retina and that the rhodopsin molecules were not aligned well. The curve was simulated by a model in which rhodopsin is distributed randomly as monomers in a planar membrane.

  7. Directed Evolution of a Bright Near-Infrared Fluorescent Rhodopsin Using a Synthetic Chromophore.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Lukas; Rice, Austin J; Bedbrook, Claire N; Zhang, Ruijie K; Lignell, Antti; Cahn, Jackson K B; Renata, Hans; Dodani, Sheel C; Cho, Inha; Cai, Long; Gradinaru, Viviana; Arnold, Frances H

    2017-03-16

    By engineering a microbial rhodopsin, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), to bind a synthetic chromophore, merocyanine retinal, in place of the natural chromophore all-trans-retinal (ATR), we generated a protein with exceptionally bright and unprecedentedly red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence. We show that chromophore substitution generates a fluorescent Arch complex with a 200-nm bathochromic excitation shift relative to ATR-bound wild-type Arch and an emission maximum at 772 nm. Directed evolution of this complex produced variants with pH-sensitive NIR fluorescence and molecular brightness 8.5-fold greater than the brightest ATR-bound Arch variant. The resulting proteins are well suited to bacterial imaging; expression and stability have not been optimized for mammalian cell imaging. By targeting both the protein and its chromophore, we overcome inherent challenges associated with engineering bright NIR fluorescence into Archaerhodopsin. This work demonstrates an efficient strategy for engineering non-natural, tailored properties into microbial opsins, properties relevant for imaging and interrogating biological systems.

  8. Impact of Reduced Rhodopsin Expression on the Structure of Rod Outer Segment Disc Membranes†

    PubMed Central

    Rakshit, Tatini; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor embedded in rod outer segment (ROS) disc membranes of photoreceptor cells that initiates vision via phototransduction. The relationship between rhodopsin expression and the formation of membrane structures in the ROS is unclear but important to better understand both normal function and pathological conditions. To determine the impact of reduced rhodopsin expression on the structure of ROS discs and the supramolecular organization of rhodopsin, ROS disc membrane samples from heterozygous rhodopsin knockout mice were examined by atomic force microscopy. Similar to rhodopsin in wild-type mice, rhodopsin formed nanodomains in ROS disc membranes of heterozygous knockout mice. The reduced rhodopsin expression in heterozygous knockout mice resulted in ROS disc membranes that were smaller compared to those in wild-type mice at all ages tested. Changes in ROS disc membrane properties were observed between 4 and 6 weeks of age in heterozygous knockout mice that were not present in age-matched wild-type mice. In 4 week-old mice, the number and density of rhodopsin in ROS disc membranes was lower than that in age-matched wild-type mice. In contrast, 6 and 8 week-old mice had more rhodopsin molecules present in disc membranes compared to 4 week-old mice, which resulted in rhodopsin densities similar to those found in age-matched wild-type mice. Thus, mechanisms appear to be present that maintain a constant density of rhodopsin within ROS disc membranes even when reducing the expression of the light receptor by about half. These adaptive mechanisms, however, only occur after 4 weeks of age. PMID:25881629

  9. Rhodopsin Kinase Activity in the Mammalian Pineal Gland and Other Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Robert L.; Klein, David C.

    1984-10-01

    Rhodopsin kinase, an enzyme involved in photochemical transduction in the retina, has been found in the mammalian pineal gland in amounts equal to those in the retina; other tissues had 7 percent of this amount, or less. This finding suggests that, in mammals, rhodopsin kinase functions in the pineal gland and other tissues to phosphorylate rhodopsin-like integral membrane receptors and is thereby involved in signal transduction.

  10. Spectral tuning of rhodopsin and visual cone pigments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiuwen; Sundholm, Dage; Wesołowski, Tomasz A; Kaila, Ville R I

    2014-02-19

    Retinal is the light-absorbing biochromophore responsible for the activation of vision pigments and light-driven ion pumps. Nature has evolved molecular tuning mechanisms that significantly shift the optical properties of the retinal pigments to enable their absorption of visible light. Using large-scale quantum chemical calculations at the density functional theory level combined with frozen density embedding theory, we show here how the protein environment of vision pigments tunes the absorption of retinal by electrostatically dominated interactions between the chromophore and the surrounding protein residues. The calculations accurately reproduce the experimental absorption maxima of rhodopsin and the red, green, and blue color pigments. We further identify key interactions responsible for the color-shifting effects by mutating the rhodopsin structure in silico, and we find that deprotonation of the retinyl is likely to be responsible for the blue-shifted absorption in the blue cone vision pigment.

  11. Arrestin can act as a regulator of rhodopsin photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Martha E; Farrens, David L

    2006-12-01

    We report that visual arrestin can regulate retinal release and late photoproduct formation in rhodopsin. Our experiments, which employ a fluorescently labeled arrestin and rhodopsin solubilized in detergent/phospholipid micelles, indicate that arrestin can trap a population of retinal in the binding pocket with an absorbance characteristic of Meta II with the retinal Schiff-base intact. Furthermore, arrestin can convert Metarhodopsin III (formed either by thermal decay or blue-light irradiation) to a Meta II-like absorbing species. Together, our results suggest arrestin may be able to play a more complex role in the rod cell besides simply quenching transducin activity. This possibility may help explain why arrestin deficiency leads to problems like stationary night blindness (Oguchi disease) and retinal degeneration.

  12. Elastic properties of polyunsaturated phosphatidylethanolamines influence rhodopsin function.

    PubMed

    Teague, Walter E; Soubias, Olivier; Petrache, Horia; Fuller, Nola; Hines, Kirk G; Rand, R Peter; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Membranes with a high content of polyunsaturated phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) facilitate formation of metarhodopsin-II (M(II)), the photointermediate of bovine rhodopsin that activates the G protein transducin. We determined whether M(II)-formation is quantitatively linked to the elastic properties of PEs. Curvature elasticity of monolayers of the polyunsaturated lipids 18 : 0-22 : 6(n - 3)PE, 18 : 0-22 : 5(n)- 6PE and the model lipid 18 : 1(n - 9)-18 : 1,(n- 9)PE were investigated in the inverse hexagonal phase. All three lipids form lipid monolayers with rather low spontaneous radii of curvature of 26-28 angstroms. In membranes, all three PEs generate high negative curvature elastic stress that shifts the equilibrium of MI(I)/M(II) photointermediates of rhodopsin towards M(II) formation.

  13. Bathoproducts of rhodopsin, isorhodopsin I, and isorhodopsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, B; Ebrey, T G; Crouch, R

    1980-01-01

    Bathorhodopsins were prepared by partially (10--15%) photoconverting bovine rhodopsin (11-cis chromophore) or isorhodopsin I (9-cis chromophore) at 77 degrees K; care was taken to avoid establishing photostationary states. The absorption spectra calculated for the bathorhodopsins derived from the two parent pigments are identical in their lambda max 'S, bandwidths, and extinction coefficients. This result provides further support for the hypothesis that bathorhodopsin is a common intermediate between an 11-cis pigment (rhodopsin) and a 9-cis one (isorhodopsin I) and thus probably has an all-trans chromophore. This in turn is strong evidence for the cis-trans isomerization model of the primary event in vision. The spectrum of the bathoproduct of isorhodopsin II (9,13-dicis chromophore) is different from the other pigments' bathoproducts. PMID:7260250

  14. Origin of Fluorescence in 11-cis Locked Bovine Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Laricheva, Elena N; Gozem, Samer; Rinaldi, Silvia; Melaccio, Federico; Valentini, Alessio; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-08-14

    The excited state lifetime of bovine rhodopsin (Rh) increases from ca. 100 fs to 85 ps when the C11═C12 bond of its chromophore is locked by a cyclopentene moiety (Rh5). To explain such an increase, we employed ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry to construct computer models of Rh and Rh5 and to investigate the shape of their excited state potential energy surfaces in a comparative way. Our results show that the observed Rh5 fluorescence (λmax(f) = 620 nm) is due to a previously unreported locally excited intermediate whose lifetime is controlled by a small energy barrier. The analysis of the properties and decay path of such an intermediate provides useful information for engineering rhodopsin variants with augmented fluorescence efficiencies.

  15. Identification of a single phosphorylation site within octopus rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ohguro, H; Yoshida, N; Shindou, H; Crabb, J W; Palczewski, K; Tsuda, M

    1998-12-01

    Light-dependent phosphorylation of rhodopsin (Rho) is a first step in the desensitization of the signaling state of the receptor during vertebrate and invertebrate visual transduction. We found that only 358Ser of the photoactivated octopus Rho (oRho*) was phosphorylated by octopus rhodopsin kinase (oRK). Tryptic truncation of the C-terminal PPQGY repeats of oRho that follow the phosphorylation region did not influence spectral or G-protein activation properties of oRho but abolished phosphorylation. Despite significant structural differences between oRK and mammalian RK, these results provide further evidence of the importance of singly phosphorylated species of Rho* in the generation of arrestin binding sites.

  16. Restoration of carbon and microbial activity in salt-induced soil by application of peanut shell biochar during short-term incubation study.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Debarati; Saha, Ajoy; Desai, Deepali; Meena, H N

    2016-04-01

    For the present study, soil samples of four artificially-induced salinity gradients (S0: control, S1: 2.0, S2: 4.0, S3: 6.0 ECiw) was incubated with fine-textured peanut shell biochar at various ratios (B0: control, B1: 2.5%, B2: 5.0%, B3: 10% w/w) for 30 days. At 1, 3, 7, 15, 30 days of incubation, samples were analyzed for soil carbon and selected enzyme activities. Results showed that biochar could increase soil organic carbon on application of highest rate of biochar addition (B3), hence potentially restored the saline soils by less C mineralization, and more sequestration of soil C. However, soil enzyme activities were biochar rate(s), day(s) of incubation and enzyme dependent. The lowest rate of biochar addition (B1) showed highest dehydrogenase (20.5 μg TPF g(-1) soil h(-1)), acid phosphatase (29.1 μg PNP g(-1) soil h(-1)) and alkaline phosphatase (16.1 μg PNP g(-1) soil h(-1)) whereas the higher rate (B2) increased the urease (5.51 μg urea-N g(-1) soil h(-1)) and fluorescein diacetate hydrolyzing activities (3.95 μg fluorescein g(-1) OD soil h(-1)) in soil. All the positive changes persisted at higher levels of salinity (S2, S3) suggesting biochar-amended soil may be potential for better nutrient cycling. Soil enzymes were found to be correlated with soil carbon and with each other while principal component analysis (PCA) extracted the most sensitive parameters as the acid and alkaline phosphatases and urease activities in the present experimental condition. This is the first time report of examining soil microbial environment using peanut shell biochar under a degraded (saline) soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Explaining the mobility of retinal in activated rhodopsin and opsin.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Blake; Feng, Jun; Corcoran, Conor; Neeley, Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Rhodopsin, the mammalian dim light photoreceptor, is the canonical model for G protein-coupled receptors. Activation of rhodopsin occurs when the covalently bound inverse agonist, retinal, absorbs a photon and undergoes an 11-cis to all-trans isomerization. Two critical components of the visual cycle occur with the (1) hydrolytic release of all-trans retinaldehyde and subsequent (2) uptake of 11-cis retinaldehyde to reform the Schiff base linkage in the apoprotein opsin. Two pores on the surface of opsin are connected via the retinal channel, as discovered upon solution of the X-ray crystal structure (Park et al., Nature, 2008), and could serve as potential entryways for uptake and release. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we examined the behavior of rhodopsin in the Meta-II conformation (active) under Meta-I conditions (inactive), and discovered that the retinal binding pocket is flexible enough to allow a 180° rotation along the long axis of the retinal polyene chain. This result reconciles a discrepancy between the known polyene chain orientation from crystallographic and spectroscopic studies and opens the door for further investigation into the intermolecular interactions between the retinal ligand and the apoprotein opsin. Subsequent docking studies of both isomers of retinal into the opsin channel were then conducted to identify the mechanism for uptake and release. Our results suggest that retinal undergoes unidirectional uptake through Pore A and release through Pore B, and that aromatic sidechain interactions play a key role in stabilizing retinal within the opsin channel. These findings are significant in developing our understanding of the retinoid cycle and how ligand-receptor interactions in rhodopsin relate to G protein-coupled receptor activation.

  18. Modelling vibrational coherence in the primary rhodopsin photoproduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingart, O.; Garavelli, M.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the rhodopsin photoreaction reveal coherent low frequency oscillations in the primary photoproduct (photorhodopsin), with frequencies slightly higher than observed in the experiment. The coherent molecular motions in the batho-precursor can be attributed to the activation of ground state vibrational modes in the hot photo-product, involving out-of-plane deformations of the carbon skeleton. Results are discussed and compared with respect to spectroscopic data and suggested reaction mechanisms.

  19. Molecular complexes that direct rhodopsin transport to primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Deretic, Dusanka

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a key molecular constituent of photoreceptor cells, yet understanding of how it regulates photoreceptor membrane trafficking and biogenesis of light-sensing organelles, the rod outer segments (ROS) is only beginning to emerge. Recently identified sequence of well-orchestrated molecular interactions of rhodopsin with the functional networks of Arf and Rab GTPases at multiple stages of intracellular targeting fits well into the complex framework of the biogenesis and maintenance of primary cilia, of which the ROS is one example. This review will discuss the latest progress in dissecting the molecular complexes that coordinate rhodopsin incorporation into ciliary-targeted carriers with the recruitment and activation of membrane tethering complexes and regulators of fusion with the periciliary plasma membrane. In addition to revealing the fundamental principals of ciliary membrane renewal, recent advances also provide molecular insight into the ways by which disruptions of the exquisitely orchestrated interactions lead to cilia dysfunction and result in human retinal dystrophies and syndromic diseases that affect multiple organs, including the eyes. PMID:24135424

  20. Coupling Efficiency of Rhodopsin and Transducin in Bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Ali I.; Thaker, Tarjani M.; Preininger, Anita M.; Iverson, T. M.; Hamm, Heidi E.

    2011-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be activated by various extracellular stimuli, including hormones, peptides, odorants, neurotransmitters, nucleotides or light. After activation, activated receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins and catalyze GDP release from the Gα subunit, the rate limiting step in G protein activation, to form a high affinity nucleotide-free GPCR-G protein complex. In vivo, subsequent GTP binding reduces affinity of the Gα protein for the activated receptor. In this study, we investigated the biochemical and structural characteristics of the prototypical GPCR, rhodopsin, and its signaling partner, transducin (Gt), in phospholipid bilayers to better understand the effects of membrane composition on high affinity complex formation, stability, and receptor mediated nucleotide release. Our results demonstrate that the high-affinity complex (rhodopsin-Gt(empty)) forms more readily and has dramatically increased stability when rhodopsin is integrated into bicelles of a defined composition. We increased the half life of functional complex to one week in the presence of negatively charged phospholipids. These data suggest that a membrane-like structure is an important contributor to the formation and stability of functional receptor-G protein complexes, and can extend the range of studies that investigate properties of these complexes. PMID:21375271

  1. Rhodopsin Photoactivation Dynamics Revealed by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchhithranga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision. During photoactivation, the chromophore retinal dissociates from protein yielding the opsin apoprotein. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks individual hydrogen atom motion because of the much higher neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen than other atoms. We used protein with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. The QENS experiments at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate an increase in protein dynamic behavior with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin is faster compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which unlike protein, manifests localized motions.

  2. Probing the Photodynamics of Rhodopsins with Reduced Retinal Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Manathunga, Madushanka; Yang, Xuchun; Luk, Hoi Ling; Gozem, Samer; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Valentini, Alessio; Ferrè, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-02-09

    While the light-induced population dynamics of different photoresponsive proteins has been investigated spectroscopically, systematic computational studies have not yet been possible due to the phenomenally high cost of suitable high level quantum chemical methods and the need of propagating hundreds, if not thousands, of nonadiabatic trajectories. Here we explore the possibility of studying the photodynamics of rhodopsins by constructing and investigating quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models featuring reduced retinal chromophores. In order to do so we use the sensory rhodopsin found in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120 (ASR) as a benchmark system. We find that the basic mechanistic features associated with the excited state dynamics of ASR QM/MM models are reproduced using models incorporating a minimal (i.e., three double-bond) chromophore. Furthermore, we show that ensembles of nonadiabatic ASR trajectories computed using the same abridged models replicate, at both the CASPT2 and CASSCF levels of theory, the trends in spectroscopy and lifetimes estimated using unabridged models and observed experimentally at room temperature. We conclude that a further expansion of these studies may lead to low-cost QM/MM rhodopsin models that may be used as effective tools in high-throughput in silico mutant screening.

  3. Photosensitivity spectrum of crayfish rhodopsin measured using fluorescence of metarhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Discrepancies exist among spectral measurements of sensitivity of crayfish photoreceptors, their absorption in situ, and the number and absorption spectra of crayfish photopigments that are extracted by digitonin solutions. We have determined the photosensitivity spectrum of crayfish rhodopsin in isolated rhabdoms using long wavelength fluorescence emission from crayfish metarhodopsin as an intrinsic probe. There is no measurable metarhodopsin in the dark-adapted receptor, so changes in the emission level are directly proportional to metarhodopsin concentration. We therefore used changes in metarhodopsin fluorescence to construct relaxation and saturation ("photoequilibrium") spectra, from which the photosensitivity spectrum of crayfish rhodopsin was calculated. This spectrum peaks at or approximately 530 nm and closely resembles the previously measured difference spectrum for total bleaches of dark-adapted rhabdoms. Measurements of the kinetics of changes in rhabdom fluorescence and in transmittance at 580 nm were compared with predictions derived from several model systems containing one or two photopigments. The comparison shows that only a single rhodopsin and its metarhodopsin are present in the main rhabdom of crayfish, and that other explanations must be sought for the multiple pigments seen in digitonin solution. The same analysis shows that there is no detectable formation of isorhodopsin in the rhabdom. PMID:7057163

  4. Biochemical analysis of a rhodopsin photoactivatable GFP fusion as a model of G-protein coupled receptor transport

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Joshua D.; Gross, Alecia K.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is trafficked to the rod outer segment of vertebrate rod cells with high fidelity. When rhodopsin transport is disrupted retinal photoreceptors apoptose, resulting in the blinding disease autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Herein, we introduce rhodopsin-photoactivatable GFP-1D4 (rhodopsin-paGFP-1D4) for the purposes of monitoring rhodopsin transport in living cells. Rhodopsin-paGFP-1D4 contains photoactivatable GFP (paGFP) fused to rhodopsin’s C-terminus and the last eight amino acids of rhodopsin (1D4) appended to the C-terminus of paGFP. The fusion protein binds the chromophore 11-cis retinal and photoisomerizes upon light activation similarly to rhodopsin. It activates the G-protein transducin with similar kinetics as does rhodopsin. Rhodopsin-paGFP-1D4 localizes to the same compartments, the primary cilium in cultured IMCD cells and the outer segment of rod cells, as rhodopsin in vitro and in vivo. This enables its use as a model of rhodopsin transport and details the importance of a free rhodopsin C-terminus in rod cell localization and health. PMID:24140958

  5. Characterization of two dominant alleles of the major rhodopsin-encoding gene ninaE in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Amitavo; Kinser, Ronald; Dolph, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In this study we investigated the biochemical and cell biologic characteristics of flies expressing two novel dominant alleles of the major rhodopsin encoding gene neither inactivation nor afterpotential E (ninaE) in a heterozygous background. Methods Presence of the deep pseudopupil in flies was assayed 5 days post eclosion. For structural analysis, 1-μm-retinal cross sections were obtained from fixed and resin-embedded Drosophila heads. Confocal microscopy was performed on dissected retinas stained with antibodies specific for rhodopsin, NinaA, and F-actin. Rhodopsin levels were determined by western and slot blot analysis. Results Dominant rhodopsin mutants showed progressive age-dependent and light-independent loss of the deep pseudopupil, without any apparent retinal degeneration at the morphological level. Expression of mutant rhodopsin caused rhodopsin to mislocalize to the cell body and the endoplasmic reticulum compartment. Mutant rhodopsin also caused loss of solubility of wild-type rhodopsin and its accumulation presumably as a high molecular mass complex in the photoreceptor cell body. Conclusions In heterozygous mutant flies, there is loss of wild-type rhodopsin immunoreactivity on a western assay but less reduction using slot blot analysis. This suggests that mutant rhodopsin is likely inducing the misfolding and insolubility of wild-type rhodopsin. Localization of rhodopsin revealed that in mutant flies, wild-type rhodopsin is mislocalized to the cell body and the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22194648

  6. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  7. Rhodopsin TM6 Can Interact with Two Separate and Distinct Sites on Arrestin: Evidence for Structural Plasticity and Multiple Docking Modes in Arrestin–Rhodopsin Binding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have implicated the concave surface of arrestin in the binding of the cytosolic surface of rhodopsin. However, specific sites of contact between the two proteins have not previously been defined in detail. Here, we report that arrestin shares part of the same binding site on rhodopsin as does the transducin Gα subunit C-terminal tail, suggesting binding of both proteins to rhodopsin may share some similar underlying mechanisms. We also identify two areas of contact between the proteins near this region. Both sites lie in the arrestin N-domain, one in the so-called “finger” loop (residues 67–79) and the other in the 160 loop (residues 155–165). We mapped these sites using a novel tryptophan-induced quenching method, in which we introduced Trp residues into arrestin and measured their ability to quench the fluorescence of bimane probes attached to cysteine residues on TM6 of rhodopsin (T242C and T243C). The involvement of finger loop binding to rhodopsin was expected, but the evidence of the arrestin 160 loop contacting rhodopsin was not. Remarkably, our data indicate one site on rhodopsin can interact with multiple structurally separate sites on arrestin that are almost 30 Å apart. Although this observation at first seems paradoxical, in fact, it provides strong support for recent hypotheses that structural plasticity and conformational changes are involved in the arrestin–rhodopsin binding interface and that the two proteins may be able to interact through multiple docking modes, with arrestin binding to both monomeric and dimeric rhodopsin. PMID:24724832

  8. All-trans/13-cis isomerization of retinal is required for phototaxis signaling by sensory rhodopsins in Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, B; Takahashi, T; Johnson, R; Derguini, F; Nakanishi, K; Spudich, J L

    1990-01-01

    An analogue of all-trans retinal in which all-trans/13-cis isomerization is blocked by a carbon bridge from C12 to C14 was incorporated into the apoproteins of sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) and sensory rhodopsin II (SR-II, also called phoborhodopsin) in retinal-deficient Halobacterium halobium membranes. The "all-trans-locked" retinal analogue forms SR-I and SR-II analogue pigments with similar absorption spectra as the native pigments. Blocking isomerization prevents the formation of the long-lived intermediate of the SR-I photocycle (S373) and those of the SR-II photocycle (S-II360 and S-II530). A computerized cell tracking and motion analysis system capable of detecting 2% of native pigment activity was used for assessing motility behavior. Introduction of the locked analogue into SR-I or SR-II apoprotein in vivo did not restore phototactic responses through any of the three known photosensory systems (SR-I attractant, SR-I repellent, or SR-II repellent). We conclude that unlike the phototaxis receptor of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been reported to mediate physiological responses without specific double-bond isomerization of its retinal chromophore (Foster et al., 1989), all-trans/13-cis isomerization is essential for SR-I and SR-II phototaxis signaling. PMID:2344465

  9. An experimental comparison of human and bovine rhodopsin provides insight into the molecular basis of retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Morrow, James M; Castiglione, Gianni M; Dungan, Sarah Z; Tang, Portia L; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Hauser, Frances E; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-03-30

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment that mediates dim-light vision in vertebrates and is a model system for the study of retinal disease. The majority of rhodopsin experiments are performed using bovine rhodopsin; however, recent evidence suggests that significant functional differences exist among mammalian rhodopsins. In this study, we identify differences in both thermal decay and light-activated retinal release rates between bovine and human rhodopsin and perform mutagenesis studies to highlight two clusters of substitutions that contribute to these differences. We also demonstrate that the retinitis pigmentosa-associated mutation G51A behaves differently in human rhodopsin compared to bovine rhodopsin and determine that the thermal decay rate of an ancestrally reconstructed mammalian rhodopsin displays an intermediate phenotype compared to the two extant pigments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing the correlation between mutant rhodopsin stability and the severity of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    McKeone, Richard; Wikstrom, Matthew; Kiel, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Following a previous study that demonstrated a correlation between rhodopsin stability and the severity of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), we investigated whether predictions of severity can be improved with a regional analysis of this correlation. The association between changes to the stability of the protein and the relative amount of rhodopsin reaching the plasma membrane was assessed. Methods Crystallography-based estimations of mutant rhodopsin stability were compared with descriptions in the scientific literature of the visual function of mutation carriers to determine the extent of associations between rhodopsin stability and clinical phenotype. To test the findings of this analysis, three residues of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged rhodopsin plasmid were targeted with site-directed random mutagenesis to generate mutant variants with a range of stability changes. These plasmids were transfected into HEK-293 cells, and then flow cytometry was used to measure rhodopsin on the cells’ plasma membrane. The GFP signal was used to measure the ratio between this membrane-bound rhodopsin and total cellular rhodopsin. FoldX stability predictions were then compared with the surface staining data and clinical data from the database to characterize the relationship between rhodopsin stability, the severity of RP, and the expression of rhodopsin at the cell surface. Results There was a strong linear correlation between the scale of the destabilization of mutant variants and the severity of retinal disease. A correlation was also seen in vitro between stability and the amount of rhodopsin at the plasma membrane. Rhodopsin is drastically reduced on the surface of cells transfected with variants that differ in their inherent stability from the wild-type by more than 2 kcal/mol. Below this threshold, surface levels are closer to those of the wild-type. Conclusions There is a correlation between the stability of rhodopsin mutations and disease severity and

  11. In vivo imaging rhodopsin distribution in the photoreceptors with nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Wen, Rong; Lam, Byron L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin is a biomarker for the function of rod photoreceptors, the dysfunction of which is related to many blinding diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Imaging rhodopsin quantitatively may provide a powerful clinical tool for diagnosis of these diseases. To map rhodopsin distribution accurately in the retina, absorption by rhodopsin intermediates need to be minimized. Methods and materials We developed nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) to image rhodopsin distribution in the retina. The system takes advantage of the light-induced shift of rhodopsin absorption spectra, which in turn affects the fundus spectral reflection before and after photo-bleaching. By imaging the retina twice, one in the dark-adapted state and the other one in the light-adapted state, the rhodopsin absorption change can be calculated from the differential image, which is a function of the rhodopsin concentration in the rod photoreceptors. Results The system was successfully applied to in vivo imaging of rat retina in different bleaching conditions to verify its feasibility. Our studies showed that the differential image between the dark- and light-adapted states represents rhodopsin distribution in the retina. We also conducted a dynamic bleaching experiment to prove the importance of reducing light absorption of rhodopsin intermediates. Conclusions The preliminary results showed that our nano-second pulsed-light SLO is promising in imaging the functional biomarker of the rod photoreceptors. By using nanosecond pulsed laser, in which one laser pulse generates one pixel of the image, the absorption of rhodopsin intermediates can be reduced. PMID:25694955

  12. Calorimetric studies of bovine rod outer segment disk membranes support a monomeric unit for both rhodopsin and opsin.

    PubMed

    Edrington, Thomas C; Bennett, Michael; Albert, Arlene D

    2008-09-15

    The photoreceptor rhodopsin is a G-protein coupled receptor that has recently been proposed to exist as a dimer or higher order oligomer, in contrast to the previously described monomer, in retinal rod outer segment disk membranes. Rhodopsin exhibits considerably greater thermal stability than opsin (the bleached form of the receptor), which is reflected in an approximately 15 degrees C difference in the thermal denaturation temperatures (T(m)) of rhodopsin and opsin as measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Here we use differential scanning calorimetry to investigate the effect of partial bleaching of disk membranes on the T(m) of rhodopsin and of opsin in native disk membranes, as well as in cross-linked disk membranes in which rhodopsin dimers are known to be present. The T(m)s of rhodopsin and opsin are expected to be perturbed if mixed oligomers are present. The T(m) remained constant for rhodopsin and opsin in native disks regardless of the level of bleaching. In contrast, the T(m) of cross-linked rhodopsin in disk membranes was dependent on the extent of bleaching. The energy of activation for denaturation of rhodopsin and cross-linked rhodopsin was calculated. Cross-linking rhodopsin significantly decreased the energy of activation. We conclude that in native disk membranes, rhodopsin behaves predominantly as a monomer.

  13. Efficient Coupling of Transducin to Monomeric Rhodopsin in a Phospholipid Bilayer*s

    PubMed Central

    Whorton, Matthew R.; Jastrzebska, Beata; Park, Paul S.-H.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Engel, Andreas; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane domain proteins that transduce extracellular signals across the plasma membrane and couple to the heterotrimeric family of G proteins. Like most intrinsic membrane proteins, GPCRs are capable of oligomerization, the function of which has only been established for a few different receptor systems. One challenge in understanding the function of oligomers relates to the inability to separate monomeric and oligomeric receptor complexes in membrane environments. Here we report the reconstitution of bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR expressed in the retina, into an apolipoprotein A-I phospholipid particle, derived from high density lipoprotein (HDL). We demonstrate that rhodopsin, when incorporated into these 10 nm reconstituted HDL (rHDL) particles, is monomeric and functional. Rhodopsin·rHDL maintains the appropriate spectral properties with respect to photoactivation and formation of the active form, metarhodopsin II. Additionally, the kinetics of metarhodopsin II decay is similar between rhodopsin in native membranes and rhodopsin in rHDL particles. Photoactivation of monomeric rhodopsin·rHDL also results in the rapid activation of transducin, at a rate that is comparable with that found in native rod outer segments and 20-fold faster than rhodopsin in detergent micelles. These data suggest that monomeric rhodopsin is the minimal functional unit in G protein activation and that oligomerization is not absolutely required for this process. PMID:18033822

  14. Vertebrate rhodopsin adaptation to dim light via rapid meta-II intermediate formation.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Tohru; Imai, Hiroo; Nikaido, Masato; Imamoto, Yasushi; Okada, Norihiro

    2010-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a photoreceptive protein present in vertebrate rod photoreceptor cells, which are responsible for scotopic vision. Recent molecular studies have shown that several aquatic vertebrate species have independently acquired rhodopsin containing Asp83Asn, Glu122Gln, and Ala292Ser substitutions, causing a blue shift in the rhodopsin absorption spectra for adaptation to the blue-green photic environment in deep water. Here, we provide new evidence for the evolutionary and functional relevance of the Asp83Asn substitution. Spectroscopic and kinetic analyses of rhodopsins in six cichlid fishes from the East African Great Lakes using charge-coupled device spectrophotometer revealed that the Asp83Asn substitution accelerated the formation of meta-II, a rhodopsin intermediate crucial for activation of the G-protein transducin. Because rapid formation of meta-II likely results in effective transduction of photic signals, it is reasonable to assume that deep-water cichlid species have acquired rhodopsin containing Asn83 to adapt to dim lighting. Remarkably, rhodopsin containing Asn83 has been identified in terrestrial vertebrates such as bats, and these rhodopsin variants also exhibit accelerated meta-II formation. Our results indicated that the Asp83Asn substitution observed in a variety of animal species was acquired independently in many different lineages during vertebrate evolution for adaptation to dimly lit environments.

  15. Euphausiid visual pigments. The rhodopsins of Euphausia superba and Meganyctiphanes norvegica (Crustacea, Euphausiacea)

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The rhabdoms of Euphausia superba contain one digitonin-extractable rhodopsin, lambda max 485 nm. The rhodopsin undergoes unusual pH- dependent spectral changes: above neutrality, the absorbance decreases progressively at 485 nm and rises near 370 nm. This change is reversible and appears to reflect an equilibrium between a protonated and an unprotonated form of the rhodopsin Schiff-base linkage. Near neutral pH and at 10 degrees C, the rhodopsin is partiaLly converted by 420-nm light to a stable 493-nm metarhodopsin. The metarhodopsin is partially photoconverted to rhodopsin by long-wavelength light in the absence of NH2OH; in the presence of NH2OH, it is slowly converted to retinal oxime and opsin. The rhodopsin of Meganyctiphanes norvegica measured in fresh rhabdoms by microspectrophotometry has properties very similar to those of the extracted rhodopsin of E. superba. Its lambda max is 488 nm and it is partially photoconverted by short wavelength irradiation to a stable photoconvertible metarhodopsin similar to that of E. superba. In the presence of light and NH2OH, the M. norvegica metarhodopsin is converted to retinal oxime and opsin. Our results indicate that previous determinations of euphausiid rhodopsin absorbance spectra were incorrect because of accessory pigment contamination. PMID:7142953

  16. Euphausiid visual pigments. The rhodopsins of Euphausia superba and Meganyctiphanes norvegica (Crustacea, Euphausiacea).

    PubMed

    Denys, C J; Brown, P K

    1982-09-01

    The rhabdoms of Euphausia superba contain one digitonin-extractable rhodopsin, lambda max 485 nm. The rhodopsin undergoes unusual pH-dependent spectral changes: above neutrality, the absorbance decreases progressively at 485 nm and rises near 370 nm. This change is reversible and appears to reflect an equilibrium between a protonated and an unprotonated form of the rhodopsin Schiff-base linkage. Near neutral pH and at 10 degrees C, the rhodopsin is partiaLly converted by 420-nm light to a stable 493-nm metarhodopsin. The metarhodopsin is partially photoconverted to rhodopsin by long-wavelength light in the absence of NH2OH; in the presence of NH2OH, it is slowly converted to retinal oxime and opsin. The rhodopsin of Meganyctiphanes norvegica measured in fresh rhabdoms by microspectrophotometry has properties very similar to those of the extracted rhodopsin of E. superba. Its lambda max is 488 nm and it is partially photoconverted by short wavelength irradiation to a stable photoconvertible metarhodopsin similar to that of E. superba. In the presence of light and NH2OH, the M. norvegica metarhodopsin is converted to retinal oxime and opsin. Our results indicate that previous determinations of euphausiid rhodopsin absorbance spectra were incorrect because of accessory pigment contamination.

  17. cDNA cloning and characterization of a novel squid rhodopsin kinase encoding multiple modular domains.

    PubMed

    Mayeenuddin, L H; Mitchell, J

    2001-01-01

    Rhodopsin phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms of inactivation in vertebrate and invertebrate visual signal transduction. Here we report the cDNA cloning and protein characterization of a 70-kDa squid rhodopsin kinase, SQRK. The cDNA encoding the 70-kDa protein demonstrates high sequence identity with octopus rhodopsin kinase (92%) and mammalian beta-adrenergic receptor kinases (63-65%), but only 33% similarity with bovine rhodopsin kinase, suggesting that invertebrate rhodopsin kinases may be structurally similar to beta-adrenergic receptor kinases. This cDNA encodes three distinct modular domains: RGS, S/TKc, and PH domains. The native SQRK is an eye-specific protein that is only expressed in photoreceptor cells and the optic ganglion as determined by immunoblotting. Purified SQRK is able to phosphorylate both squid and bovine rhodopsin. Squid rhodopsin phosphorylation by purified SQRK was sensitive to both Mg2+ and GTPgammaS but was insensitive to Ca2+/CaM regulation. The ability of SQRK to phosphorylate rhodopsin was totally lost in the presence of SQRK-specific antibodies. Our results suggest that SQRK plays an important role in squid visual signal termination.

