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Sample records for microbiol infect dis

  1. Unparticle physics in DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Yan, Mu-Lin

    2007-10-01

    The unparticle stuff scenario related to the nontrivial IR fixed point in 4D-conformal field theory was recently suggested by Georgi. We illustrate its physical effects in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) process. The possible signals of the unparticle related to parity violation asymmetry in DIS is investigated. It is found out that the behavior of this parity violation signal is sensitive to the value of the scale dimension d{sub U} of the unparticle.

  2. Kick Dis Power Puck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    There is a new toy available that can be used to demonstrate many interesting physics principles. It is called the "Kick Dis Power Puck" and is basically a round plastic hovercraft with a soft cushion material around the perimeter (Fig. 1). It is a product of the Estes Company, which is well known for their model rockets, and is available from advertisers in this journal.1,2 The puck has a diameter of 19.5 cm and comes in two colors, red or green. The two samples I purchased had masses of 307 g and 303 g, respectively. There is a forceful, built-in fan, which is run by a rechargeable battery and powers the puck for about 30 minutes. A 9-V battery charger completes the package, which sells for about 45.

  3. [Dis-social personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, E; Herpertz, S C

    2006-05-01

    Deviant behavior is gaining in clinical importance if it is founded on stable, characteristic, and enduring patterns of psychopathologically relevant personality traits which have their onset in childhood or adolescence. The classification of these traits shows variations, so that a distinction between the ICD-10 diagnosis of dis-social personality disorder, DSM-IV diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and the concept "psychopathy" is necessary. Our knowledge about the biological basis of antisocial behavior includes neurophysiologic, psychophysiologic, and genetic findings. Also relevant are results of neurotransmitter studies and structural resp. functional neuroimaging findings. Psychosocial risk factors include parental deficits, rejection, disregard, unstable relations, and abuse. Efficient psychotherapeutic treatment is cognitive-behavioral. Pharmacologic treatment is largely "off-label". The diagnosis of antisocial and dis-social personality disorders allows no conclusions on criminal responsibility. In addition to psychiatric diagnostics, considerations on the severity of the disorder and its effects on the ability to inhibit actions are necessary.

  4. DIS: an architecture for fast lisp execution

    SciTech Connect

    Yerazunis, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    DIS is an architecture for very fast execution of LISP and other artificial intelligence languages. The DIS architecture uses a number of functional units controlled by a wide (256 bit) instruction. A simulator, compiler,and optimizer were constructed for the DIS architecture. A simulated 100-nanosecond cycle time single-processor DIS machine appears to run LISP on the order of twice as fast as a CRAY-1, and on the order of ten to fifteen times faster than other LISP-directed architectures.

  5. Identities of Dis/Ability and Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Michael; Ridley, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Centring on a small-scale capability-based case study of music provision for adults with profound dis/abilities, this paper considers the significance of music and music education in people's lives. It offers a philosophical defence of music's importance in enjoying a truly human life and then, drawing on an overview of the work of dis/abled…

  6. The mouth and dis/ability.

    PubMed

    Liddiard, K; Goodley, D

    2016-06-01

    Our aims in this paper are threefold. First, to understand how the mouth reveals the kinds of human beings that are de/valued in specific national locations and in global discourses with special attention on disability. Second, to subject the mouth to analysis from critical disability studies, specifically, an approach we describe as dis/ability studies. Third, to ask how the mouth might work as a site of resistance for disabled people. The paper begins by providing an introduction to critical disability studies, a perspective that foregrounds disability as the primary focus for thinking through the ways in which the body and society are shaped together. We move in this literature review towards a dis/ability studies approach that recognises the simultaneous processes of disablism (the exclusion of people with impairments) and ableism (the system by which standards of human autonomy and capability are made as key indicators of human worth). We then analyse the mouth in relation to pathologisation, human enhancement and resistance. We conclude with some final thoughts on the offerings of a dis/ability studies approach to those of interested with the intersections of the mouth and society. PMID:27352472

  7. Sequence and structure requirements for specific recognition of HIV-1 TAR and DIS RNA by the HIV-1 Vif protein.

    PubMed

    Freisz, Séverine; Mezher, Joelle; Hafirassou, Lamine; Wolff, Philippe; Nominé, Yves; Romier, Christophe; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2012-07-01

    The HIV-1 Vif protein plays an essential role in the regulation of the infectivity of HIV-1 virion and in vivo pathogenesis. Vif neutralizes the human DNA-editing enzyme APOBEC3 protein, an antiretroviral cellular factor from the innate immune system, allowing the virus to escape the host defence system. It was shown that Vif is packaged into viral particles through specific interactions with the viral genomic RNA. Conserved and structured sequences from the 5'-noncoding region, such as the Tat-responsive element (TAR) or the genomic RNA dimerization initiation site (DIS), are primary binding sites for Vif. In the present study we used isothermal titration calorimetry to investigate sequence and structure determinants important for Vif binding to short viral RNA corresponding to TAR and DIS stem-loops. We showed that Vif specifically binds TAR and DIS in the low nanomolar range. In addition, Vif primarily binds the TAR UCU bulge, but not the apical loop. Determinants for Vif binding to the DIS loop-loop complex are likely more complex and involve the self-complementary loop together with the upper part of the stem. These results suggest that Tat-TAR inhibitors or DIS small molecule binders might be also effective to disturb Vif-TAR and Vif-DIS binding in order to reduce Vif packaging into virions.

  8. Regge Behavior of DIS Structure Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Franz Gross; I. V. Musatov; Yu.A.Simonov

    2004-02-01

    Building on previous works of the mid 1960's, we construct an integral equation for forward elastic scattering (t=0) at arbitrary virtuality Q{sup 2} and large s=W{sup 2}. This equation sums the ladder production of massless intermediate bosons to all orders, and the solution exhibits Regge behavior. The equation is used to study scattering in a simple {chi} {yields} {chi}{phi} scalar theory, where it is solved approximately and applied to the study of DIS at small x. We find that the model can naturally describe the quark distribution in both the large x region and the small x region dominated by Reggeon exchange.

  9. Small-x DIS in NLO

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2011-04-01

    Deep inelastic scattering in the saturation region (for small $x$ and/or large nucleus) is described by the evolution of color dipoles. In the leading order this evolution is governed by the non-linear BK equation. To see if this equation is relevant for existing or future DIS accelerators (like EIC or LHeC) one needs to know how big are the next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections. I review the calculation of the NLO corrections to high-energy amplitudes in QCD.

  10. Two-Photon Exchange in (Semi-)Inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Marc; Metz, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    In this note we consider effects of a Two-Photon Exchange (TPE) in inclusive DIS and semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS). In particular, transverse single spin asymmetries are generated in inclusive DIS if more than one photon is exchanged between the lepton and the hadron. We briefly summarize the TPE in DIS in the parton model and extend our approach to SIDIS, where a new leading twist $\\sin(2\\phi)$ contribution to the longitudinal beam spin asymmetry shows up. Possible TPE effects for the Sivers and the Collins asymmetries in SIDIS are power-suppressed.

  11. Precision QCD measurements in DIS at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    New and recent results on QCD measurements from the H1 and ZEUS experiments at the HERA ep collider are reviewed. The final results on the combined deep-inelastic neutral and charged current cross-sections are presented and their role in the extractions of parton distribution functions (PDFs) is studied. The PDF fits give insight into the compatibility of QCD evolution and heavy flavor schemes with the data as a function of kinematic variables such as the scale Q2. Measurements of jet production cross-sections in ep collisions provide direct proves of QCD and extractions of the strong coupling constants are performed. Charm and beauty cross-section measurements are used for the determination of the heavy quark masses. Their role in PDF fits is investigated. In the regime of diffractive DIS and photoproduction, dijet and prompt photon production cross-sections provide insights into the process of factorization and the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  12. The Development and Validation of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruwys, Tegan; Platow, Michael J.; Rieger, Elizabeth; Byrne, Don G.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents information on the psychometric properties of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS), a new scale of dieting that predicts future behavioral efforts to lose weight. We begin by reviewing recent research indicating theoretical and empirical problems with traditional approaches to measuring dieting. The DIS addresses several of…

  13. The development and validation of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS).

    PubMed

    Cruwys, Tegan; Platow, Michael J; Rieger, Elizabeth; Byrne, Don G

    2013-03-01

    This article presents information on the psychometric properties of the Dieting Intentions Scale (DIS), a new scale of dieting that predicts future behavioral efforts to lose weight. We begin by reviewing recent research indicating theoretical and empirical problems with traditional approaches to measuring dieting. The DIS addresses several of these problems by (a) focusing on naturalistic dieting behavior and (b) being future-oriented. Four validation studies are presented with a total of 741 participants. We demonstrate that the DIS has predictive utility for dieting behaviors and is positively correlated with other measures related to eating, weight, and shape. Furthermore, the DIS demonstrates discriminant validity by not being related to constructs such as self-esteem and social desirability. The DIS also has high internal consistency, with a 1-factor solution replicated with confirmatory factor analysis. The potential uses of the scale in both research and clinical settings are considered. PMID:23148647

  14. 32 CFR 298.3 - Records maintained by DIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 5105.42, “Defense Investigative Service (DA&M),” (32 CFR part 361) including investigative and... responsibilities. In implementing this policy, DIS follows the procedures set forth in 32 CFR part 286....

