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Sample records for microbiol infect dis

  1. ParaDIS_lib

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Richard D.

    2016-05-25

    The ParaDIS_lib software is a project that is funded by the DOE ASC Program. Its purpose is to provide visualization and analysis capabilities for the existing ParaDIS parallel dislocation dynamics simulation code.

  2. Unparticle physics in DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Yan, Mu-Lin

    2007-10-01

    The unparticle stuff scenario related to the nontrivial IR fixed point in 4D-conformal field theory was recently suggested by Georgi. We illustrate its physical effects in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) process. The possible signals of the unparticle related to parity violation asymmetry in DIS is investigated. It is found out that the behavior of this parity violation signal is sensitive to the value of the scale dimension dU of the unparticle.

  3. Unparticle physics in DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Yan, Mu-Lin

    2007-10-01

    The unparticle stuff scenario related to the nontrivial IR fixed point in 4D-conformal field theory was recently suggested by Georgi. We illustrate its physical effects in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) process. The possible signals of the unparticle related to parity violation asymmetry in DIS is investigated. It is found out that the behavior of this parity violation signal is sensitive to the value of the scale dimension d{sub U} of the unparticle.

  4. Kick Dis Power Puck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    There is a new toy available that can be used to demonstrate many interesting physics principles. It is called the "Kick Dis Power Puck" and is basically a round plastic hovercraft with a soft cushion material around the perimeter (Fig. 1). It is a product of the Estes Company, which is well known for their model rockets, and is available from advertisers in this journal.1,2 The puck has a diameter of 19.5 cm and comes in two colors, red or green. The two samples I purchased had masses of 307 g and 303 g, respectively. There is a forceful, built-in fan, which is run by a rechargeable battery and powers the puck for about 30 minutes. A 9-V battery charger completes the package, which sells for about 45.

  5. [Dis-social personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, E; Herpertz, S C

    2006-05-01

    Deviant behavior is gaining in clinical importance if it is founded on stable, characteristic, and enduring patterns of psychopathologically relevant personality traits which have their onset in childhood or adolescence. The classification of these traits shows variations, so that a distinction between the ICD-10 diagnosis of dis-social personality disorder, DSM-IV diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and the concept "psychopathy" is necessary. Our knowledge about the biological basis of antisocial behavior includes neurophysiologic, psychophysiologic, and genetic findings. Also relevant are results of neurotransmitter studies and structural resp. functional neuroimaging findings. Psychosocial risk factors include parental deficits, rejection, disregard, unstable relations, and abuse. Efficient psychotherapeutic treatment is cognitive-behavioral. Pharmacologic treatment is largely "off-label". The diagnosis of antisocial and dis-social personality disorders allows no conclusions on criminal responsibility. In addition to psychiatric diagnostics, considerations on the severity of the disorder and its effects on the ability to inhibit actions are necessary.

  6. Identities of Dis/Ability and Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Michael; Ridley, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Centring on a small-scale capability-based case study of music provision for adults with profound dis/abilities, this paper considers the significance of music and music education in people's lives. It offers a philosophical defence of music's importance in enjoying a truly human life and then, drawing on an overview of the work of dis/abled…

  7. Treatment of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Block, A; Ferk, G; Beer, B; Vollmar, A; Lutz, H

    1999-09-01

    FeLV infection is still considered to account for most disease-related deaths in pet cats. Different treatment attempts with various drugs were performed in the past but none resulted in healing or complete virus elimination. Therefore, it caused a sensation when Horber and Mayr [Horber, D., Mayr, B., 1991. Prax. 19, 311-314; Horber, D., Schnabl, W., Mayr, B., 1992. Tierarztl. Umschau 47, 556-560; Mayr, B., Horber, D., 1992. Kleintierprax. 37, 515-518] published that they were able to cure 80 to 100% FeLV-infected cats from viremia by using an immunomodulating compound. Articles in cat breeder and cat owner journals appeared assuming that obviously there is a rescue for FeLV-infected cats suffering from this deadly infection. The immunomodulator [Buttner, M., 1993. Comp. Immun. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 18, 1-10] used in those studies was the so-called 'paramunity inducer' PIND-ORF (Baypamun, Bayer, Leverkusen, Germany) consisting of inactivated parapox ovis virus. Since that time, Baypamun is the most commonly used drug for treatment of FeLV infection in Germany and other European countries. Four placebo-controlled double-blind trials were performed to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Baypamun and other compounds in naturally FeLV-infected cats under controlled conditions.

  8. Polarized DIS Structure Functions from Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Del Debbio, L.; Guffanti, A.; Piccione, A.

    2007-06-13

    We present a parametrization of polarized Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (DIS) structure functions based on Neural Networks. The parametrization provides a bias-free determination of the probability measure in the space of structure functions, which retains information on experimental errors and correlations. As an example we discuss the application of this method to the study of the structure function g{sub 1}{sup p}(x,Q{sup 2})

  9. The mouth and dis/ability.

    PubMed

    Liddiard, K; Goodley, D

    2016-06-01

    Our aims in this paper are threefold. First, to understand how the mouth reveals the kinds of human beings that are de/valued in specific national locations and in global discourses with special attention on disability. Second, to subject the mouth to analysis from critical disability studies, specifically, an approach we describe as dis/ability studies. Third, to ask how the mouth might work as a site of resistance for disabled people. The paper begins by providing an introduction to critical disability studies, a perspective that foregrounds disability as the primary focus for thinking through the ways in which the body and society are shaped together. We move in this literature review towards a dis/ability studies approach that recognises the simultaneous processes of disablism (the exclusion of people with impairments) and ableism (the system by which standards of human autonomy and capability are made as key indicators of human worth). We then analyse the mouth in relation to pathologisation, human enhancement and resistance. We conclude with some final thoughts on the offerings of a dis/ability studies approach to those of interested with the intersections of the mouth and society.

  10. Small-x DIS in NLO

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2011-04-01

    Deep inelastic scattering in the saturation region (for small $x$ and/or large nucleus) is described by the evolution of color dipoles. In the leading order this evolution is governed by the non-linear BK equation. To see if this equation is relevant for existing or future DIS accelerators (like EIC or LHeC) one needs to know how big are the next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections. I review the calculation of the NLO corrections to high-energy amplitudes in QCD.

  11. Two-Photon Exchange in (Semi-)Inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, M.; Metz, A.

    2009-08-04

    In this note we consider effects of a Two-Photon Exchange (TPE) in inclusive DIS and semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS). In particular, transverse single spin asymmetries are generated in inclusive DIS if more than one photon is exchanged between the lepton and the hadron. We briefly summarize the TPE in DIS in the parton model and extend our approach to SIDIS, where a new leading twist sin(2{phi}) contribution to the longitudinal beam spin asymmetry shows up. Possible TPE effects for the Sivers and the Collins asymmetries in SIDIS are power-suppressed.

  12. Two-Photon Exchange in (Semi-)Inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Marc; Metz, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    In this note we consider effects of a Two-Photon Exchange (TPE) in inclusive DIS and semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS). In particular, transverse single spin asymmetries are generated in inclusive DIS if more than one photon is exchanged between the lepton and the hadron. We briefly summarize the TPE in DIS in the parton model and extend our approach to SIDIS, where a new leading twist $\\sin(2\\phi)$ contribution to the longitudinal beam spin asymmetry shows up. Possible TPE effects for the Sivers and the Collins asymmetries in SIDIS are power-suppressed.

  13. Development of a government-owned DIS visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, Paul

    1997-06-01

    Amherst Systems, Inc., under the sponsorship of Rome Laboratory, has developed a visualization tool for use within both the DIS and the simulation and modeling communities. This product uses the IVIEW2000 software provided by the Air Force's National Air Intelligence Center (NAIC). The capabilities of IVIEW2000, combined with a DIS interface, provide analysts and developers with a free, government-owned visualization tool for the evaluation of DIS exercises. IVIEW2000 is a software package providing a visualization environment for engagement reconstruction used by the simulation, modeling and analysis community. IVIEW2000 provides many different viewing capabilities, access to player data, and a fully featured control panel with VCR-like functions. It allows analysts to view the entire or selected portions of the scenario from a variety of different angles simultaneously, while monitoring various types of player data. Prior to the addition of the DIS interface, IVIEW2000 allowed only scripted scenarios to be played and re-played. With the addition of the DIS interface, IVIEW2000 is now able to read and process DIS PDUs and operate as a real-time visualization tool. It allows an operator to attach to any/multiple DIS entity(s), provides bird's-eye view, out-the-window views, data -readouts, etc. IVIEW2000, with the DIS interface, operates on a standard SGI indigo-class machine, making it an affordable alternative to commercial DIS visualization packages.

  14. The human core exosome interacts with differentially localized processive RNases: hDIS3 and hDIS3L

    PubMed Central

    Tomecki, Rafal; Kristiansen, Maiken S; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Larsen, Katja M; Szczesny, Roman J; Drazkowska, Karolina; Pastula, Agnieszka; Andersen, Jens S; Stepien, Piotr P; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a ribonucleolytic complex involved in RNA processing and turnover. It consists of a nine-subunit catalytically inert core that serves a structural function and participates in substrate recognition. Best defined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, enzymatic activity comes from the associated subunits Dis3p (Rrp44p) and Rrp6p. The former is a nuclear and cytoplasmic RNase II/R-like enzyme, which possesses both processive exo- and endonuclease activities, whereas the latter is a distributive RNase D-like nuclear exonuclease. Although the exosome core is highly conserved, identity and arrangements of its catalytic subunits in different vertebrates remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the association of two different Dis3p homologs—hDIS3 and hDIS3L—with the human exosome core. Interestingly, these factors display markedly different intracellular localizations: hDIS3 is mainly nuclear, whereas hDIS3L is strictly cytoplasmic. This compartmental distribution reflects the substrate preferences of the complex in vivo. Both hDIS3 and hDIS3L are active exonucleases; however, only hDIS3 has retained endonucleolytic activity. Our data suggest that three different ribonucleases can serve as catalytic subunits for the exosome in human cells. PMID:20531386

  15. The Development and Validation of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruwys, Tegan; Platow, Michael J.; Rieger, Elizabeth; Byrne, Don G.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents information on the psychometric properties of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS), a new scale of dieting that predicts future behavioral efforts to lose weight. We begin by reviewing recent research indicating theoretical and empirical problems with traditional approaches to measuring dieting. The DIS addresses several of…

  16. The Development and Validation of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruwys, Tegan; Platow, Michael J.; Rieger, Elizabeth; Byrne, Don G.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents information on the psychometric properties of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS), a new scale of dieting that predicts future behavioral efforts to lose weight. We begin by reviewing recent research indicating theoretical and empirical problems with traditional approaches to measuring dieting. The DIS addresses several of…

  17. (dis)Ability and Postsecondary Education: One Woman's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Melissa; MacDonald, Judy E.; Jacquard, Sarah; Mcneil, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The storied experiences of a (dis)Abled student negotiating postsecondary education in Canada are highlighted within this article, including advocacy strategies and a critique of related policies. Persons with (dis)Abilities are a particularly marginalized population, traditionally excluded from society, with modern day views of pity or heroics…

  18. Precision QCD measurements in DIS at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    New and recent results on QCD measurements from the H1 and ZEUS experiments at the HERA ep collider are reviewed. The final results on the combined deep-inelastic neutral and charged current cross-sections are presented and their role in the extractions of parton distribution functions (PDFs) is studied. The PDF fits give insight into the compatibility of QCD evolution and heavy flavor schemes with the data as a function of kinematic variables such as the scale Q2. Measurements of jet production cross-sections in ep collisions provide direct proves of QCD and extractions of the strong coupling constants are performed. Charm and beauty cross-section measurements are used for the determination of the heavy quark masses. Their role in PDF fits is investigated. In the regime of diffractive DIS and photoproduction, dijet and prompt photon production cross-sections provide insights into the process of factorization and the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  19. The development and validation of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS).

    PubMed

    Cruwys, Tegan; Platow, Michael J; Rieger, Elizabeth; Byrne, Don G

    2013-03-01

    This article presents information on the psychometric properties of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS), a new scale of dieting that predicts future behavioral efforts to lose weight. We begin by reviewing recent research indicating theoretical and empirical problems with traditional approaches to measuring dieting. The DIS addresses several of these problems by (a) focusing on naturalistic dieting behavior and (b) being future-oriented. Four validation studies are presented with a total of 741 participants. We demonstrate that the DIS has predictive utility for dieting behaviors and is positively correlated with other measures related to eating, weight, and shape. Furthermore, the DIS demonstrates discriminant validity by not being related to constructs such as self-esteem and social desirability. The DIS also has high internal consistency, with a 1-factor solution replicated with confirmatory factor analysis. The potential uses of the scale in both research and clinical settings are considered.

  20. MobiDis: Toward a Patient Centric Healthcare Information System.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fabrizio L; Serbanati, Luca D

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents some results of the MobiDis project. MobiDis is an information system that includes healthcare consumers and providers in a unique, virtual organisation aimed at promoting a patient centric paradigm in healthcare. It allows logons from desktop or laptop computers, as well as wireless PDAs or tablet PCs connected to Internet. In MobiDis the clinical data of each consumer are stored in the consumer's virtual healthcare record (VHR), a highly structured entity that exists on the network and is simultaneously updated with information from multiple locations. The MobiDis architecture creates an environment for VHRs by providing them with a large variety of services. In order to prove that our proposed architectural solution meets the project goals a prototype was developed. The paper describes the MobiDis architecture and the VHR services, and briefly presents the prototype.

  1. DisVis: Visualizing Discussion Threads in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Nakikj, Drashko; Mamykina, Lena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals turn to online health communities (OHC) for information, advice and support about their health condition or disease. As a result of users’ active participation, these forums store overwhelming volumes of information, which can make access to this information challenging and frustrating. To help overcome this problem we designed a discussion visualization tool DisVis. DisVis includes features for overviewing, browsing and finding particular information in a discussion. In a between subjects study, we tested the impact of DisVis on individuals’ ability to provide an overview of a discussion, find topics of interest and summarize opinions. The study showed that after using the tool, the accuracy of participants’ answers increased by 68% (p-value = 0.023) while at the same time exhibiting trends for reducing the time to answer by 38% with no statistical significance (p-value = 0.082). Qualitative interviews showed general enthusiasm regarding tools for improving browsing and searching for information within discussion forums, suggested different usage scenarios, highlighted opportunities for improving the design of DisVis, and outlined new directions for visualizing user-generated content within OHCs. PMID:28269891

  2. Summary of the Spin Physics Working Group at DIS2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makins, Naomi C. R.; Rondio, Ewa; Soffer, Jacques

    2002-11-01

    We summarize in this report the experimental and theory talks which were presented in the Working Group 3 ``Spin Physics'' at the DIS2002 workshop. Recent progress achieved in several interesting topics will be underlined and also what to expect in the future.

  3. Mea Culpa: Formal Education and the Dis-Integrated World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Brian P.; Daniels, Douglas S.

    Formal education has removed itself so far from any truly integrated view of the Natural World that fragmentation and certainty are prevailing ethics. Technological progress has resulted in increased specialization within academic disciplines and their concurrent separation from each other. Knowledge is extracted from a fully integrated world, but is examined and defined by the 'dis-integrated' objectives.

  4. 32 CFR 298.3 - Records maintained by DIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM DEFENSE INVESTIGATIVE SERVICE (DIS) FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM... which may be released under the Freedom of information Act (FOIA), consistent with its other...

  5. Polarized 3 parton production in inclusive DIS at small x

    DOE PAGES

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hentschinski, Martin; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; ...

    2016-08-18

    Azimuthal angular correlations between produced hadrons/jets in high energy collisions are a sensitive probe of the dynamics of QCD at small x. Here we derive the triple differential cross section for inclusive production of 3 polarized partons in DIS at small x using the spinor helicity formalism. The target proton or nucleus is described using the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism. The resulting expressions are used to study azimuthal angular correlations between produced partons in order to probe the gluon structure of the target hadron or nucleus. Finally, our analytic expressions can also be used to calculate the real partmore » of the Next to Leading Order (NLO) corrections to di-hadron production in DIS by integrating out one of the three final state partons.« less

  6. Isolated Photons + Jets in DIS and Photoproduction at ZEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprash, Oleg

    2013-12-01

    In this report, recent measurements of the production of isolated photons accompanied by jets in DIS and photo-production at HERA are presented. The measurements are compared to the perturbative QCD calculations and to the predictions made within the kT-factorisation QCD approach. A reasonable level of agreement between data and the predictions of both types is observed, however there is still room for the theories to be improved.

  7. Nuclear higher-twist effects in eA DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, B. G.

    2009-03-23

    We discuss the relation between the treatments of the higher twist nuclear effects in eA DIS based on the pQCD collinear approximation and the light-cone path integral formalism. We show that in the collinear approximation the N = 1 rescattering contribution to the gluon emission vanishes. It is demonstrated that the nonzero gluon spectrum obtained by Guo, Wang and Zhang is a consequence of unjustified neglect of some terms in the collinear expansion.

  8. The exoribonuclease Dis3L2 defines a novel eukaryotic RNA degradation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Malecki, Michal; Viegas, Sandra C; Carneiro, Tiago; Golik, Pawel; Dressaire, Clémentine; Ferreira, Miguel G; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2013-01-01

    The final step of cytoplasmic mRNA degradation proceeds in either a 5′-3′ direction catalysed by Xrn1 or in a 3′-5′ direction catalysed by the exosome. Dis3/Rrp44, an RNase II family protein, is the catalytic subunit of the exosome. In humans, there are three paralogues of this enzyme: DIS3, DIS3L, and DIS3L2. In this work, we identified a novel Schizosaccharomyces pombe exonuclease belonging to the conserved family of human DIS3L2 and plant SOV. Dis3L2 does not interact with the exosome components and localizes in the cytoplasm and in cytoplasmic foci, which are docked to P-bodies. Deletion of dis3l2+ is synthetically lethal with xrn1Δ, while deletion of dis3l2+ in an lsm1Δ background results in the accumulation of transcripts and slower mRNA degradation rates. Accumulated transcripts show enhanced uridylation and in vitro Dis3L2 displays a preference for uridylated substrates. Altogether, our results suggest that in S. pombe, and possibly in most other eukaryotes, Dis3L2 is an important factor in mRNA degradation. Therefore, this novel 3′-5′ RNA decay pathway represents an alternative to degradation by Xrn1 and the exosome. PMID:23503588

  9. General mass scheme for jet production in DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, P.; Slominski, W.

    2012-11-01

    We propose a method for calculating DIS jet production cross sections in QCD at NLO accuracy with consistent treatment of heavy quarks. The scheme relies on the dipole subtraction method for jets, which we extend to all possible initial state splittings with heavy partons, so that the Aivazis-Collins-Olness-Tung massive collinear factorization scheme can be applied. As a first check of the formalism we recover the Aivazis-Collins-Olness-Tung result for the heavy quark structure function using a dedicated Monte Carlo program.

  10. Mechanical Unfolding of Two DIS RNA Kissing Complexes from HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan T.X.; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    An RNA kissing complex formed by the dimerization initiation site (DIS) plays a critical role in the survival and infectivity of HIV virus. Two DIS kissing sequences, Mal and Lai, have been found in most HIV-1 variants. Formation and stability of these RNA kissing complexes depend crucially on cationic conditions, particularly Mg2+. Using optical tweezers, we investigated the mechanical unfolding of single RNA molecules with either Mal-type (GUGCAC) or Lai-type (GCGCGC) kissing complexes under various ionic conditions. The force required to disrupt the kissing interaction of the two structures, the rip force, is sensitive to concentrations of KCl and MgCl2; addition of 3 mM MgCl2 to 100 mM KCl changes the rip force of Mal from 21±4 pN to 46±3 pN. From the rip force distribution, the kinetics of breaking the kissing interaction is calculated as a function of force and cation concentration. The two kissing complexes have distinct unfolding transition states, as shown by different values of ΔX‡, the distance from the folded structure to the unfolding transition state. ΔX‡ of Mal is ~0.6 nm smaller than that of Lai suggesting that fewer kissing base pairs are broken at the transition state of the former, consistent with observations that the Lai-type kissing complex is more stable and requires significantly more force to unfold than the Mal-type. Importantly, neither K+ nor Mg2+ significantly changes the position of the transition state along the reaction coordinate. However, increasing concentrations of cations increase the kinetic barrier. We derived a cation specific parameter, m, to describe how the height of the kinetic barrier depends on the concentration of cations. Our results suggest that Mg2+ greatly slows down the unfolding of the kissing complex, but has moderate effects on the formation kinetics of the structure. PMID:19452632

  11. Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Infections Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis) Styes Fungal Infections (Ringworm, Yeast, etc.) Diaper Rash Infections That Pets Carry Oral ... Pneumonia Tinea (Ringworm, Jock Itch, Athlete's Foot) Vaginal Yeast Infections Immunizations Do My Kids Need Vaccines Before ...

  12. Children with Dis/abilities in Namibia, Africa: Uncovering Complexities of Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    Children with dis/abilities the world over are widely required to sacrifice their human rights to education, equity, community, and inclusion. Fewer than 10% of children with dis/abilities in developing countries attend school. Namibia, Africa, where this study took place, is no different. Despite Namibia's adoption of international covenants and…

  13. DIS[subscript 2]ECT: A Framework for Effective Inclusive Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Flannagan, Jenny Sue

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide special education and general education teachers a framework (DIS[subscript 2]ECT) for teaching science in inclusive settings. DIS2ECT stands for Design (Backwards); Individualization; Scaffolding and Strategies; Experiential learning; Cooperative Learning; and Teamwork. This framework was derived from our…

  14. Talking (and Not Talking) about Race, Social Class and Dis/Ability: Working Margin to Margin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri, Beth A.; Connor, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine some of the omnipresent yet unacknowledged discourses of social and economic disadvantage and dis/ability within schools in the US. First, we document ways that social class, race, and dis/ability function within schools to further disadvantage and exclude already marginalized students. Next, we show how particular ways…

  15. Distributed interactive simulation virtual cassette recorder (DIS VCR); A datalogger with variable speed replay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Jonathan L.

    1994-12-01

    The overall objective of the Distributed Interactive Simulation Virtual Cassette Recorder (DIS VCR) is to add a flexible replay capability to any DIS environment and specifically to the Remote Debriefing Tool (RDT). The DIS VCR's abilities include selective filtering of incoming DIS Protocol Data Units (PDUs), variable-speed replays, ability to pause, fast-forward, rewind, efficient data storage and retrieval, and an interface that simplifies the execution of those functions. The thesis includes a DIS VCR-compatible design for concurrent replay of audio extracted from signal PDUs and an extension to the replay design that supports unmodifiable rendering or receiving applications. For variable-speed replays, the authors created a scalable simulation clock and a new PDU (the Replay PDU). Applications modified for replays use the simulation clock to govern their dead reckoning algorithms while the DIS VCR uses it to control the timed release of stored PDUs. The Replay PDU communicates mode and speed changes between the DIS VCR and replay-modified applications. The DIS VCR's full functionality was successfully demonstrated at the 1994 AFA convention.

  16. Children with Dis/abilities in Namibia, Africa: Uncovering Complexities of Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    Children with dis/abilities the world over are widely required to sacrifice their human rights to education, equity, community, and inclusion. Fewer than 10% of children with dis/abilities in developing countries attend school. Namibia, Africa, where this study took place, is no different. Despite Namibia's adoption of international covenants and…

  17. Talking (and Not Talking) about Race, Social Class and Dis/Ability: Working Margin to Margin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri, Beth A.; Connor, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine some of the omnipresent yet unacknowledged discourses of social and economic disadvantage and dis/ability within schools in the US. First, we document ways that social class, race, and dis/ability function within schools to further disadvantage and exclude already marginalized students. Next, we show how particular ways…

  18. Cumulative Viral Load and Virologic Decay Patterns after Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Subjects Influence CD4 Recovery and AIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-20

    study). The Antiproteases Cohorte Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA EP 11 study. J Infect Dis 186: 710–714. 8. Hermankova M, Ray SC, Ruff C... Sida (ANRS) CO3 Aquitaine Cohort. Clin Infect Dis 49: 1109–1116. 59. Choi AI, Shlipak MG, Hunt PW, Martin JN, Deeks SG (2009) HIV-infected persons

  19. On the need for Embodied and Dis-Embodied Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dove, Guy

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes and defends a pluralistic theory of conceptual embodiment. Our concepts are represented in at least two ways: (i) through sensorimotor simulations of our interactions with objects and events and (ii) through sensorimotor simulations of natural language processing. Linguistic representations are “dis-embodied” in the sense that they are dynamic and multimodal but, in contrast to other forms of embodied cognition, do not inherit semantic content from this embodiment. The capacity to store information in the associations and inferential relationships among linguistic representations extends our cognitive reach and provides an explanation of our ability to abstract and generalize. This theory is supported by a number of empirical considerations, including the large body of evidence from cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology supporting a multiple semantic code explanation of imageability effects. PMID:21833295

  20. Experimental Results in DIS, SIDIS and DES from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Sebastian E.

    2011-07-15

    Jefferson Lab's electron accelerator in its present incarnation, with a maximum beam energy slightly above 6 GeV, has already enabled a large number of experiments expanding our knowledge of nucleon and nuclear structure (especially in Deep Inelastic Scattering--DIS--at moderately high x, and in the resonance region). Several pioneering experiments have yielded first results on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and other Deep Exclusive Processes (DES), and the exploration of the rich landscape of transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) structure functions using Semi-Inclusive electron scattering (SIDIS) has begun. With the upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV now underway, a significantly larger kinematic space will become available. The 12 GeV program taking shape will complete a detailed mapping of inclusive, TMD and generalized distribution functions for quarks, antiquarks and gluons in the valence region and beyond.

  1. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  2. DisAp-dependent striated fiber elongation is required to organize ciliary arrays.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico F; Bonney, Stephanie; Kronenberg, Zev; Clarissa, Christina; Yandell, Mark; Elde, Nels C; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Giddings, Thomas H; Frankel, Joseph; Pearson, Chad G

    2014-12-22

    Cilia-organizing basal bodies (BBs) are microtubule scaffolds that are visibly asymmetrical because they have attached auxiliary structures, such as striated fibers. In multiciliated cells, BB orientation aligns to ensure coherent ciliary beating, but the mechanisms that maintain BB orientation are unclear. For the first time in Tetrahymena thermophila, we use comparative whole-genome sequencing to identify the mutation in the BB disorientation mutant disA-1. disA-1 abolishes the localization of the novel protein DisAp to T. thermophila striated fibers (kinetodesmal fibers; KFs), which is consistent with DisAp's similarity to the striated fiber protein SF-assemblin. We demonstrate that DisAp is required for KFs to elongate and to resist BB disorientation in response to ciliary forces. Newly formed BBs move along KFs as they approach their cortical attachment sites. However, because they contain short KFs that are rotated, BBs in disA-1 cells display aberrant spacing and disorientation. Therefore, DisAp is a novel KF component that is essential for force-dependent KF elongation and BB orientation in multiciliary arrays. © 2014 Galati et al.

  3. Hemostatic effects of recombinant DisBa-01, a disintegrin from Bothrops alternatus.

    PubMed

    Kauskot, Alexandre; Cominetti, Marcia R; Ramos, Oscar H P; Bechyne, Iga; Renard, Jean-Marie; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Crepin, Michel; Legrand, Chantal; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa S; Bonnefoy, Arnaud

    2008-05-01

    A monomeric RGD-disintegrin was recently identified from a cDNA library from the venom gland of Bothrops alternatus. The corresponding 12 kDa-recombinant protein, DisBa-01, specifically interacted with alpha(v)beta3 integrin and displayed potent anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic properties. Here, the interaction of DisBa-01 with platelet alphaIIb beta3 integrin and its effects on hemostasis and thrombosis were investigated. DisBa-01 bound to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing beta3 or alphaIIb beta3 and promoted their adhesion and the adhesion of resting platelets onto glass coverslips. The disintegrin inhibited the binding of FITC-fibrinogen and FITC-PAC-1 to ADP-stimulated platelets and inhibited ADP-, TRAP- and collagen-induced aggregation of murine, rabbit or human platelets. In a flow chamber assay, DisBa-01 inhibited and reverted platelet adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen. DisBa-01 inhibited the phosphorylation of FAK following platelet activation. The intravenous injection of DisBa-01 in C57Bl6/j mice, prolonged tail bleeding time as well as thrombotic occlusion time in mesenteric venules and arterioles following vessel injury with FeCl3. In conclusion, DisBa-01 antagonizes the platelet alphaIIb beta3 integrin and potently inhibits thrombosis.

  4. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (αs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-01

    We present an analytic O(αs) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness τ. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of the 1-jettiness distribution.

  5. The roles of the exoribonucleases DIS3L2 and XRN1 in human disease.

    PubMed

    Pashler, Amy L; Towler, Benjamin P; Jones, Christopher I; Newbury, Sarah F

    2016-10-15

    RNA degradation is a vital post-transcriptional process which ensures that transcripts are maintained at the correct level within the cell. DIS3L2 and XRN1 are conserved exoribonucleases that are critical for the degradation of cytoplasmic RNAs. Although the molecular mechanisms of RNA degradation by DIS3L2 and XRN1 have been well studied, less is known about their specific roles in the development of multicellular organisms or human disease. This review focusses on the roles of DIS3L2 and XRN1 in the pathogenesis of human disease, particularly in relation to phenotypes seen in model organisms. The known diseases associated with loss of activity of DIS3L2 and XRN1 are discussed, together with possible mechanisms and cellular pathways leading to these disease conditions. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Emergent properties define the subjective nature of health and dis-ease.

    PubMed

    Sturmberg, Joachim P

    2014-08-01

    Health and dis-ease by their etymological origins refer to an evaluative, not objective, state. Health is an adaptive state, constantly reestablishing itself through interactions between the many biological, social, emotional, and cognitive factors in a person's life. Such adaptive processes define health as an emergent state. Outcomes of emergent phenomena are not precisely predictable and reside in a phase space that contains all possible states ranging from perfect to poor health states, the latter reflecting dis-ease. However, we have seen a migration of meaning from the subjective, dis-ease, to the objective, disease, referring to uniquely identifiable biomedical change. Clinical reality though teaches us that many experiences of dis-ease are not associated with any objective abnormality, an insight with important implications for clinical care and health policy.

  7. DisSim: an online system for exploring significant similar diseases and exhibiting potential therapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Jiang, Yue; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Hongbo; Sun, Jie; Yang, Haixiu; Zhang, Shuo; Hu, Yang; Zhou, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The similarity of pair-wise diseases reveals the molecular relationships between them. For example, similar diseases have the potential to be treated by common therapeutic chemicals (TCs). In this paper, we introduced DisSim, an online system for exploring similar diseases, and comparing corresponding TCs. Currently, DisSim implemented five state-of-the-art methods to measure the similarity between Disease Ontology (DO) terms and provide the significance of the similarity score. Furthermore, DisSim integrated TCs of diseases from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), which can help to identify potential relationships between TCs and similar diseases. The system can be accessed from http://123.59.132.21:8080/DisSim. PMID:27457921

  8. Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infected Wounds with Clinical Wound Care Strategies: A Quantitative Study Using an In Vivo Rabbit Ear Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    in reducing S. aureus burden in partial-thickness porcine wounds.53 Payne et al. studied enzymatic débriding agents in infected, Fig. 9. Scanning... Microbial biofilms. Annu Rev Microbiol. 1995;49:711–745. 24. Percival SL, Bowler PG. Biofilms and their potential role in wound healing. Wounds 2004;16:234...effect of Staphylococcus epidermidis slime on the phagocytosis of murine peritoneal macrophages is interferon independent. Microbiol Immunol. 1998;42:33

  9. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Berkhout, B; van Wamel, J L

    1996-01-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the autocomplementary loop sequences. This hairpin motif with the palindromic loop sequence is referred to as the dimer initiation site (DIS), and the type of interaction is termed loop-loop kissing. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of the DIS motifs in different human and simian immunodeficiency viruses revealed conservation of the hairpin structure with a 6-mer palindrome in the loop, despite considerable sequence divergence. This finding supports the loop-loop kissing mechanism. To test this possibility, proviral genomes with mutations in the DIS palindrome were constructed. The appearance of infectious virus upon transfection into SupT1 T cells was delayed for the DIS mutants compared with that obtained by transfection of the wild-type provirus (pLAI), confirming that this RNA motif plays an important role in virus replication. Surprisingly, the RNA genome extracted from mutant virions was found to be fully dimeric and to have a normal thermal stability. These results indicate that the DIS motif is not essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA dimerization and suggest that DIS base pairing does not contribute to the stability of the mature RNA dimer. Instead, we measured a reduction in the amount of viral RNA encapsidated in the mutant virions, suggesting a role of the DIS motif in RNA packaging. This result correlates with the idea that the processes of RNA dimerization and packaging are intrinsically linked, and we propose that DIS pairing is a prerequisite for RNA packaging. PMID:8794309

  10. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, B; van Wamel, J L

    1996-10-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the autocomplementary loop sequences. This hairpin motif with the palindromic loop sequence is referred to as the dimer initiation site (DIS), and the type of interaction is termed loop-loop kissing. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of the DIS motifs in different human and simian immunodeficiency viruses revealed conservation of the hairpin structure with a 6-mer palindrome in the loop, despite considerable sequence divergence. This finding supports the loop-loop kissing mechanism. To test this possibility, proviral genomes with mutations in the DIS palindrome were constructed. The appearance of infectious virus upon transfection into SupT1 T cells was delayed for the DIS mutants compared with that obtained by transfection of the wild-type provirus (pLAI), confirming that this RNA motif plays an important role in virus replication. Surprisingly, the RNA genome extracted from mutant virions was found to be fully dimeric and to have a normal thermal stability. These results indicate that the DIS motif is not essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA dimerization and suggest that DIS base pairing does not contribute to the stability of the mature RNA dimer. Instead, we measured a reduction in the amount of viral RNA encapsidated in the mutant virions, suggesting a role of the DIS motif in RNA packaging. This result correlates with the idea that the processes of RNA dimerization and packaging are intrinsically linked, and we propose that DIS pairing is a prerequisite for RNA packaging.

  11. Fort Holabird Defense Investigative Service (DIS), Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Cleanup Plan (BCP), Version II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    Volatile Organic Compound WWII ................ World War II 0 40 DACA31-94-D-0064 A Fort Holabird DIS Base Realignment and Closure...was filled in around the time the larger Fort Holabird installation was created during World War I. The Fort Holabird DIS performed security...during World War II (WWII). After WWII, portions of Fort Holabird were reassigned or sold off piece by piece. In 1970 the Defense Department announced

  12. Exploring the diversity of conceptualizations of work (dis)ability: a scoping review of published definitions.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Valérie; Loisel, Patrick; Rivard, Michèle; Champagne, François

    2014-06-01

    Researchers are confronted to numerous definitions of work ability/disability, influenced by their context of emergence, discipline, purpose, underlying paradigm and relationship to time. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the concept through a systematic scoping review and the development of an integrative concept map of work (dis)ability. The research questions are: How has work (dis)ability been conceptualized from the perspectives of research, practice, policy and industry in the published scientific literature? How has the conceptualization of work (dis)ability evolved over time? A search strategy was designed with a library scientist to retrieve scientific publications containing explicit definition(s) of work (dis)ability in leading-edge databases. The screening and the extraction of the definitions were achieved by duplicate assessment. The definitions were subject to a comparative analysis based on the grounded theory approach. In total, 423 abstracts were retrieved from the bibliographic databases. After removing duplicates, 280 unique records were screened for inclusion. A final set of 115 publications containing unique original conceptual definitions served as basis for analysis. The scientific literature does not reflect a shared, integrated vision of the exact nature and dimensions of work (dis)ability. However, except for a few definitions, there seems to be a consensus that work (dis)ability is a relational concept resulting from the interaction of multiple dimensions that influence each other through different ecological levels. The conceptualization of work (dis)ability also seems to have become more dynamic over time. The way work (dis)ability is defined has important implications for research, compensation and rehabilitation.

  13. DisPredict: A Predictor of Disordered Protein Using Optimized RBF Kernel

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins or, regions perform important biological functions through their dynamic conformations during binding. Thus accurate identification of these disordered regions have significant implications in proper annotation of function, induced fold prediction and drug design to combat critical diseases. We introduce DisPredict, a disorder predictor that employs a single support vector machine with RBF kernel and novel features for reliable characterization of protein structure. DisPredict yields effective performance. In addition to 10-fold cross validation, training and testing of DisPredict was conducted with independent test datasets. The results were consistent with both the training and test error minimal. The use of multiple data sources, makes the predictor generic. The datasets used in developing the model include disordered regions of various length which are categorized as short and long having different compositions, different types of disorder, ranging from fully to partially disordered regions as well as completely ordered regions. Through comparison with other state of the art approaches and case studies, DisPredict is found to be a useful tool with competitive performance. DisPredict is available at https://github.com/tamjidul/DisPredict_v1.0. PMID:26517719

  14. The 3' to 5' Exoribonuclease DIS3: From Structure and Mechanisms to Biological Functions and Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sophie R.; Oliver, Antony W.; Chevassut, Timothy J.; Newbury, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    DIS3 is a conserved exoribonuclease and catalytic subunit of the exosome, a protein complex involved in the 3' to 5' degradation and processing of both nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA species. Recently, aberrant expression of DIS3 has been found to be implicated in a range of different cancers. Perhaps most striking is the finding that DIS3 is recurrently mutated in 11% of multiple myeloma patients. Much work has been done to elucidate the structural and biochemical characteristics of DIS3, including the mechanistic details of its role as an effector of RNA decay pathways. Nevertheless, we do not understand how DIS3 mutations can lead to cancer. There are a number of studies that pertain to the function of DIS3 at the organismal level. Mutant phenotypes in S. pombe, S. cerevisiae and Drosophila suggest DIS3 homologues have a common role in cell-cycle progression and microtubule assembly. DIS3 has also recently been implicated in antibody diversification of mouse B-cells. This article aims to review current knowledge of the structure, mechanisms and functions of DIS3 as well as highlighting the genetic patterns observed within myeloma patients, in order to yield insight into the putative role of DIS3 mutations in oncogenesis. PMID:26193331

  15. ChemDIS: a chemical-disease inference system based on chemical-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of toxicities associated with environmental and industrial chemicals is required for risk assessment. However, we lack the toxicological data for a large portion of chemicals due to the high cost of experiments for a huge number of chemicals. The development of computational methods for identifying potential risks associated with chemicals is desirable for generating testable hypothesis to accelerate the hazard identification process. A chemical-disease inference system named ChemDIS was developed to facilitate hazard identification for chemicals. The chemical-protein interactions from a large database STITCH and protein-disease relationship from disease ontology and disease ontology lite were utilized for chemical-protein-disease inferences. Tools with user-friendly interfaces for enrichment analysis of functions, pathways and diseases were implemented and integrated into ChemDIS. An analysis on maleic acid and sibutramine showed that ChemDIS could be a useful tool for the identification of potential functions, pathways and diseases affected by poorly characterized chemicals. ChemDIS is an integrated chemical-disease inference system for poorly characterized chemicals with potentially affected functions and pathways for experimental validation. ChemDIS server is freely accessible at http://cwtung.kmu.edu.tw/chemdis.

  16. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or articles contaminated by them is an important component of infection control and isolation precautions. To help protect exposure to infectious materials, wash your hands: Wear gloves: In addition to ...

  17. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (αs)

    DOE PAGES

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-01

    We present an analytic O(αs) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness τ. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of themore » 1-jettiness distribution.« less

  18. Roof-harvested rainwater for potable purposes: application of solar collector disinfection (SOCO-DIS).

    PubMed

    Amin, M T; Han, M Y

    2009-12-01

    The efficiency of solar disinfection (SODIS), recommended by the World Health Organization, has been determined for rainwater disinfection, and potential benefits and limitations discussed. The limitations of SODIS have now been overcome by the use of solar collector disinfection (SOCO-DIS), for potential use of rainwater as a small-scale potable water supply, especially in developing countries. Rainwater samples collected from the underground storage tanks of a rooftop rainwater harvesting (RWH) system were exposed to different conditions of sunlight radiation in 2-L polyethylene terephthalate bottles in a solar collector with rectangular base and reflective open wings. Total and fecal coliforms were used, together with Escherichia coli and heterotrophic plate counts, as basic microbial and indicator organisms of water quality for disinfection efficiency evaluation. In the SOCO-DIS system, disinfection improved by 20-30% compared with the SODIS system, and rainwater was fully disinfected even under moderate weather conditions, due to the effects of concentrated sunlight radiation and the synergistic effects of thermal and optical inactivation. The SOCO-DIS system was optimized based on the collector configuration and the reflective base: an inclined position led to an increased disinfection efficiency of 10-15%. Microbial inactivation increased by 10-20% simply by reducing the initial pH value of the rainwater to 5. High turbidities also affected the SOCO-DIS system; the disinfection efficiency decreased by 10-15%, which indicated that rainwater needed to be filtered before treatment. The problem of microbial regrowth was significantly reduced in the SOCO-DIS system compared with the SODIS system because of residual sunlight effects. Only total coliform regrowth was detected at higher turbidities. The SOCO-DIS system was ineffective only under poor weather conditions, when longer exposure times or other practical means of reducing the pH were required for the

  19. Validation of the MG-DIS: a disability assessment for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Alberto; Leonardi, Matilde; Schiavolin, Silvia; Antozzi, Carlo; Brenna, Greta; Maggi, Lorenzo; Mantegazza, Renato

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed to present the validation of the myasthenia gravis disability assessment (MG-DIS), a MG-specific patient-reported disability outcome measure. Consecutive MG patients were enrolled, followed-up for 12 months and administered the SF-36, the WHO disability assessment schedule (WHODAS 2.0) and the preliminary 31-item MG-DIS addressing impairments and activity limitations. Factor structure and metric properties were assessed. In total, 109 patients were enrolled: 76 were females, mean age 50, mean MG duration 10.4 years, 86 were AChR-positive. The MG-DIS was reduced to 20 items, explaining 70.6 % of the original questionnaire variance, four subscales (generalized impairment-related problems; bulbar function-related problems; mental health and fatigue-related problems; vision-related problems) and an overall disability index. The MG-DIS has good metric properties (Cronbach's alpha ranging between .808 and .930), is stable, showed to be more sensitive than the WHODAS 2.0 and SF-36 to detect group differences and longitudinal changes and was well correlated with the MG-composite (.642). The MG-DIS includes items representing ocular, generalized, bulbar and respiratory symptoms, and is therefore well-built around MG-specific features. MG-DIS can be used in clinical trials as well as in observational or epidemiological studies to characterize patients' disability level and address the amount of improvement in disability. Further studies are needed to explore the possibility of a shorter disability scale.