  18. Anti-bovine rhodopsin monoclonal antibody recognizing light-dependent structural change.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masashi; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Takuji; Tokunaga, Fumio

    2002-06-01

    The antigenic structure of the bovine rhodopsin molecule was investigated by using a bovine rhodopsin-specific monoclonal antibody designated Rh 29. Competition assay with sealed intact disks and broken disks indicated that the antibody-binding region was localized in the intradiscal surface. An antigenic peptide obtained by a cyanogene bromide cleavage of rhodopsin was purified and determined as residues 2-39 in the amino acid sequence. Further analysis suggested that the antigenic determinant included at least residues 21-25. These results were consistent with the structural model for membrane topology of rhodopsin. The antigenicity of the rhodopsin was compared among several states. The antibody bound to both ammonyx LO-solubilized unbleached and bleached rhodopsin. In contrast, upon membrane-embedded rhodopsin, unbleached one was 100-times less antigenic than bleached one. The results suggested that the segment around the determinant of membrane-embedded rhodopsin should undergo a structural change upon absorption of light. Rh 29 detected a band corresponding to bovine, porcine and octopus opsins in immunoblotting. Protein blot of crayfish rhabdome did not show any reactive band. These bands except for crayfish reacted with concanavalin A as well. The N-terminal structure may, therefore, conserved between mammal and erthropoda and diverge between them and cepharopoda.

  19. The electric dipole moment of rhodopsin solubilized in Triton X-100.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, D C; Cone, R A

    1975-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of solubilized rhodopsin was determined with dielectric dispersion measurements. Rhodopsin was extracted from disc membranes of cattle rod outer segments with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. The dipole moment of rhodopsin at its isoionic point in the detergent micelle is 720 D (150 charge-A). This value is comparable to dipole moments of nonmembrane proteins, especially those which tend to aggregate or polymerize. Flash irradiation of the rhodopsin results in an increase in the dipole moment of about 25 D (5 charge-A). The light-induced increase in dipole moment appears to be composed of two parts--a faster component related to a change in the number of protons bound by rhodopsin and a slower component apparently independent of the change in proton binding. PMID:1203446

  20. The rhodopsin gene of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: sequence and spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, J; Morris, A G; Hunt, D M

    1998-08-01

    The cephalopod molluscs are a group of invertebrates that occupy a wide range of oceanic photic environments. They are an ideal group of animals, therefore, in which to study the evolution of rhodopsin. The cDNA sequence of the rhodopsin gene of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis (L.) (Sub-class Coleoidea, Order Sepiida) is presented, together with an analysis of the structure of the gene. A proline-rich C terminus is present; this structure is characteristic of cephalopod rhodopsins. In common with all invertebrate opsins studied so far, the equivalent site to the counterion in vertebrate opsins is occupied by an aromatic amino acid. An intron is present that splits codon 107, in contrast to the intronless rhodopsin gene in two species of myopsid squid. A spectral tuning model involving substitutions at only three amino acid sites is proposed for the spectral shifts between the rhodopsins of Sepia officinalis, three species of squid and Paroctopus defleini.

  1. Rhodopsin Absorption from First Principles: Bypassing Common Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Valsson, Omar; Campomanes, Pablo; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Filippi, Claudia

    2013-05-14

    Bovine rhodopsin is the most extensively studied retinal protein and is considered the prototype of this important class of photosensitive biosystems involved in the process of vision. Many theoretical investigations have attempted to elucidate the role of the protein matrix in modulating the absorption of retinal chromophore in rhodopsin, but, while generally agreeing in predicting the correct location of the absorption maximum, they often reached contradicting conclusions on how the environment tunes the spectrum. To address this controversial issue, we combine here a thorough structural and dynamical characterization of rhodopsin with a careful validation of its excited-state properties via the use of a wide range of state-of-the-art quantum chemical approaches including various flavors of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), different multireference perturbative schemes (CASPT2 and NEVPT2), and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Through extensive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations, we obtain a comprehensive structural description of the chromophore-protein system and sample a wide range of thermally accessible configurations. We show that, in order to obtain reliable excitation properties, it is crucial to employ a sufficient number of representative configurations of the system. In fact, the common use of a single, ad hoc structure can easily lead to an incorrect model and an agreement with experimental absorption spectra due to cancelation of errors. Finally, we show that, to properly account for polarization effects on the chromophore and to quench the large blue-shift induced by the counterion on the excitation energies, it is necessary to adopt an enhanced description of the protein environment as given by a large quantum region including as many as 250 atoms.

  2. Microsecond Time-Resolved Circular Dichroism of Rhodopsin Photointermediates†

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Yiren Gu; Szundi, Istvan; Lewis, James W.; Kliger, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved circular dichroism measurements, over a spectral range from 300 to 700 nm, were made at delays of 5, 100 and 500 μs after room temperature photoexcitation of bovine rhodopsin in lauryl maltoside suspension. The purpose was to provide more structural information about intermediate states in the activation of rhodopsin and other G protein-coupled receptors. In particular, information was sought about photointermediates that are isochromic or nearly isochromic in their unpolarized absorbance. The circular dichroism spectrum of lumirhodopsin, obtained after correcting the 5 μs difference CD data for the rhodopsin bleached, was in reasonable agreement with the lumirhodopsin CD spectrum obtained previously by thermal trapping at -76°C. Similarly, the metarhodopsin II spectrum obtained at 500 μs delay was also in agreement with the results of previous work on the temperature trapped form of metarhodopsin II. However, the CD of the mixture formed at 100 μs delay after photoexcitation, whose only visible absorbing component is lumirhodopsin, could not be accounted for near 480 nm in terms of the initially formed, 5 μs lumirhodopsin CD spectrum. Thus, the CD spectrum of lumirhodopsin changes on the time scale from 5 to 100 μs, showing reduced rotational strength in its visible band, possibly associated with either a process responsible for a small spectral shift that occurs in the lumirhodopsin absorbance spectrum at earlier times or the Schiff base deprotonation-reprotonation which occurs during equilibration of lumirhodopsin with the Meta I380 photointermediate. Either explanation suggests a chromophore conformation change closely associated with deprotonation which could be the earliest direct trigger of activation. PMID:19905009

  3. Allele-Specific Inhibition of Rhodopsin With an Antisense Oligonucleotide Slows Photoreceptor Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Susan F.; Jazayeri, Ali; Matthes, Michael T.; Yasumura, Douglas; Yang, Haidong; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andy; Freier, Sue; Hung, Gene; Adamson, Peter S.; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P.; LaVail, Matthew M.; McCaleb, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To preserve photoreceptor cell structure and function in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa with P23H rhodopsin by selective inhibition of the mutant rhodopsin allele using a second generation antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Methods Wild-type mice and rats were treated with ASO by intravitreal (IVT) injection and rhodopsin mRNA and protein expression were measured. Transgenic rats expressing the murine P23H rhodopsin gene (P23H transgenic rat Line 1) were administered either a mouse-specific P23H ASO or a control ASO. The contralateral eye was injected with PBS and used as a comparator control. Electroretinography (ERG) measurements and analyses of the retinal outer nuclear layer were conducted and correlated with rhodopsin mRNA levels. Results Rhodopsin mRNA and protein expression was reduced after a single ASO injection in wild-type mice with a rhodopsin-specific ASO. Transgenic rat eyes that express a murine P23H rhodopsin gene injected with a murine P23H ASO had a 181 ± 39% better maximum amplitude response (scotopic a-wave) as compared with contralateral PBS-injected eyes; the response in control ASO eyes was not significantly different from comparator contralateral eyes. Morphometric analysis of the outer nuclear layer showed a significantly thicker nuclear layer in eyes injected with murine P23H ASO (18%) versus contralateral PBS-injected eyes. Conclusions Allele-specific ASO-mediated knockdown of mutant P23H rhodopsin expression slowed the rate of photoreceptor degeneration and preserved the function of photoreceptor cells in eyes of the P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat. Our data indicate that ASO treatment is a potentially effective therapy for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26436889

  4. Optical control of a rhodopsin-based switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovryn, Ben; Li, Xiang; Chiel, Hillel; Herlitze, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    A preliminary result supports the feasibility of using visible light to modulate the membrane potential of a cell. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) were transfected with vertebrate rhodopsin and a gradient inward rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel. Whole cell patch clamp recordings of HEK293 cells exposed to 9-cis retinal showed that illumination increases the potassium current compared with recordings obtained in the dark. When combined with a rapid scanning device, this approach has the potential to control the activity of many neurons.

  5. Quantum chemical modeling of rhodopsin mutants displaying switchable colors.

    PubMed

    Melaccio, Federico; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-09-28

    We look at the possibility to compute and understand the color change occurring upon mutation of a photochromic protein. Accordingly, ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemical methods are used to construct basic quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) models for a small mutant library of the sensory rhodopsin of Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. PCC7120 cyanobacterium. Together with the wild-type forms, a set of 26 absorption maxima spanning a ca. 80 nm range is obtained. We show that these models can be used to capture the electrostatic change controlling the computed color variation and the change in the ionization of specific side chains.

  6. Rhodopsin in the rod surface membrane regenerates more rapidly than bulk rhodopsin in the disc membranes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Christopher; Tillman, Megan; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2014-01-01

    Sustained vertebrate vision requires that opsin chromophores isomerized by light to the all-trans form be replaced with 11-cis retinal to regenerate the visual pigment. We have characterized the early receptor potential (ERP), a component of the electroretinogram arising from photoisomerization-induced charge displacements in plasma membrane visual pigment, and used it to measure pigment bleaching and regeneration in living mice. The mouse ERP was characterized by an outward ‘R2’ charge displacement with a time constant of 215 μs that discharged through a membrane with an apparent time constant of ∼0.6 ms. After complete bleaching of rhodopsin, the ERP recovered in two phases. The initial, faster phase had a time constant of ∼1 min, accounted for ∼20% of the total, and was not dependent on the level of expression of the retinal pigment epithelium isomerase, Rpe65. The slower, complementary phase had a time constant of 23 min in wild-type (WT) mice (C57Bl/6) and was substantially slowed in Rpe65+/− mice. Comparison of the ERPs of a mouse line expressing 150% of the normal level of cone M-opsin with those of WT mice revealed that M-opsin contributed 26% of the total WT ERP in these experiments, with the remaining 74% arising from rhodopsin. Thus, the fast regenerating fraction (20%) corresponds approximately to the fraction of the total ERP independently estimated to arise from M-opsin. Because both phases of the ERP recover substantially faster than previous measurements of bulk rhodopsin regeneration in living mice, we conclude that delivery of the highly hydrophobic 11-cis retinal to the interior of rod photoreceptors appears to be retarded by transit across the cytoplasmic gap between plasma and disc membranes. PMID:24801306

  7. Nuclear Wavepacket Propogation Model for the Retinal Chromophore in Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corn, Brittany; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2009-05-01

    Rhodopsin, consisting of a retinal chromophore and a protein opsin, is responsible for the first steps in the vision process through a cis to trans photoisomerization, which is completed within 200 fs[1]. Efforts to control the ultrafast dynamics of this molecule have been carried out experimentally[2] as well as through quantum mechanical modeling of nuclear wave packet propagation[3]. We propose a two state model in which the ground electronic Potential Energy Surface (PES) is made up of two adjacent harmonic potentials, representing the cis and trans retinal saddle points, as well as an excited PES, characterized by the Morse potential, which meets the ground PES at a conical intersection. We explore the achievement of a high quantum yield of the trans retinal configuration by varying parameters of the external field and choosing the most adequate shape. Another investigation is presented in which we compare the charge distribution of cis and trans retinal in order to reveal a charge transfer mechanism behind the isomerization of rhodopsin. The results of the Lowdin and Natural Population Analyses demonstrate a significant transfer of charge in and around the isomerization region. [1] RW Schoenlein, LA Peteanu, RA Mathies, CV Shank, Science 254, 412 (1991) [2] VI Prokhorenko, AM Nagy, SA Waschuk, LS Brown, RR Birge, RJD Miller, Science 313, 1257 (2006) [3] S Hahn, G Stock, Chem Phys 259, 297-312 (2000)

  8. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a light-driven unidirectional rotor.

    PubMed

    Strambi, Angela; Durbeej, Bo; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2010-12-14

    The implementation of multiconfigurational quantum chemistry methods into a quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics protocol has allowed the construction of a realistic computer model for the sensory rhodopsin of the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120. The model, which reproduces the absorption spectra of both the all-trans and 13-cis forms of the protein and their associated K and L intermediates, is employed to investigate the light-driven steps of the photochromic cycle exhibited by the protein. It is found that the photoisomerizations of the all-trans and 13-cis retinal chromophores occur through unidirectional, counterclockwise 180° rotations of the =C14-C15= moiety with respect to the Lys210-linked end of the chromophore axis. Thus, the sequential interconversions of the all-trans and 13-cis forms during a single photochromic cycle yield a complete (360°) unidirectional rotation of the =C14-C15= moiety. This finding implies that Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a biological realization of a light-driven molecular rotor.

  9. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a light-driven unidirectional rotor

    PubMed Central

    Strambi, Angela; Durbeej, Bo; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of multiconfigurational quantum chemistry methods into a quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics protocol has allowed the construction of a realistic computer model for the sensory rhodopsin of the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120. The model, which reproduces the absorption spectra of both the all-trans and 13-cis forms of the protein and their associated K and L intermediates, is employed to investigate the light-driven steps of the photochromic cycle exhibited by the protein. It is found that the photoisomerizations of the all-trans and 13-cis retinal chromophores occur through unidirectional, counterclockwise 180° rotations of the ═C14─C15═ moiety with respect to the Lys210-linked end of the chromophore axis. Thus, the sequential interconversions of the all-trans and 13-cis forms during a single photochromic cycle yield a complete (360°) unidirectional rotation of the ═C14─C15═ moiety. This finding implies that Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a biological realization of a light-driven molecular rotor. PMID:21098308

  10. Conformational equilibria of light-activated rhodopsin in nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Kusnetzow, Ana Karin; Szczepek, Michal; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Bayburt, Timothy H.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2017-01-01

    Conformational equilibria of G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are intimately involved in intracellular signaling. Here conformational substates of the GPCR rhodopsin are investigated in micelles of dodecyl maltoside (DDM) and in phospholipid nanodiscs by monitoring the spatial positions of transmembrane helices 6 and 7 at the cytoplasmic surface using site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance spectroscopy. The photoactivated receptor in DDM is dominated by one conformation with weak pH dependence. In nanodiscs, however, an ensemble of pH-dependent conformational substates is observed, even at pH 6.0 where the MIIbH+ form defined by proton uptake and optical spectroscopic methods is reported to be the sole species present in native disk membranes. In nanodiscs, the ensemble of substates in the photoactivated receptor spontaneously decays to that characteristic of the inactive state with a lifetime of ∼16 min at 20 °C. Importantly, transducin binding to the activated receptor selects a subset of the ensemble in which multiple substates are apparently retained. The results indicate that in a native-like lipid environment rhodopsin activation is not analogous to a simple binary switch between two defined conformations, but the activated receptor is in equilibrium between multiple conformers that in principle could recognize different binding partners. PMID:28373559

  11. Differential Dynamics of Extracellular and Cytoplasmic Domains in Denatured States of Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a model system for understanding membrane protein folding. Recently, conditions that allow maximally denaturing rhodopsin without causing aggregation have been determined, opening the door to the first structural characterization of denatured states of rhodopsin by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. One-dimensional 1H NMR spectra confirm a progressive increase in flexibility of resonances in rhodopsin with increasing denaturant concentrations. Two-dimensional 1H–15N HSQC spectra of [15N]-α-lysine-labeled rhodopsin in which signals arise primarily from residues in the cytoplasmic (CP) domain and of [15N]-α,ε-tryptophan-labeled rhodopsin in which signals arise only from transmembrane (TM) and extracellular (EC) residues indicate qualitatively that EC and CP domains may be differentially affected by denaturation. To obtain residue-specific information, particular residues in EC and CP domains were investigated by site-directed spin labeling. EPR spectra of the spin-labeled samples indicate that the EC residues retain more rigidity in the denatured states than the CP residues. These results support the notion of residual structure in denatured states of rhodopsin. PMID:25268658

  12. Covalent bond between ligand and receptor required for efficient activation in rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Take; Yamashita, Takahiro; Imai, Hiroo; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2010-03-12

    Rhodopsin is an extensively studied member of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although rhodopsin shares many features with the other GPCRs, it exhibits unique features as a photoreceptor molecule. A hallmark in the molecular structure of rhodopsin is the covalently bound chromophore that regulates the activity of the receptor acting as an agonist or inverse agonist. Here we show the pivotal role of the covalent bond between the retinal chromophore and the lysine residue at position 296 in the activation pathway of bovine rhodopsin, by use of a rhodopsin mutant K296G reconstituted with retinylidene Schiff bases. Our results show that photoreceptive functions of rhodopsin, such as regiospecific photoisomerization of the ligand, and its quantum yield were not affected by the absence of the covalent bond, whereas the activation mechanism triggered by photoisomerization of the retinal was severely affected. Furthermore, our results show that an active state similar to the Meta-II intermediate of wild-type rhodopsin did not form in the bleaching process of this mutant, although it exhibited relatively weak G protein activity after light irradiation because of an increased basal activity of the receptor. We propose that the covalent bond is required for transmitting structural changes from the photoisomerized agonist to the receptor and that the covalent bond forcibly keeps the low affinity agonist in the receptor, resulting in a more efficient G protein activation.

  13. Rescue of Photoreceptor Degeneration by Curcumin in Transgenic Rats with P23H Rhodopsin Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Chavali, Venkata R. M.; Joseph, Victory T.; Kadam, Rajendra; Lin, Jonathan H.; Jamison, Jeffrey A.; Kompella, Uday B.; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-01-01

    The P23H mutation in the rhodopsin gene causes rhodopsin misfolding, altered trafficking and formation of insoluble aggregates leading to photoreceptor degeneration and autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). There are no effective therapies to treat this condition. Compounds that enhance dissociation of protein aggregates may be of value in developing new treatments for such diseases. Anti-protein aggregating activity of curcumin has been reported earlier. In this study we present that treatment of COS-7 cells expressing mutant rhodopsin with curcumin results in dissociation of mutant protein aggregates and decreases endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore we demonstrate that administration of curcumin to P23H-rhodopsin transgenic rats improves retinal morphology, physiology, gene expression and localization of rhodopsin. Our findings indicate that supplementation of curcumin improves retinal structure and function in P23H-rhodopsin transgenic rats. This data also suggest that curcumin may serve as a potential therapeutic agent in treating RP due to the P23H rhodopsin mutation and perhaps other degenerative diseases caused by protein trafficking defects. PMID:21738619

  14. Blue light's effects on rhodopsin: photoreversal of bleaching in living rat eyes.

    PubMed

    Grimm, C; Remé, C E; Rol, P O; Williams, T P

    2000-11-01

    To determine whether blue light induces photoreversal of rhodopsin bleaching in vivo. Eyes of anesthetized albino rats were exposed to either green (550 nm) or deep blue (403 nm) light, and the time course of rhodopsin bleaching was determined. Rhodopsin was isolated from whole retinas by detergent extraction and measured photometrically. To inhibit photoreversal of bleaching, rats were perfused with 70 mM hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH), a known inhibitor of photoreversal. To determine whether blue-absorbing, photoreversible photoproducts were formed, rhodopsin was bleached to near completion with green light and then exposed to blue light. Finally, experimental results were simulated on a computer by means of a simple, three-component model involving a long-lived photoreversible photoproduct. Photoreversal of bleaching in blue light occurs in vivo as evidenced by the following: In the absence of NH(2)OH, bleaching of rhodopsin by blue light was slow and complex. In the presence of NH(2)OH, however, blue light bleached rhodopsin very fast with a simple, pseudo-first-order kinetic. A long-lived bleaching intermediate produced by green light exposure was photoreversed to rhodopsin by exposure to blue light. The three-component computer model, invoking a blue-absorbing, photoreversible, long-lived intermediate accurately described the data. Because of the instantaneous, nonmetabolic regeneration of rhodopsin by the process of photoreversal of bleaching, blue light exposure permits the absorption of large numbers of photons by rhodopsin and by a photoreversible intermediate of bleaching in vivo. These data may have an important impact on resolving mechanisms of blue light-mediated damage to the retina.

  15. Kinetics of bleaching and regeneration of rhodopsin in abnormal (RCS) and normal albino rats in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, I

    1978-01-01

    1. Rhodopsin concentration has been measured by the method of densitometry in retinae of rats with inherited retinal dystrophy (RCS) raised in darkness and compared with that of normal rats similarly reared. 2. In both RCS and normal rats the fraction of rhodopsin bleached is always directly proportional to the photon content of the light, I.t, where I is the light intensity in effective quanta (500 nm) cm-2 sec-1 and t is the duration of the bleaching exposure in seconds. 3. Rhodopsin photosensitivity for bleaching is slightly higher in RCS rats than in normals (2.3 (10)-16 cm2 chromophore-1 compared with 1.3 (10)-16 cm2 chromophore-1). 4. Rhodopsin regeneration in the dark in both RCS and normal rats cannot be described by the kinetics of a simple monomolecular chemical reaction. 5. Following 5 min bleaches, the regeneration rate becomes slower as the preceding bleach is made stronger. Regeneration in the dark is significantly faster in the RCS rats than in the normal ones. 6. In normal rats, after a full bleach, rhodopsin regenerates back to the dark-adapted level within 3--4 hr. In RCS rats rhodopsin regenerates to reach a plateau level, below the previous dark-adapted level, that lasts for several hours. 7. The faction of total rhodopsin that can regenerate gradually declines with age until in 70 days old RCS rats no rhodopsin regeneration can be measured by the ensitometer. However, total rhodopsin density (fully bleached-dark-adapted) is still close to normal. PMID:671279

  16. Characteristics of the photoconversion of rhodopsin in the early stages of photolysis.

    PubMed

    Fel'dman, T B; Fedorovich, I B; Ostrovskii, M A

    2004-09-01

    Low-temperature spectrophotometry was used to study the primary stages of rhodopsin photolysis. A digitonin extract of rhodopsin was irradiated at -155 degrees C with blue light of wavelength 436 nm. The stage of the bathorhodopsin --> lumirhodopsin conversion was accompanied by the simultaneous formation of several products. Formation of an intermediate product spectrally similar to the known "blue-shifted intermediate" (BSI) was demonstrated. It is suggested that the appearance of more than one intermediate product at each stage of photolysis reflects the existence of several conformational states of the rhodopsin molecule during its photoconversion.

  17. Rhodopsin-mediated blue-light damage to the rat retina: effect of photoreversal of bleaching.

    PubMed

    Grimm, C; Wenzel, A; Williams, T; Rol, P; Hafezi, F; Remé, C

    2001-02-01

    Acute white-light damage to rods depends on the amount of rhodopsin available for bleaching during light exposure. Bleached rhodopsin is metabolically regenerated through the visual cycle involving the pigment epithelium, or photochemically by deep blue light through photoreversal of bleaching. Because photoreversal is faster than metabolic regeneration of rhodopsin by several orders of magnitude, the photon catch capacity of the retina is significantly augmented during blue-light illumination, which may explain the greater susceptibility of the retina to blue light than to green light. However, blue light can also affect function of several blue-light-absorbing enzymes that may lead to the induction of retinal damage. Therefore, this study was conducted to test whether rhodopsin and its bleaching intermediates play a role in blue-light-induced retinal degeneration. Eyes of anesthetized rats and mice that did or did not contain rhodopsin were exposed to green (550 +/- 10 nm) or deep blue (403 +/- 10 nm) light for up to 2 hours. Rats with nearly rhodopsinless retinas were obtained by bleaching rhodopsin in animals with inhibited metabolic rhodopsin regeneration-that is, under halothane anesthesia. In addition, Rpe65(-/-) mice that are completely without rhodopsin were used to test the susceptibility to blue-light damage of a rodent retina completely devoid of the visual pigment. Effects of illumination on photoreceptor morphology were assessed 24 hours or 10 days thereafter by morphologic and biochemical methods. Exposure to blue light resulted in severe retinal damage and activation of the transcription factor AP-1 in rats. In contrast, green light had no effect. When rhodopsin was almost completely bleached by short-term green-light exposure while metabolic regeneration (but not photoreversal) was prevented by halothane anesthesia, blue-light exposure induced distinct lesions in rat retinas. When both metabolic rhodopsin regeneration and photoreversal of bleaching

  18. UV-Visible and Infrared Methods for Investigating Lipid-Rhodopsin Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Experimental UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods are described for characterizing lipid-protein interactions for the example of rhodopsin in a membrane bilayer environment. The combined use of FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy monitors the structural and functional changes during rhodopsin activation. Such studies investigate how membrane lipids stabilize the various rhodopsin photoproducts, analogous to mutating the protein. Interpretation of the results entails a non-specific flexible surface model for explaining the role of membrane lipid-protein interactions in biological functions. PMID:22976026

  19. UV-visible and infrared methods for investigating lipid-rhodopsin membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    We describe experimental UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods for characterizing lipid-protein interactions for rhodopsin in a membrane bilayer environment. The combination of FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy is used to monitor the structural and functional changes during rhodopsin activation. Investigations of how membrane lipids stabilize various rhodopsin photoproducts are analogous to mutating the protein in terms of gain or loss of function. Interpretation of the results entails a flexible surface model for explaining membrane lipid-protein interactions through material properties relevant to biological activity.

  20. A pivot between helices V and VI near the retinal-binding site is necessary for activation in rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hisao; Terakita, Akihisa; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2010-03-05

    Rhodopsins are photoreceptor proteins that have diverged from ligand-binding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Unlike other GPCRs, rhodopsins contain an intrinsic antagonist, 11-cis-retinal, which is converted to the agonist all-trans-retinal upon absorption of a photon. Through evolution, vertebrate rhodopsins have lost the ability of direct binding to the agonist, but some invertebrate and vertebrate non-visual rhodopsins have retained this ability. Here, we investigated the difference in the agonist-binding state between these rhodopsins to further our understanding of the structural and functional diversity of rhodopsins. Mutational analyses of agonist-binding rhodopsin showed that replacement of Ala-269, one of the residues constituting the antagonist-binding site, with bulky amino acids resulted in a large spectral shift in its active state and a great reduction in G protein activity, whereas these were rescued by subsequent replacement of Phe-208 with smaller amino acids. Although similar replacements in vertebrate rhodopsin did not cause a spectral shift in the active state, a similar reduction in and recovery of G protein activity was observed. Therefore, the agonist is located close to Ala-269 in the agonist-binding rhodopsin, but not in vertebrate rhodopsins, and Ala-269 with Phe-208 acts as a pivot for the formation of the G protein-activating state in both rhodopsins. The positions corresponding to Ala-269 and Phe-208 in other GPCRs have been reported to form part of an agonist-binding site. Therefore, an agonist-binding rhodopsin has the molecular architecture of the agonist-binding site similar to that of a general GPCR, whereas vertebrate rhodopsins changed the architecture, resulting in loss of agonist binding during molecular evolution.

  1. Membrane potential modulates photocycling rates of bacterial rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Manor, D; Hasselbacher, C A; Spudich, J L

    1988-08-09

    Effects of membrane potential on photochemical reactions of three retinal-containing chromoproteins in Halobacterium halobium, sensory rhodopsin I (sR-I), bacteriorhodopsin, and halorhodopsin, are described. Each of the three exhibits a decreased rate of thermal decay of its principal intermediate when photoactivated in an artificially energized compared to a deenergized membrane. The similar response of the three pigments suggests a voltage-dependent conformational change common to their respective photocycles. Spectral and kinetic properties of the sR-I photochemical reaction cycle were measured in phototactic H. halobium cells, and differences from in vitro photocycle kinetics were attributable to the electrical membrane potential present in vivo. In vivo sR-I photocycling rates were reproduced in envelope vesicle preparations in the presence of a valinomycin-induced potassium diffusion potential.

  2. Photochemical chromophore isomerization in histidine kinase rhodopsin HKR1.

    PubMed

    Luck, Meike; Bruun, Sara; Keidel, Anke; Hegemann, Peter; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-04-28

    Histidine kinase rhodopsin 1 is a photoreceptor in green algae functioning as a UV-light sensor. It switches between a UV-absorbing state (Rh-UV) and a blue-absorbing state (Rh-Bl) with a protonated retinal Schiff base (RSB) cofactor in a mixture of 13-trans,15-anti and 13-cis,15-syn isomers. The present spectroscopic study now shows that cofactor-protein assembly stabilizes the protonated 13-trans,15-anti RSB isomer. Formation of the active photoswitch requires the photoinduced conversion to Rh-UV. The transitions between the Rh-Bl isomers and the deprotonated 13-cis,15-anti and 13-trans,15-syn isomers of Rh-UV proceed via multiple photoisomerizations of one or simultaneously two double bonds. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular mechanism of photosignaling by archaeal sensory rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Hoff, W D; Jung, K H; Spudich, J L

    1997-01-01

    Two sensory rhodopsins (SRI and SRII) mediate color-sensitive phototaxis responses in halobacteria. These seven-helix receptor proteins, structurally and functionally similar to animal visual pigments, couple retinal photoisomerization to receptor activation and are complexed with membrane-embedded transducer proteins (HtrI and HtrII) that modulate a cytoplasmic phosphorylation cascade controlling the flagellar motor. The Htr proteins resemble the chemotaxis transducers from Escherichia coli. The SR-Htr signaling complexes allow studies of the biophysical chemistry of signal generation and relay, from the photobiophysics of initial excitation of the receptors to the final output at the level of the flagellar motor switch, revealing fundamental principles of sensory transduction and more broadly the nature of dynamic interactions between membrane proteins. We review here recent advances that have led to new insights into the molecular mechanism of signaling by these membrane complexes.

  4. Ultrafast photochemistry of anabaena sensory rhodopsin: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Schapiro, Igor; Ruhman, Sanford

    2014-05-01

    Light induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore activates biological function in all retinal protein (RP) driving processes such as ion-pumping, vertebrate vision and phototaxis in organisms as primitive as archea, or as complex as mammals. This process and its consecutive reactions have been the focus of experimental and theoretical research for decades. The aim of this review is to demonstrate how the experimental and theoretical research efforts can now be combined to reach a more comprehensive understanding of the excited state process on the molecular level. Using the Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin as an example we will show how contemporary time-resolved spectroscopy and recently implemented excited state QM/MM methods consistently describe photochemistry in retinal proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromophore/protein interaction in bacterial sensory rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, J L; McCain, D A; Nakanishi, K; Okabe, M; Shimizu, N; Rodman, H; Honig, B; Bogomolni, R A

    1986-01-01

    Retinal analogues with altered conjugated double bond systems or altered stereochemistry were incorporated into the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin (SR) and the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium halobium. Wavelength shifts in absorption ("opsin shifts") due to analogue interaction with the protein microenvironment demonstrate that the same overall electrostatic and steric properties of the retinal binding-site structures exist in both proteins despite their different functions. pi-Electron calculations from the opsin shifts lead to a new description of protein charge distribution that applies to the binding sites of both SR and BR. The new data extends the previously proposed external point charge model for BR to include an ion-pair protein/chromophore interaction near the beta-ionone moiety. The new data modifies the previously proposed external point-charge model, the derivation of which involved an experimentally erroneous opsin shift for one of the BR analogues. PMID:2937462

  6. The supramolecular structure of the GPCR rhodopsin in solution and native disc membranes

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kitaru; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Summary Rhodopsin, the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, which is densely packed in the disc membranes of rod outer segments, was proposed to function as a monomer. However, a growing body of evidence indicates dimerization and oligomerization of numerous G-protein-coupled receptors, and atomic force microscopy images revealed rows of rhodopsin dimers in murine disc membranes. In this work we demonstrate by electron microscopy of negatively stained samples, blue native- and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, chemical crosslinking, and by proteolysis that native bovine rhodopsin exists mainly as dimers and higher oligomers. These results corroborate the recent findings from atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling on the supramolecular structure and packing arrangement of murine rhodopsin dimers. PMID:15764373

  7. Role of Membrane Integrity on G protein-coupled Receptors: Rhodopsin Stability and Function

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Debinski, Aleksander; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) – a member of the superfamily that shares a similar structural architecture consisting of seven-transmembrane helices and propagates various signals across biological membranes. Rhodopsin is embedded in the lipid bilayer of specialized disk membranes in the outer segments of retinal rod photoreceptor cells where it transmits a light-stimulated signal. Photoactivated rhodopsin then activates a visual signaling cascade through its cognate G protein, transducin or Gt, that results in a neuronal response in the brain. Interestingly, the lipid composition of ROS membranes not only differs from that of the photoreceptor plasma membrane but is critical for visual transduction. Specifically, lipids can modulate structural changes in rhodopsin that occur after photoactivation and influence binding of transducin. Thus, altering the lipid organization of ROS membranes may result in visual dysfunction and blindness. PMID:21435354

  8. Kinetic, Energetic, and Mechanical Differences between Dark-State Rhodopsin and Opsin

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Gerstung, Moritz; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Helenius, Jonne; Maeda, Akiko; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Park, Paul S.-H.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor pigment of the retina, initiates vision upon photon capture by its covalently linked chromophore 11-cis-retinal. In the absence of light, the chromophore serves as an inverse agonist locking the receptor in the inactive dark state. In the absence of chromophore, the apoprotein opsin shows low-level constitutive activity. Toward revealing insight into receptor properties controlled by the chromophore, we applied dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the kinetic, energetic, and mechanical differences between dark-state rhodopsin and opsin in native membranes from the retina of mice. Both rhodopsin and opsin are stabilized by ten structural segments. Compared to dark-state rhodopsin, the structural segments stabilizing opsin showed higher interaction strengths and mechanical rigidities and lower conformational variabilities, lifetimes, and free energies. These changes outline a common mechanism toward activating G-protein-coupled receptors. Additionally, we detected that opsin was more pliable and frequently stabilized alternate structural intermediates. PMID:23434406

  9. Characterization and chromosomal localization of the gene for human rhodopsin kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Yamamoto, S.; Dryja, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    G-protein-dependent receptor kinases (GRKs) play a key role in the adapatation of receptors to persistent stimuli. In rod photoreceptors rhodopsin kinase (RK) mediates rapid densensitization of rod photoreceptors to light by catalyzing phosphorylation of the visual pigment rhodopsin. To study the structure and mechanism of FRKs in human photoreceptors, we have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones derived from the human RK locus using a bovine rhodopsin kinase cDNA fragment as a probe. The RK locus, assigned to chromosome 13 band q34, is composed of seven exons that encode a protein 92% identical in amino acid sequence to bovine rhodopsin kinase. The marked difference between the structure of this gene and that of another recently clone human GRK gene suggests the existence of a wide evolutionary gap between members of the GRK gene family. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Rhodopsin: the Functional Significance of Asn-Linked Glycosylation and Other Post-translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Anne R.; Fliesler, Steven J.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the G-protein coupled receptor in retinal rod photoreceptors, is a highly conserved protein that undergoes several types of post-translational modifications. These modifications are essential to maintain the protein’s structure as well as its proper function in the visual transduction cycle. Rhodopsin is N-glycosylated at Asn-2 and Asn-15 in its extracellular N-terminal domain. Mutations within the glycosylation consensus sequences of rhodopsin cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, a disease that leads to blindness. Several groups have studied the role of rhodopsin’s N-linked glycan chains in protein structure and function using a variety of approaches. These include the generation of a transgenic mouse model, study of a naturally occurring mutant animal model, in vivo pharmacological inhibition of glycosylation, and in vitro analyses using transfected COS-1 cells. These studies have provided insights into the possible role of rhodopsin glycosylation, but have yielded conflicting results. PMID:19941415

  11. Highly conserved tyrosine stabilizes the active state of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Joseph A; South, Kieron; Ahuja, Shivani; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Opefi, Chikwado A; Eilers, Markus; Vogel, Reiner; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2010-11-16

    Light-induced isomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in the visual pigment rhodopsin triggers displacement of the second extracellular loop (EL2) and motion of transmembrane helices H5, H6, and H7 leading to the active intermediate metarhodopsin II (Meta II). We describe solid-state NMR measurements of rhodopsin and Meta II that target the molecular contacts in the region of the ionic lock involving these three helices. We show that a contact between Arg135(3.50) and Met257(6.40) forms in Meta II, consistent with the outward rotation of H6 and breaking of the dark-state Glu134(3.49)-Arg135(3.50)-Glu247(6.30) ionic lock. We also show that Tyr223(5.58) and Tyr306(7.53) form molecular contacts with Met257(6.40). Together these results reveal that the crystal structure of opsin in the region of the ionic lock reflects the active state of the receptor. We further demonstrate that Tyr223(5.58) and Ala132(3.47) in Meta II stabilize helix H5 in an active orientation. Mutation of Tyr223(5.58) to phenylalanine or mutation of Ala132(3.47) to leucine decreases the lifetime of the Meta II intermediate. Furthermore, the Y223F mutation is coupled to structural changes in EL2. In contrast, mutation of Tyr306(7.53) to phenylalanine shows only a moderate influence on the Meta II lifetime and is not coupled to EL2.