  15. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  16. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  17. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  18. Multiple myeloma-associated hDIS3 mutations cause perturbations in cellular RNA metabolism and suggest hDIS3 PIN domain as a potential drug target

    PubMed Central

    Tomecki, Rafal; Drazkowska, Karolina; Kucinski, Iwo; Stodus, Krystian; Szczesny, Roman J.; Gruchota, Jakub; Owczarek, Ewelina P.; Kalisiak, Katarzyna; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    hDIS3 is a mainly nuclear, catalytic subunit of the human exosome complex, containing exonucleolytic (RNB) and endonucleolytic (PIN) active domains. Mutations in hDIS3 have been found in ∼10% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we show that these mutations interfere with hDIS3 exonucleolytic activity. Yeast harboring corresponding mutations in DIS3 show growth inhibition and changes in nuclear RNA metabolism typical for exosome dysfunction. Construction of a conditional DIS3 knockout in the chicken DT40 cell line revealed that DIS3 is essential for cell survival, indicating that its function cannot be replaced by other exosome-associated nucleases: hDIS3L and hRRP6. Moreover, HEK293-derived cells, in which depletion of endogenous wild-type hDIS3 was complemented with exogenously expressed MM hDIS3 mutants, proliferate at a slower rate and exhibit aberrant RNA metabolism. Importantly, MM mutations are synthetically lethal with the hDIS3 PIN domain catalytic mutation both in yeast and human cells. Since mutations in PIN domain alone have little effect on cell physiology, our results predict the hDIS3 PIN domain as a potential drug target for MM patients with hDIS3 mutations. It is an interesting example of intramolecular synthetic lethality with putative therapeutic potential in humans. PMID:24150935

  19. Spin-Azimuthal Asymmetries in DIS at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut

    2003-01-01

    We present latest measurements of beam and target single-spin asymmetries in the single pion electroproduction in the DIS. In addition to significant target single-spin asymmetries the CLAS detector at Jlab also measures a significant beam-spin asymmetry when the analysis is restricted to events for which the pion carries a large fraction of the virtual photon momentum.

  20. Mea Culpa: Formal Education and the Dis-Integrated World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Brian P.; Daniels, Douglas S.

    Formal education has removed itself so far from any truly integrated view of the Natural World that fragmentation and certainty are prevailing ethics. Technological progress has resulted in increased specialization within academic disciplines and their concurrent separation from each other. Knowledge is extracted from a fully integrated world, but is examined and defined by the 'dis-integrated' objectives.

  1. Coop-Dis-Q: A Reading Comprehension Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Lane Roy

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a new technique for improving the reading comprehension of elementary students. The Coop-Dis-Q technique combines cooperative learning, discussion, and questioning strategies to create a synergistic instructional effect. The specific steps of the technique and successful use of the technique in a fifth-grade classroom are…

  2. Polarized 3 parton production in inclusive DIS at small x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hentschinski, Martin; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2016-10-01

    Azimuthal angular correlations between produced hadrons/jets in high energy collisions are a sensitive probe of the dynamics of QCD at small x. Here we derive the triple differential cross section for inclusive production of 3 polarized partons in DIS at small x. The target proton or nucleus is described using the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism. The resulting expressions are used to study azimuthal angular correlations between produced partons in order to probe the gluon structure of the target hadron or nucleus. Our analytic expressions can also be used to calculate the real part of the Next to Leading Order (NLO) corrections to di-hadron production in DIS by integrating out one of the three final state partons.

  3. Inhibition of cyclic diadenylate cyclase, DisA, by polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Opoku-Temeng, Clement; Sintim, Herman O.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP has emerged as an important signaling molecule that controls a myriad of functions, including cell wall homeostasis in different bacteria. Polyphenols display various biological activities and tea polyphenols in particular have been shown to possess among other properties antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Certain tea polyphenols, such as catechin and epigallocatechin gallate, have been used to augment the action of traditional antibiotics that target the cell wall. Considering the expanding role played by cyclic dinucleotides in bacteria, we investigated whether the action of polyphenols on bacteria could be due in part to modulation of c-di-AMP signaling. Out of 14 tested polyphenols, tannic acid (TA), theaflavin-3′-gallate (TF2B) and theaflavin-3,3′-digallate (TF3) exhibited inhibitory effects on B. subtilis c-di-AMP synthase, DisA. TF2B and TF3 specifically inhibited DisA but not YybT (a PDE) whilst TA was more promiscuous and inhibited both DisA and YybT. PMID:27150552

  4. A novel case of Raoultella planticola urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Olson, D S; Asare, K; Lyons, M; Hofinger, D M

    2013-02-01

    Raoultella species are Gram-negative, non-motile bacilli primarily considered to be environmental bacteria (Bagley et al.; Curr Microbiol 6:105-109, 1981). R. planticola has rarely been documented as a cause of human infections and has never been reported to cause urinary tract infections. We report the first case of R. planticola cystitis.

  5. General mass scheme for jet production in DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, P.; Slominski, W.

    2012-11-01

    We propose a method for calculating DIS jet production cross sections in QCD at NLO accuracy with consistent treatment of heavy quarks. The scheme relies on the dipole subtraction method for jets, which we extend to all possible initial state splittings with heavy partons, so that the Aivazis-Collins-Olness-Tung massive collinear factorization scheme can be applied. As a first check of the formalism we recover the Aivazis-Collins-Olness-Tung result for the heavy quark structure function using a dedicated Monte Carlo program.

  6. Infection.

    PubMed

    Miclau, Theodore; Schmidt, Andrew H; Wenke, Joseph C; Webb, Lawrence X; Harro, Janette M; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-09-01

    Musculoskeletal infection is a clinical problem with significant direct healthcare costs. The prevalence of infection after closed, elective surgery is frequently estimated to be less than 2%, but in severe injuries, posttraumatic infection rates have been reported as 10% or greater. Although clinical infections are found outside the realm of medical devices, it is clear that the enormous increase of infections associated with the use of implants presents a major challenge worldwide. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections.

  7. A compendium of DIS3 mutations and associated transcriptional signatures in plasma cell dyscrasias

    PubMed Central

    Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Fabris, Sonia; Tonon, Giovanni; Segalla, Simona; Cifola, Ingrid; Pinatel, Eva; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Musto, Pellegrino; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    DIS3 is a catalytic subunit of the human exosome complex, containing exonucleolytic (RNB) and endonucleolytic (PIN) domains, recently found mutated in multiple myeloma (MM), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous form of plasma cell (PC) dyscrasia. We analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) the DIS3 PIN and RNB domains in purified bone marrow PCs from 164 representative patients, including 130 cases with MM, 24 with primary PC leukemia and 10 with secondary PC leukemia. DIS3 mutations were found respectively in 18.5%, 25% and 30% of cases. Identified variants were predominantly missense mutations localized in the RNB domain, and were often detected at low allele frequency. DIS3 mutations were preferentially carried by IGH-translocated/nonhyperdiploid patients. Sequential analysis at diagnosis and relapse in a subset of cases highlighted some instances of increasing DIS3 mutation burden during disease progression. NGS also revealed that the majority of DIS3 variants in mutated cases were comparably detectable at transcriptional level. Furthermore, gene expression profiling analysis in DIS3-mutated patients identified a transcriptional signature suggestive for impaired RNA exosome function. In conclusion, these data further support the pathological relevance of DIS3 mutations in plasma cell dyscrasias and suggest that DIS3 may represent a potential tumor suppressor gene in such disorders. PMID:26305418

  8. On the need for Embodied and Dis-Embodied Cognition.

    PubMed

    Dove, Guy

    2010-01-01

    This essay proposes and defends a pluralistic theory of conceptual embodiment. Our concepts are represented in at least two ways: (i) through sensorimotor simulations of our interactions with objects and events and (ii) through sensorimotor simulations of natural language processing. Linguistic representations are "dis-embodied" in the sense that they are dynamic and multimodal but, in contrast to other forms of embodied cognition, do not inherit semantic content from this embodiment. The capacity to store information in the associations and inferential relationships among linguistic representations extends our cognitive reach and provides an explanation of our ability to abstract and generalize. This theory is supported by a number of empirical considerations, including the large body of evidence from cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology supporting a multiple semantic code explanation of imageability effects. PMID:21833295

  9. On the need for Embodied and Dis-Embodied Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dove, Guy

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes and defends a pluralistic theory of conceptual embodiment. Our concepts are represented in at least two ways: (i) through sensorimotor simulations of our interactions with objects and events and (ii) through sensorimotor simulations of natural language processing. Linguistic representations are “dis-embodied” in the sense that they are dynamic and multimodal but, in contrast to other forms of embodied cognition, do not inherit semantic content from this embodiment. The capacity to store information in the associations and inferential relationships among linguistic representations extends our cognitive reach and provides an explanation of our ability to abstract and generalize. This theory is supported by a number of empirical considerations, including the large body of evidence from cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology supporting a multiple semantic code explanation of imageability effects. PMID:21833295

  10. DIS[subscript 2]ECT: A Framework for Effective Inclusive Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Flannagan, Jenny Sue

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide special education and general education teachers a framework (DIS[subscript 2]ECT) for teaching science in inclusive settings. DIS2ECT stands for Design (Backwards); Individualization; Scaffolding and Strategies; Experiential learning; Cooperative Learning; and Teamwork. This framework was derived from our…

  11. Structural analysis of Dis3l2, an exosome-independent exonuclease from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui; Zhu, Yuwei; Qiu, Yu; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2015-06-01

    After deadenylation and decapping, cytoplasmic mRNA can be digested in two opposite directions: in the 5'-3' direction by Xrn1 or in the 3'-5' direction by the exosome complex. Recently, a novel 3'-5' RNA-decay pathway involving Dis3l2 has been described that differs from degradation by Xrn1 and the exosome. The product of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene SPAC2C4.07c was identified as a homologue of human Dis3l2. In this work, the 2.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of S. pombe Dis3l2 (SpDis3l2) is reported, the conformation of which is obviously different from that in the homologous mouse Dis3l2-RNA complex. Fluorescence polarization assay experiments showed that RNB and S1 are the primary RNA-binding domains and that the CSDs (CSD1 and CSD2) play an indispensable role in the RNA-binding process of SpDis3l2. Taking the structure comparison and mutagenic experiments together, it can be inferred that the RNA-recognition pattern of SpDis3l2 resembles that of its mouse homologue rather than that of the Escherichia coli RNase II-RNA complex. Furthermore, a drastic conformation change could occur following the binding of the RNA substrate to SpDis3l2.