  20. The 3'-5' exoribonuclease Dis3 regulates the expression of specific microRNAs in Drosophila wing imaginal discs

    PubMed Central

    Towler, Benjamin P; Jones, Christopher I; Viegas, Sandra C; Apura, Patricia; Waldron, Joseph A; Smalley, Sarah K; Arraiano, Cecilia M; Newbury, Sarah F

    2015-01-01

    Dis3 is a highly conserved exoribonuclease which degrades RNAs in the 3'-5' direction. Mutations in Dis3 are associated with a number of human cancers including multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this work, we have assessed the effect of a Dis3 knockdown on Drosophila imaginal disc development and on expression of mature microRNAs. We find that Dis3 knockdown severely disrupts the development of wing imaginal discs in that the flies have a “no wing” phenotype. Use of RNA-seq to quantify the effect of Dis3 knockdown on microRNA expression shows that Dis3 normally regulates a small subset of microRNAs, with only 11 (10.1%) increasing in level ≥2-fold and 6 (5.5%) decreasing in level ≥2-fold. Of these microRNAs, miR-252–5p is increased 2.1-fold in Dis3-depleted cells compared to controls while the level of the miR-252 precursor is unchanged, suggesting that Dis3 can act in the cytoplasm to specifically degrade this mature miRNA. Furthermore, our experiments suggest that Dis3 normally interacts with the exosomal subunit Rrp40 in the cytoplasm to target miR-252–5p for degradation during normal wing development. Another microRNA, miR-982–5p, is expressed at lower levels in Dis3 knockdown cells, while the miR-982 precursor remains unchanged, indicating that Dis3 is involved in its processing. Our study therefore reveals an unexpected specificity for this ribonuclease toward microRNA regulation, which is likely to be conserved in other eukaryotes and may be relevant to understanding its role in human disease. PMID:25892215

  1. Access, Opportunity, and Career: Supporting the Aspirations of Dis/abled Students with High-End Needs in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Barrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Acting as an entry marker into the adult world, the transition from compulsory schooling is inextricably linked with a change in career status. As such, transition is widely acknowledged to be a significant event in the lives of "all" young people regardless of their dis/abilities. However, many dis/abled students in New Zealand,…

  2. Utilizing a Low-Cost, Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS) to Improve Learning in Developing Rural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an innovation Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS), utilizing general IWBs (Interactive Whiteboard) didactics, to support student learning for rural and developing regions. LaDIS is a system made to support traditional classroom practices between an instructor and a group of students. This invention effectively transforms a…

  3. A Socio-Cultural Reframing of Science and Dis/ability in Education: Past Problems, Current Concerns, and Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.; Valle, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we assert the value of a socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education. We begin by problematizing current issues in education pertaining to the often-unquestioned concept of dis/ability and the impact that has upon research, theory, practice, and policy. As our topic is broad, we have chosen to focus upon four…

  4. A Socio-Cultural Reframing of Science and Dis/ability in Education: Past Problems, Current Concerns, and Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.; Valle, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we assert the value of a socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education. We begin by problematizing current issues in education pertaining to the often-unquestioned concept of dis/ability and the impact that has upon research, theory, practice, and policy. As our topic is broad, we have chosen to focus upon four…

  5. Utilizing a Low-Cost, Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS) to Improve Learning in Developing Rural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an innovation Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS), utilizing general IWBs (Interactive Whiteboard) didactics, to support student learning for rural and developing regions. LaDIS is a system made to support traditional classroom practices between an instructor and a group of students. This invention effectively transforms a…

  6. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasque, Penny A.; Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children with varying abilities.

  7. AuDis: an automatic CRF-enhanced disease normalization in biomedical text.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Chun; Hsu, Yi-Yu; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Diseases play central roles in many areas of biomedical research and healthcare. Consequently, aggregating the disease knowledge and treatment research reports becomes an extremely critical issue, especially in rapid-growth knowledge bases (e.g. PubMed). We therefore developed a system, AuDis, for disease mention recognition and normalization in biomedical texts. Our system utilizes an order two conditional random fields model. To optimize the results, we customize several post-processing steps, including abbreviation resolution, consistency improvement and stopwords filtering. As the official evaluation on the CDR task in BioCreative V, AuDis obtained the best performance (86.46% of F-score) among 40 runs (16 unique teams) on disease normalization of the DNER sub task. These results suggest that AuDis is a high-performance recognition system for disease recognition and normalization from biomedical literature.Database URL: http://ikmlab.csie.ncku.edu.tw/CDR2015/AuDis.html.

  8. The Transparency of Evil in "The Leftovers" and Its Implications for Student (Dis)engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kessel, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    The HBO series, "The Leftovers," provides a thought-provoking platform for discussing Baudrillard's conceptualization of evil and the implications for contemporary pedagogical discourse about student (dis)engagement. The dystopic scenario of 2% of the world's population suddenly disappearing might help us rethink our own society,…

  9. A New Theoretical Approach to Postsecondary Student Disability: Disability-Diversity (Dis)Connect Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquino, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Disability is often viewed as an obstacle to postsecondary inclusion, but not a characteristic of student diversity. Additionally, current theoretical frameworks isolate disability from other student diversity characteristics. In response, a new conceptual framework, the Disability-Diversity (Dis)Connect Model (DDDM), was created to address…

  10. Tipping Point: The Diversity Threshold for White Student (Dis) Engagement in Traditional Student Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elston, Dhanfu El-Hajj

    2011-01-01

    During a time when most institutions of higher education are in search of underrepresented student participation, Georgia State University (GSU), a majority White institution, has observed a lack of involvement of White students in co-curricular activities. The purpose of the research study was to critically examine White students' (dis)…

  11. Arts Integration: An Exploration of the Dis/Connect between Policy and Live(d) Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaJevic, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the dis/connect between arts integration policy (i.e. written texts and curriculum documents) and the live(d) practice of teachers working with arts integration. Although previous studies have examined how arts integration is implemented in schools and how it affects student achievement, particularly standardized test…

  12. The Regulatory Environment: A Source of Job (Dis)Satisfaction for Early Childhood Professionals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenech, Marianne; Sumsion, Jennifer; Robertson, Greg; Goodfellow, Joy

    2008-01-01

    This article extends current understandings of sources of job (dis)satisfaction for childcare staff by investigating the hypothesis that early childhood professionals' satisfaction with regulatory requirements is a predictor of job satisfaction. Findings show that for early childhood professionals in New South Wales, Australia, satisfaction with…

  13. The Regulatory Environment: A Source of Job (Dis)Satisfaction for Early Childhood Professionals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenech, Marianne; Sumsion, Jennifer; Robertson, Greg; Goodfellow, Joy

    2008-01-01

    This article extends current understandings of sources of job (dis)satisfaction for childcare staff by investigating the hypothesis that early childhood professionals' satisfaction with regulatory requirements is a predictor of job satisfaction. Findings show that for early childhood professionals in New South Wales, Australia, satisfaction with…

  14. Scripted Curriculum: What Movies Teach about Dis/ability and Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosto, Vonzell

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Tropes of dis/ability in the movies and master-narratives of Black males in education and society are typically treated in isolation. Furthermore, education research on Hollywood movies has typically focused on portrayals of schools, principals, and teachers even though education professionals are exposed to a broader range of…

  15. Arts Integration: An Exploration of the Dis/Connect between Policy and Live(d) Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaJevic, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the dis/connect between arts integration policy (i.e. written texts and curriculum documents) and the live(d) practice of teachers working with arts integration. Although previous studies have examined how arts integration is implemented in schools and how it affects student achievement, particularly standardized test…

  16. Pion content of the nucleon in polarized semi-inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, W.; Thomas, A.W.

    1994-04-01

    An explicit pionic component of the nucleon may be identified by measuring polarized {Delta}{sup ++} fragments produced in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) off polarized protons. The pion-exchange model predicts highly correlated polarizations of the {Delta}{sup ++} and target proton, in marked contrast with the competing diquark fragmentation process.

  17. Development of a Web-Based Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) Environment Using JavaScript

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    the equator and the Prime Meridian intersect. The positive y-axis runs from the center point out to where the equator intersects the 90 degree east... meridian , and the positive z-axis points from the center toward the North Pole. The “dis.js” library provides methods to convert coordinates

  18. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasque, Penny A.; Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children with varying abilities.

  19. Inclusion and Participation in Everyday School Life: Experiences of Children with Physical (Dis)Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbjørnslett, Mona; Engelsrud, Gunn Helene; Helseth, Sølvi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the school experiences of children with physical (dis)abilities. Based on 39 interviews with 15 Norwegian children, participation in everyday school life is introduced as a central theme and divided into three sub-themes: community and independence; adequate help and influence in the classroom; and influence in planning and…

  20. Scripted Curriculum: What Movies Teach about Dis/ability and Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosto, Vonzell

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Tropes of dis/ability in the movies and master-narratives of Black males in education and society are typically treated in isolation. Furthermore, education research on Hollywood movies has typically focused on portrayals of schools, principals, and teachers even though education professionals are exposed to a broader range of…

  1. The Transparency of Evil in "The Leftovers" and Its Implications for Student (Dis)engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kessel, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    The HBO series, "The Leftovers," provides a thought-provoking platform for discussing Baudrillard's conceptualization of evil and the implications for contemporary pedagogical discourse about student (dis)engagement. The dystopic scenario of 2% of the world's population suddenly disappearing might help us rethink our own society,…

  2. AuDis: an automatic CRF-enhanced disease normalization in biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Chun; Hsu, Yi-Yu; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Diseases play central roles in many areas of biomedical research and healthcare. Consequently, aggregating the disease knowledge and treatment research reports becomes an extremely critical issue, especially in rapid-growth knowledge bases (e.g. PubMed). We therefore developed a system, AuDis, for disease mention recognition and normalization in biomedical texts. Our system utilizes an order two conditional random fields model. To optimize the results, we customize several post-processing steps, including abbreviation resolution, consistency improvement and stopwords filtering. As the official evaluation on the CDR task in BioCreative V, AuDis obtained the best performance (86.46% of F-score) among 40 runs (16 unique teams) on disease normalization of the DNER sub task. These results suggest that AuDis is a high-performance recognition system for disease recognition and normalization from biomedical literature. Database URL: http://ikmlab.csie.ncku.edu.tw/CDR2015/AuDis.html PMID:27278815

  3. `Periodically-active phenomenon' of DIS-NCS with scattering transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Song; Li, Ning; Li, Shaoyuan

    2011-08-01

    When networked control systems (NCSs) are stable with any constant time delays, they are called delay-independently stable (DIS). For delay-independently stable networked control systems (DIS-NCSs), 'staircase phenomenon' in its dynamic response has been discovered and proven to be an intrinsic problem, which can only be eliminated by changing the system's traditional feedback structure. Recent research proves that the introduction of scattering transformation into DIS-NCS can effectively eliminate the 'staircase phenomenon'. But new problems appear, as the DIS-NCS with scattering transformation displays another undesired 'periodically-active phenomenon' in its dynamic response, which literally means that the system's dynamic response is active periodically. In this article, the definition and certain examples of 'periodically-active phenomenon' are given at the beginning, which show that the phenomenon is indeed a problem and may bring unexpected results. Then the analysis of the reason for its appearance is provided. To eliminate it, this article proceeds to propose a simple but effective method: inserting certain filters into the system. The needed theoretical proof of this method is given. Simulation is provided in the end.

  4. Short-range and long-range correlations in DIS at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S. V.; Zawiejski, L.

    1999-09-23

    Correlations in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) at HERA are investigated in order to test perturbative QCD and quark fragmentation universality. Two-particle correlations at small angular separations are measured in the Breit frame and compared to e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. Also presented are the correlations between the current and target regions of the Breit frame.

  5. Mechanism of Dis3l2 substrate recognition in the Lin28-let-7 pathway.

    PubMed

    Faehnle, Christopher R; Walleshauser, Jack; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2014-10-09

    The pluripotency factor Lin28 inhibits the biogenesis of the let-7 family of mammalian microRNAs. Lin28 is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and has a fundamental role in regulation of development, glucose metabolism and tissue regeneration. Overexpression of Lin28 is correlated with the onset of numerous cancers, whereas let-7, a tumour suppressor, silences several human oncogenes. Lin28 binds to precursor let-7 (pre-let-7) hairpins, triggering the 3' oligo-uridylation activity of TUT4 and TUT7 (refs 10-12). The oligoU tail added to pre-let-7 serves as a decay signal, as it is rapidly degraded by Dis3l2 (refs 13, 14), a homologue of the catalytic subunit of the RNA exosome. The molecular basis of Lin28-mediated recruitment of TUT4 and TUT7 to pre-let-7 and its subsequent degradation by Dis3l2 is largely unknown. To examine the mechanism of Dis3l2 substrate recognition we determined the structure of mouse Dis3l2 in complex with an oligoU RNA to mimic the uridylated tail of pre-let-7. Three RNA-binding domains form an open funnel on one face of the catalytic domain that allows RNA to navigate a path to the active site different from that of its exosome counterpart. The resulting path reveals an extensive network of uracil-specific interactions spanning the first 12 nucleotides of an oligoU-tailed RNA. We identify three U-specificity zones that explain how Dis3l2 recognizes, binds and processes uridylated pre-let-7 in the final step of the Lin28-let-7 pathway.

  6. Mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition in the Lin28/let-7 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2014-01-01

    Summary paragraph The pluripotency factor Lin28 inhibits the biogenesis of the let-7 family of mammalian microRNAs1–4. Lin28 is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and has a fundamental role in regulation of development5, glucose metabolism6 and tissue regeneration7. Alternatively, Lin28 overexpression is correlated with the onset of numerous cancers8, while let-7, a tumor suppressor, silences several human oncogenes5. Lin28 binds to precursor let-7 (pre-let-7) hairpins9, triggering the 3' oligo-uridylation activity of TUT4/710–12. The oligoU tail added to pre-let-7 serves as a decay signal, as it is rapidly degraded by Dis3L213,14, a homolog of the catalytic subunit of the RNA exosome. The molecular basis of Lin28 mediated recruitment of TUT4/7 to pre-let-7 and its subsequent degradation by Dis3L2 is largely unknown. To examine the mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition we determined the structure of mouse Dis3L2 in complex with an oligoU RNA to mimic the uridylated tail of pre-let-7. Three RNA binding domains form an open funnel on one face of the catalytic domain that allows RNA to navigate a path to the active site different from its exosome counterpart. The resulting path reveals an extensive network of uracil-specific interactions spanning the first twelve nucleotides of an oligoU-tailed RNA. We identify three U-specificity zones that explain how Dis3L2 recognizes, binds and processes uridylated pre-let-7 in the final step of the Lin28/let-7 pathway. PMID:25119025

  7. Choriodecidual inflammatory syndrome (CoDIS) is the leading, and under recognised, cause of early preterm delivery and second trimester miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Sebire, N J

    2001-04-01

    Severe preterm birth (delivery before 32 completed weeks of gestation), with or without preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM), remains the leading cause of perinatal mortality. It is proposed that localized inflammation of the chorion and decidua in the membranes immediately above the internal cervical os, with or without amniotic cavity infection and inflammation, is the leading, but under recognised, cause of second trimester miscarriage and severe preterm delivery. The term 'CoDIS' (choriodecidual inflammatory syndrome), may provide a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology than currently used terminology which over emphasizes the importance of overt intra-amniotic infection as opposed to localized extra-amniotic inflammation which stimulates uterine evacuation.

  8. DisGeNET: a discovery platform for the dynamical exploration of human diseases and their genes

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, Janet; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Bravo, Àlex; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Baron, Martin; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2015-01-01

    DisGeNET is a comprehensive discovery platform designed to address a variety of questions concerning the genetic underpinning of human diseases. DisGeNET contains over 380 000 associations between >16 000 genes and 13 000 diseases, which makes it one of the largest repositories currently available of its kind. DisGeNET integrates expert-curated databases with text-mined data, covers information on Mendelian and complex diseases, and includes data from animal disease models. It features a score based on the supporting evidence to prioritize gene-disease associations. It is an open access resource available through a web interface, a Cytoscape plugin and as a Semantic Web resource. The web interface supports user-friendly data exploration and navigation. DisGeNET data can also be analysed via the DisGeNET Cytoscape plugin, and enriched with the annotations of other plugins of this popular network analysis software suite. Finally, the information contained in DisGeNET can be expanded and complemented using Semantic Web technologies and linked to a variety of resources already present in the Linked Data cloud. Hence, DisGeNET offers one of the most comprehensive collections of human gene-disease associations and a valuable set of tools for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of genetic origin, designed to fulfill the needs of different user profiles, including bioinformaticians, biologists and health-care practitioners. Database URL: http://www.disgenet.org/ PMID:25877637

  9. Dis3- and exosome subunit-responsive 3 Prime mRNA instability elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Daniel L.; Hou, Dezhi; Gross, Robert H.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful use of a novel RNA-specific bioinformatic tool, RNA SCOPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified novel 3 Prime UTR cis-acting element that destabilizes a reporter mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show exosome subunits are required for cis-acting element-mediated mRNA instability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Define precise sequence requirements of novel cis-acting element. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show that microarray-defined exosome subunit-regulated mRNAs have novel element. -- Abstract: Eukaryotic RNA turnover is regulated in part by the exosome, a nuclear and cytoplasmic complex of ribonucleases (RNases) and RNA-binding proteins. The major RNase of the complex is thought to be Dis3, a multi-functional 3 Prime -5 Prime exoribonuclease and endoribonuclease. Although it is known that Dis3 and core exosome subunits are recruited to transcriptionally active genes and to messenger RNA (mRNA) substrates, this recruitment is thought to occur indirectly. We sought to discover cis-acting elements that recruit Dis3 or other exosome subunits. Using a bioinformatic tool called RNA SCOPE to screen the 3 Prime untranslated regions of up-regulated transcripts from our published Dis3 depletion-derived transcriptomic data set, we identified several motifs as candidate instability elements. Secondary screening using a luciferase reporter system revealed that one cassette-harboring four elements-destabilized the reporter transcript. RNAi-based depletion of Dis3, Rrp6, Rrp4, Rrp40, or Rrp46 diminished the efficacy of cassette-mediated destabilization. Truncation analysis of the cassette showed that two exosome subunit-sensitive elements (ESSEs) destabilized the reporter. Point-directed mutagenesis of ESSE abrogated the destabilization effect. An examination of the transcriptomic data from exosome subunit depletion-based microarrays revealed that mRNAs with ESSEs are found in every up-regulated mRNA data set but are

  10. Why Do Smallholder Farmers Dis-adopt Conservation Agriculture? Insights from Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinseu, Edna; Dougill, Andrew; Stringer, Lindsay

    2017-04-01

    International donors and advisory bodies, national governments and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are all actively promoting conservation agriculture (CA) as a route to sustainable agricultural development, recognising the importance of agriculture to the national economy and livelihoods of rural communities. CA is anchored in 3 principles: i) minimum soil disturbance, ii) continuous soil cover and iii) crop associations. It is advocated on the basis of improving crop yields, income and/or profits; reducing production costs; and conserving soil and water. Despite huge investments made by CA proponents, many farmers only practice CA for a short time. They subsequently dis-adopt (abandon) the seemingly appropriate innovation and revert back to conventional tillage practices. While factors affecting the (initial) adoption of agricultural technologies have been studied extensively, dis-adoption has rarely been investigated. Improving our understanding of dis-adoption of seemingly appropriate and sustainable interventions is vital for long-term sustainable land management, food security and for ensuring sustained impacts of agricultural development project interventions more broadly. This research investigates why smallholder farmers abandon CA practices in Malawi by exploring farmers' experiences of CA and their implications in dis-adoption. A mixed methods approach was used, involving household questionnaire survey and focus group discussions with smallholder farmers. Findings reveal that reasons for dis-adoption are multi-dimensional and multi-layered. While CA proponents are marketing CA as a time saving, labour saving and yield improving technology, many farmers report contrary experiences. Findings also showed that farmers lacked ownership of CA projects and encountered various social challenges, which coupled with unfulfilled expectations, led to dis-adoption. In sub-Saharan Africa, this suggests that there is a need to: (1) market CA as a climate

  11. [Estimation of cost-saving for reducing radioactive waste from nuclear medicine facilities by implementing decay in storage (DIS) in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    DIS has not yet been implemented in Japan as of 2011. Therefore, even if risk was negligible, medical institutions have to entrust radioactive temporal waste disposal to Japan Radio Isotopes Association (JRIA) in the current situation. To decide whether DIS should be implemented in Japan or not, cost-saving effect of DIS was estimated by comparing the cost that nuclear medical facilities pay. By implementing DIS, the total annual cost for all nuclear medical facilities in Japan is estimated to be decreased to 30 million yen or less from 710 million yen. DIS would save 680 million yen (96%) per year.

  12. Nuclear parton density functions from jet production in DIS at an EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, M.; Kovařík, K.; Potthoff, J.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the potential of inclusive-jet production in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) to improve our current knowledge of nuclear parton density functions (PDFs). We demonstrate that the kinematic reach is extended similarly to inclusive DIS, but that the uncertainty of the nuclear PDFs, in particular of the gluon density at low Bjorken-x , is considerably reduced, by up to an order of magnitude compared to the present situation. Using an approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (aNNLO) calculation implemented in the program JetViP, we also make predictions for three different EIC designs and for four different light and heavy nuclei.

  13. Polarized 3He target and Final State Interactions in SiDIS

    DOE PAGES

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; ...

    2017-01-03

    Jefferson Lab is starting a wide experimental program aimed at studying the neutron’s structure, with a great emphasis on the extraction of the parton transverse-momentum distributions (TMDs). To this end, Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SiDIS) experiments on polarized $^3$He will be carried out, providing, together with proton and deuteron data, a sound flavor decomposition of the TMDs. Here, given the expected high statistical accuracy, it is crucial to disentangle nuclear and partonic degrees of freedom to get an accurate theoretical description of both initial and final states. In this contribution, a preliminary study of the Final State Interaction (FSI) in themore » standard SiDIS, where a pion (or a Kaon) is detected in the final state is presented, in view of constructing a realistic description of the nuclear initial and final states.« less

  14. Polarized ^{\\varvec{3}}He Target and Final State Interactions in SiDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; Salmè, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Jefferson Lab is starting a wide experimental program aimed at studying the neutron's structure, with a great emphasis on the extraction of the parton transverse-momentum distributions (TMDs). To this end, Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SiDIS) experiments on polarized ^3He will be carried out, providing, together with proton and deuteron data, a sound flavor decomposition of the TMDs. Given the expected high statistical accuracy, it is crucial to disentangle nuclear and partonic degrees of freedom to get an accurate theoretical description of both initial and final states. In this contribution, a preliminary study of the Final State Interaction (FSI) in the standard SiDIS, where a pion (or a Kaon) is detected in the final state is presented, in view of constructing a realistic description of the nuclear initial and final states.

  15. National (dis)identification and ethnic and religious identity: a study among Turkish-Dutch muslims.

    PubMed

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Yildiz, Ali Aslan

    2007-10-01

    National (dis)identification is examined in three studies among Turkish-Dutch Muslim participants. In explaining national (dis)identification, the first study focuses on ethnic identity, the second on ethnic and religious identity, and the third on three dimensions of religious identity. Many participants show low commitment to the nation, and many indicate national disidentification. In addition, there is very strong ethnic and religious identification. Ethnic and Muslim identifications relate negatively to Dutch identification and, in Study 3, to stronger Dutch disidentification. Furthermore, perceived group rejection is associated with increased ethnic minority and religious identification but also with decreased national Dutch identification. In addition, in Studies 1 and 2 the effect of perceived rejection on Dutch identification is (partly) mediated by minority group identification. The findings are discussed in relation to social psychological thinking about group identification, dual identities, and the importance of religion for intergroup relations.

  16. AdS black disk model for small-x DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2011-05-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple AdS black disk model to describe saturation in DIS. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value 1+ω/3+ω, independently of the target.

  17. Quark-photon-quark correlation and transverse target single spin asymmetry in inclusive DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias; Alhalholy, Tareq

    2017-07-01

    We calculate the q γ q correlation function associated to transverse target lepton-nucleon inclusive deep-inelastic scattering by direct evaluation of the corresponding matrix element utilizing the electromagnetic impact parameter fields for a transversely polarized nucleon. The results are compared with the two existing models for the q γ q correlator. Using the calculated q γ q correlation function, we estimate the transverse target single-spin asymmetry in an inclusive DIS process.

  18. Cumulative (Dis)Advantage and the Matthew Effect in Life-Course Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bask, Miia; Bask, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    To foster a deeper understanding of the mechanisms behind inequality in society, it is crucial to work with well-defined concepts associated with such mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to define cumulative (dis)advantage and the Matthew effect. We argue that cumulative (dis)advantage is an intra-individual micro-level phenomenon, that the Matthew effect is an inter-individual macro-level phenomenon and that an appropriate measure of the Matthew effect focuses on the mechanism or dynamic process that generates inequality. The Matthew mechanism is, therefore, a better name for the phenomenon, where we provide a novel measure of the mechanism, including a proof-of-principle analysis using disposable personal income data. Finally, because socio-economic theory should be able to explain cumulative (dis)advantage and the Matthew mechanism when they are detected in data, we discuss the types of models that may explain the phenomena. We argue that interactions-based models in the literature traditions of analytical sociology and statistical mechanics serve this purpose. PMID:26606386

  19. HIV-1 DIS stem loop forms an obligatory bent kissing intermediate in the dimerization pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mundigala, Hansini; Michaux, Jonathan B.; Feig, Andrew L.; Ennifar, Eric; Rueda, David

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 dimerization initiation sequence (DIS) is a conserved palindrome in the apical loop of a conserved hairpin motif in the 5′-untranslated region of its RNA genome. DIS hairpin plays an important role in genome dimerization by forming a ‘kissing complex’ between two complementary hairpins. Understanding the kinetics of this interaction is key to exploiting DIS as a possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug target. Here, we present a single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) study of the dimerization reaction kinetics. Our data show the real-time formation and dissociation dynamics of individual kissing complexes, as well as the formation of the mature extended duplex complex that is ultimately required for virion packaging. Interestingly, the single-molecule trajectories reveal the presence of a previously unobserved bent intermediate required for extended duplex formation. The universally conserved A272 is essential for the formation of this intermediate, which is stabilized by Mg2+, but not by K+ cations. We propose a 3D model of a possible bent intermediate and a minimal dimerization pathway consisting of three steps with two obligatory intermediates (kissing complex and bent intermediate) and driven by Mg2+ ions. PMID:24813449

  20. HIV-1 DIS stem loop forms an obligatory bent kissing intermediate in the dimerization pathway.

    PubMed

    Mundigala, Hansini; Michaux, Jonathan B; Feig, Andrew L; Ennifar, Eric; Rueda, David

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 dimerization initiation sequence (DIS) is a conserved palindrome in the apical loop of a conserved hairpin motif in the 5'-untranslated region of its RNA genome. DIS hairpin plays an important role in genome dimerization by forming a 'kissing complex' between two complementary hairpins. Understanding the kinetics of this interaction is key to exploiting DIS as a possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug target. Here, we present a single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) study of the dimerization reaction kinetics. Our data show the real-time formation and dissociation dynamics of individual kissing complexes, as well as the formation of the mature extended duplex complex that is ultimately required for virion packaging. Interestingly, the single-molecule trajectories reveal the presence of a previously unobserved bent intermediate required for extended duplex formation. The universally conserved A272 is essential for the formation of this intermediate, which is stabilized by Mg(2+), but not by K(+) cations. We propose a 3D model of a possible bent intermediate and a minimal dimerization pathway consisting of three steps with two obligatory intermediates (kissing complex and bent intermediate) and driven by Mg(2+) ions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. DisProt 7.0: a major update of the database of disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Damiano; Tabaro, Francesco; Mičetić, Ivan; Necci, Marco; Quaglia, Federica; Oldfield, Christopher J; Aspromonte, Maria Cristina; Davey, Norman E; Davidović, Radoslav; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Elofsson, Arne; Gasparini, Alessandra; Hatos, András; Kajava, Andrey V; Kalmar, Lajos; Leonardi, Emanuela; Lazar, Tamas; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Macossay-Castillo, Mauricio; Meszaros, Attila; Minervini, Giovanni; Murvai, Nikoletta; Pujols, Jordi; Roche, Daniel B; Salladini, Edoardo; Schad, Eva; Schramm, Antoine; Szabo, Beata; Tantos, Agnes; Tonello, Fiorella; Tsirigos, Konstantinos D; Veljković, Nevena; Ventura, Salvador; Vranken, Wim; Warholm, Per; Uversky, Vladimir N; Dunker, A Keith; Longhi, Sonia; Tompa, Peter; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2017-01-04

    The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt, URL: www.disprot.org) has been significantly updated and upgraded since its last major renewal in 2007. The current release holds information on more than 800 entries of IDPs/IDRs, i.e. intrinsically disordered proteins or regions that exist and function without a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We have re-curated previous entries to purge DisProt from conflicting cases, and also upgraded the functional classification scheme to reflect continuous advance in the field in the past 10 years or so. We define IDPs as proteins that are disordered along their entire sequence, i.e. entirely lack structural elements, and IDRs as regions that are at least five consecutive residues without well-defined structure. We base our assessment of disorder strictly on experimental evidence, such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (primary techniques) and a broad range of other experimental approaches (secondary techniques). Confident and ambiguous annotations are highlighted separately. DisProt 7.0 presents classified knowledge regarding the experimental characterization and functional annotations of IDPs/IDRs, and is intended to provide an invaluable resource for the research community for a better understanding structural disorder and for developing better computational tools for studying disordered proteins.

  2. DisProt 7.0: a major update of the database of disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Damiano; Tabaro, Francesco; Mičetić, Ivan; Necci, Marco; Quaglia, Federica; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Aspromonte, Maria Cristina; Davey, Norman E.; Davidović, Radoslav; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Elofsson, Arne; Gasparini, Alessandra; Hatos, András; Kajava, Andrey V.; Kalmar, Lajos; Leonardi, Emanuela; Lazar, Tamas; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Macossay-Castillo, Mauricio; Meszaros, Attila; Minervini, Giovanni; Murvai, Nikoletta; Pujols, Jordi; Roche, Daniel B.; Salladini, Edoardo; Schad, Eva; Schramm, Antoine; Szabo, Beata; Tantos, Agnes; Tonello, Fiorella; Tsirigos, Konstantinos D.; Veljković, Nevena; Ventura, Salvador; Vranken, Wim; Warholm, Per; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith; Longhi, Sonia; Tompa, Peter; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2017-01-01

    The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt, URL: www.disprot.org) has been significantly updated and upgraded since its last major renewal in 2007. The current release holds information on more than 800 entries of IDPs/IDRs, i.e. intrinsically disordered proteins or regions that exist and function without a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We have re-curated previous entries to purge DisProt from conflicting cases, and also upgraded the functional classification scheme to reflect continuous advance in the field in the past 10 years or so. We define IDPs as proteins that are disordered along their entire sequence, i.e. entirely lack structural elements, and IDRs as regions that are at least five consecutive residues without well-defined structure. We base our assessment of disorder strictly on experimental evidence, such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (primary techniques) and a broad range of other experimental approaches (secondary techniques). Confident and ambiguous annotations are highlighted separately. DisProt 7.0 presents classified knowledge regarding the experimental characterization and functional annotations of IDPs/IDRs, and is intended to provide an invaluable resource for the research community for a better understanding structural disorder and for developing better computational tools for studying disordered proteins. PMID:27899601

  3. A socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education: past problems, current concerns, and future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, David J.; Valle, Jan W.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we assert the value of a socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education. We begin by problematizing current issues in education pertaining to the often-unquestioned concept of dis/ability and the impact that has upon research, theory, practice, and policy. As our topic is broad, we have chosen to focus upon four interconnected areas: (1) the historical mistrust of science and pseudo-science by people with dis/abilities; (2) the pervasive use of pseudo-science within the contemporary field of special education; (3) the use of dis/ability studies in education (DSE) to provide a contrast between a traditional positivist framing and a socio-cultural framing of dis/ability, and; (4) a brief exploration of what a DSE/socio-cultural grounding looks like for both schools and classroom teachers. In sum, our intention is to engage science educators to reject deficit-notions of dis/ability in favor of understanding it as part of human variation, and consider the personal and professional benefits of this shift.

  4. Perlman syndrome nuclease DIS3L2 controls cytoplasmic non-coding RNAs and provides surveillance pathway for maturing snRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Łabno, Anna; Warkocki, Zbigniew; Kuliński, Tomasz; Krawczyk, Paweł Szczepan; Bijata, Krystian; Tomecki, Rafał; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The exosome-independent exoribonuclease DIS3L2 is mutated in Perlman syndrome. Here, we used extensive global transcriptomic and targeted biochemical analyses to identify novel DIS3L2 substrates in human cells. We show that DIS3L2 regulates pol II transcripts, comprising selected canonical and histone-coding mRNAs, and a novel FTL_short RNA from the ferritin mRNA 5′ UTR. Importantly, DIS3L2 contributes to surveillance of maturing snRNAs during their cytoplasmic processing. Among pol III transcripts, DIS3L2 particularly targets vault and Y RNAs and an Alu-like element BC200 RNA, but not Alu repeats, which are removed by exosome-associated DIS3. Using 3′ RACE-Seq, we demonstrate that all novel DIS3L2 substrates are uridylated in vivo by TUT4/TUT7 poly(U) polymerases. Uridylation-dependent DIS3L2-mediated decay can be recapitulated in vitro, thus reinforcing the tight cooperation between DIS3L2 and TUTases. Together these results indicate that catalytically inactive DIS3L2, characteristic of Perlman syndrome, can lead to deregulation of its target RNAs to disturb transcriptome homeostasis. PMID:27431325

  5. Targeted Prevention or Treatment of Bacterial Biofilm Infections of Severe Burns and Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    highly predictable settings, thus lending it to preventive strategies. References Cited 1. Church, D ., S. Elsayed, O. Reid, B. Winston, and R. Lindsay...2006. Burn wound infections. Clin Microbiol Rev 19(2):403-34. 2. Suber, F., M. C. Carroll, and F. D . Moore, Jr. 2007. Innate response to self...12 neutrophils. Infect Immun 73(6): 3693 -701. 4. Moskowitz, S. M., J. M. Foster, J. Emerson, and J. L. Burns. 2004. Clinically feasible biofilm

  6. Targeted Prevention or Treatment of Bacterial Biofilm Infections of Severe Burns and Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    to preventive strategies. 9 References Cited 1. Church, D ., S. Elsayed, O. Reid, B. Winston, and R. Lindsay. 2006. Burn wound infections. Clin...Microbiol Rev 19(2):403-34. 2. Suber, F., M. C. Carroll, and F. D . Moore, Jr. 2007. Innate response to self-antigen significantly exacerbates burn wound...M. L. Vasil, and J. A. Nick. 2005. Enhanced Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development mediated by human neutrophils. Infect Immun 73(6): 3693 -701. 4

  7. Gene2DisCo: Gene to disease using disease commonalities.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Marco

    2017-09-04

    Finding the human genes co-causing complex diseases, also known as "disease-genes", is one of the emerging and challenging tasks in biomedicine. This process, termed gene prioritization (GP), is characterized by a scarcity of known disease-genes for most diseases, and by a vast amount of heterogeneous data, usually encoded into networks describing different types of functional relationships between genes. In addition, different diseases may share common profiles (e.g. genetic or therapeutic profiles), and exploiting disease commonalities may significantly enhance the performance of GP methods. This work aims to provide a systematic comparison of several disease similarity measures, and to embed disease similarities and heterogeneous data into a flexible framework for gene prioritization which specifically handles the lack of known disease-genes. We present a novel network-based method, Gene2DisCo, based on generalized linear models (GLMs) to effectively prioritize genes by exploiting data regarding disease-genes, gene interaction networks and disease similarities. The scarcity of disease-genes is addressed by applying an efficient negative selection procedure, together with imbalance-aware GLMs. Gene2DisCo is a flexible framework, in the sense it is not dependent upon specific types of data, and/or upon specific disease ontologies. On a benchmark dataset composed of nine human networks and 708 medical subject headings (MeSH) diseases, Gene2DisCo largely outperformed the best benchmark algorithm, kernelized score functions, in terms of both area under the ROC curve (0.94 against 0.86) and precision at given recall levels (for recall levels from 0.1 to 1 with steps 0.1). Furthermore, we enriched and extended the benchmark data to the whole human genome and provided the top-ranked unannotated candidate genes even for MeSH disease terms without known annotations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of four-dimensional imaging spectrometers (4D-IS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Nahum; Scriven, Gordon; Garman, John; Li, Ming De; Zhang, Jingyi

    2006-08-01

    The incentive for the 4D-IS concept was driven by the need to adequately resolve all four dimensions of data (2D spatial, spectral, and temporal) with a single, radiometrically calibrated sensor. Very fast changing phenomena are of interest; including missile exhaust plumes, missile intercept events, and lightning strikes, hypervelocity impacts, etc. Present sensor capabilities are limited to imaging sensors (producing spatial image), spectrometers (that produce a mean signature over an entire field of view with no spatial resolution), radiometers (producing in-band radiance over an entire FOV), or imaging spectrometers (or hyperspectral sensors, tunable filter type, pushbroom scanning, imaging Fourier Transform, Fabry-Perot, or CTHIS type) that produce a data cube containing spatial/spectral information but suffer from the fact that the cube acquisition process may take longer time than the temporal scale during which the event changes. The Computer Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS) is another sensor capable of 4D data collection. However, the inversion process for CTIS is computationally extensive and data processing time may be an issue in real-time applications. Hence, the 4D-IS concept with its ability to capture a full image cube at a single exposure and provide real time data processing offers a new and enhanced capability over present sensors. The 4D-IS uses a reformatter fiber optics to map a 2D image to a linear array that serves as an input slit to an imaging spectrometer. The paper describes three such instruments, a VNIR, a MWIR, and a dual band MW/LWIR. The paper describes the sensors' architecture, mapping, calibration procedures, and remapping the FPA plane into an image cube. Real-time remapping software is used to aid the operator in alignment of the sensor is described. Sample data are shown for rocket motor firings and other events.

  9. DisVis: quantifying and visualizing accessible interaction space of distance-restrained biomolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    van Zundert, G C P; Bonvin, A M J J

    2015-10-01

    We present DisVis, a Python package and command line tool to calculate the reduced accessible interaction space of distance-restrained binary protein complexes, allowing for direct visualization and quantification of the information content of the distance restraints. The approach is general and can also be used as a knowledge-based distance energy term in FFT-based docking directly during the sampling stage. The source code with documentation is freely available from https://github.com/haddocking/disvis. a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. IGBP-DIS global 1 km land cover data set, DISCover: First results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, T.R.; Belward, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Data and Information System (IGBP-DIS) is co-ordinating the development of global land data sets from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data. The first is a 1 km spatial resolution land cover product `DISCover', based on monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index composites from 1992 and 1993. DISCover is a 17 class land cover dataset based on the science requirements of IGBP elements. Mapping uses unsupervised classification with post-classification refinement using ancillary data. Draft Africa, North America and South America products are now available for peer review.

  11. Inclusive hadron distributions in p+p collisions from saturation models of HERA DIS data.

    SciTech Connect

    Tribedy, P.; Venugopalan, R.

    2010-12-06

    Dipole models based on various saturation scenarios provide reasonable fits to small-x DIS inclusive, diffractive and exclusive data from HERA. Proton un-integrated gluon distributions extracted from such fits are employed in a k{sub {perpendicular}}-factorization framework to calculate inclusive gluon distributions at various energies. The n-particle multiplicity distribution predicted in the Glasma flux tube approach shows good agreement with data over a wide range of energies. Hadron inclusive transverse momentum distributions expressed in terms of the saturation scale demonstrate universal behavior over a wider kinematic range systematically with increasing center of mass energies.

  12. [The nursing team and Maslow: (dis)satisfaction in the work].

    PubMed

    Vitória Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia; Porto, Isaura Setenta

    2006-01-01

    This text tries to understand the Nursing team and their (dis)satisfactions in the work. We consider the association with the theory of basic human needs of Abraham Maslow as a way to systemize and to comprehend the recurrent situations and the day-by-day Nursing issues. The necessities are structuralized hierarchically in physiological, security, social, auto-esteem and auto-accomplishment indicating the degree of satisfaction (from the disease to the fullness) of an individual or group. The advantage of this approach consists of being able to use the solid, depth and rich Maslow theory in concrete and particular situations of the Nursing team.

  13. DisArticle: a web server for SVM-based discrimination of articles on traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Kyun; Nam, SeJin; Kim, SangHyun

    2017-01-28

    Much research has been done in Northeast Asia to show the efficacy of traditional medicine. While MEDLINE contains many biomedical articles including those on traditional medicine, it does not categorize those articles by specific research area. The aim of this study was to provide a method that searches for articles only on traditional medicine in Northeast Asia, including traditional Chinese medicine, from among the articles in MEDLINE. This research established an SVM-based classifier model to identify articles on traditional medicine. The TAK + HM classifier, trained with the features of title, abstract, keywords, herbal data, and MeSH, has a precision of 0.954 and a recall of 0.902. In particular, the feature of herbal data significantly increased the performance of the classifier. By using the TAK + HM classifier, a total of about 108,000 articles were discriminated as articles on traditional medicine from among all articles in MEDLINE. We also built a web server called DisArticle ( http://informatics.kiom.re.kr/disarticle ), in which users can search for the articles and obtain statistical data. Because much evidence-based research on traditional medicine has been published in recent years, it has become necessary to search for articles on traditional medicine exclusively in literature databases. DisArticle can help users to search for and analyze the research trends in traditional medicine.

  14. Reorganization of water distribution system of Greater Jammu using computer software OPT DIS.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indrani; Bassin, Jagdish; Kelkar, Prakash; Gupta, Apurba

    2003-01-01

    Water supply in old Jammu city is not evenly distributed due to undulating terrain and increase in population density. A study was undertaken to suggest measures for improvement to the distribution system. The paper presents results of analysis carried out using computer package OPT DIS developed at NEERI for optimal design of distribution sytem including system augmentation and reorganization measures needed for the design year 2021. The analysis of zone 1 of the distribution network indicates that seven pipes need alteation to cater to the demand for the year 2006 and fifteen pipes need replacement for the year 2021. New pipelines (13 nos.) are to be provided in parallel to the existing pipes in Upper Reach and 28 pipes in Lower Reach to ensure the service standards of 225 lpcd with minimum residual head of 17 m. Efficient algorithm for augmentations of water supply systems comprising combination of dead-end and loop network are having much wider application in developing countries. The software OPT DIS developed at NEERI was found to be extremely powerful and user friendly for addressing such systems with varying demand pattern, peaking factor, pipe condition, water supply modes and design horizones.

  15. [(Dis)satisfaction with mental healthcare work: a study in Psychosocial Care Centers].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, José Maria Ximenes; Jorge, Maria Salete Bessa; Assis, Marluce Maria Araújo

    2011-04-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze satisfaction in the workplace of mental healthcare professionals who serve in Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps). The research is of a qualitative nature and the data-collecting medium was semistructured interviews with 19 workers of three Caps in Fortaleza, in the Northern Brazilian State of Ceará. The treatment of the empirical material was based upon the analysis of content with an emphasis on the thematic bias. The results revealed the determinants of (dis)satisfaction present in the daily routine of these workers. The relationships established with the users were singled out as the main source of satisfaction, whereas the work and wage conditions were the main motives for dissatisfaction. In addition to these aspects, consequences of (dis)satisfaction at work in the private, social and organizational field of the workers' life in the Caps were revealed, mainly in physical and mental health. Lastly, they emphasized the urgent need for implementation - on the part of public administration - of strategies that seek to reduce the precariousness of healthcare work, especially in mental health, with a view to mitigating damages potentially caused by such work.