  12. Normal and Mutant Rhodopsin Activation Measured with the Early Receptor Current in a Unicellular Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Pragati; Sullivan, Jack M.

    1999-01-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) represents molecular charge movement during rhodopsin conformational dynamics. To determine whether this time-resolved assay can probe various aspects of structure–function relationships in rhodopsin, we first measured properties of expressed normal human rhodopsin with ERC recordings. These studies were conducted in single fused giant cells containing on the order of a picogram of regenerated pigment. The action spectrum of the ERC of normal human opsin regenerated with 11-cis-retinal was fit by the human rhodopsin absorbance spectrum. Successive flashes extinguished ERC signals consistent with bleaching of a rhodopsin photopigment with a normal range of photosensitivity. ERC signals followed the univariance principle since millisecond-order relaxation kinetics were independent of the wavelength of the flash stimulus. After signal extinction, dark adaptation without added 11-cis-retinal resulted in spontaneous pigment regeneration from an intracellular store of chromophore remaining from earlier loading. After the ERC was extinguished, 350-nm flashes overlapping metarhodopsin-II absorption promoted immediate recovery of ERC charge motions identified by subsequent 500-nm flashes. Small inverted R2 signals were seen in response to some 350-nm flashes. These results indicate that the ERC can be photoregenerated from the metarhodopsin-II state. Regeneration with 9-cis-retinal permits recording of ERC signals consistent with flash activation of isorhodopsin. We initiated structure–function studies by measuring ERC signals in cells expressing the D83N and E134Q mutant human rhodopsin pigments. D83N ERCs were simplified in comparison with normal rhodopsin, while E134Q ERCs had only the early phase of charge motion. This study demonstrates that properties of normal rhodopsin can be accurately measured with the ERC assay and that a structure–function investigation of rapid activation processes in analogue and mutant visual pigments is

  13. Kinetically resolved states of the Halobacterium halobium flagellar motor switch and modulation of the switch by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    McCain, D A; Amici, L A; Spudich, J L

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous switching of the rotation sense of the flagellar motor of the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium and modulation of the switch by attractant and repellent photostimuli were analyzed by using a computerized cell-tracking system with 67-ms resolution coupled to electronic shutters. The data fit a three-state model of the switch, in which a Poisson process governs the transition from state N (nonreversing) to state R (reversing). After a reversal, the switch returns to state N, passing through an intermediate state I (inactive), which produces a ca. 2-s period of low reversal frequency before the state N Poisson rate is restored. The stochastic nature of the H. halobium switch reveals a close similarity to Escherichia coli flagellar motor properties as elucidated previously. Sensory modulation of the switch by both photoattractant and photorepellent signals can be interpreted in terms of modulation of the single forward rate constant of the N to R transition. Insight into the mechanism of modulation by the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) was gained by increasing the lifetime of the principal photointermediate of the SR-I photochemical reaction cycle, S373, by replacing the native chromophore, all-trans-retinal, with the acyclic analog, 3,7,11-trimethyl-2,4,6,8-dodecapentaenal. Flash photolysis of analog-containing cells revealed an eightfold decrease in the rate of thermal decay of S373, and behavioral analysis showed longer periods of reversal suppression than that of cells with the native chromophore over similar ranges of illumination intensities. This indicates that attractant signaling is governed by the lifetime of the S373 intermediate rather than by the frequency of photocycling. In this sense, SR-I is similar to rhodopsin, whose function depends on an active photoproduct (Meta-II). PMID:3654583

  14. Rapid hydrogen ion uptake of rod outer segments and rhodopsin solutions on illumination

    PubMed Central

    Falk, G.; Fatt, P.

    1966-01-01

    1. Flash illumination of a suspension of frog rod outer segments or rhodopsin solution in contact with a platinum electrode produces a rapidly developing negative displacement of potential of the electrode (with respect to a reversible electrode). 2. The amplitude of the potential change varies inversely with the H+ buffering capacity of the medium. It is inferred that the response is due to an uptake of H+ by the rod outer segments or rhodopsin, with the platinum surface acting as a pH electrode. 3. Determination of the action spectrum shows that the response depends on the absorption of light by rhodopsin. 4. In frog rods one acid-binding group with a pK of about 7·9 is produced for each molecule of rhodopsin bleached, consistent with a rhodopsin concentration in frog rods of 1·7 mM. 5. It is suggested that the time course of the response with rhodopsin solutions reflects the kinetics of the conversion of metarhodopsin I to metarhodopsin II. 6. A slower time course of voltage change observed for suspensions of outer segments is attributable to the time required for the diffusion of H+ buffer out of the rods. PMID:5945249

  15. Glycosylation of rhodopsin is necessary for its stability and incorporation into photoreceptor outer segment discs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Anne R.; Vuong, Linda; Brobst, Daniel; Fliesler, Steven J.; Peachey, Neal S.; Gorbatyuk, Marina S.; Naash, Muna I.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin, a G-protein coupled receptor, most abundant protein in retinal rod photoreceptors, is glycosylated at asparagines-2 and 15 on its N-terminus. To understand the role of rhodopsin's glycosylation in vivo, we generated and characterized a transgenic mouse model that expresses a non-glycosylated form of rhodopsin. We show that lack of glycosylation triggers a dominant form of progressive retinal degeneration. Electron microscopic examination of retinas at postnatal day 17 revealed the presence of vacuolar structures that distorted rod photoreceptor outer segments and became more prominent with age. Expression of non-glycosylated rhodopsin alone showed that it is unstable and is regulated via ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation at the base of outer segments. We observed similar vacuolization in outer segments of transgenic mice expressing human rhodopsin with a T17M mutation (hT17M), suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the degenerative process in mice expressing the non-glycosylated rhodopsin and the RHOhT17M mice is likely the cause of phenotype observed in retinitis pigmentosa patients carrying T17M mutation. PMID:25637522

  16. Epistatic interactions influence terrestrial-marine functional shifts in cetacean rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-03-15

    Like many aquatic vertebrates, whales have blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions in the dim-light visual pigment, rhodopsin, that are thought to increase photosensitivity in underwater environments. We have discovered that known spectral tuning substitutions also have surprising epistatic effects on another function of rhodopsin, the kinetic rates associated with light-activated intermediates. By using absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence-based retinal release assays on heterologously expressed rhodopsin, we assessed both spectral and kinetic differences between cetaceans (killer whale) and terrestrial outgroups (hippo, bovine). Mutation experiments revealed that killer whale rhodopsin is unusually resilient to pleiotropic effects on retinal release from key blue-shifting substitutions (D83N and A292S), largely due to a surprisingly specific epistatic interaction between D83N and the background residue, S299. Ancestral sequence reconstruction indicated that S299 is an ancestral residue that predates the evolution of blue-shifting substitutions at the origins of Cetacea. Based on these results, we hypothesize that intramolecular epistasis helped to conserve rhodopsin's kinetic properties while enabling blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions as cetaceans adapted to aquatic environments. Trade-offs between different aspects of molecular function are rarely considered in protein evolution, but in cetacean and other vertebrate rhodopsins, may underlie multiple evolutionary scenarios for the selection of specific amino acid substitutions. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in native human and murine rod outer segment disc membranes

    PubMed Central

    Whited, Allison M.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes display distinct domains that organize membrane proteins and signaling molecules to facilitate efficient and reliable signaling. The organization of rhodopsin, a G protein-coupled receptor, in native rod outer segment disc membranes was investigated by atomic force microscopy. Atomic force microscopy revealed that rhodopsin is arranged into domains of variable size, which we refer to herein as nanodomains, in native membranes. Quantitative analysis of 150 disc membranes revealed that the physical properties of nanodomains are conserved in humans and mice and that the properties of individual disc membranes can be variable. Examining the variable properties of disc membranes revealed some of the factors contributing to the size of rod outer segment discs and the formation of nanodomains in the membrane. The diameter of rod outer segment discs was dependent on the number of rhodopsin molecules incorporated into the membrane but independent of the spatial density of rhodopsin. The number of nanodomains present in a single disc was also dependent on the number of rhodopsin molecules incorporated into the membrane. The size of the nanodomains was largely independent of the number or spatial density of rhodopsin in the membrane. PMID:25305340

  18. Time-resolved rhodopsin activation currents in a unicellular expression system.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J M; Shukla, P

    1999-09-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) is the charge redistribution occurring in plasma membrane rhodopsin during light activation of photoreceptors. Both the molecular mechanism of the ERC and its relationship to rhodopsin conformational activation are unknown. To investigate whether the ERC could be a time-resolved assay of rhodopsin structure-function relationships, the distinct sensitivity of modern electrophysiological tools was employed to test for flash-activated ERC signals in cells stably expressing normal human rod opsin after regeneration with 11-cis-retinal. ERCs are similar in waveform and kinetics to those found in photoreceptors. The action spectrum of the major R(2) charge motion is consistent with a rhodopsin photopigment. The R(1) phase is not kinetically resolvable and the R(2) phase, which overlaps metarhodopsin-II formation, has a rapid risetime and complex multiexponential decay. These experiments demonstrate, for the first time, kinetically resolved electrical state transitions during activation of expressed visual pigment in a unicellular environment (single or fused giant cells) containing only 6 x 10(6)-8 x 10(7) molecules of rhodopsin. This method improves measurement sensitivity 7 to 8 orders of magnitude compared to other time-resolved techniques applied to rhodopsin to study the role particular amino acids play in conformational activation and the forces that govern those transitions.

  19. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of photochromic reactions of bacteriorhodopsin and visual rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Tatiana B; Smitienko, Olga A; Shelaev, Ivan V; Gostev, Fedor E; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Dolgikh, Dmitriy A; Nadtochenko, Victor A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Ostrovsky, Mikhail A

    2016-11-01

    Photochromic ultrafast reactions of bacteriorhodopsin (H. salinarum) and bovine rhodopsin were conducted with a femtosecond two-pump probe pulse setup with the time resolution of 20-25fs. The dynamics of the forward and reverse photochemical reactions for both retinal-containing proteins was compared. It is demonstrated that when retinal-containing proteins are excited by femtosecond pulses, dynamics pattern of the vibrational coherent wave packets in the course of the reaction is different for bacteriorhodopsin and visual rhodopsin. As shown in these studies, the low-frequencies that form a wave packets experimentally observed in the dynamics of primary products formation as a result of retinal photoisomerization have different intensities and are clearer for bovine rhodopsin. Photo-reversible reactions for both retinal proteins were performed from the stage of the relatively stable photointermediates that appear within 3-5ps after the light pulse impact. It is demonstrated that the efficiency of the reverse phototransition K-form→bacteriorhodopsin is almost five-fold higher than that of the Batho-intermediate→visual rhodopsin phototransition. The results obtained indicate that in the course of evolution the intramolecular mechanism of the chromophore-protein interaction in visual rhodopsin becomes more perfect and specific. The decrease in the probability of the reverse chromophore photoisomerization (all-trans→11-cis retinal) in primary photo-induced rhodopsin products causes an increase in the efficiency of the photoreception process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rhodopsin expression in the zebrafish pineal gland from larval to adult stage.

    PubMed

    Magnoli, Domenico; Zichichi, Rosalia; Laurà, Rosaria; Guerrera, Maria Cristina; Campo, Salvatore; de Carlos, Felix; Suárez, Alberto Álvarez; Abbate, Francesco; Ciriaco, Emilia; Vega, Jose Antonio; Germanà, Antonino

    2012-03-09

    The zebrafish pineal gland plays an important role in different physiological functions including the regulation of the circadian clock. In the fish pineal gland the pinealocytes are made up of different segments: outer segment, inner segment and basal pole. Particularly, in the outer segment the rhodopsin participates in the external environment light reception that represents the first biochemical step in the melatonin production. It is well known that the rhodopsin in the adult zebrafish is well expressed in the pineal gland but both the expression and the cellular localization of this protein during development remain still unclear. In this study using qRT-PCR, sequencing and immunohistochemistry the expression as well as the protein localization of the rhodopsin in the zebrafish from larval (10 dpf) to adult stage (90 dpf) were demonstrated. The rhodopsin mRNA expression presents a peak of expression at 10 dpf, a further reduction to 50 dpf before increasing again in the adult stage. Moreover, the cellular localization of the rhodopsin-like protein was always localized in the pinealocyte at all ages examined. Our results demonstrated the involvement of the rhodopsin in the zebrafish pineal gland physiology particularly in the light capture during the zebrafish lifespan.

  1. Deprotonation of the Schiff base of rhodopsin is obligate in the activation of the G protein.

    PubMed Central

    Longstaff, C; Calhoon, R D; Rando, R R

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis of rhodopsin leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that activates a G protein, thus beginning the visual cascade. This activated form of rhodopsin appears coincident in time with the spectroscopically defined intermediate, metarhodopsin II. Metarhodopsin I, the precursor of metarhodopsin II, contains a protonated Schiff base, whereas metarhodopsin II does not. The question of whether the deprotonation of the protonated Schiff base is obligate in the formation of activated rhodopsin was addressed by monomethylating the active-site lysine of permethylated rhodopsin and determining whether this pigment can activate the G protein upon photolysis. The photolysis of the new pigment, which absorbs at 520 nm, led to the formation of a relatively stable metarhodopsin I-like intermediate with a lambda max of approximately equal to 485 nm, with no apparent formation of either metarhodopsin II- or metarhodopsin III-like intermediates. The only probe available to detect formation of the active form of rhodopsin is G protein activation. Photolysis of the pigment in the presence of the G protein did not lead to measurable activation of the GTPase activity of the latter. These studies establish a functional link between Schiff base deprotonation and activation of the G protein. It is concluded that proton transfer from the protonated Schiff base of rhodopsin is obligate for the initiation of visual transduction. PMID:3012559

  2. Evidence for repeated loss of selective constraint in rhodopsin of amblyopsid cavefishes (Teleostei: Amblyopsidae).

    PubMed

    Niemiller, Matthew L; Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M; Shah, Premal; Schmitz, Lars; Near, Thomas J

    2013-03-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying regressive evolution-the degeneration or loss of a derived trait--are largely unknown, particularly for complex structures such as eyes in cave organisms. In several eyeless animals, the visual photoreceptor rhodopsin appears to have retained functional amino acid sequences. Hypotheses to explain apparent maintenance of function include weak selection for retention of light-sensing abilities and its pleiotropic roles in circadian rhythms and thermotaxis. In contrast, we show that there has been repeated loss of functional constraint of rhodopsin in amblyopsid cavefishes, as at least three cave lineages have independently accumulated unique loss-of-function mutations over the last 10.3 Mya. Although several cave lineages still possess functional rhodopsin, they exhibit increased rates of nonsynonymous mutations that have greater effect on the structure and function of rhodopsin compared to those in surface lineages. These results indicate that functionality of rhodopsin has been repeatedly lost in amblyopsid cavefishes. The presence of a functional copy of rhodopsin in some cave lineages is likely explained by stochastic accumulation of mutations following recent subterranean colonization. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Time-resolved rhodopsin activation currents in a unicellular expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J M; Shukla, P

    1999-01-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) is the charge redistribution occurring in plasma membrane rhodopsin during light activation of photoreceptors. Both the molecular mechanism of the ERC and its relationship to rhodopsin conformational activation are unknown. To investigate whether the ERC could be a time-resolved assay of rhodopsin structure-function relationships, the distinct sensitivity of modern electrophysiological tools was employed to test for flash-activated ERC signals in cells stably expressing normal human rod opsin after regeneration with 11-cis-retinal. ERCs are similar in waveform and kinetics to those found in photoreceptors. The action spectrum of the major R(2) charge motion is consistent with a rhodopsin photopigment. The R(1) phase is not kinetically resolvable and the R(2) phase, which overlaps metarhodopsin-II formation, has a rapid risetime and complex multiexponential decay. These experiments demonstrate, for the first time, kinetically resolved electrical state transitions during activation of expressed visual pigment in a unicellular environment (single or fused giant cells) containing only 6 x 10(6)-8 x 10(7) molecules of rhodopsin. This method improves measurement sensitivity 7 to 8 orders of magnitude compared to other time-resolved techniques applied to rhodopsin to study the role particular amino acids play in conformational activation and the forces that govern those transitions. PMID:10465746

  4. Three-dimensional structure of an invertebrate rhodopsin and basis for ordered alignment in the photoreceptor membrane.

    PubMed

    Davies, A; Gowen, B E; Krebs, A M; Schertler, G F; Saibil, H R

    2001-11-30

    Invertebrate rhodopsins activate a G-protein signalling pathway in microvillar photoreceptors. In contrast to the transducin-cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase pathway found in vertebrate rods and cones, visual transduction in cephalopod (squid, octopus, cuttlefish) invertebrates is signalled via Gq and phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin contains the conserved residues of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family, but has only 35% identity with mammalian rhodopsins. Unlike vertebrate rhodopsins, cephalopod rhodopsin is arranged in an ordered lattice in the photoreceptor membranes. This organization confers sensitivity to the plane of polarized light and also provides the optimal orientation of the linear retinal chromophores in the cylindrical microvillar membranes for light capture. Two-dimensional crystals of squid rhodopsin show a rectilinear arrangement that is likely to be related to the alignment of rhodopsins in vivo.Here, we present a three-dimensional structure of squid rhodopsin determined by cryo-electron microscopy of two-dimensional crystals. Docking the atomic structure of bovine rhodopsin into the squid density map shows that the helix packing and extracellular plug structure are conserved. In addition, there are two novel structural features revealed by our map. The linear lattice contact appears to be made by the transverse C-terminal helix lying on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane. Also at the cytoplasmic surface, additional density may correspond to a helix 5-6 loop insertion found in most GPCRs relative to vertebrate rhodopsins. The similarity supports the conservation in structure of rhodopsins (and other G-protein-coupled receptors) from phylogenetically distant organisms. The map provides the first indication of the structural basis for rhodopsin alignment in the microvillar membrane.

  5. Theoretical and applied studies of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallent, Jack R.

    Part I. The conformational and electronic properties of the 12-s-cis and 12-s-trans conformers of 11-cis retinal are analyzed. Our models confirm that the 12-s-cis isomer is more stable in vacuum and the 12-s-trans conformer is more stable in polar and nonpolar solvent environments due to dispersive and electrostatic interactions. Electronic analysis indicates that the features in the absorption spectrum are due to a complex set of overlapping transitions. Assignments are made for all four band systems. Ground- and excited-state surfaces connecting rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin along the F11,12 dihedral reaction path are partially adiabatically mapped. Forward and reverse photochemistry is simulated via molecular dynamics. The activated complex is reached in ˜375 fs following excitation. Best results for quantum yields and product formation times are obtained by including both dynamic and phased (partitioned) nonadiabatic coupling: FR→B=0.698;tR→B =1.360 ps; FB→R=0.521;tB→R =1.628 ps. The lower quantum yield of the B → R isomerization is due to a sign change in the nonadiabatic coupling term at F11,12 = 92° and to the rapid arrival of the trajectory into the activated complex which prevents equilibration of the excited state and lowers the dynamic coupling term. The Sn←S1 excited singlet state spectrum is calculated as a function of time following excitation of rhodopsin. A model of thermal noise in rods is proposed whereby thermal isomerization occurs when the retinal Schiff base is unprotonated. This model accounts for the low activation energy of 23--27 kcal mol-1 and is supported by both molecular models and experimental measurements. Part II. A prototype holographic memory is described which demonstrates simultaneous storage and retrieval of ten holographic images in the same volume of a bacteriorhodopsin(BR)/polyvinylalcohol(PVA) film. The suitability of BR as a volume holographic memory medium is discussed. Photochemistry in dried PVA films of

  6. Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy To Visualize Rhodopsin-Containing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keffer, J. L.; Sabanayagam, C. R.; Lee, M. E.; DeLong, E. F.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sunlight is captured and converted to chemical energy in illuminated environments. Although (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosystems have been characterized in detail, retinal-based photosystems, rhodopsins, have only recently been identified as important mediators of light energy capture and conversion. Recent estimates suggest that up to 70% of cells in some environments harbor rhodopsins. However, because rhodopsin autofluorescence is low—comparable to that of carotenoids and significantly less than that of (bacterio)chlorophylls—these estimates are based on metagenomic sequence data, not direct observation. We report here the use of ultrasensitive total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to distinguish between unpigmented, carotenoid-producing, and rhodopsin-expressing bacteria. Escherichia coli cells were engineered to produce lycopene, β-carotene, or retinal. A gene encoding an uncharacterized rhodopsin, actinorhodopsin, was cloned into retinal-producing E. coli. The production of correctly folded and membrane-incorporated actinorhodopsin was confirmed via development of pink color in E. coli and SDS-PAGE. Cells expressing carotenoids or actinorhodopsin were imaged by TIRF microscopy. The 561-nm excitation laser specifically illuminated rhodopsin-containing cells, allowing them to be differentiated from unpigmented and carotenoid-containing cells. Furthermore, water samples collected from the Delaware River were shown by PCR to have rhodopsin-containing organisms and were examined by TIRF microscopy. Individual microorganisms that fluoresced under illumination from the 561-nm laser were identified. These results verify the sensitivity of the TIRF microscopy method for visualizing and distinguishing between different molecules with low autofluorescence, making it useful for analyzing natural samples. PMID:25769822

  7. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to visualize rhodopsin-containing cells.

    PubMed

    Keffer, J L; Sabanayagam, C R; Lee, M E; DeLong, E F; Hahn, M W; Maresca, J A

    2015-05-15

    Sunlight is captured and converted to chemical energy in illuminated environments. Although (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosystems have been characterized in detail, retinal-based photosystems, rhodopsins, have only recently been identified as important mediators of light energy capture and conversion. Recent estimates suggest that up to 70% of cells in some environments harbor rhodopsins. However, because rhodopsin autofluorescence is low-comparable to that of carotenoids and significantly less than that of (bacterio)chlorophylls-these estimates are based on metagenomic sequence data, not direct observation. We report here the use of ultrasensitive total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to distinguish between unpigmented, carotenoid-producing, and rhodopsin-expressing bacteria. Escherichia coli cells were engineered to produce lycopene, β-carotene, or retinal. A gene encoding an uncharacterized rhodopsin, actinorhodopsin, was cloned into retinal-producing E. coli. The production of correctly folded and membrane-incorporated actinorhodopsin was confirmed via development of pink color in E. coli and SDS-PAGE. Cells expressing carotenoids or actinorhodopsin were imaged by TIRF microscopy. The 561-nm excitation laser specifically illuminated rhodopsin-containing cells, allowing them to be differentiated from unpigmented and carotenoid-containing cells. Furthermore, water samples collected from the Delaware River were shown by PCR to have rhodopsin-containing organisms and were examined by TIRF microscopy. Individual microorganisms that fluoresced under illumination from the 561-nm laser were identified. These results verify the sensitivity of the TIRF microscopy method for visualizing and distinguishing between different molecules with low autofluorescence, making it useful for analyzing natural samples. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Rhodopsins carrying modified chromophores--the 'making of', structural modelling and their light-induced reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ockenfels, Andreas; Schapiro, Igor; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    A series of vitamin-A aldehydes (retinals) with modified alkyl group substituents (9-demethyl-, 9-ethyl-, 9-isopropyl-, 10-methyl, 10-methyl-13-demethyl-, and 13-demethyl retinal) was synthesized and their 11-cis isomers were used as chromophores to reconstitute the visual pigment rhodopsin. Structural changes were selectively introduced around the photoisomerizing C11=C12 bond. The effect of these structural changes on rhodopsin formation and bleaching was determined. Global fit of assembly kinetics yielded lifetimes and spectral features of the assembly intermediates. Rhodopsin formation proceeds stepwise with prolonged lifetimes especially for 9-demethyl retinal (longest lifetime τ3 = 7500 s, cf., 3500 s for retinal), and for 10-methyl retinal (τ3 = 7850 s). These slowed-down processes are interpreted as either a loss of fixation (9dm) or an increased steric hindrance (10me) during the conformational adjustment within the protein. Combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations provided structural insight into the retinal analogues-assembled, full-length rhodopsins. Extinction coefficients, quantum yields and kinetics of the bleaching process (μs-to-ms time range) were determined. Global fit analysis yielded lifetimes and spectral features of bleaching intermediates, revealing remarkably altered kinetics: whereas the slowest process of wild-type rhodopsin and of bleached and 11-cis retinal assembled rhodopsin takes place with lifetimes of 7 and 3.8 s, respectively, this process for 10-methyl-13-demethyl retinal was nearly 10 h (34670 s), coming to completion only after ca. 50 h. The structural changes in retinal derivatives clearly identify the precise interactions between chromophore and protein during the light-induced changes that yield the outstanding efficiency of rhodopsin.

  9. Rhodopsin 5– and Rhodopsin 6–Mediated Clock Synchronization in Drosophila melanogaster Is Independent of Retinal Phospholipase C-β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Szular, Joanna; Sehadova, Hana; Gentile, Carla; Szabo, Gisela; Chou, Wen-Hai; Britt, Steven G.; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks of most organisms are synchronized with the 24-hour solar day by the changes of light and dark. In Drosophila, both the visual photoreceptors in the compound eyes as well as the blue-light photoreceptor Cryptochrome expressed within the brain clock neurons contribute to this clock synchronization. A specialized photoreceptive structure located between the retina and the optic lobes, the Hofbauer-Buchner (H-B) eyelet, projects to the clock neurons in the brain and also participates in light synchronization. The compound eye photoreceptors and the H-B eyelet contain Rhodopsin photopigments, which activate the canonical invertebrate phototransduction cascade after being excited by light. We show here that 2 of the photopigments present in these photoreceptors, Rhodopsin 5 (Rh5) and Rhodopsin 6 (Rh6), contribute to light synchronization in a mutant (norpAP41) that disrupts canonical phototransduction due to the absence of Phospholipase C-β (PLC-β). We reveal that norpAP41 is a true loss-of-function allele, resulting in a truncated PLC-β protein that lacks the catalytic domain. Light reception mediated by Rh5 and Rh6 must therefore utilize either a different (nonretinal) PLC-β enzyme or alternative signaling mechanisms, at least in terms of clock-relevant photoreception. This novel signaling mode may distinguish Rhodopsin-mediated irradiance detection from image-forming vision in Drosophila. PMID:22306971

  10. Nanoparticle-mediated rhodopsin cDNA but not intron-containing DNA delivery causes transgene silencing in a rhodopsin knockout model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Mitra, Rajendra N; Filonov, Nazar A; Han, Zongchao

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we compared the efficacy of nanoparticle (NP)-mediated intron-containing rhodopsin (sgRho) vs. intronless cDNA in ameliorating retinal disease phenotypes in a rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. We showed that NP-mediated sgRho delivery achieved long-term expression and phenotypic improvement in RKO mice, but not NP housing cDNA. However, the protein level of the NP-sgRho construct was only 5-10% of wild-type at 8 mo postinjection. To have a better understanding of the reduced levels of long-term expression of the vectors, in the present study, we evaluated the epigenetic changes of subretinal delivering NP-cDNA vs. NP-sgRho in the RKO mouse eyes. Following the administration, DNA methylation and histone status of specific regions (bacteria plasmid backbone, promoter, rhodopsin gene, and scaffold/matrix attachment region) of the vectors were evaluated at various time points. We documented that epigenetic transgene silencing occurred in vector-mediated gene transfer, which were caused by the plasmid backbone and the cDNA of the transgene, but not the intron-containing transgene. No toxicity or inflammation was found in the treated eyes. Our results suggest that cDNA of the rhodopsin transgene and bacteria backbone interfered with the host defense mechanism of DNA methylation-mediated transgene silencing through heterochromatin-associated modifications. © FASEB.

  11. Channelrhodopsin-2 gene transduced into retinal ganglion cells restores functional vision in genetically blind rats.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroshi; Sugano, Eriko; Isago, Hitomi; Hiroi, Teru; Wang, Zhuo; Ohta, Emi; Tamai, Makoto

    2010-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that transduction of the channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) gene, a microbial-type rhodopsin gene, into retinal ganglion cells of genetically blind rats will restore functional vision, we recorded visually evoked potentials and tested the experimental rats for the presence of optomotor responses. The N-terminal fragment of the ChR2 gene was fused to the fluorescent protein Venus and inserted into an adeno-associated virus to make AAV2-ChR2V. AAV2-ChR2V was injected intravitreally into the eyes of 6-month-old dystrophic RCS (rdy/rdy) rats. Visual function was evaluated six weeks after the injection by recording visually evoked potentials (VEPs) and testing optomotor responses. The expression of ChR2V in the retina was investigated histologically. We found that VEPs could not be recorded from 6-month-old dystrophic RCS rats that had not been injected with AAV2-ChR2V. In contrast, VEPs were elicited from RCS rats six weeks after injection with AAV2-ChR2V. The VEPs were recorded at stimulation rates <20Hz, which was the same as that of normal rats. Optomotor responses were also significantly better after the AAV2-ChR2V injection. Expression of ChR2V was observed mainly in the retinal ganglion cells. These findings demonstrate that visual function can be restored in blind rats by transducing the ChR2V gene into retinal ganglion cells.

  12. The primary structures of the Archaeon Halobacterium salinarium blue light receptor sensory rhodopsin II and its transducer, a methyl-accepting protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Brooun, A; Mueller, M M; Alam, M

    1996-08-06

    Recently, a large family of transducer proteins in the Archaeon Halobacterium salinarium was identified. On the basis of the comparison of the predicted structural domains of these transducers, three distinct subfamilies of transducers were proposed. Here we report isolation, complete gene sequences, and analysis of the encoded primary structures of transducer gene htrII, a member of family B, and its blue light receptor gene (sopII) of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII). The start codon ATG of the 714-bp sopII gene is one nucleotide beyond the termination codon TGA of the 2298-bp htrII gene. The deduced protein sequence of HtrII predicts a eubacterial chemotaxis transducer type with two hydrophobic membrane-spanning segments connecting sizable domains in the periplasm and cytoplasm. HtrII has a common feature with HtrI, the sensory rhodopsin I transducer; like HtrI, HtrII possesses a hydrophilic loop structure just after the second transmembrane segment. The C-terminal 299 residues (765 amino acid residues total) of HtrII show strong homology to the signaling and methylation domain of eubacterial transducer Tsr. The hydropathy plot of the primary structure of SRII indicates seven membrane-spanning alpha-helical segments, a characteristic feature of retinylidene proteins ("rhodopsins") from a widespread family of photoactive pigments. SRII shows high identity with SRI (42%), bacteriorhodopsin (BR) (32%), and halorhodopsin (24%). The crucial positions for retinal binding sites in these proteins are nearly identical, with the exception of Met-118 (numbering according to the mature BR sequence), which is replaced by Val in SRII. In BR, residues Asp-85 and Asp-96 are crucial in proton pumping. In SRII, the position corresponding to Asp-85 in BR is conserved, but the corresponding position of Asp-96 is replaced by an aromatic Tyr. Coexpression of the htrII and sopII genes restores SRII phototaxis to a mutant (Pho81) that contains a deletion in the htrI/sopI and insertion in

  13. Light-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, B E; Khorana, H G; Nasi, E

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the functioning of bovine rod opsin, which is efficiently synthesized from RNA made by in vitro transcription, following injection into Xenopus oocytes. We found that oocytes expressing the gene for opsin exhibit light-dependent ionic currents only after pigment generation by incubation with 11-cis-retinal. These currents are similar to the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) response of oocytes, but their amplitude is substantially smaller. 2. In order to optimize the conditions for obtaining light-induced currents in RNA-injected oocytes, the native ACh response was examined under several conditions. It was found that elevated external calcium markedly enhances the muscarinic response and that these currents have a non-linear dependence on membrane voltage, increasing substantially with depolarization. 3. Using the optimal conditions for evoking the largest ACh responses, (28 mM [Ca2+]o, 0 mV, omission of serum and Hepes from the media), the light-evoked currents obtained in RNA-injected oocytes were remarkably enhanced, and responses to multiple light stimuli could be obtained. 4. The light response appeared to desensitize, even after long periods of recovery and pigment regeneration. By contrast, the ACh responses continued to appear normal. These results suggest that desensitization of photoresponses expressed in Xenopus oocytes involve changes at early stages of the pathway, resulting in a reduced ability of rhodopsin to couple to the endogenous signalling system. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7692039

  14. Switch of rhodopsin expression in terminally differentiated Drosophila sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Simon G; Desplan, Claude

    2008-07-24

    Specificity of sensory neurons requires restricted expression of one sensory receptor gene and the exclusion of all others within a given cell. In the Drosophila retina, functional identity of photoreceptors depends on light-sensitive Rhodopsins (Rhs). The much simpler larval eye (Bolwig organ) is composed of about 12 photoreceptors, eight of which are green-sensitive (Rh6) and four blue-sensitive (Rh5). The larval eye becomes the adult extraretinal 'eyelet' composed of four green-sensitive (Rh6) photoreceptors. Here we show that, during metamorphosis, all Rh6 photoreceptors die, whereas the Rh5 photoreceptors switch fate by turning off Rh5 and then turning on Rh6 expression. This switch occurs without apparent changes in the programme of transcription factors that specify larval photoreceptor subtypes. We also show that the transcription factor Senseless (Sens) mediates the very different cellular behaviours of Rh5 and Rh6 photoreceptors. Sens is restricted to Rh5 photoreceptors and must be excluded from Rh6 photoreceptors to allow them to die at metamorphosis. Finally, we show that Ecdysone receptor (EcR) functions autonomously both for the death of larval Rh6 photoreceptors and for the sensory switch of Rh5 photoreceptors to express Rh6. This fate switch of functioning, terminally differentiated neurons provides a novel, unexpected example of hard-wired sensory plasticity.

  15. Impaired Rhodopsin Generation in the Rat Model of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Malechka, Volha V; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Takahashi, Yusuke; Shin, Younghwa; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2017-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients experience functional deficits in dark adaptation, contrast sensitivity, and color perception before microvascular pathologies become apparent. Herein, we evaluated early changes in neural retinal function and in retinoid metabolism in the eye in diabetes. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats showed decreased a- and b-wave amplitudes of scotopic and photopic electroretinography responses 4 months after diabetes induction compared to nondiabetic controls. Although Western blot analysis revealed no difference in opsin expression, rhodopsin content was decreased in diabetic retinas, as shown by a difference in absorbance. Consistently, levels of 11-cis-retinal, the chromophore for visual pigments, were significantly lower in diabetic retinas compared to those in controls, suggesting a retinoid deficiency. Among visual cycle proteins, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein and stimulated by retinoic acid 6 protein showed significantly lower levels in diabetic rats than those in nondiabetic controls. Similarly, serum levels of retinol-binding protein 4 and retinoids were significantly lower in diabetic rats. Overall, these results suggest that retinoid metabolism in the eye is impaired in type 1 diabetes, which leads to deficient generation of visual pigments and neural retinal dysfunction in early diabetes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding.