  12. Distributed interactive simulation virtual cassette recorder (DIS VCR); A datalogger with variable speed replay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Jonathan L.

    1994-12-01

    The overall objective of the Distributed Interactive Simulation Virtual Cassette Recorder (DIS VCR) is to add a flexible replay capability to any DIS environment and specifically to the Remote Debriefing Tool (RDT). The DIS VCR's abilities include selective filtering of incoming DIS Protocol Data Units (PDUs), variable-speed replays, ability to pause, fast-forward, rewind, efficient data storage and retrieval, and an interface that simplifies the execution of those functions. The thesis includes a DIS VCR-compatible design for concurrent replay of audio extracted from signal PDUs and an extension to the replay design that supports unmodifiable rendering or receiving applications. For variable-speed replays, the authors created a scalable simulation clock and a new PDU (the Replay PDU). Applications modified for replays use the simulation clock to govern their dead reckoning algorithms while the DIS VCR uses it to control the timed release of stored PDUs. The Replay PDU communicates mode and speed changes between the DIS VCR and replay-modified applications. The DIS VCR's full functionality was successfully demonstrated at the 1994 AFA convention.

  13. Children with Dis/abilities in Namibia, Africa: Uncovering Complexities of Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    Children with dis/abilities the world over are widely required to sacrifice their human rights to education, equity, community, and inclusion. Fewer than 10% of children with dis/abilities in developing countries attend school. Namibia, Africa, where this study took place, is no different. Despite Namibia's adoption of international covenants and…

  14. (dis)Ability and Postsecondary Education: One Woman's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Melissa; MacDonald, Judy E.; Jacquard, Sarah; Mcneil, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The storied experiences of a (dis)Abled student negotiating postsecondary education in Canada are highlighted within this article, including advocacy strategies and a critique of related policies. Persons with (dis)Abilities are a particularly marginalized population, traditionally excluded from society, with modern day views of pity or heroics…

  15. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  16. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (αs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-01

    We present an analytic O(αs) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness τ. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of the 1-jettiness distribution.

  17. DisSim: an online system for exploring significant similar diseases and exhibiting potential therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Jiang, Yue; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Hongbo; Sun, Jie; Yang, Haixiu; Zhang, Shuo; Hu, Yang; Zhou, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The similarity of pair-wise diseases reveals the molecular relationships between them. For example, similar diseases have the potential to be treated by common therapeutic chemicals (TCs). In this paper, we introduced DisSim, an online system for exploring similar diseases, and comparing corresponding TCs. Currently, DisSim implemented five state-of-the-art methods to measure the similarity between Disease Ontology (DO) terms and provide the significance of the similarity score. Furthermore, DisSim integrated TCs of diseases from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), which can help to identify potential relationships between TCs and similar diseases. The system can be accessed from http://123.59.132.21:8080/DisSim. PMID:27457921

  18. DisSim: an online system for exploring significant similar diseases and exhibiting potential therapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Jiang, Yue; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Hongbo; Sun, Jie; Yang, Haixiu; Zhang, Shuo; Hu, Yang; Zhou, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The similarity of pair-wise diseases reveals the molecular relationships between them. For example, similar diseases have the potential to be treated by common therapeutic chemicals (TCs). In this paper, we introduced DisSim, an online system for exploring similar diseases, and comparing corresponding TCs. Currently, DisSim implemented five state-of-the-art methods to measure the similarity between Disease Ontology (DO) terms and provide the significance of the similarity score. Furthermore, DisSim integrated TCs of diseases from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), which can help to identify potential relationships between TCs and similar diseases. The system can be accessed from http://123.59.132.21:8080/DisSim. PMID:27457921

  19. Di-jet production and angular correlations in DIS at NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2016-03-01

    Angular correlations are a sensitive probe of the dynamics of QCD at high energy. In particular azimuthal angular correlations between two hadrons produced in Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) of a virtual photon on a hadron or nucleus offer the best environment in which to investigate high gluon density (gluon saturation) effects expected to arise at small x. Here we give a progress report on our derivation of Next to Leading Order (NLO) corrections to di-jet (di-hadron) production in DIS.

  20. The 3' to 5' Exoribonuclease DIS3: From Structure and Mechanisms to Biological Functions and Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sophie R.; Oliver, Antony W.; Chevassut, Timothy J.; Newbury, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    DIS3 is a conserved exoribonuclease and catalytic subunit of the exosome, a protein complex involved in the 3' to 5' degradation and processing of both nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA species. Recently, aberrant expression of DIS3 has been found to be implicated in a range of different cancers. Perhaps most striking is the finding that DIS3 is recurrently mutated in 11% of multiple myeloma patients. Much work has been done to elucidate the structural and biochemical characteristics of DIS3, including the mechanistic details of its role as an effector of RNA decay pathways. Nevertheless, we do not understand how DIS3 mutations can lead to cancer. There are a number of studies that pertain to the function of DIS3 at the organismal level. Mutant phenotypes in S. pombe, S. cerevisiae and Drosophila suggest DIS3 homologues have a common role in cell-cycle progression and microtubule assembly. DIS3 has also recently been implicated in antibody diversification of mouse B-cells. This article aims to review current knowledge of the structure, mechanisms and functions of DIS3 as well as highlighting the genetic patterns observed within myeloma patients, in order to yield insight into the putative role of DIS3 mutations in oncogenesis. PMID:26193331

  1. Dis1: A Yeast Gene Required for Proper Meiotic Chromosome Disjunction

    PubMed Central

    Rockmill, B.; Fogel, S.

    1988-01-01

    Mutants at a newly identified locus, DIS1 (disjunction), were detected by screening for mutants that generate aneuploid spores (chromosome VIII disomes) at an increased frequency. Strains carrying the partially dominant alleles, DIS1-1 or DIS1-2, generate disomes at rates up to 100 times the background level. Mitotic nondisjunction is also increased 10- to 50-fold over background. Half-tetrad analysis of disomes for a marked interval on chromosome VIII yields wild-type map distances, indicating that a general recombination deficiency is not the cause of nondisjuction. Meiotic nondisjunction in DIS1 mutants is not chromosome specific; 5% of the spores disomic for chromosome VIII are also disomic for chromosome III. Although only one disomic spore is found per exceptional ascus most of the disomes appear to be generated in the first meiotic division because recovered chromosome VIII disomes contain mostly nonsister chromosomes. We propose that disome generation in the DIS1 mutants results from precocious separation of sister centromeres. PMID:3294101

  2. DIS3 shapes the RNA polymerase II transcriptome in humans by degrading a variety of unwanted transcripts.

    PubMed

    Szczepińska, Teresa; Kalisiak, Katarzyna; Tomecki, Rafal; Labno, Anna; Borowski, Lukasz S; Kulinski, Tomasz M; Adamska, Dorota; Kosinska, Joanna; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    Human DIS3, the nuclear catalytic subunit of the exosome complex, contains exonucleolytic and endonucleolytic active domains. To identify DIS3 targets genome-wide, we combined comprehensive transcriptomic analyses of engineered HEK293 cells that expressed mutant DIS3, with Photoactivatable Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Cross-Linking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) experiments. In cells expressing DIS3 with both catalytic sites mutated, RNAs originating from unannotated genomic regions increased ∼2.5-fold, covering ∼70% of the genome and allowing for thousands of novel transcripts to be discovered. Previously described pervasive transcription products, such as Promoter Upstream Transcripts (PROMPTs), accumulated robustly upon DIS3 dysfunction, representing a significant fraction of PAR-CLIP reads. We have also detected relatively long putative premature RNA polymerase II termination products of protein-coding genes whose levels in DIS3 mutant cells can exceed the mature mRNAs, indicating that production of such truncated RNA is a common phenomenon. In addition, we found DIS3 to be involved in controlling the formation of paraspeckles, nuclear bodies that are organized around NEAT1 lncRNA, whose short form was overexpressed in cells with mutated DIS3. Moreover, the DIS3 mutations resulted in misregulation of expression of ∼50% of transcribed protein-coding genes, probably as a secondary effect of accumulation of various noncoding RNA species. Finally, cells expressing mutant DIS3 accumulated snoRNA precursors, which correlated with a strong PAR-CLIP signal, indicating that DIS3 is the main snoRNA-processing enzyme. EXOSC10 (RRP6) instead controls the levels of the mature snoRNAs. Overall, we show that DIS3 has a major nucleoplasmic function in shaping the human RNA polymerase II transcriptome.