  16. DisMeta – a Meta Server for Construct Design and Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intrinsically disordered or unstructured regions in proteins are both common and biologically important, particularly in regulation, signaling and modulating intermolecular recognition processes. From a practical point of view, however, such disordered regions often can pose significant challenges for crystallization. Disordered regions are also detrimental to NMR spectral quality, complicating the analysis of resonance assignments and three-dimensional protein structures by NMR methods. The DisMeta Server has been used by Northeastern Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) as a primary tool for construct design and optimization in preparing samples for both NMR and crystallization studies. It is a meta-server that generates a consensus analysis of eight different sequence-based disorder predictors to identify regions that are likely to be disordered. DisMeta also identifies predicted secretion signal peptides, trans-membrane segments, and low complexity regions. Identification of disordered regions, by either experimental or computational methods, is an important step in the NESG structure production pipeline, allowing the rational design of protein constructs that have improved expression and solubility, improved crystallization, and better quality NMR spectra. PMID:24203321

  17. QCD analysis of DIS and SIDIS data with two alternative methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Akhunzyanov, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    The global fit analysis of all published data on DIS and semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) asymmetries is performed in the next to leading (NLO) QCD order. The respective parameterization on polarized PDFs is constructed. The especial attention is paid to the impact of novel SIDIS data on the polarized distributions of light sea and strange quarks as well as on the polarized gluon distributions. The first moments of these distributions entering the nucleon spin are found to be surprisingly small quantities. The alternative direct (free of any fitting procedure) method of NLO QCD analysis is elaborated. Method is especially important for analysis of SIDIS data because it allows to avoid the problems arising in the conventional fitting procedure: functional arbitrariness at initial scale and ambiguities in the error band calculation. Within the alternative method the central values and uncertainties of the measured asymmetries directly propagate to the central values and uncertainties of the polarized PDFs we are interested in. The method is applied to all existing SIDIS data on pion production for an estimation in NLO QCD of the valence and sea quark contributions to the proton spin. As a result one arrives at the conclusion that, contrary to the valence contributions, the sea contributions to the proton spin are compatible with zero within the errors.

  18. Balantidiasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    metronidazole (500 mg 2 times/day for 5 days); other drugs such as ampicillin, car- basone, diodoquin, nitrimidazine, and paromomycin have been used...coli acquired in France. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2004;23:393-395. 22. Garcia-Laverde A, de Bonilla L. Clinical trials with metronidazole in

  19. Progress Report for the Sixth Quarter (1 April 1994 - 30 June 1994) for Contract N00014-93-C-0019 (Hawaii Biotechnology Group, Inc)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    Konkel, M.E., F. Babakhani, and L.A. Joens. 1990. Invasion-related antigens of Campylobacter jejuni . J. Infect. Dis. 162:888-895. Naess, V., and T...Hofstad. 1984. Chemical studies of partially hydrolysed lipopolysaccharides from four strains of Campylobacter jejuni and two strains of Campylobacter coll. J. Gen. Microbiol. 130:2783-2789. -4- i

  20. DisGeNET-RDF: harnessing the innovative power of the Semantic Web to explore the genetic basis of diseases

    PubMed Central

    Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Piñero, Janet; Bravo, Àlex; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: DisGeNET-RDF makes available knowledge on the genetic basis of human diseases in the Semantic Web. Gene-disease associations (GDAs) and their provenance metadata are published as human-readable and machine-processable web resources. The information on GDAs included in DisGeNET-RDF is interlinked to other biomedical databases to support the development of bioinformatics approaches for translational research through evidence-based exploitation of a rich and fully interconnected linked open data. Availability and implementation: http://rdf.disgenet.org/ Contact: support@disgenet.org PMID:27153650

  1. DisGeNET-RDF: harnessing the innovative power of the Semantic Web to explore the genetic basis of diseases.

    PubMed

    Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Piñero, Janet; Bravo, Àlex; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I

    2016-07-15

    DisGeNET-RDF makes available knowledge on the genetic basis of human diseases in the Semantic Web. Gene-disease associations (GDAs) and their provenance metadata are published as human-readable and machine-processable web resources. The information on GDAs included in DisGeNET-RDF is interlinked to other biomedical databases to support the development of bioinformatics approaches for translational research through evidence-based exploitation of a rich and fully interconnected linked open data. http://rdf.disgenet.org/ support@disgenet.org. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Coxiella Burnetii: Host and Bacterial Responses to Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-16

    investigations into Rocky Mountain spotted fever . Allowing the ticks to feed on guinea pigs resulted in a febrile response [2] and their inflammatory...Introduction .1. History Q fever was first observed in Australia in 1933 as a dis...bacterial response to infection. This review is ntended to provide a basic introduction to C. burnetii and Q fever , while emphasizing immunomodulatory

  3. School Choice or the Politics of Desperation? Black and Latinx Parents of Students with Dis/Abilities Selecting Charter Schools in Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waitoller, Federico R.; Super, Gia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the city of Chicago to examine how Black and Latinx parents of students with dis/abilities1 engage with school choice. Using analytical tools from grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) and a theoretical lens informed by critical notions of space, race and dis/ability, we analyze interviews with parents of students…

  4. Systematic phenomenological study of the cos2{phi} asymmetry in unpolarized semi-inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Vincenzo; Prokudin, Alexei; Ma Boqiang

    2008-08-15

    We study the cos2{phi} azimuthal asymmetry in unpolarized semi-inclusive DIS, taking into account both the perturbative contribution (gluon emission and splitting) and the nonperturbative effects arising from intrinsic transverse motion and transverse spin of quarks. In particular we explore the possibility to extract from some information about the Boer-Mulders function h{sub 1}{sup perpendicular}, which represents a transverse-polarization asymmetry of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. Predictions are presented for the HERMES, COMPASS and JLab kinematics, where is dominated by the kinematical higher-twist contribution, and turns to be of order of a few percent. We show that under reasonable assumptions a larger asymmetry in {pi}{sup -} production, compared to {pi}{sup +} production, would represent a signature of the Boer-Mulders effect.

  5. Electron-deuteron DIS with spectator tagging at EIC: Development of theoretical framework

    SciTech Connect

    Cosyn, Wim B.; Guzey, Vadim A.; Sargsian, Misak M.; Strikman, Mark M.; Weiss, Christian

    2016-03-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) on the deuteron with detection of a forward-moving nucleon (p, n) and measurement of its recoil momentum ("spectator tagging''). Such experiments offer full control of the nuclear configuration during the high-energy process and can be used for precision studies of the neutron's partonic structure and its spin dependence, nuclear modifications of partonic structure, and nuclear shadowing at small x. We review the theoretical description of spectator tagging at EIC energies (light-front nuclear structure, on-shell extrapolation in the recoil nucleon momentum, final-state interactions, diffractive effects at small x) and report about on-going developments.

  6. [Basic human needs of nursing professional: situations of (dis)satisfaction at work].

    PubMed

    Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia Vitoria; Porto, Isaura Setenta

    2011-04-01

    Care is associated with the nursing actions considering, above all, a group of needs of the nursing team. The objectives of this study were: to characterize situations of (dis) satisfaction of the nursing team at work and analyze their possible implications. Maslow's theory of basic human needs was used to understand the motivational factors, and a qualitative methodology was used applying quantitative techniques. The method consisted of participant observation with registers on a filed diary associated to the application of a questionnaire on 18 participants from the nursing team of a Public Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. The study indicates that the basic needs of the nursing team are compromised, especially safety and physiological needs, which are the most primary. The compromising of the subjects' primary needs implies health hazards and reduced work performance in hospital settings.

  7. When less equal is less human: Intragroup (dis)respect and the experience of being human.

    PubMed

    Renger, Daniela; Mommert, Alex; Renger, Sophus; Simon, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that equality-based respect is an important antecedent of positive social interaction and group-serving behavior. In the present research we tested whether intragroup equality-based respect affects perceptions of being treated as a human as well as self-dehumanization. In Experiment 1, we found that high respect received from fellow work group members heightens group members' sense of being treated as a human being, while low respect diminishes it. In Experiment 2, we secured evidence that (dis)respect also affected recipients' self-views in terms of self-dehumanization. More specifically, if respect was withheld by other ingroup members, fewer human nature and human uniqueness traits, as well as secondary positive emotions, were attributed to the self. This increase in self-infrahumanization was further related to higher endorsement of unethical behavior. We discuss the importance of equality-based respect for (de-)humanization processes in social groups.

  8. Electron-deuteron DIS with spectator tagging at EIC: Development of theoretical framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2016-03-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) on the deuteron with detection of a forward-moving nucleon (p, n) and measurement of its recoil momentum ("spectator tagging"). Such experiments offer full control of the nuclear configuration during the high-energy process and can be used for precision studies of the neutron's partonic structure and its spin dependence, nuclear modifications of partonic structure, and nuclear shadowing at small x. We review the theoretical description of spectator tagging at EIC energies (light-front nuclear structure, on-shell extrapolation in the recoil nucleon momentum, final-state interactions, diffractive effects at small x) and report about on-going developments.

  9. Distress from Motivational Dis-integration: When Fundamental Motives Are Too Weak or Too Strong.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, James F M; Franks, Becca; Higgins, E Tory

    2016-01-01

    Past research has shown that satisfying different kinds of fundamental motives contributes to well-being. More recently, advances in motivational theory have shown that z is also tied to the integration of different motives. In other words, well-being depends not only on maximizing effectiveness in satisfying specific motives, but also on ensuring that motives work together such that no individual motive is too weak or too strong. In this chapter, we review existing research to show that specific forms of psychological distress can be linked to specific types of motivational imbalance or dis-integration. Such disintegration can arise from either excessive weakness of a specific motive or the excessive strength and/or dominance of a specific motive, thereby inhibiting other motives. Possible neural correlates and avenues of intervention are discussed.

  10. Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics by TOG-domain proteins XMAP215/Dis1 and CLASP

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bassam, Jawdat; Chang, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) regulate the dynamic properties of microtubules (MTs) are still poorly understood. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of two conserved families of MAPs, the XMAP215/Dis1 and CLASP family of proteins. In vivo and in vitro studies show that XMAP215 proteins act as microtubule polymerases at MT plus ends to accelerate MT assembly, while CLASP proteins promote MT rescue and suppress MT catastrophe events. These are structurally related proteins that use conserved TOG domains to recruit tubulin dimers to MTs. We discuss models for how these proteins might use these individual tubulin dimers to regulate dynamic behaviors of MT plus ends. PMID:21782439

  11. On morphological selection rule of noisy character applied to model (dis)orderly protein formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siódmiak, Jacek; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Gadomski, Adam

    2010-05-01

    We propose that the main mechanism controlling the selection rule of model (dis)orderly protein formations, such as non-Kossel crystal growth and aggregation of lysozyme from aqueous solution, is an ion-channeling filter having flicker-noise properties. This filter is originated at the interfaces between growing solidlike object and its external liquid-type phase, and it can be considered as a series of voltage gated ion subchannels. The dynamics of each channel is studied by using both simulation and analytic argumentation lines, and represents a novel thought on how to utilize the presence of constructive-noise sources in protein formation, a field of utmost experimental and technological interest.

  12. Success in the workplace: From the voice of (dis)abled to the voice of enabled

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The intention of this article is twofold; first to encourage a shift in seeing ‘the disabled’ not as people with disabilities but rather as people with unique abilities. Secondly, to explore ways of facilitating gainful employment for these uniquely abled people. The term disability is examined against a backdrop of definitions including the definition postulated by the International Classification of Functioning. In this article, the life experiences of a purposive sample of people with (dis)abilities who have been successful in the world of work are explored. A narrative approach gives voice to their experiences. Quotes from the participants’ responses are used to illustrate the common themes that emerged relating to their experiences. These themes are resonated against a backdrop of relevant literature. If disabled people are enabled to recognize and use their unique abilities, as well as develop various self-determination skills, imagine the endless possibilities which could arise for them and society in general. PMID:28729997

  13. Social origins and post-high school institutional pathways: a cumulative dis/advantage approach.

    PubMed

    Giudici, Francesco; Pallas, Aaron M

    2014-03-01

    The social stratification that takes place during the transition out of high school is traditionally explained with theoretical frameworks such as status attainment and social reproduction. In our paper, we suggest the cumulative dis/advantage hypothesis as an alternative theoretical and empirical approach that explains this divergence in institutional pathways as the result of the dynamic interplay between social institutions (in our case, schools) and individuals' resources. We use data from the NLSY79 in order to compute institutional pathways (defined by educational and occupational status) of 9,200 high school graduates. Optimal Matching Analysis and Cluster Analysis generated a typology of life course pathways. Our results show that both ascribed characteristics and students' high school characteristics and resources are predictors of post-high school pathways.

  14. Multifactorial causal model of brain (dis)organization and therapeutic intervention: Application to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Carbonell, Félix M; Sotero, Roberto C; Chouinard-Decorte, Francois; Evans, Alan C

    2017-05-15

    Generative models focused on multifactorial causal mechanisms in brain disorders are scarce and generally based on limited data. Despite the biological importance of the multiple interacting processes, their effects remain poorly characterized from an integrative analytic perspective. Here, we propose a spatiotemporal multifactorial causal model (MCM) of brain (dis)organization and therapeutic intervention that accounts for local causal interactions, effects propagation via physical brain networks, cognitive alterations, and identification of optimum therapeutic interventions. In this article, we focus on describing the model and applying it at the population-based level for studying late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). By interrelating six different neuroimaging modalities and cognitive measurements, this model accurately predicts spatiotemporal alterations in brain amyloid-β (Aβ) burden, glucose metabolism, vascular flow, resting state functional activity, structural properties, and cognitive integrity. The results suggest that a vascular dysregulation may be the most-likely initial pathologic event leading to LOAD. Nevertheless, they also suggest that LOAD it is not caused by a unique dominant biological factor (e.g. vascular or Aβ) but by the complex interplay among multiple relevant direct interactions. Furthermore, using theoretical control analysis of the identified population-based multifactorial causal network, we show the crucial advantage of using combinatorial over single-target treatments, explain why one-target Aβ based therapies might fail to improve clinical outcomes, and propose an efficiency ranking of possible LOAD interventions. Although still requiring further validation at the individual level, this work presents the first analytic framework for dynamic multifactorial brain (dis)organization that may explain both the pathologic evolution of progressive neurological disorders and operationalize the influence of multiple interventional

  15. The Dis-Art Creative Journey, Art Therapy for Persons with Disabilities: Adaptation of the Creative Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzzatto, Paola; Bruno, Teresa; Cosco, Marianna; Del Curatolo, Annamaria; Frigenti, Franca; Macchioni, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a 10-session group art therapy program for people with physical and neurological disabilities. This program, the DIS-ART Creative Journey, was adapted from the Creative Journey used with cancer patients, and was tested in Italy by 4 art therapists. The 5-step structure of each session and the 10 facilitating techniques used…

  16. (Re)Writing Civics in the Digital Age: The Role of Social Media in Student (Dis)Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman Daley, Joannah

    2012-01-01

    (Re)Writing Civics in the Digital Age: The Role of Social Media in Student (Dis)Engagement addresses an important gap in the knowledge of civic rhetoric available in Rhetoric and Composition by using qualitative methods to explore the parameters of civic engagement through social media-based digital writing. With funding from URI's Office of…

  17. Subjectivation, Agency and the Schooling of Raced and Dis/Abled Asylum-Seeking Children in the Italian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliarini, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    This paper intends to address the challenges that the Italian education system is facing in terms of policies and practices relating to dis/abled asylum-seeking and refugee children, in order to make sense of the politics of daily life inside schools and the network of social services for forced migrants, and to pay renewed attention to the notion…

  18. DisGeNET: a comprehensive platform integrating information on human disease-associated genes and variants

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, Janet; Bravo, Àlex; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Gutiérrez-Sacristán, Alba; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Centeno, Emilio; García-García, Javier; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2017-01-01

    The information about the genetic basis of human diseases lies at the heart of precision medicine and drug discovery. However, to realize its full potential to support these goals, several problems, such as fragmentation, heterogeneity, availability and different conceptualization of the data must be overcome. To provide the community with a resource free of these hurdles, we have developed DisGeNET (http://www.disgenet.org), one of the largest available collections of genes and variants involved in human diseases. DisGeNET integrates data from expert curated repositories, GWAS catalogues, animal models and the scientific literature. DisGeNET data are homogeneously annotated with controlled vocabularies and community-driven ontologies. Additionally, several original metrics are provided to assist the prioritization of genotype–phenotype relationships. The information is accessible through a web interface, a Cytoscape App, an RDF SPARQL endpoint, scripts in several programming languages and an R package. DisGeNET is a versatile platform that can be used for different research purposes including the investigation of the molecular underpinnings of specific human diseases and their comorbidities, the analysis of the properties of disease genes, the generation of hypothesis on drug therapeutic action and drug adverse effects, the validation of computationally predicted disease genes and the evaluation of text-mining methods performance. PMID:27924018

  19. Highly efficient enzymatic preparation of c-di-AMP using the diadenylate cyclase DisA from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cao; Wang, Jieping; Luo, Yunchao; Fu, Yang; Su, Jianmei; He, Jin

    2013-05-10

    Cyclic 3',5'-diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a newly recognized bacterial nucleotide second messenger molecule. In addition, it has been shown to be a potential vaccine adjuvant. Although multiple methods are available for c-di-AMP synthesis, the yields are low and the purification procedures are laborious. Here, we report an enzymatic method for more efficient and economical c-di-AMP synthesis using a diadenylate cyclase DisA from Bacillus thuringiensis BMB 171 (btDisA). After overexpression and purification of btDisA, the enzyme-catalyzed reaction conditions were further investigated. Under the optimum conditions, in which 100mM CHES (pH 9.5) containing 2μM btDisA, 10mM ATP, and 10mM MgCl2 was incubated at 50°C for 4h, a high conversion rate of c-di-AMP was obtained. Coupling this process with HPLC purification and lyophilization yielded 100mg of highly pure c-di-AMP that was harvested in white powder form from a 50mL enzyme-catalyzed reaction system. The protocol is not only directly applicable for preparing abundant amounts of c-di-AMP for extensive biochemical and immunological use, but can also be scaled up to meet the requirements for medical applications.

  20. The Canadian Legal System, the Robert Latimer Case, and the Rhetorical Construction of (Dis)ability: "Bodies that Matter?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers Judge Ted Noble's 1997 ruling of the Latimer case in terms of how it rhetorically constructs and privileges the normal, able-bodied status quo, while, at the same time, deconstructs and positions as inferior the "abnormal," dis-abled minority. In this case, Noble not only took the unprecedented step of granting…

  1. (Re)Writing Civics in the Digital Age: The Role of Social Media in Student (Dis)Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman Daley, Joannah

    2012-01-01

    (Re)Writing Civics in the Digital Age: The Role of Social Media in Student (Dis)Engagement addresses an important gap in the knowledge of civic rhetoric available in Rhetoric and Composition by using qualitative methods to explore the parameters of civic engagement through social media-based digital writing. With funding from URI's Office of…

  2. Beyond the University of Racial Diversity: Some Remarks on Race, Diversity, (Dis)Advantage and Affirmative Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghid, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The compelling essays in this issue of the journal take on the often contentious and complex issue of racial affirmative action. I do not wish to repeat the arguments authors offer either in defence or against student admissions to a university on the grounds of race, (dis)advantage, class, gender, and so on. Rather, I wish to respond to a…

  3. Conception and evaluation of a QoS-based architecture for DIS applications in a differentiated services Internet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Fabien; Chassot, Christophe; Lozes, Andre; Diaz, Michel

    2001-07-01

    Compared with classical applications, advanced distributed applications such as multimedia applications or distributed interactive simulation (DIS) have both new features and new constraints in terms of communication requirements. To tackle these needs, several projects have been initiated within the Internet community to design a new generation of protocols for the future Internet's architec-ture. The research reported here deals with the design of a communication architecture with guaranteed end to end quality of service (QoS) for DIS-like applications in an IPv6 environment providing 'differentiated' services. The paper is composed of three major parts: the first one presents features and requirement of DIS applications; the second part exposes the design principles of the pro-posed architecture and the networking platform on which it has been developed; the third part presents the experimental measures defined for the validation of the IP QoS management mechanisms, and then proposes and discusses a possible configuration of the architecture allowing to distribute DIS applications with respect to their communication requirements.

  4. Activity and in vivo dynamics of Bacillus subtilis DisA are affected by RadA/Sms and by Holliday junction-processing proteins.

    PubMed

    Gándara, Carolina; de Lucena, Daniella K C; Torres, Rubén; Serrano, Ester; Altenburger, Stephan; Graumann, Peter L; Alonso, Juan C

    2017-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis c-di-AMP synthase DisA and RecA-related RadA/Sms are involved in the repair of DNA damage in exponentially growing cells. We provide genetic evidence that DisA or RadA/Sms is epistatic to the branch migration translocase (BMT) RecG and the Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase RecU in response to DNA damage. We provide genetic evidence damage. Functional DisA-YFP formed dynamic foci in exponentially growing cells, which moved through the nucleoids at a speed compatible with a DNA-scanning mode. DisA formed more static structures in the absence of RecU or RecG than in wild type cells, while dynamic foci were still observed in cells lacking the BMT RuvAB. Purified DisA synthesizes c-di-AMP, but interaction with RadA/Sms or with HJ DNA decreases DisA-mediated c-di-AMP synthesis. RadA/Sms-YFP also formed dynamic foci in growing cells, but the foci moved throughout the cells rather than just on the nucleoids, and co-localized rarely with DisA-YFP foci, suggesting that RadA/Sms and DisA interact only transiently in unperturbed conditions. Our data suggest a model in which DisA moving along dsDNA indicates absence of DNA damage/replication stress via normal c-di-AMP levels, while interaction with HJ DNA/halted forks leads to reduced c-di-AMP levels and an ensuing block in cell proliferation. RadA/Sms may be involved in modulating DisA activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Clinical Infectious Outcomes Associated with Biofilm-related Infections: a Retrospective Chart Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-07

    patient population and bacterial isolates, demonstrated that biofilm formation was associated with persistence of skin and soft tissue wound infection ...acquired data from military casualties having persistent wound infections [3]. A majority of the isolates selected were biofilm producers. This may be due to...et al. Biofilms and persistent wound infections in United States military trauma patients: a case–control analysis. BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:190. 4

  6. Development of In Vitro Correlate Assays of Immunity to Infection with Yersinia Pestis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    to Yersinia enterocolitica in mice. Med. Microbiol. Immunol. 181:333–338. 5. Boise, L. H., and C. M. Collins. 2001. Salmonella-induced cell lysis...666. 28. Mills, S. D., A. Boland, M. P. Sory, P. van der Smissen, C. Kerbourch, B. B. Finlay, and G. R. Cornelis. 1997. Yersinia enterocolitica induces...Heesemann, and B. Rouot. 1997. Interaction of Yersinia enterocolitica with macrophages leads to macrophage cell death through apoptosis. Infect. Immun

  7. Archaeal Viruses of the Sulfolobales: Isolation, Infection, and CRISPR Spacer Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 with an environmental virus mixture isolated from Yellowstone National Park (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012). Experimental studies of isolated genetic elements from this mixture revealed that SMV1 (S ulfolobus Monocauda Virus 1), a tailed spindle-shaped virus, can induce spacer acquisition in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs and the techniques used both to infect laboratory strains with these virus mixtures and to obtain purified virus particles. Secondly, we present the experimental conditions required for activating SMV1-induced spacer acquisition in two different Sulfolobus species.

  8. Epizootiology of Hantavirus Infections in Baltimore Isolation of a Virus from Norway Rats, and Characteristics of Infected Rat Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    diagnosis of human 6. Svedmyr A, Lee HW, Berglund A, et al. Epidemic infection. J Infect Dis 1980;141:131-4. nephropathy in Scandinavia is related to...perforate trypsinized monolayers, were 1) passed to vaginal orifices and/or pregnancy in fe- cell-free 25 cm 2 flasks; 2) inoculated onto males), and...Simi- was seen in the largest mass class (>500 g). larly, males and females showed no signifi- This difference in pregnancy rates in the cant

  9. Uneasy encounters: Youth, social (dis)comfort and the autistic self.

    PubMed

    Coleman-Fountain, Edmund

    2017-07-01

    Notions of deficit and 'faultiness' shape depictions of the association between autism and uneasy social relationships. That framing has been the focus of critique by autistic activists and scholars who, exploring autistic people's sociality, reframe issues of social difficulty in terms of inequality and discomfort. Located within this set of debates, the article analyses data from a UK based study of mental health narratives derived from semi-structured interviews with 19 autistic young adults aged 23 to 24. The NIHR funded the study, and a UK National Health Service Research Ethics Committee gave ethical approval. Sociality and social difficulties, feelings of discomfort, and perceptions of the autistic self as 'faulty' were themes of the study. Exploring the nexus of inequality, non-autistic social power, fears about social performance and (dis)comfort that underpinned the accounts, the article explores the conclusions the young adults reached about social difficulty. Critically examining notions of improvability, the article contributes to debates about sociality, social difficulty and comfort by questioning the assumption that social dysfunction is due to autistic 'fault'. The article concludes with a discussion of inequality in autistic and non-autistic encounters, and of the social dynamics that deny autistic people social comfort. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transverse target spin asymmetry in inclusive DIS with two-photon exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-09-06

    We study the transverse target spin dependence of the cross section for the inclusive electron-nucleon scattering with unpolarized beam. Such dependence is absent in the one-photon exchange approximation (Christ-Lee theorem) and arises only in higher orders of the QED expansion, from the interference of one-photon and absorptive two-photon exchange amplitudes as well as from real photon emission (bremsstrahlung). We demonstrate that the transverse spin-dependent two-photon exchange cross section is free of QED infrared and collinear divergences. We argue that in DIS kinematics the transverse spin dependence should be governed by a "parton-like" mechanism in which the two-photon exchange couples mainly to a single quark. We calculate the normal spin asymmetry in an approximation where the dominant contribution arises from quark helicity flip due to interactions with non-perturbative vacuum fields (constituent quark picture) and is proportional to the quark transversity distribution in the nucleon. Such helicity-flip processes are not significantly Sudakov-suppressed if the infrared scale for gluon emission in the photon-quark subprocess is of the order of the chiral symmetry breaking scale, mu^2_chiral>>Lambda^2_QCD. We estimate the asymmetry in the kinematics of the planned Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment to be of the order 10^-4, with different sign for proton and neutron. We also comment on the spin dependence in the limit of soft high-energy scattering.

  11. Prevalence of mental disorders in elderly people: the European MentDis_ICF65+ study.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Sylke; Schulz, Holger; Volkert, Jana; Dehoust, Maria; Sehner, Susanne; Suling, Anna; Ausín, Berta; Canuto, Alessandra; Crawford, Mike; Da Ronch, Chiara; Grassi, Luigi; Hershkovitz, Yael; Muñoz, Manuel; Quirk, Alan; Rotenstein, Ora; Santos-Olmo, Ana Belén; Shalev, Arieh; Strehle, Jens; Weber, Kerstin; Wegscheider, Karl; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Härter, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Except for dementia and depression, little is known about common mental disorders in elderly people. To estimate current, 12-month and lifetime prevalence rates of mental disorders in different European and associated countries using a standardised diagnostic interview adapted to measure the cognitive needs of elderly people. The MentDis_ICF65+ study is based on an age-stratified, random sample of 3142 older men and women (65-84 years) living in selected catchment community areas of participating countries. One in two individuals had experienced a mental disorder in their lifetime, one in three within the past year and nearly one in four currently had a mental disorder. The most prevalent disorders were anxiety disorders, followed by affective and substance-related disorders. Compared with previous studies we found substantially higher prevalence rates for most mental disorders. These findings underscore the need for improving diagnostic assessments adapted to the cognitive capacity of elderly people. There is a need to raise awareness of psychosocial problems in elderly people and to deliver high-quality mental health services to these individuals. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  12. Immunogenomic engineering of a plug-and-(dis)play hybridoma platform

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, Mark; Parola, Cristina; Kelton, William J.; Heuberger, Paul; Reddy, Sai T.

    2016-01-01

    Hybridomas, fusions of primary mouse B cells and myelomas, are stable, rapidly-proliferating cell lines widely utilized for antibody screening and production. Antibody specificity of a hybridoma clone is determined by the immunoglobulin sequence of the primary B cell. Here we report a platform for rapid reprogramming of hybridoma antibody specificity by immunogenomic engineering. Here we use CRISPR-Cas9 to generate double-stranded breaks in immunoglobulin loci, enabling deletion of the native variable light chain and replacement of the endogenous variable heavy chain with a fluorescent reporter protein (mRuby). New antibody genes are introduced by Cas9-targeting of mRuby for replacement with a donor construct encoding a light chain and a variable heavy chain, resulting in full-length antibody expression. Since hybridomas surface express and secrete antibodies, reprogrammed cells are isolated using flow cytometry and cell culture supernatant is used for antibody production. Plug-and-(dis)play hybridomas can be reprogrammed with only a single transfection and screening step. PMID:27531490

  13. Social (dis)order and psychosocial trauma: Look earlier, look outside, and look beyond the persons.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Amalio; Blanco, Rubén; Díaz, Darío

    2016-04-01

    The most common and extreme suffering humankind has ever experienced comes from interpersonal and collective intentional violence. In dealing with traumatic outcomes psychology must overcome the mutually constitutive interaction between the (dis)order of a given macro or microsocial context and the mental health of the persons living in it. Social psychologist Ignacio Martín-Baró addressed in a preferential way the study of civil war in El Salvador in terms of intergroup hostility and polarization. He also approached the aftereffects of war by means of a theoretical core assumption: that traumatic experience rooted in collective violence (a human-made stressor) should be understood bearing in mind its social roots (pretraumatic situation), its personal and collective harm (collective injury), and the destruction of the social fabric. These are the arguments for his conceptualization of psychosocial trauma. Twenty-six years after the violent murder of Martín-Baró, along with 5 Jesuit priests, a housekeeper, and his teenage daughter, the current authors have adopted his general framework. Based on new theoretical insights and supporting data, the authors propose an expanded 4-dimension theoretical argument on psychosocial trauma: (a) pretrauma conditions based on social distress, (b) shared network of fear leading to breakdown of core social assumptions, (c) the outgroup as a target of negative emotions, and (d) destruction of family ties and community networks. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Heterogeneous performances of conceptual dis/continuity: a dialectic reading of Brown and Kloser's article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sungwon; Kim, Mijung

    2009-12-01

    We review Brown and Kloser's article, "Conceptual continuity and the science of baseball: using informal science literacy to promote students science learning" from a Vygotskian cultural-historical and dialectic perspective. Brown and Kloser interpret interview data with student baseball players and claim that students' conceptual understanding articulated in vernacular genres involves continuities (similarities) with the canonical scientific explanations. In this commentary, we suggest that the authors' approach presupposes the dichotomy of the formal and the informal, which brings the authors' attention to continuity into the separation of cognition from language. We propose a Vygotskian approach that points out the problem of theorizing cognition (conceptual understanding) by depending on specific forms of representation (e.g., scientific terms). As alternative, we envision a Vygotskian cultural-historical approach to language, which considers different, irreducible modes of communication as an integrated whole and therefore allows theorizing cognition without dichotomizing it from the concrete ways by which human being communicates. We provide an exemplary analysis of a lecture talk in a university physics classroom and exemplify dialectic theories that explain the development of conceptual understanding. We discuss that this Vygotskian dialectic approach shows that people communicate scientific concepts through hybridization, which does not reproduce a genre self-identically; the continuity of conceptual understanding involves dis/continuity.

  15. Immunogenomic engineering of a plug-and-(dis)play hybridoma platform.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Mark; Parola, Cristina; Kelton, William J; Heuberger, Paul; Reddy, Sai T

    2016-08-17

    Hybridomas, fusions of primary mouse B cells and myelomas, are stable, rapidly-proliferating cell lines widely utilized for antibody screening and production. Antibody specificity of a hybridoma clone is determined by the immunoglobulin sequence of the primary B cell. Here we report a platform for rapid reprogramming of hybridoma antibody specificity by immunogenomic engineering. Here we use CRISPR-Cas9 to generate double-stranded breaks in immunoglobulin loci, enabling deletion of the native variable light chain and replacement of the endogenous variable heavy chain with a fluorescent reporter protein (mRuby). New antibody genes are introduced by Cas9-targeting of mRuby for replacement with a donor construct encoding a light chain and a variable heavy chain, resulting in full-length antibody expression. Since hybridomas surface express and secrete antibodies, reprogrammed cells are isolated using flow cytometry and cell culture supernatant is used for antibody production. Plug-and-(dis)play hybridomas can be reprogrammed with only a single transfection and screening step.

  16. The Influence of (Dis)belief in Free Will on Immoral Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, Emilie A.; Vuillaume, Laurène; Magalhães De Saldanha da Gama, Pedro A.; Cleeremans, Axel

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of human existence is that we all hold beliefs that determine how we act. Amongst such beliefs, the idea that we are endowed with free will appears to be linked to prosocial behaviors, probably by enhancing the feeling of responsibility of individuals over their own actions. However, such effects appear to be more complex that one might have initially thought. Here, we aimed at exploring how induced disbeliefs in free will impact the sense of agency over the consequences of one’s own actions in a paradigm that engages morality. To do so, we asked participants to choose to inflict or to refrain from inflicting an electric choc to another participant in exchange of a small financial benefit. Our results show that participants who were primed with a text defending neural determinism – the idea that humans are a mere bunch of neurons guided by their biology – administered fewer shocks and were less vindictive toward the other participant. Importantly, this finding only held for female participants. These results show the complex interaction between gender, (dis)beliefs in free will and moral behavior. PMID:28144228

  17. Acquired (dis)liking of natural cheese in different repeated exposure environment.

    PubMed

    Go, Jung-Eun; Kim, Mi-Ran; Chung, Seo-Jin

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the development of (dis)liking of various types of natural cheese with repeated exposures among Korean young females in two environment settings. Six types of natural cheese with varying flavor and texture characteristics were selected: Brie, Emmental, Gorgonzola, Gouda, Parmigiano-Reggiano and sharp Cheddar. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups (individual evaluation vs. social interaction) and exposed to all six types of cheeses eight times for 4 weeks. The acceptance scores for these cheeses were monitored at the beginning (first taste test) and end (second taste test) of the exposure test as well as 1 month after the completion of exposure test (third taste test). The results showed that the acceptance of cheese was affected by the cheese type and the number of test trials but not by tasting environment. The acceptance levels were higher for Brie, Gouda and sharp Cheddar than for Emmental, Gorgonzola and Parmigiano-Reggiano. When the subjects were exposed to Brie, Emmental, Gouda, and sharp Cheddar repeatedly, their acceptance level increased significantly. This study demonstrated that the liking of natural cheese can occur through repeated exposure to the cheese, but with the outcome varying with the type of cheese. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Associated with Parent-Child (Dis)Agreement on Child Behavior and Parenting Problems in Chinese Immigrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Joey J.; Lau, Anna S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined familial and cultural factors predicting parent-child (dis)agreement on child behavior and parenting problems. Immigrant Chinese parents (89.7% mothers; M age = 44.24 years) and their children (62 boys; 57.9%) between the ages of 9 and 17 years (M = 11.9 years, SD = 2.9) completed measures of parent punitive behavior and child…

  19. Factors Associated with Parent-Child (Dis)Agreement on Child Behavior and Parenting Problems in Chinese Immigrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Joey J.; Lau, Anna S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined familial and cultural factors predicting parent-child (dis)agreement on child behavior and parenting problems. Immigrant Chinese parents (89.7% mothers; M age = 44.24 years) and their children (62 boys; 57.9%) between the ages of 9 and 17 years (M = 11.9 years, SD = 2.9) completed measures of parent punitive behavior and child…

  20. Preparation of Dis-Azo Dyes Derived from p-Aminophenol and Their Fastness Properties for Synthetic Polymer-Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otutu, J. O.; Okoro, D.; Ossai, E. K.

    The preparation and properties of a series of dis-azo dyes derived from p-aminophenol is described. The influence on colour, dyeing fastness properties of the dyes on synthetic polymer-fibres is reported. Most of the dyes synthesized afford better light fastness and better wet (wash, perspiration) fastness on PET than on nylon 6 fabric. The structure of each compound was confirmed by using infrared, UV-VIS and elemental analysis.

  1. Low-cost real-time 3D PC distributed-interactive-simulation (DIS) application for C4I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, David L.; Veron, Harry

    1998-04-01

    A 3D Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) application was developed and demonstrated in a PC environment. The application is capable of running in the stealth mode or as a player which includes battlefield simulations, such as ModSAF. PCs can be clustered together, but not necessarily collocated, to run a simulation or training exercise on their own. A 3D perspective view of the battlefield is displayed that includes terrain, trees, buildings and other objects supported by the DIS application. Screen update rates of 15 to 20 frames per second have been achieved with fully lit and textured scenes thus providing high quality and fast graphics. A complete PC system can be configured for under $2,500. The software runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT. It is written in C++ and uses a commercial API called RenderWare for 3D rendering. The software uses Microsoft Foundation classes and Microsoft DirectPlay for joystick input. The RenderWare libraries enhance the performance through optimization for MMX and the Pentium Pro processor. The RenderWare and the Righteous 3D graphics board from Orchid Technologies with an advertised rendering rate of up to 2 million texture mapped triangles per second. A low-cost PC DIS simulator that can partake in a real-time collaborative simulation with other platforms is thus achieved.

  2. Chains of (dis)trust: exploring the underpinnings of knowledge-sharing and quality care across mental health services.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick R; Calnan, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Quality and safety in healthcare settings are underpinned by organisational cultures, which facilitate or impede the refinement, sharing and application of knowledge. Avoiding the use of the term culture as a residual category, we focus specifically on describing chains of (dis)trust, analysing their development across relatively low-trust service contexts and their impact upon knowledge-sharing and caregiving. Drawing upon data from in-depth interviews with service users, healthcare professionals, service managers and other stakeholders across three mental healthcare (psychosis) teams in southern England, we identify micro-mechanisms that explain how (dis)trust within one intra-organisational relationship impacts upon other relationships. Experiences and inferences of vulnerability, knowledge, uncertainty, interests and time, among actors who are both trustees and trusters across different relationships, are pertinent to such analyses. This more micro-level understanding facilitates detailed conceptualisations of trust chains as meso-level tendencies that contribute to wider vicious or virtuous cycles of organisational (dis)trust. We explore how knowledge-sharing and caregiving are vitally interwoven within these chains of trust or distrust, enhancing and/or inhibiting the instrumental and communicative aspects of quality healthcare as a result.

  3. Prayer and the Registered Nurse (PRN): nurses' reports of ease and dis-ease with patient-initiated prayer request.

    PubMed

    Minton, Mary E; Isaacson, Mary; Banik, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    To explore nurse comfort with patient-initiated prayer request scenarios. Spiritual care is fundamental to patient care evidenced by Joint Commission requirement of a spiritual assessment on a patient's hospital admission. Prayer is an assessment component. Patients may seek solace and support by requesting prayer from the bedside nurse, the nurse may lack confidence in responding. Absent in the literature are reports specific to nurses' comfort when patients initiate prayer requests. Cross-sectional mixed methods study. Data were collected in early 2014 from 134 nurses in the USA via an online survey using QuestionPro. The qualitative results reported here were collated by scenario and analysed using thematic analysis. The scenario responses revealed patterns of ease and dis-ease in response to patient requests for prayer. The pattern of ease of prayer with patients revealed three themes: open to voice of calm or silence; physical or spiritual; can I call the chaplain. For these nurses, prayer is a natural component of nursing care, as the majority of responses to all scenarios demonstrated an overwhelming ease in response and capacity to pray with patients on request. The pattern of dis-ease of prayer with patients distinguished two themes: cautious hesitancy and whose God. These nurses experienced dis-ease with the patient's request no matter the situation. Educators and administrators must nurture opportunities for students and nurses to learn about and engage in the reflective preparation needed to respond to patient prayer requests. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Network protocol changes can improve DisCom WAN performance : evaluating TCP modifications and SCTP in the ASC tri-lab environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2005-06-01

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Distance Computing (DisCom) Wide Area Network (WAN) is a high performance, long distance network environment that is based on the ubiquitous TCP/IP protocol set. However, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the algorithms that govern its operation were defined almost two decades ago for a network environment vastly different from the DisCom WAN. In this paper we explore and evaluate possible modifications to TCP that purport to improve TCP performance in environments like the DisCom WAN. We also examine a much newer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) that claims to provide reliable network transport while also implementing multi-streaming, multi-homing capabilities that are appealing in the DisCom high performance network environment. We provide performance comparisons and recommendations for continued development that will lead to network communications protocol implementations capable of supporting the coming ASC Petaflop computing environments.

  5. Measuring sin2θw in PV-DIS with the Baseline Spectrometers at JLab 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul

    2007-07-18

    The couplings of leptons to quarks are fundamental parameters of the electroweak interaction. Within the framework of the Standard Model, these couplings can be related to sin2θw. Parity violation (PV) in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is proportional to these couplings and hence sensitive sin2θw. PV-DIS, first measured at SLAC in the mid-1970's, was used to establish the Standard Model. The high quality and intensity of the upgraded 11 GeV CEBAF beam at Jefferson Laboratory will make it an ideal tool for PV studies. In DIS the asymmetry from parity violation is large (APV ≈10-4 Q2), allowing precise measurements with modest beam-time. This talk will explore a PV-DIS measurement which can be made using the baseline spectrometers that will exist as part of the 12 GeV JLab upgrade.

  6. Protocols to Assess Coagulation Following In Vitro Infection with Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-25

    initiator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, is upregulated in macrophages following infection of nonhuman primates with the filovirus Ebola virus...Jahrling PB, Larsen T, Geisbert JB, Paragas J, Young HA, Fredeking TM, Rote WE, Vlasuk GP. 2003. Treatment of Ebola virus infection with a recombinant...coagulation abnormalities in ebola hemorrhagic fever: overexpression of tissue factor in primate monocytes/macrophages is a key event. J Infect Dis 188:1618

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Adenovirus Type 4 Infections in US Military Recruits in the Postvaccination Era (1997-2003)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    effect was evident, intracellular viral DNA was isolated from infected cells using the method developed by Shinagawa et al. [45], with modifications...Aoki K, Sawada H, Ishiguro N, Shinagawa M. Changes in subgenome types of adenovirus type 4 isolated from patients with ocular disease between 1985 and...identification of species, serotypes, and coinfections. J Clin Microbiol 2005; 43:5743–52. 45. Shinagawa M, Matsuda A, Ishiyama T, Goto H, Sato G. A rapid and

  8. Model-based sensor rendering for a DIS multisensor airborne surveillance platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John D.; Santapietro, John J.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports on the continuing development of a DIS- compliant model for an airborne platform carrying a multisensor payload. This payload consists of a moving target indicator (MTI) radar, a cooperative battlefield combat identification system (BCIS), and imaging sensors. The imaging sensors are a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and a forward looking infrared (FLIR) imager. The entire platform model is an extension to the ModSAF environment. The sensor model code is fully portable and integrated as ModSAF libraries. Relevant emission protocol data units (PDU) are generated and transmitted. The overall simulation architecture and the MTI and BCIS models have been described in detail elsewhere. The current work concentrates on the development of real-time model-based imaging functions. The software tools which provide this capability are available both in the government- owned inventory and as commercial products. The purpose of the current activity is to investigate the feasibility of integrating software of this kind with the ModSAF environment in order to produce realistic target/scene rendering similar to those obtained by high-resolution imaging sensors. To this end, we investigated real-time scene generation using two approaches. The first, through integration of the IRMA software package developed and distributed by the USAF Wright Laboratories, Eglin AFB, and the second is by use of the commercial software package SensorVisionTM, which is marketed and distributed by Paradigm Solutions, Inc. Both of these produce scene renderings in user specified wavebands by combining entity state PDU information with terrain data. The scene model information is passed to rendering software to produce an IR or SAR rendering of the scene.