    PubMed

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-03-14

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations.

  17. Toward an understanding of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin mimics.

    PubMed

    Huntress, Mark M; Gozem, Samer; Malley, Konstantin R; Jailaubekov, Askat E; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Vengris, Mikas; Geiger, James H; Borhan, Babak; Schapiro, Igor; Larsen, Delmar S; Olivucci, Massimo

    2013-09-05

    Recently, a rhodopsin protein mimic was constructed by combining mutants of the cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABPII) with an all-trans retinal chromophore. Here, we present a combined computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and experimental ultrafast kinetic study of CRABPII. We employ the QM/MM models to study the absorption (λ(a)max), fluorescence (λ(f)max), and reactivity of a CRABPII triple mutant incorporating the all-trans protonated chromophore (PSB-KLE-CRABPII). We also study the spectroscopy of the same mutant incorporating the unprotonated chromophore and of another double mutant incorporating the neutral unbound retinal molecule held inside the pocket. Finally, for PSB-KLE-CRABPII, stationary fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy resolved two different evolving excited state populations which were computationally assigned to distinct locally excited and charge-transfer species. This last species is shown to evolve along reaction paths describing a facile isomerization of the biologically relevant 11-cis and 13-cis double bonds. This work represents a first exploratory attempt to model and study these artificial protein systems. It also indicates directions for improving the QM/MM models so that they could be more effectively used to assist the bottom-up design of genetically encodable probes and actuators employing the retinal chromophore.

  18. Investigation of evolution-related aspects of bacterial rhodopsins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated evolution-related aspects of bacterial rhodopsins, the unique retinal-based energy transducing systems of halophilic archae. The approach was to describe both structural and functional aspects: the structure by sequencing genes to explore which regions are conserved, and the function by comparing proton and chloride transport in the closely related systems, bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin, respectively. In the latter, we have made a good start toward the ultimate goal of separating the attributes of the general principles of retinal-based ionic pumps from those of the specific ion specificities, by determining the thermodynamics of the internal steps of the protein-mediated active transport process, as well as some of the intraprotein ion-transfer steps. Our present emphasis is on continuing to acquire the tools for studying what distinguishes proton transport from chloride transport. We consider it important, therefore, that we have been able to provide firm mathematical grounds for the kinetics analyses which underlies these studies. Our molecular biological studies have received a great boost from the expression vector for the bop gene based on a halobacterial plasmid, that we recently developed.

  19. Retinal Photoisomerization in Rhodopsin: Electrostatic and Steric Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasello, Gaia; Altoe, Piero; Stenta, Marco; Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Garavelli, Marco; Orlandi, Giorgio

    2007-12-26

    Excited state QM(CASPT2//CASSCF)/MM(GAFF) calculations, by our recently developed code COBRAMM (Computations at Bologna Relating Ab-initio and Molecular Mechanic Methods), were carried out in rhodopsin to investigate on the steric and electrostatic effects in retinal photoisomerization catalysis due to the {beta}-ionone ring and glutammate 181 (GLU 181), respectively. The excited state photoisomerization channel has been mapped and a new christallographyc structure (2.2 Aa resolution) has been used for this purpose. Two different set-ups have been used to evaluate the electrostatic effects of GLU 181 (which is very close to the central double bond of the chromophore): the first with a neutral GLU 181 (as commonly accepted), the second with a negatively charged (i.e. deprotonated) GLU 181 (as very recent experimental findings seem to suggest). On the other hand, {beta}-ionone ring steric effects were evaluated by calculating the photoisomerization path of a modified chromophore, where the ring double bond has been saturated. Spectroscopic properties were calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  20. Photoreceptor IFT complexes containing chaperones, guanylyl cyclase 1 and rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Reshma; Li, Mei; Sun, Jun; Baker, Sheila A; Insinna, Christine; Besharse, Joseph C

    2009-06-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) provides a mechanism for the transport of cilium-specific proteins, but the mechanisms for linkage of cargo and IFT proteins have not been identified. Using the sensory outer segments (OS) of photoreceptors, which are derived from sensory cilia, we have identified IFT-cargo complexes containing IFT proteins, kinesin 2 family proteins, two photoreceptor-specific membrane proteins, guanylyl cyclase 1 (GC1, Gucy2e) and rhodopsin (RHO), and the chaperones, mammalian relative of DNAJ, DnajB6 (MRJ), and HSC70 (Hspa8). Analysis of these complexes leads to a model in which MRJ through its binding to IFT88 and GC1 plays a critical role in formation or stabilization of the IFT-cargo complexes. Consistent with the function of MRJ in the activation of HSC70 ATPase activity, Mg-ATP enhances the co-IP of GC1, RHO, and MRJ with IFT proteins. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of MRJ in IMCD3 cells expressing GC1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reduces cilium membrane targeting of GC1-GFP without apparent effect on cilium elongation.

  1. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  2. Structure of the retinal chromophore in 7,9-dicis-rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Loppnow, G.R.; Miley, M.E.; Mathies, R.A. ); Liu, R.S.H. ); Kandori, H.; Shichida, Y.; Fukada, Y.; Yoshizawa, T. )

    1990-09-25

    Bovine rhodopsin was bleached and regenerated with 7,9-dicis-retinal to form 7,9-dicis-rhodopsin, which was purified on a concanavalin A affinity column. The absorption maximum of the 7,9-dicis pigment is 453 nm, giving an opsin shift of 1600 cm{sup {minus}1} compared to 2500 cm{sup {minus}1} for 11-cis-rhodopsin and 2400 cm{sup {minus}1} for 9-cis-rhodopsin. Rapid-flow resonance Raman spectra have been obtained of 7,9-dicis-rhodopsin in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O at room temperature. The shift of the 1654-cm{sup {minus}1} C{double bond}N stretch to 1627 cm{sup {minus}1} in D{sub 2}O demonstrates that the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated. The absence of any shift in the 1201-cm{sup {minus}1} mode, which is assigned as the C{sub 14}-C{sub 15} stretch, or of any other C-C stretching modes in D{sub 2}O indicates that the Schiff base C{double bond}N configuration is trans (anti). Assuming that the cyclohexenyl ring binds with the same orientation in 7,9-dicis-, 9-cis-, and 11-cis-rhodopsins, the presence of two cis bonds requires that the N-H bond of the 7,9-dicis chromophore points in the opposite direction from that in the 9-cis or 11-cis pigment. However, the Schiff base C{double bond}NH{sup +} stretching frequency and its D{sub 2}O shift in 7,9-dicis-rhodopsin are very similar to those in 11-cis- and 9-cis-rhodopsin, indicating that the Schiff base electrostatic/hydrogen-bonding environments are effectively the same. The C{double bond}N trans (anti) Schiff base geometry of 7,9-dicis-rhodopsin and the insensitivity of its Schiff base vibrational properties to orientation are rationalized by examining the binding site specificity with molecular modeling.

  3. Structure and function in rhodopsin: Destabilization of rhodopsin by the binding of an antibody at the N-terminal segment provides support for involvement of the latter in an intradiscal tertiary structure

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Kiweon; Reeves, Philip J.; Khorana, H. Gobind

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal anti-rhodopsin antibody (B6–30N), characterized by Hargrave and coworkers [Adamus, G., Zam, Z. S., Arendt, A., Palczewski, K., McDowell, J. M. & Hargrave, P. (1991) Vision Res. 31, 17–31] as recognizing a short peptide sequence at the N terminus, failed to bind to rhodopsin when the latter was solubilized in dodecylmaltoside (DM). Of the detergents tested thus far, DM affords maximum stability to rhodopsin. Solubilization of rhodopsin in cholate allowed binding of the antibody, but the binding caused destabilization as evidenced by the accelerated loss of absorbance at 500 nm. The result provides support for the earlier conclusion that the N-terminal segment is an integral part of a tertiary structure in the intradiscal domain of native rhodopsin coupled to a tertiary structure in the transmembrane domain. Additional comparative studies on the stability of rhodopsin in different detergents were carried out after direct solubilization from rod outer segments and after extensive treatments to remove the endogenous phospholipids. Purification of rhodopsin in DM resulted in essentially quantitative removal of endogenous phospholipids. When rhodopsin thus purified was treated with the above antibody in DM and in cholate, enhanced destabilization (5-fold) was observed in the latter detergent. PMID:10737783

  4. Expression and light-triggered movement of rhodopsins in the larval visual system of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Manuel; Kimler, Kyle J; Leming, Matthew T; Hu, Xiaobang; Whaley, Michelle A; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2015-05-01

    During the larval stages, the visual system of the mosquito Aedes aegypti contains five stemmata, often referred to as larval ocelli, positioned laterally on each side of the larval head. Here we show that stemmata contain two photoreceptor types, distinguished by the expression of different rhodopsins. The rhodopsin Aaop3 (GPROP3) is expressed in the majority of the larval photoreceptors. There are two small clusters of photoreceptors located within the satellite and central stemmata that express the rhodopsin Aaop7 (GPROP7) instead of Aaop3. Electroretinogram analysis of transgenic Aaop7 Drosophila indicates that Aaop3 and Aaop7, both classified as long-wavelength rhodopsins, possess similar but not identical spectral properties. Light triggers an extensive translocation of Aaop3 from the photosensitive rhabdoms to the cytoplasmic compartment, whereas light-driven translocation of Aaop7 is limited. The results suggest that these photoreceptor cell types play distinct roles in larval vision. An additional component of the larval visual system is the adult compound eye, which starts to develop at the anterior face of the larval stemmata during the 1st instar stage. The photoreceptors of the developing compound eye show rhodopsin expression during the 4th larval instar stage, consistent with indications from previous reports that the adult compound eye contributes to larval and pupal visual capabilities.

  5. Phagosome maturation during endosome interaction revealed by partial rhodopsin processing in retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Meschede, Ingrid P.; Seabra, Miguel C.; Futter, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in phagocytosis and degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are associated with aging and retinal disease. The daily burst of rod outer segment (ROS) phagocytosis by the RPE provides a unique opportunity to analyse phagosome processing in vivo. In mouse retinae, phagosomes containing stacked rhodopsin-rich discs were identified by immuno-electron microscopy. Early apical phagosomes stained with antibodies against both cytoplasmic and intradiscal domains of rhodopsin. During phagosome maturation, a remarkably synchronised loss of the cytoplasmic epitope coincided with movement to the cell body and preceded phagosome–lysosome fusion and disc degradation. Loss of the intradiscal rhodopsin epitope and disc digestion occurred upon fusion with cathepsin-D-positive lysosomes. The same sequential stages of phagosome maturation were identified in cultured RPE and macrophages challenged with isolated POS. Loss of the cytoplasmic rhodopsin epitope was insensitive to pH but sensitive to protease inhibition and coincided with the interaction of phagosomes with endosomes. Thus, during pre-lysosomal maturation of ROS-containing phagosomes, limited rhodopsin processing occurs upon interaction with endosomes. This potentially provides a sensitive readout of phagosome–endosome interactions that is applicable to multiple phagocytes. PMID:25074813

  6. Engineered Zinc Finger Nuclease–Mediated Homologous Recombination of the Human Rhodopsin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, David L.; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Methods. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Results. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. Conclusions. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. PMID:20671268

  7. Lumi I --> Lumi II: the last detergent independent process in rhodopsin photoexcitationt.

    PubMed

    Epps, Jacqueline; Lewis, James W; Szundi, Istvan; Kliger, David S

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved absorbance difference spectra were collected at delays from 1 to 128 micros after photolysis of membrane and detergent suspensions of rhodopsin at 20 degrees C. Fitting both sets of data with two exponential decays plus a constant showed a similar fast process (lifetime 11 micros in membrane, 12 micros in 5% dodecyl maltoside) with a small but similar spectral change. This demonstrates that the Lumi I - Lumi II process, previously characterized in detergent suspensions, has similar properties in membrane without significant effect of detergent. The slower exponential process detected in the data is quite different in membrane compared to detergent solubilized samples, showing that the pronounced effect of detergent on the later rhodopsin photointermediates begins fairly abruptly near 20 micros. Besides affecting the late processes, the data collected here shows that detergent induces a small blue shift in the 1 micros difference spectrum (the Lumi I minus rhodopsin difference spectrum). The blue shift is similar to one induced by chloride ion in the E181Q rhodopsin mutant and may indicate that the ionization state of Glu181 in rhodopsin is affected by detergent.

  8. A photochromic histidine kinase rhodopsin (HKR1) that is bimodally switched by ultraviolet and blue light.

    PubMed

    Luck, Meike; Mathes, Tilo; Bruun, Sara; Fudim, Roman; Hagedorn, Rolf; Tran Nguyen, Tra My; Kateriya, Suneel; Kennis, John T M; Hildebrandt, Peter; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-11-16

    Rhodopsins are light-activated chromoproteins that mediate signaling processes via transducer proteins or promote active or passive ion transport as ion pumps or directly light-activated channels. Here, we provide spectroscopic characterization of a rhodopsin from the Chlamydomonas eyespot. It belongs to a recently discovered but so far uncharacterized family of histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs). These are modular proteins consisting of rhodopsin, a histidine kinase, a response regulator, and in some cases an effector domain such as an adenylyl or guanylyl cyclase, all encoded in a single protein as a two-component system. The recombinant rhodopsin fragment, Rh, of HKR1 is a UVA receptor (λ(max) = 380 nm) that is photoconverted by UV light into a stable blue light-absorbing meta state Rh-Bl (λ(max) = 490 nm). Rh-Bl is converted back to Rh-UV by blue light. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the Rh-UV chromophore is in an unusual 13-cis,15-anti configuration, which explains why the chromophore is deprotonated. The excited state lifetime of Rh-UV is exceptionally stable, probably caused by a relatively unpolar retinal binding pocket, converting into the photoproduct within about 100 ps, whereas the blue form reacts 100 times faster. We propose that the photochromic HKR1 plays a role in the adaptation of behavioral responses in the presence of UVA light.

  9. Study of the orientation of retinal in bovine rhodopsin: the use of a photoactivatable retinal analog

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.

    1987-05-01

    Rhodopsin is the major transmembrane protein in the photoreceptor cells of vertebrate and invertebrate retina. Bovine rhodopsin consists of a polypeptide chain of 348 amino acids of known sequence in which the chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, is linked to Lys-296 as a Schiff base. To investigate the orientation of retinal in the protein and to study the interactions between retinal and the protein, the authors have developed a crosslinking approach using a /sup 3/H-labeled photoactivatable analog of retinal. Bleached rhodopsin in rod outer segments was reconstituted with the analog to give a pigment with lambda/sub max/ at 460nm. Reduction of the Schiff base with borane dimenthylamine, followed by degradation with CNBr and sequencing of the radioactive fragment showed that the analog is attached to Lys-296, as in the native rhodopsin. Further, the reconstitute protein after photolysis was phosphorylated by rhodopsin kinase. Photolysis of the reconstituted pigment at -15/sup 0/C resulted in crosslinking of the analog to the opsin to the extent of 30% as analyzed by SDS electrophoresis. The site(s) of crosslinking in the protein are under investigation.

  10. Engineered zinc finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination of the human rhodopsin gene.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, David L; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-12-01

    Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination.

  11. [Phototaxis of the green algae: the new class of rhodopsin receptors].

    PubMed

    Govorunova, E G; Jung, K H; Sineshchekov, O A

    2004-01-01

    Photomotility behavior in green flagellate algae is mediated by rhodopsin-like receptors, which was initially suggested on the basis of physiological evidence. The cascade of rapid Ca(2+)-dependent electrical responses in the plasma membrane plays a key role in the signal transduction chain during both phototaxis and the photophobic response. The photoreceptor current through the plasma membrane is the earliest detectable event upon photoexcitation of the photoreceptors. Analysis of this current revealed that it consists of at least two components with different characteristics. Genes encoding two archaeal-type rhodopsins (type I rhodopsins) were recently identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and named (Chlamydomonas Sensory Rhodopsins A and B CSRA and CSRB). The measurements of photoelectric and motor responses in genetic transformants of C. reinhardtii enriched in each of these receptor proteins showed that the two components of the photoreceptor current are mediated by the two rhodopsins, and that both CSRA and CSRB are involved in phototaxis and the photophobic response. The CSRA-mediated current dominates at high light intensities and contributes primarily to the photophobic response. The CSRB-initiated transduction involves an efficient amplification cascade and mediates the highly sensitive phototaxis at low light intensities. CSRA and CSRB expressed heterologously in oocytes of Xenopus laevis act as light-gated proton channels, although it is unclear whether this channel activity plays a functional role in the initiation of motor responses and/or occurs in the native system.

  12. Squid visual arrestin: cDNA cloning and calcium-dependent phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase (SQRK).

    PubMed

    Mayeenuddin, Linnia H; Mitchell, Jane

    2003-05-01

    Arrestin binding to rhodopsin is one of the major mechanisms of termination of photoresponses in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here we report the cDNA cloning and characterization of a 48-kDa visual arrestin from squid (Loligo pealei). The cDNA encoded a protein that had 56-64% amino acid sequence similarity to reported arrestin sequences. This protein does not encode any distinct modular domains but contains five fingerprint regions that have been identified within arrestins. Antibodies raised to the recombinant arrestin protein detected arrestin expression only in the eye and recognized a doublet in photoreceptor membranes, representing unphosphorylated and phosphorylated arrestin. In squid eye membranes, arrestin was phosphorylated in a Ca2+-dependent manner and this phosphorylation was inhibited by antibodies raised against squid rhodopsin kinase, but not by inhibitors of protein kinase C or calmodulin kinase. Addition of purified squid rhodopsin kinase to washed rhabdomeric membranes resulted in phosphorylation of rhodopsin, and arrestin was also phosphorylated when calcium was present. This is the first report of a rhodopsin kinase phosphorylating an arrestin substrate, and suggests a dual role for this kinase in the inactivation of the squid visual system.

  13. Blocking transcription of the human rhodopsin gene by triplex-mediated DNA photocrosslinking.

    PubMed

    Intody, Z; Perkins, B D; Wilson, J H; Wensel, T G

    2000-11-01

    To explore the ability of triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) to inhibit genes responsible for dominant genetic disorders, we used two TFOs to block expression of the human rhodopsin gene, which encodes a G protein-coupled receptor involved in the blinding disorder autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Psoralen-modified TFOs and UVA irradiation were used to form photoadducts at two target sites in a plasmid expressing a rhodopsin-EGFP fusion, which was then transfected into HT1080 cells. Each TFO reduced rhodopsin-GFP expression by 70-80%, whereas treatment with both reduced expression by 90%. Expression levels of control genes on either the same plasmid or one co-transfected were not affected by the treatment. Mutations at one TFO target eliminated its effect on transcription, without diminishing inhibition by the other TFO. Northern blots indicated that TFO-directed psoralen photoadducts blocked progression of RNA polymerase, resulting in truncated transcripts. Inhibition of gene expression was not relieved over a 72 h period, suggesting that TFO-induced psoralen lesions are not repaired on this time scale. Irradiation of cells after transfection with plasmid and psoralen-TFOs produced photoadducts inside the cells and also inhibited expression of rhodopsin-EGFP. We conclude that directing DNA damage with psoralen-TFOs is an efficient and specific means for blocking transcription from the human rhodopsin gene.

  14. Rescue of mutant rhodopsin traffic by metformin-induced AMPK activation accelerates photoreceptor degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguila, Monica; Opefi, Chikwado A.; South, Kieron; Bellingham, James; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Munro, Peter M.; Kanuga, Naheed; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Dubis, Adam M.; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Graca, Anna B.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Ali, Robin R.; Sakami, Sanae; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Sherman, Michael Y.; Reeves, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein misfolding caused by inherited mutations leads to loss of protein function and potentially toxic ‘gain of function’, such as the dominant P23H rhodopsin mutation that causes retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Here, we tested whether the AMPK activator metformin could affect the P23H rhodopsin synthesis and folding. In cell models, metformin treatment improved P23H rhodopsin folding and traffic. In animal models of P23H RP, metformin treatment successfully enhanced P23H traffic to the rod outer segment, but this led to reduced photoreceptor function and increased photoreceptor cell death. The metformin-rescued P23H rhodopsin was still intrinsically unstable and led to increased structural instability of the rod outer segments. These data suggest that improving the traffic of misfolding rhodopsin mutants is unlikely to be a practical therapy, because of their intrinsic instability and long half-life in the outer segment, but also highlights the potential of altering translation through AMPK to improve protein function in other protein misfolding diseases. PMID:28065882

  15. Total synthesis of a gene for octopus rhodopsin and its preliminary expression.

    PubMed

    Harada, Y; Sakamoto, T; Shinomura, T; Takamoto, K; Senda, T; Tsuda, M

    1991-10-01

    To carry out systematic structure-function studies of octopus rhodopsin, photoreceptor protein of octopus visual cells, by means of specific amino-acid replacements, we have totally synthesized a DNA duplex of 1,365 base pairs that encodes the entire octopus rhodopsin of 455 amino acids [Ovchinnikov et al. (1988) FEBS Lett. 232, 69-72] by introducing codons preferred in Escherichia coli. Total synthesis simplifies site-specific mutagenesis in all parts of the gene by replacement of short restriction fragments by their newly synthesized counterparts containing the required nucleotide alterations. Thirty unique restriction sites were introduced in the octopus rhodopsin gene, which was assembled on a plasmid in two steps. Five cartridge genes of 344, 296, 320, 212, and 317 base pairs capable of being expressed independently were first constructed by using 48 synthetic oligonucleotides ranging in size from 54 to 73 nucleotides. The entire gene was constructed by consecutive linkage of cartridge genes. These cartridge genes were designed to correspond to the transmembrane helical unit of octopus rhodopsin, resulting in easy construction of various chimeric rhodopsins. The nucleotide sequences were confirmed by sequencing the cartridges as well as the entire gene. These synthetic genes were cloned into an expression vector carrying the trp promoter of E. coli, and were preliminarily expressed in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Expression and light-triggered movement of rhodopsins in the larval visual system of mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Manuel; Kimler, Kyle J.; Leming, Matthew T.; Hu, Xiaobang; Whaley, Michelle A.; O'Tousa, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the larval stages, the visual system of the mosquito Aedes aegypti contains five stemmata, often referred to as larval ocelli, positioned laterally on each side of the larval head. Here we show that stemmata contain two photoreceptor types, distinguished by the expression of different rhodopsins. The rhodopsin Aaop3 (GPROP3) is expressed in the majority of the larval photoreceptors. There are two small clusters of photoreceptors located within the satellite and central stemmata that express the rhodopsin Aaop7 (GPROP7) instead of Aaop3. Electroretinogram analysis of transgenic Aaop7 Drosophila indicates that Aaop3 and Aaop7, both classified as long-wavelength rhodopsins, possess similar but not identical spectral properties. Light triggers an extensive translocation of Aaop3 from the photosensitive rhabdoms to the cytoplasmic compartment, whereas light-driven translocation of Aaop7 is limited. The results suggest that these photoreceptor cell types play distinct roles in larval vision. An additional component of the larval visual system is the adult compound eye, which starts to develop at the anterior face of the larval stemmata during the 1st instar stage. The photoreceptors of the developing compound eye show rhodopsin expression during the 4th larval instar stage, consistent with indications from previous reports that the adult compound eye contributes to larval and pupal visual capabilities. PMID:25750414

  17. Modeling photo-bleaching kinetics to map local variations in rod rhodopsin density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, M.; Dobrosotskaya, J.; King, E. J.; Czaja, W.; Bonner, R. F.

    2011-03-01

    Localized rod photoreceptor and rhodopsin losses have been observed in post mortem histology both in normal aging and in age-related maculopathy. We propose to noninvasively map local rod rhodopsin density through analysis of the brightening of the underlying lipofuscin autofluorescence (LAF) in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) imaging sequences starting in the dark adapted eye. The detected LAF increases as rhodopsin is bleached (time constant ~ 25sec) by the average retinal irradiance of the cSLO 488nm laser beam. We fit parameters of analytical expressions for the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching that Lamb validated using electroretinogram recordings in human. By performing localized (~ 100μm) kinetic analysis, we create high resolution maps of the rhodopsin density. This new noninvasive imaging and analysis approach appears well-suited for measuring localized changes in the rod photoreceptors and correlating them at high spatial resolution with localized pathological changes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) seen in steady-state LAF images.

  18. Photoactivation of rhodopsin causes an increased hydrogen-deuterium exchange of buried peptide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Rath, P; DeGrip, W J; Rothschild, K J

    1998-01-01

    A key step in visual transduction is the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin that lead to binding and activation of the G-protein transducin. In order to explore the nature of these conformational changes, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to measure the kinetics of hydrogen/deuterium exchange in rhodopsin upon photoexcitation. The extent of hydrogen/deuterium exchange of backbone peptide groups can be monitored by measuring the integrated intensity of the amide II and amide II' bands. When rhodopsin films are exposed to D2O in the dark for long periods, the amide II band retains at least 60% of its integrated intensity, reflecting a core of backbone peptide groups that are resistant to H/D exchange. Upon photoactivation, rhodopsin in the presence of D2O exhibits a new phase of H/D exchange which at 10 degrees C consists of fast (time constant approximately 30 min) and slow (approximately 11 h) components. These results indicate that photoactivation causes buried portions of the rhodopsin backbone structure to become more accessible. PMID:9449322

  19. A Photochromic Histidine Kinase Rhodopsin (HKR1) That Is Bimodally Switched by Ultraviolet and Blue Light*

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Meike; Mathes, Tilo; Bruun, Sara; Fudim, Roman; Hagedorn, Rolf; Tran Nguyen, Tra My; Kateriya, Suneel; Kennis, John T. M.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsins are light-activated chromoproteins that mediate signaling processes via transducer proteins or promote active or passive ion transport as ion pumps or directly light-activated channels. Here, we provide spectroscopic characterization of a rhodopsin from the Chlamydomonas eyespot. It belongs to a recently discovered but so far uncharacterized family of histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs). These are modular proteins consisting of rhodopsin, a histidine kinase, a response regulator, and in some cases an effector domain such as an adenylyl or guanylyl cyclase, all encoded in a single protein as a two-component system. The recombinant rhodopsin fragment, Rh, of HKR1 is a UVA receptor (λmax = 380 nm) that is photoconverted by UV light into a stable blue light-absorbing meta state Rh-Bl (λmax = 490 nm). Rh-Bl is converted back to Rh-UV by blue light. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the Rh-UV chromophore is in an unusual 13-cis,15-anti configuration, which explains why the chromophore is deprotonated. The excited state lifetime of Rh-UV is exceptionally stable, probably caused by a relatively unpolar retinal binding pocket, converting into the photoproduct within about 100 ps, whereas the blue form reacts 100 times faster. We propose that the photochromic HKR1 plays a role in the adaptation of behavioral responses in the presence of UVA light. PMID:23027869

  20. Investigation of Rhodopsin Dynamics in its Signaling State by Solid-State Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Struts, Andrey V.; Chawla, Udeep; Perera, Suchithranga M.D.C.; Brown, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed deuterium NMR spectroscopy is a valuable tool to study the structural dynamics of biomolecules in cases where solution NMR is inapplicable. Solid-state 2H NMR spectral studies of aligned membrane samples of rhodopsin with selectively labeled retinal provide information on structural changes of the chromophore in different protein states. In addition, solid-state 2H NMR relaxation time measurements allow one to study the dynamics of the ligand during the transition from the inactive to the active state. Here we describe the methodological aspects of solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy for functional studies of rhodopsin, with an emphasis on the dynamics of the retinal cofactor. We provide complete protocols for the preparation of NMR samples of rhodopsin with 11-cis-retinal selectively deuterated at the methyl groups in aligned membranes. In addition, we review optimized conditions for trapping the rhodopsin photointermediates; and lastly we address the challenging problem of trapping the signaling state of rhodopsin in aligned membrane films. PMID:25697522

  1. C-terminal threonines and serines play distinct roles in the desensitization of rhodopsin, a G protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Anthony W; Doan, Thuy; Moaven, Hormoz; Sokal, Iza; Baameur, Faiza; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Homan, Kristoff T; Tesmer, John JG; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Chen, Jeannie; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors generate measurable responses to single-photon activation of individual molecules of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), rhodopsin. Timely rhodopsin desensitization depends on phosphorylation and arrestin binding, which quenches G protein activation. Rhodopsin phosphorylation has been measured biochemically at C-terminal serine residues, suggesting that these residues are critical for producing fast, low-noise responses. The role of native threonine residues is unclear. We compared single-photon responses from rhodopsin lacking native serine or threonine phosphorylation sites. Contrary to expectation, serine-only rhodopsin generated prolonged step-like single-photon responses that terminated abruptly and randomly, whereas threonine-only rhodopsin generated responses that were only modestly slower than normal. We show that the step-like responses of serine-only rhodopsin reflect slow and stochastic arrestin binding. Thus, threonine sites play a privileged role in promoting timely arrestin binding and rhodopsin desensitization. Similar coordination of phosphorylation and arrestin binding may more generally permit tight control of the duration of GPCR activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05981.001 PMID:25910054

  2. Rhodopsin Gene Expression Determines Rod Outer Segment Size and Rod Cell Resistance to a Dominant-Negative Neurodegeneration Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Price, Brandee A.; Sandoval, Ivette M.; Chan, Fung; Nichols, Ralph; Roman-Sanchez, Ramon; Wensel, Theodore G.; Wilson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Two outstanding unknowns in the biology of photoreceptors are the molecular determinants of cell size, which is remarkably uniform among mammalian species, and the mechanisms of rod cell death associated with inherited neurodegenerative blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. We have addressed both questions by performing an in vivo titration with rhodopsin gene copies in genetically engineered mice that express only normal rhodopsin or an autosomal dominant allele, encoding rhodopsin with a disease-causing P23H substitution. The results reveal that the volume of the rod outer segment is proportional to rhodopsin gene expression; that P23H-rhodopsin, the most common rhodopsin gene disease allele, causes cell death via a dominant-negative mechanism; and that long term survival of rod cells carrying P23H-rhodopsin can be achieved by increasing the levels of wild type rhodopsin. These results point to promising directions in gene therapy for autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by dominant-negative mutations. PMID:23185477

  3. Ecological restoration of a copper polluted vineyard: Long-term impact of farmland abandonment on soil bio-chemical properties and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Manici, Luisa M; Caputo, Francesco; Peruzzi, Elisabetta; Ciavatta, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the degree of interference of high soil copper (Cu) contamination when an old vineyard is converted into a protected area. This study was performed within an intensive agricultural system; it was organized into a two-factorial nested design to analyze the impact of management (conventional vs re-naturalized orchard) and position within each orchard (tree-rows and strips). Chemical and biochemical properties along with bacterial and fungal communities, evaluated with PCR-DGGE starting from total soil DNA, were analyzed. Total Cu was localized in tree rows in the old vineyard at 1000 mg kg(-1) of soil, whereas it did not exceed 80 mg kg(-1) soil in the other treatments. Total organic carbon and all biochemical properties significantly improved in re-naturalized compared to conventionally cultivated site, while no significant differences were observed between tree row and strip. Moreover, a higher extractable carbon-extractable nitrogen (Cext-to-Next) ratio in the re-naturalized (19.3) site than in the conventionally managed site (10.2) indicated a shift of soil system from C-limited to N-limited, confirming a successful ecological restoration. Deep improvement of soil biochemical properties exceeded the negative impact of Cu contamination. A shift of bacterial community composition as well as increased bacterial diversity in Cu contaminated treatment indicated a bacterial response to Cu stress; to the contrary, soil fungi were less susceptible than bacteria, though an overall reduction of fungal DNA was detected. Findings suggest that ecological restoration of highly polluted agricultural soils leads to overcoming the reduction of soil functionalities linked to Cu contamination and opens interesting perspectives for mitigating Cu stress in agricultural soils with strategies based on conservative agriculture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. River restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Angermeier, Paul L.; Bledsoe, Brian; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Macdonnell, Larry; Merritt, David M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Poff, N. Leroy; Tarboton, David

    2005-10-01

    River restoration is at the forefront of applied hydrologic science. However, many river restoration projects are conducted with minimal scientific context. We propose two themes around which a research agenda to advance the scientific basis for river restoration can be built. First, because natural variability is an inherent feature of all river systems, we hypothesize that restoration of process is more likely to succeed than restoration aimed at a fixed end point. Second, because physical, chemical, and biological processes are interconnected in complex ways across watersheds and across timescales, we hypothesize that restoration projects are more likely to be successful in achieving goals if undertaken in the context of entire watersheds. To achieve restoration objectives, the science of river restoration must include (1) an explicit recognition of the known complexities and uncertainties, (2) continued development of a theoretical framework that enables us to identify generalities among river systems and to ask relevant questions, (3) enhancing the science and use of restoration monitoring by measuring the most effective set of variables at the correct scales of measurement, (4) linking science and implementation, and (5) developing methods of restoration that are effective within existing constraints. Key limitations to river restoration include a lack of scientific knowledge of watershed-scale process dynamics, institutional structures that are poorly suited to large-scale adaptive management, and a lack of political support to reestablish delivery of the ecosystem amenities lost through river degradation. This paper outlines an approach for addressing these shortcomings.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Bovine Rhodopsin and Bacteriorhodopsin: Possible Roles in Folding and Function†

    PubMed Central

    Sapra, K. Tanuj; Park, Paul S.-H.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Muller, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interactions and mechanical properties that contribute to the stability and function of proteins are complex and of fundamental importance. In this study, we used single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to explore the interactions and the unfolding energy landscape of bovine rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin. An analysis of the experimental data enabled the extraction of parameters that provided insights into the kinetic stability and mechanical properties of these membrane proteins. Individual structural segments of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin have different properties. A core of rigid structural segments was observed in rhodopsin but not in bacteriorhodopsin. This core may reflect differences in mechanisms of protein folding between the two membrane proteins. The different structural rigidity of the two proteins may also reflect their adaptation to differing functions. PMID:18266338

  6. Transmembrane Helices Tilt, Bend, Slide, Torque, and Unwind between Functional States of Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Ren, Peter X.; Balusu, Rohith; Yang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    The seven-helical bundle of rhodopsin and other G-protein coupled receptors undergoes structural rearrangements as the transmembrane receptor protein is activated. These structural changes are known to involve tilting and bending of various transmembrane helices. However, the cause and effect relationship among structural events leading to a cytoplasmic crevasse for G-protein binding is less well defined. Here we present a mathematical model of the protein helix and a simple procedure to determine multiple parameters that offer precise depiction of a helical conformation. A comprehensive survey of bovine rhodopsin structures shows that the helical rearrangements during the activation of rhodopsin involve a variety of angular and linear motions such as torsion, unwinding, and sliding in addition to the previously reported tilting and bending. These hitherto undefined motion components unify the results obtained from different experimental approaches, and demonstrate conformational similarity between the active opsin structure and the photoactivated structures in crystallo near the retinal anchor despite their marked differences.