  3. DIS3 shapes the RNA polymerase II transcriptome in humans by degrading a variety of unwanted transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Szczepińska, Teresa; Kalisiak, Katarzyna; Tomecki, Rafal; Labno, Anna; Borowski, Lukasz S.; Kulinski, Tomasz M.; Adamska, Dorota; Kosinska, Joanna; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Human DIS3, the nuclear catalytic subunit of the exosome complex, contains exonucleolytic and endonucleolytic active domains. To identify DIS3 targets genome-wide, we combined comprehensive transcriptomic analyses of engineered HEK293 cells that expressed mutant DIS3, with Photoactivatable Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Cross-Linking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) experiments. In cells expressing DIS3 with both catalytic sites mutated, RNAs originating from unannotated genomic regions increased ∼2.5-fold, covering ∼70% of the genome and allowing for thousands of novel transcripts to be discovered. Previously described pervasive transcription products, such as Promoter Upstream Transcripts (PROMPTs), accumulated robustly upon DIS3 dysfunction, representing a significant fraction of PAR-CLIP reads. We have also detected relatively long putative premature RNA polymerase II termination products of protein-coding genes whose levels in DIS3 mutant cells can exceed the mature mRNAs, indicating that production of such truncated RNA is a common phenomenon. In addition, we found DIS3 to be involved in controlling the formation of paraspeckles, nuclear bodies that are organized around NEAT1 lncRNA, whose short form was overexpressed in cells with mutated DIS3. Moreover, the DIS3 mutations resulted in misregulation of expression of ∼50% of transcribed protein-coding genes, probably as a secondary effect of accumulation of various noncoding RNA species. Finally, cells expressing mutant DIS3 accumulated snoRNA precursors, which correlated with a strong PAR-CLIP signal, indicating that DIS3 is the main snoRNA-processing enzyme. EXOSC10 (RRP6) instead controls the levels of the mature snoRNAs. Overall, we show that DIS3 has a major nucleoplasmic function in shaping the human RNA polymerase II transcriptome. PMID:26294688

  4. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (αs)

    DOE PAGES

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-01

    We present an analytic O(αs) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness τ. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of themore » 1-jettiness distribution.« less

  5. Responses of a direct ion storage dosimeter (DIS-1) to heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H

    2001-12-01

    The responses of a direct ion storage dosimeter (DIS-1) to energetic heavy charged particles were examined using (4)He, (12)C, (40)Ar and (56)Fe ion beams at the HIMAC at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The efficiency of the DIS-1 on the basis of absorbed dose was almost unity for the helium and carbon ions and was slightly decreased for the argon and iron ions. The linearity in the dose response and the angular independence for these heavy ions were fairly good. Although further studies are necessary, these results suggest that the DIS-1 would be a suitable passive dosimeter for measurements of absorbed dose in a field dominated by heavy charged particles such as the space environment. PMID:11741505

  6. Roof-harvested rainwater for potable purposes: application of solar collector disinfection (SOCO-DIS).

    PubMed

    Amin, M T; Han, M Y

    2009-12-01

    The efficiency of solar disinfection (SODIS), recommended by the World Health Organization, has been determined for rainwater disinfection, and potential benefits and limitations discussed. The limitations of SODIS have now been overcome by the use of solar collector disinfection (SOCO-DIS), for potential use of rainwater as a small-scale potable water supply, especially in developing countries. Rainwater samples collected from the underground storage tanks of a rooftop rainwater harvesting (RWH) system were exposed to different conditions of sunlight radiation in 2-L polyethylene terephthalate bottles in a solar collector with rectangular base and reflective open wings. Total and fecal coliforms were used, together with Escherichia coli and heterotrophic plate counts, as basic microbial and indicator organisms of water quality for disinfection efficiency evaluation. In the SOCO-DIS system, disinfection improved by 20-30% compared with the SODIS system, and rainwater was fully disinfected even under moderate weather conditions, due to the effects of concentrated sunlight radiation and the synergistic effects of thermal and optical inactivation. The SOCO-DIS system was optimized based on the collector configuration and the reflective base: an inclined position led to an increased disinfection efficiency of 10-15%. Microbial inactivation increased by 10-20% simply by reducing the initial pH value of the rainwater to 5. High turbidities also affected the SOCO-DIS system; the disinfection efficiency decreased by 10-15%, which indicated that rainwater needed to be filtered before treatment. The problem of microbial regrowth was significantly reduced in the SOCO-DIS system compared with the SODIS system because of residual sunlight effects. Only total coliform regrowth was detected at higher turbidities. The SOCO-DIS system was ineffective only under poor weather conditions, when longer exposure times or other practical means of reducing the pH were required for the

  7. The 3'-5' exoribonuclease Dis3 regulates the expression of specific microRNAs in Drosophila wing imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Towler, Benjamin P; Jones, Christopher I; Viegas, Sandra C; Apura, Patricia; Waldron, Joseph A; Smalley, Sarah K; Arraiano, Cecilia M; Newbury, Sarah F

    2015-01-01

    Dis3 is a highly conserved exoribonuclease which degrades RNAs in the 3'-5' direction. Mutations in Dis3 are associated with a number of human cancers including multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this work, we have assessed the effect of a Dis3 knockdown on Drosophila imaginal disc development and on expression of mature microRNAs. We find that Dis3 knockdown severely disrupts the development of wing imaginal discs in that the flies have a "no wing" phenotype. Use of RNA-seq to quantify the effect of Dis3 knockdown on microRNA expression shows that Dis3 normally regulates a small subset of microRNAs, with only 11 (10.1%) increasing in level ≥ 2-fold and 6 (5.5%) decreasing in level ≥ 2-fold. Of these microRNAs, miR-252-5p is increased 2.1-fold in Dis3-depleted cells compared to controls while the level of the miR-252 precursor is unchanged, suggesting that Dis3 can act in the cytoplasm to specifically degrade this mature miRNA. Furthermore, our experiments suggest that Dis3 normally interacts with the exosomal subunit Rrp40 in the cytoplasm to target miR-252-5p for degradation during normal wing development. Another microRNA, miR-982-5p, is expressed at lower levels in Dis3 knockdown cells, while the miR-982 precursor remains unchanged, indicating that Dis3 is involved in its processing. Our study therefore reveals an unexpected specificity for this ribonuclease toward microRNA regulation, which is likely to be conserved in other eukaryotes and may be relevant to understanding its role in human disease.

  8. Access, Opportunity, and Career: Supporting the Aspirations of Dis/abled Students with High-End Needs in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Barrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Acting as an entry marker into the adult world, the transition from compulsory schooling is inextricably linked with a change in career status. As such, transition is widely acknowledged to be a significant event in the lives of "all" young people regardless of their dis/abilities. However, many dis/abled students in New Zealand,…

  9. A Socio-Cultural Reframing of Science and Dis/ability in Education: Past Problems, Current Concerns, and Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.; Valle, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we assert the value of a socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education. We begin by problematizing current issues in education pertaining to the often-unquestioned concept of dis/ability and the impact that has upon research, theory, practice, and policy. As our topic is broad, we have chosen to focus upon four…

  10. Utilizing a Low-Cost, Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS) to Improve Learning in Developing Rural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an innovation Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS), utilizing general IWBs (Interactive Whiteboard) didactics, to support student learning for rural and developing regions. LaDIS is a system made to support traditional classroom practices between an instructor and a group of students. This invention effectively transforms a…

  11. Cold-sensitive and caffeine-supersensitive mutants of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe dis genes implicated in sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkura, H; Adachi, Y; Kinoshita, N; Niwa, O; Toda, T; Yanagida, M

    1988-01-01

    We isolated novel classes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cold-sensitive dis mutants that block mitotic chromosome separation (nine mapped in the dis1 gene and one each in the dis2 and dis3 genes). Defective phenotype at restrictive temperature is similar among the mutants; the chromosomes condense and anomalously move to the cell ends in the absence of their disjoining so that they are unequally distributed at the two cell ends. Synchronous culture analyses indicate that the cells can enter into mitosis at normal timing but become lethal during mitosis. In comparison with the wild-type mitosis, defects are found in the early spindle structure, the mitotic chromosome structure, the poleward chromosome movement by the spindle elongation and the telophase spindle degradation. The dis mutants lose at permissive temperature an artificial minichromosome at higher rates than occur in the wild type. We found that all the dis mutants isolated are supersensitive to caffeine at permissive temperature. Furthermore, the mutant cells in the presence of caffeine produce a phenotype similar to that obtained at restrictive temperature. We suggest that the dis genes are required for the sister chromatid separation at the time of mitosis and that caffeine might affect the dis gene expression. We cloned, in addition to the dis2+ and dis3+ genes, multicopy extragenic suppressor sequences which complement dis1 and dis2 mutations. A complex regulatory system may exist for the execution of the dis+ gene functions. Images PMID:3409871

  12. Choriodecidual inflammatory syndrome (CoDIS) is the leading, and under recognised, cause of early preterm delivery and second trimester miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Sebire, N J

    2001-04-01

    Severe preterm birth (delivery before 32 completed weeks of gestation), with or without preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM), remains the leading cause of perinatal mortality. It is proposed that localized inflammation of the chorion and decidua in the membranes immediately above the internal cervical os, with or without amniotic cavity infection and inflammation, is the leading, but under recognised, cause of second trimester miscarriage and severe preterm delivery. The term 'CoDIS' (choriodecidual inflammatory syndrome), may provide a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology than currently used terminology which over emphasizes the importance of overt intra-amniotic infection as opposed to localized extra-amniotic inflammation which stimulates uterine evacuation.