  9. Cumulative Viral Load and Virologic Decay Patterns After Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Subjects Influence CD4 Recovery and AIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-20

    Cohorte Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA EP 11 study. J Infect Dis 186: 710–714. 8. Hermankova M, Ray SC, Ruff C, Powell-Davis M, Ingersoll R, et...malignancy in HIV-infected patients during the combination antiretroviral therapy era: Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le Sida (ANRS) CO3 Aquitaine

  10. Exploring Physicians' Dissatisfaction and Work-Related Stress: Development of the PhyDis Scale

    PubMed Central

    Pedrazza, Monica; Berlanda, Sabrina; Trifiletti, Elena; Bressan, Franco

    2016-01-01

    with reference to attachment styles, which is recognized as being a central variable of individual difference supporting caregiving practices. This study represents an original and innovative attempt to address physicians' dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. The PhyDis scale has been developed and, in line with international findings, our results indicate that role uncertainty and loss of social esteem are the most dissatisfying factors. PMID:27588013

  11. Plagioclase-melt (dis)equilibrium due to cooling dynamics: Implications for thermometry, barometry and hygrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollo, Silvio; Putirka, Keith; Iezzi, Gianluca; Del Gaudio, Pierdomenico; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2011-07-01

    The compositional variation of plagioclase and the partitioning of major elements between plagioclase and melt have been experimentally measured as a function of the cooling rate. Crystals were grown from a basaltic melt at a pressure of 500 MPa under (i) variable cooling rates of 0.5, 2.1, 3, 9.4, and 15 °C/min from 1250 °C down to 1000 °C, (ii) quenching temperatures of 1025, 1050, 1075, 1090, and 1100 °C at the fixed cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min, and (iii) isothermal temperatures of 1000, 1025, 1050, 1075, 1090, and 1100 °C. Our results show that euhedral, faceted plagioclases form during isothermal and slower cooling experiments exhibiting idiomorphic tabular shapes. In contrast, dendritic shapes are observed from faster cooled charges. As the cooling rate is increased, concentrations of Al + Ca + Fe + Mg increase and Si + Na + K decrease in plagioclase favoring higher An and lower Ab + Or contents. Significant variations of pl-liqKd are also observed by the comparison between isothermal and cooled charges; notably, pl-liqKdAb-An, pl-liqKdCa-Na and pl-liqKdFe-Mg progressively change with increasing cooling rate. Therefore, crystal-melt exchange reactions have the potential to reveal the departure from equilibrium for plagioclase-bearing cooling magmas. Finally, thermometers, barometers, and hygrometers derived through the plagioclase-liquid equilibria have been tested at these non-equilibrium experimental conditions. Since such models are based on assumption of equilibrium, any form of disequilibrium will yield errors. Results show that errors on estimates of temperature, pressure, and melt-water content increase systematically with increasing cooling rate (i.e. disequilibrium condition) depicting monotonic trends towards drastic overestimates. These trends are perfectly correlated with those of pl-liqKdCa-Na, pl-liqKdAb-An, and pl-liqKdFe-Mg, thus demonstrating their ability to test (dis)equilibrium conditions.

  12. Exploring Physicians' Dissatisfaction and Work-Related Stress: Development of the PhyDis Scale.

    PubMed

    Pedrazza, Monica; Berlanda, Sabrina; Trifiletti, Elena; Bressan, Franco

    2016-01-01

    reference to attachment styles, which is recognized as being a central variable of individual difference supporting caregiving practices. This study represents an original and innovative attempt to address physicians' dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. The PhyDis scale has been developed and, in line with international findings, our results indicate that role uncertainty and loss of social esteem are the most dissatisfying factors.

  13. A novel role for the 3′-5′ exoribonuclease Dis3L2 in controlling cell proliferation and tissue growth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a complex organism, cell proliferation and apoptosis need to be precisely controlled in order for tissues to develop correctly. Excessive cell proliferation can lead to diseases such as cancer. We have shown that the exoribonuclease Dis3L2 is required for the correct regulation of proliferation in a natural tissue within the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Dis3L2 is a member of a highly conserved family of exoribonucleases that degrade RNA in a 3′-5′ direction. We show that knockdown of dis3L2 in the Drosophila wing imaginal discs results in substantial wing overgrowth due to increased cellular proliferation rather than an increase in cell size. Imaginal discs are specified in the embryo before proliferating and differentiating to form the adult structures of the fly. Using RNA-seq we identified a small set of mRNAs that are sensitive to Dis3L2 activity. Of the mRNAs which increase in levels and are therefore potential targets of Dis3L2, we identified 2 that change at the post-transcriptional level but not at the transcriptional level, namely CG2678 (a transcription factor) and pyrexia (a TRP cation channel). We also demonstrate a compensatory effect between Dis3L2 and the 5′-3′ exoribonuclease Pacman demonstrating that these 2 exoribonucleases function to regulate opposing pathways within the developing tissue. This work provides the first description of the molecular and developmental consequences of Dis3L2 inactivation in a non-human animal model. The work is directly relevant to the understanding of human overgrowth syndromes such as Perlman syndrome. PMID:27630034

  14. cos(4φ) azimuthal anisotropy in small- x DIS dijet production beyond the leading power TMD limit

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2016-07-25

    Here we determine the first correction to the quadrupole operator in high-energy QCD beyond the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) limit of Weizsäcker-Williams and linearly polarized gluon distributions. These functions give rise to isotropic, respectively, ~cos2more » $$\\phi$$ angular distributions in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dijet production. On the other hand, the correction produces a ~cos4$$\\phi$$ angular dependence which is suppressed by one additional power of the dijet transverse momentum scale (squared) P2.« less

  15. An unconventional interaction between Dis1/TOG and Mal3/EB1 in fission yeast promotes the fidelity of chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yuzy; Maurer, Sebastian P.; Yukawa, Masashi; Zakian, Silva; Singleton, Martin R.; Surrey, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dynamic microtubule plus-ends interact with various intracellular target regions such as the cell cortex and the kinetochore. Two conserved families of microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins, the XMAP215, ch-TOG or CKAP5 family and the end-binding 1 (EB1, also known as MAPRE1) family, play pivotal roles in regulating microtubule dynamics. Here, we study the functional interplay between fission yeast Dis1, a member of the XMAP215/TOG family, and Mal3, an EB1 protein. Using an in vitro microscopy assay, we find that purified Dis1 autonomously tracks growing microtubule ends and is a bona fide microtubule polymerase. Mal3 recruits additional Dis1 to microtubule ends, explaining the synergistic enhancement of microtubule dynamicity by these proteins. A non-canonical binding motif in Dis1 mediates the interaction with Mal3. X-ray crystallography shows that this new motif interacts in an unconventional configuration with the conserved hydrophobic cavity formed within the Mal3 C-terminal region that typically interacts with the canonical SXIP motif. Selectively perturbing the Mal3–Dis1 interaction in living cells demonstrates that it is important for accurate chromosome segregation. Whereas, in some metazoans, the interaction between EB1 and the XMAP215/TOG family members requires an additional binding partner, fission yeast relies on a direct interaction, indicating evolutionary plasticity of this critical interaction module. PMID:27872152

  16. Spindle-kinetochore attachment requires the combined action of Kin I-like Klp5/6 and Alp14/Dis1-MAPs in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Miguel Angel; Koonrugsa, Nirada; Toda, Takashi

    2002-11-15

    Fission yeast Klp5 and Klp6 belong to the microtubule-destabilizing Kin I family. In klp5 mutants, spindle checkpoint proteins Mad2 and Bub1 are recruited to mitotic kinetochores for a prolonged duration, indicating that these kinetochores are unattached. Further analysis shows that there are kinetochores to which only Bub1, but not Mad2, localizes. These kinetochores are likely to have been captured, yet lack tension. Thus Klp5 and Klp6 play a role in a spindle- kinetochore interaction at dual steps, capture and generation of tension. The TOG/XMAP215 family, Alp14 and Dis1 are known to stabilize microtubules and be required for the bivalent attachment of the kinetochore to the spindle. Despite apparent opposing activities towards microtubule stability, Klp5/Klp6 and Alp14/Dis1 share an essential function, as either dis1klp or alp14klp mutants are synthetically lethal, like alp14dis1. Defective phenotypes are similar to each other, characteristic of attachment defects and chromosome mis-segregation. Furthermore Alp14 is of significance for kinetochore localization of Klp5. We propose that Klp5/Klp6 and Alp14/Dis1 play a collaborative role in bipolar spindle formation during prometaphase through producing spindle dynamism.

  17. VennDIS: a JavaFX-based Venn and Euler diagram software to generate publication quality figures.

    PubMed

    Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Sinha, Ankit; Boutros, Paul C; Kislinger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Venn diagrams are graphical representations of the relationships among multiple sets of objects and are often used to illustrate similarities and differences among genomic and proteomic datasets. All currently existing tools for producing Venn diagrams evince one of two traits; they require expertise in specific statistical software packages (such as R), or lack the flexibility required to produce publication-quality figures. We describe a simple tool that addresses both shortcomings, Venn Diagram Interactive Software (VennDIS), a JavaFX-based solution for producing highly customizable, publication-quality Venn, and Euler diagrams of up to five sets. The strengths of VennDIS are its simple graphical user interface and its large array of customization options, including the ability to modify attributes such as font, style and position of the labels, background color, size of the circle/ellipse, and outline color. It is platform independent and provides real-time visualization of figure modifications. The created figures can be saved as XML files for future modification or exported as high-resolution images for direct use in publications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Bio-dis and the paddle dissolution apparatuses applied to the release characterization of ketoprofen from hypromellose matrices.

    PubMed

    Ramos Pezzini, Bianca; Gomes Ferraz, Humberto

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this work were: (1) to comparatively evaluate the effects of hypromellose viscosity grade and content on ketoprofen release from matrix tablets, using Bio-Dis and the paddle apparatuses, (2) to investigate the influence of the pH of the dissolution medium on drug release. Furthermore, since direct compression had not shown to be appropriate to obtain the matrices under study, it was also an objective (3) to evaluate the impact of granulation on drug release process. Six formulations of ketoprofen matrix tablets were obtained by compression, with or without previous granulation, varying the content and viscosity grade of hypromellose. Dissolution tests were carried out at a fixed pH, in each experiment, with the paddle method (pH 4.5, 6.0, 6.8, or 7.2), while a pH gradient was used in Bio-Dis (pH 1.2 to 7.2). The higher the hypromellose viscosity grade and content were, the lower the amount of ketoprofen released was in both apparatuses, the content effect being more expressive. Drug dissolution enhanced with the increase of the pH of the medium due to its pH-dependent solubility. Granulation caused an increase in drug dissolution and modified the mechanism of the release process.

  19. The DisVis and PowerFit Web Servers: Explorative and Integrative Modeling of Biomolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    van Zundert, G C P; Trellet, M; Schaarschmidt, J; Kurkcuoglu, Z; David, M; Verlato, M; Rosato, A; Bonvin, A M J J

    2017-02-03

    Structure determination of complex molecular machines requires a combination of an increasing number of experimental methods with highly specialized software geared toward each data source to properly handle the gathered data. Recently, we introduced the two software packages PowerFit and DisVis. These combine high-resolution structures of atomic subunits with density maps from cryo-electron microscopy or distance restraints, typically acquired by chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry, respectively. Here, we report on recent advances in both GPGPU-accelerated software packages: PowerFit is a tool for rigid body fitting of atomic structures in cryo-electron density maps and has been updated to also output reliability indicators for the success of fitting, through the use of the Fisher z-transformation and associated confidence intervals; DisVis aims at quantifying the information content of distance restraints and identifying false-positive restraints. We extended its analysis capabilities to include an analysis of putative interface residues and to output an average shape representing the putative location of the ligand. To facilitate their use by a broad community, they have been implemented as web portals harvesting both local CPU resources and GPGPU-accelerated EGI grid resources. They offer user-friendly interfaces, while minimizing computational requirements, and provide a first interactive view of the results. The portals can be accessed freely after registration via http://milou.science.uu.nl/services/DISVIS and http://milou.science.uu.nl/services/POWERFIT.

  20. Functional requirements document for NASA/MSFC Earth Science and Applications Division: Data and information system (ESAD-DIS). Interoperability, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. Briscoe; Grider, Gary W.

    1992-01-01

    These Earth Science and Applications Division-Data and Information System (ESAD-DIS) interoperability requirements are designed to quantify the Earth Science and Application Division's hardware and software requirements in terms of communications between personal and visualization workstation, and mainframe computers. The electronic mail requirements and local area network (LAN) requirements are addressed. These interoperability requirements are top-level requirements framed around defining the existing ESAD-DIS interoperability and projecting known near-term requirements for both operational support and for management planning. Detailed requirements will be submitted on a case-by-case basis. This document is also intended as an overview of ESAD-DIs interoperability for new-comers and management not familiar with these activities. It is intended as background documentation to support requests for resources and support requirements.

  1. 9 CFR 82.21 - Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry. 82.21 Section 82.21 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Chlamydiosis in Poultry § 82.21 Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used for...

  2. 9 CFR 82.21 - Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry. 82.21 Section 82.21 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Chlamydiosis in Poultry § 82.21 Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used for...

  3. The beneficial endophyte Trichoderma hamatum isolate DIS 219b promotes growth and delays the onset of the drought response in Theobroma cacao

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hanhong; Sicher, Richard C.; Kim, Moon S.; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Strem, Mary D.; Melnick, Rachel L.; Bailey, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Theobroma cacao (cacao) is cultivated in tropical climates and is exposed to drought stress. The impact of the endophytic fungus Trichoderma hamatum isolate DIS 219b on cacao's response to drought was studied. Colonization by DIS 219b delayed drought-induced changes in stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis, and green fluorescence emissions. The altered expression of 19 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (seven in leaves and 17 in roots with some overlap) by drought was detected using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. Roots tended to respond earlier to drought than leaves, with the drought-induced changes in expression of seven ESTs being observed after 7 d of withholding water. Changes in gene expression in leaves were not observed until after 10 d of withholding water. DIS 219b colonization delayed the drought-altered expression of all seven ESTs responsive to drought in leaves by ≥3 d, but had less influence on the expression pattern of the drought-responsive ESTs in roots. DIS 219b colonization had minimal direct influence on the expression of drought-responsive ESTs in 32-d-old seedlings. By contrast, DIS 219b colonization of 9-d-old seedlings altered expression of drought-responsive ESTs, sometimes in patterns opposite of that observed in response to drought. Drought induced an increase in the concentration of many amino acids in cacao leaves, while DIS 219b colonization caused a decrease in aspartic acid and glutamic acid concentrations and an increase in alanine and γ-aminobutyric acid concentrations. With or without exposure to drought conditions, colonization by DIS 219b promoted seedling growth, the most consistent effects being an increase in root fresh weight, root dry weight, and root water content. Colonized seedlings were slower to wilt in response to drought as measured by a decrease in the leaf angle drop. The primary direct effect of DIS 219b colonization was promotion of root growth, regardless of water status, and an increase

  4. Student (dis)engagement and need-supportive teaching behavior: a multi-informant and multilevel approach.

    PubMed

    Van den Berghe, Lynn; Tallir, Isabel B; Cardon, Greet; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen

    2015-08-01

    Starting from self-determination theory, we explored whether student engagement/disengagement relates to teachers' need support and whether this relationship is moderated by teachers' causality orientations. A sample of 2004 students situated in 127 classes taught by 33 physical education teachers participated in the study. Both teachers and students reported on students' (dis)engagement, allowing investigation of the proposed relationships both at the student and teacher level. Most of the variance in need support was at the student level, but there was also between-teacher and between-class variance in need support. Engagement related to more need support, but only at the student level. In total, few moderation effects were found. Teachers with a relatively low controlled orientation were more need supportive when perceiving their students as emotionally and behaviorally engaged. By making teachers aware of these dynamics, automatic responses to student engagement can be better thought out. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

  5. Managing risk and marginalizing identities: on the society-of-captives thesis and the harm of social dis-ease.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    This article develops the constitutive features of the society-of-captives thesis as suggested by Arrigo and Milovanovic, and Arrigo, Bersot, and Sellers. The relevance of this thesis is briefly explored in relation to the institutional and community-based treatment philosophies that currently inform the mental health and criminal justice systems. This exploration specifies how risk (being human and doing humanness differently) is managed symbolically, linguistically, materially, and culturally. The management of this risk extends to the kept as well as to their keepers, regulators, and watchers (i.e., the society of captives). This article calls for a new clinical praxis (being/doing a critical mindfulness) designed to overcome the totalizing madness (the harm of social dis-ease) that follows from managing risk fearfully and marginalizing identities desperately as reified recursively through society's captivity. The ethical underpinnings of this clinical praxis represent an emergent direction for undertaking correctional policy reform.

  6. Arabidopsis RabF1 (ARA6) Is Involved in Salt Stress and Dark-Induced Senescence (DIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Congfei; Karim, Sazzad; Zhang, Hongsheng; Aronsson, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis small GTPase RabF1 (ARA6) functions in endosomal vesicle transport and may play a crucial role in recycling and degradation of molecules, thus involved in stress responses. Here we have reported that complementary overexpression lines RabF1OE (overexpression), GTPase mutants RabF1Q93L (constitutively active) and RabF1S47N (dominant negative) lines show longer root growth than wild-type, rabF1 knockout and N-myristoylation deletion (Δ1−29, N-terminus) complementary overexpression mutant plants under salt induced stress, which indicates that N-myristoylation of RabF1 is indispensable for salt tolerance. Moreover, RabF1 is highly expressed during senescence and RabF1OE lines were more tolerant of dark-induced senescence (DIS) than wild-type and rabF1. PMID:28157156

  7. Factors associated with parent-child (dis)agreement on child behavior and parenting problems in Chinese immigrant families.

    PubMed

    Fung, Joey J; Lau, Anna S

    2010-01-01

    We examined familial and cultural factors predicting parent-child (dis)agreement on child behavior and parenting problems. Immigrant Chinese parents (89.7% mothers; M age = 44.24 years) and their children (62 boys; 57.9%) between the ages of 9 and 17 years (M = 11.9 years, SD = 2.9) completed measures of parent punitive behavior and child problems. Concordance in item profiles and discrepancies in overall problem levels were assessed. Overall, immigrant parents reported fewer child and parenting problems than did their children. Relationship closeness predicted less disagreement in ratings of child internalizing symptoms and punitive parenting. Parental acculturative stress and parent-child acculturation dissonance predicted more disagreement regarding internalizing problems. The findings highlight potential under-identification of internalizing problems among immigrant Chinese families that may be driven by acculturation processes.

  8. Particle production in the Color Glass Condensate: from electron-proton DIS to proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2014-06-01

    We study single inclusive hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions in the CGC framework. The parameters in the calculation are obtained by fitting electron-proton deep inelastic scattering data. The obtained dipole-proton amplitude is generalized to dipole-nucleus scattering without any additional nuclear parameters other than the Woods-Saxon distribution. We show that it is possible to use an initial condition without an anomalous dimension and still obtain a good description of the HERA inclusive cross section and LHC single particle production measurements. We argue that one must consistently use the proton transverse area as measured by a high virtuality probe in DIS also for the single inclusive cross section in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions, and obtain a nuclear modification factor RpA that at midrapidity approaches unity at large momenta and at all energies.

  9. Analyse And Graphical Representation On Implementation Of New ISO/DIS 14001:2015 Revision In Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagateanu, Alina Mihaela; Nicolaescu, Sergiu Ştefan; Kifor, Claudiu Vasile

    2015-09-01

    We live in a dynamic world that is constantly changing in order to lighten our daily activities. All changes made must meet several conditions, most of them having a direct relationship with the environment and are applicable for more than one person. Considering that in this moment the standard for environment protection has passed the review period and will be published in the near future, the present article aims to highlight the most important changes from the new version of ISO / DIS 14001: 2015. The information is structured for the organizations which holds the old version ISO 14001: 2004, so, the necessary steps to follow can be easily understood while moving totally to the new version.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Multiple Genomic Regions Associated with Susceptibility to and Control of Ovine Lentivirus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-17

    2010) Small ruminant lentiviruses and human immunodeficiency virus: cousins that take a long view. Curr HIV Res 8: 26–52. 3. Cutlip RC, Lehmkuhl HD...1543. 8. Blacklaws BA (2012) Small ruminant lentiviruses: immunopathogenesis of visna- maedi and caprine arthritis and encephalitis virus. Comp...Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 35: 259–269. 9. Reina R, Berriatua E, Lujan L, Juste R, Sanchez A, et al. (2009) Prevention strategies against small ruminant

  11. Responding to "Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy That Accounts for Dis/Ability". A Harvard Educational Review Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alim, H. Samy; Baglieri, Susan; Ladson-Billings, Gloria; Paris, Django; Rose, David H.; Valente, Joseph Michael

    2017-01-01

    In the fall of 2016, the "Harvard Educational Review" ("HER") published "Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy that Accounts for Dis/Ability" by Federico R. Waitoller, assistant professor in the Department of Special Education at the University…

  12. Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy That Accounts for Dis/Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waitoller, Federico R.; Thorius, Kathleen A. King

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Federico R. Waitoller and Kathleen A. King Thorius extend recent discussions on culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP) in order to explicitly account for student dis/ability. The authors engage in this work as part of an inclusive education agenda. Toward this aim, they discuss how CSP and universal design for learning will benefit…

  13. Identifying the drivers of liking by investigating the reasons for (dis)liking using CATA in cross-cultural context: a case study on barbecue sauce.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Hye; Gwak, Mi-Jin; Chung, Seo-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Ok; O'Mahony, Michael; Ishii, Rie; Bae, Ye-Won

    2015-06-01

    The present study cross-culturally investigated the drivers of liking for traditional and ethnic chicken marinades using descriptive analysis and consumer taste tests incorporating the check-all-that-apply (CATA) method. Seventy-three Koreans and 86 US consumers participated. The tested sauces comprised three tomato-based sauces, a teriyaki-based sauce and a Korean spicy seasoning-based sauce. Chicken breasts were marinated with each of the five barbecue sauces, grilled and served for evaluation. Descriptive analysis and consumer taste tests were conducted. Consumers rated the acceptance on a hedonic scale and checked the reasons for (dis)liking by the CATA method for each sauce. A general linear model, multiple factor analysis and chi-square analysis were conducted using the data. The results showed that the preference orders of the samples between Koreans and US consumers were strikingly similar to each other. However, the reasons for (dis)liking the samples differed cross-culturally. The drivers of liking of two sauces sharing relatively similar sensory profiles but differing significantly in hedonic ratings were effectively delineated by reasons of (dis)liking CATA results. Reasons for (dis)liking CATA proved to be a powerful supporting method to understand the internal drivers of liking which can be overlooked by generic descriptive analysis. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy That Accounts for Dis/Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waitoller, Federico R.; Thorius, Kathleen A. King

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Federico R. Waitoller and Kathleen A. King Thorius extend recent discussions on culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP) in order to explicitly account for student dis/ability. The authors engage in this work as part of an inclusive education agenda. Toward this aim, they discuss how CSP and universal design for learning will benefit…

  15. The Allee effect and infectious diseases: extinction, multistability, and the (dis-)appearance of oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hilker, Frank M; Langlais, Michel; Malchow, Horst

    2009-01-01

    Infectious diseases that affect their host on a long timescale can regulate the host population dynamics. Here we show that a strong Allee effect can lead to complex dynamics in simple epidemic models. Generally, the Allee effect renders a population bistable, but we also identify conditions for tri- or monostability. Moreover, the disease can destabilize endemic equilibria and induce sustained oscillations. These disappear again for high transmissibilities, with eventually vanishing host population. Disease-induced extinction is thus possible for density-dependent transmission and without any alternative reservoirs. The overall complexity suggests that the system is very sensitive to perturbations and control methods, even in parameter regions with a basic reproductive ratio far beyond R(0) = 1. This may have profound implications for biological conservation as well as pest management. We identify important threshold quantities and attribute the dynamical behavior to the joint interplay of a strong Allee effect and infection.

  16. Epizootiology of Hantavirus Infections in Baltimore Isolation of a Virus from Norway Rats, and Characteristics of Infected Rat Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    bank voles and serologic diagnosis of human 6. Svedmyr A, Lee HW. Berglund A, et al. Epidemic infection. I Infect Dis 1980:141:131 4. nephropathy in...or pregnancy in fe- cell-free 25 cm- flasks; 2) inoculated onto males), and body mass was used as an in- fresh monolayers of 50-70 per cent con...signifi- This difference in pregnancy rates in the cant difference in geometric mean titers four mass classes above 200 g was signifi- (males, 8.93 ± 2.16

  17. Possible Involvement of Endogenous Beta-Endorphin in the Pathophysiological Mechanisms of Pichinde Virus-Infected Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    without significant histopathological changes. treatment of arenavirus -induced Lassa fever in humans Furthermore, among many other organs ex;amined, no S(1... fever , leukopenia, Pichinde virus infection and after fl-endorphin intra- thrombopenia, inalertness, terminal hypothermia, and venous infusion...Science 245:188-190, 1989. Lassa fever contrasted. Rev Infect Dis 2(supplement 4):S743- 28. Holaday JW. Cardiovascular effects of endogenous opiate sys

  18. Infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a natural killer (NK) cell response in cattle that is lacking following vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a role in innate antiviral immunity by directly lysing virus-infected cells and producing antiviral cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNgamma). We developed a system for characterizing the bovine NK response to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes a dis...

  19. Thermal (dis)comfort experienced from physiological movements across indoor, transitional and outdoor spaces in Singapore: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li Heng, Su; Chow, Winston

    2017-04-01

    Human thermal comfort research is important as climate discomfort can adversely affect both health and work productivity in cities; however, such biometeorological work in low-latitude urban areas is still relatively unstudied hitherto. In the tropical metropolis of Singapore, a suite of policies have been implemented aimed at improving environmental sustainability via increasing car-free commutes and pedestrian movement during work/school journeys, with the consequence that individuals will likely have increased personal exposure through a variety of spaces (and climates) during typical daily activities. As such, research into exploring the thermal (dis)comfort experienced during pedestrian movements across these indoor, outdoor and transitional (semi-outdoor) spaces would yield interesting applied biometerological insights. This pilot study thus investigates how pedestrian thermal comfort varies spatially across a university campus, and how the physical intensity of pedestrian travel affects thermal comfort across these spaces. Over a 10-week period, we profiled six students for both their objective and subjective pedestrian thermal comfort during traverses across different spaces. Data were obtained through use of (a.) of a heat stress sensor, (b.) a fitness tracker, and (b.) a questionnaire survey to record traverse measurements of the microclimate, their physiological data, and their perceived microclimate comfort respectively. Measured climate and physiological data were used to derive commonly-used thermal comfort indices like wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and physiological equivalent temperature (PET). Further, interviews were conducted with all six subjects at the end of the fieldwork period to ascertain details on individual acclimatization behavior and adaptation strategies. The results indicate that (a.) more than 50% of the microclimatic conditions within each indoor, semi-outdoor, and outdoor space exceeded heat stress thresholds of both PET and

  20. Mechanical unfolding of two DIS RNA kissing complexes from HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan T X; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2009-03-13

    An RNA kissing complex formed by the dimerization initiation site plays a critical role in the survival and infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus. Two dimerization initiation site kissing sequences, Mal and Lai, have been found in most human immunodeficiency virus 1 variants. Formation and stability of these RNA kissing complexes depend crucially on cationic conditions, particularly Mg 2+. Using optical tweezers, we investigated the mechanical unfolding of single RNA molecules with either Mal-type (GUGCAC) or Lai-type (GCGCGC) kissing complexes under various ionic conditions. The force required to disrupt the kissing interaction of the two structures, the rip force, is sensitive to concentrations of KCl and MgCl2; addition of 3 mM MgCl2 to 100 mM KCl changes the rip force of Mal from 21 +/- 4 to 46 +/- 3 pN. From the rip force distribution, the kinetics of breaking the kissing interaction is calculated as a function of force and cation concentration. The two kissing complexes have distinct unfolding transition states, as shown by different values of deltaX(++), which is the distance from the folded structure to the unfolding transition state. The deltaX(++) of Mal is approximately 0.6 nm smaller than that of Lai, suggesting that fewer kissing base pairs are broken at the transition state of the former, consistent with observations that the Lai-type kissing complex is more stable and requires significantly more force to unfold than the Mal type. More importantly, neither K+ nor Mg 2+ significantly changes the position of the transition state along the reaction coordinate. However, increasing concentrations of cations increase the kinetic barrier. We derived a cation-specific parameter, m, to describe how the height of the kinetic barrier depends on the concentration of cations. Our results suggest that Mg 2+ greatly slows down the unfolding of the kissing complex but has moderate effects on the formation kinetics of the structure.

  1. Biodegradable sizing agents from soy protein via controlled hydrolysis and dis-entanglement for remediation of textile effluents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maiping; Xu, Helan; Hou, Xiuliang; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Yiqi

    2017-03-01

    Fully biodegradable textile sizes with satisfactory performance properties were developed from soy protein with controlled hydrolysis and dis-entanglement to tackle the intractable environmental issues associated with the non-biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in textile effluents. PVA derived from petroleum is the primary sizing agent due to its excellent sizing performance on polyester-containing yarns, especially in increasingly prevailing high-speed weaving. However, due to the poor biodegradability, PVA causes serious environmental pollution, and thus, should be substituted with more environmentally friendly polymers. Soy protein treated with high amount of triethanolamine was found with acceptable sizing properties. However, triethanolamine is also non-biodegradable and originated from petroleum, therefore, is not an ideal additive. In this research, soy sizes were developed from soy protein treated with glycerol, the biodegradable triol that could also be obtained from soy. The soy sizes had good film properties, adhesion to polyester and abrasion resistance close to PVA, rendering them qualified for sizing applications. Regarding desizing, consumption of water and energy for removal of soy size could be remarkably decreased, comparing to removal of PVA. Moreover, with satisfactory degradability, the wastewater containing soy sizes was readily dischargeable after treated in activated sludge for two days. In summary, the fully biodegradable soy sizes had potential to substitute PVA for sustainable textile processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stigma, discrimination, and sexual (dis)satisfaction among people living with HIV: results from the "AIDES et toi" survey.

    PubMed

    Rojas Castro, D; Le Gall, J M; Andreo, C; Spire, B

    2010-08-01

    The effects of HIV-related stigma and discrimination have been studied in several areas, such as access to testing, quality of care quality, and access to work. Nevertheless, the effects of stigma and discrimination on the sexual life of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have not been studied enough. AIDES, a French community-based organization, has developed a biannual survey which assesses several socioeconomical and psychosocial dimensions of the people in contact with this organization. A focus on the results concerning sexual (dis)satisfaction and the factors associated are presented here. A convenience sample of 521 HIV-positive men having sex with men, heterosexual men and women was analyzed. A logistic regression was performed to examine which factors were significantly associated with sexual dissatisfaction. Results showed that being older, not having a full-time job, not having a steady sexual partner, lower frequency of sexual intercourse, discrimination in the sexual relationship setting, and the perception of loneliness were independently associated with sexual dissatisfaction. A quality health approach must include the aspects linked to sexual life and sexual satisfaction. Given the potentially harmful effects that HIV-related stigma and discrimination have on PLWHA's well-being, more specific actions and advocacy in this direction should be developed and implemented.

  3. Senescent cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete active MMP-2 that promotes keratinocyte dis-cohesion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hassona, Y; Cirillo, N; Heesom, K; Parkinson, E K; Prime, S S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that senescent cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) derived from genetically unstable oral squamous cell carcinomas (GU-OSCC), unlike non-senescent CAFs from genetically stable carcinomas (GS-OSCC), promoted keratinocyte invasion in vitro in a paracrine manner. The mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Methods: Previous work to characterise the senescent-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) has used antibody arrays, technology that is limited by the availability of suitable antibodies. To extend this work in an unbiased manner, we used 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy for protein identification. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were investigated by gelatin zymography and western blotting. Neutralising antibodies were used to block key molecules in the functional assays of keratinocyte adhesion and invasion. Results: Among a variety of proteins that were differentially expressed between CAFs from GU-OSCC and GS-OSCC, MMP-2 was a major constituent of senescent CAF-CM derived from GU-OSCC. The presence of active MMP-2 was confirmed by gelatine zymography. MMP-2 derived from senescent CAF-CM induced keratinocyte dis-cohesion and epithelial invasion into collagen gels in a TGF-β-dependent manner. Conclusions: Senescent CAFs from GU-OSCC promote a more aggressive oral cancer phenotype by production of active MMP-2, disruption of epithelial adhesion and induction of keratinocyte invasion. PMID:25117810

  4. Semi-inclusive DIS Experiments Using Transversely Polarized Targets in Hall-A: Current Results and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyan Allada

    2012-12-01

    Measurement of single (SSA) and double spin asymmetries (DSA) in semi-inclusive DIS reactions using polarized targets provide a powerful method to probe transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs). In particular, the experimentally measured SSA on nucleon targets can help in extracting the transversity and Sivers distribution functions of u and d-quarks. Similarly, the measured DSA are sensitive to the quark spin-orbital correlations, and provide an access to the TMD parton distribution function (g{sub 1T} ). A recent experiment conducted in Hall-A Jefferson Lab using transversely polarized {sup 3}He provide first such measurements on neutron target. The measurement was performed using 5.9 GeV beam from CEBAF and measured the target SSA/DSA in the SIDIS reaction {sup 3}He{sup {dagger}}(e,e'{pi}{sup {+/-}} )X. The kinematical range, x = 0.19 ~ 0.34, at Q{sup 2} = 1.77 ~ 2.73 (GeV/c){sup 2} , was focused on the valence quark region. The results from this measurement along with our plans for future high precision measurements in Hall-A are presented.

  5. (Dis)placing trust: the long-term effects of job displacement on generalised trust over the adult lifecourse.

    PubMed

    Laurence, James

    2015-03-01

    Increasing rates of job displacement (i.e. involuntary job loss from redundancy, downsizing, restructuring) have been suggested to be a key driver of declining macro-levels of generalised trust. This article undertakes the first test of how job displacement affects individuals' tendencies to (dis)trust over the adult lifecourse, using two-waves of the Great Britain National Child Development Study cohort data, on a sample of n=6840 individuals. Applying both lagged dependent variable logistic regression and two-wave change-score models, experiencing job displacement between the ages of 33 and 50 appears to significantly scar individuals' generalised trust, with depressed trust observable at least nine years after the event occurred. However, this effect is dependent on the value an individual places on work: the greater the attachment to employment the stronger the negative effect of displacement. A range of mediators, such as physical health, mental well-being, and personal efficacy, do not appear to account for the effect.

  6. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  7. Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bloodstream (bacteremia) Joint infection (arthritis) Ear infection (otitis media) Infection of the sinus membranes (sinusitis) Eye infection ( ... breathing; for bacteremia, fever and less energy; for ear infections, fever and ear pain; and for sinustitis, fever ...

  8. Prince Edward Island implements province-wide drug information system. A small step for DIS; a giant leap for the pan-Canadian interoperable electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Giokas, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    On March 13, 2008, Friendly Pharmacy in Charlottetown made a small but significant piece of Canadian healthcare history. It was the first drugstore to go online with Prince Edward Island's Drug Information System (DIS), the centrepiece of the province's All Drugs All People program. PEI is the first province to implement a DIS solution using a common pan-Canadian messaging standard based on Health Level 7 Version 3, an internationally recognized set of standards for clinical, financial and administrative messaging. PEI's initiative has positive implications for the rest of Canada. It is an important step toward the creation of a pan-Canadian interoperable electronic health record system covering all facets of patient care.

  9. Efficient export of prefolded, disulfide-bonded recombinant proteins to the periplasm by the Tat pathway in Escherichia coli CyDisCo strains.

    PubMed

    Matos, Cristina F R O; Robinson, Colin; Alanen, Heli I; Prus, Piotr; Uchida, Yuko; Ruddock, Lloyd W; Freedman, Robert B; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Numerous high-value therapeutic proteins are produced in Escherichia coli and exported to the periplasm, as this approach simplifies downstream processing and enables disulfide bond formation. Most recombinant proteins are exported by the Sec pathway, which transports substrates across the plasma membrane in an unfolded state. The Tat system also exports proteins to the periplasm, but transports them in a folded state. This system has attracted interest because of its tendency to transport correctly folded proteins, but this trait renders it unable to export proteins containing disulfide bonds since these are normally acquired only in the periplasm; reduced substrates tend to be recognized as incorrectly folded and rejected. In this study we have used a series of novel strains (termed CyDisCo) which oxidise disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm, and we show that these cells efficiently export a range of disulfide-containing proteins when a Tat signal peptide is attached. These test proteins include alkaline phosphatase (PhoA), a phytase containing four disulfide bonds (AppA), an antiinterleukin 1β scFv and human growth hormone. No export of PhoA or AppA is observed in wild-type cells lacking the CyDisCo factors. The PhoA, AppA and scFv proteins were exported in an active form by Tat in the CyDisCo strain, and mass spectrometry showed that the vast majority of the scFv protein was disulfide-bonded and correctly processed. The evidence indicates that this combination of Tat + CyDisCo offers a novel means of exporting active, correctly folded disulfide bonded proteins to the periplasm.

  10. Taking a Bite out of Malaria: Controlled Human Malaria Infection by Needle and Syringe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Shmuklarsky MJ, Schneider I, McGovern TW, Chulay JD, Ballou WR, Hoffman SL, 1997. Clinical manifestations of Plasmodium falciparum malaria experimentally...SL, 1994. Diagnosis of malaria by detection of Plasmodium falciparum HRP-2 antigen with a rapid dipstick antigen-capture assay. Lancet 343: 564–568. 12... malaria by immuniza- tion with radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporo- zoites. J Infect Dis 185: 1155–1164. 20. Epstein JE, Tewari K, Lyke

  11. Structural analysis of the diadenylate cyclase reaction of DNA-integrity scanning protein A (DisA) and its inhibition by 3'-dATP.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martina; Deimling, Tobias; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Witte, Gregor

    2015-08-01

    The identification of the essential bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) synthesized by the DNA-integrity scanning protein A (DisA) has opened up a new and emerging field in bacterial signalling. To further analyse the diadenylate cyclase (DAC) reaction catalysed by the DAC domains of DisA, we crystallized Thermotoga maritima DisA in the presence of different ATP analogues and metal ions to identify the metal-binding site and trap the enzyme in pre- and post-reaction states. Through structural and biochemical assays we identified important residues essential for the reaction in the active site of the DAC domains. Our structures resolve the metal-binding site and thus explain the activation of ATP for the DAC reaction. Moreover, we were able to identify a potent inhibitor of the DAC domain. Based on the available structures and homology to annotated DAC domains we propose a common mechanism for c-di-AMP synthesis by DAC domains in c-di-AMP-producing species and a possible approach for its effective inhibition.

  12. Dis-appearance and dys-appearance anew: living with excess skin and intestinal changes following weight loss surgery.

    PubMed

    Groven, Karen Synne; Råheim, Målfrid; Engelsrud, Gunn

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this article is to explore bodily changes following weight loss surgery. Our empirical material is based on individual interviews with 22 Norwegian women. To further analyze their experiences, we build primarily on the phenomenologist Drew Leder`s distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. Additionally, our analysis is inspired by Simone de Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty and Julia Kristeva. Although these scholars have not directed their attention to obesity operations, they occupy a prime framework for shedding light on different dimensions of bodily change. In doing so, we were able to identify two main themes: The felt "inner" body versus the visible "surface" body and the "old" body versus the "new" body. In different, though interconnected ways, these main themes encompass tensions between changes the women experienced as contributing to a more "normal" and active life, feeling more accepted, and changes that generated ambivalence. In particular, their skin became increasingly problematic because it did not "shrink" like the rest of the body. On the contrary, it became looser and looser. Moreover, badsmelling folds of skin that wobbled, sweated and chafed at the smallest movement, aprons of fat hanging in front of their stomachs, batwing arms, thick flabby thighs and sagging breasts were described as a huge contrast to the positive response they received to their changed body shape when they were out and about with their clothes on. At the same time, they expressed ambivalence with regards to removing the excess skin by means of plastic surgery. Through their own and other women`s experiences they learned removing the excess skin by means of surgery could be a double-edged sword. By illuminating the experiences of the ones undergoing such changes our article offers new insight in a scholarly debate predominated by medical research documenting the positive outcomes of weight loss surgery.