  7. The Retromer Complex Is Required for Rhodopsin Recycling and Its Loss Leads to Photoreceptor Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiuan; Tan, Kai Li; Agosto, Melina A.; Xiong, Bo; Yamamoto, Shinya; Sandoval, Hector; Jaiswal, Manish; Bayat, Vafa; Zhang, Ke; Charng, Wu-Lin; David, Gabriela; Duraine, Lita; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Wensel, Theodore G.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin mistrafficking can cause photoreceptor (PR) degeneration. Upon light exposure, activated rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) in Drosophila PRs is internalized via endocytosis and degraded in lysosomes. Whether internalized Rh1 can be recycled is unknown. Here, we show that the retromer complex is expressed in PRs where it is required for recycling endocytosed Rh1 upon light stimulation. In the absence of subunits of the retromer, Rh1 is processed in the endolysosomal pathway, leading to a dramatic increase in late endosomes, lysosomes, and light-dependent PR degeneration. Reducing Rh1 endocytosis or Rh1 levels in retromer mutants alleviates PR degeneration. In addition, increasing retromer abundance suppresses degenerative phenotypes of mutations that affect the endolysosomal system. Finally, expressing human Vps26 suppresses PR degeneration in Vps26 mutant PRs. We propose that the retromer plays a conserved role in recycling rhodopsins to maintain PR function and integrity. PMID:24781186

  8. A rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein immunolocalization.

    PubMed

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Here, we report the DNA sequence of the rhodopsin gene in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta). The primers were designed according to the conserved regions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic rhodopsin-like proteins deposited in the GenBank. The sequence consists of 1,272 bp comprised of 5 introns. The correspondent protein, named Cyanophopsin, showed high identity to rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi, and Algae. At the N-terminal, the protein is characterized by a region with no transmembrane alpha-helices (80 aa), followed by a region with 7alpha-helices (219 aa) and a shorter 35-aa C-terminal region. The DNA sequence of the N-terminal region was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant purified peptide was used as antigen in hens to obtain polyclonal antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence in C. paradoxa cells showed a marked labeling of the muroplast (aka cyanelle) membrane.

  9. Electron density deformations provide new insights into the spectral shift of rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Erix Wiliam; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; López, Rafael; Sánchez-García, Elsa; Montero-Cabrera, Luis Alberto; de la Vega, José Manuel García

    2013-10-30

    Spectral shifts of rhodopsin, which are related to variations of the electron distribution in 11-cis-retinal, are investigated here using the method of deformed atoms in molecules. We found that systems carrying the M207R and S186W mutations display large perturbations of the π-conjugated system with respect to wild-type rhodopsins. These changes agree with the predicted behavior of the bond length alternation (BLA) and the blue shifts of vertical excitation energies of these systems. The effect of the planarity of the central and Schiff-base regions of retinal chain on the electronic structure of the chromophore is also investigated. By establishing nonlinear polynomial relations between BLA, chain distortions, and vertical excitation energies, we are also able to provide a semiquantitative approach for the understanding of the mechanisms regulating spectral shifts in rhodopsin and its mutants.

  10. The kinetics of regeneration of rhodopsin under enzyme-limited availability of 11-cis retinoid.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Trevor D; Corless, Robert M; Pananos, A Demetri

    2015-05-01

    In order to describe the regeneration of rhodopsin and the recovery of visual sensitivity following exposure of the eye to intense bleaching illumination, two models have been proposed, in which there is either a "resistive" or an "enzymatic" limit to the supply of retinoid. A solution has previously been derived for the resistive model, and here we derive an analytical solution for the enzymatic model and we investigate the form of this solution as a function of parameter values. We demonstrate that this enzymatic model provides a good fit to human post-bleach recovery, for four cases: for rhodopsin regeneration in normal subjects; for psychophysical scotopic dark adaptation in normal subjects; for rhodopsin regeneration and scotopic dark adaptation in fundus albipunctatus patients; and for cone pigment regeneration in normal subjects. Finally, we present arguments favouring the enzymatic model as the cellular basis for normal human rod and cone pigment regeneration.

  11. Molecular analysis and genetic mapping of the rhodopsin gene in families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, S.; Wedemann, H.; Samanns, C.; Horn, M.; Schwinger, E.; Gal, A. ); David, D. ); Terwilliger, D.J.; Ott, J. ); Born, L.I. van den )

    1993-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients/families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened for rhodopsin mutations. Direct sequencing revealed 13 different mutations in a total of 14 (i.e., 16%) unrelated patients. Five of these mutations (T4K, Q28H, R135G, F220C, and C222R) have not been reported so far. In addition, multipoint linkage analysis was performed on two large families with autosomal dominant RP due to rhodopsin mutations by using five DNA probes from 3q21-q24. No tight linkage was found between the rhodopsin locus (RHO) and D3S47 ([theta][sub max] = 0.08). By six-point analysis, RHO was localized in the region between D3S21 and D3S47, with a maximum lod score of 13.447 directly at D3S20. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Rhodopsin-Regulated Insulin Receptor Signaling Pathway in Rod Photoreceptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Raju V.S.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The retina is an integral part of the central nervous system and retinal cells are known to express insulin receptors (IR), although their function is not known. This article describes recent studies that link the photoactivation of rhodopsin to tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR and subsequent activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), a neuron survival factor. Our studies suggest that the physiological role of this process is to provide neuroprotection of the retina against light-damage by activating proteins that protect against stress-induced apoptosis. We focus mainly on our recently identified regulation of the IR pathway through the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. Various mutant and knockout proteins of phototransduction cascade have been used to study the light-induced activation of the retinal IR. Our studies suggest that rhodopsin may have additional previously uncharacterized signaling functions in photoreceptors. PMID:20407846

  13. A novel photointermediate of octopus rhodopsin activates its G-protein.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Kikkawa, S; Tominaga, K; Tsugi, N; Tsuda, M

    1998-10-02

    The photointermediate of octopus rhodopsin responsible for G-protein activation was examined by a GTPgammaS-binding assay in a reconstituted system with purified rhodopsin and photoreceptor G-protein. When octopus rhodopsin alone was incubated in the dark after illumination, its ability to stimulate GTPgammaS-binding by the G-protein decreased in a time-dependent manner. We associate this decay with the decay of a novel photointermediate, transient acid metarhodopsin, which lies between mesorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin. Spectroscopic evidence for its existence was suggested by its effects on the turbidity of the vesicles. These results suggest that the transient acid metarhodopsin, not the stable final photoproduct, acid metarhodopsin, activates a G-protein in octopus photoreceptors.

  14. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  15. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  16. FTIR study of the photoreaction of bovine rhodopsin in the presence of hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kota; Furutani, Yuji; Kandori, Hideki

    2010-07-15

    In bovine rhodopsin, 11-cis-retinal forms a Schiff base linkage with Lys296. The Schiff base is not reactive to hydroxylamine in the dark, which is consistent with the well-protected retinal binding site. In contrast, under illumination it easily forms all-trans retinal oxime, resulting in the loss of color. This suggests that activation of rhodopsin creates a specific reaction channel for hydroxylamine or loosens the chromophore binding pocket. In the present study, to extract structural information on the Schiff base vicinity and to understand the changes upon activation of rhodopsin, we compared light-induced FTIR difference spectra of bovine rhodopsin in the presence and absence of hydroxylamine under physiological pH (approximately 7). Although the previous FTIR study did not observe the complex formation between rhodopsin and G-protein transducin in hydrated films, the present study clearly shows that hydrated films can be used for studies of the interaction between rhodopsin and hydroxylamine. Hydroxylamine does not react with the Schiff base of Meta-I intermediate trapped at 240 K, possibly because of decreased conformational motions under the frozen environment, while FTIR spectroscopy showed that hydroxylamine affects the hydrogen bonds of the Schiff base and water molecules in Meta-I. In contrast, formation of the retinal oxime was clearly observed at 280 K, the characteristic temperature of Meta-II accumulation in the absence of hydroxylamine, and time-dependent formation of retinal oxime was observed from Meta-II at 265 K as well. The obtained difference FTIR spectra of retinal oxime and opsin are different from that of Meta-II. It is likely that the antiparallel beta-sheet constituting a part of the retinal binding pocket at the extracellular surface is structurally disrupted in the presence of hydroxylamine, which allows the hydrolysis of the Schiff base into retinal oxime.

  17. MODELLING THE P2Y PURINOCEPTOR USING RHODOPSIN AS TEMPLATE

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhee, A. Michiel; Fischer, Bilha; Van Galen, Philip J. M.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The P2Y1 purinoceptor cloned from chick brain (Webb, T. et al. (1993) FEBS Lett., 324, 219–225) is a 362 amino acid, 41 kDa protein. To locate residues tentatively involved in ligand recognition a molecular model of the P2Y purinoceptor has been constructed. The model was based on the primary sequence and structural homology with the G-protein coupled photoreceptor rhodopsin, in analogy to the method proposed by Ballesteros and Weinstein ((1995) Meth. Neurosci. 25, 366–428). Transmembrane helices were constructed from the amino acid sequence, minimized individually, and positioned in a helical bundle. The helical bundle was then minimized using the Amber forcefield in Discover (BIOSYM Technologies) to obtain the final model. Several residues that have been shown to be critical in ligand binding in other GPCRs are conserved in the P2Y1 purinoceptor. According to our model the side chains of these conserved residues are facing the internal cleft in which ligand binding likely occurs. The model also suggests four basic residues (H121 in TM3, H266 and K269 in TM6 and R299 in TM7) near the extracellular surface that might be involved in ligand binding. These basic residues might be essential in coordinating the triphosphate chain of the endogenous ligand adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). Potential binding sites for agonists have been explored by docking several derivatives (including newly synthesized N6-derivatives) into the model. The N6-phenylethyl substituent is tolerated pharmacologically, and in our model this substituent occupies a region predominantly defined by aromatic residues such as F51 (TM1), Y100 (TM2) and F120 (TM3). The dimethylated analogue of ATP, N6,N6-dimethyl-adenosine 5′-triphosphate, is less well tolerated pharmacologically, and our model predicts that the attenuated activity is due to interference with hydrogen bonding capacity to Q296 (TM7). PMID:8872457

  18. Spectrum of rhodopsin mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Joong; Kim, Cinoo; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Hum; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kimm, Kuchan; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations in patients with mutations. Methods The RHO mutations were screened by direct sequencing, and mutation prevalence was measured in patients and controls. The impact of missense mutations to RP was predicted by segregation analysis, peptide sequence alignment, and in silico analysis. The severity of disease in patients with the missense mutations was compared by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic visual field testing. Results Five heterozygous mutations were identified in six of 302 probands with RP, including a novel mutation (c.893C>A, p.A298D) and four known mutations (c.50C>T, p.T17M; c.533A>G, p.Y178C; c.888G>T, p.K296N; and c.1040C>T, p.P347L). The allele frequency of missense mutations was measured in 114 ethnically matched controls. p.A298D, newly identified in a sporadic patient, had never been found in controls and was predicted to be pathogenic. Among the patients with the missense mutations, we observed the most severe phenotype in patients with p.P347L, less severe phenotypes in patients with p.Y178C or p.A298D, and a relatively moderate phenotype in a patient with p.T17M. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum of RHO mutations in Korean RP patients and clinical features that vary according to mutations. Our findings will be useful for understanding these genetic spectra and the genotype–phenotype correlations and will therefore help with predicting disease prognosis and facilitating the development of gene therapy. PMID:21677794

  19. Low-Temperature Trapping of Photointermediates of the Rhodopsin E181Q Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Megan N.; Greco, Jordan A.; Wagner, Nicole L.; Amora, Tabitha L.; Ramos, Lavoisier A.; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Knox, Barry E.; Birge, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Three active-site components in rhodopsin play a key role in the stability and function of the protein: 1) the counter-ion residues which stabilize the protonated Schiff base, 2) water molecules, and 3) the hydrogen-bonding network. The ionizable residue Glu-181, which is involved in an extended hydrogen-bonding network with Ser-186, Tyr-268, Tyr-192, and key water molecules within the active site of rhodopsin, has been shown to be involved in a complex counter-ion switch mechanism with Glu-113 during the photobleaching sequence of the protein. Herein, we examine the photobleaching sequence of the E181Q rhodopsin mutant by using cryogenic UV-visible spectroscopy to further elucidate the role of Glu-181 during photoactivation of the protein. We find that lower temperatures are required to trap the early photostationary states of the E181Q mutant compared to native rhodopsin. Additionally, a Blue Shifted Intermediate (BSI, λmax = 498 nm, 100 K) is observed after the formation of E181Q Bathorhodopsin (Batho, λmax = 556 nm, 10 K) but prior to formation of E181Q Lumirhodopsin (Lumi, λmax = 506 nm, 220 K). A potential energy diagram of the observed photointermediates suggests the E181Q Batho intermediate has an enthalpy value 7.99 KJ/mol higher than E181Q BSI, whereas in rhodopsin, the BSI is 10.02 KJ/mol higher in enthalpy than Batho. Thus, the Batho to BSI transition is enthalpically driven in E181Q and entropically driven in native rhodopsin. We conclude that the substitution of Glu-181 with Gln-181 results in a significant perturbation of the hydrogen-bonding network within the active site of rhodopsin. In addition, the removal of a key electrostatic interaction between the chromophore and the protein destabilizes the protein in both the dark state and Batho intermediate conformations while having a stabilizing effect on the BSI conformation. The observed destabilization upon this substitution further supports that Glu-181 is negatively charged in the early

  20. Low-Temperature Trapping of Photointermediates of the Rhodopsin E181Q Mutant.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Megan N; Greco, Jordan A; Wagner, Nicole L; Amora, Tabitha L; Ramos, Lavoisier A; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Knox, Barry E; Birge, Robert R

    Three active-site components in rhodopsin play a key role in the stability and function of the protein: 1) the counter-ion residues which stabilize the protonated Schiff base, 2) water molecules, and 3) the hydrogen-bonding network. The ionizable residue Glu-181, which is involved in an extended hydrogen-bonding network with Ser-186, Tyr-268, Tyr-192, and key water molecules within the active site of rhodopsin, has been shown to be involved in a complex counter-ion switch mechanism with Glu-113 during the photobleaching sequence of the protein. Herein, we examine the photobleaching sequence of the E181Q rhodopsin mutant by using cryogenic UV-visible spectroscopy to further elucidate the role of Glu-181 during photoactivation of the protein. We find that lower temperatures are required to trap the early photostationary states of the E181Q mutant compared to native rhodopsin. Additionally, a Blue Shifted Intermediate (BSI, λmax = 498 nm, 100 K) is observed after the formation of E181Q Bathorhodopsin (Batho, λmax = 556 nm, 10 K) but prior to formation of E181Q Lumirhodopsin (Lumi, λmax = 506 nm, 220 K). A potential energy diagram of the observed photointermediates suggests the E181Q Batho intermediate has an enthalpy value 7.99 KJ/mol higher than E181Q BSI, whereas in rhodopsin, the BSI is 10.02 KJ/mol higher in enthalpy than Batho. Thus, the Batho to BSI transition is enthalpically driven in E181Q and entropically driven in native rhodopsin. We conclude that the substitution of Glu-181 with Gln-181 results in a significant perturbation of the hydrogen-bonding network within the active site of rhodopsin. In addition, the removal of a key electrostatic interaction between the chromophore and the protein destabilizes the protein in both the dark state and Batho intermediate conformations while having a stabilizing effect on the BSI conformation. The observed destabilization upon this substitution further supports that Glu-181 is negatively charged in the early

  1. Two-dimensional rhodopsin crystals from disk membranes of frog retinal rod outer segments.

    PubMed Central

    Corless, J M; McCaslin, D R; Scott, B L

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals of rhodopsin have been prepared from purified frog disk membranes by using the detergent Tween 80. The space group of the orthorhombic crystals is p22121; the unit cell dimensions are 47 X 151 A. Projection maps of negatively stained preparations have been calculated to a resolution of approximately 22 A. The rhodopsin molecules are associated as dimers that appear to be slightly sigmoidal and are 20-25 A in width and 70-80 A in length. Images PMID:6175962

  2. Studying the stoichiometries of membrane proteins by mass spectrometry: microbial rhodopsins and a potassium ion channel.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jan; Aslimovska, Lubica; Bamann, Christian; Glaubitz, Clemens; Bamberg, Ernst; Brutschy, Bernd

    2010-04-14

    In the present work we demonstrate the advantages of LILBID mass spectrometry in the mass analysis of membrane proteins with emphasis on ion-pumps and channels. Due to their hydrophobic nature, membrane proteins have to be solubilized by detergents. However, these molecules tend to complicate the analysis by mass spectrometry. In LILBID, detergent molecules are readily tolerated which allows for the study of solution phase quaternary structures of membrane proteins. This is shown for the proton-pump bacteriorhodospin and the potassium channel KcsA where in both cases the stoichiometries found by LILBID reflect the known structures from 2D or 3D crystals. With proteorhodopsin we demonstrate a preliminary detergent screening showing different structures in different detergents and the implications for the functionality of this protein. We show that Triton-X 100 prevents the formation of the pentamer of proteorhodopsin. Furthermore, the quaternary structures of proteorhodopsin cloned without the signal peptide and of the cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 were studied. The intrinsic properties of channelrhodopsin-2 allow for mass spectrometric analysis in very high salt concentrations up to 100 mM of NaCl. In summary we demonstrate that LILBID is an alternative mass spectrometric method for the analysis of membrane proteins from solution phase.

  3. All-optical electrophysiology in mammalian neurons using engineered microbial rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Hochbaum, Daniel R.; Zhao, Yongxin; Farhi, Samouil L.; Klapoetke, Nathan; Werley, Christopher A.; Kapoor, Vikrant; Zou, Peng; Kralj, Joel M.; Maclaurin, Dougal; Smedemark-Margulies, Niklas; Saulnier, Jessica L.; Boulting, Gabriella L.; Straub, Christoph; Cho, Yong Ku; Melkonian, Michael; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Harrison, D. Jed; Murthy, Venkatesh N.; Sabatini, Bernardo; Boyden, Edward S.; Campbell, Robert E.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2014-01-01

    All-optical electrophysiology—spatially resolved simultaneous optical perturbation and measurement of membrane voltage—would open new vistas in neuroscience research. We evolved two archaerhodopsin-based voltage indicators, QuasAr1 and 2, which show improved brightness and voltage sensitivity, microsecond response times, and produce no photocurrent. We engineered a novel channelrhodopsin actuator, CheRiff, which shows improved light sensitivity and kinetics, and spectral orthogonality to the QuasArs. A co-expression vector, Optopatch, enabled crosstalk-free genetically targeted all-optical electrophysiology. In cultured neurons, we combined Optopatch with patterned optical excitation to probe back-propagating action potentials in dendritic spines, synaptic transmission, sub-cellular microsecond-timescale details of action potential propagation, and simultaneous firing of many neurons in a network. Optopatch measurements revealed homeostatic tuning of intrinsic excitability in human stem cell-derived neurons. In brain slice, Optopatch induced and reported action potentials and subthreshold events, with high signal-to-noise ratios. The Optopatch platform enables high-throughput, spatially resolved electrophysiology without use of conventional electrodes. PMID:24952910

  4. Cyclic AMP-dependent activation of rhodopsin gene transcription in cultured retinal precursor cells of chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Pierre; Bernard, Marianne

    2009-07-01

    The present study describes a robust 50-fold increase in rhodopsin gene transcription by cAMP in cultured retinal precursor cells of chicken embryo. Retinal cells isolated at embryonic day 8 (E8) and cultured for 3 days in serum-supplemented medium differentiated mostly into red-sensitive cones and to a lesser degree into green-sensitive cones, as indicated by real-time RT-PCR quantification of each specific opsin mRNA. In contrast, both rhodopsin mRNA concentration and rhodopsin gene promoter activity required the presence of cAMP-increasing agents [forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)] to reach significant levels. This response was rod-specific and was sufficient to activate rhodopsin gene transcription in serum-free medium. The increase in rhodopsin mRNA levels evoked by a series of cAMP analogs suggested the response was mediated by protein kinase A, not by EPAC. Membrane depolarization by high KCl concentration also increased rhodopsin mRNA levels and this response was strongly potentiated by IBMX. The rhodopsin gene response to cAMP-increasing agents was developmentally gated between E6 and E7. Rod-specific transducin alpha subunit mRNA levels also increased up to 50-fold in response to forskolin and IBMX, while rod-specific phosphodiesterase-VI and rod arrestin transcripts increased 3- to 10-fold. These results suggest a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway may play a role in rod differentiation.

  5. Constitutively active rhodopsin mutants causing night blindness are effectively phosphorylated by GRKs but differ in arrestin-1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey. A.; Ostermaier, Martin K.; Singhal, Ankita; Panneels, Valerie; Homan, Kristoff T.; Glukhova, Alisa; Sligar, Stephen G.; Tesmer, John J. G.; Schertler, Gebhard F.X.; Standfuss, Joerg; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of activating mutations associated with night blindness on the stoichiometry of rhodopsin interactions with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) and arrestin-1 have not been reported. Here we show that the monomeric form of WT rhodopsin and its constitutively active mutants M257Y, G90D, and T94I, reconstituted into HDL particles are effectively phosphorylated by GRK1, as well as two more ubiquitously expressed subtypes, GRK2 and GRK5. All versions of arrestin-1 tested (WT, pre-activated, and constitutively monomeric mutants) bind to monomeric rhodopsin and show the same selectivity for different functional forms of rhodopsin as in native disc membranes. Rhodopsin phosphorylation by GRK1 and GRK2 promotes arrestin-1 binding to a comparable extent, whereas similar phosphorylation by GRK5 is less effective, suggesting that not all phosphorylation sites on rhodopsin are equivalent in promoting arrestin-1 binding. The binding of WT arrestin-1 to phospho-opsin is comparable to the binding to its preferred target, P-Rh*, suggesting that in photoreceptors arrestin-1 only dissociates after opsin regeneration with 11-cis-retinal, which converts phospho-opsin into inactive phospho-rhodopsin that has lower affinity for arrestin-1. Reduced binding of arrestin-1 to the phospho-opsin form of G90D mutant likely contributes to night blindness caused by this mutation in humans. PMID:23872075

  6. Mercury-induced dark-state instability and photobleaching alterations of the visual g-protein coupled receptor rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Margarita; Toledo, Darwin; Pérez, Juan Jesús; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2014-07-21

    Mercuric compounds were previously shown to affect the visual phototransduction cascade, and this could result in vision impairment. We have analyzed the effect of mercuric chloride on the structure and stability of the dim light vision photoreceptor rhodopsin. For this purpose, we have used both native rhodopsin immunopurified from bovine retinas and a recombinant mutant rhodopsin carrying several Cys to Ser substitutions in order to investigate the potential binding site of mercury on the receptor. Our results show that mercuric chloride dramatically reduces the stability of dark-state rhodopsin and alters the molecular features of the photoactived conformation obtained upon illumination by eliciting the formation of an altered photointermediate. The thermal bleaching kinetics of native and mutant rhodopsin is markedly accelerated by mercury in a concentration-dependent manner, and its chromophore regeneration ability is severely reduced without significantly affecting its G-protein activation capacity. Furthermore, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements on the retinal release process, ensuing illumination, suggest that mercury impairs complete retinal release from the receptor binding pocket. Our results provide further support for the capacity of mercury as a hazardous metal ion with reported deleterious effect on vision and provide a molecular explanation for such an effect at the rhodopsin photoreceptor level. We suggest that mercury could alter vision by acting in a specific manner on the molecular components of the retinoid cycle, particularly by modifying the ability of the visual photoreceptor protein rhodopsin to be regenerated and to be normally photoactivated by light.

  7. Preservation & Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue on preservation and restoration presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that include Web sites, CD-ROM and software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources as well as classroom activities. Age levels are specified for most materials. I Sidebars discuss restoring a masterpiece, a bug's life,…

  8. Formation and Decay of the Arrestin·Rhodopsin Complex in Native Disc Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Beyrière, Florent; Sommer, Martha E.; Szczepek, Michal; Bartl, Franz J.; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin; Ritter, Eglof

    2015-01-01

    In the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin, light-induced cis/trans isomerization of the retinal ligand triggers a series of distinct receptor states culminating in the active Metarhodopsin II (Meta II) state, which binds and activates the G protein transducin (Gt). Long before Meta II decays into the aporeceptor opsin and free all-trans-retinal, its signaling is quenched by receptor phosphorylation and binding of the protein arrestin-1, which blocks further access of Gt to Meta II. Although recent crystal structures of arrestin indicate how it might look in a precomplex with the phosphorylated receptor, the transition into the high affinity complex is not understood. Here we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to monitor the interaction of arrestin-1 and phosphorylated rhodopsin in native disc membranes. By isolating the unique infrared signature of arrestin binding, we directly observed the structural alterations in both reaction partners. In the high affinity complex, rhodopsin adopts a structure similar to Gt-bound Meta II. In arrestin, a modest loss of β-sheet structure indicates an increase in flexibility but is inconsistent with a large scale structural change. During Meta II decay, the arrestin-rhodopsin stoichiometry shifts from 1:1 to 1:2. Arrestin stabilizes half of the receptor population in a specific Meta II protein conformation, whereas the other half decays to inactive opsin. Altogether these results illustrate the distinct binding modes used by arrestin to interact with different functional forms of the receptor. PMID:25847250

  9. Salt effects on the conformational stability of the visual G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2011-12-07

    Membrane protein stability is a key parameter with important physiological and practical implications. Inorganic salts affect protein stability, but the mechanisms of their interactions with membrane proteins are not completely understood. We have undertaken the study of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, the α-helical membrane protein rhodopsin from vertebrate retina, and explored the effects of inorganic salts on the thermal decay properties of both its inactive and photoactivated states. Under high salt concentrations, rhodopsin significantly increased its activation enthalpy change for thermal bleaching, whereas acid denaturation affected the formation of a denatured loose-bundle state for both the active and inactive conformations. This behavior seems to correlate with changes in protonated Schiff-base hydrolysis. However, chromophore regeneration with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and MetarhodopsinII decay kinetics were slower only in the presence of sodium chloride, suggesting that in this case, the underlying phenomenon may be linked to the activation of rhodopsin and the retinal release processes. Furthermore, the melting temperature, determined by means of circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry measurements, was increased in the presence of high salt concentrations. The observed effects on rhodopsin could indicate that salts favor electrostatic interactions in the retinal binding pocket and indirectly favor hydrophobic interactions at the membrane protein receptor core. These effects can be exploited in applications where the stability of membrane proteins in solution is highly desirable. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Ke, Jiyuan; Eileen Tan, M. H.; Zhang, Chenghai; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Pascal, Bruce; Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Lee, Regina J.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Gu, Xin; Pal, Kuntal; Ma, Jinming; Zhi, Xiaoyong; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Basu, Shibom; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Liu, Haiguang; Lisova, Stella; Kupitz, Christopher; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Raimund; Jiang, Yi; Tan, Minjia; Yang, Huaiyu; Li, Jun; Wang, Meitian; Zheng, Zhong; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Zhao, Yingming; Standfuss, Jörg; Diederichs, Kay; Dong, Yuhui; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Caffrey, Martin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Ernst, Oliver P.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signaling to numerous G protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly, in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including TM7 and Helix 8 to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a ~20° rotation between the N- and C- domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signaling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology. PMID:26200343

  11. Unusual thermal and conformational properties of the rhodopsin congenital night blindness mutant Thr-94 --> Ile.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Eva; del Valle, Luis J; Garriga, Pere

    2003-02-21

    Naturally occurring point mutations in the opsin gene cause the retinal diseases retinitis pigmentosa and congenital night blindness. Although these diseases involve similar mutations in very close locations in rhodopsin, their progression is very different, with retinitis pigmentosa being severe and causing retinal degeneration. We report on the expression and characterization of the recently found T94I mutation associated with congenital night blindness, in the second transmembrane helix or rhodopsin, and mutations at the same site. T94I mutant rhodopsin folded properly and was able to bind 11-cis-retinal to form chromophore, but it showed a blue-shifted visible band at 478 nm and reduced molar extinction coefficient. Furthermore, T94I showed dramatically reduced thermal stability, extremely long lived metarhodopsin II intermediate, and highly increased reactivity toward hydroxylamine in the dark, when compared with wild type rhodopsin. The results are consistent with the location of Thr-94 in close proximity to Glu-113 counterion in the vicinity of the Schiff base linkage and suggest a role for this residue in maintaining the correct dark inactive conformation of the receptor. The reported results, together with previously published data on the other two known congenital night blindness mutants, suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying this disease may not be structural misfolding, as proposed for retinitis pigmentosa mutants, but abnormal functioning of the receptor by decreased thermal stability and/or constitutive activity.

  12. The two parallel photocycles of the Chlamydomonas sensory photoreceptor histidine kinase rhodopsin 1.

    PubMed

    Luck, Meike; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs) belong to a class of unexplored sensory photoreceptors that share a similar modular architecture. The light sensing rhodopsin domain is covalently linked to signal-transducing modules and in some cases to a C-terminal guanylyl-cyclase effector. In spite of their wide distribution in unicellular organisms, very little is known about their physiological role and mechanistic functioning. We investigated the photochemical properties of the recombinant rhodopsin-fragment of Cr-HKR1 originating from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our spectroscopic studies revealed an unusual thermal stability of the photoproducts with the deprotonated retinal Schiff base (RSB). Upon UV-irradiation these Rh-UV states with maximal absorbance in the UVA-region (Rh-UV) photochemically convert to stable blue light absorbing rhodopsin (Rh-Bl) with protonated chromophore. The heterogeneity of the sample is based on two parallel photocycles with the chromophore in C15=N-syn- or -anti-configuration. This report represents an attempt to decipher the underlying reaction schemes and interconversions of the two coexisting photocycles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Constitutive activation of opsin: interaction of mutants with rhodopsin kinase and arrestin.

    PubMed

    Rim, J; Oprian, D D

    1995-09-19

    Mutation of Gly90, Glu113, Ala292, and Lys296 in the visual pigment rhodopsin constitutively activates the protein for activation of the G protein transducin. Three of these mutations have been shown to cause two different human diseases. Mutation of Gly90 and Ala292 results in complete night blindness, and mutation of Lys296 results in the degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa. We show here that the mutants not only constitutively activate transducin but are also constitutively activated for phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. In addition, the phosphorylated mutants are shown to bind tightly to the inhibitory protein arrestin in a reaction that quenches the activity toward transducin. Thus the same mutations that result in constitutive activation of transducin also result in constitutive phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase and binding of arrestin to inhibit the activity. This implies that the same conformational change may be responsible for activation of transducin and rhodopsin kinase. It also suggests that degeneration of photoreceptor cells in retinitis pigmentosa results indirectly from the activated state of the receptor, perhaps as a consequence of phosphorylation and persistent binding of arrestin.

  14. Functional role of positively selected amino acid substitutions in mammalian rhodopsin evolution.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A; Invergo, Brandon M; Ramon, Eva; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Garriga, Pere

    2016-02-11

    Visual rhodopsins are membrane proteins that function as light photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina. Specific amino acids have been positively selected in visual pigments during mammal evolution, which, as products of adaptive selection, would be at the base of important functional innovations. We have analyzed the top candidates for positive selection at the specific amino acids and the corresponding reverse changes (F13M, Q225R and A346S) in order to unravel the structural and functional consequences of these important sites in rhodopsin evolution. We have constructed, expressed and immunopurified the corresponding mutated pigments and analyzed their molecular phenotypes. We find that position 13 is very important for the folding of the receptor and also for proper protein glycosylation. Position 225 appears to be important for the function of the protein affecting the G-protein activation process, and position 346 would also regulate functionality of the receptor by enhancing G-protein activation and presumably affecting protein phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Our results represent a link between the evolutionary analysis, which pinpoints the specific amino acid positions in the adaptive process, and the structural and functional analysis, closer to the phenotype, making biochemical sense of specific selected genetic sequences in rhodopsin evolution.

  15. Effect of photoregeneration on the calculation of the amount of rhodopsin bleached by small flashes.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, J H; Liebman, P A

    1994-01-01

    A sample of rhodopsin that is exposed to a series of small light flashes of equal intensity is expected to bleach in successively smaller decrements in proportion to the remaining unbleached rhodopsin. The exponential depletion law describing this effect has been used as a rapid, convenient, and intuitive method for determining the fraction of rhodopsin bleached per flash. This method is commonly assumed to be free of error provided the amount bleached is small, so that there is no significant photoregeneration. We show here, however, that if there is any photoregeneration, the bleach fraction calculated in this manner can be in error by a factor of two or more, no matter how little rhodopsin is bleached. This flaw occurs insidiously, without perturbing the expected exponentiality of the bleaching decrements, thereby escaping ready notice. The erroneous bleach values readily propagate as underestimates of metarhodopsin and accompanying G-protein equilibrium and kinetic constants. We derive equations for correcting such errors and illustrate how empirical constants can be obtained from experiments that permit the true fraction bleached to be determined. PMID:8130348

  16. The density and photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in the living retina

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M.; Pugh, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    1. The visual pigment in a 5° circular patch of the living human retina 18° temporal from the fovea was studied with the Rushton retinal densitometer. The measuring light (570 nm) was selected to obviate artifacts from colour photoproducts. 2. The action spectrum of a 10% bleach agrees well with the action spectrum at absolute threshold for the same patch of retina. The quantized C.I.E. scotopic spectral sensitivity curve is a good description of both spectra. Therefore, the visual pigment studied must be human rhodopsin. 3. Its density has been estimated in five different ways. The results are in reasonable agreement. The optical density of human rhodopsin in vivo is about 0·35 (common logarithmic units) at its γmax. 4. The photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in vivo was determined by studying its rate of bleaching in response to steps of monochromatic light exposed to the dark adapted eye, by measuring the amount bleached in the steady state by monochromatic lights as well as the amount bleached by 10 sec flashes of white light. 5. The results obtained by the different methods are in good agreement with each other and with previous estimates made by others using white light. 6. The photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in vivo [εγmax = 62,000 to 120,000 l./cm mole] is much higher than expected from in vitro measurements. PMID:4825455

  17. Assembly of an Activated Rhodopsin/Transducin Complex in Nanoscale Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    D’Antona, Aaron M.; Xie, Guifu; Sligar, Stephen G.; Oprian, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    The formation and characterization of an activated complex of the visual pigment rhodopsin and its downstream signaling partner transducin has been the subject of intense focus by several research groups. While the subunit composition of the activated complex is still the subject of some controversy, our laboratory [Xie, G., D’Antona, A. M., Edwards, P. C., Fransen, M., Standfuss, J., Schertler, G. F. X., and Oprian, D. D. (2011) Biochemistry 50, 10399–10407] and that of Ernst et al. [Ernst, O. P., Gramse, V., Kolbe, M., Hofmann, K. P., and Heck, M. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104, 10859–10864] find that the two proteins are present in a 1/1 molar ratio. Unfortunately, these data could not distinguish a 1/1 complex from 2/2 or 3/3 and so on. For this reason, we reinvestigated the issue of stoichiometry in the activated complex, exploiting the ability of Nanodisc lipid bilayers to isolate single molecules of rhodopsin. We show here that the purified complex in Nanodiscs contains an activated rhodopsin with a covalently-bound all-trans-retinal chromophore; that transducin has an empty nucleotide-binding pocket; that the isolated complex is active and dissociates upon addition of guanine nucleotide; and finally that the stoichiometry corresponds to exactly one molecule of rhodopsin and one molecule of transducin. PMID:24328127

  18. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Ke, Jiyuan; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Zhang, Chenghai; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Lee, Regina J.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Gu, Xin; Pal, Kuntal; Ma, Jinming; Zhi, Xiaoyong; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Basu, Shibom; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Coe, Jesse; Liu, Haiguang; Lisova, Stella; Kupitz, Christopher; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Raimund; Jiang, Yi; Tan, Minjia; Yang, Huaiyu; Li, Jun; Wang, Meitian; Zheng, Zhong; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Zhao, Yingming; Standfuss, Jörg; Diederichs, Kay; Dong, Yuhui; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Caffrey, Martin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Ernst, Oliver P.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-07-22

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a ~20° rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. In conclusion, this structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.