  13. Arts Integration: An Exploration of the Dis/Connect between Policy and Live(d) Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaJevic, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the dis/connect between arts integration policy (i.e. written texts and curriculum documents) and the live(d) practice of teachers working with arts integration. Although previous studies have examined how arts integration is implemented in schools and how it affects student achievement, particularly standardized test…

  14. Inclusion and Participation in Everyday School Life: Experiences of Children with Physical (Dis)Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbjørnslett, Mona; Engelsrud, Gunn Helene; Helseth, Sølvi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the school experiences of children with physical (dis)abilities. Based on 39 interviews with 15 Norwegian children, participation in everyday school life is introduced as a central theme and divided into three sub-themes: community and independence; adequate help and influence in the classroom; and influence in planning and…

  15. Tipping Point: The Diversity Threshold for White Student (Dis) Engagement in Traditional Student Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elston, Dhanfu El-Hajj

    2011-01-01

    During a time when most institutions of higher education are in search of underrepresented student participation, Georgia State University (GSU), a majority White institution, has observed a lack of involvement of White students in co-curricular activities. The purpose of the research study was to critically examine White students' (dis)…

  16. The Transparency of Evil in "The Leftovers" and Its Implications for Student (Dis)engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kessel, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    The HBO series, "The Leftovers," provides a thought-provoking platform for discussing Baudrillard's conceptualization of evil and the implications for contemporary pedagogical discourse about student (dis)engagement. The dystopic scenario of 2% of the world's population suddenly disappearing might help us rethink our own society,…

  17. 32 CFR 298.4 - Procedures for release of DIS records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the extent known, the title description, and date. 32 CFR part 286 does not authorize “fishing expeditions.” In the event a request is not reasonably described as defined in 32 CFR part 286, the requester will be notified by DIS of the defect. (2) The request must contain the first name, middle name...

  18. 32 CFR 298.4 - Procedures for release of DIS records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the extent known, the title description, and date. 32 CFR part 286 does not authorize “fishing expeditions.” In the event a request is not reasonably described as defined in 32 CFR part 286, the requester will be notified by DIS of the defect. (2) The request must contain the first name, middle name...

  19. 32 CFR 298.4 - Procedures for release of DIS records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the extent known, the title description, and date. 32 CFR part 286 does not authorize “fishing expeditions.” In the event a request is not reasonably described as defined in 32 CFR part 286, the requester will be notified by DIS of the defect. (2) The request must contain the first name, middle name...

  20. 32 CFR 298.4 - Procedures for release of DIS records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the extent known, the title description, and date. 32 CFR part 286 does not authorize “fishing expeditions.” In the event a request is not reasonably described as defined in 32 CFR part 286, the requester will be notified by DIS of the defect. (2) The request must contain the first name, middle name...

  1. 32 CFR 298.4 - Procedures for release of DIS records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the extent known, the title description, and date. 32 CFR part 286 does not authorize “fishing expeditions.” In the event a request is not reasonably described as defined in 32 CFR part 286, the requester will be notified by DIS of the defect. (2) The request must contain the first name, middle name...

  2. Pion content of the nucleon in polarized semi-inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, W.; Thomas, A.W.

    1994-04-01

    An explicit pionic component of the nucleon may be identified by measuring polarized {Delta}{sup ++} fragments produced in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) off polarized protons. The pion-exchange model predicts highly correlated polarizations of the {Delta}{sup ++} and target proton, in marked contrast with the competing diquark fragmentation process.

  3. AuDis: an automatic CRF-enhanced disease normalization in biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Chun; Hsu, Yi-Yu; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Diseases play central roles in many areas of biomedical research and healthcare. Consequently, aggregating the disease knowledge and treatment research reports becomes an extremely critical issue, especially in rapid-growth knowledge bases (e.g. PubMed). We therefore developed a system, AuDis, for disease mention recognition and normalization in biomedical texts. Our system utilizes an order two conditional random fields model. To optimize the results, we customize several post-processing steps, including abbreviation resolution, consistency improvement and stopwords filtering. As the official evaluation on the CDR task in BioCreative V, AuDis obtained the best performance (86.46% of F-score) among 40 runs (16 unique teams) on disease normalization of the DNER sub task. These results suggest that AuDis is a high-performance recognition system for disease recognition and normalization from biomedical literature. Database URL: http://ikmlab.csie.ncku.edu.tw/CDR2015/AuDis.html PMID:27278815

  4. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasque, Penny A.; Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children with varying abilities.

  5. AuDis: an automatic CRF-enhanced disease normalization in biomedical text.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Chun; Hsu, Yi-Yu; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Diseases play central roles in many areas of biomedical research and healthcare. Consequently, aggregating the disease knowledge and treatment research reports becomes an extremely critical issue, especially in rapid-growth knowledge bases (e.g. PubMed). We therefore developed a system, AuDis, for disease mention recognition and normalization in biomedical texts. Our system utilizes an order two conditional random fields model. To optimize the results, we customize several post-processing steps, including abbreviation resolution, consistency improvement and stopwords filtering. As the official evaluation on the CDR task in BioCreative V, AuDis obtained the best performance (86.46% of F-score) among 40 runs (16 unique teams) on disease normalization of the DNER sub task. These results suggest that AuDis is a high-performance recognition system for disease recognition and normalization from biomedical literature.Database URL: http://ikmlab.csie.ncku.edu.tw/CDR2015/AuDis.html. PMID:27278815

  6. Scripted Curriculum: What Movies Teach about Dis/ability and Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosto, Vonzell

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Tropes of dis/ability in the movies and master-narratives of Black males in education and society are typically treated in isolation. Furthermore, education research on Hollywood movies has typically focused on portrayals of schools, principals, and teachers even though education professionals are exposed to a broader range of…

  7. Mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition in the Lin28/let-7 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2014-01-01

    Summary paragraph The pluripotency factor Lin28 inhibits the biogenesis of the let-7 family of mammalian microRNAs1–4. Lin28 is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and has a fundamental role in regulation of development5, glucose metabolism6 and tissue regeneration7. Alternatively, Lin28 overexpression is correlated with the onset of numerous cancers8, while let-7, a tumor suppressor, silences several human oncogenes5. Lin28 binds to precursor let-7 (pre-let-7) hairpins9, triggering the 3' oligo-uridylation activity of TUT4/710–12. The oligoU tail added to pre-let-7 serves as a decay signal, as it is rapidly degraded by Dis3L213,14, a homolog of the catalytic subunit of the RNA exosome. The molecular basis of Lin28 mediated recruitment of TUT4/7 to pre-let-7 and its subsequent degradation by Dis3L2 is largely unknown. To examine the mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition we determined the structure of mouse Dis3L2 in complex with an oligoU RNA to mimic the uridylated tail of pre-let-7. Three RNA binding domains form an open funnel on one face of the catalytic domain that allows RNA to navigate a path to the active site different from its exosome counterpart. The resulting path reveals an extensive network of uracil-specific interactions spanning the first twelve nucleotides of an oligoU-tailed RNA. We identify three U-specificity zones that explain how Dis3L2 recognizes, binds and processes uridylated pre-let-7 in the final step of the Lin28/let-7 pathway. PMID:25119025

  8. DisGeNET: a discovery platform for the dynamical exploration of human diseases and their genes.

    PubMed

    Piñero, Janet; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Bravo, Àlex; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Baron, Martin; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I

    2015-01-01

    DisGeNET is a comprehensive discovery platform designed to address a variety of questions concerning the genetic underpinning of human diseases. DisGeNET contains over 380,000 associations between >16,000 genes and 13,000 diseases, which makes it one of the largest repositories currently available of its kind. DisGeNET integrates expert-curated databases with text-mined data, covers information on Mendelian and complex diseases, and includes data from animal disease models. It features a score based on the supporting evidence to prioritize gene-disease associations. It is an open access resource available through a web interface, a Cytoscape plugin and as a Semantic Web resource. The web interface supports user-friendly data exploration and navigation. DisGeNET data can also be analysed via the DisGeNET Cytoscape plugin, and enriched with the annotations of other plugins of this popular network analysis software suite. Finally, the information contained in DisGeNET can be expanded and complemented using Semantic Web technologies and linked to a variety of resources already present in the Linked Data cloud. Hence, DisGeNET offers one of the most comprehensive collections of human gene-disease associations and a valuable set of tools for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of genetic origin, designed to fulfill the needs of different user profiles, including bioinformaticians, biologists and health-care practitioners. Database URL: http://www.disgenet.org/ PMID:25877637