  13. The DIS, the CODD, IGSNs and DOIs: Tools you need to succeed with your ocean and continental scientific drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgas, Thomas; Conze, Ronald; Lorenz, Henning; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Wilkens, Roy; Lyle, Mitchell; Westerhold, Thomas; Drury, Anna Joy; Tian, Jun; Hahn, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Scientific ocean drilling over the past >40 years and corresponding efforts on land (by now for more than >20 years) has led to the accumulation of an enormous amount of valuable petrophysical, geochemical, biological and geophysical data obtained through laboratory and field experiments across a multitude of scale-and time dimensions. Such data can be utilized comprehensively in a holistic fashion, and thereby provide base toward an enhanced "Core-Log-Integration", modeling small-scale basin processes to large-scale Earth phenomena, while also storing and managing all relevant information in an "Open Access" fashion. Since the early 1990's members of our team have acquired and measured a large dataset of physical and geochemical properties representing both terrestrial and marine geological environments. This dataset cover a variety of both macro-to-microscale dimensions, and thereby allowing this type of interdisciplinary data examination. Over time, data management and processing tools have been developed and were recently merged with modern data publishing methods, which allow identifying and tracking data and associated publications in a trackable and concise manner. Our current presentation summarizes an important part of the value chain in geosciences, comprising: 1) The state-of-the-art in data management for continental and lake drilling projects performed with and through ICDP's Drilling Information System (DIS). 2) The CODD (Code for Ocean Drilling Data) as numerical-based, programmable data processing toolbox and applicable for both continental and marine drilling projects. 3) The implementation of Persistent Identifiers, such as the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) to identify and track sample material as part of Digital-Object-Identifier (DOI)-tagged operation reports and research publications. 4) A list of contacts provided for scientists with an interest in learning and applying methods and techniques we offer in form of basic and advanced

  14. ProDis-ContSHC: learning protein dissimilarity measures and hierarchical context coherently for protein-protein comparison in protein database retrieval

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The need to retrieve or classify protein molecules using structure or sequence-based similarity measures underlies a wide range of biomedical applications. Traditional protein search methods rely on a pairwise dissimilarity/similarity measure for comparing a pair of proteins. This kind of pairwise measures suffer from the limitation of neglecting the distribution of other proteins and thus cannot satisfy the need for high accuracy of the retrieval systems. Recent work in the machine learning community has shown that exploiting the global structure of the database and learning the contextual dissimilarity/similarity measures can improve the retrieval performance significantly. However, most existing contextual dissimilarity/similarity learning algorithms work in an unsupervised manner, which does not utilize the information of the known class labels of proteins in the database. Results In this paper, we propose a novel protein-protein dissimilarity learning algorithm, ProDis-ContSHC. ProDis-ContSHC regularizes an existing dissimilarity measure dij by considering the contextual information of the proteins. The context of a protein is defined by its neighboring proteins. The basic idea is, for a pair of proteins (i, j), if their context N(i) and N(j) is similar to each other, the two proteins should also have a high similarity. We implement this idea by regularizing dij by a factor learned from the context N(i) and N(j). Moreover, we divide the context to hierarchial sub-context and get the contextual dissimilarity vector for each protein pair. Using the class label information of the proteins, we select the relevant (a pair of proteins that has the same class labels) and irrelevant (with different labels) protein pairs, and train an SVM model to distinguish between their contextual dissimilarity vectors. The SVM model is further used to learn a supervised regularizing factor. Finally, with the new Supervised learned Dissimilarity measure, we update the

  15. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  16. DIS, DIS++ and the High Level Architecture (DIS, DIS++ en de High Level Architecture)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    initiatief van het US DoD Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO). Dit initiatief, medio 1995 gestart, resulteerde o.a. in een Memo- randum van de...ondersteunt (met overdracht van digitale data) de conversatie tussen twee partijen en tussen meerdere partijen gelijktijdig. De Intercom Signal PDU is

  17. Digital Integrating Subsystem (DIS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    division multiplexed, serial, round-robin passing protocol ( RRPP ) data transfer. The bus is composed of the several bus interface units (BIUs...with its associated computing element) satis- fies the following requirements. * Maintains RRPP - The Supervisor, through an on-card PROM, initiates...an EOT to start the RRPP on power up and continuously monitors EOTs on the DISMUX bus during operation. 55 * Retains in memory the RRPP sequence - The

  18. [Microbiological diagnosis of infections of the skin and soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Burillo, Almudena; Moreno, Antonio; Salas, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections are often seen in clinical practice, yet their microbiological diagnosis is among the most complex of laboratory tasks. The diagnosis of a skin and a soft tissue infection is generally based on clinical criteria and not microbiological results. A microbiological diagnosis is reserved for cases in which the etiology of infection is required, e.g., when the infection is particularly severe, when less common microorganisms are suspected as the causative agent (e.g. in immunocompromised patients), when response to antimicrobial treatment is poor, or when a longstanding wound does not heal within a reasonable period of time. We report the indications, sampling and processing techniques, and interpretation criteria for various culture types, including quantitative cultures from biopsy or tissue specimens and semiquantitative and qualitative cultures performed on all types of samples. For non-invasive samples taken from open wounds, application of the Q index to Gram stains is a cost-effective way to standardize sample quality assessment and interpretation of the pathogenic involvement of the different microorganisms isolated from cultures. All these issues are covered in the SEIMC microbiological procedure number 22: Diagnóstico microbiológico de las infecciones de piel y tejidos blandos (Microbiological diagnosis of infections of the skin and soft tissues) (2nd ed., 2006, www.seimc.org/protocolos/microbiologia).

  19. Sediment tracing in the upper Hunter catchment using elemental and mineralogical compositions: Implications for catchment-scale suspended sediment (dis)connectivity and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryirs, Kirstie; Gore, Damian

    2013-07-01

    River bed colmation layers clog the interstices of gravel-bed rivers, impeding the vertical exchange of water and nutrients that drives ecosystem function in the hyporheic zone. In catchments where fine-grained sediment supply has increased since human disturbance, understanding sediment provenance and the (dis)connectivity of supply allows practitioners to target sediment source problems and treat them within catchment management plans. Release of alluvial fine-grained sediment from channel bank erosion since European settlement has resulted in the formation of a colmation layer along the upper Hunter River at Muswellbrook, eastern Australia. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) are used to determine the elemental and mineralogical signatures of colmation layer and floodplain sediment sources across this 4480 km2 catchment. This sediment tracing technique is used to construct a picture of how suspended sediment supply and (dis)connectivity operates in this catchment. In this system, the primary source areas are subcatchments in which sediments are stored largely in partly confined floodplain pockets, but from which sediment supply is unimpeded and directly connected to the receiving reach. Subcatchments in which alluvial sediment storage is significant — and which contain large, laterally unconfined valleys — are essentially 'switched off' or disconnected from the receiving reach. This is because large sediment sinks act to trap fine-grained sediment before it reaches the receiving reach, forming a buffer along the sediment conveyor belt. Given the age structure of floodplains in the receiving reach, this pattern of source area contributions and (dis)connectivity must have occurred throughout the Holocene.

  20. The tobacco MAP215/Dis1-family protein TMBP200 is required for the functional organization of microtubule arrays during male germline establishment

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung Aeong; Pal, Madhumita Das; Park, Soon Ki; Johnson, James Andrew; Twell, David

    2010-01-01

    The haploid microspore division during pollen development in flowering plants is an intrinsically asymmetric division which establishes the male germline for sexual reproduction. Arabidopsis gem1 mutants lack the male germline as a result of disturbed microspore polarity, division asymmetry, and cytokinesis and represent loss-of-function mutants in MOR1/GEM1, a plant orthologue of the conserved MAP215/Dis1 microtubule associated protein (MAP) family. This provides genetic evidence for the role of MAP215/Dis1 in the organization of gametophytic microtubule arrays, but it has remained unknown how microtubule arrays are affected in gem1 mutant microspores. Here, novel male gametophytic microtubule-reporter Nicotiana tabacum plants were constructed, expressing a green fluorescent protein-α-TUBULIN fusion protein (GFP-TUA6) under the control of a microspore-specific promoter. These plants allow effective visualization of all major male gametophytic microtubule arrays and provide useful tools to study the regulation of microtubule arrays by MAPs and other effectors. Depletion of TMBP200, a tobacco homologue of MOR1/GEM1 in gametophytic microtubule-reporter plants using microspore-targeted RNA interference, induced defects in microspore polarity, division asymmetry and cytokinesis that were associated with striking defects in phragmoplast position, orientation, and structure. Our observations further reveal a requirement for TMBP200 in gametophytic spindle organization and a novel role in spindle position and orientation in polarized microspores. These results provide direct evidence for the function of MAP215/Dis1 family protein TMBP200 in the organization of microtubule arrays critical for male germline formation in plants. PMID:20022922

  1. Detection of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in water samples of Spain by specific real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Grúas, Cristina; Llambi, Silvia; Arruga, M Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary cause of the legionellosis diseases (90 %) (Yu et al. in J Infect Dis 186:127-128, 2002; Doleans et al. in J Clin Microbiol 42:458-460, 2004; Den Boer et al. in Clin Microbiol Infect 14:459-466, 2008). In this study, methodologies based on molecular biology were developed in order to provide a quick diagnosis of the bacterial presence in water samples of Spain. Multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were realized to target the 16S rRNA and macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) genes of, respectively, Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila including in the design of an internal control. The results obtained by the culture and the gene amplification methods agreed in 94.44 % for the 16S rRNA gene, and a concordance of 66.67 % of the cases was obtained for the mip gene.

  2. The Finnish disease heritage database (FinDis) update-a database for the genes mutated in the Finnish disease heritage brought to the next-generation sequencing era.

    PubMed

    Polvi, Anne; Linturi, Henna; Varilo, Teppo; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Byrne, Myles; Fokkema, Ivo F A C; Almusa, Henrikki; Metzidis, Anthony; Avela, Kristiina; Aula, Pertti; Kestilä, Marjo; Muilu, Juha

    2013-11-01

    The Finnish Disease Heritage Database (FinDis) (http://findis.org) was originally published in 2004 as a centralized information resource for rare monogenic diseases enriched in the Finnish population. The FinDis database originally contained 405 causative variants for 30 diseases. At the time, the FinDis database was a comprehensive collection of data, but since 1994, a large amount of new information has emerged, making the necessity to update the database evident. We collected information and updated the database to contain genes and causative variants for 35 diseases, including six more genes and more than 1,400 additional disease-causing variants. Information for causative variants for each gene is collected under the LOVD 3.0 platform, enabling easy updating. The FinDis portal provides a centralized resource and user interface to link information on each disease and gene with variant data in the LOVD 3.0 platform. The software written to achieve this has been open-sourced and made available on GitHub (http://github.com/findis-db), allowing biomedical institutions in other countries to present their national data in a similar way, and to both contribute to, and benefit from, standardized variation data. The updated FinDis portal provides a unique resource to assist patient diagnosis, research, and the development of new cures.

  3. Coastal flooding impact evaluation using an INtegrated DisRuption Assessment (INDRA) model for Varna region, Western Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Nataliya; Eftimova, Petya; Valchev, Nikolay; Prodanov, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    The study presents evaluation and comparative analysis of storm induced flooding impacts on different coastal receptors at a scale of Varna region using INtegrated DisRuption Assessment (INDRA) model. The model was developed within the FP7 RISC-KIT project, as a part of Coastal Risk Assessment Framework (CRAF) consisting of two phases. CRAF Phase 1 is a screening process that evaluates coastal risk at a regional scale by means of coastal indices approach, which helps to identify potentially vulnerable coastal sectors: hot spots (HS). CRAF Phase 2 has the objective to assess and rank identified hotspots by detailed risk analysis done by jointly performing a hazard assessment and an impact evaluation on different categories (population, businesses, ecosystems, transport and utilities) using INDRA model at a regional level. Basically, the model assess the shock of events by estimating the impact on directly exposed to flooding hazard receptors of different vulnerability, as well as the potential ripple effects during an event in order to assess the "indirect" impacts, which occur outside the hazard area and/or continue after the event for all considered categories. The potential impacts are expressed in terms of uniform "Impact Indicators", which independently score the indirect impacts of these categories assessing disruption and recovery of the receptors. The ultimate hotspot ranking is obtained through the use of a Multi Criteria analysis (MCA) incorporated in the model, considering preferences of stakeholders. The case study area - Varna regional coast - is located on the western Black Sea, Bulgaria. The coastline, with a length of about 70 km, stretches from cape Ekrene to cape St. Atanas and includes Varna Bay. After application of CRAF Phase 1 three hotspots were selected for further analysis: Kabakum beach (HS1), Varna Central beach plus Port wall (HS2) and Artificial Island (HS3). For first two hotspots beaches and associated infrastructure are the assets

  4. Analysis of two sub-reaches in an Alpine catchment: an evidence of sediment (dis)connectivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oss-Cazzador, Daniele; Rainato, Riccardo; Picco, Lorenzo; Lenzi, Mario A.

    2017-04-01

    Sediment connectivity is the degree of linkage that controls sediment fluxes throughout landscape, particularly between sediment sources and channel network. It is a key topic in the study of sediment dynamics in mountainous catchments. Sediment transport in mountain areas is strongly related to the gradient of slopes and to water stream. Along the channel network, streambed roughness, channel geometry and fluvial bed forms exert a dominant control on flow resistance, influencing local velocity and transport capacity. Using the morphometric characterization, the aim of this study is to evaluate the (dis)connectivity of two sub-reaches of an alpine river. These areas are located along the main channel of the Rio Cordon, an alpine boulder-bed, step-pool stream draining an area of 5 km2 in the Veneto Region (Italy). The mean slope of the river is 17%. Field surveys were carried out using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), in two different reaches: one located in the upper part of the basin (S1), and the other located just 800 m downstream, below of a waterfall (S2). Thanks to the high point density (cell 0.03 m x 0.03 m), the TLS data permitted to analyze streambed roughness, slope, and to detect bed-forms. The sub-reach S1 is characterized by a mean slope of 14%, an active channel width ranging from 6.9 m to 9.6 m, a mean flowing channel width of about 2.2 m, with predominant riffle-pool morphology. On the other hand, a mean slope of 10.8%, an active channel width ranging from 2.6 m to 4.2 m, a mean flowing channel width of 1.9 m, and a step-pool morphology, characterizes S2. Along this study reach there are 4 steps, spaced on average 15 m, and along its lower part it presents a vegetated bar surrounded by exposed gravels. Roughness analysis show that class of medium-gravel (8-16 mm, according to the Wentworth's scale) prevails in both sub-reaches. However, comparing the sub-reaches S1 is characterized by a lower amount of sand, and more pebbles and stones detectable

  5. Viral Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... to fight it off. For most viral infections, treatments can only help with symptoms while you wait ... for viral infections. There are antiviral medicines to treat some viral infections. Vaccines can help prevent you ...

  6. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including ... Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder ...

  7. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  8. Campylobacter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Campylobacter Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Campylobacter Infections Print A ... Doctor? en español Infecciones por campylobacter What Are Campylobacter Infections? Campylobacter bacteria are one of the main ...

  9. Staph Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections Staph bacteria can cause toxic shock syndrome , cellulitis , staph food poisoning, and these infections: Folliculitis and ... Tetanus First Aid: Skin Infections Toxic Shock Syndrome Cellulitis Impetigo MRSA Abscess Cellulitis Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions ...

  10. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can get infected by them. Some common types of skin infections are Bacterial: Cellulitis and impetigo. Staphylococcal infections can also affect the skin. Viral: Shingles, warts, and herpes simplex Fungal: Athlete's foot and yeast infections Parasitic: Body lice, head lice, and scabies ...

  11. The World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument for people with intellectual and physical disabilities (WHOQOL-Dis): evidence of validity of the Brazilian version.

    PubMed

    Bredemeier, Juliana; Wagner, Gabriela Peretti; Agranonik, Marilyn; Perez, Tatiana Spalding; Fleck, Marcelo P

    2014-05-30

    The number of people with disabilities in Brazil and worldwide has grown substantially in recent decades. Cross-cultural quality of life instruments can be helpful in the development of interventions designed to meet the needs of this population and contribute to rational allocation of resources. This study sought to provide evidence of validity and reliability the Brazilian Portuguese version of WHOQOL-Dis-D (a cross-cultural, multicentre instrument developed by the WHOQOL-Group for the assessment of quality of life in persons with physical disability - PD) and WHOQOL-Dis-ID (for persons with intellectual disability - ID). Classical psychometric methods were used to conduct independent analyses of the PD and ID samples. Criterion groups were established for analysis of construct validity. Concurrent validity was assessed in relation to SWLS and BDI-II scores; discriminant validity, in relation to WHODAS-II. Cronbach alpha was used to test the instrument scales and subscales for reliability. The ID subgroup was retested, and test-retest reliability assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficients and paired Student's t-test. A total of 162 (98 females) people with PD and 156 (55 females) people with ID participated in the study. Cronbach alpha was satisfactory across practically all domains and factors in the PD subsample. In IDs, most factors or domains had coefficients higher than 0.70, but four subscales exhibited less satisfactory performance. Evidence of construct and concurrent validity and reliability were obtained. The analyses presented herein provide satisfactory evidence of the validity and reliability of the instrument and corroborated the factor structure revealed during cross-cultural research. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to obtain additional evidence of validity and reliability.

  12. Development of a spatio-temporal disaggregation method (DisNDVI) for generating a time series of fine resolution NDVI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, V. M.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-03-01

    Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a key parameter in understanding the vegetation dynamics, has high spatial and temporal variability. However, continuous monitoring of NDVI is not feasible at fine spatial resolution (<60 m) owing to the long revisit time needed by the satellites to acquire the fine spatial resolution data. Further, the study attains significance in the case of humid tropical regions of the earth, where the prevailing atmospheric conditions restrict availability of fine resolution cloud free images at a high temporal frequency. As an alternative to the lack of high resolution images, the current study demonstrates a novel disaggregation method (DisNDVI) which integrates the spatial information from a single fine resolution image and temporal information in terms of crop phenology from time series of coarse resolution images to generate estimates of NDVI at fine spatial and temporal resolution. The phenological variation of the pixels captured at the coarser scale provides the basis for relating the temporal variability of the pixel with the NDVI available at fine resolution. The proposed methodology was tested over a 30 km × 25 km spatially heterogeneous study area located in the south of Tamil Nadu, India. The robustness of the algorithm was assessed by an independent comparison of the disaggregated NDVI and observed NDVI obtained from concurrent Landsat ETM+ imagery. The results showed good spatial agreement across the study area dominated with agriculture and forest pixels, with a root mean square error of 0.05. The validation done at the coarser scale showed that disaggregated NDVI spatially averaged to 240 m compared well with concurrent MODIS NDVI at 240 m (R2 > 0.8). The validation results demonstrate the effectiveness of DisNDVI in improving the spatial and temporal resolution of NDVI images for utility in fine scale hydrological applications such as crop growth monitoring and estimation of evapotranspiration.

  13. The World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument for people with intellectual and physical disabilities (WHOQOL-Dis): evidence of validity of the Brazilian version

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of people with disabilities in Brazil and worldwide has grown substantially in recent decades. Cross-cultural quality of life instruments can be helpful in the development of interventions designed to meet the needs of this population and contribute to rational allocation of resources. This study sought to provide evidence of validity and reliability the Brazilian Portuguese version of WHOQOL-Dis-D (a cross-cultural, multicentre instrument developed by the WHOQOL-Group for the assessment of quality of life in persons with physical disability – PD) and WHOQOL-Dis-ID (for persons with intellectual disability – ID). Methods Classical psychometric methods were used to conduct independent analyses of the PD and ID samples. Criterion groups were established for analysis of construct validity. Concurrent validity was assessed in relation to SWLS and BDI-II scores; discriminant validity, in relation to WHODAS-II. Cronbach alpha was used to test the instrument scales and subscales for reliability. The ID subgroup was retested, and test-retest reliability assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficients and paired Student’s t-test. Results A total of 162 (98 females) people with PD and 156 (55 females) people with ID participated in the study. Cronbach alpha was satisfactory across practically all domains and factors in the PD subsample. In IDs, most factors or domains had coefficients higher than 0.70, but four subscales exhibited less satisfactory performance. Evidence of construct and concurrent validity and reliability were obtained. Conclusions The analyses presented herein provide satisfactory evidence of the validity and reliability of the instrument and corroborated the factor structure revealed during cross-cultural research. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to obtain additional evidence of validity and reliability. PMID:24886102

  14. Acinetobacter baumannii Genes Required for Bacterial Survival during Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Smith, Sara; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Crepin, Sebastien; Kole, Monica; Zahdeh, Carina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is emerging as a leading global multiple-antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogen. The identity of genes essential for pathogenesis in a mammalian host remains largely unknown. Using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS), we identified A. baumannii genes involved in bacterial survival in a leukopenic mouse model of bloodstream infection. Mice were inoculated with a pooled transposon mutant library derived from 109,000 mutants, and TraDIS was used to map transposon insertion sites in the genomes of bacteria in the inoculum and of bacteria recovered from mouse spleens. Unique transposon insertion sites were mapped and used to calculate a fitness factor for every insertion site based on its relative abundance in the inoculum and postinfection libraries. Eighty-nine transposon insertion mutants that were underrepresented after experimental infection in mice compared to their presence in the inocula were delineated as candidates for further evaluation. Genetically defined mutants lacking feoB (ferrous iron import), ddc (d-ala-d-ala-carboxypeptidase), and pntB (pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase subunit) exhibited a fitness defect during systemic infection resulting from bacteremia. In vitro, these mutants, as well as a fepA (ferric enterobactin receptor) mutant, are defective in survival in human serum and within macrophages and are hypersensitive to killing by antimicrobial peptides compared to the survival of the parental strain under these conditions. Our data demonstrate that FepA is involved in the uptake of exogenous enterobactin in A. baumannii. Genetic complementation rescues the phenotypes of mutants in assays that emulate conditions encountered during infection. In summary, we have determined novel A. baumannii fitness genes involved in the pathogenesis of mammalian infection. IMPORTANCE A. baumannii is a significant cause of bacterial bloodstream infection in humans. Since multiple antibiotic resistance

  15. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  16. [Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) guidelines for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections. 2010 update].

    PubMed

    Ayats, Josefina; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Sánchez, Fernando; García-Rodríguez, Julio; Guarro, Josep; Guinea, Jesús; Linares, María J; Pontón, José; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines are an update of recommendations for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections by the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) published in 2004 (Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2004, 22:32-9). In this updated version of the guidelines, a comprehensive review of the most recent diagnostic innovations and levels of evidence to recommend those diagnostic procedures are included. We first analyse conventional diagnostic methods, microscopic examination and culture, underlining their limitations which have led to the development of alternative methods, such as fungal antigen and DNA quantification. Those alternative methods of diagnosis are analysed by fungal infection. We also briefly review the methods for molecular identification of fungal species and recommendations for carrying out susceptibility tests for antifungal drugs, including reference procedures, commercial techniques and their indications.

  17. Staph Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Staph Infections Staph infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Many healthy people carry these bacteria ... MRSA You may have heard about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a type of staph bacteria with ...

  18. Opportunistic Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections Opportunistic Infections and Their Relationship to HIV/AIDS People with healthy immune systems can be exposed ... Disease Dementia Hospitalization & Palliative Care Related Topics on AIDS.gov Signs and Symptoms Immune System 101 Stages ...

  19. Breast infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... slowly, over several weeks, rather than quickly stopping breastfeeding Alternative Names Mastitis; Infection - breast tissue; Breast abscess Images Normal female breast anatomy Breast infection Female breast References Hunt KK, Mittendorf ...

  20. Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Salmonella infection Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Salmonella infection (salmonellosis) is a common bacterial disease that affects the intestinal tract. Salmonella bacteria typically live in animal and human intestines and are ...

  1. Campylobacter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ... Sometimes, particularly when a Campylobacter infection is severe, antibiotics may be given. If taken early in the ...

  2. MRSA Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRSA infection By Mayo Clinic Staff Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is caused by a type of ... a fever, see your doctor. Different varieties of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, commonly called "staph," exist. Staph bacteria are ...

  3. Hantavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but deadly viral infection. It is spread by mice and rats. They shed the virus in their ... breathe infected air or come into contact with rodents or their urine or droppings. You cannot catch ...

  4. Spinal infections.

    PubMed

    Tay, Bobby K-B; Deckey, Jeffrey; Hu, Serena S

    2002-01-01

    Spinal infections can occur in a variety of clinical situations. Their presentation ranges from the infant with diskitis who is unwilling to crawl or walk to the adult who develops an infection after a spinal procedure. The most common types of spinal infections are hematogenous bacterial or fungal infections, pediatric diskitis, epidural abscess, and postoperative infections. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of spinal infections, the cornerstone of treatment, requires a high index of suspicion in at-risk patients and the appropriate evaluation to identify the organism and determine the extent of infection. Neurologic function and spinal stability also should be carefully evaluated. The goals of therapy should include eradicating the infection, relieving pain, preserving or restoring neurologic function, improving nutrition, and maintaining spinal stability.

  5. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  6. Coronavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Coronaviruses are common viruses that most people get some time in their life. They are common throughout the world, and they can infect people and animals. Several different coronaviruses can infect people ...

  7. Campylobacter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Campylobacter infection is a common foodborne illness. You get it from eating raw or undercooked poultry. You ... whether you need to take antibiotics. To prevent campylobacter infection, cook poultry thoroughly. Use a separate cutting ...

  8. Staph Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes skin infections like folliculitis, boils, impetigo, and cellulitis that are limited to a small area of ... to other parts of the body by scratching. Cellulitis (pronounced: sell-yuh-LYE-tus) is an infection ...

  9. Peeking under the Iron Curtain: Development of a Microcosm for Imaging the Colonization of Steel Surfaces by Mariprofundus sp. Strain DIS-1, an Oxygen-Tolerant Fe-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Adam C; Adaktylou, Irini J; Emerson, David

    2016-11-15

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is a major cause of damage to steel infrastructure in the marine environment. Despite their ability to grow directly on Fe(II) released from steel, comparatively little is known about the role played by neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Recent work has shown that FeOB grow readily on mild steel (1018 MS) incubated in situ or as a substrate for pure cultures in vitro; however, details of how they colonize steel surfaces are unknown yet are important for understanding their effects. In this study, we combine a novel continuously upwelling microcosm with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to determine the degree of colonization of 1018 MS by the marine FeOB strain DIS-1. 1018 MS coupons were incubated with sterile seawater (pH 8) inoculated with strain DIS-1. Incubations were performed both under oxic conditions and in an anoxic-to-oxic gradient. Following incubations of 1 to 10 days, the slides were removed from the microcosms and stained to visualize both cells and stalk structures. Stained coupons were visualized by CLSM after being mounted in a custom frame to preserve the three-dimensional structure of the biofilm. The incubation of 1018 MS coupons with strain DIS-1 under oxic conditions resulted in initial attachment of cells within 2 days and nearly total coverage of the coupon with an ochre film within 5 days. CLSM imaging revealed a nonadherent biofilm composed primarily of the Fe-oxide stalks characteristic of strain DIS-1. When incubated with elevated concentrations of Fe(II), DIS-1 colonization of 1018 MS was inhibited.

  10. Vaginal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nicolle, Lindsay E.

    1989-01-01

    Vaginal infections are among the most common complaints for which women see their physicians. The patient complains primarily of vaginal discharge or pruritus. Optimal management of these infections requires a careful history, physical examination, and laboratory assessment to determine the pathogen. Specific therapy is available for the three important causes of vaginal infection: yeast vulvovaginitis, trichomoniasis, and bacterial vaginosis. Concomitant sexually transmitted diseases should be excluded in women with complaints suggestive of vaginal infection. PMID:21248968

  11. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent injury to the bone. You may also be at risk if you are having hemodialysis. Symptoms of bone infections include Pain in the infected area Chills and ...

  12. Tapeworm Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... When to see a doctor If you experience any of the signs or symptoms of tapeworm infection, seek medical attention. A tapeworm infection starts after ... the most of your time together. For tapeworm infection, some basic questions to ask ... of tests do I need, if any? What treatments are available and which do you ...

  13. The Effect of Carbon Monoxide Exposure on Susceptibility of Mice to Respiratory Infection with Listeria Monocytogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    diphtheroid-like rod with rounded ends measuring 1.0 to 2.0 p by 0.5 p. Listeriosis is one of the most recently recognized and least understood of all...Cellular resistance in Listeriosis . J. Infect. Dis. 114: 258-264. 3. Bennett, B. 1965. Isolation and cultivation in vitro of macrophages from various...mice. Its bearing on their suscepti- bility to endotoxin. J. Exptl. Med. 115: 1149-59. ۥ" N 70 38. Seeliger, H. P. 1961. Listeriosis . New York, Hafner

  14. The Energy Industry Profile of ISO/DIS 19115-1: Facilitating Discovery and Evaluation of, and Access to Distributed Information Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, S. J.; Richard, S. M.; Doniger, A.; Danko, D. M.; Derenthal, L.; Energistics Metadata Work Group

    2011-12-01

    A diverse group of organizations representative of the international community involved in disciplines relevant to the upstream petroleum industry, - energy companies, - suppliers and publishers of information to the energy industry, - vendors of software applications used by the industry, - partner government and academic organizations, has engaged in the Energy Industry Metadata Standards Initiative. This Initiative envisions the use of standard metadata within the community to enable significant improvements in the efficiency with which users discover, evaluate, and access distributed information resources. The metadata standard needed to realize this vision is the initiative's primary deliverable. In addition to developing the metadata standard, the initiative is promoting its adoption to accelerate realization of the vision, and publishing metadata exemplars conformant with the standard. Implementation of the standard by community members, in the form of published metadata which document the information resources each organization manages, will allow use of tools requiring consistent metadata for efficient discovery and evaluation of, and access to, information resources. While metadata are expected to be widely accessible, access to associated information resources may be more constrained. The initiative is being conducting by Energistics' Metadata Work Group, in collaboration with the USGIN Project. Energistics is a global standards group in the oil and natural gas industry. The Work Group determined early in the initiative, based on input solicited from 40+ organizations and on an assessment of existing metadata standards, to develop the target metadata standard as a profile of a revised version of ISO 19115, formally the "Energy Industry Profile of ISO/DIS 19115-1 v1.0" (EIP). The Work Group is participating on the ISO/TC 211 project team responsible for the revision of ISO 19115, now ready for "Draft International Standard" (DIS) status. With ISO 19115 an

  15. (Dis)organization of Palliative Care as a Potential Quality-of-Life Issue in the Senior Population--Croatian Experiences.

    PubMed

    Turina, Iva Sorta-Bilajac; Kresina, Helena Glibotić; Babić, Svjetlana Gašparović; Janković, Suzana; Kresina, Sandro; Brkljačić, Morana

    2015-06-01

    This paper analyses the current situation in the Croatian health-care system, with special emphasis on the (dis)organization of palliative care within the public health, more precisely gerontology context. Namely, population world-wide is getting older, that is both a statistical and an everyday-medical fact. Today we consider citizens after the age of 65 as the elderly, with a tendency to move the age-limit to 75 years. Croatia on the matter swiftly follows global trends, while literature points to the fact that an increase in the elderly population dictates the need for an organized system of palliative care and hospice building. Although we cannot ignore the fact that children can become palliative care patients, we can conclude that these are predominantly elderly patients. In fact, approximately half of patients--users of palliative care--have some type of oncological diagnosis; a significant number of patients suffer from dementia, stroke, or heart failure. As for the Primorsko-goranska county and the City of Rijeka, they show similar trend, as can be illustrated with data from the 2011 census, when the share of citizens over 65 years in the population of the Primorsko-goranska county reached 18.91%, and in the population of the City of Rijeka 19.74%. Thus, one of the main quality-of-life issues in the Croatian senior population is the (dis)function of the palliative medicine/care system. Practice, namely, shows that there has still been no implementation. In particular, palliative medicine is not yet recognized as a speciality or sub-speciality, standards and norms for this activity are not set, palliative care is still not included in the system of obligatory health insurance, and as far as the national strategy of health policy for the area of palliative care, Croatian Government at its meeting held on 27th December 2013 finally adopted the "Strategic Plan for Palliative Care of the Republic of Croatia for the period from 2014 to 2016". Exactly because we

  16. (dis)connectivity in Catchment-Scale Sediment Cascades: Forecasting Responses in Sediment Flux Associated with Various Forms of Environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryirs, K.

    2010-12-01

    Fluvial systems are key elements that drive Earth surface change because they convey most of the global fluxes of water and sediment from land to oceans. Fluvial fluxes of water and sediment also drive a significant proportion of the terrestrial biochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients and pollutants. Understanding the internal dynamics of the sediment cascade is therefore critical to forecasting how environmental change, whether driven by extrinsic climate change, or intrinsic human-disturbance, might affect biochemical fluxes. To understand the internal dynamics of sediment flux requires a framework that can incorporate the various processes involved in the movement of sediment from the source area through the basin system to the outlet, and can take account of spatial variability within the system and the timeframes over which these processes operate. Traditionally a sediment budget approach has been used to quantify the sediment being supplied, transported and stored in various parts of catchments. In more recent years, a more sophisticated approach to analysis of catchment linkages and (dis)connectivity has been developed that incorporates both spatial and temporal variability in the operation of the sediment cascade. This framework is based on an understanding of longitudinal, lateral and vertical linkages in sediment flux in catchments, and where blockages occur to disrupt these linkages. These blockages have been termed buffers, barriers and blankets (Fryirs et al 2007). Depending on the position of these blockages, and their sediment residence time, various parts of catchment may be actively contributing sediment to the catchment sediment cascade and be switched on, or inactive and switched off. The degree of spatial connectivity determines the effective catchment area. The breaching capacity of buffers, barriers and blankets determines the effective timescale over which certain parts of a catchment are switched on. The sediment residence time and

  17. Rifamycin Derivatives Are Effective Against Staphylococcal Biofilms In Vitro and Elutable From PMMA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-21

    S109–115. 9. Burns TC, Stinner DJ, Mack AW, Potter BK, Beer R, Eckel TT, Possley DR, Beltran MJ, Hayda RA, Andersen RC, Keeling JJ, Frisch HM, Murray CK...retention. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010;29:961–967. 20. Ellington JK, Harris M, Hudson MC, Vishin S, Webb LX, Sherertz R. Intracellular...tibia fractures. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2014;77: S194–197. 41. Obst G, Gagnon RF, Harris A, Prentis J, Richards GK. The ac- tivity of rifampin and

  18. Arbovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, J. David; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review Arbovirus (arthropod-borne virus) infections are increasingly important causes of neurologic disease in the United States through both endemic transmission and travel-associated infections. This article reviews the major arbovirus infections that can cause neurologic disease likely to be encountered in the United States. Recent Findings West Nile virus continues to be an important cause of epidemic encephalitis, while emerging arbovirus infections such as dengue and chikungunya have rapidly expanded their geographic distribution. As emerging arboviruses expand in new geographic regions, neurologic abnormalities are reported in new patient populations. Summary Emerging arbovirus infections are increasingly important causes of neurologic disease throughout the world and in the United States. While no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved therapy is yet available for these infections, prompt recognition and diagnosis from the consulting neurologist will ensure appropriate supportive care for the patient. PMID:26633778

  19. [Hand infections].

    PubMed

    Schiele, Philippe; Le Nen, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Superficial and deep hand infections are frequent in general medical practice. Clinical examination is a crucial step for an adapted provided care. Most of the time, surgery is the only way to heal infections. However, in some cases (like bites), empiric antibiotherapy is first indicated to limit infection. Staphyloccocus aureus as well as Group Beta Streptococcus are the most frequently pathogenes associated with hand infections. Methicillin resistant S. Aureus must always be considered in the diagnoses. Whatever treatment is provided, clinical assessement must be repeated within two days. An early adaquated treatment prevent functional complications and in some cases death of the patients.

  20. Anaerobic Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of antibiotics taken by mouth for months. Bacteroides and Prevotella infections. Bacterial organisms from species called Bacteroides and Prevotella are anaerobic. They are common organisms ...

  1. A qualitative study of patient (dis)trust in public and private hospitals: the importance of choice and pragmatic acceptance for trust considerations in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Paul R; Rokkas, Philippa; Cenko, Clinton; Pulvirenti, Mariastella; Dean, Nicola; Carney, Simon; Brown, Patrick; Calnan, Michael; Meyer, Samantha

    2015-07-30

    This paper explores the nature and reasoning for (dis)trust in Australian public and private hospitals. Patient trust increases uptake of, engagement with and optimal outcomes from healthcare services and is therefore central to health practice, policy and planning. A qualitative study in South Australia, including 36 in-depth interviews (18 from public and 18 from private hospitals). 'Private patients' made active choices about both their hospital and doctor, playing the role of the 'consumer', where trust and choice went hand in hand. The reputation of the doctor and hospital were key drivers of trust, under the assumption that a better reputation equates with higher quality care. However, making a choice to trust a doctor led to personal responsibility and the additional requirement for self-trust. 'Public patients' described having no choice in their hospital or doctor. They recognised 'problems' in the public healthcare system but accepted and even excused these as 'part of the system'. In order to justify their trust, they argued that doctors in public hospitals tried to do their best in difficult circumstances, thereby deserving of trust. This 'resigned trust' may stem from a lack of alternatives for free health care and thus a dependence on the system. These two contrasting models of trust within the same locality point to the way different configurations of healthcare systems, hospital experiences, insurance coverage and related forms of 'choice' combine to shape different formats of trust, as patients act to manage their vulnerability within these contexts.

  2. Generation of a Tn5 transposon library in Haemophilus parasuis and analysis by transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS).

    PubMed

    Luan, Shi-Lu; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Peters, Sarah E; Mayho, Matthew; Weinert, Lucy A; Crowther, Sarah A; Wang, Jinhong; Langford, Paul R; Rycroft, Andrew; Wren, Brendan W; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J

    2013-10-25

    Haemophilus parasuis is an important respiratory tract pathogen of swine and the etiological agent of Glässer's disease. The molecular pathogenesis of H. parasuis is not well studied, mainly due to the lack of efficient tools for genetic manipulation of this bacterium. In this study we describe a Tn5-based random mutagenesis method for use in H. parasuis. A novel chloramphenicol-resistant Tn5 transposome was electroporated into the virulent H. parasuis serovar 5 strain 29755. High transposition efficiency of Tn5, up to 10(4) transformants/μg of transposon DNA, was obtained by modification of the Tn5 DNA in the H. parasuis strain HS071 and establishment of optimal electrotransformation conditions, and a library of approximately 10,500 mutants was constructed. Analysis of the library using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS) revealed that the insertion of Tn5 was evenly distributed throughout the genome. 10,001 individual mutants were identified, with 1561 genes being disrupted (69.4% of the genome). This newly-developed, efficient mutagenesis approach will be a powerful tool for genetic manipulation of H. parasuis in order to study its physiology and pathogenesis.

  3. Complementation of the cs dis2-11 cell cycle mutant of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by a protein phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, K; Fleig, U; Schell, J; Palme, K

    1992-04-01

    The activities of type I protein phosphatases play a central role in eukaryotic cell cycle control. Here, we report the cloning and characterization from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana of a cDNA clone named PP1-At which is highly homologous to protein phosphatase 1. The deduced amino acid sequence of PP1-At shows that the PP1-At protein is 318 amino acid residues long and has a molecular weight of 35,298 Da. The PP1-At protein has strong similarity to all other known protein phosphatase type 1 catalytic subunits. Approximately 62% of the amino acids are identical to type 1 protein phosphatases of rabbit, mouse, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. RNA blot analysis revealed a single mRNA species of approximately the same size as the cDNA isolated. The PP1-At-encoded mRNA of 1.3 kb is abundant in most vegetative Arabidopsis tissues, with the lowest level of expression in leaves. When transferred to the fission yeast S.pombe, the PP1-At-encoded protein can rescue a semidominant mutant, cold sensitive (cs) dis2-11, which under nonpermissive conditions is unable to complete chromosome disjunction.

  4. Characteristics of a 85Kr beta-particle source applied in Series 1 reference irradiations of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Hakanen, A T; Sipilä, P M; Sahla, T T

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics necessary to specify an ISO 6980 Series 1 reference radiation field were determined for a commercially available 85Kr beta-particle source, using a BEAM EGS4 Monte Carlo code. The characteristics include residual maximum beta energy, E(res), and the uniformity of the dose rate over the calibration area. The E(res) and the uniformity were also determined experimentally, using an extrapolation ionization chamber (EC) and a 0.2 cm3 parallel plate ionization chamber, respectively. The depth-dose curve measured with the EC gave a value 0.62 MeV for the E(res). Series 2 90Sr + 90Y and Series 1(85) Kr beta-particle sources calibrated for H(p)(0.07) at the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) of STUK were used to determine the energy and angular responses of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters. The averaged zero angle H(p)(0.07) responses to the 90Sr + 90Y and 85Kr reference radiations were 135 and 80%, respectively. The responses were normalized to 100%, H(p)(0.07) response to 137Cs photon radiation.

  5. Campylobacter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... feces (poop), which can lead to infection in humans via contaminated food, meats (especially chicken), water taken from contaminated sources (streams or rivers near where animals graze), and milk products that haven't been ... the human digestive system, Campylobacter infects and attacks the lining ...

  6. Staph Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. previous continue Can I Prevent a Staph Skin Infection? Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are everywhere. Many healthy people carry staph bacteria without getting sick. Cleanliness and good hygiene are ... You can help prevent staph skin infections by washing your hands often and by ...

  7. Salmonella Infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for both acute and chronic poultry diseases. These diseases cause economically significant losses for poultry producers in many nations and absorb large investments of public and private resources in testing and control efforts. Infect...

  8. Significance of Staphylococcus epidermidis in Health Care-Associated Infections, from Contaminant to Clinically Relevant Pathogen: This Is a Wake-Up Call!

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, have been recognized as an important cause of health care-associated infections. Concurrently, S. epidermidis is a common contaminant in clinical cultures, which poses a diagnostic challenge. An article in this issue of Journal of Clinical Microbiology (I. Tolo, J. C. Thomas, R. S. B. Fischer, E. L. Brown, B. M. Gray, and D. A. Robinson, J Clin Microbiol 54:1711–1719, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.03345-15) describes a rapid single nucleotide polymorphism-based assay for distinguishing between S. epidermidis isolates from hospital and nonhospital sources, which represents an important contribution to the characterization and understanding of S. epidermidis health care-associated infections. PMID:27170016

  9. Drug release from E chemistry hypromellose tablets using the Bio-Dis USP type III apparatus: An evaluation of the effect of systematic agitation and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Supuk, Enes; Mahdi, Mohammed H; Adebisi, Adeola O; Nep, Elijah; Conway, Barbara R; Kaialy, Waseem; Al-Hamidi, Hiba; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of systematic agitation, increasing ionic strength and gel strength on drug release from a gel-forming matrix (HPMC E10M, E4M and E50LV) using USP type III Bio-Dis apparatus with theophylline as a model drug. The triboelectric charging; particle sizing, water content, true density and SEM of all the hypromellose grades, theophylline and formulated blends were characterised. The results showed that balanced inter-particulate forces exist between drug particles and the excipient surface and this enabled optimum charge to mass ratio to be measured. Agitation and ionic strength affected drug release from E50LV and E4M tablet matrices in comparison to the E10M tablet matrices. Drug release increased substantially when water was used as the dissolution media relative to media at pH 1.2 (containing 0.4M NaCl). The results showed all f2 values for the E10M tablet matrices were above 50 suggesting the drug release from these tablet matrices to be similar. Rheological data also explained the different drug release behaviour with the stress required to yield/erode being 1Pa, 150Pa, and 320Pa, for the E50LV, E4M and E10M respectively. The stiffness of the gel was also found to be varied from 2.5Pa, 176.2Pa and 408.3Pa for the E50LV, E4M and E10M respectively. The lower G' value can be explained by a softer gel being formed after tablet introduction into the dissolution media thereby indicating faster drug release.

  10. Hookworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestinal wall and suck blood, which results in iron deficiency anemia and protein loss. Adult worms and larvae ... problems that may result from hookworm infection include: Iron deficiency anemia , caused by loss of blood Nutritional deficiencies ...

  11. Spinal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal infection include fever, chills, headache, neck stiffness, pain, wound redness and tenderness, and wound drainage. In some cases, patients may notice new weakness, numbness or tingling sensations in the arms and/or legs. The symptoms ...

  12. Pneumocystis Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common type of infection is pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). PCP once was the major cause of death for ... or treat most cases. The key to surviving PCP is early treatment. The first signs of PCP ...

  13. Shigella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Washing So Important? Diarrhea Vomiting Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Fevers "Stomach Flu" Why Do I Need to Wash My Hands? Food Poisoning Salmonellosis Shigellosis Cholera E. Coli Gastrointestinal Infections ...

  14. Bacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  15. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds. The most common one causes tuberculosis. Another one causes leprosy. Still others cause infections ... aren't "typical" because they don't cause tuberculosis. But they can still harm people, especially people ...

  16. Pinworm Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... length. While the infected person sleeps, female pinworms lay thousands of eggs in the folds of skin ... Female pinworms move to the anal area to lay their eggs, which often results in anal itching. ...