  19. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    DOE PAGES

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; ...

    2015-07-22

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a ~20° rotationmore » between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. In conclusion, this structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.« less

  20. Guanylate cyclase 1 relies on rhodopsin for intracellular stability and ciliary trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Pearring, Jillian N; Spencer, William J; Lieu, Eric C; Arshavsky, Vadim Y

    2015-01-01

    Sensory cilia are populated by a select group of signaling proteins that detect environmental stimuli. How these molecules are delivered to the sensory cilium and whether they rely on one another for specific transport remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether the visual pigment, rhodopsin, is critical for delivering other signaling proteins to the sensory cilium of photoreceptor cells, the outer segment. Rhodopsin is the most abundant outer segment protein and its proper transport is essential for formation of this organelle, suggesting that such a dependency might exist. Indeed, we demonstrated that guanylate cyclase-1, producing the cGMP second messenger in photoreceptors, requires rhodopsin for intracellular stability and outer segment delivery. We elucidated this dependency by showing that guanylate cyclase-1 is a novel rhodopsin-binding protein. These findings expand rhodopsin’s role in vision from being a visual pigment and major outer segment building block to directing trafficking of another key signaling protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12058.001 PMID:26590321

  1. Kinetic, energetic, and mechanical differences between dark-state rhodopsin and opsin.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Shiho; Gerstung, Moritz; Colozo, Alejandro T; Helenius, Jonne; Maeda, Akiko; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Park, Paul S-H; Müller, Daniel J

    2013-03-05

    Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor pigment of the retina, initiates vision upon photon capture by its covalently linked chromophore 11-cis-retinal. In the absence of light, the chromophore serves as an inverse agonist locking the receptor in the inactive dark state. In the absence of chromophore, the apoprotein opsin shows low-level constitutive activity. Toward revealing insight into receptor properties controlled by the chromophore, we applied dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the kinetic, energetic, and mechanical differences between dark-state rhodopsin and opsin in native membranes from the retina of mice. Both rhodopsin and opsin are stabilized by ten structural segments. Compared to dark-state rhodopsin, the structural segments stabilizing opsin showed higher interaction strengths and mechanical rigidities and lower conformational variabilities, lifetimes, and free energies. These changes outline a common mechanism toward activating G-protein-coupled receptors. Additionally, we detected that opsin was more pliable and frequently stabilized alternate structural intermediates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Simple purification and functional reconstitution of octopus photoreceptor Gq, which couples rhodopsin to phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, S; Tominaga, K; Nakagawa, M; Iwasa, T; Tsuda, M

    1996-12-10

    In invertebrate photoreceptors, illuminated rhodopsin activates multiple G proteins, which are assumed to initiate multiple phototransduction cascades. In this paper, we focused on one of the phototransduction cascades, which utilizes rhodopsin, a Gq-like G protein, and phospholipase C (PLC). A Gq-like G protein from octopus photoreceptors was successfully purified to apparent homogeneity as an active form by simple two-step chromatography. The purified G protein had an alpha beta gamma-trimeric structure consisting of 44-kDa alpha, 37-kDa beta, and 9-kDa gamma subunits. The 44-kDa alpha subunit was assigned to the Gq class by western blot with antiserum against mammalian Gq alpha and by partial amino acid sequencing of its proteolytic fragments. Light-dependent binding of GTP gamma S was observed when the purified octopus Gq was reconstituted with octopus rhodopsin that had been integrated into phospholipid vesicles. Octopus Gq activated PLC beta 1 purified from bovine brain dose-dependently in the presence of A1F4-. Finally, light- and GTP-dependent activation of PLC beta 1 was observed in a reconstitution system consisting of octopus rhodopsin, Gq, and bovine PLC beta 1.

  3. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhou, X Edward; Gao, Xiang; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W; Ke, Jiyuan; Tan, M H Eileen; Zhang, Chenghai; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M; Pascal, Bruce D; Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Lee, Regina J; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Gu, Xin; Pal, Kuntal; Ma, Jinming; Zhi, Xiaoyong; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Basu, Shibom; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Conrad, Chelsie E; Coe, Jesse; Liu, Haiguang; Lisova, Stella; Kupitz, Christopher; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Raimund; Jiang, Yi; Tan, Minjia; Yang, Huaiyu; Li, Jun; Wang, Meitian; Zheng, Zhong; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Zhao, Yingming; Standfuss, Jörg; Diederichs, Kay; Dong, Yuhui; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Caffrey, Martin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chapman, Henry N; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Ernst, Oliver P; Katritch, Vsevolod; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Griffin, Patrick R; Hubbell, Wayne L; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2015-07-30

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a ∼20° rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.

  4. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  5. Reaction rate and collisional efficiency of the rhodopsin-transducin system in intact retinal rods.

    PubMed Central

    Kahlert, M; Hofmann, K P

    1991-01-01

    A model of transducin activation is constructed from its partial reactions (formation of metarhodopsin II, association, and dissociation of the rhodopsin-transducin complex). The kinetic equations of the model are solved both numerically and, for small photoactivation, analytically. From data on the partial reactions in vitro, rate and activation energy profile of amplified transducin turnover are modeled and compared with measured light-scattering signals of transducin activation in intact retinal rods. The data leave one free parameter, the rate of association between transducin and rhodopsin. Best fit is achieved for an activation energy of 35 kJ/mol, indicating lateral membrane diffusion of the proteins as its main determinant. The absolute value of the association rate is discussed in terms of the success of collisions to form the catalytic complex. It is greater than 30% for the intact retina and 10 times lower after permeabilization with staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin. Dissociation rates for micromolar guanosinetriphosphale (GTP) (Kohl, B., and K. P. Hofmann, 1987. Biophys. J. 52:271-277) must be extrapolated linearly up to the millimolar range to explain the rapid transducin turnover in situ. This is interpreted by an unstable rhodopsin-transducin-GTP transient state. At the time of maximal turnover after a flash, the rate of activation is determined as 30, 120, 800, 2,500, and 4,000 activated transducins per photoactivated rhodopsin and second at 5, 10, 20, 30, 37 degrees C, respectively. PMID:1901231

  6. Ecological and Lineage-Specific Factors Drive the Molecular Evolution of Rhodopsin in Cichlid Fishes.

    PubMed

    Torres-Dowdall, Julián; Henning, Frederico; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2015-11-01

    The visual system in the colorful cichlid fishes from the African great lakes is believed to be important for their adaptive radiations. However, few studies have attempted to compare the visual system of radiating cichlid lineages with that of cichlids that have not undergone recent radiations. One such study published in this journal (Schott RK, Refvik SP, Hauser FE, López-Fernández H, Chang BSW. 2014. Divergent positive selection in rhodopsin from lake and riverine cichlid fishes. Mol Biol Evol. 31:1149-1165) found divergent selection on rhodopsin between African lacustrine and riverine cichlid species and riverine Neotropical cichlids, concluding that ecology drives the molecular evolution of this opsin. Here, we expand this analysis by incorporating rhodopsin sequences from Neotropical lacustrine cichlids and show that both ecology and phylogeny are important drivers of the molecular evolution of rhodopsin in cichlids. We found little overlap of sites under selection between African and Neotropical lineages and a faster rate of molecular evolution in African compared with Neotropical cichlids. These results support the notion that genetic or population genetic features particular to African cichlids contributed to their radiations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Functional role of positively selected amino acid substitutions in mammalian rhodopsin evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A.; Invergo, Brandon M.; Ramon, Eva; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Garriga, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Visual rhodopsins are membrane proteins that function as light photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina. Specific amino acids have been positively selected in visual pigments during mammal evolution, which, as products of adaptive selection, would be at the base of important functional innovations. We have analyzed the top candidates for positive selection at the specific amino acids and the corresponding reverse changes (F13M, Q225R and A346S) in order to unravel the structural and functional consequences of these important sites in rhodopsin evolution. We have constructed, expressed and immunopurified the corresponding mutated pigments and analyzed their molecular phenotypes. We find that position 13 is very important for the folding of the receptor and also for proper protein glycosylation. Position 225 appears to be important for the function of the protein affecting the G-protein activation process, and position 346 would also regulate functionality of the receptor by enhancing G-protein activation and presumably affecting protein phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Our results represent a link between the evolutionary analysis, which pinpoints the specific amino acid positions in the adaptive process, and the structural and functional analysis, closer to the phenotype, making biochemical sense of specific selected genetic sequences in rhodopsin evolution. PMID:26865329

  8. Rhodopsin in plasma from patients with diabetic retinopathy - development and validation of digital ELISA by Single Molecule Array (Simoa) technology.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Eva Rabing Brix; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Christensen, Henry; Hansen, Søren Berndt; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan

    2017-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most frequent cause of blindness among younger adults in the western world. No blood biomarkers exist to detect DR. Hypothetically, Rhodopsin concentrations in blood has been suggested as an early marker for retinal damage. The aim of this study was therefore to develop and validate a Rhodopsin assay by employing digital ELISA technology, and to investigate whether Rhodopsin concentrations in diabetes patients with DR are elevated compared with diabetes patients without DR. A digital ELISA assay using a Simoa HD-1 Analyzer (Quanterix©, Lexington, MA 02421, USA) was developed and validated and applied on a cohort of diabetes patients characterised with (n=466) and without (n=144) DR. The Rhodopsin assay demonstrated a LOD of 0.26ng/l, a LLOQ of 3ng/l and a linear measuring range from 3 to 2500ng/l. Total CV% was 32%, 23%, 19% and 17% respectively at the following Rhodopsin concentrations: 1, 3, 5 and 13ng/l. Recovery was 17%, 34%, 51% and 55% respectively at Rhodopsin concentrations of 2, 10, 50 and 250ng/l. There was no statistically significant difference in the plasma concentration of Rhodopsin between the diabetes patients with or without DR, but significantly increased number of DR patients having concentrations above the LOD. We developed and validated a digital ELISA method for quantification of Rhodopsin in plasma but found no statistically significant difference in the plasma concentration of Rhodopsin between diabetes patients with DR compared to diabetes patients without DR, though significantly more DR patients had values above the LOD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The Roles of Transmembrane Domain Helix-III during Rhodopsin Photoactivation

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Wen-bin; Yi, Tingfang; Kim, Jong-Myoung; Khorana, H. Gobind

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin, the prototypic member of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), undergoes isomerization of 11-cis-retinal to all-trans-retinal upon photoactivation. Although the basic mechanism by which rhodopsin is activated is well understood, the roles of whole transmembrane (TM) helix-III during rhodopsin photoactivation in detail are not completely clear. Principal Findings We herein use single-cysteine mutagenesis technique to investigate conformational changes in TM helices of rhodopsin upon photoactivation. Specifically, we study changes in accessibility and reactivity of cysteine residues introduced into the TM helix-III of rhodopsin. Twenty-eight single-cysteine mutants of rhodopsin (P107C-R135C) were prepared after substitution of all natural cysteine residues (C140/C167/C185/C222/C264/C316) by alanine. The cysteine mutants were expressed in COS-1 cells and rhodopsin was purified after regeneration with 11-cis-retinal. Cysteine accessibility in these mutants was monitored by reaction with 4, 4′-dithiodipyridine (4-PDS) in the dark and after illumination. Most of the mutants except for T108C, G109C, E113C, I133C, and R135C showed no reaction in the dark. Wide variation in reactivity was observed among cysteines at different positions in the sequence 108–135 after photoactivation. In particular, cysteines at position 115, 119, 121, 129, 131, 132, and 135, facing 11-cis-retinal, reacted with 4-PDS faster than neighboring amino acids. The different reaction rates of mutants with 4-PDS after photoactivation suggest that the amino acids in different positions in helix-III are exposed to aqueous environment to varying degrees. Significance Accessibility data indicate that an aqueous/hydrophobic boundary in helix-III is near G109 and I133. The lack of reactivity in the dark and the accessibility of cysteine after photoactivation indicate an increase of water/4-PDS accessibility for certain cysteine-mutants at Helix-III during formation of Meta II. We

  10. How Rhodopsin Tunes the Equilibrium between Protonated and Deprotonated Forms of the Retinal Chromophore.

    PubMed

    van Keulen, Siri C; Solano, Alicia; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2017-09-12

    Rhodopsin is a photoactive G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that converts dim light into a signal for the brain, leading to eyesight. Full activation of this GPCR is achieved after passing through several steps of the protein's photoactivation pathway. Key events of rhodopsin activation are the initial cis-trans photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal moiety followed by conformational rearrangements and deprotonation of the chromophore's protonated Schiff base (PSB), which ultimately lead to full activation in the meta II state. PSB deprotonation is crucial for achieving full activation of rhodopsin; however, the specific structural rearrangements that have to take place to induce this pKa shift are not well understood. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to identify intermediate states after the cis-trans isomerization of rhodopsin's retinal moiety. In order to select the intermediate state in which PSB deprotonation is experimentally known to occur, the validity of the intermediate configurations was checked through an evaluation of the optical properties in comparison with experiment. Subsequently, the selected state was used to investigate the molecular factors that enable PSB deprotonation at body temperature to obtain a better understanding of the difference between the protonated and the deprotonated state of the chromophore. To this end, the deprotonation reaction has been investigated by applying QM/MM MD simulations in combination with thermodynamic integration. The study shows that, compared to the inactive 11-cis-retinal case, trans-retinal rhodopsin is able to undergo PSB deprotonation due to a change in the conformation of the retinal and a consequent alteration in the hydrogen-bond (HB) network in which PSB and the counterion Glu113 are embedded. Besides the retinal moiety and Glu113, also two water molecules as well as Thr94 and Gly90 that are related to congenital night blindness are part of this essential HB

  11. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  12. Relocating the Active-Site Lysine in Rhodopsin: 2. Evolutionary Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Devine, Erin L; Theobald, Douglas L; Oprian, Daniel D

    2016-08-30

    The visual pigment rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor that covalently binds its retinal chromophore via a Schiff base linkage to an active-site Lys residue in the seventh transmembrane helix. Although this residue is strictly conserved among all type II retinylidene proteins, we found previously that the active-site Lys in bovine rhodopsin (Lys296) can be moved to three other locations (G90K, T94K, S186K) while retaining the ability to form a pigment with retinal and to activate transducin in a light-dependent manner [ Devine et al. ( 2013 ) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110 , 13351 - 13355 ]. Because the active-site Lys is not functionally constrained to be in helix seven, it is possible that it could relocate within the protein, most likely via an evolutionary intermediate with two active-site Lys. Therefore, in this study we characterized potential evolutionary intermediates with two Lys in the active site. Four mutant rhodopsins were prepared in which the original Lys296 was left untouched and a second Lys residue was substituted for G90K, T94K, S186K, or F293K. All four constructs covalently bind 11-cis-retinal, form a pigment, and activate transducin in a light-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that rhodopsin can tolerate a second Lys in the retinal binding pocket and suggest that an evolutionary intermediate with two Lys could allow migration of the Schiff base Lys to a position other than the observed, highly conserved location in the seventh TM helix. From sequence-based searches, we identified two groups of natural opsins, insect UV cones and neuropsins, that contain Lys residues at two positions in their active sites and also have intriguing spectral similarities to the mutant rhodopsins studied here.

  13. Evidence against a second autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.; Bhattacharya, S. ); Farrar, J.; Humphries, P. ); Denton, M. ); Gal, A. )

    1993-08-01

    In 1989 McWilliam et al. reported close linkage of the autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) locus to chromosome 3q marker D3S47 in a large Irish pedigree (McWilliam et al 1989). Subsequent studies confirmed linkage in two other adRP families (Lester et al 1990; Olsson et al. 1990). Shortly afterward, utations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, mapping to 3q21-24, were implicated in disease causation, and it is now known that around one-third of adRP results from such mutations (Dryja et al. 1991; Sung et al. 1991; Inglchearn et al. 1992a). At that time, sequencing studies had failed to find rhodopsin mutations in the three families first linked to 3q. Several adRP families in which rhodopsin mutations had been found gave lod scores that, when pooled, had a peak of 4.47 at a theta of .12 (Inglehearn et al. 1992b). The apparent lack of mutations in families TCDM1, adRP3, and 20 together with the linkage data in these and the proved RHO-RP families, led to speculation that two adRP loci existed on chromosome 3q (Olsson et al. 1990; Inglehearn et al. 1992b). However this situation has been reversed by more recent analysis, since rhodopsin mutations have now been found in all three families. There is therefore no longer any evidence to support the hypothesis that a second adRP locus exists close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q.

  14. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  15. Regulation of rhodopsin-eGFP distribution in transgenic xenopus rod outer segments by light.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Mohammad; Calvert, Peter D; Solessio, Eduardo; Pugh, Edward N; Knox, Barry E

    2013-01-01

    The rod outer segment (OS), comprised of tightly stacked disk membranes packed with rhodopsin, is in a dynamic equilibrium governed by a diurnal rhythm with newly synthesized membrane inserted at the OS base balancing membrane loss from the distal tip via disk shedding. Using transgenic Xenopus and live cell confocal imaging, we found OS axial variation of fluorescence intensity in cells expressing a fluorescently tagged rhodopsin transgene. There was a light synchronized fluctuation in intensity, with higher intensity in disks formed at night and lower intensity for those formed during the day. This fluctuation was absent in constant light or dark conditions. There was also a slow modulation of the overall expression level that was not synchronized with the lighting cycle or between cells in the same retina. The axial variations of other membrane-associated fluorescent proteins, eGFP-containing two geranylgeranyl acceptor sites and eGFP fused to the transmembrane domain of syntaxin, were greatly reduced or not detectable, respectively. In acutely light-adapted rods, an arrestin-eGFP fusion protein also exhibited axial variation. Both the light-sensitive Rho-eGFP and arrestin-eGFP banding were in phase with the previously characterized birefringence banding (Kaplan, Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 21, 395-402 1981). In contrast, endogenous rhodopsin did not exhibit such axial variation. Thus, there is an axial inhomogeneity in membrane composition or structure, detectable by the rhodopsin transgene density distribution and regulated by the light cycle, implying a light-regulated step for disk assembly in the OS. The impact of these results on the use of chimeric proteins with rhodopsin fused to fluorescent proteins at the carboxyl terminus is discussed.

  16. Mitogen-associated protein kinase- and protein kinase A-dependent regulation of rhodopsin promoter expression in zebrafish rod photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Jiang; Gao, Yan; Willis, Callie L; Li, Ping; Tiano, Joseph P; Nakamura, Paul A; Hyde, David R; Li, Lei

    2007-02-15

    Mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent signal transductions play important roles in the regulation of gene expression. Both MAPK and PKA pathways can be activated by light exposure. In this study, we investigated the effect of light on MAPK and PKA signal transduction and their roles in the regulation of rhodopsin promoter expression by using transgenic zebrafish [Tg(rhod::GFP)]. The Tg(rhod::GFP) fish express short half-life GFP that is under the transcriptional control of the zebrafish rhodopsin promoter and can therefore be used for in vivo studies of rhodopsin gene transcription in live cells. Blue light plays a role in the regulation of rhodopsin promoter expression via an MAPK-mediated signal transduction cascade. Blue light excites cryptochromes (CRY), which activate the downstream PKC-dependent MAPK signal pathway. White light, on the other hand, regulates rhodopsin promoter expression via a G-protein-coupled cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. White light promotes dopamine release in the retina, which activates dopamine receptors and the downstream PKA pathway. Blocking MAPK signaling diminishes the blue light-induced increases in rhodopsin promoter expression, but this treatment has no effect on white light-mediated rhodopsin promoter expression. Conversely, blocking the PKA pathway diminishes the white light-induced rhodopsin promoter expression but does not affect rhodopsin promoter expression regulated by blue light. Together, the data suggest that MAPK and PKA regulate rhodopsin transcription through parallel signal transduction pathways.

  17. Rhodopsin-stimulated activation-deactivation cycle of transducin: kinetics of the intrinsic fluorescence response of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Guy, P M; Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1990-07-31

    The intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the alpha subunit of transducin (alpha T) has been shown to be sensitive to the binding of guanine nucleotides, with the fluorescence being enhanced by as much as 2-fold upon the binding of GTP or nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues [cf. Phillips and Cerione (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15498-15505]. In this work, we have used these fluorescence changes to analyze the kinetics for the activation (GTP binding)-deactivation (GTPase) cycle of transducin in a well-defined reconstituted phospholipid vesicle system containing purified rhodopsin and the alpha T and beta gamma T subunits of the retinal GTP-binding protein. Both the rate and the extent of the GTP-induced fluorescence enhancement are dependent on [rhodopsin], while only the rate (and not the extent) of the GTP gamma S-induced enhancement is dependent on the levels of rhodopsin. Comparisons of the fluorescence enhancements elicited by GTP gamma S and GTP indicate that the GTP gamma S-induced enhancements directly reflect the GTP gamma S-binding event while the GTP-induced enhancements represent a composite of the GTP-binding and GTP hydrolysis events. At high [rhodopsin], the rates for GTP binding and GTPase are sufficiently different such that the GTP-induced enhancement essentially reflects GTP binding. A fluorescence decay, which always follows the GTP-induced enhancement, directly reflects the GTP hydrolytic event. The rate of the fluorescence decay matches the rate of [32P]Pi production due to [gamma-32P]GTP hydrolysis, and the decay is immediately reversed by rechallenging with GTP. The GTP-induced fluorescence changes (i.e., the enhancement and ensuing decay) could be fit to a simple model describing the activation-deactivation cycle of transducin. The results of this modeling suggest the following points: (1) the dependency of the activation-deactivation cycle on [rhodopsin] can be described by a simple dose response profile; (2) the rate of the rhodopsin

  18. The Severe Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Rhodopsin Mutant Ter349Glu Mislocalizes and Induces Rapid Rod Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, T. J.; Gross, Alecia K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause approximately one-tenth of retinitis pigmentosa cases worldwide, and most result in endoplasmic reticulum retention and apoptosis. Other rhodopsin mutations cause receptor mislocalization, diminished/constitutive activity, or faulty protein-protein interactions. The purpose of this study was to test for mechanisms by which the autosomal dominant rhodopsin mutation Ter349Glu causes an early, rapid retinal degeneration in patients. The mutation adds an additional 51 amino acids to the C terminus of the protein. Folding and ligand interaction of Ter349Glu rhodopsin were tested by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectrophotometry. The ability of the mutant to initiate phototransduction was tested using a radioactive filter binding assay. Photoreceptor localization was assessed both in vitro and in vivo utilizing fluorescent immunochemistry on transfected cells, transgenic Xenopus laevis, and knock-in mice. Photoreceptor ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Spectrally, Ter349Glu rhodopsin behaves similarly to wild-type rhodopsin, absorbing maximally at 500 nm. The mutant protein also displays in vitro G protein activation similar to that of WT. In cultured cells, mislocalization was observed at high expression levels whereas ciliary localization occurred at low expression levels. Similarly, transgenic X. laevis expressing Ter349Glu rhodopsin exhibited partial mislocalization. Analysis of the Ter349Glu rhodopsin knock-in mouse showed a rapid, early onset degeneration in homozygotes with a loss of proper rod outer segment development and improper disc formation. Together, the data show that both mislocalization and rod outer segment morphogenesis are likely associated with the human phenotype. PMID:23940033

  19. Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope Measurement of Local Fundus Reflectance and Autofluorescence Changes Arising from Rhodopsin Bleaching and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We measured the bleaching and regeneration kinetics of rhodopsin in the living human eye with two-wavelength, wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and investigated the effect of rhodopsin bleaching on autofluorescence intensity. Methods. The retina was imaged with an Optos P200C SLO by its reflectance of 532 and 633 nm light, and its autofluorescence excited by 532 nm light, before and after exposure to lights calibrated to bleach rhodopsin substantially. Bleaching was confined to circular retinal regions of 4.8° visual angle located approximately 16° superotemporal and superonasal to fixation. Images were captured as 12-bit tiff files and postprocessed to extract changes in reflectance and autofluorescence. Results. At the locus of bleaching transient increases in reflectance of the 532 nm, but not the 633 nm beam were observed readily and quantified. A transient increase in autofluorescence also occurred. The action spectrum, absolute sensitivity, and recovery of the 532 nm reflectance increase were consistent with previous measurements of human rhodopsin's spectral sensitivity, photosensitivity, and regeneration kinetics. The autofluorescence changes closely tracked the changes in rhodopsin density. Conclusions. The bleaching and regeneration kinetics of rhodopsin can be measured locally in the human retina with a widely available SLO. The increased autofluorescence excited by 532 nm light upon bleaching appears primarily due to transient elimination of rhodopsin's screening of autofluorescent fluorochromes in the RPE. The spatially localized measurement with a widely available SLO of rhodopsin, the most abundant protein in the retina, could be a valuable adjunct to retinal health assessment. PMID:23412087

  20. Role of the C9 methyl group in rhodopsin activation: characterization of mutant opsins with the artificial chromophore 11-cis-9-demethylretinal.

    PubMed

    Han, M; Groesbeek, M; Smith, S O; Sakmar, T P

    1998-01-13

    Activation of the visual pigment rhodopsin involves both steric and electrostatic interactions between the chromophore and opsin within the retinal-binding site. Removal of the C9 methyl group of 11-cis-retinal inhibits light-dependent activation of the G protein, transducin, suggesting a direct steric contact. More recently, we have shown that steric interactions lead to receptor activation when Gly121 in the middle of transmembrane helix 3 is replaced by larger hydrophobic residues. In order to understand in more detail the role of the C9 methyl group of retinal in the structure and function of rhodopsin, we first studied the properties of recombinant 9-dm-Rho (opsin reconstituted with 11-cis-9-demethylretinal). The 9-dm-Rho pigment displayed a blue-shifted lambdamax, increased hydroxylamine reactivity, and decreased ability to activate transducin. These properties are consistent with the hypothesis that the C9 methyl group is a crucial structural anchor for the correct docking of the chromophore in its binding site. Next, we investigated the possible interaction between Gly121 of opsin and the C9 methyl group of retinal by characterizing recombinant pigments produced by combining mutant opsins (G121A, -V, -I, -L, and -W) with 11-cis-9-demethylretinal. Mutant opsins G121I, -L, and -W failed to bind the chromophore. However, the double mutant G121L/F261A bound 11-cis-9-demethylretinal to form a stable pigment with a lambdamax of 451 nm. When activity was assayed in membranes, the reduction in transducin activation by 9-dm-Rho caused by the lack of a C9 methyl group on the chromophore could be partially restored by replacing Gly121 with a bulky residue (leucine, isoleucine, or tryptophan). These results support a model of receptor activation that involves steric interaction between the C9 methyl group of the chromophore and the opsin in the vicinity of Gly121 on transmembrane helix 3.

  1. Properties of a water-soluble, yellow protein isolated from a halophilic phototrophic bacterium that has photochemical activity analogous to sensory rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T E; Yakali, E; Cusanovich, M A; Tollin, G

    1987-01-27

    A water-soluble yellow protein, previously discovered in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Ectothiorhodospira halophila, contains a chromophore which has an absorbance maximum at 446 nm. The protein is now shown to be photoactive. A pulse of 445-nm laser light caused the 446-nm peak to be partially bleached and red-shifted in a time less than 1 microsecond. The intermediate thus formed was subsequently further bleached in the dark in a biphasic process occurring in approximately 20 ms. Finally, the absorbance of native protein was restored in a first-order process occurring over several seconds. These kinetic processes are remarkably similar to those of sensory rhodopsin from Halobacterium, and to a lesser extent bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin; although these proteins are membrane-bound, they have absorbance maxima at about 570 nm, and they cycle more rapidly. In attempts to remove the chromophore for identification, it was found that a variety of methods of denaturation of the protein caused transient or permanent conversion to a form which has an absorbance maximum near 340 nm. Thus, by analogy to the rhodopsins, the absorption at 446 nm in the native protein appears to result from a 106-nm red shift of the chromophore induced by the protein. Acid denaturation followed by extraction with organic solvents established that the chromophore could be removed from the protein. It is not identical with all-trans-retinal and remains to be identified, although it could still be a related pigment. The E. halophila yellow protein has a circular dichroism spectrum which indicates little alpha-helical secondary structure (19%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Microbial community structure and denitrification in a wetland mitigation bank.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Ariane L; Matthews, Jeffrey W; Kent, Angela D

    2010-07-01

    Wetland mitigation is implemented to replace ecosystem functions provided by wetlands; however, restoration efforts frequently fail to establish equivalent levels of ecosystem services. Delivery of microbially mediated ecosystem functions, such as denitrification, is influenced by both the structure and activity of the microbial community. The objective of this study was to compare the relationship between soil and vegetation factors and microbial community structure and function in restored and reference wetlands within a mitigation bank. Microbial community composition was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism targeting the 16S rRNA gene (total bacteria) and the nosZ gene (denitrifiers). Comparisons of microbial function were based on potential denitrification rates. Bacterial community structures differed significantly between restored and reference wetlands; denitrifier community assemblages were similar among reference sites but highly variable among restored sites throughout the mitigation bank. Potential denitrification was highest in the reference wetland sites. These data demonstrate that wetland restoration efforts in this mitigation bank have not successfully restored denitrification and that differences in potential denitrification rates may be due to distinct microbial assemblages observed in restored and reference (natural) wetlands. Further, we have identified gradients in soil moisture and soil fertility that were associated with differences in microbial community structure. Microbial function was influenced by bacterial community composition and soil fertility. Identifying soil factors that are primary ecological drivers of soil bacterial communities, especially denitrifying populations, can potentially aid the development of predictive models for restoration of biogeochemical transformations and enhance the success of wetland restoration efforts.

  3. Microbial Community Structure and Denitrification in a Wetland Mitigation Bank▿

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Ariane L.; Matthews, Jeffrey W.; Kent, Angela D.

    2010-01-01

    Wetland mitigation is implemented to replace ecosystem functions provided by wetlands; however, restoration efforts frequently fail to establish equivalent levels of ecosystem services. Delivery of microbially mediated ecosystem functions, such as denitrification, is influenced by both the structure and activity of the microbial community. The objective of this study was to compare the relationship between soil and vegetation factors and microbial community structure and function in restored and reference wetlands within a mitigation bank. Microbial community composition was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism targeting the 16S rRNA gene (total bacteria) and the nosZ gene (denitrifiers). Comparisons of microbial function were based on potential denitrification rates. Bacterial community structures differed significantly between restored and reference wetlands; denitrifier community assemblages were similar among reference sites but highly variable among restored sites throughout the mitigation bank. Potential denitrification was highest in the reference wetland sites. These data demonstrate that wetland restoration efforts in this mitigation bank have not successfully restored denitrification and that differences in potential denitrification rates may be due to distinct microbial assemblages observed in restored and reference (natural) wetlands. Further, we have identified gradients in soil moisture and soil fertility that were associated with differences in microbial community structure. Microbial function was influenced by bacterial community composition and soil fertility. Identifying soil factors that are primary ecological drivers of soil bacterial communities, especially denitrifying populations, can potentially aid the development of predictive models for restoration of biogeochemical transformations and enhance the success of wetland restoration efforts. PMID:20453124

  4. Model of Abnormal Chromophore-Protein Interaction for Е181К Rhodopsin Mutation: Computer Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Tatyana; Ostrovsky, Mikhail; Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore with the surrounding amino acid residues in the chromophore center of the rhodopsin protein has been investigated for the Е181К mutant form using molecular dynamics simulation. A comparative analysis of the arrangement of the amino acid residues in the chromophore center has been performed for both wild (native) and mutant rhodopsins. It is shown that for the Е181К mutant rhodopsin there is no proper binding of 11-cis-retinal with the surrounding amino acid residues. The distortion of the conformation states in the mutant rhodopsin molecule takes place in both the chromophore center and cytoplasmic domain. Our simulations suggest that a stable covalent linkage of 11-cis-retinal with the protein part (viz. opsin) of the rhodopsin molecule will not form. This, on the other hand, implies that the protein's active site in the cytoplasmic domain, which is responsible for the G-protein binding (so-called transducin), may not be completely blocked.Based on our molecular simulation data, we discuss the possible correlation between retinitis pigmentosa pathogenesis and the structural and functional properties of the rhodopsin protein.

  5. Model of Abnormal Chromophore-Protein Interaction for Е181К Rhodopsin Mutation: Computer Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Tatyana; Ostrovsky, Mikhail; Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore with the surrounding amino acid residues in the chromophore center of the rhodopsin protein has been investigated for the Е181К mutant form using molecular dynamics simulation. A comparative analysis of the arrangement of the amino acid residues in the chromophore center has been performed for both wild (native) and mutant rhodopsins. It is shown that for the Е181К mutant rhodopsin there is no proper binding of 11-cis-retinal with the surrounding amino acid residues. The distortion of the conformation states in the mutant rhodopsin molecule takes place in both the chromophore center and cytoplasmic domain. Our simulations suggest that a stable covalent linkage of 11-cis-retinal with the protein part (viz. opsin) of the rhodopsin molecule will not form. This, on the other hand, implies that the protein’s active site in the cytoplasmic domain, which is responsible for the G-protein binding (so-called transducin), may not be completely blocked. Based on our molecular simulation data, we discuss the possible correlation between retinitis pigmentosa pathogenesis and the structural and functional properties of the rhodopsin protein. PMID:22930661

  6. Structural Mechanism for Light-driven Transport by a New Type of Chloride Ion Pump, Nonlabens marinus Rhodopsin-3.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Toshiaki; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Nakajima, Yu; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; DeLong, Edward F; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Iwasaki, Wataru; Shirouzu, Mikako

    2016-08-19

    The light-driven inward chloride ion-pumping rhodopsin Nonlabens marinus rhodopsin-3 (NM-R3), from a marine flavobacterium, belongs to a phylogenetic lineage distinct from the halorhodopsins known as archaeal inward chloride ion-pumping rhodopsins. NM-R3 and halorhodopsin have distinct motif sequences that are important for chloride ion binding and transport. In this study, we present the crystal structure of a new type of light-driven chloride ion pump, NM-R3, at 1.58 Å resolution. The structure revealed the chloride ion translocation pathway and showed that a single chloride ion resides near the Schiff base. The overall structure, chloride ion-binding site, and translocation pathway of NM-R3 are different from those of halorhodopsin. Unexpectedly, this NM-R3 structure is similar to the crystal structure of the light-driven outward sodium ion pump, Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2. Structural and mutational analyses of NM-R3 revealed that most of the important amino acid residues for chloride ion pumping exist in the ion influx region, located on the extracellular side of NM-R3. In contrast, on the opposite side, the cytoplasmic regions of K. eikastus rhodopsin 2 were reportedly important for sodium ion pumping. These results provide new insight into ion selection mechanisms in ion pumping rhodopsins, in which the ion influx regions of both the inward and outward pumps are important for their ion selectivities.