  9. Dis3- and exosome subunit-responsive 3 Prime mRNA instability elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Daniel L.; Hou, Dezhi; Gross, Robert H.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful use of a novel RNA-specific bioinformatic tool, RNA SCOPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified novel 3 Prime UTR cis-acting element that destabilizes a reporter mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show exosome subunits are required for cis-acting element-mediated mRNA instability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Define precise sequence requirements of novel cis-acting element. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show that microarray-defined exosome subunit-regulated mRNAs have novel element. -- Abstract: Eukaryotic RNA turnover is regulated in part by the exosome, a nuclear and cytoplasmic complex of ribonucleases (RNases) and RNA-binding proteins. The major RNase of the complex is thought to be Dis3, a multi-functional 3 Prime -5 Prime exoribonuclease and endoribonuclease. Although it is known that Dis3 and core exosome subunits are recruited to transcriptionally active genes and to messenger RNA (mRNA) substrates, this recruitment is thought to occur indirectly. We sought to discover cis-acting elements that recruit Dis3 or other exosome subunits. Using a bioinformatic tool called RNA SCOPE to screen the 3 Prime untranslated regions of up-regulated transcripts from our published Dis3 depletion-derived transcriptomic data set, we identified several motifs as candidate instability elements. Secondary screening using a luciferase reporter system revealed that one cassette-harboring four elements-destabilized the reporter transcript. RNAi-based depletion of Dis3, Rrp6, Rrp4, Rrp40, or Rrp46 diminished the efficacy of cassette-mediated destabilization. Truncation analysis of the cassette showed that two exosome subunit-sensitive elements (ESSEs) destabilized the reporter. Point-directed mutagenesis of ESSE abrogated the destabilization effect. An examination of the transcriptomic data from exosome subunit depletion-based microarrays revealed that mRNAs with ESSEs are found in every up-regulated mRNA data set but are

  10. The distribution of mental illness found by DIS (Diagnostic Interview Schedule) among internal and orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Y; Nishizono, M; Yamamoto, J

    1990-03-01

    In order to understand how psychiatric problems are distributed in general medical departments, we used DIS (Diagnostic Interview Schedule). The subjects are 307 inpatients and outpatients in the Departments in Internal Medicine and Orthopedics of Fukuoka University Hospital, M Hospital and N Hospital. As a result, 53.4% of all the subjects showed some psychiatric problems. These are, in a descending order, tobacco dependence (30.0%), psychosexual dysfunction (14.3%), alcohol abuse/dependence (14.0%), major depressive episode (6.5%), organic brain syndrome (4.9%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (3.9%), dysthymic disorder (2.3%), panic disorder (2.0%) and others. Also, we discussed comparison between internal patients and neurotic patients who visited psychiatrists complaining of physical symptoms, and the incidence of DIS diagnoses in individual physical diseases. PMID:2362392

  11. [Estimation of cost-saving for reducing radioactive waste from nuclear medicine facilities by implementing decay in storage (DIS) in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    DIS has not yet been implemented in Japan as of 2011. Therefore, even if risk was negligible, medical institutions have to entrust radioactive temporal waste disposal to Japan Radio Isotopes Association (JRIA) in the current situation. To decide whether DIS should be implemented in Japan or not, cost-saving effect of DIS was estimated by comparing the cost that nuclear medical facilities pay. By implementing DIS, the total annual cost for all nuclear medical facilities in Japan is estimated to be decreased to 30 million yen or less from 710 million yen. DIS would save 680 million yen (96%) per year.

  12. [Estimation of cost-saving for reducing radioactive waste from nuclear medicine facilities by implementing decay in storage (DIS) in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    DIS has not yet been implemented in Japan as of 2011. Therefore, even if risk was negligible, medical institutions have to entrust radioactive temporal waste disposal to Japan Radio Isotopes Association (JRIA) in the current situation. To decide whether DIS should be implemented in Japan or not, cost-saving effect of DIS was estimated by comparing the cost that nuclear medical facilities pay. By implementing DIS, the total annual cost for all nuclear medical facilities in Japan is estimated to be decreased to 30 million yen or less from 710 million yen. DIS would save 680 million yen (96%) per year. PMID:22516599

  13. AdS black disk model for small-x DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2011-05-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple AdS black disk model to describe saturation in DIS. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value 1+ω/3+ω, independently of the target.

  14. Cumulative (Dis)Advantage and the Matthew Effect in Life-Course Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bask, Miia; Bask, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    To foster a deeper understanding of the mechanisms behind inequality in society, it is crucial to work with well-defined concepts associated with such mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to define cumulative (dis)advantage and the Matthew effect. We argue that cumulative (dis)advantage is an intra-individual micro-level phenomenon, that the Matthew effect is an inter-individual macro-level phenomenon and that an appropriate measure of the Matthew effect focuses on the mechanism or dynamic process that generates inequality. The Matthew mechanism is, therefore, a better name for the phenomenon, where we provide a novel measure of the mechanism, including a proof-of-principle analysis using disposable personal income data. Finally, because socio-economic theory should be able to explain cumulative (dis)advantage and the Matthew mechanism when they are detected in data, we discuss the types of models that may explain the phenomena. We argue that interactions-based models in the literature traditions of analytical sociology and statistical mechanics serve this purpose. PMID:26606386

  15. Cumulative (Dis)Advantage and the Matthew Effect in Life-Course Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bask, Miia; Bask, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    To foster a deeper understanding of the mechanisms behind inequality in society, it is crucial to work with well-defined concepts associated with such mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to define cumulative (dis)advantage and the Matthew effect. We argue that cumulative (dis)advantage is an intra-individual micro-level phenomenon, that the Matthew effect is an inter-individual macro-level phenomenon and that an appropriate measure of the Matthew effect focuses on the mechanism or dynamic process that generates inequality. The Matthew mechanism is, therefore, a better name for the phenomenon, where we provide a novel measure of the mechanism, including a proof-of-principle analysis using disposable personal income data. Finally, because socio-economic theory should be able to explain cumulative (dis)advantage and the Matthew mechanism when they are detected in data, we discuss the types of models that may explain the phenomena. We argue that interactions-based models in the literature traditions of analytical sociology and statistical mechanics serve this purpose.

  16. A socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education: past problems, current concerns, and future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, David J.; Valle, Jan W.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we assert the value of a socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education. We begin by problematizing current issues in education pertaining to the often-unquestioned concept of dis/ability and the impact that has upon research, theory, practice, and policy. As our topic is broad, we have chosen to focus upon four interconnected areas: (1) the historical mistrust of science and pseudo-science by people with dis/abilities; (2) the pervasive use of pseudo-science within the contemporary field of special education; (3) the use of dis/ability studies in education (DSE) to provide a contrast between a traditional positivist framing and a socio-cultural framing of dis/ability, and; (4) a brief exploration of what a DSE/socio-cultural grounding looks like for both schools and classroom teachers. In sum, our intention is to engage science educators to reject deficit-notions of dis/ability in favor of understanding it as part of human variation, and consider the personal and professional benefits of this shift.

  17. (A whistle-stop tour of) theoretical models of diffraction in DIS

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M. F.

    1997-04-20

    The purpose of this talk was to present a very brief overview of theoretical models of diffraction in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). In particular, predictions for the behaviour of the diffractive structure functions F{sub 2}{sup D}, R{sup D} are presented. The measurement of these functions at both small and high values of the variable {beta} and their evolution with Q{sup 2} is expected to reveal crucial information concerning the underlying dynamics. This talk is based on the more extensive review which also discusses expectations for charm in diffraction and contains a more complete list of references.

  18. [The nursing team and Maslow: (dis)satisfaction in the work].

    PubMed

    Vitória Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia; Porto, Isaura Setenta

    2006-01-01

    This text tries to understand the Nursing team and their (dis)satisfactions in the work. We consider the association with the theory of basic human needs of Abraham Maslow as a way to systemize and to comprehend the recurrent situations and the day-by-day Nursing issues. The necessities are structuralized hierarchically in physiological, security, social, auto-esteem and auto-accomplishment indicating the degree of satisfaction (from the disease to the fullness) of an individual or group. The advantage of this approach consists of being able to use the solid, depth and rich Maslow theory in concrete and particular situations of the Nursing team. PMID:17340737

  19. [Management of the most frequent functional gastrointestinal dis orders in healthy infants].

    PubMed

    Toca, María del C; Sosa, Patricia; Aprigliano, Gustavo; Furnes, Raquel; Marchisone, Silvia; Mora, Mabel; Orsi, Marina; Saieg, Graciela; Tabacco, Omar; Wagener, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Healthy infants during the first year of life often have multiple functional gastrointestinal symptoms such as colic, regurgitation and constipation. The usual fuzziness and/or crying at this stage of life is interpreted as digestive discomfort or pain, and the corresponding concerns result in unsuitable behaviors as overeating, interruption of breastfeeding, multiple changes of formulas, innumerable queries and unnecessary medications. The aim of this paper is to update knowledge on the pathophysiology of the most common functional gastrointestinal dis orders, in order to avoid over diagnosis and select the most appropriate therapeutic approach and convenient nutritional interventions.

  20. IGBP-DIS global 1 km land cover data set, DISCover: First results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, T.R.; Belward, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Data and Information System (IGBP-DIS) is co-ordinating the development of global land data sets from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data. The first is a 1 km spatial resolution land cover product `DISCover', based on monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index composites from 1992 and 1993. DISCover is a 17 class land cover dataset based on the science requirements of IGBP elements. Mapping uses unsupervised classification with post-classification refinement using ancillary data. Draft Africa, North America and South America products are now available for peer review.