  17. Kidney Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... filter waste from your blood and return your filtered blood to the rest of your body. Having ... urinary tract infections if they: Drink fluids, especially water. Fluids can help remove bacteria from your body ...

  18. Norovirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Noroviruses are a group of related viruses. Infection with these viruses causes an illness called gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. It can spread from person to person, or ...

  19. Norovirus Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has a norovirus infection Noroviruses are difficult to wipe out because they can withstand hot and cold ... especially after using the toilet or changing a diaper. Avoid contaminated food and water, including food that ...

  20. Neonatal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... their surroundings, particularly if they have weakened immune systems that would make them more susceptible. Symptoms of infection in newborns aren't very specific and may include persistent crying, irritability, sleeping more than usual, lethargy, refusing ...

  1. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cause of ear infections. Get your child’s vaccinations on time.Practice routine hand washing and avoid sharing food and drinks, especially if your child is exposed to large groups of kids in ...

  2. Hand Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread to others. Necrotizing Fasciitis, or “Flesh-Eating Bacteria” Necrotizing fasciitis is a very rare but severe infection. Streptococcus pyogenes or other “flesh-eating bacteria” enter the body through a cut. Bacteria toxins ...

  3. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... you should be familiar with include the following: Cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that first affects ... skin. Although other types of bacteria can cause cellulitis, Saureus is responsible for many childhood cases. Symptoms ...

  4. Risk Factors for Chorioamnion Infection and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Among Active-Duty Military women and Dependent Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    invasion and premature birth. This study will determine if the presence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a risk factor for ureaplasmal invasion of the...urealyticum, Mycoplasma species and Bacterial Vaginosis Pre-natal Screens N=2,101 BV Uu MYCO SP NEG BV+Uu BV+MYCO SP BV+Uu+MYCO SP Uu+MYCO SP OVG* only only...bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women. Clin. Infect. Dis. 16 Suppl 4:S273-81, 1993. 5. Romero, R., M. Sirtori, E. Oyarzum, C. Avila, M. Mazor, R. Callahan

  5. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  6. The DisHuman Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine; Liddiard, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the relationship between the human and disability; with specific focus on the lives of disabled children and young people. We begin with an analysis of the close relationship between "the disabled" and "the freak". We demonstrate that the historical markings of disability as object of curiosity and…

  7. The DisHuman Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine; Liddiard, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the relationship between the human and disability; with specific focus on the lives of disabled children and young people. We begin with an analysis of the close relationship between "the disabled" and "the freak". We demonstrate that the historical markings of disability as object of curiosity and…

  8. Hepatitis Infection in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence and Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kresina, Thomas F; Sylvestre, Diana; Seeff, Leonard; Litwin, Alain H; Hoffman, Kenneth; Lubran, Robert; Clark, H Westley

    2008-01-01

    Many new and existing cases of viral hepatitis infections are related to injection drug use. Transmission of these infections can result directly from the use of injection equipment that is contaminated with blood containing the hepatitis B or C virus or through sexual contact with an infected individual. In the latter case, drug use can indirectly contribute to hepatitis transmission through the dis-inhibited at-risk behavior, that is, unprotected sex with an infected partner. Individuals who inject drugs are at-risk for infection from different hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A, B, or C. Those with chronic hepatitis B virus infection also face additional risk should they become co-infected with hepatitis D virus. Protection from the transmission of hepatitis viruses A and B is best achieved by vaccination. For those with a history of or who currently inject drugs, the medical management of viral hepatitis infection comprising screening, testing, counseling and providing care and treatment is evolving. Components of the medical management of hepatitis infection, for persons considering, initiating, or receiving pharmacologic therapy for opioid addiction include: testing for hepatitis B and C infections; education and counseling regarding at-risk behavior and hepatitis transmission, acute and chronic hepatitis infection, liver disease and its care and treatment; vaccination against hepatitis A and B infection; and integrative primary care as part of the comprehensive treatment approach for recovery from opioid abuse and dependence. In addition, participation in a peer support group as part of integrated medical care enhances treatment outcomes. Liver disease is highly prevalent in patient populations seeking recovery from opioid addiction or who are currently receiving pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. Pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction is not a contraindication to evaluation, care, or treatment of liver disease due to hepatitis virus infection. Successful

  9. Infection: musculoskeletal.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Diego

    2011-05-01

    The imaging approach to osteomyelitis has evolved in the past two decades. Advances in MRI allow for whole body imaging, decreasing the need for scintigraphy when symptoms are not localized or the disease may be multifocal. There is an increasing clinical need for depiction of abscesses in the soft tissues and subperiosteal space, particularly because methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections constitute more than one-third of all the infections. The increasing emphasis on radiation dose reduction has also led away from scintigraphy and computed tomography. MR imaging has become the advanced imaging modality of choice in osteomyelitis. There is an increasing understanding of the appropriate role for gadolinium enhancement, which is not indicated when the pre-gadolinium images are normal. Other related infections, including pyomyositis, are best imaged with MRI.

  10. The Isotopologue Record of Repeat Vital Effect Offenders: Tracking (Dis)equilibrium Effects in Sea Urchins and Nannofossil Using Clumped Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, C. M.; Davies, A.; Drury, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Vital effects vary between species and affect various isotopic systems in unequal proportion. The magnitude of the response of different isotopic systems might thus be key in understanding biologically-mediated disequilibrium, especially in groups that show a tendency to be "repeat offenders" with regards to vital effects. Here we present carbon, oxygen, and clumped isotope data from echinoderm calcite and nannofossil ooze, both of which exhibit strong vital effects in bulk isotopes. Our study is the first to investigate the clumped isotope (dis)equilibrium of echinoids. Results from two echinoids, three marine gastropods and a bivalve mollusk from modern beach deposits of Bali, Indonesia, highlight a significant offset in clumped isotopes of a regular echinoid test from expected values, interpreted as evidence of a similar "vital effect" as observed in surface corals. This is in contrast to the test of an irregular "sand dollar" echinoid, with clumped isotope values within error of expected sea surface temperature. Furthermore, data on the inter-skeletal variability in the clumped isotopic composition of two regular echinoid species shows that the spines of the echinoids are in equilibrium with seawater with respect to clumped isotopes, but the test is not. For the nannofossil material, no clumped isotope vital effects are observed, consistent with previously published studies but at odds with strong vital effects in carbon and oxygen isotopes, often correlated with cell-size. In addition, we reveal that the <63 micron fraction of deep-sea ooze could constitute useful material for clumped isotope studies. An intriguing result of our study is that vital effects are mostly absent in clumped isotopes, even in phylums known for important isotopic effects. It remains to be explained why some parts of the echinoids show clear vital effects, notably enrichment in clumped isotopes of urchin tests. Mechanisms that could explain this include pH effects during calcification

  11. DisPATCh as a tool to evaluate coarse-scale remotely sensed soil moisture using localized in situ measurements: Application to SMOS and AMSR-E data in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbéteau, Yoann; Merlin, Olivier; Molero, Beatriz; Rüdiger, Christoph; Bacon, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Validating coarse-scale satellite soil moisture data still represents a big challenge, notably due to the large mismatch existing between the spatial resolution (> 10 km) of microwave radiometers and the representativeness scale (several m) of localized in situ measurements. This study aims to examine the potential of DisPATCh (Disaggregation based on Physical and Theoretical scale Change) for validating SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) and AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth observation system) level-3 soil moisture products. The ∽40-50 km resolution SMOS and AMSR-E data are disaggregated at 1 km resolution over the Murrumbidgee catchment in Southeastern Australia during a one year period in 2010-2011, and the satellite products are compared with the in situ measurements of 38 stations distributed within the study area. It is found that disaggregation improves the mean difference, correlation coefficient and slope of the linear regression between satellite and in situ data in 77%, 92% and 94% of cases, respectively. Nevertheless, the downscaling efficiency is lower in winter than during the hotter months when DisPATCh performance is optimal. Consistently, better results are obtained in the semi-arid than in a temperate zone of the catchment. In the semi-arid Yanco region, disaggregation in summer increases the correlation coefficient from 0.63 to 0.78 and from 0.42 to 0.71 for SMOS and AMSR-E in morning overpasses and from 0.37 to 0.63 and from 0.47 to 0.73 for SMOS and AMSR-E in afternoon overpasses, respectively. DisPATCh has strong potential in low vegetated semi-arid areas where it can be used as a tool to evaluate coarse-scale remotely sensed soil moisture by explicitly representing the sub-pixel variability.

  12. Hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Alex; Hotez, Peter J; Diemert, David; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; McCarthy, James S; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Croese, John; Bethony, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-08

    Hookworms are soil-transmitted nematode parasites that can reside for many years in the small intestine of their human hosts; Necator americanus is the predominant infecting species. Adult worms feed on the blood of a host and can cause iron deficiency anaemia, especially in high-risk populations (children and women of childbearing age). Almost 500 million people in developing tropical countries are infected, and simulation models estimate that hookworm infection is responsible for >4 million disability-adjusted life years lost annually. Humans mount an immune response to hookworms, but it is mostly unsuccessful at removing adult worms from the bowel. Accordingly, the host switches to an immune-tolerant state that enables hookworms to reside in the gut for many years. Although anthelmintic drugs are available and widely used, their efficacy varies and the drugs do not prevent reinfection. Thus, other control strategies aimed at improving water quality, sanitation and hygiene are needed. In addition, efforts are underway to develop a human hookworm vaccine through public-private partnerships. However, hookworms could also be a resource; as hookworms have the capability to regulate the host's inflammation, researchers are experimentally infecting patients to treat some inflammatory diseases as an approach to discover new anti-inflammatory molecules. This area of endeavour might well yield new biotherapeutics for autoimmune and allergic diseases.

  13. Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... it, you'll be saying bye-bye to fungi (say: FUN-guy). What Is a Fungal Infection? Fungi , the word for more than one fungus, can ... but of course, they're not!). Because the fungi that cause tinea (ringworm) live on different parts ...

  14. Fusarium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muhammed, Maged; Anagnostou, Theodora; Desalermos, Athanasios; Kourkoumpetis, Themistoklis K.; Carneiro, Herman A.; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Coleman, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fusarium species is a ubiquitous fungus that causes opportunistic infections. We present 26 cases of invasive fusariosis categorized according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria of fungal infections. All cases (20 proven and 6 probable) were treated from January 2000 until January 2010. We also review 97 cases reported since 2000. The most important risk factors for invasive fusariosis in our patients were compromised immune system, specifically lung transplantation (n = 6) and hematologic malignancies (n = 5), and burns (n = 7 patients with skin fusariosis), while the most commonly infected site was the skin in 11 of 26 patients. The mortality rates among our patients with disseminated, skin, and pulmonary fusariosis were 50%, 40%, and 37.5%, respectively. Fusarium solani was the most frequent species, isolated from 49% of literature cases. Blood cultures were positive in 82% of both current study and literature patients with disseminated fusariosis, while the remaining 16% had 2 noncontiguous sites of infection but negative blood cultures. Surgical removal of focal lesions was effective in both current study and literature cases. Skin lesions in immunocompromised patients should raise the suspicion for skin or disseminated fusariosis. The combination of medical monotherapy with voriconazole or amphotericin B and surgery in such cases is highly suggested. PMID:24145697

  15. Protozoan Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Other protozoal infections are caused by luminal parasites. Of these, Giardia lamblia , Crytosporidium and Trichomonas vaginalis are the most...complement- mediated killing. African trypanosomes and Giardia lamblia , for exam- ple, are killed by action of the alternative complement pathway...operation between T cells and macrophages is import- ant in defence against Giardia . Resistance to murine giardiasis requires participation of thymus

  16. [Infected pseudarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Kinzl, L; Suger, G

    1996-09-01

    In open fractures the rate of infected non-union defects has in recent years decreased due to the increased primary application of external fixation. In spite of this positive state of affairs the condition is still encountered often enough to warrant specific treatment strategies and techniques. In the treatment of infected pseudarthroses the general principles of osteitis treatment are applied. This includes radical excision of infected pseudarthrotic bone and of the diseased surrounding soft tissue, provides mechanical stability in the non-union area and requires effective local treatment of the infection in combination with systemic, target-specific and temporary well-defined antibiotic therapy as well as procedures to improve local circulation. The incorporation of autogenous bone transplants in defects appears to depend on close contact between the transplant and the vascularized receiving site and on the quantity of the transplanted osseous material. A promising alternative method of dealing with extensive bone defects is osteogenesis produced by callus distraction; therefore special attention is given to Ilizarov's ring fixation system. Unstable scar formation demands local muscular flaps or microvascularized free flap transfer, which seems to be superior to other methods.

  17. Tinea Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Tinea is the name of a group of diseases caused by a fungus. Types of tinea include ringworm, athlete's foot and jock itch. These infections are ... depend on the affected area of the body: Ringworm is a red skin rash that forms a ...

  18. Paratyphoid Infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The numerous motile members of the bacterial genus Salmonella are collectively referred to as paratyphoid (PT) salmonellae. Found throughout the world, these organisms infect a wide variety of hosts (including invertebrate and vertebrate wildlife, domestic animals, and humans) to yield either asympt...

  19. Cytomegalovirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus found around the world. It is related to the viruses that cause chickenpox and infectious mononucleosis (mono). Between 50 percent ... in the United States have had a CMV infection by age 40. Once CMV is in a ...

  20. Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... it, you'll be saying bye-bye to fungi (say: FUN-guy). What Is a Fungal Infection? Fungi , the word for more than one fungus, can ... but of course, they're not!). Because the fungi that cause tinea (ringworm) live on different parts ...

  1. Chlamydia Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... PID). PID can cause permanent damage to your reproductive system. This can lead to long-term pelvic pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy. Women who have had chlamydia infections more than once are at higher risk of serious reproductive health complications. Men often don't have health ...

  2. Salmonella infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections of poultry with bacteria of the genus Salmonella can cause clinical disease, but are of greater current concern as agents of food-borne transmission of illness to humans. However, two nonmotile organisms, S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarum, are host-specific for avian species. Pullorum disease...

  3. Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of all types of fungi are harmful. Some fungi reproduce through tiny spores in the air. You can inhale the spores or they can land on you. As a result, fungal infections often start in the lungs ... or take antibiotics. Fungi can be difficult to kill. For skin and ...

  4. Prevention of indigenous infection of mice with Escherichia coli by nonspecific immunostimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, K; Yokokura, T; Mitsuyama, M; Yoshikai, Y; Nomoto, K

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that the lethal toxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in specific-pathogen-free mice is due to an intestinal infection with indigenous Escherichia coli induced by the drug (K. Nomoto, T. Yokokura, Y. Yoshikai, M. Mitsuyama, and K. Nomoto, Can J. Microbiol. 37:244-247, 1991). In the present study we demonstrate that nonspecific immunostimulation is effective in the protection of mice from the lethal indigenous infection induced by 5-FU. Intravenous or subcutaneous injection of a preparation of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei YIT 9018, a potent nonspecific immunostimulant, into BALB/c mice reduced the lethal toxicity of 5-FU at doses ranging from 338 to 800 mg/kg of body weight if YIT 9018 was injected 7 to 40 days before administration of 5-FU. Systemic infection with E. coli developed in all of the 5-FU-treated control mice 7 days or more after administration of 5-FU in large doses and was accompanied by overgrowth of the bacteria in the intestinal tract. Pretreatment of mice with YIT 9018 resulted in a decreased occurrence of systemic infection with E. coli to levels of 0 to 20% and no significant changes in the population levels of E. coli in the intestinal tract during the 14 days after administration of 5-FU. The levels of leukopenia in the spleen and peripheral blood were lower, and recovery of granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and femur began earlier in the treated animals than in the 5-FU-treated controls. Intravenous transfusion of syngeneic normal bone marrow cells or spleen cells into the mice at an early period after administration of 5-FU diminished markedly the occurrence of the lethal indigenous infection, suggestion that an earlier recovery from chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression is important in the mechanisms of protection of the host from the infection. PMID:1605602

  5. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Prendergast, Bernard D

    2016-02-27

    Infective endocarditis occurs worldwide, and is defined by infection of a native or prosthetic heart valve, the endocardial surface, or an indwelling cardiac device. The causes and epidemiology of the disease have evolved in recent decades with a doubling of the average patient age and an increased prevalence in patients with indwelling cardiac devices. The microbiology of the disease has also changed, and staphylococci, most often associated with health-care contact and invasive procedures, have overtaken streptococci as the most common cause of the disease. Although novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have emerged, 1 year mortality has not improved and remains at 30%, which is worse than for many cancers. Logistical barriers and an absence of randomised trials hinder clinical management, and longstanding controversies such as use of antibiotic prophylaxis remain unresolved. In this Seminar, we discuss clinical practice, controversies, and strategies needed to target this potentially devastating disease.

  6. Viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Puigdomènech, Isabel; de Armas-Rillo, Laura; Machado, José-David

    2011-01-01

    Viruses have developed different survival strategies in host cells by crossing cell-membrane compartments, during different steps of their viral life cycle. In fact, the non-regenerative viral membrane of enveloped viruses needs to encounter the dynamic cell-host membrane, during early steps of the infection process, in which both membranes fuse, either at cell-surface or in an endocytic compartment, to promote viral entry and infection. Once inside the cell, many viruses accomplish their replication process through exploiting or modulating membrane traffic, and generating specialized compartments to assure viral replication, viral budding and spreading, which also serve to evade the immune responses against the pathogen. In this review, we have attempted to present some data that highlight the importance of membrane dynamics during viral entry and replicative processes, in order to understand how viruses use and move through different complex and dynamic cell-membrane structures and how they use them to persist. PMID:21966556

  7. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Dunne, B; Marr, T; Kim, D; Andrews, D; Edwards, M; Merry, C; Larbalestier, R

    2014-07-01

    Infective endocarditis continues to pose a therapeutic challenge to treating clinicians. We believe that the successful management of endocarditis mandates a thorough understanding of the risk factors for adverse outcomes and a co-ordinated team approach. Between the years 2000 and 2009, 85 patients required surgery for infective endocarditis, with a total of 112 infected valves being treated surgically. Data was analysed to determine factors significantly associated with morbidity and mortality. The mean age was 50.5 years. Nine (10.5%) of these patients had Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis, the remaining 76 (89.5%) had Native Valve Endocarditis. Twenty-nine percent of patients were NYHA 4 pre-operatively, 15% of patients were haemodynamically unstable requiring inotropic support, 34% were persistently febrile despite antibiotic therapy, and 48% had suffered any embolic event, 20% suffered cerebral emboli. The commonest causative organism in our series was Staphylococcus Aureus (54.1%) with 2.3% of cases being due to MRSA. The second commonest organism isolated was Streptococcus spp. at 21.1%. Operative mortality was 12.9%, of which on-table mortality was 2.2%. Mean follow-up was 56 months (range 1-151). Early recurrence rates (<3 months) were 2.3%. Late recurrence was 7.0%. The pre-operative factors associated with increased mortality were age over 65, inotropic requirement, uncontrolled sepsis and cerebral emboli. We summarise our experience and recommendations for a team approach to the management of infective endocarditis. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Daniel A.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is rare in developed countries. However, recent outbreaks in the United States and Europe and the potential use of the bacteria for bioterrorism have focused interest on it. Furthermore, although anthrax was known to typically occur as one of three syndromes related to entry site of (i.e., cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational), a fourth syndrome including severe soft tissue infection in injectional drug users is emerging. Although shock has been described with cutaneous anthrax, it appears much more common with gastrointestinal, inhalational (5 of 11 patients in the 2001 outbreak in the United States), and injectional anthrax. Based in part on case series, the estimated mortalities of cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalational, and injectional anthrax are 1%, 25 to 60%, 46%, and 33%, respectively. Nonspecific early symptomatology makes initial identification of anthrax cases difficult. Clues to anthrax infection include history of exposure to herbivore animal products, heroin use, or clustering of patients with similar respiratory symptoms concerning for a bioterrorist event. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with Gram stain and culture from blood or surgical specimens followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR or immunohistochemistry). Although antibiotic therapy (largely quinolone-based) is the mainstay of anthrax treatment, the use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists is a consideration. PMID:21852539

  9. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Fonseca, Ana Catarina

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease of the endocardium of the heart and cardiac valves, caused by a variety of infectious agents, ranging from streptococci to rickettsia. The proportion of cases associated with rheumatic valvulopathy and dental surgery has decreased in recent years, while endocarditis associated with intravenous drug abuse, prosthetic valves, degenerative valve disease, implanted cardiac devices, and iatrogenic or nosocomial infections has emerged. Endocarditis causes constitutional, cardiac and multiorgan symptoms and signs. The central nervous system can be affected in the form of meningitis, cerebritis, encephalopathy, seizures, brain abscess, ischemic embolic stroke, mycotic aneurysm, and subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke in endocarditis is an ominous prognostic sign. Treatment of endocarditis includes prolonged appropriate antimicrobial therapy and in selected cases, cardiac surgery. In ischemic stroke associated with infective endocarditis there is no indication to start antithrombotic drugs. In previously anticoagulated patients with an ischemic stroke, oral anticoagulants should be replaced by unfractionated heparin, while in intracranial hemorrhage, all anticoagulation should be interrupted. The majority of unruptured mycotic aneurysms can be treated by antibiotics, but for ruptured aneurysms, endovascular or neurosurgical therapy is indicated.

  10. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Stages of HIV Infection How Does HIV Progress in Your Body? Without treatment, HIV advances ... are the three stages of HIV infection: Acute HIV Infection Stage Within 2-4 weeks after HIV ...

  11. Fish tapeworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    Fish tapeworm infection is an intestinal infection with the tapeworm parasite found in fish. ... The fish tapeworm ( Diphyllobothrium latum ) is the largest parasite that infects humans. Humans become infected when they eat raw or undercooked ...

  12. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News media ... who suffer from the most common type of ear infection, called middle ear infection or otitis media ( ...

  13. Murine Mycobacterium marinum Infection as a Model for Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Julia; Carlsson, Fredric

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are a major human health problem globally. Regarding tuberculosis the situation is worsened by the poor efficacy of current vaccine regimens and by emergence of drug-resistant strains (Manjelievskaia J et al, Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 110: 110, 2016; Pereira et al., Lancet Infect Dis 12:300-306, 2012; http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/) undermining both disease-prevention and available treatments. Thus, increased basic understanding of mycobacterial-and particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis-virulence strategies and pathogenesis is of great importance. To this end several in vivo infection models are available (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013; Leung et al., Eur J Immunol 43:2246-2254, 2013; Patel et al., J Lab Physicians 3:75-79, 2011; van Leeuwen et al., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 5:a018580, 2015). While these models all have their merits they also exhibit limitations, and none perfectly mimics all aspects of human tuberculosis. Thus, there is a need for multiple models that may complement each other, ultimately allowing us to gain true insight into the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections.Here, we describe a recently developed mouse model of Mycobacterium marinum infection that allows kinetic and quantitative studies of disease progression in live animals [8]. Notably, this model exhibits features of human tuberculosis not replicated in M. tuberculosis infected mice, and may provide an important complement to the field. For example, granulomas in the M. marinum model develop central caseating necrosis (Carlsson et al., PLoS Pathog 6:e1000895, 2010), a hallmark of granulomas in human tuberculosis normally not replicated in murine M. tuberculosis infection. Moreover, while tuberculosis is heterogeneous and presents with a continuum of active and latent disease, M. tuberculosis infected mice essentially lack this dynamic range and do not replicate latency (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013

  14. A Toll-Like Receptor 2-Responsive Lipid Effector Pathway Protects Mammals against Skin Infections with Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Georgel, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Lauth, Xavier; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Seltmann, Holger; Sovath, Sosathya; Hoebe, Kasper; Du, Xin; Rutschmann, Sophie; Jiang, Zhengfan; Bigby, Timothy; Nizet, Victor; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Beutler, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    flake (flk), an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced recessive germ line mutation of C57BL/6 mice, impairs the clearance of skin infections by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive pathogens that elicit innate immune responses by activating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) (K. Takeda and S. Akira, Cell. Microbiol. 5:143-153, 2003). Positional cloning and sequencing revealed that flk is a novel allele of the stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 gene (Scd1). flake homozygotes show reduced sebum production and are unable to synthesize the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) palmitoleate (C16:1) and oleate (C18:1), both of which are bactericidal against gram-positive (but not gram-negative) organisms in vitro. However, intradermal MUFA administration to S. aureus-infected mice partially rescues the flake phenotype, which indicates that an additional component of the sebum may be required to improve bacterial clearance. In normal mice, transcription of Scd1—a gene with numerous NF-κB elements in its promoter—is strongly and specifically induced by TLR2 signaling. Similarly, the SCD1 gene is induced by TLR2 signaling in a human sebocyte cell line. These observations reveal the existence of a regulated, lipid-based antimicrobial effector pathway in mammals and suggest new approaches to the treatment or prevention of infections with gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16040962

  15. Will droplet digital PCR become the test of choice for detecting and quantifying ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection? Maybe not.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Julius

    2013-11-01

    Evaluation of: Roberts CH, Last A, Molina-Gonzalez S et al. Development and evaluation of a next-generation digital PCR diagnostic assay for ocular chlamydia trachomatis infections. J. Clin. Microbiol. 51(7), 2195-2203 (2013). Trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness in developing countries. Currently, there is no program to eliminate blinding trachoma as a public health problem. We need better diagnostic tests for research and to assess progress in control programs. Roberts et al. adapted droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), an emulsion PCR process that performs absolute quantitation of nucleic acids, to detect and quantify Chlamydia trachomatis infections. They compared the results with ddPCR on conjunctival swab specimens collected in trachoma-endemic area to results using Roche's Amplicor® C. trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG) PCR and found that ddPCR sensitivity was 73.3%. The authors concluded that 'ddPCR is an effective diagnostic technology suitable for both research and clinical use in diagnosing ocular C. trachomatis infections'. This reviewer disagrees, feeling that if the stated sensitivity is accurate, it is too low, and suggests there may be good reasons to adapt commercially available tests for this purpose.

  16. Identification of Staphylococcus epidermidis in the clinical microbiology laboratory by molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Amity L

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical assays for the phenotypic identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the clinical microbiology laboratory have been well described in previous publications (Becker and Von Eiff Manual of Clinical Microbiology, ASM Press, Washington, pp. 308-330, 2011; Kloos and Wolfshohl J Clin Microbiol 16:509-516, 1982). This discussion focuses on identification of Staphylococcus epidermidis through molecular and proteomic methods. Molecular assays have been shown to be more discriminatory between the coagulase-negative staphylococcal species than are phenotypic assays (Zadoks and Watts Vet Microbiol 134:20-28, 2009; Sheraba et al. BMC Res Notes 3:278, 2010; Patteet et al. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 31:747-751, 2012). The molecular and proteomic methods that have shown the greatest utilization potential within the clinical laboratory are as follows: PCR amplification and sequencing of discriminatory genes, real-time polymerase chain reaction with species-specific probes in conjunction with a melt-curve analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  17. Yersinia-induced Apoptosis In Vivo Aids in the Establishment of a Systemic Infection of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Monack, Denise M.; Mecsas, Joan; Bouley, Donna; Falkow, Stanley

    1998-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia cause a systemic infection in mice that is dependent on the presence of a large plasmid encoding a number of secreted virulence proteins called Yops. We previously demonstrated that a plasmid-encoded Yop, YopJ, was essential for inducing apoptosis in cultured macrophages. Here we report that YopJ is a virulence factor in mice and is important for the establishment of a systemic infection. The oral LD50 for a yopJ mutant Yersinia pseudotuberculosis increases 64-fold compared with wild-type. Although the yopJ mutant strain is able to reach the spleen of infected mice, the mutant strain seldom reaches the same high bacterial load that is seen with wild-type Yersinia strain and begins to be cleared from infected spleens on day 4 after infection. Furthermore, when in competition with wild-type Yersinia in a mixed infection, the yopJ mutant strain is deficient for spread from the Peyer's patches to other lymphoid tissue. We also show that wild-type Yersinia induces apoptosis in vivo of Mac-1+ cells from infected mesenteric lymph nodes or spleens, as measured by quantitative flow cytometry of TUNEL (Tdt-mediated dUTP–biotin nick-end labeling)-positive cells. The levels of Mac-1+, TUNEL+ cells from tissue infected with the yopJ mutant strain were equivalent to the levels detected in cells from uninfected tissue. YopJ is necessary for the suppression of TNF-α production seen in macrophages infected with wild-type Yersinia, based on previous in vitro studies (Palmer, L.E., S. Hobbie, J.E. Galan, and J.B. Bliska. 1998. Mol. Microbiol. 27:953–965). We conclude here that YopJ plays a role in the establishment of a systemic infection by inducing apoptosis and that this is consistent with the ability to suppress the production of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α. PMID:9841926

  18. [Rotavirus infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Rotaviruses are genetically highly variable, non-enveloped viruses with a double-stranded, segmented ribonucleic acid genome. They are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. In children aged less than 5 years, they are the most frequent agent of severe acute diarrheal illnesses. In less developed countries, rotavirus diseases are one of the most frequent causes of death in infants and little children. Typically, symptomatic rotavirus diseases in infants (<5 years) and the elderly (>70 years) arise with sudden onset of watery diarrhoea with high risk of dehydration, accompanied by vomiting and, in several cases, unspecific respiratory symptoms such as cold and sore throat. In adults aged less than 70 years, illnesses due to rotavirus appear generally mild or as travel diarrhoea. Although rotavirus infections are considered to by systemic, extraintestinal manifestations such as rotavirus central nervous system diseases are relatively rare. Rotaviruses are transmitted primarily from person-to-person by the faecal-oral route. Treatment of rotavirus diarrhoea is usually symptomatic and comprises a sufficient fluid and electrolyte substitution. Although nitazoxanide and some other drugs show high efficacy against rotavirus in vitro and in vivo, there is currently no recommended specific antiviral therapy. For prophylaxis, special attention should be paid to adequate hygienic rules. Because of the high stability of rotaviruses to changing environmental conditions, disinfection should be performed applying disinfectants with proven activity against rotaviruses. In Germany, two efficient and secure live vaccines against rotaviruses have been approved. Their application, however, is not generally recommended.

  19. Human Spotted Fever Rickettsial Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Salitral (Piura Department); La Merced (Junin Department); and Cusco ( Cusco Department) (Figure). Chiclayito is a small village (population 6,133) ≈30 m...city of Lima, on the eastern side of the Andes. The dis- trict has a population of 31,000; approximately half live in La Merced. Cusco (population...50 from Chiclayito and the Salitral Health Centers (Piura Department), 67 from Cusco Hospital ( Cusco Department), and 53 from La Merced Hospital

  20. Infections and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you are pregnant, an infection can be more than just a problem for you. Some infections can be dangerous to your baby. You can help yourself avoid infections: Don't eat raw or undercooked meat Don' ...

  1. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Listeria Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Listeria Infections A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Listeriosis About Listeria Listeria infections (known as listeriosis ) are rare. When ...

  2. Listeria Infection (Listeriosis)

    MedlinePlus

    Listeria infection Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Listeria infection is a foodborne bacterial illness that can be very serious for pregnant women and people with impaired immune systems. Listeria infection is most ...

  3. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    Ear infection (middle ear) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff An ear infection (acute otitis media) is most often a bacterial or viral infection that affects the middle ear, the air-filled space behind the eardrum that ...

  4. Clostridium difficile Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Condition Family HealthSeniors Share ...

  5. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates ...

  6. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates ...

  7. [Hantavirus infections].

    PubMed

    Strady, C; Jaussaud, R; Remy, G; Penalba, C

    2005-03-12

    Hantaviruses are cosmopolite anthropozoonosis considered as an emerging disease. Four pathogenic types for humans and part of the Bunyaviridae species are hosted by rodents and have been isolated: the Sin nombre virus responsible for the severe American respiratory form; the Hantaan and Seoul viruses responsible for hemorrhagic fevers with renal syndrome (HFRS) of severe to moderate expression in Asia and also in the Balkans; the Puumala virus responsible for HFRS of moderate expression or the socalled nephropathia epidemica in Europe. The Puumala virus is responsible for a minor form of the disease that is observed in areas of the Occidental sector of the ex-URSS, in Scandinavia and in the rest of Europe, notably in the North-East of France. The epidemic episodes occur every three years. They follow the proliferation of rodents, notably russet voles, the reservoir hosts, and their degree of infection. The concept of an occupation at risk in 20 to 49 year-old men (working in forests, agriculture, living near a forest, contact with wood) in an endemic area has not always been found. Its clinical form can vary greatly in its presentation. Basically it is a severe algic influenza syndrome accompanied by acute myopia in 38% of cases, but is nearly pathognomonic in the context. Respiratory involvement is frequent but benign. The initial syndrome can suggest an abdominal or urological surgical emergency, which is source of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. Early biological examination reveals thrombopenia and proteinuria. Then more or less severe acute kidney failure appears in slightly more than 50% of cases. Although it usually regresses with symptomatic treatment, after effects remain in some patients. The environmental changes, the geographical distribution depending on the biotope, the dynamics and behaviour of rodents and the viral circulation between them and its transmission to human beings and its risk factors must continue to be studied in order to gain

  8. Cold atmospheric plasma: a new tool for the treatment of superficial driveline infections.

    PubMed

    Hilker, Lutz; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus Dieter; Wollert, Hans-Georg

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous driveline infections (DI) are leading factors for morbidity and mortality in ventricular assist device (VAD) patients. In recent years, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been safely and effectively used in clinical settings to treat topical infections. We describe the first use of CAP to treat a superficial DI. CAP was applied with the kinPen® MED plasma jet device (neoplas tools GmbH, Greifswald, Germany), in the treatment of a DI in a 66-year-old VAD patient in Klinikum Karlsburg, Germany. The patient received a daily application of CAP of 1 min for 12 days. One CAP application was administered each week for 4 weeks in our outpatient clinic after patient discharge. Laboratory tests were conducted and photographs of the driveline exit site were taken. After CAP treatment, the local infection was completely regressed without any signs of exudation or recurrence of the infection. There were no adverse side effects observed, and the HVAD logfile data did not show any abnormalities during treatment. Here, we demonstrate a successful resolution of a VAD DI with the kinPen plasma jet device. We believe that CAP has the potential to be a simple and effective tool in the treatment of superficial DIs.

  9. Prevalence and serovar distribution of asymptomatic cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infections as determined by highly sensitive PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Lan, J; Melgers, I; Meijer, C J; Walboomers, J M; Roosendaal, R; Burger, C; Bleker, O P; van den Brule, A J

    1995-01-01

    The prevalence rates and serovar distributions of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infections were investigated in two different groups of women. Group I consisted of 393 asymptomatic young women (aged 17 to 30 years) who were invited to participate in a C. trachomatis screening program. Group II consisted of 734 randomly selected patients (aged 17 to 68 years) attending an inner-city gynecological outpatient clinic. C. trachomatis was detected in cervical scrapes by PCR specific for endogenous plasmid. These plasmid PCR-positive samples were subsequently subjected to genotyping by C. trachomatis-specific omp1 PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (J. Lan, J. M. M. Walboomers, R. Roosendaal, G. J. van Doornum, D. M. MacLaren, C. J. L. M. Meijer, and A. J. C. van den Brule, J. Clin. Microbiol. 31:1060-1065, 1993). The overall prevalence rates of C. trachomatis found in patients younger than 30 years were 9.2 and 11.8% in groups I and II, respectively. A clear age dependency was seen in group II, with the highest prevalence rate (20%) found in patients younger than 20 years, while the rate declined significantly after 30 years of age (5.9%). In women younger than 30 years, the genotyping results showed that serovars E, I, and D (in decreasing order) were frequent in group I, while serovars F, E, and G (in decreasing order) were predominantly found in group II. The study shows that C. trachomatis infections are highly prevalent in asymptomatic young women. The different serovar distributions found most likely reflect the different compositions of the study groups, but additional analysis of the case histories of individual patients suggests that certain serovars might be associated with symptomatic (i.e., serovar G) or asymptomatic (i.e., serovars D and I) infections. PMID:8586701

  10. HIV and gynaecological infections.

    PubMed

    Sebitloane, Mothshedisi H

    2005-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection primarily affects women during their reproductive years, and the co-existence of gynaecological infections is not surprising, given the fact that HIV is mainly acquired via heterosexual contact. Most gynaecological infections are themselves sexually acquired, and have the potential to increase the risk both of acquiring and transmitting the HI virus. As most sexually transmitted infections are asymptomatic, there is a need to improve methods of diagnosis and algorithms for early detection of sexually transmitted infections. HIV infection, however, particularly advanced disease, may alter the clinical presentation, course and response to conservative treatment for some of the sexually transmitted infections.

  11. Pediatric HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Espanol, Teresa; Caragol, Isabel; Soler, Pere; Hernandez, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    HIV infection by maternal transmission is increasing in the world due to the increase in infected women who are not receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. Prognosis of HIV infection in children is poor because the newborn has an immature immune system. Early diagnosis and therapy are needed to avoid the development of AIDS. New therapies are becoming available but prevention of infection, through maternal therapy during pregnancy, is the most effective measure in avoiding this infection through this transmission route.

  12. Shewanella putrefaciens infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Constant, Jonathan; Chernev, Ivan; Gomez, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes infection in humans. In the last few decades a growing number of cases have been described. The following report outlines the case of a 40-year-old immunocompetent white man with S. putrefaciens infective endocarditis. This is the first known case of infective endocarditis due to an apparently monomicrobial S. putrefaciens infection, and the second known case of S. putrefaciens-related infective endocarditis worldwide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Prosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Saima; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections represent a major therapeutic challenge for both healthcare providers and patients. This paper reviews the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, microbiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of prosthetic joint infection. The most optimal management strategy should be identified based on a number of considerations including type and duration of infection, antimicrobial susceptibility of the infecting pathogen, condition of infected tissues and bone stock, patient wishes and functional status. PMID:22847032

  14. Neuroparasitic infections: nematodes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M D; Zunt, J R

    2005-09-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system--Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.--is reviewed.

  15. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI. PMID:26950194

  16. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-04-02

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI.

  17. [Infection prevention and control for foodborne infections].

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    Patients' care for foodborne infections is sometimes very critical, since these patients exerting high copy numbers of contagious pathogens. Recently, Norovirus infection became the most frequent pathogen for large outbreaks in the community and the hospital around the world. Norovirus is alcohol-resistant and highly contagious. For preventing outbreaks of foodborne infections, standard precaution(and contact precaution for diaper changing patients) is required by the CDC's isolation precaution guideline revised at 2007. We need to provide for infection prevention and control in the epidemic winter period not only in healthcare facilities but also for communities.

  18. Rapid Detection of Mycobacteria in Patients with HIV Infection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    Mycobacterium paratuberculosis strains by restriction endonuclease analysis and ENA hybridization. J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:1591-1596. 5. Chiodini, R.J...1990. Characterization of Mvcobacterium paratuberculosis and organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex by restriction polymorphism of the rim gene

  19. Acute Chest Wall Infections: Surgical Site Infections, Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections, and Sternoclavicular Joint Infection.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Paul; Tieu, Brandon H

    2017-05-01

    Acute chest wall infections are uncommon and share similar risk factors for infection at other surgical sites. Smoking cessation has been shown to decrease the risk of surgical site infection. Depending on the depth of infection and/or involvement of the organ space, adequate therapy involves antibiotics and drainage. Early diagnosis and debridement of necrotizing soft tissue infections is essential to reduce mortality. Sternoclavicular joint infections require surgical debridement, en bloc resection, and antibiotic therapy. A standard approach to wound closure after resection has yet to be established. Vacuum-assisted closure is a valuable adjunct to standard therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Infections after organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kern, W V; Wagner, D; Hirsch, H H

    2005-06-01

    Early postoperative infections after transplantation vary according to the transplanted organ. During the subsequent course opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus reactivation, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, invasive pneumococcal infection and mould infections predominate. Reactivated tuberculous infection appears to become more prevalent. Some of the opportunistic infections are preventable by chemoprophylaxis; others can be managed very effectively by monitoring and early preemptive therapy. Physicians caring for patients after organ transplantation need to early consider in the differential diagnosis rare pathogens which are often overlooked with standard diagnostic procedures.

  1. The 21st century epidemic: infections as inductors of neuro-degeneration associated with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Licastro, Federico; Carbone, Ilaria; Raschi, Elena; Porcellini, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex disease resulting in neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Investigations on environmental factors implicated in AD are scarce and the etiology of the disease remains up to now obscure. The disease's pathogenesis may be multi-factorial and different etiological factors may converge during aging and induce an activation of brain microglia and macrophages. This microglia priming will result in chronic neuro-inflammation under chronic antigen activation. Infective agents may prime and drive iper-activation of microglia and be partially responsible of the induction of brain inflammation and decline of cognitive performances. Age-associated immune dis-functions induced by chronic sub-clinical infections appear to substantially contribute to the appearance of neuro-inflammation in the elderly. Individual predisposition to less efficient immune responses is another relevant factor contributing to impaired regulation of inflammatory responses and accelerated cognitive decline. Life-long virus infection may play a pivotal role in activating peripheral and central inflammatory responses and in turn contributing to increased cognitive impairment in preclinical and clinical AD.

  2. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Helicobacter Pylori Infections Page Content Article Body Most people, ... always) caused by bacteria—specifically, an organism called Helicobacter pylori. H pylori infections occur at a low ...

  3. Yeast Infection (Vaginal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your infection is caused by a type of candida other than Candida albicans You're pregnant You have uncontrolled diabetes ... or suppositories You develop other symptoms The fungus candida causes a vaginal yeast infection. Your vagina naturally ...

  4. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Professional Version Also of Interest Test your knowledge Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection. The infection ... Learn more about our commitment to Global Medical Knowledge . Merck Manuals About Disclaimer Permissions Privacy Contributors Terms ...

  5. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections A A ... bathroom and before handling food in any way. Salmonella Basics Not everyone who ingests Salmonella bacteria will ...

  6. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  7. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  8. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  9. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  10. Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Salmonella Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  11. Prevent Infections in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections before and during pregnancy: Protect yourself from Zika virus. Zika virus can be passed from a pregnant woman ... to her baby around the time of birth. Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly (a ...

  12. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  13. Yeast Infection during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... OK? What's the best way to treat a yeast infection during pregnancy? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D. You can safely treat a yeast infection during pregnancy with various over-the-counter ...

  14. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 children) Changes in altitude or climate Cold climate Exposure to smoke Family history of ear infections ... or fewer children. This can reduce your child's chances of getting a cold or other infection, and ...