  7. Structural Mechanism for Light-driven Transport by a New Type of Chloride Ion Pump, Nonlabens marinus Rhodopsin-3*♦

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Toshiaki; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Nakajima, Yu; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; DeLong, Edward F.; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Iwasaki, Wataru; Shirouzu, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The light-driven inward chloride ion-pumping rhodopsin Nonlabens marinus rhodopsin-3 (NM-R3), from a marine flavobacterium, belongs to a phylogenetic lineage distinct from the halorhodopsins known as archaeal inward chloride ion-pumping rhodopsins. NM-R3 and halorhodopsin have distinct motif sequences that are important for chloride ion binding and transport. In this study, we present the crystal structure of a new type of light-driven chloride ion pump, NM-R3, at 1.58 Å resolution. The structure revealed the chloride ion translocation pathway and showed that a single chloride ion resides near the Schiff base. The overall structure, chloride ion-binding site, and translocation pathway of NM-R3 are different from those of halorhodopsin. Unexpectedly, this NM-R3 structure is similar to the crystal structure of the light-driven outward sodium ion pump, Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2. Structural and mutational analyses of NM-R3 revealed that most of the important amino acid residues for chloride ion pumping exist in the ion influx region, located on the extracellular side of NM-R3. In contrast, on the opposite side, the cytoplasmic regions of K. eikastus rhodopsin 2 were reportedly important for sodium ion pumping. These results provide new insight into ion selection mechanisms in ion pumping rhodopsins, in which the ion influx regions of both the inward and outward pumps are important for their ion selectivities. PMID:27365396

  8. Analysis of conformational changes in rhodopsin by histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, David T; Miyagi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) is a technique that measures the exchange of protein hydrogens for deuteriums in a D2O-containing buffer, providing readout of the structural dynamics. Histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (His-HDX-MS) is a variation of this technique that measures the slow HDX of imidazole C2 hydrogens of histidines. This measurement, when accompanied by pH titration, provides both pK as and half-lives (t 1/2) of the HDX reaction for individual histidine residues in proteins. The pK a and t 1/2 values indicate the electrostatic environment and the degree of side-chain solvent accessibility of the histidine residues, respectively. Herein we describe an experimental protocol to characterize rhodopsin by His-HDX-MS. This technique can be used to monitor different states of rhodopsin and might be useful for monitoring longtime scale events in other GPCRs.

  9. Structure of the intersection space associated with ZIE photoisomerization of retinal in rhodopsin proteins.

    PubMed

    Migani, Annapaola; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Ferré, Nicolas; Cembran, Alessandro; Garavelli, Marco; Olivucci, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we employ a CASSCF/AMBER quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics tool to map the intersection space (IS) of a protein. In particular, we provide evidence that the S1 excited-state potential-energy surface of the visual photoreceptor rhodopsin is spanned by an IS segment located right at the bottom of the surface. Analysis of the molecular structures of the protein chromophore (a protonated Schiff base of retinal) along IS reveals a type of geometrical deformation not observed in vacuo. Such a structure suggests that conical intersections mediating different photochemical reactions reside along the same intersection space. This conjecture is investigated by mapping the intersection space of the rhodopsin chromophore model 2-Z-hepta-2,4,6-trieniminium cation and of the conjugated hydrocarbon 3-Z-deca-1,3,5,6,7-pentaene.

  10. Photoreversibility and photostability in films of octopus rhodopsin isolated from octopus photoreceptor membranes.

    PubMed

    Paternolli, Cristina; Neebe, Martin; Stura, Enrico; Barbieri, Francesca; Ghisellini, Paola; Hampp, Norbert; Nicolini, Claudio

    2009-03-15

    In this work, a new biomaterial resulting from the isolation of octopus rhodopsin (OR) starting from octopus photoreceptor membranes is presented. Mass spectroscopic characterization was employed in order to verify the presence of rhodopsin in the extract. Photoreversibility and photochromic properties were investigated using spectrophotometric measurements and pulsed light. Thin films of OR were realized using the gel-matrix entrapment method in polyvinyl alcohol solution. The results indicate that the photoreversibility and the photostability of the OR in gel-matrices are maintained. Several measurements were performed to test the stability of the resulting biomaterial in time and at room temperature. Preliminary tests demonstrate that the photoreversibility and the photostability are still found after few days from the biomaterial preparation and after the exposure for several hours at room temperature.

  11. Thermal destabilization of rhodopsin and opsin by proteolytic cleavage in bovine rod outer segment disk membranes.

    PubMed

    Landin, J S; Katragadda, M; Albert, A D

    2001-09-18

    The G-protein coupled receptor, rhodopsin, consists of seven transmembrane helices which are buried in the lipid bilayer and are connected by loop domains extending out of the hydrophobic core. The thermal stability of rhodopsin and its bleached form, opsin, was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal transitions were asymmetric, and the temperatures of the thermal transitions were scan rate dependent. This dependence exhibited characteristics of a two-state irreversible denaturation in which intermediate states rapidly proceed to the final irreversible state. These studies suggest that the denaturation of both rhodopsin and opsin is kinetically controlled. The denaturation of the intact protein was compared to three proteolytically cleaved forms of the protein. Trypsin removed nine residues of the carboxyl terminus, papain removed 28 residues of the carboxyl terminus and a portion of the third cytoplasmic loop, and chymotrypsin cleaved cytoplasmic loops 2 and 3. In each of these cases the fragments remained associated as a complex in the membrane. DSC studies were carried out on each of the fragmented proteins. In all of the samples the scan rate dependence of the Tm indicated that the transition was kinetically controlled. Trypsin-proteolyzed protein differed little from the intact protein. However, the activation energy for denaturation was decreased when cytoplasmic loop 3 was cleaved by papain or chymotrypsin. This was observed for both bleached and unbleached samples. In the presence of the chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, the noncovalent interactions among the proteolytic fragments produced by papain and chymotrypsin cleavage were sufficiently strong such that each of the complexes denatured as a unit. Upon bleaching, the papain fragments exhibited a single thermal transition. However, after bleaching, the chymotrypsin fragments exhibited two calorimetric transitions. These data suggest that the loops of rhodopsin exert a

  12. Dynamic structure of retinylidene ligand of rhodopsin probed by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Lau, Pick-Wei; Grossfield, Alan; Feller, Scott E; Pitman, Michael C; Brown, Michael F

    2007-09-28

    Rhodopsin is currently the only available atomic-resolution template for understanding biological functions of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. The structural basis for the phenomenal dark state stability of 11-cis-retinal bound to rhodopsin and its ultrafast photoreaction are active topics of research. In particular, the beta-ionone ring of the retinylidene inverse agonist is crucial for the activation mechanism. We analyzed a total of 23 independent, 100 ns all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of rhodopsin embedded in a lipid bilayer in the microcanonical (N,V,E) ensemble. Analysis of intramolecular fluctuations predicts hydrogen-out-of-plane (HOOP) wagging modes of retinal consistent with those found in Raman vibrational spectroscopy. We show that sampling and ergodicity of the ensemble of simulations are crucial for determining the distribution of conformers of retinal bound to rhodopsin. The polyene chain is rigidly locked into a single, twisted conformation, consistent with the function of retinal as an inverse agonist in the dark state. Most surprisingly, the beta-ionone ring is mobile within its binding pocket; interactions are non-specific and the cavity is sufficiently large to enable structural heterogeneity. We find that retinal occupies two distinct conformations in the dark state, contrary to most previous assumptions. The beta-ionone ring can rotate relative to the polyene chain, thereby populating both positively and negatively twisted 6-s-cis enantiomers. This result, while unexpected, strongly agrees with experimental solid-state (2)H NMR spectra. Correlation analysis identifies the residues most critical to controlling mobility of retinal; we find that Trp265 moves away from the ionone ring prior to any conformational transition. Our findings reinforce how molecular dynamics simulations can challenge conventional assumptions for interpreting experimental data, especially where existing models neglect conformational fluctuations.

  13. Determinants of visual pigment absorbance: identification of the retinylidene Schiff's base counterion in bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Nathans, J

    1990-10-16

    The role of negatively charged residues in tuning the absorbance spectrum of bovine rhodopsin has been tested by mutating each aspartate and glutamate to asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Previous work demonstrated that aspartate83, glutamate122, and glutamate134 can be replaced by neutral residues with little or no effect on the absorbance spectrum of the resulting pigment [Nathans, J. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 937-942]. With one exception, mutations at the remaining 19 aspartate and glutamate residues result in very nearly wild-type absorbance spectra. The exception is glutamate113: mutation to glutamine causes the pigment to absorb at 380 nm, reflecting deprotonation of the retinylidene Schiff's base. Upon addition of either chloride, bromide, or iodide, the absorbance rapidly shifts to 495, 498, or 504.5 nm, respectively, reflecting protonation of the Schiff's base. The progressive red shift observed upon addition of halides with larger atomic radii strongly suggests that halides are serving as the Schiff's base counterion. Halides have no effect on the absorbance spectrum of wild-type rhodopsin. I infer, therefore, that glutamate113 is the retinylidene Schiff's base counterion in wild-type rhodopsin. Sakmar et al. [(1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 8309-8313] and Zhukovsky and Oprian [(1989) Science 246, 928-930] have arrived at the same conclusion based upon a related series of experiments. These data support a model in which spectral tuning in bovine rhodopsin results from interactions between the polyene chain of 11-cis-retinal and uncharged amino acids in the binding pocket.

  14. Structural changes of Salinibacter sensory rhodopsin I upon formation of the K and M photointermediates.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sudo, Yuki; Furutani, Yuji; Takahashi, Hazuki; Homma, Michio; Kandori, Hideki

    2008-12-02

    Sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) is one of the most interesting photosensory receptors in nature because of its ability to mediate opposite signals depending on light color by photochromic one-photon and two-photon reactions. Recently, we characterized SRI from eubacterium Salinibacter ruber (SrSRI). This protein allows more detailed information about the structure and structural changes of SRI during its action to be obtained. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is applied to SrSRI, and the spectral changes upon formation of the K and M intermediates are compared with those of other archaeal rhodopsins, SRI from Halobacterium salinarum (HsSRI), sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), bacteriorhodopsin (BR), and halorhodopsin (HR). Spectral comparison of the hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) vibrations of the retinal chromophore in the K intermediates shows that extended choromophore distortion takes place in SrSRI and HsSRI, as well as in SRII, whereas the distortion is localized in the Schiff base region in BR and HR. It appears that sensor and pump functions are distinguishable from the spectral feature of HOOP modes. The HOOP band at 864 cm(-1) in SRII, important for negative phototaxis, is absent in SrSRI, suggesting differences in signal transfer mechanism between SRI and SRII. The strongly hydrogen-bound water molecule, important for proton pumps, is observed at 2172 cm(-1) in SrSRI, as well as in BR and SRII. The formation of the M intermediate accompanies the appearance of peaks at 1753 (+) and 1743 (-) cm(-1), which can be interpreted as the protonation signal of the counterion (Asp72) and the proton release signal from an unidentified carboxylic acid, respectively. The structure and structural changes of SrSRI are discussed on the basis of the present infrared spectral comparisons with other rhodopsins.

  15. Probing conformational changes in rhodopsin using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Orban, Tivadar; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to evaluate changes in protein conformation between two or more states. Here, we describe a complete methodology that can be used to assess conformational changes in rhodopsin accompanying its transition from the inactive to activated state upon light exposure. This approach may be employed to investigate the structure and conformational changes of various membrane proteins.

  16. [Retinitis pigmentosa: results of rhodopsin gene analysis in the Galician population].

    PubMed

    Blanco, M J; Capeans, C; Lareu, M V; Carracedo, A; Piñero, A; Santos, L; Copena, M J; Sánchez-Salorio, M

    2000-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most prevalent inherited degeneration in the retina. The clinical manifestations are variable in terms of severity, age of onset and progression. The clinical variation is paralleled by genetic heterogeneity (more than 20 different loci have been described to date). The aim of this work was to identify mutations in rhodopsin gene and to determine the frequencies of the different genetic forms of RP in the Galician population. 47 previously diagnosed RP patients and their relatives were studied. Genetic forms of RP were identified by recording full family history and clinical examination. DNA samples from patients with RP and control individuals were screened for point mutations in the rhodopsin gene by using PCR SSCPs (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphisms) and direct sequencing in 36 unrelated nonsyndromic RP patients. We report the frequency distribution of the different genetic RP forms. In the SSCPs analysis of rhodopsin gene we found different mobility shifts: one variant in the 5'-untranslated region of the gen and one variant in the third intron. Direct sequencing revealed an A269-->G and an C3982-->T transitions, respectively. Additionally, we observed a single base change in codon 160 (C-->A) of this gene. Polymorphisms are commom findings in the exon 1 and 3 of rhodopsin gene. They are neutral variations and do not represent a change in the protein. No significant differences in the frecuencies of A269-->G and C3982-->T polymorphisms among the three groups of RP patients (ADRP, ARRP, Esporadic RP) and normal individuals were found. There was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium in each genotype in any group.

  17. The Origin of GPCRs: Identification of Mammalian like Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Glutamate and Frizzled GPCRs in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in humans are classified into the five main families named Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled and Secretin according to the GRAFS classification. Previous results show that these mammalian GRAFS families are well represented in the Metazoan lineages, but they have not been shown to be present in Fungi. Here, we systematically mined 79 fungal genomes and provide the first evidence that four of the five main mammalian families of GPCRs, namely Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Glutamate and Frizzled, are present in Fungi and found 142 novel sequences between them. Significantly, we provide strong evidence that the Rhodopsin family emerged from the cAMP receptor family in an event close to the split of Opisthokonts and not in Placozoa, as earlier assumed. The Rhodopsin family then expanded greatly in Metazoans while the cAMP receptor family is found in 3 invertebrate species and lost in the vertebrates. We estimate that the Adhesion and Frizzled families evolved before the split of Unikonts from a common ancestor of all major eukaryotic lineages. Also, the study highlights that the fungal Adhesion receptors do not have N-terminal domains whereas the fungal Glutamate receptors have a broad repertoire of mammalian-like N-terminal domains. Further, mining of the close unicellular relatives of the Metazoan lineage, Salpingoeca rosetta and Capsaspora owczarzaki, obtained a rich group of both the Adhesion and Glutamate families, which in particular provided insight to the early emergence of the N-terminal domains of the Adhesion family. We identified 619 Fungi specific GPCRs across 79 genomes and revealed that Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota phylum have Metazoan-like GPCRs rather than the GPCRs specific for Fungi. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of the presence of four of the five main GRAFS families in Fungi and clarifies the early evolutionary history of the GPCR superfamily. PMID:22238661

  18. Suppressor mutation analysis of the sensory rhodopsin I-transducer complex: insights into the color-sensing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jung, K H; Spudich, J L

    1998-04-01

    The molecular complex containing the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) and transducer protein HtrI (halobacterial transducer for SRI) mediates color-sensitive phototaxis responses in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. One-photon excitation of the complex by orange light elicits attractant responses, while two-photon excitation (orange followed by near-UV light) elicits repellent responses in swimming cells. Several mutations in SRI and HtrI cause an unusual mutant phenotype, called orange-light-inverted signaling, in which the cell produces a repellent response to normally attractant light. We applied a selection procedure for intragenic and extragenic suppressors of orange-light-inverted mutants and identified 15 distinct second-site mutations that restore the attractant response. Two of the 3 suppressor mutations in SRI are positioned at the cytoplasmic ends of helices F and G, and 12 suppressor mutations in HtrI cluster at the cytoplasmic end of the second HtrI transmembrane helix (TM2). Nearly all suppressors invert the normally repellent response to two-photon stimulation to an attractant response when they are expressed with their suppressible mutant alleles or in an otherwise wild-type strain. The results lead to a model for control of flagellar reversal by the SRI-HtrI complex. The model invokes an equilibrium between the A (reversal-inhibiting) and R (reversal-stimulating) conformers of the signaling complex. Attractant light and repellent light shift the equilibrium toward the A and R conformers, respectively, and mutations are proposed to cause intrinsic shifts in the equilibrium in the dark form of the complex. Differences in the strength of the two-photon signal inversion and in the allele specificity of suppression are correlated, and this correlation can be explained in terms of different values of the equilibrium constant (Keq) for the conformational transition in different mutants and mutant-suppressor pairs.

  19. Suppressor Mutation Analysis of the Sensory Rhodopsin I-Transducer Complex: Insights into the Color-Sensing Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Spudich, John L.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular complex containing the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) and transducer protein HtrI (halobacterial transducer for SRI) mediates color-sensitive phototaxis responses in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. One-photon excitation of the complex by orange light elicits attractant responses, while two-photon excitation (orange followed by near-UV light) elicits repellent responses in swimming cells. Several mutations in SRI and HtrI cause an unusual mutant phenotype, called orange-light-inverted signaling, in which the cell produces a repellent response to normally attractant light. We applied a selection procedure for intragenic and extragenic suppressors of orange-light-inverted mutants and identified 15 distinct second-site mutations that restore the attractant response. Two of the 3 suppressor mutations in SRI are positioned at the cytoplasmic ends of helices F and G, and 12 suppressor mutations in HtrI cluster at the cytoplasmic end of the second HtrI transmembrane helix (TM2). Nearly all suppressors invert the normally repellent response to two-photon stimulation to an attractant response when they are expressed with their suppressible mutant alleles or in an otherwise wild-type strain. The results lead to a model for control of flagellar reversal by the SRI-HtrI complex. The model invokes an equilibrium between the A (reversal-inhibiting) and R (reversal-stimulating) conformers of the signaling complex. Attractant light and repellent light shift the equilibrium toward the A and R conformers, respectively, and mutations are proposed to cause intrinsic shifts in the equilibrium in the dark form of the complex. Differences in the strength of the two-photon signal inversion and in the allele specificity of suppression are correlated, and this correlation can be explained in terms of different values of the equilibrium constant (Keq) for the conformational transition in different mutants and mutant-suppressor pairs. PMID:9555883

  20. Removal of the transducer protein from sensory rhodopsin I exposes sites of proton release and uptake during the receptor photocycle.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, K D; Spudich, J L

    1993-01-01

    The phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin-I (SR-I) was genetically truncated in the COOH terminus which leads to overexpression in Halobacterium salinarium and was expressed in the presence and absence of its transducer, HtrI. Pyranine (8-hydroxyl-1,3,6-pyrene-trisulfonate) was used as a pH probe to show that proton release to the bulk phase results from the SR-I587 to S373 photoconversion, but only in the absence of transducer. The stoichiometry is 1 proton/S373 molecule formed. When SR-I is overexpressed in the presence of HtrI, the kinetics of the thermal return of S373 to SR-I587 is biphasic. A kinetic dissection indicates that overexpressed SR-I is present in two pools: one pool which generates an SR-I molecule possessing a normal (i.e., transducer-interacting) pH-independent rate of S373 decay, and a second pool which shows the pH-dependent kinetics of transducer-free S373 decay. The truncated SR-I receptor functions normally based on the following criteria: (i) Truncated SR-I restores phototaxis (attractant and repellent responses) when expressed in a strain lacking native SR-I, but containing HtrI. (ii) The absorption spectrum and the flash-induced absorption difference spectrum are indistinguishable from those of native SR-I. (iii) The rate of decay of S373 is pH-dependent in the absence of HtrI but not in the presence of HtrI. The data presented here indicate that a proton-conducting path exists between the protonated Schiff base nitrogen and the extramembranous environment in the transducer-free receptor, and transducer binding blocks this path. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312493

  1. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  2. Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Provides Insight into the Interactions of Lipids and Cholesterol with Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Joshua N.; Kao, Ta-chun; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Protein function is a complicated interplay between structure and dynamics, which can be heavily influenced by environmental factors and conditions. This is particularly true in the case of membrane proteins, such as the visual receptor rhodopsin. It has been well documented that lipid headgroups, polyunsaturated tails, and the concentration of cholesterol in membranes all play a role in the function of rhodopsin. Recently, we used all-atom simulations to demonstrate that different lipid species have preferential interactions and possible binding sites on rhodopsin’s surface, consistent with experiment. However, the limited timescales of the simulations meant that the statistical uncertainty of these results was substantial. Accordingly, we present here 32 independent 1.6 µs coarse-grained simulations exploring lipids and cholesterols surrounding rhodopsin and opsin, in lipid bilayers mimicking those found naturally. Our results agree with those found experimentally and in previous simulations, but with far better statistical certainty. The results demonstrate the value of combining all-atom and coarse-grained models with experiment to provide a well-rounded view of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:24158802

  3. Nucleotide Bound to rab11a Controls Localization in Rod Cells But Not Interaction with Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Reish, Nicholas J.; Boitet, Evan R.; Bales, Katie L.

    2014-01-01

    Precise vectorial transport of rhodopsin is essential for rod photoreceptor health and function. Mutations that truncate or extend the C terminus of rhodopsin disrupt this transport, and lead to retinal degeneration and blindness in human patients and in mouse models. Here we show that such mutations disrupt the binding of rhodopsin to the small GTPase rab11a. The rhodopsin–rab11a interaction is a direct binding interaction that does not depend on the nucleotide binding state of rab11a. Expression of EGFP-rab11a fusion proteins in Xenopus laevis photoreceptors revealed that the nucleotide binding status of rab11a affects its subcellular localization, with GTP-locked mutants concentrated in the inner segment and GDP-locked mutants concentrated in the outer segment. shRNA-mediated knockdown of rab11a in rods led to shortened outer segments and retinal degeneration. Together, our results show the critical importance of direct rhodopsin–rab11a interactions for the formation and maintenance of vertebrate photoreceptors. PMID:25378153

  4. The structural basis of agonist-induced activation in constitutively active rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Standfuss, Jörg; Edwards, Patricia C; D'Antona, Aaron; Fransen, Maikel; Xie, Guifu; Oprian, Daniel D; Schertler, Gebhard F X

    2011-03-31

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome and mediate cellular responses to an extensive array of hormones, neurotransmitters and sensory stimuli. Although some crystal structures have been determined for GPCRs, most are for modified forms, showing little basal activity, and are bound to inverse agonists or antagonists. Consequently, these structures correspond to receptors in their inactive states. The visual pigment rhodopsin is the only GPCR for which structures exist that are thought to be in the active state. However, these structures are for the apoprotein, or opsin, form that does not contain the agonist all-trans retinal. Here we present a crystal structure at a resolution of 3 Å for the constitutively active rhodopsin mutant Glu 113 Gln in complex with a peptide derived from the carboxy terminus of the α-subunit of the G protein transducin. The protein is in an active conformation that retains retinal in the binding pocket after photoactivation. Comparison with the structure of ground-state rhodopsin suggests how translocation of the retinal β-ionone ring leads to a rotation of transmembrane helix 6, which is the critical conformational change on activation. A key feature of this conformational change is a reorganization of water-mediated hydrogen-bond networks between the retinal-binding pocket and three of the most conserved GPCR sequence motifs. We thus show how an agonist ligand can activate its GPCR.

  5. Retinal ligand mobility explains internal hydration and reconciles active rhodopsin structures.

    PubMed

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Mertz, Blake; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Romo, Tod D; Pitman, Michael C; Feller, Scott E; Grossfield, Alan; Brown, Michael F

    2014-01-21

    Rhodopsin, the mammalian dim-light receptor, is one of the best-characterized G-protein-coupled receptors, a pharmaceutically important class of membrane proteins that has garnered a great deal of attention because of the recent availability of structural information. Yet the mechanism of rhodopsin activation is not fully understood. Here, we use microsecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, validated by solid-state (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, to understand the transition between the dark and metarhodopsin I (Meta I) states. Our analysis of these simulations reveals striking differences in ligand flexibility between the two states. Retinal is much more dynamic in Meta I, adopting an elongated conformation similar to that seen in the recent activelike crystal structures. Surprisingly, this elongation corresponds to both a dramatic influx of bulk water into the hydrophobic core of the protein and a concerted transition in the highly conserved Trp265(6.48) residue. In addition, enhanced ligand flexibility upon light activation provides an explanation for the different retinal orientations observed in X-ray crystal structures of active rhodopsin.

  6. Glutamic acid 181 is negatively charged in the bathorhodopsin photointermediate of visual rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Megan N.; Amora, Tabitha L.; Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Knox, Barry E.; Birge, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Assignment of the protonation state of the residue Glu-181 is important to our understanding of the primary event, activation processes and wavelength selection in rhodopsin. Despite extensive study, there is no general agreement on the protonation state of this residue in the literature. Electronic assignment is complicated by the location of Glu-181 near the nodal point in the electrostatic charge shift that accompanies excitation of the chromophore into the low-lying, strongly allowed ππ* state. Thus, the charge on this residue is effectively hidden from electronic spectroscopy. This situation is resolved in bathorhodopsin, because photoisomerization of the chromophore places Glu-181 well within the region of negative charge shift following excitation. We demonstrate that Glu-181 is negatively charged in bathorhodopsin based on the shift in the batho absorption maxima at 10K [λmax band (native)= 544±2 nm, λmax band (E181Q)= 556±3 nm] and the decrease in the λmax band oscillator strength (0.069±0.004) of E181Q relative to the native protein. Because the primary event in rhodopsin does not include a proton translocation or disruption of the hydrogen-bonding network within the binding pocket, we may conclude that the Glu-181 residue in rhodopsin is also charged. PMID:21319741

  7. Glutamic acid 181 is negatively charged in the bathorhodopsin photointermediate of visual rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Megan N; Amora, Tabitha L; Ramos, Lavoisier S; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Knox, Barry E; Birge, Robert R

    2011-03-09

    Assignment of the protonation state of the residue Glu-181 is important to our understanding of the primary event, activation processes and wavelength selection in rhodopsin. Despite extensive study, there is no general agreement on the protonation state of this residue in the literature. Electronic assignment is complicated by the location of Glu-181 near the nodal point in the electrostatic charge shift that accompanies excitation of the chromophore into the low-lying, strongly allowed ππ* state. Thus, the charge on this residue is effectively hidden from electronic spectroscopy. This situation is resolved in bathorhodopsin, because photoisomerization of the chromophore places Glu-181 well within the region of negative charge shift following excitation. We demonstrate that Glu-181 is negatively charged in bathorhodopsin on the basis of the shift in the batho absorption maxima at 10 K [λ(max) band (native) = 544 ± 2 nm, λ(max) band (E181Q) = 556 ± 3 nm] and the decrease in the λ(max) band oscillator strength (0.069 ± 0.004) of E181Q relative to that of the native protein. Because the primary event in rhodopsin does not include a proton translocation or disruption of the hydrogen-bonding network within the binding pocket, we may conclude that the Glu-181 residue in rhodopsin is also charged.

  8. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; ...

    2015-06-27

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here in this study, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallizationmore » conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.« less

  9. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jorg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valerie

    2015-06-27

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here in this study, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  10. Improvements in G protein-coupled receptor purification yield light stable rhodopsin crystals.

    PubMed

    Salom, David; Le Trong, Isolde; Pohl, Ehmke; Ballesteros, Juan A; Stenkamp, Ronald E; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lodowski, David T

    2006-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of transmembrane signaling proteins and are the target of approximately half of all therapeutic agents. Agonist ligands bind their cognate GPCRs stabilizing the active conformation that is competent to bind G proteins, thus initiating a cascade of intracellular signaling events leading to modification of the cell activity. Despite their biomedical importance, the only known GPCR crystal structures are those of inactive rhodopsin forms. In order to understand how GPCRs are able to transduce extracellular signals across the plasma membrane, it is critical to determine the structure of these receptors in their ligand-bound, active state. Here, we report a novel combination of purification procedures that allowed the crystallization of rhodopsin in two new crystal forms and can be applicable to the purification and crystallization of other membrane proteins. Importantly, these new crystals are stable upon photoactivation and the preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of both photoactivated and ground state rhodopsin crystals are also reported.

  11. The effect of phosphorylation on arrestin-rhodopsin interaction in the squid visual system.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelly A; Ou, Wei-Lin; Guan, Xinyu; Sugamori, Kim S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhishek; Ernst, Oliver P; Mitchell, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Invertebrate visual opsins are G protein-coupled receptors coupled to retinoid chromophores that isomerize reversibly between inactive rhodopsin and active metarhodopsin upon absorption of photons of light. The squid visual system has an arrestin protein that binds to metarhodopsin to block signaling to Gq and activation of phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin kinase (SQRK) can phosphorylate both metarhodopsin and arrestin, a dual role that is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor kinases. The sites and role of arrestin phosphorylation by SQRK were investigated here using recombinant proteins. Arrestin was phosphorylated on serine 392 and serine 397 in the C-terminus. Unphosphorylated arrestin bound to metarhodopsin and phosphorylated metarhodopsin with similar high affinities (Kd 33 and 21 nM respectively), while phosphorylation of arrestin reduced the affinity 3- to 5-fold (Kd 104 nM). Phosphorylation of metarhodopsin slightly increased the dissociation of arrestin observed during a 1 hour incubation. Together these studies suggest a unique role for SQRK in phosphorylating both receptor and arrestin and inhibiting the binding of these two proteins in the squid visual system. Invertebrate visual systems are inactivated by arrestin binding to metarhodopsin that does not require receptor phosphorylation. Here we show that squid rhodopsin kinase phosphorylates arrestin on two serines (S392,S397) in the C-terminus and phosphorylation decreases the affinity of arrestin for squid metarhodopsin. Metarhodopsin phosphorylation has very little effect on arrestin binding but does increase arrestin dissociation. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Retinal Ligand Mobility Explains Internal Hydration and Reconciles Active Rhodopsin Structures

    PubMed Central

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Mertz, Blake; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Romo, Tod D.; Pitman, Michael C.; Feller, Scott E.; Grossfield, Alan; Brown, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the mammalian dim-light receptor, is one of the best-characterized G-protein-coupled receptors, a pharmaceutically important class of membrane proteins that has garnered a great deal of attention because of the recent availability of structural information. Yet the mechanism of rhodopsin activation is not fully understood. Here, we use microsecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, validated by solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, to understand the transition between the dark and metarhodopsin I (Meta I) states. Our analysis of these simulations reveals striking differences in ligand flexibility between the two states. Retinal is much more dynamic in Meta I, adopting an elongated conformation similar to that seen in the recent activelike crystal structures. Surprisingly, this elongation corresponds to both a dramatic influx of bulk water into the hydrophobic core of the protein and a concerted transition in the highly conserved Trp2656.48 residue. In addition, enhanced ligand flexibility upon light activation provides an explanation for the different retinal orientations observed in X-ray crystal structures of active rhodopsin. PMID:24328554

  13. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S W; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-09

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  14. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments. PMID:27934935

  15. Relationship between the excited state relaxation paths of rhodopsin and isorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Strambi, Angela; Coto, Pedro B; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2008-03-19

    The pigment Isorhodopsin, an analogue of the visual pigment Rhodopsin, is investigated via quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics computations based on an ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemical treatment. The limited <5 kcal mol(-1) error found for the spectral parameters allows for a nearly quantitative analysis of the excited-state structure and reactivity of its 9-cis-retinal chromophore. We demonstrate that, similar to Rhodopsin, Isorhodopsin features a shallow photoisomerization path. However, the structure of the reaction coordinate appears to be reversed. In fact, while the coordinate still corresponds to an asynchronous crankshaft motion, the dominant isomerization component involves a counterclockwise, rather than clockwise, twisting of the 9-cis bond. Similarly, the minor component involves a clockwise, rather than counterclockwise, twisting of the 11-trans bond. Ultimately, these results indicate that Rhodopsin and Isorhodopsin relax along a common excited-state potential energy valley starting from opposite ends. The fact that the central and lowest energy region of such valley runs along a segment of the intersection space between the ground and excited states of the protein explains why the pigments decay at distinctive conical intersection structures.

  16. Mutation spectrum of the rhodopsin gene among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Han, L.B.; Cowley, G.S.; McGee, T.L.; Berson, E.L. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150 patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.

  17. Transmembrane Helices Tilt, Bend, Slide, Torque, and Unwind between Functional States of Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhong; Ren, Peter X.; Balusu, Rohith; Yang, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    The seven-helical bundle of rhodopsin and other G-protein coupled receptors undergoes structural rearrangements as the transmembrane receptor protein is activated. These structural changes are known to involve tilting and bending of various transmembrane helices. However, the cause and effect relationship among structural events leading to a cytoplasmic crevasse for G-protein binding is less well defined. Here we present a mathematical model of the protein helix and a simple procedure to determine multiple parameters that offer precise depiction of a helical conformation. A comprehensive survey of bovine rhodopsin structures shows that the helical rearrangements during the activation of rhodopsin involve a variety of angular and linear motions such as torsion, unwinding, and sliding in addition to the previously reported tilting and bending. These hitherto undefined motion components unify the results obtained from different experimental approaches, and demonstrate conformational similarity between the active opsin structure and the photoactivated structures in crystallo near the retinal anchor despite their marked differences. PMID:27658480

  18. Hydrogen bonding changes of internal water molecules in rhodopsin during metarhodopsin I and metarhodopsin II formation.

    PubMed Central

    Rath, P; Delange, F; Degrip, W J; Rothschild, K J

    1998-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a 7-helix, integral membrane protein found in the rod outer segments, which serves as the light receptor in vision. Light absorption by the retinylidene chromophore of rhodopsin triggers an 11-cis-->all-trans isomerization, followed by a series of protein conformational changes, which culminate in the binding and activation of the G-protein transducin by the metarhodopsin II (Meta II) intermediate. Fourier transform IR difference spectroscopy has been used to investigate the structural changes that water, as well as other OH- and NH-containing groups, undergo during the formation of the metarhodopsin I (Meta I) and Meta II intermediates. Bands associated with the OH stretch modes of water are identified by characteristic downshifts upon substitution of H2(18)O for H2O. Compared with earlier work, several negative bands associated with water molecules in unphotolysed rhodopsin were detected, which shift to lower frequencies upon formation of the Meta I and Meta II intermediates. These data indicate that at least one water molecule undergoes an increase in hydrogen bonding upon formation of the Meta I intermediate, while at least one other increases its hydrogen bonding during Meta II formation. Amino acid residue Asp-83, which undergoes a change in its hydrogen bonding during Meta II formation, does not appear to interact with any of the structurally active water molecules. Several NH and/or OH groups, which are inaccessible to hydrogen/deuterium exchange, also undergo alterations during Meta I and Meta II formation. PMID:9445403

  19. Structure and function in rhodopsin. Cysteines 65 and 316 are in proximity in a rhodopsin mutant as indicated by disulfide formation and interactions between attached spin labels.

    PubMed

    Yang, K; Farrens, D L; Altenbach, C; Farahbakhsh, Z T; Hubbell, W L; Khorana, H G

    1996-11-12

    To probe proximity relationships between different amino acids in the interhelical loops in the cytoplasmic domain of rhodopsin, we are using a general approach in which two cysteine residues are introduced at different locations. Here we report on the characteristics of one such mutant that contains the naturally occurring cysteine 316 near the cytoplasmic end of helix G and a second cysteine at position 65 (H65C), near the cytoplasmic end of helix A. The mutant protein after expression in COS-1 cells and reconstitution with 11-cis-retinal can be bound to anti-rhodopsin antibody 1D4-Sepharose at pH 6 in a form that contains the two cysteines in the free sulfhydryl form. In this form, the mutant protein reacts as expected with N-ethylmaleimide in the dark at room temperature and can be derivatized with nitroxide spin labels. However, under appropriate conditions, the mutant can be isolated with the cysteines in the disulfide form, which has been characterized by analysis of fragments produced on proteolysis with thermolysin. A study of the interactions between nitroxide spin labels attached to the two cysteine residues in the mutant protein indicates that in the dark state they are within about 10 A of each other. On illumination the distance between the spin labels increases. Collectively, the above results show that, upon folding of the mutant opsin in vivo, cysteines 65 and 316, and by inference, helices A and G, are in proximal locations and move further apart upon photoactivation.

  20. I. Structural studies on rhodopsin by photoaffinity labeling. II. Bioorganic studies on a rhodopsin analog from a retinal containing a 9-membered ring in the side chain

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, L.

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling of rhodopsin was carried out to identify the amino acids in the binding sites of the retinal and thereby arrive at a possible helical arrangement of the protein. A retinal analog, with a radioactive photolabel (diazoacetate) at position 3 was used for these studies. {sup 14}C label 3S-diazoacetoxy-9-cis-retinal bound to bovine opsin and regenerated a chromophore with {lambda}{sub max} at 465 nm. Photolysis of the complex at 254 nm resulted in covalent crosslinking of the retinal analog to the protein in 18-20% yield. Proteolytic cleavage (V8 protease) of the crosslinked protein and determination of the distribution of radioactivity indicated that both fragments V8-L (Met{sub 1}-Glu{sub 239}) and V8-S (Ser{sub 240}-Clu{sub 341}) were labeled. Further cleavage of labeled V8-S with CNBr (in HCOOH) showed that the major crosslinking sites were contained in a 51 residue peptide in helix 6, CNBr c+d (Val{sub 258}-Met{sub 308}). An attempt was made to construct a chemical model for bathorhodopsin, the primary photochemical intermediate in the bleaching sequence of rhodopsin.