  1. New COMPASS Results on Transverse Spin Asymmetries in Hadron Pair Production in DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbrizzai, G.

    2016-02-01

    The COMPASS measurements of the azimuthal asymmetries in the hadron pairs production in DIS on transversely polarised targets are here presented. Results on oppositely charged pion and kaon pairs produced on both deuteron and proton targets are shown. They have been used to update the calculation of the Transversity function which was previously extracted from the asymmetries measured from un-identified hadron pairs. Also a new method for the direct measurement of the integral of Transversity using both COMPASS and BELLE results is presented.

  2. DisVis: quantifying and visualizing accessible interaction space of distance-restrained biomolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    van Zundert, G.C.P.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present DisVis, a Python package and command line tool to calculate the reduced accessible interaction space of distance-restrained binary protein complexes, allowing for direct visualization and quantification of the information content of the distance restraints. The approach is general and can also be used as a knowledge-based distance energy term in FFT-based docking directly during the sampling stage. Availability and implementation: The source code with documentation is freely available from https://github.com/haddocking/disvis. Contact: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26026169

  3. [Management of the most frequent functional gastrointestinal dis orders in healthy infants].

    PubMed

    Toca, María del C; Sosa, Patricia; Aprigliano, Gustavo; Furnes, Raquel; Marchisone, Silvia; Mora, Mabel; Orsi, Marina; Saieg, Graciela; Tabacco, Omar; Wagener, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Healthy infants during the first year of life often have multiple functional gastrointestinal symptoms such as colic, regurgitation and constipation. The usual fuzziness and/or crying at this stage of life is interpreted as digestive discomfort or pain, and the corresponding concerns result in unsuitable behaviors as overeating, interruption of breastfeeding, multiple changes of formulas, innumerable queries and unnecessary medications. The aim of this paper is to update knowledge on the pathophysiology of the most common functional gastrointestinal dis orders, in order to avoid over diagnosis and select the most appropriate therapeutic approach and convenient nutritional interventions. PMID:26593804

  4. Conformations of flanking bases in HIV-1 RNA DIS kissing complexes studied by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Réblová, Kamila; Fadrná, Eva; Sarzynska, Joanna; Kulinski, Tadeusz; Kulhánek, Petr; Ennifar, Eric; Koca, Jaroslav; Sponer, Jirí

    2007-12-01

    Explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations (in total almost 800 ns including locally enhanced sampling runs) were applied with different ion conditions and with two force fields (AMBER and CHARMM) to characterize typical geometries adopted by the flanking bases in the RNA kissing-loop complexes. We focus on flanking base positions in multiple x-ray and NMR structures of HIV-1 DIS kissing complexes and kissing complex from the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. An initial x-ray open conformation of bulged-out bases in HIV-1 DIS complexes, affected by crystal packing, tends to convert to a closed conformation formed by consecutive stretch of four stacked purine bases. This is in agreement with those recent crystals where the packing is essentially avoided. We also observed variants of the closed conformation with three stacked bases, while nonnegligible populations of stacked geometries with bulged-in bases were detected, too. The simulation results reconcile differences in positions of the flanking bases observed in x-ray and NMR studies. Our results suggest that bulged-out geometries are somewhat more preferred, which is in accord with recent experiments showing that they may mediate tertiary contacts in biomolecular assemblies or allow binding of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  5. DisMeta: a meta server for construct design and optimization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Acton, Thomas B; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered or unstructured regions in proteins are both common and biologically important, particularly in regulation, signaling, and modulating intermolecular recognition processes. From a practical point of view, however, such disordered regions often can pose significant challenges for crystallization. Disordered regions are also detrimental to NMR spectral quality, complicating the analysis of resonance assignments and three-dimensional protein structures by NMR methods. The DisMeta Server has been used by Northeastern Structural Genomics (NESG) consortium as a primary tool for construct design and optimization in preparing samples for both NMR and crystallization studies. It is a meta-server that generates a consensus analysis of eight different sequence-based disorder predictors to identify regions that are likely to be disordered. DisMeta also identifies predicted secretion signal peptides, transmembrane segments, and low-complexity regions. Identification of disordered regions, by either experimental or computational methods, is an important step in the NESG structure production pipeline, allowing the rational design of protein constructs that have improved expression and solubility, improved crystallization, and better quality NMR spectra.

  6. DisClose: Discovering Colossal Closed Itemsets via a Memory Efficient Compact Row-Tree

    SciTech Connect

    Zulkurnain, Nurul F.; Keane, John A.; Haglin, David J.

    2013-02-01

    Itemset mining has recently focused on discovery of frequent itemsets from high-dimensional datasets with relatively few rows and a larger number of items. With exponentially in-creasing running time as average row length increases, mining such datasets renders most conventional algorithms impracti-cal. Unfortunately, large cardinality closed itemsets are likely to be more informative than small cardinality closed itemsets in this type of dataset. This paper proposes an approach, called DisClose, to extract large cardinality (colossal) closed itemsets from high-dimensional datasets. The approach relies on a memory-efficient Compact Row-Tree data structure to represent itemsets during the search process. The search strategy explores the transposed representation of the dataset. Large cardinality itemsets are enumerated first followed by smaller ones. In addition, we utilize a minimum cardinality threshold to further reduce the search space. Experimental result shows that DisClose can complete the extraction of colossal closed itemsets in the considered dataset, even for low support thresholds. The algorithm immediately discovers closed itemsets without needing to check if each new closed itemset has previously been found.

  7. DisGeNET-RDF: harnessing the innovative power of the Semantic Web to explore the genetic basis of diseases

    PubMed Central

    Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Piñero, Janet; Bravo, Àlex; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: DisGeNET-RDF makes available knowledge on the genetic basis of human diseases in the Semantic Web. Gene-disease associations (GDAs) and their provenance metadata are published as human-readable and machine-processable web resources. The information on GDAs included in DisGeNET-RDF is interlinked to other biomedical databases to support the development of bioinformatics approaches for translational research through evidence-based exploitation of a rich and fully interconnected linked open data. Availability and implementation: http://rdf.disgenet.org/ Contact: support@disgenet.org PMID:27153650

  8. Social origins and post-high school institutional pathways: a cumulative dis/advantage approach.

    PubMed

    Giudici, Francesco; Pallas, Aaron M

    2014-03-01

    The social stratification that takes place during the transition out of high school is traditionally explained with theoretical frameworks such as status attainment and social reproduction. In our paper, we suggest the cumulative dis/advantage hypothesis as an alternative theoretical and empirical approach that explains this divergence in institutional pathways as the result of the dynamic interplay between social institutions (in our case, schools) and individuals' resources. We use data from the NLSY79 in order to compute institutional pathways (defined by educational and occupational status) of 9,200 high school graduates. Optimal Matching Analysis and Cluster Analysis generated a typology of life course pathways. Our results show that both ascribed characteristics and students' high school characteristics and resources are predictors of post-high school pathways.

  9. Quark helicity flip and the transverse spin dependence of inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21

    Inclusive DIS with unpolarized beam exhibits a subtle dependence on the transverse target spin, arising from the interference of one-photon and two-photon exchange amplitudes in the cross section. We argue that this observable probes mainly the quark helicity-flip amplitudes induced by the non-perturbative vacuum structure of QCD (spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking). This conjecture is based on (a) the absence of significant Sudakov suppression of the helicity-flip process if soft gluon emission in the quark subprocess is limited by the chiral symmetry breaking scale mu^2_{chiral} >> Lambda^2_{QCD}; (b) the expectation that the quark helicity-conserving twist-3 contribution is small. The normal target spin asymmetry is estimated to be of the order 10^{-4} in the kinematics of the planned Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment.

  10. Distress from Motivational Dis-integration: When Fundamental Motives Are Too Weak or Too Strong.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, James F M; Franks, Becca; Higgins, E Tory

    2016-01-01

    Past research has shown that satisfying different kinds of fundamental motives contributes to well-being. More recently, advances in motivational theory have shown that z is also tied to the integration of different motives. In other words, well-being depends not only on maximizing effectiveness in satisfying specific motives, but also on ensuring that motives work together such that no individual motive is too weak or too strong. In this chapter, we review existing research to show that specific forms of psychological distress can be linked to specific types of motivational imbalance or dis-integration. Such disintegration can arise from either excessive weakness of a specific motive or the excessive strength and/or dominance of a specific motive, thereby inhibiting other motives. Possible neural correlates and avenues of intervention are discussed.

  11. [Ethical questions in the work of the health team: the (dis)respect to client's rights].

    PubMed

    Santos, Letícia Rosa; Beneri, Regina Ledo; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch

    2005-12-01

    Ethical questions emerge all of the time in our society. Within this context, it has been proposed to comprehend the perception of clients at a University Hospital about the (dis)respect to their rights regarding the received health service. Questionnaires have been applied, with closed questions, to 41% of in-hospital patients and semistructured interviews to 11 clients from different units in this institution. It has been noticed that most of the clients do not know their rights as clients of this institution. Besides, these rights are not respected upon hospital care, leading to the need of making the population aware of their rights and preparing the health team to be conscious about the clients' rights.