  15. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  16. Cutaneous Infections in Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Eugene K.; deWeber, Kevin; Berry, James W.; Wilckens, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Cutaneous infections are common in wrestlers. Although many are simply a nuisance in the everyday population, they can be problematic to wrestlers because such infections may result in disqualification from practice or competition. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are therefore important. Evidence Acquisition: Medline and PubMed databases, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate were searched through 2012 with the following keywords in various combinations: skin infections, cutaneous infections, wrestlers, athletes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, skin and soft tissue infections, tinea corporis, tinea capitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster, molluscum contagiosum, verruca vulgaris, warts, scabies, and pediculosis. Relevant articles found in the primary search, and selected references from those articles were reviewed for pertinent clinical information. Results: The most commonly reported cutaneous infections in wrestlers are herpes simplex virus infections (herpes gladiatorum), bacterial skin and soft tissue infections, and dermatophyte infections (tinea gladiatorum). The clinical appearance of these infections can be different in wrestlers than in the community at large. Conclusion: For most cutaneous infections, diagnosis and management options in wrestlers are similar to those in the community at large. With atypical presentations, testing methods are recommended to confirm the diagnosis of herpes gladiatorum and tinea gladiatorum. There is evidence to support the use of prophylactic medications to prevent recurrence of herpes simplex virus and reduce the incidence of dermatophyte infections in wrestlers. PMID:24427413

  17. Disseminated Balamuthia mandrillaris Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neil; Almira-Suarez, M. I.; Reese, Jennifer M.; Hoke, George M.; Mandell, James W.; Roy, Sharon L.; Visvesvara, Govinda

    2015-01-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a rare cause of human infection, but when infections do occur, they result in high rates of morbidity and mortality. A case of disseminated Balamuthia infection is presented. Early diagnosis and initiation of recommended therapy are essential for increased chances of successful outcomes. PMID:26135864

  18. Primary Aortic Infections and Infected Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Primary infections of the aorta and infected aortic aneurysms are rare and are life threatening. Most of them are due to bacterial infection occurring in an atheromatous plaque or a pre existing aneurysm during bacteremia. Rarely spread from a contiguous septic process may be the cause. The reported hospital mortality ranges from 16–44%. Gram positive bacteria are still the most common causative organisms. More recently, Gram negative bacilli are seen increasingly responsible. The mortality rate is higher for the Gram negative infection since they most often cause supra renal aneurysms and are more prone for rupture. Best results are achieved by appropriate antibiotics and aggressive surgical treatment. Excision of the infected aneurysm sac as well as surrounding tissue and in situ reconstruction of aorta is the preferred treatment. Pedicled omental cover also helps to reduce infection. Long term antibiotic is needed to prevent reinfection. Mortality is high for those who undergo emergency operation, with advanced age and for nonsalmonella infection. PMID:23555384

  19. Erratum to "Apotransferrin administration prevents growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis in serum of stem cell transplant patients by binding of free iron". [FEMS Immunol. Med Microbiol. 37 (2003) 45-51].

    PubMed

    von Bonsdorff, Leni; Sahlstedt, Leila; Ebeling, Freja; Ruutu, Tapani; Parkkinen, Jaakko

    2004-03-08

    We investigated the effect of free, non-transferrin-bound iron occurring in haematological stem cell transplant patients on growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis in serum in vitro, and prevention of bacterial growth by exogenous apotransferrin. S. epidermidis did not grow in normal serum at inoculated bacterial densities up to 10(3) cfu ml(-1) but slow growth could be detected at higher initial inocula. Addition of free iron abolished the growth-inhibitory effect of serum, whereas addition of apotransferrin again restored it. Appearance of free iron and loss of growth inhibition coincided in patient serum samples taken daily during myeloablative therapy. Intravenously administered apotransferrin effectively bound free iron and restored the growth inhibition in patient sera. The results suggest that exogenous apotransferrin might protect stem cell transplant patients against infections by S. epidermidis and possibly other opportunistic pathogens.

  20. Inflammation, Infection, and Future Cardiovascular Risk

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-15

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Myocardial Infarction; Venous Thromboembolism; Heart Diseases; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Herpesviridae Infections; Inflammation

  1. Fungal Musculoskeletal Infections.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michael W; Miller, Andy O; Walsh, Thomas J; Brause, Barry D

    2017-06-01

    Fungi are rare but important causes of osteoarticular infections, and can be caused by a wide array of yeasts and molds. Symptoms are often subacute and mimic those of other more common causes of osteoarticular infection, which can lead to substantial delays in treatment. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis. The severity of infection depends on the inherent pathogenicity of the fungi, the immune status of the host, the anatomic location of the infection, and whether the infection involves a foreign body. Treatment often involves a combination of surgical debridement and prolonged antifungal therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neonatal and Perinatal Infections.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amira M; Morris, Shaun K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-08-01

    Lack of success in achieving considerable reductions in neonatal mortality is a contributory factor in failing to achieve Millennium Development Goal 4.2.6 million neonates still die each year, with preterm birth and infections the two leading causes. Maternal infections and environmental and infant factors influence acquisition of viral and bacterial infections in the perinatal and neonatal period. Scaling up evidence-based interventions addressing maternal risk factors and underlying causes could reduce neonatal infections by 84%. The emergence of new infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance present public health challenges that must be addressed to achieve substantial reductions in neonatal mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Infection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Markin, R S; Stratta, R J; Woods, G L

    1990-01-01

    Infections occurring in liver transplant recipients result in significant morbidity and mortality. Factors influencing the frequency of posttransplant infections include pretransplant nutritional status, latent viral infections, and the degree of immunosuppression used to modulate the immune response to the allograft. Infectious agents may be introduced into the patient via the allograft, through infusion of blood products, and through intravenous lines, catheters, and drains. Infections also develop as a result of reactivation of latent viruses or by overgrowth or invasion by endogenous organisms. The intensity of the immunosuppressive regimen directly affects the frequency of infection. Infection may be categorized as bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal. The most frequent organisms include bacterial--enterobacteriaceae; viral--cytomegalovirus; fungal--Candida species and Aspergillus species; and protozoal--Pneumocystis carinii. Diagnosing infection requires the use of many different methods in combination, including routine bacterial culture, viral culture, and fungal culture. Histologic and cytologic examination may lead to rapid identification of some organisms. Specialized collection procedures such as bronchoalveolar lavage provide rapid access to material for culture and cytologic examination. Serum serology in conjunction with histotopic or cytologic evaluation is useful in diagnosing some infections, such as Epstein-Barr virus. New technology such as polymerase chain reaction allows detection of all types of infection at or before the onset of clinical symptoms. Rapid and early diagnosis of infection in this patient population can reduce infection-related morbidity and mortality.

  4. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Odell, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized worldwide. Although over 150 different species of NTM have been described, pulmonary infections are most commonly due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium abscessus. The identification of these organisms in pulmonary specimens does not always equate with active infection; supportive radiographic and clinical findings are needed to establish the diagnosis. It is difficult to eradicate NTM infections. A prolonged course of therapy with a combination of drugs is required. Unfortunately, recurrent infection with new strains of mycobacteria or a relapse of infection caused by the original organism is not uncommon. Surgical resection is appropriate in selected cases of localized disease or in cases in which the infecting organism is resistant to medical therapy. Additionally, surgery may be required for infections complicated by hemoptysis or abscess formation. This review will summarize the practical aspects of the diagnosis and management of NTM thoracic infections, with emphasis on the indications for surgery and the results of surgical intervention. The management of NTM disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections is beyond the scope of this article and, unless otherwise noted, comments apply to hosts without HIV infection PMID:24624285

  5. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  6. Bacterial infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, B J; Hussain, F; Roistacher, K

    1994-06-01

    Although the original opportunistic pathogens described in AIDS were protozoal and fungal organisms, bacterial infections are now recognized with increased prevalence and altered expression in patients with HIV infection. Especially since populations outside of North America and populations of i.v. drug abusers have been studied, bacterial infections have been shown to cause substantially increased morbidity and mortality both early and late in the course of HIV infection. Just as strategies have been developed for primary and secondary prophylaxis of classical HIV-related opportunistic infections, prevention of bacterial complications should be a high priority. Good hygiene and avoidance of unsterile needles in illicit drug use, tattooing, ear-piercing, or other cosmetic or ritual activities should be emphasized in patient education. Patients should be counseled to avoid uncooked or poorly cooked eggs and poultry and to avoid unpasteurized milk products. Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for all HIV-seropositive patients and should be given as early as possible after recognition of HIV infection for maximal efficacy. Influenza vaccine is also recommended. It may have a role in preventing bacterial pneumonia secondary to influenza. Patient management should include regular dental care and nutritional evaluation. The use of intravenous or central catheters should be limited to essential therapies. When patients present with new febrile illness, a high index of suspicion for invasive bacterial disease is appropriate. The signs of serious bacterial infection in HIV-positive patients are subtle. Diagnostic evaluation should include cultures of blood and other relevant clinical specimens. Empiric antimicrobial therapy based on the clinical presentation may be life saving in patients with invasive bacterial disease complicating HIV infection.

  7. Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lucia L.; Oliveira, Priscila R.; Carvalho, Vladimir C.; Saconi, Eduardo S.; Cabrita, Henrique B.; Rodrigues, Marcelo B.

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of joint prostheses is becoming increasingly common, especially for the hip and knee. Infection is considered to be the most devastating of prosthesis-related complications, leading to prolonged hospitalization, repeated surgical intervention, and even definitive loss of the implant. The main risk factors to periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are advanced age, malnutrition, obesity, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection at an advanced stage, presence of distant infectious foci, and antecedents of arthroscopy or infection in previous arthroplasty. Joint prostheses can become infected through three different routes: direct implantation, hematogenic infection, and reactivation of latent infection. Gram-positive bacteria predominate in cases of PJI, mainly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PJIs present characteristic signs that can be divided into acute and chronic manifestations. The main imaging method used in diagnosing joint prosthesis infections is X-ray. Computed tomography (CT) scan may assist in distinguishing between septic and aseptic loosening. Three-phase bone scintigraphy using technetium has high sensitivity, but low specificity. Positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) presents very divergent results in the literature. Definitive diagnosis of infection should be made by isolating the microorganism through cultures on material obtained from joint fluid puncturing, surgical wound secretions, surgical debridement procedures, or sonication fluid. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic infections in arthroplasty cases. Treatment in a single procedure is appropriate in carefully selected cases. PMID:24023542

  8. The MentDis_ICF65+ study protocol: prevalence, 1-year incidence and symptom severity of mental disorders in the elderly and their relationship to impairment, functioning (ICF) and service utilisation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The EU currently lacks reliable data on the prevalence and incidence of mental disorders in older people. Despite the availability of several national and international epidemiological studies, the size and burden of mental disorders in the elderly remain unclear due to various reasons. Therefore, the aims of the MentDis_ICF65+ study are (1) to adapt existing assessment instruments, and (2) to collect data on the prevalence, the incidence, and the natural course and prognosis of mental disorders in the elderly. Method/design Using a cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal design, this multi-centre study from six European countries and associated states (Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland) is based on age-stratified, random samples of elderly people living in the community. The study program consists of three phases: (1) a methodological phase devoted primarily to the adaptation of age- and gender-specific assessment tools for older people (e.g., the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, CIDI) as well as psychometric evaluations including translation, back translation; (2) a baseline community study in all participating countries to assess the lifetime, 12 month and 1 month prevalence and comorbidity of mental disorders, including prior course, quality of life, health care utilization and helpseeking, impairments and participation and, (3) a 12 month follow-up of all baseline participants to monitor course and outcome as well as examine predictors. Discussion The study is an essential step forward towards the further development and improvement of harmonised instruments for the assessment of mental disorders as well as the evaluation of activity impairment and participation in older adults. This study will also facilitate the comparison of cross-cultural results. These results will have bearing on mental health care in the EU and will offer a starting point for necessary structural changes to be initiated for

  9. The MentDis_ICF65+ study protocol: prevalence, 1-year incidence and symptom severity of mental disorders in the elderly and their relationship to impairment, functioning (ICF) and service utilisation.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Sylke; Härter, Martin; Volkert, Jana; Hausberg, Maria; Sehner, Susanne; Wegscheider, Karl; Rabung, Sven; Ausín, Berta; Canuto, Alessandra; Da Ronch, Chiara; Grassi, Luigi; Hershkovitz, Yael; Lelliott, Paul; Muñoz, Manuel; Quirk, Alan; Rotenstein, Ora; Santos-Olmo, Ana Belén; Shalev, Arieh; Siegert, Jens; Weber, Kerstin; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Koch, Uwe; Schulz, Holger

    2013-02-18

    The EU currently lacks reliable data on the prevalence and incidence of mental disorders in older people. Despite the availability of several national and international epidemiological studies, the size and burden of mental disorders in the elderly remain unclear due to various reasons. Therefore, the aims of the MentDis_ICF65+ study are (1) to adapt existing assessment instruments, and (2) to collect data on the prevalence, the incidence, and the natural course and prognosis of mental disorders in the elderly. Using a cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal design, this multi-centre study from six European countries and associated states (Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland) is based on age-stratified, random samples of elderly people living in the community. The study program consists of three phases: (1) a methodological phase devoted primarily to the adaptation of age- and gender-specific assessment tools for older people (e.g., the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, CIDI) as well as psychometric evaluations including translation, back translation; (2) a baseline community study in all participating countries to assess the lifetime, 12 month and 1 month prevalence and comorbidity of mental disorders, including prior course, quality of life, health care utilization and helpseeking, impairments and participation and, (3) a 12 month follow-up of all baseline participants to monitor course and outcome as well as examine predictors. The study is an essential step forward towards the further development and improvement of harmonised instruments for the assessment of mental disorders as well as the evaluation of activity impairment and participation in older adults. This study will also facilitate the comparison of cross-cultural results. These results will have bearing on mental health care in the EU and will offer a starting point for necessary structural changes to be initiated for mental health care policy at the level of

  10. Viral infections and allergies.

    PubMed

    Xepapadaki, Paraskevi; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory viral infections have been implicated in the origin of, protection from and exacerbation of allergy-related symptoms in a variety of ways. Viral infections are closely linked to infantile wheezing. Severe bronchiolitis in early infancy may predispose to chronic childhood asthma as well as allergic sensitization; alternatively it could represent a marker of susceptible individuals. In contrast, repeated mild infections in early life may have a protective role in the development of asthma or atopy by driving the immune system towards Th1 responses. However, evidence on this hypothesis is not consistent as far as respiratory viruses are concerned. Several factors, including the presence of an atopic environment, timing of exposure and severity of the infection, interactively contribute to the allergy-infection relationship. In the present report, recent data on the role of viral infections in the development and progression of allergy and asthma are reviewed.

  11. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  12. Cryptococcal ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection.

    PubMed

    Viereck, Matthew J; Chalouhi, Nohra; Krieger, David I; Judy, Kevin D

    2014-11-01

    The standard treatment of hydrocephalus is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. While infection is a common complication, rarely are fungal organisms implicated. Cryptococcus neoformans has been reported in only nine cases of shunt infection to our knowledge. The timing from shunt placement to symptom onset varies widely from 10 days to 15 months. We present a patient who developed a cryptococcal infection of his VP shunt more than two decades following shunt placement.

  13. Infection after hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Ring, David

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative infections are uncommon after hand surgery. Infection can delay recovery and contribute to scarring and stiffness. Measures intended to reduce the risk of infection after hand surgery include hand washing, skin preparation, sterile technique, and prophylactic antibiotics. The role of prophylactic antibiotics for small, clean, elective hand surgery procedures lasting less than 2 hours is debated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Staphylococci and staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Foster, Timothy J

    2010-12-01

    The International Symposium of Staphylococci and Staphylococcal Infections is a biennial conference that brings together clinicians who treat staphylococcal infections in the community and in hospitals, veterinary microbiologists who study staphylococcal infections in animals, and basic scientists who study pathogenesis of infection and the biology of staphylococci. Over 430 delegates from 24 countries met in the historic Assembly Rooms in Bath, UK. Sessions comprised keynote lectures along with short talks by junior investigators chosen from submitted abstracts. This article reviews several important developments in the field that were discussed at the conference.

  15. Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ross, S.A.; Novak, Z.; Pati, S.; Boppana, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is recognized as the most common congenital viral infection in humans and an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. This recognition of the clinical importance of invasive CMV disease in the setting of immunodeficiency and in children with congenital CMV infection has led to the development of new diagnostic procedures for the rapid identification of immunocompromised individuals with CMV disease, as well as fetuses and infants with congenital infection. Diagnosis of acute maternal CMV infection by the presence of IgM and low IgG avidity requires confirmation of fetal infection which is typically performed by CMV PCR of the amniotic fluid. Viral culture of the urine and saliva obtained within the first two weeks of life continue to be the gold standard for diagnosis of congenitally infected infants. PCR assays of dried blood spots from infants have not been shown to have sufficient sensitivity for the identification of most infants with congenital CMV infection. However, saliva PCR assays are currently being assessed as a useful screening method for congenital CMV infection. In the immunocompromised host, newer rapid diagnostic assays such as pp65 antigenemia and real-time CMV PCR of blood or plasma have allowed for preemptive treatment reducing morbidity and mortality. However, lack of standardized real-time PCR protocols hinders the comparison of the data across different centers and the development of uniform guidelines for the management of invasive CMV infections in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:21827433

  16. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    MedlinePlus

    CMV mononucleosis; Cytomegalovirus; CMV; Human cytomegalovirus; HCMV ... infection is spread by: Blood transfusions Organ transplants ... viruses remain in your body for the rest of your life. If your ...

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin ...

  18. Congenital brain infections.

    PubMed

    Arbelaez, Andres; Restrepo, Feliza; Davila, Jorge; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric congenital intracranial infections are a group of different and important entities that constitute a small percentage of all pediatric infections. The causal factors and clinical presentations are different in children compared with adults. They require early recognition because delay diagnosis and initiation of treatment may have catastrophic consequences. Despite improvements in prenatal screening, vaccine safety, and antibiotics, infections of the central nervous system remain an important cause of neurological disabilities worldwide. This article reviews the most common congenital infections and their imaging findings.

  19. Unusual infections in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Neafie, R C; Marty, A M

    1993-01-01

    Nine cases of unusual infections in humans are presented. In each case, we present the clinical history, histopathologic changes (if indicated), morphologic features of the causative organism, diagnosis, discussion, differential diagnosis, therapy, and current literature. All of the cases are illustrated with pertinent photographs. The nine cases are as follows: (i) acanthocephaliasis, the first acquired human infection by Moniliformis moniliformis in the United States; (ii) dipylidiasis, an uncommon infection caused by the dog tapeworm, Dipylidium caninum; (iii) granulomatous amebic encephalitis, caused by the recently identified leptomyxid group of amebae; (iv) schistosomiasis, a dual infection of the urinary bladder with the rare presentation of both adult worms and eggs of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni in tissue sections; (v) syphilitic gastritis, an uncommon presentation of Treponema pallidum infection, in a patient with an additional incidental infection by Helicobacter pylori; (vi) microsporidiosis, the only infection caused by a Pleistophora sp. in humans; (vii) sporotrichosis, a rare disseminated infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii with numerous yeast cells in the scrotum; (viii) angiostrongyliasis, the first and only infection caused by Angiostrongylus costaricensis acquired in either Puerto Rico or the United States; and (ix) botryomycosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, caused by gram-positive cocci with an unusually large number of granules. Images PMID:8457979

  20. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  1. [The infected wound].

    PubMed

    Nerlich, M L; Bosch, U

    1988-02-01

    The therapy of infected wounds is based on the knowledge of the pathophysiology of infection and on early diagnosis. The development of an infection depends on the general condition of the patient, local factors like foreign body contamination and tissue necrosis and the pathogenicity of the bacteria. The diagnosis of a wound infection is made upon the classical symptoms dolor, rubor, calor, tumor and functio laesa and depends on continuous wound care and repeated clinical judgement. The differentiation between an abscess as encapsulated infection and a diffuse non localized phlegmonous inflammation has different therapeutic consequences as the surgical treatment of an abscess consists of incision and drainage whereas the excision of infected tissue is necessary in phlegmones. The wound revision is a special form of excision. The surgical debridement is the most effective part of the therapy. Excision of infected and necrotic tissue help the phagocytic cells in infection fighting and remove the ideal culture medium for bacteria. The use of antibiotics can be very helpful if stringent indications are applied. Additional therapeutic approaches like improvement of local oxygen supply and enhancement of phagocytic function of macrophages could support the surgical therapy of the infected wound.

  2. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  3. On the (dis) advantages of cannibalism.

    PubMed

    Getto, Ph; Diekmann, O; de Roos, A M

    2005-12-01

    Cannibalism is an interaction between individuals that can produce counter- intuitive effects at the population level. A striking effect is that a population may persist under food conditions such that the non-cannibalistic variant is doomed to go extinct. This so-called life boat mechanism has received considerable attention. Implicitly, such studies sometimes suggest, that the life boat mechanism procures an evolutionary advantage to the cannibalistic trait. Here we compare, in the context of a size structured population model, the conditions under which the life boat mechanism works, with those that guarantee, that a cannibalistic mutant can invade successfully under the steady environmental conditions as set by a non-cannibalistic resident. We find qualitative agreement and quantitative difference. In particular, we find that a prerequisite for the life boat mechanism is, that cannibalistic mutants are successful invaders. Roughly speaking, our results show that cannibalism brings advantages to both the individuals and the population when adult food is limiting.

  4. The (dis)unity of nursing science.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Robyn L

    2014-10-01

    This paper looks at the implications of contemporary work in philosophy of science for nursing science. Early work on the nature of theories in nursing was strongly influenced by logical empiricism, and this influence remains even long after nurse scholars have come to reject logical empiricism as an adequate philosophy of science. Combined with the need to establish nursing as an autonomous profession, nursing theory's use of logical empiricism has led to serious conceptual problems. Philosophers of science have also rejected many of the central tenets of logical empiricism, including its focus on the logical justification of theories and the idea that science is, or should be, unified. Instead, there has been an increasing focus on the practice of science, which in turn has led to a pluralist understanding of science that emphasizes the construction of scientific models that are appropriate for certain purposes or in certain contexts. I suggest that this approach to philosophy of science may provide better resources for nursing science. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Excursions in fluvial (dis)continuity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, Gordon E.; O'Connor, James E.; Safran, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Lurking below the twin concepts of connectivity and disconnectivity are their first, and in some ways, richer cousins: continuity and discontinuity. In this paper we explore how continuity and discontinuity represent fundamental and complementary perspectives in fluvial geomorphology, and how these perspectives inform and underlie our conceptions of connectivity in landscapes and rivers. We examine the historical roots of continuum and discontinuum thinking, and how much of our understanding of geomorphology rests on contrasting views of continuity and discontinuity. By continuum thinking we refer to a conception of geomorphic processes as well as geomorphic features that are expressed along continuous gradients without abrupt changes, transitions, or thresholds. Balance of forces, graded streams, and hydraulic geometry are all examples of this perspective. The continuum view has played a prominent role in diverse disciplinary fields, including ecology, paleontology, and evolutionary biology, in large part because it allows us to treat complex phenomena as orderly progressions and invoke or assume equilibrium processes that introduce order and prediction into our sciences.In contrast the discontinuous view is a distinct though complementary conceptual framework that incorporates non-uniform, non-progressive, and non-equilibrium thinking into understanding geomorphic processes and landscapes. We distinguish and discuss examples of three different ways in which discontinuous thinking can be expressed: 1) discontinuous spatial arrangements or singular events; 2) specific process domains generally associated with thresholds, either intrinsic or extrinsic; and 3) physical dynamics or changes in state, again often threshold-linked. In moving beyond the continuous perspective, a fertile set of ideas comes into focus: thresholds, non-equilibrium states, heterogeneity, catastrophe. The range of phenomena that is thereby opened up to scientific exploration similarly expands: punctuated episodes of cutting and filling, discretization of landscapes into hierarchies of structure and control, the work of extreme events. Orderly and progressive evolution towards a steady or ideal state is replaced by chaotic episodes of disturbance and recovery. Recent developments in the field of geomorphology suggest that we may be on the cusp of a new paradigm that recognizes that both continuous and discontinuous processes and mechanisms play a role in fluvial processes and landscape evolution with neither holding sway over the other and both needed to see rivers as they are.

  6. The GMO-Nanotech (Dis)Analogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Ronald; Kay, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetically-modified-organism (GMO) experience has been prominent in motivating science, industry, and regulatory communities to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. However, there are some significant problems with the GMO-nanotech analogy. First, it overstates the likelihood of a GMO-like backlash against…

  7. Dis/Ability through Artists' Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Suesi; Gervais, Julie; Dase, Monica; Griseta, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    An individual's concept of disability depends upon one's experience, based on personal, physical, mental, and emotional knowledge (Linton, 1998; Wendell, 1996). The United Nations (United Nations, 2005) defines disability as any restriction or deficiency of ability to perform within the range of what is considered normal for an individual. A…

  8. Excursions in fluvial (dis)continuity

    Treesearch

    Gordon E. Grant; Jim E. O' Connor; Elizabeth Safran

    2017-01-01

    Lurking below the twin concepts of connectivity and disconnectivity are their first, and in someways, richer cousins: continuity and discontinuity. In this paper we explore how continuity and discontinuity represent fundamental and complementary perspectives in fluvial geomorphology, and how these perspectives inform and underlie our conceptions of connectivity in...

  9. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

  10. New DIS and collider results on PDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, E.

    2015-05-15

    The HERA ep collider experiments have measured the proton structure functions over a wide kinematic range. New data from the H1 experiment now extend the range to higher 4-momentum transfer (√(Q{sup 2})) over which a precision of ∼ 2% is achieved in the neutral current channel. A factor of two reduction in the systematic uncertainties over previous measurement is attained. The charged current structure function measurements are also significantly improved in precision. These data, when used in QCD analyses of the parton density functions (PDFs) reduce the PDF uncertainties particularly at high momentum fractions x which is relevant to low energy neutrino scattering cross sections. New data from the LHC pp collider experiments may also offer significant high x PDF improvements as the experimental uncertainties improve.

  11. Data Intensive Systems (DIS) Benchmark Performance Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    calculated. These give a rough measure of the texture of each ROI. A gray-level co-occurrence matrix ( GLCM ) contains information about the spatial...sum and difference histograms.19 The descriptors chosen as features for this benchmark are GLCM entropy and GLCM energy, and are defined in terms of...stressmark, the relationships of pairs of pixels within a randomly generated image are measured. These features quantify the texture of the image

  12. Semi-Inclusive DIS and Transversity

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, Philip G.

    2005-02-10

    A review is presented of some aspects of semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering and transversity. In particular, the role of kT-dependent and higher-twist (or multi-parton) distributions in generating single-spin asymmetries is discussed.

  13. Understanding (Dis)abilities through Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtts, Stephanie A.; Gavigan, Karen W.

    2008-01-01

    The authors of this article examined how pre-service teachers can use children's and young adult literature about disabilities to enhance understanding of individual differences through a bibliotherapeutic approach. An introduction to bibliotherapy is provided along with related literature from the field. Strategies for using children's and young…

  14. Dis-integrating Perspectives of Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bob

    1995-01-01

    Responds to L. Eubank and K. R. Gregg article (this issue), suggesting they have misinterpreted and misrepresented claims made by B. Jacobs and J. Schumann. Claims discussed include the micro- and macro-organization of neurobiology and language, the Explananda, Jacobs and Schumann's acquisition mechanism, and reductionism. The single acquisition…

  15. International Education and (Dis)Embodied Cosmopolitanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidhu, Ravinder Kaur; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of practices and representations that constitute international education. While international education has provided substantial contributions and benefits for nation-states and international students, we question the discourses and practices which inform the international education export industry. The…

  16. The GMO-Nanotech (Dis)Analogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Ronald; Kay, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetically-modified-organism (GMO) experience has been prominent in motivating science, industry, and regulatory communities to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. However, there are some significant problems with the GMO-nanotech analogy. First, it overstates the likelihood of a GMO-like backlash against…

  17. International Education and (Dis)Embodied Cosmopolitanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidhu, Ravinder Kaur; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of practices and representations that constitute international education. While international education has provided substantial contributions and benefits for nation-states and international students, we question the discourses and practices which inform the international education export industry. The…

  18. Soft color screening effects in diffractive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasechnik, Roman; Enberg, Rikard; Ingelman, Gunnar

    2011-07-15

    We construct a QCD-based model where soft gluon rescattering between final state partons in deep inelastic scattering leads to events with large rapidity gaps and a leading proton. The model successfully describes the precise HERA data on the diffractive deep inelastic structure function in the whole available kinematical range.

  19. Preventing Giardia Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, W. Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Outdoor recreationists are at risk for developing giardia infection from drinking contaminated stream water. Giardia is the most common human parasite found in contaminated water that causes gastrointestinal illness. Describes medical treatment and ways of preventing infection through water treatment, including heat, filtration, and chemical…

  20. [Nosocomial infection: clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Frottier, J

    1993-05-01

    Nosocomial infections develop within a hospital or are produced by microorganisms acquired during hospitalization. They may involve not only patients (2 to 10 percent) but also hospital personnel. They arise from complex interactions of multiple causal factors. Patients risk factors are these that reduce the patient's capacity for resisting the injurious effects of the microorganisms and impair natural host defense mechanisms: patients with malignant disorders or immunosuppressive therapy, poor nutritional status, extensive burn wounds ... The young and the elderly are generally more susceptible to infection. Other infections are preventable. Disease causation is often multifactorial. Nosocomial urinary tract infections had the highest rate, followed by lower respiratory tract infections, surgical infections and bacteremias. The emergence of other nosocomial infections, caused by bacteria (tuberculosis), virus (HIV, hepatitis B and C virus, cytomegalovirus...), Aspergillus species or Pneumocystis carinii appears to be recent in origin and is of importance to immunocompromised hosts, other patients and hospital personnel. Nosocomial infections and their social and economic impacts require for their prevention vigorous organized hospital-wide surveillance and control programs.

  1. Preventing Giardia Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, W. Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Outdoor recreationists are at risk for developing giardia infection from drinking contaminated stream water. Giardia is the most common human parasite found in contaminated water that causes gastrointestinal illness. Describes medical treatment and ways of preventing infection through water treatment, including heat, filtration, and chemical…

  2. Preventing infections when visiting

    MedlinePlus

    ... Goering R, Dockrell H, Zuckerman M, et al. Hospital infection, sterilization and disinfection. In: Goering R, Dockrell H, Zuckerman M, et al., eds. Mims' Medical Microbiology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 36. Infection control. In: Mills JE, ed. Nursing Procedures . 5th ed. ...

  3. Urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2013-07-01

    The urinary tract is a common source for life-threatening infections. Most patients with sepsis or septic shock from a urinary source have complicated urinary tract infection. This article explains the epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. Effective management, appropriate collection of microbiology specimens, prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy, source control, and supportive therapy are described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  5. Lung transplant infection.

    PubMed

    Burguete, Sergio R; Maselli, Diego J; Fernandez, Juan F; Levine, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become an accepted therapeutic procedure for the treatment of end-stage pulmonary parenchymal and vascular disease. Despite improved survival rates over the decades, lung transplant recipients have lower survival rates than other solid organ transplant recipients. The morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation is largely due to infection- and rejection-related complications. This article will review the common infections that develop in the lung transplant recipient, including the general risk factors for infection in this population, and the most frequent bacterial, viral, fungal and other less frequent opportunistic infections. The epidemiology, diagnosis, prophylaxis, treatment and outcomes for the different microbial pathogens will be reviewed. The effects of infection on lung transplant rejection will also be discussed.

  6. Occupational Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Jae Sim

    2010-01-01

    Occupational infection is a human disease caused by work-associated exposure to microbial agents through human and environmental contact. According to the literature, occupational infection was the third leading cause of occupational disease (861 cases, 8.0%), and health care, agricultural, forestry, and fishery workers were risk groups in Korea. In addition, most high-risk groups have not been protected by workers' compensation, which could lead to underestimation of the exact spectrum and magnitude of the problem, and may also result in a lack of development and implementation of occupational infection management. Through a review of national guidelines and documentations on prevention and control of occupational infection, a management strategy would promote adherence to worker safety regulations if it is explicit with regard to the agent and mode of infection in each of the high-risk groups. PMID:21258592

  7. Thinking about HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Evelyn P; Siberry, George K; Hutton, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can occur during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. Evidence-based interventions (routine screening of pregnant women, initiation of antiretroviral drugs for mother's treatment or prevention of MTCT, and avoiding breastfeeding) have reduced transmission rates in the United States from 25% to 30% to less than 2%. Triple-drug combination antiretroviral therapy effectively controls HIV infection and improves survival and quality of life for HIV-infected children and adolescents. Initial regimens use combinations of two NRTIs together with an NNRTI or a ritonavir-boosted PI. These regimens have been shown to increase CD4 counts and achieve virologic suppression. Prevention of serious and opportunistic infections reduces morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents who have HIV infection. Recommendations for immunizations and chemoprophylaxis vary with the patient's CD4 count. Condoms made from latex, polyurethane, or other synthetic materials have been shown to decrease the transmission of STIs, including HIV infection.

  8. [Surgical site infections].

    PubMed

    Sganga, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are recognized as a common surgical complication, occurring in about 2-5% of all surgical procedures. SSIs represent the third most frequent nosocomial infection, accounting for 14-16% of all infections observed in hospitalized patients and up to 38% of those observed among surgical patients. Knowledge of incidence, epidemiology, classification, process of wound healing, and pathogenesis of surgical site infection is of great importance. Given the high economic burden that infections provoke, beyond the increased morbidity and mortality, it appears mandatory to improve our tools in order to reduce their incidence, as a reduction of only 0.1% can result in a considerable saving of economic resources to be allocated to other activities, such as screening and prevention programs.

  9. [Infections in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Egger, M; Muhlemann, K; Aebi, C; Taüber, M G

    1999-10-01

    Infections in pregnancy may complicate its course and harm the fetus or newborn after vertical transmission. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is mandatory in pregnant women given the high risk of secondary pyelonephritis. Intraamniotic infection usually arises by the ascending route and is associated with premature rupture of membranes. Vaginal infections promote preterm labour or premature rupture of membranes and may be transmitted to the child during labour. They must therefore be treated although they often cause little discomfort to the pregnant woman. Systemic infections due to viral, protozoal and bacterial pathogens may be transmitted transplacentally and cause embryopathies, fetopathies or neonatal infections. Depending on the responsible agent the negative impact on the course of pregnancy and on the fetus' or neonate's health can be prevented or reduced by prophylactic or therapeutic interventions.

  10. Genitourinary infection in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Julka, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is known to increase the risk of infection and the commonest amongst them are the ones involving the genitourinary tract. The infections in a diabetic patient are unique in that they are recurrent, more severe, requiring hospitalization, and also have higher mortality than nondiabetics. Some infections are exclusively found in diabetics like the emphysematous pyelonephritis while others have their natural history complicated due to hyperglycemia. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may lead to albuminuria and urinary tract infection and may need to be treated in diabetics. Not just this certain organisms have a predilection for the genitourinary tract of the diabetic patient. All of the above makes the diabetic patient vulnerable to infections and therefore early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is mandatory. PMID:24251228

  11. [Infection by human cytomegalovirus].

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu Gámez, Sara; Ruiz, Mercedes Pérez; Navarro Marí, José María

    2014-02-01

    Prevalence of human cytomegalovirus infection is very high worldwide. Following primary infection, the virus remains latent, being able to cause recurrences either by reinfection with a new strain or by reactivation of the replication of the latent virus. The most severe disease is seen in congenital infection and in immunosuppressed patients, in whom the virus act as an opportunistic pathogen. Serological techniques are the methods of choice in primary infection and to determine the immune status against CMV in organ donor and receptor. Although well-standardized studies are lacking, the recent commercial availability of methods that measure cellular immune response are promising to predict the risk of CMV disease in immunosuppressed individuals. Molecular assays, that have gradually been substituting viral culture and/or antigen detection, are the most widely used methods for the diagnosis and control of CMV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Lipid Metabolism during Infection and Endotoxemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    containing 8- and 10-carbon fatty acids almost exclusively) have been used in certain therapeutic diets . In contrast to the long-chain triglycerides...increased utilization of ketone bodies. The major substrates for hepatic ketogenesis are long-chain fatty acids. The term ’ ketogenic capacity’ refers to the...bodies is influenced not only by substrate availability and enzyme activities, but also more directly by the dis- posal of acetyl-CoA through ketogenic

  13. Candida infection of the skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Candida infection of the skin is a yeast infection ...

  14. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Disease Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toxoplasma infection can result from congenital infection or infection after birth by any of the modes of transmission discussed on the epidemiology and risk factors page. Eye lesions from congenital ...

  15. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multimedia Related Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections Recommend ... infection, but can also cause severe illnesses like meningitis (an infection of the covering of the brain ...

  16. Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Wiep Klaas; Lyras, Dena; Lacy, D. Borden; Wilcox, Mark H.; Kuijper, Ed J.

    2017-01-01

    Infection of the colon with the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile is potentially life threatening, especially in elderly people and in patients who have dysbiosis of the gut microbiota following antimicrobial drug exposure. C. difficile is the leading cause of health-care-associated infective diarrhoea. The life cycle of C. difficile is influenced by antimicrobial agents, the host immune system, and the host microbiota and its associated metabolites. The primary mediators of inflammation in C. difficile infection (CDI) are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), and, in some bacterial strains, the binary toxin CDT. The toxins trigger a complex cascade of host cellular responses to cause diarrhoea, inflammation and tissue necrosis — the major symptoms of CDI. The factors responsible for the epidemic of some C. difficile strains are poorly understood. Recurrent infections are common and can be debilitating. Toxin detection for diagnosis is important for accurate epidemiological study, and for optimal management and prevention strategies. Infections are commonly treated with specific antimicrobial agents, but faecal microbiota transplants have shown promise for recurrent infections. Future biotherapies for C. difficile infections are likely to involve defined combinations of key gut microbiota. PMID:27158839

  17. Infections in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Andréa; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with a risk of severe infections. While neutropenia is likely to be the main predisposing factor, several other immune defects have been reported, including impaired neutrophil function, B-, T- and NK-cell defects and the possible consequences of iron overload due to red blood cell transfusions. The advanced age of most patients, their frequent comorbidities, and the fact that drugs such as hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide, which are effective in myelodysplastic syndromes but can transiently worsen neutropenia, may increase the risk of infection and their severity in this context. The majority of infections in myelodysplastic syndromes are bacterial, while the incidence of fungal infections is not well known and viral infections seem to be rare. No prophylactic measures against infections have demonstrated efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes. However, pending more data, we propose here some recommendations for the management of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In the future, an important contribution can be made by prospective trials testing the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to infection in these patients, especially in the context of the new drugs available for myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:22733024

  18. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis Genital Infections

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Catherine M.; Ferone, Morgan E.

    2016-01-01

    Etiology, transmission and protection: Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) globally. However, C. trachomatis also causes trachoma in endemic areas, mostly Africa and the Middle East, and is a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Epidemiology, incidence and prevalence: The World Health Organization estimates 131 million new cases of C. trachomatis genital infection occur annually. Globally, infection is most prevalent in young women and men (14-25 years), likely driven by asymptomatic infection, inadequate partner treatment and delayed development of protective immunity. Pathology/Symptomatology: C. trachomatis infects susceptible squamocolumnar or transitional epithelial cells, leading to cervicitis in women and urethritis in men. Symptoms are often mild or absent but ascending infection in some women may lead to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID), resulting in reproductive sequelae such as ectopic pregnancy, infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Complications of infection in men include epididymitis and reactive arthritis. Molecular mechanisms of infection: Chlamydiae manipulate an array of host processes to support their obligate intracellular developmental cycle. This leads to activation of signaling pathways resulting in disproportionate influx of innate cells and the release of tissue damaging proteins and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Treatment and curability: Uncomplicated urogenital infection is treated with azithromycin (1 g, single dose) or doxycycline (100 mg twice daily x 7 days). However, antimicrobial treatment does not ameliorate established disease. Drug resistance is rare but treatment failures have been described. Development of an effective vaccine that protects against upper tract disease or that limits transmission remains an important goal. PMID:28357377

  20. Novel Antigens of Helicobacter pylori Correspond to Ulcer-Related Antibody Pattern of Sera from Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Atanassov, Christo; Pezennec, Leon; d'Alayer, Jacques; Grollier, Ghislaine; Picard, Bertrand; Fauchère, Jean-Louis

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we reported that the patterns of antibodies to Helicobacter pylori protein antigens in serum may be useful for screening patients at high risk for ulcers (P. Aucher et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 36:931-936, 1998). Here we report the identification, by a combination of electrophoretic, immunochemical, and protein sequencing methods, of five antigens that correspond to this antibody pattern: groEL, catalase A, flagellin A, beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I (β-ketoacyl-ACP S), and peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPiase). β-Ketoacyl-ACP S and PPiase are reported for the first time as antigens of diagnostic interest in infections by H. pylori. The antigenicity of the five antigens, together with those of CagA and VacA, was tested in an immunoblot assay with water-soluble protein extracts from two H. pylori pathogenic strains (HP 141 and ATCC 43579) and panels of sera from H. pylori-positive patients with gastroduodenal ulcers (GDU), nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD), as well as sera from H. pylori-negative healthy volunteers. For catalase A, groEL, and flagellin A antigens, no overall statistically important values were found making it possible to discriminate between patients with GDU and NUD. For both H. pylori strains, the mean performance indices (MPI) presenting percentages of correctly classified patients with GDU and NUD showed that the most significant antibody patterns were as follows: anti-VacA + anti-β-ketoacyl-ACP S (MPI = 76.1), anti-VacA + anti-PPiase (MPI = 71.8), and anti-CagA + anti-VacA + anti-β-ketoacyl-ACP S (MPI = 70.5). Antibody patterns detected with these antigen profiles may therefore be useful in developing a diagnostic test designed to predict the clinical severity of the H. pylori infection within the adult population of France. PMID:11825970

  1. Can newly developed, rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection tests be reliably used for the laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infections?

    PubMed

    Dunn, James J; Ginocchio, Christine C

    2015-06-01

    Five years ago, the Point-Counterpoint series was launched. The initial article asked about the role of rapid immunochromatographic antigen testing in the diagnosis of influenza A virus 2009 H1N1 infection (D. F. Welch and C. C. Ginocchio, J Clin Microbiol 48:22-25, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02268-09). Since that article, not only have major changes been made in immunochromatographic antigen detection (IAD) testing for the influenza viruses, but there has also been rapid development of commercially available nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for influenza virus detection. Further, a novel variant of influenza A, H7N9, has emerged in Asia, and H5N1 is also reemergent. In that initial article, the editor of this series, Peter Gilligan, identified two issues that required further consideration. One was how well IAD tests worked in clinical settings, especially in times of antigen drift and shift. The other was the role of future iterations of influenza NAATs and whether this testing would be available in a community hospital setting. James Dunn, who is Director of Medical Microbiology and Virology at Texas Children's Hospital, has extensive experience using IAD tests for diagnosing influenza. He will discuss the application and value of these tests in influenza diagnosis. Christine Ginocchio, who recently retired as the Senior Medical Director, Division of Infectious Disease Diagnostics, North Shore-LIJ Health System, and now is Vice President for Global Microbiology Affairs at bioMérieux, Durham, NC, wrote the initial counterpoint in this series, where she advocated the use of NAATs for influenza diagnosis. She will update us on the commercially available NAAT systems and explain what their role should be in the diagnosis of influenza infection.

  2. Infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Anne; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2015-03-18

    All newly registered graduate nurses are required to have the appropriate knowledge and understanding to perform the skills required for patient care, specifically the competencies identified in the Nursing and Midwifery Council's essential skills clusters. This article focuses on the third essential skills cluster - infection prevention and control. It provides an overview and discussion of the key skills and behaviours that must be demonstrated to meet the standards set by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. In doing so, it considers the key principles of infection prevention and control, including local and national policies, standard infection control precautions, risk assessment, standard isolation measures and asepsis.