  1. The primary structure of sensory rhodopsin II: a member of an additional retinal protein subgroup is coexpressed with its transducer, the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin II.

    PubMed

    Seidel, R; Scharf, B; Gautel, M; Kleine, K; Oesterhelt, D; Engelhard, M

    1995-03-28

    The blue-light receptor genes (sopII) of sensory rhodopsin (SR) II were cloned from two species, the halophilic bacteria Haloarcula vallismortis (vSR-II) and Natronobacterium pharaonis (pSR-II). Upstream of both sopII gene loci, sequences corresponding to the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin (Htr) II were recognized. In N. pharaonis, psopII and phtrII are transcribed as a single transcript. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of vHtr-II and pHtr-II with Htr-I and the chemotactic methyl-accepting proteins from Escherichia coli revealed considerable identities in the signal domain and methyl-accepting sites. Similarities with Htr-I in Halobacterium salinarium suggest a common principle in the phototaxis of extreme halophiles. Alignment of all known retinal protein sequences from Archaea identifies both SR-IIs as an additional subgroup of the family. Positions defining the retinal binding site are usually identical with the exception of Met-118 (numbering is according to the bacteriorhodopsin sequence), which might explain the typical blue color shift of SR-II to approximately 490 nm. In archaeal retinal proteins, the function can be deduced from amino acids in positions 85 and 96. Proton pumps are characterized by Asp-85 and Asp-96; chloride pumps by Thr-85 and Ala-96; and sensors by Asp-85 and Tyr-96 or Phe-96.

  2. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  3. Ecological restoration

    Treesearch

    Christopher D. Barton; John I. Blake; Donald W. Imm

    2005-01-01

    The long history of human settlement, agriculture, and industry at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has created extensive opportunities for ecological restoration. Two hundred years of farming, drainage, dam construction, stream channeling, fire protection, subsistence hunting and fishing, exotic animal and plant introduction, and selective timber harvesting have caused...

  4. Response of soil microbial communities during changes in land management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The response of soil microbial communities to restoration following disturbances is poorly understood. We studied the soil microbial communities in a forest disturbance-restoration series comprising a native deciduous forest (DF), conventionally tilled cropland (CT) and mid-succession forest (SF) re...

  5. The heat-shock response co-inducer arimoclomol protects against retinal degeneration in rhodopsin retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, D A; Aguila, M; McCulley, C H; Bevilacqua, D; Mendes, H F; Athanasiou, D; Novoselov, S S; Kanuga, N; Munro, P M; Coffey, P J; Kalmar, B; Greensmith, L; Cheetham, M E

    2014-05-22

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases that cause blindness due to the progressive death of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. There are currently no effective treatments for RP. Inherited mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensing protein of rod photoreceptor cells, are the most common cause of autosomal-dominant RP. The majority of mutations in rhodopsin, including the common P23H substitution, lead to protein misfolding, which is a feature in many neurodegenerative disorders. Previous studies have shown that upregulating molecular chaperone expression can delay disease progression in models of neurodegeneration. Here, we have explored the potential of the heat-shock protein co-inducer arimoclomol to ameliorate rhodopsin RP. In a cell model of P23H rod opsin RP, arimoclomol reduced P23H rod opsin aggregation and improved viability of mutant rhodopsin-expressing cells. In P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat models, pharmacological potentiation of the stress response with arimoclomol improved electroretinogram responses and prolonged photoreceptor survival, as assessed by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness in the retina. Furthermore, treated animal retinae showed improved photoreceptor outer segment structure and reduced rhodopsin aggregation compared with vehicle-treated controls. The heat-shock response (HSR) was activated in P23H retinae, and this was enhanced with arimoclomol treatment. Furthermore, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is induced in P23H transgenic rats, was also enhanced in the retinae of arimoclomol-treated animals, suggesting that arimoclomol can potentiate the UPR as well as the HSR. These data suggest that pharmacological enhancement of cellular stress responses may be a potential treatment for rhodopsin RP and that arimoclomol could benefit diseases where ER stress is a factor.

  6. Retinal Dynamics During Light Activation of Rhodopsin Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael F.; Salgado, Gilmar F. J.; Struts, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a canonical member of class A of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) that are implicated in many of the drug interventions in humans and are of great pharmaceutical interest. The molecular mechanism of rhodopsin activation remains unknown as atomistic structural information for the active metarhodopsin II state is currently lacking. Solid-state 2H NMR constitutes a powerful aproarch to study atomic-level dynamics of membrane proteins. In the present application we describe how information is obtained about interactions of the retinal cofactor with rhodopsin that change with light activation of the photoreceptor. The retinal methyl groups play an important role in rhodopsin function by directing conformational changes upon transition into the active state. Site-specific 2H labels have been introduced into the methyl groups of retinal and solid-state 2H NMR methods applied to obtain order parameters and correlation times that quantify the mobility of the cofactor in the inactive dark state, as well as the cryo-trapped metarhodopsin I and metarhodopsin II states. Analysis of the angular-dependent 2H NMR lineshapes for selectively deuterated methyl groups of rhodopsin in aligned membranes enables determination of the average ligand conformation within the binding pocket. The relaxation data suggest that the β-ionone ring is not expelled from its hydrophobic pocket in the transition from the pre-activated metarhodopsin I to the active metarhodopsin II state. Rather, the major structural changes of the retinal cofactor occur already at the metarhodopsin I state in the activation process. The metarhodopsin I to metarhodopsin II transition involves mainly conformational changes of the protein within the membrane lipid bilayer rather than the ligand. The dynamics of the retinylidene methyl groups upon isomerization are explained by an activation mechanism involving cooperative rearrangments of extracellular loop E2 together with transmembrane helices H5 and

  7. Energetics of primary processes in visula escitation: photocalorimetry of rhodopsin in rod outer segment membranes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A; Converse, C A

    1976-07-13

    A sensitive technique for the direct calorimetric determination of the energetics of photochemical reactions under low levels of illumination, and its application to the study of primary processes in visula excitation, are described. Enthlpies are reported for various steps in the bleaching of rhodopsin in intact rod outer segment membranes, together with the heats of appropriate model reactions. Protonation changes are also determined calorimetrically by use of buffers with differing heats of proton ionization. Bleaching of rhodopsin is accompanied by significant uptake of heat energy, vastly in excess of the energy required for simple isomerization of the retinal chromophore. Metarhodopsin I formation involves the uptake of about 17 kcal/mol and no net change in proton ionization of the system. Formation of metarhodopsin II requires an additional energy of about 10 kcal/mol and involves the uptake on one hydrogen ion from solution. The energetics of the overall photolysis reaction, rhodopsin leads to opsin + all-trans-retinal, are pH dependent and involve the exposure of an additional titrating group on opsin. This group has a heat of proton ionization of about 12 kcal/mal, characteristic of a primary amine, but a pKa in the region of neutrality. We suggest that this group is the Schiff base lysine of the chromophore binding site of rhodopsin which becomes exposed on photolysis. The low pKa for this active lysine would result in a more stable retinal-opsin linkage, and might be induced by a nearby positively charged group on the protein (either arginine or a second lysine residue). This leads to a model involving intramolecular protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen in the retinal-opsin linkage of rhodopsin, which is consistent with the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of the system. We further propose that the metarhodopsin I leads to metarhodopsin II step in the bleaching sequence involves reversible hydrolysis of the Schiff base linkage in the

  8. Restoration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  9. Regulatory dissociation of Tctex-1 light chain from dynein complex is essential for the apical delivery of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ting-Yu; Peretti, Diego; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2006-11-01

    Post-Golgi to apical surface delivery in polarized epithelial cells requires the cytoplasmic dynein motor complex. However, the nature of dynein-cargo interactions and their underlying regulation are largely unknown. Previous studies have shown that the apical surface targeting of rhodopsin requires the dynein light chain, Tctex-1, which binds directly to both dynein intermediate chain (IC) and rhodopsin. In this report, we show that the S82E mutant of Tctex-1, which mimics Tctex-1 phosphorylated at serine 82, has a reduced affinity for dynein IC but not for rhodopsin. Velocity sedimentation experiments further suggest that S82E is not incorporated into the dynein complex. The dominant-negative effect of S82E causes rhodopsin mislocalization in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The S82A mutant, which mimics dephosphorylated Tctex-1, can be incorporated into dynein complex but is impaired in its release. Expression of S82A also causes disruption of the apical localization of rhodopsin in MDCK cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the dynein complex disassembles to release cargo due to the specific phosphorylation of Tctex-1 at the S82 residue and that this process is critical for the apical delivery of membrane cargoes.

  10. First cytoplasmic loop of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can function at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Tose, Koji; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are classified into several families based on their amino acid sequences. In family 1, GPCRs such as rhodopsin and adrenergic receptor, the structure-function relationship has been extensively investigated to demonstrate that exposure of the third cytoplasmic loop is essential for selective G protein activation. In contrast, much less is known about other families. Here we prepared chimeric mutants between Gt-coupled rhodopsin and Gi/Go- and Gs-coupled glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor of family 2 and tried to identify the loop region that functions at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin. We succeeded in expressing a mutant having the first cytoplasmic loop of GLP-1 receptor and found that this mutant activated Gi and Go efficiently but did not activate Gt. Moreover, the rhodopsin mutant having the first loop of Gs-coupled secretin receptor of family 2 decreased the Gi and Go activation efficiencies. Therefore, the first loop of GLP-1 receptor would share a similar role to the third loop of rhodopsin in G protein activation. This result strongly suggested that different families of GPCRs have maintained molecular architectures of their ancestral types to generate a common mechanism, namely exposure of the cytoplasmic loop, to activate peripheral G protein.

  11. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  12. Alkylated hydroxylamine derivatives eliminate peripheral retinylidene Schiff bases but cannot enter the retinal binding pocket of light-activated rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Piechnick, Ronny; Heck, Martin; Sommer, Martha E

    2011-08-23

    Besides Lys-296 in the binding pocket of opsin, all-trans-retinal forms adducts with peripheral lysine residues and phospholipids, thereby mimicking the spectral and chemical properties of metarhodopsin species. These pseudophotoproducts composed of nonspecific retinylidene Schiff bases have long plagued the investigation of rhodopsin deactivation and identification of decay products. We discovered that, while hydroxylamine can enter the retinal binding pocket of light-activated rhodopsin, the modified hydroxylamine compounds o-methylhydroxylamine (mHA), o-ethylhydroxylamine (eHA), o-tert-butylhydroxylamine (t-bHA), and o-(carboxymethyl)hydroxylamine (cmHA) are excluded. However, the alkylated hydroxylamines react quickly and efficiently with exposed retinylidene Schiff bases to form their respective retinal oximes. We further investigated how t-bHA affects light-activated rhodopsin and its interaction with binding partners. We found that both metarhodopsin II (Meta II) and Meta III are resistant to t-bHA, and neither arrestin nor transducin binding is affected by t-bHA. This discovery suggests that the hypothetical solvent channel that opens in light-activated rhodopsin is extremely stringent with regard to size and/or polarity. We believe that alkylated hydroxylamines will prove to be extremely useful reagents for the investigation of rhodopsin activation and decay mechanisms. Furthermore, the use of alkylated hydroxylamines should not be limited to in vitro studies and could help elucidate visual signal transduction mechanisms in the living cells of the retina. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Investigation of Thermal Dynamics and Photo-Dynamics of the Rhodopsin Domain of the Rhodopsin-Guanylyl Cyclase from the Nematophagous Fungus Catenaria anguillulae.

    PubMed

    Penzkofer, Alfons; Scheib, Ulrike; Stehfest, Katja; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-10-05

    The rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase from the nematophagous fungus Catenaria anguillulae belongs to a recently discovered class of enzymerhodopsins and may find application as a tool in optogenetics. Here the rhodopsin domain CaRh of the rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase from Catenaria anguillulae was studied by absorption and emission spectroscopic methods. The absorption cross-section spectrum and excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence quantum distributions of CaRh samples were determined (first absorption band in the green spectral region). The thermal stability of CaRh was studied by long-time attenuation measurements at room temperature (20.5 °C) and refrigerator temperature of 3.5 °C. The apparent melting temperature of CaRh was determined by stepwise sample heating up and cooling down (obtained apparent melting temperature: 62 ± 2 °C). The photocycle dynamics of CaRh was investigated by sample excitation to the first inhomogeneous absorption band of the CaRhda dark-adapted state around 590 nm (long-wavelength tail), 530 nm (central region) and 470 nm (short-wavelength tail) and following the absorption spectra development during exposure and after exposure (time resolution 0.0125 s). The original protonated retinal Schiff base PRSBall-trans in CaRhda photo-converted reversibly to protonated retinal Schiff base PRSBall-trans,la1 with restructured surroundings (CaRhla₁ light-adapted state, slightly blue-shifted and broadened first absorption band, recovery to CaRhda with time constant of 0.8 s) and deprotonated retinal Schiff base RSB13-cis (CaRhla₂ light-adapted state, first absorption band in violet to near ultraviolet spectral region, recovery to CaRhda with time constant of 0.35 s). Long-time light exposure of light-adapted CaRhla₁ around 590, 530 and 470 nm caused low-efficient irreversible degradation to photoproducts CaRhprod. Schemes of the primary photocycle dynamics of CaRhda and the secondary photocycle dynamics of CaRhla1 are developed.

  14. Not all butterfly eyes are created equal: rhodopsin absorption spectra, molecular identification, and localization of ultraviolet-, blue-, and green-sensitive rhodopsin-encoding mRNAs in the retina of Vanessa cardui.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Adriana D; Bernard, Gary D; Szeto, Allan S; Nagy, Lisa M; White, Richard H

    2003-04-14

    Surveys of spectral sensitivities, visual pigment spectra, and opsin gene sequences have indicated that all butterfly eyes contain ultraviolet-, blue-, and green-sensitive rhodopsins. Some species also contain a fourth or fifth type, related in amino acid sequence to green-sensitive insect rhodopsins, but red shifted in absorbance. By combining electron microscopy, epi-microspectrophotometry, and polymerase chain reaction cloning, we found that the compound eye of Vanessa cardui has the typical ultrastructural features of the butterfly retina but contains only the three common insect rhodopsins. We estimated lambda-max values and relative densities of the rhodopsins in the Vanessa retina (0.72, P530; 0.12, P470; and 0.15, P360) from microspectrophotometric measurements and calculations based on a computational model of reflectance spectra. We isolated three opsin-encoding cDNA fragments that were identified with P530, P470, and P360 by homology to the well-characterized insect rhodopsin families. The retinal mosaic was mapped by opsin mRNA in situ hybridization and found to contain three kinds of ommatidia with respect to their patterns of short wavelength rhodopsin expression. In some ommatidia, P360 or P470 was expressed in R1 and R2 opposed receptor cells; in others, one cell expressed P360, whereas its complement expressed P470. P530 was expressed in the other seven cells of all ommatidia. P470-expressing cells were abundant in the ventral retina but nearly absent dorsally. Our results indicated that there are major differences between the color vision systems of nymphalid and papilionid butterflies: the nymphalid Vanessa has a simpler, trichromatic, system than do the tetrachromatic papilionids that have been studied. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Rhodopsin in the Dark Hot Sea: Molecular Analysis of Rhodopsin in a Snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, Living near the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Rie; Kabutomori, Ryo; Okano, Keiko; Mitsui, Hiromasa; Takemura, Akihiro; Miwa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Visual systems in deep-sea fishes have been previously studied from a photobiological aspect; however, those of deep-sea fish inhabiting the hydrothermal vents are far less understood due to sampling difficulties. In this study, we analyzed the visual pigment of a deep-sea snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, discovered and collected only near the hydrothermal vents of oceans around Japan. Proteins were solubilized from the C. rhodomelas eyeball and subjected to spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the presence of a pigment characterized by an absorption maximum (λmax) at 480 nm. Immunoblot analysis of the ocular protein showed a rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity. We also isolated a retinal cDNA encoding the entire coding sequence of putative C. rhodomelas rhodopsin (CrRh). HEK293EBNA cells were transfected with the CrRh cDNA and the proteins extracted from the cells were subjected to spectroscopic analysis. The recombinant CrRh showed the absorption maximum at 480 nm in the presence of 11-cis retinal. Comparison of the results from the eyeball extract and the recombinant CrRh strongly suggests that CrRh has an A1-based 11-cis-retinal chromophore and works as a photoreceptor in the C. rhodomelas retina, and hence that C. rhodomelas responds to dim blue light much the same as other deep-sea fishes. Because hydrothermal vent is a huge supply of viable food, C. rhodomelas likely do not need to participate diel vertical migration and may recognize the bioluminescence produced by aquatic animals living near the hydrothermal vents.

  16. Rhodopsin in the Dark Hot Sea: Molecular Analysis of Rhodopsin in a Snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, Living near the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Rie; Kabutomori, Ryo; Okano, Keiko; Mitsui, Hiromasa; Takemura, Akihiro; Miwa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Visual systems in deep-sea fishes have been previously studied from a photobiological aspect; however, those of deep-sea fish inhabiting the hydrothermal vents are far less understood due to sampling difficulties. In this study, we analyzed the visual pigment of a deep-sea snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, discovered and collected only near the hydrothermal vents of oceans around Japan. Proteins were solubilized from the C. rhodomelas eyeball and subjected to spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the presence of a pigment characterized by an absorption maximum (λmax) at 480 nm. Immunoblot analysis of the ocular protein showed a rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity. We also isolated a retinal cDNA encoding the entire coding sequence of putative C. rhodomelas rhodopsin (CrRh). HEK293EBNA cells were transfected with the CrRh cDNA and the proteins extracted from the cells were subjected to spectroscopic analysis. The recombinant CrRh showed the absorption maximum at 480 nm in the presence of 11-cis retinal. Comparison of the results from the eyeball extract and the recombinant CrRh strongly suggests that CrRh has an A1-based 11-cis-retinal chromophore and works as a photoreceptor in the C. rhodomelas retina, and hence that C. rhodomelas responds to dim blue light much the same as other deep-sea fishes. Because hydrothermal vent is a huge supply of viable food, C. rhodomelas likely do not need to participate diel vertical migration and may recognize the bioluminescence produced by aquatic animals living near the hydrothermal vents. PMID:26275172

  17. Forest restoration paradigms

    Treesearch

    John Stanturf; Brian J. Palik; Mary I. Williams; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 2 billion ha of forests are degraded globally and global change suggests even greater need for forest restoration. Four forest restoration paradigms are identified and discussed: revegetation, ecological restoration, functional restoration, and forest landscape restoration. Restoration is examined in terms of a degraded starting point and an ending point...

  18. A role for the cytoplasmic DEAD box helicase Dbp21E2 in rhodopsin maturation and photoreceptor viability

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Karen L.; O’Tousa, Joseph. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Dbp21E2 (Dead box protein 21E2) is a member of a family of DEAD box helicases active in RNA processing and stability. We used genetic mosaics to identify mutants in Dbp21E2 that affect rhodopsin biogenesis and the maintenance of photoreceptor structure. Analysis of a GFP-tagged Rh1 rhodopsin construct placed under control of a heat shock promoter showed that Dbp21E21 fails to efficiently transport Rh1 from the photoreceptor cell body to the rhabdomere. Retinal degeneration is not dependent on the Rh1 transport defects. We also show that GFP- and RFP-tagged Dbp21E2 proteins are localized to discrete cytoplasmic structures that are not associated with organelles known to be active in rhodopsin transport. The molecular genetic analysis described here reveals an unexpected role for the Dbp21E2 helicase and provides an experimental system to further characterize its function. PMID:22794106

  19. Modeling Photo-Bleaching Kinetics to Create High Resolution Maps of Rod Rhodopsin in the Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Martin; Dobrosotskaya, Julia; Cunningham, Denise; Wong, Wai T.; Chew, Emily Y.; Czaja, Wojtek; Bonner, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and describe a novel non-invasive in-vivo method for mapping local rod rhodopsin distribution in the human retina over a 30-degree field. Our approach is based on analyzing the brightening of detected lipofuscin autofluorescence within small pixel clusters in registered imaging sequences taken with a commercial 488nm confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) over a 1 minute period. We modeled the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching by applying variational optimization techniques from applied mathematics. The physical model and the numerical analysis with its implementation are outlined in detail. This new technique enables the creation of spatial maps of the retinal rhodopsin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) bisretinoid distribution with an ≈ 50μm resolution. PMID:26196397

  20. Light activation of rhodopsin: insights from molecular dynamics simulations guided by solid-state NMR distance restraints

    PubMed Central

    Hornak, Viktor; Ahuja, Shivani; Eilers, Markus; Goncalves, Joseph A.; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2009-01-01

    Structural restraints provided by solid-state NMR measurements of the metarhodopsin II intermediate are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to help visualize the structural changes in the light activation of rhodopsin. Since the time scale for the formation of the metarhodopsin II intermediate (> 1 ms) is beyond that readily accessible by molecular dynamics, we use NMR distance restraints derived from 13C dipolar recoupling measurements to guide the simulations. The simulations yield a working model for how photoisomerization of the 11-cis retinylidene chromophore bound within the interior of rhodopsin is coupled to transmembrane helix motion and receptor activation. The mechanism of activation that emerges is that multiple switches on the extracellular (or intradiscal) side of rhodopsin trigger structural changes that converge to disrupt the ionic lock between helices H3 and H6 on the intracellular side of the receptor. PMID:20004206

  1. Structure and function in rhodopsin: Mass spectrometric identification of the abnormal intradiscal disulfide bond in misfolded retinitis pigmentosa mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hwa, John; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Khorana, H. Gobind

    2001-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) point mutations in both the intradiscal (ID) and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin cause partial or complete misfolding of rhodopsin, resulting in loss of 11-cis-retinal binding. Previous work has shown that misfolding is caused by the formation of a disulfide bond in the ID domain different from the native Cys-110–Cys-187 disulfide bond in native rhodopsin. Here we report on direct identification of the abnormal disulfide bond in misfolded RP mutants in the transmembrane domain by mass spectrometric analysis. This disulfide bond is between Cys-185 and Cys-187, the same as previously identified in misfolded RP mutations in the ID domain. The strategy described here should be generally applicable to identification of disulfide bonds in other integral membrane proteins. PMID:11320236

  2. A comparative study of rhodopsin function in the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis): Spectral tuning and light-activated kinetics.

    PubMed

    van Hazel, Ilke; Dungan, Sarah Z; Hauser, Frances E; Morrow, James M; Endler, John A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-07-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating the phototransduction cascade in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Although well-characterized in a few model systems, comparative studies of rhodopsin function, particularly for nonmammalian vertebrates are comparatively lacking. Bowerbirds are rare among passerines in possessing a key substitution, D83N, at a site that is otherwise highly conserved among G protein-coupled receptors. While this substitution is present in some dim-light adapted vertebrates, often accompanying another unusual substitution, A292S, its functional relevance in birds is uncertain. To investigate functional effects associated with these two substitutions, we use the rhodopsin gene from the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis) as a background for site-directed mutagenesis, in vitro expression and functional characterization. We also mutated these sites in two additional rhodopsins that do not naturally possess N83, chicken and bovine, for comparison. Both sites were found to contribute to spectral blue-shifts, but had opposing effects on kinetic rates. Substitutions at site 83 were found to primarily affect the kinetics of light-activated rhodopsin, while substitutions at site 292 had a larger impact on spectral tuning. The contribution of substitutions at site 83 to spectral tuning in particular depended on genetic background, but overall, the effects of substitutions were otherwise surprisingly additive, and the magnitudes of functional shifts were roughly similar across all three genetic backgrounds. By employing a comparative approach with multiple species, our study provides new insight into the joint impact of sites 83 and 292 on rhodopsin structure-function as well as their evolutionary significance for dim-light vision across vertebrates. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  3. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Involvement of distinct arrestin-1 elements in binding to different functional forms of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Tiandi; Chen, Qiuyan; Cho, Min-Kyu; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Iverson, Tina M; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Sanders, Charles R

    2013-01-15

    Solution NMR spectroscopy of labeled arrestin-1 was used to explore its interactions with dark-state phosphorylated rhodopsin (P-Rh), phosphorylated opsin (P-opsin), unphosphorylated light-activated rhodopsin (Rh*), and phosphorylated light-activated rhodopsin (P-Rh*). Distinct sets of arrestin-1 elements were seen to be engaged by Rh* and inactive P-Rh, which induced conformational changes that differed from those triggered by binding of P-Rh*. Although arrestin-1 affinity for Rh* was seen to be low (K(D) > 150 μM), its affinity for P-Rh (K(D) ~80 μM) was comparable to the concentration of active monomeric arrestin-1 in the outer segment, suggesting that P-Rh generated by high-gain phosphorylation is occupied by arrestin-1 under physiological conditions and will not signal upon photo-activation. Arrestin-1 was seen to bind P-Rh* and P-opsin with fairly high affinity (K(D) of~50 and 800 nM, respectively), implying that arrestin-1 dissociation is triggered only upon P-opsin regeneration with 11-cis-retinal, precluding noise generated by opsin activity. Based on their observed affinity for arrestin-1, P-opsin and inactive P-Rh very likely affect the physiological monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium of arrestin-1, and should therefore be taken into account when modeling photoreceptor function. The data also suggested that complex formation with either P-Rh* or P-opsin results in a global transition in the conformation of arrestin-1, possibly to a dynamic molten globule-like structure. We hypothesize that this transition contributes to the mechanism that triggers preferential interactions of several signaling proteins with receptor-activated arrestins.

  5. Variations on a molecular switch: transport and sensory signalling by archaeal rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Spudich, J L

    1998-06-01

    The archaeal rhodopsins are a family of seven-transmembrane-helix, visual pigment-like proteins found in Halobacterium salinarum and related halophilic Archaea. Two, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and halorhodopsin (HR), are transport rhodopsins that carry out light-driven electrogenic translocation of protons and chloride, respectively, across the cell membrane. The other two, sensory rhodopsins I and II (SRI and SRII), are phototaxis receptors that send signals to tightly bound transducer proteins that in turn control a phosphorylation cascade modulating the cell's flagellar motors. Recent progress has cast light on how nature has modified the common design of these proteins to carry out their distinctly different functions: electrogenic ion transport and non-electrogenic signal transduction. A key shared mechanism between BR and SRII appears to be an interhelical salt bridge locked conformational switch that is released by photoisomerization of retinal. In BR disruption of the lock opens a cytoplasmic half-channel that ensures uptake of the transported proton from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane at a critical time in the pumping cycle. Transducer-free SRI uses the same mechanism to carry out light-driven proton transport, but interaction with its transducer blocks the cytoplasmic half-channel thereby interrupting the transport cycle. In SRI, transducer interaction also disrupts the salt bridge in the dark, poising the receptor in an intermediate conformation able to produce opposite signals depending on the colour of the stimulus light. A model for signalling is proposed in which the salt bridge-controlled half-channel is used to modulate interaction with the Htr proteins when the receptor signalling states are formed.

  6. Isolation and functional characterization of a stable complex between photoactivated rhodopsin and the G protein, transducin

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Golczak, Marcin; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Engel, Andreas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Transitory binding between photoactivated rhodopsin (Rho* or Meta II) and the G protein transducin (Gt-GDP) is the first step in the visual signaling cascade. Light causes photoisomerization of the 11-cis-retinylidene chromophore in rhodopsin (Rho) to all-trans-retinylidene, which induces conformational changes that allow Gt-GDP to dock onto the Rho* surface. GDP then dissociates from Gt, leaving a transient nucleotide-empty Rho*-Gte complex before GTP becomes bound, and Gt-GTP then dissociates from Rho*. Further biochemical advances are required before structural studies of the various Rho*-Gt complexes can be initiated. Here, we describe the isolation of n-dodecyl-β-maltoside solubilized, stable, functionally active, Rho*-Gte, Rhoe*-Gte, and 9-cis-retinal/11-cis-retinal regenerated Rho-Gte complexes by sucrose gradient centrifugation. In these complexes, Rho* spectrally remained in its Meta II state, and Gte retained its ability to interact with GTPγS. Removal of all-trans-retinylidene from Rho*-Gte had no effect on the stability of the Rhoe*-Gte complex. Moreover, opsin in the Rhoe*-Gte complex with an empty nucleotide-binding pocket in Gt and an empty retinoid-binding pocket in Rho was regenerated up to 75% without complex dissociation. These results indicate that once Rho* couples with Gt, the chromophore plays a minor role in stabilizing this complex. Moreover, in complexes regenerated with 9-cis-retinal/11-cis-retinal, Rho retains a conformation similar to Rho* that is stabilized by Gte apo-protein.—Jastrzebska, B., Golczak, M., Fotiadis, D., Engel, A., and Palczewski, K.. Isolation and functional characterization of a stable complex between photoactivated rhodopsin and the G protein, transducin. PMID:18827025

  7. Disease progression in patients with dominant retinitis pigmentosa and rhodopsin mutations.

    PubMed

    Berson, Eliot L; Rosner, Bernard; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Dryja, Thaddeus P; Sandberg, Michael A

    2002-09-01

    To measure the rate of progression of retinal degeneration in patients with retinitis pigmentosa due to dominant rhodopsin mutations and to determine whether the rate of progression correlates with the location of the altered amino acid in the rhodopsin molecule. Change in ocular function was observed for an average of 8.7 years in 140 patients. After censoring data to eliminate "ceiling" and "floor" effects, longitudinal rates of change were compared, after weighting by follow-up time and number of visits, with rates inferred from cross-sectional analyses of the data from baseline visits. Mean rates of change were compared among groups of patients with mutations affecting the globule, plug, or C-terminal region of the protein after adjusting for age, gender, and baseline function. Mean annual exponential rates of decline were 1.8% for visual acuity, 2.6% for visual field area, and 8.7% for ERG amplitude. The rates of visual acuity and ERG amplitude decline were significantly faster, and the rate of visual field area decline was significantly slower, than those inferred from baseline visits. Rates of acuity loss did not vary significantly with the region affected by the mutation. In contrast, the mean annual rate of field loss in the C terminus group (7.4%) was significantly faster than that in the globule (1.7%) or plug (1.1%) group. The mean annual rate of ERG decline was also significantly faster in the C terminus group (13.5%) than in the globule (8.5%) or plug (3.7%) groups and significantly faster in the globule group than in the plug group. Rates of decline in visual function for groups of patients with rhodopsin mutations cannot be accurately inferred from cross-sectional analyses of baseline visits. Average rates of decline of visual field area and ERG amplitude are fastest in patients with mutations affecting the C-terminal region.

  8. Ultra-high vacuum surface analysis study of rhodopsin incorporation into supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Michel, Roger; Subramaniam, Varuni; McArthur, Sally L; Bondurant, Bruce; D'Ambruoso, Gemma D; Hall, Henry K; Brown, Michael F; Ross, Eric E; Saavedra, S Scott; Castner, David G

    2008-05-06

    Planar supported lipid bilayers that are stable under ambient atmospheric and ultra-high-vacuum conditions were prepared by cross-linking polymerization of bis-sorbylphosphatidylcholine (bis-SorbPC). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to investigate bilayers that were cross-linked using either redox-initiated radical polymerization or ultraviolet photopolymerization. The redox method yields a more structurally intact bilayer; however, the UV method is more compatible with incorporation of transmembrane proteins. UV polymerization was therefore used to prepare cross-linked bilayers with incorporated bovine rhodopsin, a light-activated, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). A previous study (Subramaniam, V.; Alves, I. D.; Salgado, G. F. J.; Lau, P. W.; Wysocki, R. J.; Salamon, Z.; Tollin, G.; Hruby, V. J.; Brown, M. F.; Saavedra, S. S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5320-5321) showed that rhodopsin retains photoactivity after incorporation into UV-polymerized bis-SorbPC, but did not address how the protein is associated with the bilayer. In this study, we show that rhodopsin is retained in supported bilayers of poly(bis-SorbPC) under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, on the basis of the increase in the XPS nitrogen concentration and the presence of characteristic amino acid peaks in the ToF-SIMS data. Angle-resolved XPS data show that the protein is inserted into the bilayer, rather than adsorbed on the bilayer surface. This is the first study to demonstrate the use of ultra-high-vacuum techniques for structural studies of supported proteolipid bilayers.

  9. Computer Molecular Dynamics Studies on Protein Structures (Visual Pigment Rhodopsin and Cyclin-Dependent Kinases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T.

    2007-05-01

    Based on the computer molecular dynamics (MD) calculations we have simulated for the visual pigment rhodopsin and cyclin-dependent kinase proteins the dynamical and structural properties at reliable physiological temperatures and conditions. MD simulations are carried out on the rhodopsin protein to investigate the conformational changes of the protein in relation to the inclusion of the 11-cis chromophore retinal into consideration. It was demonstrated that the adaptation of the chromophore retinal in the opsin site causes a considerable influence on its protein binding pocket, as well as on conformations of the cytoplasmic part, but the extracelluar part of the protein shows a comparably small changes. On the basis of the simulaton results we discuss some molecular mechanisms for the rhodopsin protein function as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the dark state, i.e. for the chromophore retinal as a ligand-agonist stabilizaing the inactive conformation. The central role that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) play in the timing of cell division and repair and the high incidence of genetic alteration of CDKs or deregulation of CDK inhibitors in a number of cancers make CDC28 of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae very attractive model for studies of mechanisms of CDK regulation. The crystal structure of the human CDK2 has served as a model for the catalytic core of other CDKs, including CDC28. Nanoseconds long molecular dynamics trajectories of the CDK2/ATP complex were analyzed. The MD simulations of substitution CDK2-G16S in conserved G-loop shows an important of this amino acid and a conformational change of CDK2 structure resulting in the moving of the G-loop away from ATP and a new rearrangement of amino acids in the T-loop.

  10. Reversible photocontrol of peptide conformation with a rhodopsin-like photoswitch.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Lomas, Marina; Samanta, Subhas; Campos, Pedro J; Woolley, G Andrew; Sampedro, Diego

    2012-04-25

    Reversible photocontrol of biomolecules requires chromophores that can efficiently undergo large conformational changes upon exposure to wavelengths of light that are compatible with living systems. We designed a benzylidene-pyrroline chromophore that mimics the Schiff base of rhodopsin and can be used to introduce light-switchable intramolecular cross-links in peptides and proteins. This new class of photoswitch undergoes an ~10 Å change in end-to-end distance upon isomerization and can be used to control the conformation of a target peptide efficiently and reversibly using, alternately, violet (400 nm) and blue (446 nm) light.

  11. Quantum-classical model of retinal photoisomerization reaction in visual pigment rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Shigaev, A S; Feldman, T B; Nadtochenko, V A; Ostrovsky, M A

    2016-11-01

    A quantum-classical model of photoisomerization of the visual pigment rhodopsin chromophore is proposed. At certain (and more realistic) parameter value combinations, the model is shown to accurately reproduce a number of independent experimental data on the photoreaction dynamics: the quantum yield, the time to reach the point of conical intersection of potential energy surfaces, the termination time of the evolution of quantum subsystem, as well as the characteristic low frequencies of retinal molecular lattice fluctuations during photoisomerization. In addition, the model behavior is in good accordance with experimental data about coherence and local character of quantum transition.

  12. Models of ionic transport in biological membranes. Raman spectroscopy as a probe of valinomycin, gramicidin A', and rhodopsin conformations.

    PubMed

    Rothschild,