  3. Infections of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Amy A

    2014-11-01

    Although the cerebellum can be affected by any infection that also involves other parts of the brain parenchyma, cerebrospinal fluid, or nerve roots, a limited range of infections targets cerebellar structures preferentially. Thus, a primarily cerebellar syndrome narrows infectious differential diagnostic considerations. The differential diagnosis of rapidly evolving cerebellar signs suggesting infection includes prescription or illicit drug intoxications or adverse reactions, inflammatory pseudotumor, paraneoplastic processes, and acute postinfectious cerebellitis. This article discusses the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of viral, bacterial, fungal, and prion pathogens affecting the cerebellum in patterns predictable by pace of illness and by involved neuroanatomic structures.

  4. Psychogenic "HIV infection".

    PubMed

    Sno, H N; Storosum, J G; Wortel, C H

    1991-01-01

    The case of a man who falsely represented himself as being HIV positive is reported. In less than one year he was admitted twice with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. The diagnoses malingering and factitious disorder were consecutively made. Early recognition of Factitious Disorder is essential to prevent patients from harmful diagnostic procedures or surgical treatments. Psychiatric treatment is best focused on management and care rather than cure. Psychogenic "HIV infection" might become more common than acknowledged up to now. Physicians should consider the occurrence of psychogenic "HIV infection," part of the symptomatology may be psychogenically determined, or indeed frankly simulated.

  5. [Heart transplantation and infection].

    PubMed

    Ozábalová, Eva; Krejčí, Jan; Hude, Petr; Godava, Julius; Honek, Tomáš; Špinarová, Lenka; Pavlík, Petr; Bedáňová, Helena; Němec, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is a method of treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure with severe symptoms despite complex therapy. Post-transplant difficulties include acute rejection and infectious complications, which are the most common reason of morbidity and mortality in the first year after heart transplant. It requires the patient to remain on immunosuppressive medication to avoid the possibility of graft rejection. Therefore the range of infection is much larger. The diagnosis and treatment of viral, bacterial and fungal infections is often difficult.Key words: heart transplantation - immunosuppression - infection.

  6. Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Debbie-Ann T; Nataro, James P

    2017-08-01

    In less than 2 years since entry into the Americas, we have witnessed the emergent spread of Zika virus into large subsets of immunologically naïve human populations and then encountered the devastating effects of microcephaly and brain anomalies that can arise from in utero infection with the virus. Diagnostic evaluation and management of affected infants continues to evolve as our understanding of Zika virus rapidly advances. The development of a safe and effective vaccine holds the potential to attenuate the spread of infection and limit the impact of congenital infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  8. cos(4φ) azimuthal anisotropy in small- x DIS dijet production beyond the leading power TMD limit

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2016-07-25

    Here we determine the first correction to the quadrupole operator in high-energy QCD beyond the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) limit of Weizsäcker-Williams and linearly polarized gluon distributions. These functions give rise to isotropic, respectively, ~cos2$\\phi$ angular distributions in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dijet production. On the other hand, the correction produces a ~cos4$\\phi$ angular dependence which is suppressed by one additional power of the dijet transverse momentum scale (squared) P2.

  9. cos(4φ) azimuthal anisotropy in small- x DIS dijet production beyond the leading power TMD limit

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2016-07-25

    Here we determine the first correction to the quadrupole operator in high-energy QCD beyond the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) limit of Weizsäcker-Williams and linearly polarized gluon distributions. These functions give rise to isotropic, respectively, ~cos2$\\phi$ angular distributions in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dijet production. On the other hand, the correction produces a ~cos4$\\phi$ angular dependence which is suppressed by one additional power of the dijet transverse momentum scale (squared) P2.

  10. [Relationship between odontogenic infections and infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Jaime

    2012-03-24

    Revised guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis published by national and international associations in the last years do not support the indiscriminate use of antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures. However, some of them still recommend its use in high-risk patients before dental treatments likely to cause bleeding. Given the high prevalence of bacteremia of dental origin due to tooth-brushing, mastication or other daily activities, it appears unlikely that infective endocarditis from oral microorganisms can be completely prevented. A good oral health status and satisfactory level of oral hygiene are sufficient to control the consequences of the systemic spread of oral microorganisms in healthy individuals. However, caution is still needed and prophylactic antibiotics must be administered to susceptible or medically compromised patients. This review briefly outlines the current concepts of odontogenic bacteremia and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing dental treatment.

  11. Tapeworm infection - beef or pork

    MedlinePlus

    Teniasis; Pork tapeworm; Beef tapeworm; Tapeworm; Taenia saginata ; Taenia solium ; Taeniasis ... Tapeworm infection is caused by eating the raw or undercooked meat of infected animals. Cattle usually carry ...

  12. Fungal Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Candidiasis Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus Vaginal ... Sources Diagnosis Treatment Statistics Healthcare Professionals More Resources Candida auris General Information about Candida auris Tracking Candida ...

  13. Who Gets Fungal Infections?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Candidiasis Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus Vaginal ... Sources Diagnosis Treatment Statistics Healthcare Professionals More Resources Candida auris General Information about Candida auris Tracking Candida ...

  14. Middle Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... US are prescribed for ear infections. Using an observation option could reduce antibiotic prescriptions annually by up ... to 2 years - for AOM with severe symptoms; observation is an option for AOM if non-severe. ...

  15. Giardia Infection Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat Giardia infection. Effective treatments include metronidazole, tinidazole, and nitazoxanide 1 . Alternatives to these medications ... lamblia WB C6 clone resistant to nitazoxanide and metronidazole. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2008;62(1):72-82. ...

  16. Seasonality of staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Leekha, S; Diekema, D J; Perencevich, E N

    2012-10-01

    Characterization of seasonal variation of Staphylococcus aureus is important in understanding the epidemiology of, and designing preventive strategies against this highly virulent and ever-evolving pathogen. In this review, we summarize the findings of epidemiological studies that have evaluated seasonality in S. aureus colonization and infection. Although most studies published to date are methodologically weak, some seasonal variation in the occurrence of S. aureus infection appears to exist, particularly an association of warm-weather months with S. aureus skin and soft-tissue infections. We highlight the limitations of the published literature, and provide suggestions for future studies on this topic. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  17. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Toxoplasmosis General Information Toxoplasmosis FAQs Toxoplasmosis & Pregnancy FAQs Epidemiology & ...

  18. H. pylori Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pill, liquid or pudding that contains tagged carbon molecules. If you have an H. pylori infection, carbon ... uses a special device to detect the carbon molecules. Acid-suppressing drugs known as proton pump inhibitors ( ...

  19. Cancer treatment: preventing infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... before they spread. How Having Cancer Increases Infection Risk As part of your immune system, your white ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  20. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paralysis of the face Inflammation around the brain ( epidural abscess ) or in the brain Damage to the part ... pubmed/23818543 . Read More Cholesteatoma Ear infection - acute Epidural abscess Mastoiditis Otitis Review Date 4/21/2015 Updated ...

  1. Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infections Page Content Article Body When you hear the word chlamydia, you might think of the sexually transmitted disease ( ...

  2. Advances in infection control

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several initiatives took place in recent years in relation to nosocomial infection control in order to increase patient safety. Some of these initiatives will be commented in this brief review. PMID:27074240

  3. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions OverviewWhat is group B strep?Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a ... can develop an infection of the lungs (called pneumonia), bloodstream (called sepsis), or the fluid around the ...

  4. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Infection and Other Complications NLN ...

  5. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  6. Skin infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Müllegger, Robert R; Häring, Nina S; Glatz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A wide array of infectious diseases can occur in pregnancy. Their acquisition, clinical presentation, and course during gestation may be altered due to an impairment of the maternal cellular immunity. Some infectious diseases can lead to serious consequences for the mother or the offspring, including congenital malformations. This review describes in detail the clinical presentation, course, management, and associated maternal and fetal risks of selected viral (varicella-zoster virus infections, condylomata acuminata), fungal (candida vulvovaginitis), bacterial (Lyme borreliosis), and parasitic (scabies) infections. The treatment options are critically reviewed. First-line therapies include acyclovir and varicella-zoster virus immunoglobulin for varicella-zoster virus infections, surgical modalities for genital warts, topical clotrimazole and oral fluconazole for Candida vulvovaginitis, amoxicillin and cefuroxime for Lyme borreliosis, and permethrin for scabies. A synopsis of maternal and fetal risks of other important infections is also included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  8. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  9. [Plant-infecting reoviruses].

    PubMed

    Sasaya, Takahide

    2014-01-01

    The family Reoviridae separates two subfamilies and consists of 15 genera. Fourteen viruses in three genera (Phytoreovirus, Oryzavirus, and Fijivirus) infect plants. The outbreaks of the plant-infecting reoviruses cause sometime the serious yield loss of rice and maize, and are a menace to safe and efficient food production in the Southeast Asia. The plant-infecting reoviruses are double-shelled icosahedral particles, from 50 to 80nm in diameter, and include from 10 to 12 segmented double-stranded genomic RNAs depending on the viruses. These viruses are transmitted in a persistent manner by the vector insects and replicated in both plants and in their vectors. This review provides a brief overview of the plant-infecting reoviruses and their recent research progresses including the strategy for viral controls using transgenic rice plants.

  10. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Histoplasmosis Chapter 3 - Influenza HIV Infection Philip J. Peters, John T. Brooks INFECTIOUS ... at 888-448-4911 ( www.nccc.ucsf.edu ). HIV TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR US TRAVELERS ENTERING FOREIGN COUNTRIES ...

  11. Coxsackievirus Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft palate, the fleshy back portion of the roof of the mouth. Hemorrhagic conjunctivitis , an infection that ... one or both testicles Reviewed by: Nicole A. Green, MD Date reviewed: January 2014 previous 1 • 2 • ...

  12. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  13. Yeast infections (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infections may follow a course of antibiotics that were prescribed for another purpose. The antibiotics change the normal "balance" between organisms in the vagina by suppressing the growth of protective bacteria that normally have an antifungal effect.

  14. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Infection and Other Complications NLN ...

  15. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  16. Periprosthetic Shoulder Infection

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Vincenzo; Chillemi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is considered the most effective surgical procedure for endstage shoulder pain from different causes including osteoarthritis, cuff-tear arthropathy, trauma, and tumors. Although uncommon and less frequent than knee or hip periprosthetic infection, periprosthetic shoulder infection represents a devastating complication and, despite treatment, is associated with unsatisfactory results. The most commonly identified microorganisms in periprosthetic shoulder infections are Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Propionibacterium acnes. Diagnosis is not always easy and mainly derives from the integration of clinical symptoms, laboratory exams, radiological studies and microbiological swabs. Different options are available for treatment, including antibiotic therapy, lavage and debridement with retention of the prosthesis, one-stage reimplantation, two-stage reimplantation with antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer and resection arthroplasty. The aim of this review is to describe the current knowledge regarding risk factors, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of periprosthetic shoulder infection. PMID:23919098

  17. Repeated Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... another cause for runny noses and wheezing in young children. Because more women of childbearing age are ... the head grows, drainage problems get better. If young children are having too many ear infections, they ...

  18. Infection and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The development of some autoimmune diseases is increasing in the developed world faster than can be accounted for by genetic change. The development of these autoimmune diseases, such as Type 1 diabetes, is known to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Environmental factors which have been considered to play a role include infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria. The search for a common initiating infection in the aetiology of Type 1 diabetes as proved thus far inconclusive. An alternative way of considering a role for infection is that infection may have historically prevented the development of autoimmune disease. In the developing world changes have occurred such that many chronic infections have been eliminated and this may have led to the emergence of autoimmune pathology. Evidence in support of this hypothesis is considered here and factors governing the development of autoimmunity compared with those which might have influenced the development of childhood leukaemia.

  19. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-11-30

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish).

  20. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... in and drinking water from contaminated streams or lakes can lead to an infection and chronic diarrhea. ... or camping, never drink from streams, springs, or lakes unless local health authorities have certified the water ...

  1. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Pregnancy Myths and Tales E. Coli Food Safety for Your Family Salmonella Infections Why ... Important? Staying Healthy During Pregnancy Fevers Food Poisoning E. Coli Food Safety E. Coli Food Poisoning Contact Us ...

  2. Staph infections - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection in the intensive care unit. In: Parillo JE, Dellinger RP, eds. Critical Care Medicine: Principles of ... other coagulase-negative staphylococci. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles ...

  3. Bacterial Infections - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bacterial Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bacterialinfections.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  4. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    PubMed

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  5. Pets and Pasteurella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... a potentially serious infection of the skin called cellulitis. On occasion, these bacteria can be spread to ... or nose mucus. Signs and Symptoms Symptoms of cellulitis usually begin after a very short incubation period, ...

  6. INFECTION AS OCCUPATIONAL RISK,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The percentage of the job-connected infectious diseases of the total number of occupational diseases has been subject to only minor fluctuations...since 1949. Of the occupational infections of medical personnel, tuberculosis and infectious hepatitis are the most important; among diseases that can be...importance in the recognition of an infectious disease as an occupational disease. The article discusses the sources of infection, the manner of

  7. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    PubMed

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections.

  8. Definition of infection.

    PubMed

    Krismer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Acute periprosthetic infections occur either early, due to perioperative contamination, or late and haematogenous, and are caused by virulent bacteria. Late chronic or delayed periprosthetic infections produce implant loosening or symptoms of articular pain, and are caused by low-virulence bacteria. The intension of the definitions characterising the virulence of bacteria are more important than exact periods (delayed from 4 weeks to 2 years, early before and late after this period).

  9. Aerococci and aerococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Magnus

    2013-06-01

    Aerococcus is a genus that comprises seven species, of which Aerococcus urinae, and Aerococcus sanguinicola are emerging human pathogens. Aerococci are gram positive cocci that are easily misidentified as streptococci or staphylococci, and thus the incidence of aerococcal infections has been underestimated. With the introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) clinical microbiologists now have access to a rapid and accurate method to identify aerococci. A. urinae and A. sanguinicola are isolated in a small proportion of urinary specimens in many laboratories and many patients with bacteriuria with aerococci have symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI). A. urinae, and also A. sanguinicola, cause invasive infections including infective endocarditis (IE) with many reported fatalities. Especially older men with urinary tract abnormalities are at risk for bacteraemia with A. urinae but the prognosis of bacteraemia without IE is favourable. Penicillin is appropriate for treatment of invasive infections and in IE, addition of an aminoglycoside should be considered. Treatment of UTI with aerococci is complicated by uncertainty about the effect of trimethoprim-sulphametoxazole and fluoroquinolones on aerococci. This review will discuss identification of Aerococcus spp., antibiotic resistance, the clinical presentation and management of aerococcal infections as well as the virulence mechanisms of these bacteria.

  10. Bartonella (Rochalimaea) quintana infections.

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, M; Raoult, D

    1996-01-01

    Bartonella (formerly Rochalimaea) quintana is the etiological agent of trench fever, a disease extensively reported during the World Wars. Recent molecular biology approaches have allowed dramatic extension of the spectrum of Bartonella infections. B. quintana is now also recognized as an etiological agent of fever and bacteremia, endocarditis, bacillary angiomatosis, and chronic lymphadenopathy. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and/or homeless people are the most vulnerable to infection. Poverty and louse infestation were the main epidemiological factors associated with B. quintana infections during wartime. Although poverty and chronic alcoholism have been associated with modern cases of trench fever and bacteremia due to B. quintana in Europe and the United States, vectors for B. quintana have not been clearly identified and B. quintana has not been isolated from modern-day lice. Microscopic bacillary angiomatosis lesions are characterized by tumor-like capillary lobules, with proliferating endothelial cells. In vitro experiments have shown that B. quintana survives within endothelial cells and stimulates cell proliferation. These observations, together with the finding that lesions may regress when antibiotic therapy is administered, strongly suggest that B. quintana itself stimulates angiogenesis. Bartonella infections are characterized by a high frequency of relapses after brief courses of antibiotic therapy. It is to be noted that in vitro, although Bartonella species are highly susceptible to antibiotics, only the aminoglycosides have proved to be bactericidal. However, the most effective antibiotic regimen for Bartonella infections remains to be established. PMID:8809460

  11. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  12. Urticaria and infections

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Urticaria is a group of diseases that share a distinct skin reaction pattern. Triggering of urticaria by infections has been discussed for many years but the exact role and pathogenesis of mast cell activation by infectious processes is unclear. In spontaneous acute urticaria there is no doubt for a causal relationship to infections and all chronic urticaria must have started as acute. Whereas in physical or distinct urticaria subtypes the evidence for infections is sparse, remission of annoying spontaneous chronic urticaria has been reported after successful treatment of persistent infections. Current summarizing available studies that evaluated the course of the chronic urticaria after proven Helicobacter eradication demonstrate a statistically significant benefit compared to untreated patients or Helicobacter-negative controls without urticaria (p < 0.001). Since infections can be easily treated some diagnostic procedures should be included in the routine work-up, especially the search for Helicobacter pylori. This review will update the reader regarding the role of infections in different urticaria subtypes. PMID:20066173

  13. Automatic infection detection system.

    PubMed

    Granberg, Ove; Bellika, Johan Gustav; Arsand, Eirik; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    An infected person may be contagious already before the first symptoms appear. This person can, in the period of disease evolution, infect several associated citizens before consulting a general practitioner (GP). Early detection of contagion is therefore important to prevent spreading of diseases. The Automatic Infection Detection (AID) System faces this problem through investigating the hypothesis that the blood glucose (BG) level increases when a person is infected. The first objective of the prototyped version of the AID system was to identify possible BG elevations in the incubation time that could be related to the spread of infectious diseases. To do this, we monitored two groups of people, with and without diabetes mellitus. The AID system analyzed the results and we were able to detect two cases of infection during the study period. The time of detection occurred simultaneous or near the time of onset of symptoms. The detection did not occur earlier for a number of reasons. The most likely one is that the evolution process of an infectious disease is both complicated and involves the immune system and several organs in the body. The investigation with regard to isolating the key relations is therefore considered as a very complex study. Nevertheless, the AID system managed to detect the infection much earlier than what is possible with today's early warning systems for infectious diseases.

  14. Nosocomial infection update.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Historically, staphylococci, pseudomonads, and Escherichia coli have been the nosocomial infection troika; nosocomial pneumonia, surgical wound infections, and vascular access-related bacteremia have caused the most illness and death in hospitalized patients; and intensive care units have been the epicenters of antibiotic resistance. Acquired antimicrobial resistance is the major problem, and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the pathogen of greatest concern. The shift to outpatient care is leaving the most vulnerable patients in hospitals. Aging of our population and increasingly aggressive medical and surgical interventions, including implanted foreign bodies, organ transplantations, and xenotransplantation, create a cohort of particularly susceptible persons. Renovation of aging hospitals increases risk of airborne fungal and other infections. To prevent and control these emerging nosocomial infections, we need to increase national surveillance, "risk adjust" infection rates so that interhospital comparisons are valid, develop more noninvasive infection-resistant devices, and work with health-care workers on better implementation of existing control measures such as hand washing. PMID:9716961

  15. Neuroparasitic Infections: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M.D.; Zunt, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system—Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.—is reviewed. Objectives On completion of this article, the reader should be able to summarize the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of the common nematodal infections of the nervous system. Accreditation The Indiana University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit The Indiana University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 Category 1 credit toward the AMA Physicians Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. Disclosure Statements of disclosure have been obtained regarding the authors’ relevant financial relationships. The authors have nothing to disclose. PMID:16170738

  16. [Infections and fingolimod].

    PubMed

    Cervera, Carlos

    2012-08-16

    Fingolimod is the first approved drug with oral availability for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. To review the mechanism of action of fingolimod and its relationship with the development of infections. To propose preventive measures for those patients who are receiving the drug or will initiate a new treatment. In addition, the role of fingolimod in the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy on the basis of recent knowledge of its pathophysiology will be discussed. The mechanism of action of fingolimod is based on an antagonic effect on the sphingosine 1-phospate receptors that will generate an inhibition of the egress of naive and central memory lymphocytes into the bloodstream, allowing the free recirculation of memory effectors T lymphocytes. This effect will produce lymphopenia. Fingolimod-associated lymphopenia is a consequence of lymphocyte redistribution, and it is selective and reversible. There is no evidence of higher number of opportunistic and non-opportunistic infections in comparison to placebo or interferon beta-1a in patients receiving fingolimod. However, two patients developed severe herpetic infections under fingolimod. Fingolimod induce a selective and reversible lymphopenia that, taking into account the most recent available data, does not seem to be associated with higher risk of opportunistic infections due to a preservation of immuno-surveillance. The risk of herpesvirus infection should be taken into consideration and more studies are warranted to confirm if an association of these infections with the use of fingolimod exists.

  17. Detection and Characterization of Infections and Infection Susceptibility

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Immune Disorders; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Genetic Immunological Deficiencies; Hyperimmunoglobulin-E Recurrent Infection Syndrome; Recurrent Infections; Unknown Immune Deficiency; GATA2 Deficiency (MonoMAC); Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections; Hyper IgE (Job s) Syndrome; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Susceptibility to Disseminated Infections; Primary Immune Deficiency Disease (PIDD)

  18. Emerging Infections in Burns

    PubMed Central

    Branski, Ludwik K.; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed; Rivero, Haidy; Jeschke, Marc G.; Sanford, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients who suffer severe burns are at higher risk for local and systemic infections. In recent years, emerging resistant pathogens have forced burn care providers world wide to search for alternative forms of treatment. Multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp., and various fungal strains have been the major contributors to the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. Multi-drug-resistant S. aureus remains the major cause of gram-positive burn wound infections world wide. Treatment strategies include rigorous isolation protocols and new types of antibiotics where necessary. Methods We reviewed 398 severely burned patients (burns >40% total body surface area [TBSA]) admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2006. Patients who did not contract multi-drug-resistant gram-negative organisms during their hospital course and received our standard antibiotic regimen—vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam—served as controls (piperacillin/tazobactam; n = 280). The treatment group consisted of patients who, during their acute hospital stay, developed infections with multi-drug-resistant gram-negative pathogens and were treated with vancomycin and colistin for at least three days (colistin; n = 118). Results Gram-negative organisms continue to cause the most severe infections in burn patients. Colistin has re-emerged as a highly effective antibiotic against multiresistant Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter infections of burns. Patients who required colistin therapy had a significantly larger average total and full-thickness burn than patients treated with piperacillin/tazobactam and vancomycin, and the mortality rate was significantly higher in the colistin group (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the colistin and piperacillin/tazobactam groups in the incidence of neurotoxicity, hepatic toxicity, or nephrotoxicity. The main fungal pathogens in burn patients are Candida

  19. [Emerging invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Alvez, F; Figueras, C; Roselló, E

    2010-07-01

    The frequency and diversity of invasive fungal infections has changed over the last 25 years. The emergence of less common, but medically important fungi has increased, and the children at risk has expanded, with the inclusion of medical conditions such as cancer, mainly haematological malignancy or stem cell transplant, immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged neutropenia, and T-cell immunodeficiency. Among mould infections, fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis (Dematiaceous fungi) have been increasingly reported in this group of patients. To successfully manage these challenging infections, it is imperative that paediatricians and sub-specialists remain aware of the optimal and timely diagnosis and therapeutic options. Unlike other common mycoses that cause human disease, there no simple antigen or serological tests available to detect these pathogens in tissue or blood. The outcome for these disseminate, and often refractory fungal infections in neutropenic patients and transplant recipients remains extremely poor, requiring early and aggressive therapy. Unfortunately there are no guidelines outlining the choices for optimal therapy in the treatment of paediatric invasive fungal infections do not exist, and on the other hand are limited paediatric data available comparing antifungal agents in children with proven, probable or suspected invasive fungal infection. The options for treatment rest mainly on some adult guidelines that comment on the treatment of these emerging and uncommon important fungi in children. Despite the sparse clinical trials available on treatment and its poor outcome, options for treatment of invasive fungal infections have increased with the advance of new antifungal agents, with improved tolerability and increased range of activity. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis are discussed in this article.

  20. Worm Infections in Children.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Jill E; Hotez, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    • On the basis of research evidence, worm infections are important global child health conditions causing chronic disability that lasts from childhood into adulthood (Table 1). (2)(3) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, the major worm infections found in developing countries include ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection, and schistosomiasis; toxocariasis, enterobiasis, and cysticercosis are also found in poor regions of North America and Europe. (4)(9)(13) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of expert consensus, children and adolescents are often vulnerable to acquiring large numbers of worms, ie, high-intensity infections (Fig 1)(21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: D • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, moderate and heavy worm burdens cause increased morbidity because of growth and intellectual stunting in children and adolescents. Many of these effects may result from helminth-induced malnutrition. (21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: C • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, worm infections are also commonly associated with eosinophilia. (48) (49) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence as well as consensus, helminthes can cause inflammation in the lung (asthma), gastrointestinal tract (enteritis and colitis), liver (hepatitis and fibrosis), and urogenital tract. (7)(21)(22)(23)(27)(28)(40)(41)(43) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, microscopy techniques for diagnosis of worm infections in children often exhibit suboptimal sensitivities and specificities, necessitating new or improved diagnostic modalities such as polymerase chain reaction. (54)(55) Evidence Quality: A • On the basis of research evidence and expert consensus, mass drug administration (“preventive chemotherapy”) has becomea standard practice for ministries of health in low- and middle-income countries to control intestinal helminth infections and schistosomiasis. (67)(68) Evidence

  1. Pneumocystis infections: the iceberg?

    PubMed

    Dei-Cas, E

    2000-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is a well-recognized lung disease of immunocompromised patients, but the real impact of Pneumocystis infection in humans remains to be discovered. Pneumocystis represents probably one of the more frequent infectious agents faced by humans. Seroconversion revealed P. carinii primary infection in > 90% of infants and small children, but the infection source and the clinical or pathological changes associated with this first contact with the parasite remain unknown. Pneumocystis organisms are atypical microfungi able to attach specifically to type-I alveolar epithelial cells, and to proliferate, provoking severe pneumonitis. A deep impairment of cell-mediated immunity associated with changes in pulmonary surfactant make it possible for Pneumocystis to grow within the host. Alveolar type-II cell hypertrophy, macrophagic infiltrate and intra-alveolar foamy eosinophilic material are the most typical changes. CD4+ T-lymphocytes and interferon play a major role in host defense against P. carinii. Alveolar macrophages phagocytose P. carinii via the macrophage-mannose receptor and produce reactive free-radicals and nitric oxide under Pneumocystis stimulation. Furthermore, PCP is associated with an early decrease of surfactant phospholipids, increased hydrophilic surfactant protein (SP) levels and decreased hydrophobic SPs. Normal surfactant improves PCP, and consistently, it inhibits the parasite growth. New detection tools have revealed that hospitalized patients can be latently infected with Pneumocystis and that immunocompetent hosts develop transient Pneumocystis infections. Pneumocystis organisms circulate in human populations, being able to infect hosts with diverse susceptibility levels. In fact, airborne Pneumocystis infection can display a large spectrum of clinical presentations and most likely, we recognize at present only the tip of the iceberg.

  2. HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A

    1996-09-01

    Many of the clinical features of HIV/AIDS can be ascribed to the profound immune deficiency which develops in infected patients. The destruction of the immune system by the virus results in opportunistic infection, as well as an increased risk of autoimmune disease and malignancy. In addition, disease manifestations related to the virus itself may occur. For example, during the primary illness which occurs within weeks after first exposure to HIV, clinical symptoms occur in at least 50% of cases, typically as a mononucleosis syndrome. HIV-related complications are rarely encountered in patients with preserved immunity (i.e. CD4 T-cell counts greater than 500 cells/mm3). Recurrent mucocutaneous herpes simplex (HSV), herpes zoster (VZV), oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia occur with increasing frequency as the CD4 count drops below this level. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) occurs in association with HIV and often presents early in the clinical course. The risk of developing opportunistic infections and malignancies typical of AIDS increases progressively as CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/mm3. The clinical manifestations of infections associated with AIDS tend to fall into well-recognized patterns of presentation, including pneumonia, dysphagia/odynophagia, diarrhoea, neurological symptoms, fever, wasting, anaemia and visual loss. The commonest pathogens include Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium intracellulare and cytomegalovirus. Malignant disease in patients with HIV infection also occurs in a characteristic pattern. Only two tumours are prevalent: Kaposi's sarcoma, a multifocal tumour of vascular endothelium which typically involves skin and mucosal surfaces; and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is typically high grade in phenotype, often arising within the central nervous system. The principles of therapy include reduction of HIV replication by antiretroviral

  3. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  4. Burn wound infections.

    PubMed

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-04-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices.

  5. Microvesicles and viral infection.

    PubMed

    Meckes, David G; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis.

  6. [Arthritis and infections].

    PubMed

    Cimaz, R; Meregalli, E; Biggioggero, M; Casadei, A; Careddu, P

    2005-08-01

    Arthritis caused by infectious agents can be secondary to direct invasion of the joint space or to immune mechanisms (subsequent to or concomitant to an infection). Septic arthritis refers to a situation when bacteria can be cultured in synovial fluid. Arthritis can complicate for example meningococcemia or infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Haemophilus influenzae. Reactive (postinfectious) arthritides are an important diagnostic category within a pediatric rheumatology practice. Yersinia and, less frequently, Salmonella, play an important role in postdiarrheal disorders. The arthritis that can ensue is usually oligoarticular and occurs 1-2 weeks after the enteric infection. Reiter's syndrome, rare in the pediatric age, is characterized by the triad urethritis-conjunctivitis-arthritis. Postviral arthritides can occur after a variety of viral infections, including Parvovirus B19, rubella, and others (e.g. hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, chickenpox, mumps). Especially in patients with acute arthritis, the presence of preceding infections should always be investigated. Although the majority of postinfectious arthritides are self-limiting in nature and do not require specific treatment, conditions such as Lyme borreliosis and rheumatic fever can be associated with significant morbidity, and sometimes can be even lethal.

  7. Surgical infection in art.

    PubMed

    Meakins, J L

    1996-12-01

    The earliest images of medicine and surgery in Western art are from the late Middle Ages. Although often attractive, at that time they were illustrative and mirrored the text on how to diagnose or treat a specific condition. These drawings in medieval manuscripts represent management of abscesses, perianal infection and fistulas, amputation, and wound dressings. With the Renaissance, art in all its forms flourished, and surgeons were represented at work draining carbuncles, infected bursae, and mastoiditis; managing ulcers, scrofula, and skin infections; and performing amputations. Specific diagnosis can be made, such as streptococcal infection in the discarded leg of the miraculous transplantation performed by Saints Cosmas and Damian and in the works of Rembrandt van Rijn and Frederic Bazille. Evocations of cytokine activity are evident in works by Albrecht Dürer, Edvard Munch, and James Tissot. The iconography of society's view of a surgeon is apparent and often not complimentary. The surgeon's art is a visual art. Astute observation leads to early diagnosis and better results in surgical infection and the septic state. Learning to see what we look at enhances our appreciation of the world around us but, quite specifically, makes us better clinicians.

  8. Immunization against brucella infection

    PubMed Central

    Elberg, Sanford S.

    1959-01-01

    The author describes a study, carried out in the Province of Córdoba, Spain, to test the efficacy of a live vaccine prepared from the Rev I strain of Brucella melitensis against caprine brucellosis and to determine the extent of natural infection in goats and humans in the Province. It was found that the vaccine significantly increased the resistance of the goats to infection without inducing a carrier state of the vaccine strain and that the immunity persisted for at least 15 months—the period of test. Serum agglutination tests, milk ring tests, and milk culture tests on goats showed that approximately 16-29% of the individual animals examined would be considered infective on the basis of one or other of the tests. Of the 118 herds tested, 111 were discovered to be harbouring infected animals. Serum agglutination tests on humans revealed that 25 of the 880 people tested (2.8%) had titres of 160 International Units (IU) or above and that, on the basis of a diagnostic titre of 80 IU or above, 7% of the population would be regarded as showing evidence of a past or present infection. PMID:13819864

  9. [Urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    2011-09-01

    Urinary tract infections occur very frequently in the community and in hospitalized patients and are mainly caused by Escherichia (E.) coli. Depending on virulence determinants of uropathogenic microorganisms and host-specific defense mechanisms, urinary tract infections can manifest as cystitis, pyelonephritis (bacterial interstitial nephritis), bacteremia or urosepsis. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections in otherwise healthy women should be treated for 3-7 days depending on the antibiotic therapy chosen, even if spontaneous remission rates of up to 40% have been reported. Antibiotics of the first choice for empirical treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection are fluoroquinolones, pivmecillinam and fosfomycin. A huge problem is the increasing antimicrobial resistance of uropathogenic microorganisms. Complicated urinary tract infections associated with anatomical and/or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract and/or comorbidities such as diabetes or immunosuppressive therapy, need longer antibiotic treatment (e.g. 10-14 days) as well as interdisciplinary diagnostic procedures. Treatment of community acquired urosepsis includes cephalosporins of the third generation, piperacillin/tazobactam or ciprofloxacin. For nosocomial urosepsis the combination with an aminoglycoside or a carbapenem is recommended.

  10. Infected Dentine Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Edwina; Fejerskov, Ole; Nyvad, Bente

    2015-11-01

    Dentine becomes infected as a result of caries lesion formation on root surfaces and when lesions progress following cavitation of enamel lesions. However, this infection is unimportant because the driving force for lesion formation and progression is the overlying biofilm. This explains why root surface caries can be controlled by mechanical plaque control and fluoride, and restorations are not needed to arrest these lesions. Similarly, the infected dentine in cavitated coronal lesions does not have to be removed to arrest the lesion. If the lesion is either accessible or opened for cleaning by the patient or parent, the lesion can be arrested. Sealing of infected dentine within the tooth, either by a Hall crown in the primary dentition or by partial caries removal prior to placing a well-sealed filling, will also arrest the lesion. When restoring deep lesions in symptomless, vital teeth, vigorous excavation of infected dentine is likely to expose the pulp and make root canal treatment necessary. Thus complete excavation'is not needed and should be avoided. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Root surface caries can be arrested by cleaning and fluoride application. Restorations are not essential. Vigorous excavation of softened dentine in deep cavities of symptomless, vital teeth is contra-indicated. It is not needed and increases the risk of pulp exposure.

  11. [Atherosclerosis and infection?].

    PubMed

    Zeman, K

    2006-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is guided by chronicle inflammation process. In the last decades of the 20th century, studies considering infection another possible risk factor of atherosclerosis development were written. Helicobacter pylori, Porphyromas gingivalis, some viruses but most frequently Chlamydia pneumonie are infection agens mentioned in these studies. Some of them emphasize also combined infections caused by more pathogenic factors having influence on vascular inflammation. Serological, epidemiological, histological and imunological studies show the pathogenic influence of acute or chronic infections. Many studies selected makrolid antibiotics as treatment in patients with ischaemic heart disease. However, existing experience with antibiotics did not bring clear results. These studies have mentioned the fact antibiotics have not been indicated as treatment in patients with acute or chronic vascular system infliction by atherosclerosis. Since the experimental and clinical research of influence of inflammations on the development of atherosclerosis moved forward a lot, no exact evidence of this complicated pathogenic mechanism was given. It will obviously take some time to confirm whether the relation between infections and artherosclerosis is causal, i.e. initiating the pathogenic process, accelerating it or keeping it alive.

  12. Chlamydiaceae infections in pig

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria. They are responsible for a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. In pigs, Chlamydia suis, Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia psittaci have been isolated. Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs are associated with different pathologies such as conjunctivitis, pneumonia, pericarditis, polyarthritis, polyserositis, pseudo-membranous or necrotizing enteritis, periparturient dysgalactiae syndrome, vaginal discharge, return to oestrus, abortion, mummification, delivery of weak piglets, increased perinatal and neonatal mortality and inferior semen quality, orchitis, epididymitis and urethritis in boars. However, Chlamydiaceae are still considered as non-important pathogens because reports of porcine chlamydiosis are rare. Furthermore, Chlamydiaceae infections are often unnoticed because tests for Chlamydiaceae are not routinely performed in all veterinary diagnostic laboratories and Chlamydiaceae are often found in association with other pathogens, which are sometimes more easily to detect. However, recent studies have demonstrated that Chlamydiaceae infections in breeding sows, boars and piglets occur more often than thought and are economically important. This paper presents an overview on: the taxonomy of Chlamydiaceae occurring in pigs, diagnostic considerations, epidemiology and pathology of infections with Chlamydiaceae in pigs, public health significance and finally on prevention and treatment of Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs. PMID:21314912

  13. Infection control for norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, L.; Park, G. W.; Vega, E.; Hall, A.; Parashar, U.; Vinjé, J.; Lopman, B.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are notoriously difficult to prevent and control, owing to their low infectious dose, high shedding titre, and environmental stability. The virus can spread through multiple transmission routes, of which person-to-person and foodborne are the most important. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have helped to establish norovirus as the most common cause of sporadic gastroenteritis and the most common cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis across all ages. In this article, we review the epidemiology and virology of noroviruses, and prevention and control guidelines, with a focus on the principles of disinfection and decontamination. Outbreak management relies on sound infection control principles, including hand hygiene, limiting exposure to infectious individuals, and thorough environmental decontamination. Ideally, all infection control recommendations would rely on empirical evidence, but a number of challenges, including the inability to culture noroviruses in the laboratory and the challenges of outbreak management in complex environments, has made it difficult to garner clear evidence of efficacy in certain areas of infection control. New experimental data on cultivable surrogates for human norovirus and on environmental survivability and relative resistance to commonly used disinfectants are providing new insights for further refinining disinfection practices. Finally, clinical trials are underway to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines, which may shift the current infection control principles to more targeted interventions. PMID:24813073

  14. Infection in Burns

    PubMed Central

    Norbury, William; Herndon, David N.; Tanksley, Jessica; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Developments in critical care and surgical approaches to treating burn wounds, together with newer antimicrobial treatments, have significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this injury. Methods: Review of the pertinent English-language literature. Results: Several resistant organisms have emerged as the maleficent cause of invasive infection in burn patients, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, non-albicans Candida spp., and Aspergillus. Advances in antimicrobial therapies and the release of new classes of antibiotics have certainly added to the armamentarium of therapeutic resources for the clinician. Conclusion: Strict infection control measures, constant wound surveillance with regular sampling of tissues for quantitative culture, and early excision and wound closure remain the principal adjuncts to control of invasive infections in burn patients. PMID:26978531

  15. [Infection and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Senneville, E

    2008-09-01

    The large number of factors that influence the outcome of patients with diabetic foot infections calls for a multidisciplinary management of such patients. Infection is always the consequence of a preexisting foot wound whose chronicity is facilitated by the diabetic peripheral neuropathy, whereas peripheral vascular disease is a factor of poor outcome, especially regarding the risk for leg amputation. Primary and secondary prevention of IPD depends both on the efficacy of wound off-loading. Antibiotic treatment should only be considered for clinically infected foot wounds for which diagnostic criteria have recently been proposed by international consensus. The choice of the antibiotic regimen should take into account the risk for selecting bacterial resistance, and as a consequence, agents with a narrow spectrum of activity should be preferred. Respect of the measures for preventing the spread of bacterial resistance in diabetic foot centers is particularly important.

  16. Respiratory infections: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grassi, C

    1985-01-01

    A review of clinical studies of piperacillin shows that it is valuable for the treatment of respiratory infections due to Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas sp, anaerobes, and mixed flora including anaerobes. Various studies of a total of 420 patients treated with piperacillin for lower respiratory tract infections found that 97% of the patients were cured or markedly improved. Piperacillin has also been found as effective as combination therapy (gentamicin or tobramycin plus carbenicillin or ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious infections, including pneumonia and several caused by gram-negative organisms and anaerobic organisms. A review of the literature on bacteriological responses to piperacillin shows that 126 of 153 (82%) of the susceptible strains could be eradicated. Streptococcus pneumoniae, beta-hemolytic streptococci, Haemophilus influenzae, Peptostreptococcus sp, Bacteroides sp, and Fusobacterium sp have been completely eradicated by treatment with piperacillin. Most of the published studies indicate that therapy with the drug is usually well tolerated.

  17. Overwhelming postsplenectomy infection.

    PubMed

    Krivit, W

    1977-01-01

    One of the more intriguing aspects of the spleen is the protection against certain bacterial infections afforded by its unique vascular and immune function. There have been extensive clinical surveys which indicate an incidence of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection (OPSI) above that of the disease for which the splenectomy was done. In the absence of the spleen, either congenital or subsequent to surgical removal, this overwhelming sepsis has a 50% case fatality rate. The most common infective organism has been Diplococcus (tstreptococcus) pneumoniae (D. pneumoniae). Intensive investigations indicated loss of phagocytic function of the spleen, depression of serum IgM levels, a possible suppression of the lymphocyte responsiveness, and changes in opsonin-alternative complement system as potential causes of OPSI. Preventive measures against OPSI include trials of prophylactic Phenoxymethyl Penicillin (penicillin) and pneumococcal vaccine.

  18. Hemophagocytic syndromes and infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fisman, D. N.

    2000-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an unusual syndrome characterized by fever, splenomegaly, jaundice, and the pathologic finding of hemophagocytosis (phagocytosis by macrophages of erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and their precursors) in bone marrow and other tissues. HLH may be diagnosed in association with malignant, genetic, or autoimmune diseases but is also prominently linked with Epstein-Barr (EBV) virus infection. Hyperproduction of cytokines, including interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, by EBV- infected T lymphocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of HLH. EBV-associated HLH may mimic T-cell lymphoma and is treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy, while hemophagocytic syndromes associated with nonviral pathogens often respond to treatment of the underlying infection. PMID:11076718

  19. Emerging chlamydial infections.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    Chlamydiae are important intracellular bacterial pathogens of vertebrates. In the last years, novel members of this group have been discovered: Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis seems to be emerging respiratory human pathogens, while Waddlia chondrophila might be a new agent of bovine abortion. Various species have been showed to infect also the herpetofauna and fishes, and some novel chlamydiae are endosymbionts of arthropods. In addition, molecular studies evidenced a huge diversity of chlamydiae from both environmental and clinical samples, most of such a diversity could be formed by novel lineages of chlamydiae. Experimental studies showed that free-living amoebae may support multiplication of various chlamydiae, then could play an important role as reservoir/vector of chlamydial infections. Here we reviewed literature data concerning chlamydial infections, with a particular emphasis on the novely described chlamydial organisms.

  20. Blood-borne infections.

    PubMed

    Pirozzolo, Jason J; LeMay, Donald C

    2007-07-01

    Blood-borne infections are transmitted by way of direct blood contact from one individual to another from injured skin or a mucous membrane. Blood-borne infections can also be transmitted through blood doping and drug abuse and through sexual contact. Risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) HBV infection include travel to regions with endemic hepatitis. Prevention of blood-borne pathogens in the student-athlete should focus on traditional transmission routes and off-the-field behavior because experts believe that field transmission of blood-borne pathogens is minimal. Worldwide, HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HIV are the most common pathogens encountered. This article focuses on HBV and HCV as being the most prevalent in athletics.