  12. Phosphorylation of dis2 protein phosphatase at the C-terminal cdc2 consensus and its potential role in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, H; Ishii, K; Yanagida, M

    1994-01-01

    We show that the fission yeast dis2 protein phosphatase, which is highly similar to mammalian type 1 phosphatase, is a phosphoprotein containing phosphoserine (phospho-S) and threonine (phospho-T). It has several phosphorylation sites, two of which locate in the C-terminus. Phospho-T was abolished in the alanine substitution mutant at the C-terminal T316, which is conserved as a residue in the cdc2 consensus, TPPR, in a number of type 1-like phosphatases. In G2-arrested cdc2-L7 cells, the degree of T316 phosphorylation was reduced, whereas it was enhanced in metaphase-arrested nuc2-663 mutant cells. Phospho-T was produced in dis2 by fission yeast cdc2 kinase, but not in the substitution mutant A316, indicating that the T316 residue was the site for cdc2 kinase in vitro. Phosphatase activity of wild type dis2 was reduced by incubation with cdc2 kinase, but that of mutant dis2-A316 was not. Phosphorylation of T316 hence has a potential significance in cell cycle control in conjunction with cdc2 kinase activation and inactivation. Overexpression phenotypes of wild type dis2+, sds21+ and mutant dis2-A316, sds21-TPPR genes were consistent with negative regulation of dis2 by phosphorylation. This type of regulation would explain why cells harboring the dis2-11 mutation enter mitosis but fail to exit from it. Images PMID:7957097

  13. (Re)Writing Civics in the Digital Age: The Role of Social Media in Student (Dis)Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman Daley, Joannah

    2012-01-01

    (Re)Writing Civics in the Digital Age: The Role of Social Media in Student (Dis)Engagement addresses an important gap in the knowledge of civic rhetoric available in Rhetoric and Composition by using qualitative methods to explore the parameters of civic engagement through social media-based digital writing. With funding from URI's Office of…

  14. Beyond the University of Racial Diversity: Some Remarks on Race, Diversity, (Dis)Advantage and Affirmative Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghid, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The compelling essays in this issue of the journal take on the often contentious and complex issue of racial affirmative action. I do not wish to repeat the arguments authors offer either in defence or against student admissions to a university on the grounds of race, (dis)advantage, class, gender, and so on. Rather, I wish to respond to a…

  15. The Canadian Legal System, the Robert Latimer Case, and the Rhetorical Construction of (Dis)ability: "Bodies that Matter?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers Judge Ted Noble's 1997 ruling of the Latimer case in terms of how it rhetorically constructs and privileges the normal, able-bodied status quo, while, at the same time, deconstructs and positions as inferior the "abnormal," dis-abled minority. In this case, Noble not only took the unprecedented step of granting Robert…

  16. A role for the Perlman syndrome exonuclease Dis3l2 in the Lin28-let-7 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hao-Ming; Triboulet, Robinson; Thornton, James E.; Gregory, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    The pluripotency factor Lin28 blocks the expression of let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) in undifferentiated cells during development and functions as an oncogene in a subset of cancers1. Lin28 binds to let-7 precursor RNAs and recruits 3′ terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTases) to selectively inhibit let-7 biogenesis2–4. Uridylated pre-let-7 is refractory to processing by Dicer and is rapidly degraded by an unknown ribonuclease5. Here we identify Dis3l2 as the 3′-5′ exonuclease responsible for the decay of uridylated pre-let-7. Biochemical reconstitution assays reveal that 3′ oligouridylation stimulates Dis3l2 activity in vitro, and knockdown of Dis3l2 in mouse embryonic stem cells leads to the stabilization of pre-let-7. Our study establishes 3′ oligouridylation as an RNA decay signal for Dis3l2 and identifies the first physiological RNA substrate of this novel exonuclease that is mutated in the Perlman syndrome of fetal overgrowth and predisposition to Wilms’ tumor6. PMID:23594738

  17. Integration of whole-genome sequencing into infection control practices: the potential and the hurdles.

    PubMed

    Robilotti, Elizabeth; Kamboj, Mini

    2015-04-01

    Microbial whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is poised to transform many of the currently used approaches in medical microbiology. Recent reports on the application of WGS to understand genetic evolution and reconstruct transmission pathways have provided valuable information that will influence infection control practices. While this technology holds great promise, obstacles to full implementation remain. Two articles in this issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology (S. Octavia, Q. Wang, M. M. Tanaka, S. Kaur, V. Sintchenko, and R. Lan, J Clin Microbiol 53:1063-1071, 2015, doi:10.1128/JCM.03235-14, and S. J. Salipante, D. J. SenGupta, L. A. Cummings, T. A. Land, D. R. Hoogestraat, and B. T. Cookson, J Clin Microbiol 53:1072-1079, 2015, doi:10.1128/JCM.03385-14) describe the breadth of application of WGS to the field of clinical epidemiology. PMID:25673795

  18. MAPping the eukaryotic tree of life: structure, function, and evolution of the MAP215/Dis1 family of microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gard, David L; Becker, Bret E; Josh Romney, S

    2004-01-01

    The MAP215/Dis1 family of proteins is an evolutionarily ancient family of microtubule-associated proteins, with characterized members in all major kingdoms of eukaryotes, including fungi (Stu2 in S. cerevisiae, Dis1 and Alp14 in S. pombe), Dictyostelium (DdCP224), plants (Mor1 in A. thaliana and TMBP200 in N. tabaccum), and animals (Zyg9 in C. elegans, Msps in Drosophila, XMAP215 in Xenopus, and ch-TOG in humans). All MAP215/Dis1 proteins (with the exception of those in plants) localize to microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs), including spindle pole bodies in yeast and centrosomes in animals, and all bind to microtubules in vitro and?or in vivo. Diverse roles in regulating microtubule assembly and organization have been proposed for individual family members, and a substantial body of evidence suggests that MAP215/Dis1-related proteins play critical roles in the assembly and function of the meiotic/mitotic spindles and/or cell division. An extensive search of public databases (including both EST and genome databases) identified partial sequences predicted to encode more than three dozen new members of the MAP215/Dis1 family, including putative MAP215/Dis1-related proteins in Giardia lamblia and four other protists, sixteen additional species of fungi, six plants, and twelve animals. The structure and function of MAP215/Dis1 proteins are discussed in relation to the evolution of this ancient family of microtubule-associated proteins.

  19. Heterogeneous performances of conceptual dis/continuity: a dialectic reading of Brown and Kloser's article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sungwon; Kim, Mijung

    2009-12-01

    We review Brown and Kloser's article, "Conceptual continuity and the science of baseball: using informal science literacy to promote students science learning" from a Vygotskian cultural-historical and dialectic perspective. Brown and Kloser interpret interview data with student baseball players and claim that students' conceptual understanding articulated in vernacular genres involves continuities (similarities) with the canonical scientific explanations. In this commentary, we suggest that the authors' approach presupposes the dichotomy of the formal and the informal, which brings the authors' attention to continuity into the separation of cognition from language. We propose a Vygotskian approach that points out the problem of theorizing cognition (conceptual understanding) by depending on specific forms of representation (e.g., scientific terms). As alternative, we envision a Vygotskian cultural-historical approach to language, which considers different, irreducible modes of communication as an integrated whole and therefore allows theorizing cognition without dichotomizing it from the concrete ways by which human being communicates. We provide an exemplary analysis of a lecture talk in a university physics classroom and exemplify dialectic theories that explain the development of conceptual understanding. We discuss that this Vygotskian dialectic approach shows that people communicate scientific concepts through hybridization, which does not reproduce a genre self-identically; the continuity of conceptual understanding involves dis/continuity.

  20. Immunogenomic engineering of a plug-and-(dis)play hybridoma platform.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Mark; Parola, Cristina; Kelton, William J; Heuberger, Paul; Reddy, Sai T

    2016-01-01

    Hybridomas, fusions of primary mouse B cells and myelomas, are stable, rapidly-proliferating cell lines widely utilized for antibody screening and production. Antibody specificity of a hybridoma clone is determined by the immunoglobulin sequence of the primary B cell. Here we report a platform for rapid reprogramming of hybridoma antibody specificity by immunogenomic engineering. Here we use CRISPR-Cas9 to generate double-stranded breaks in immunoglobulin loci, enabling deletion of the native variable light chain and replacement of the endogenous variable heavy chain with a fluorescent reporter protein (mRuby). New antibody genes are introduced by Cas9-targeting of mRuby for replacement with a donor construct encoding a light chain and a variable heavy chain, resulting in full-length antibody expression. Since hybridomas surface express and secrete antibodies, reprogrammed cells are isolated using flow cytometry and cell culture supernatant is used for antibody production. Plug-and-(dis)play hybridomas can be reprogrammed with only a single transfection and screening step. PMID:27531490

  1. Social (dis)order and psychosocial trauma: Look earlier, look outside, and look beyond the persons.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Amalio; Blanco, Rubén; Díaz, Darío

    2016-04-01

    The most common and extreme suffering humankind has ever experienced comes from interpersonal and collective intentional violence. In dealing with traumatic outcomes psychology must overcome the mutually constitutive interaction between the (dis)order of a given macro or microsocial context and the mental health of the persons living in it. Social psychologist Ignacio Martín-Baró addressed in a preferential way the study of civil war in El Salvador in terms of intergroup hostility and polarization. He also approached the aftereffects of war by means of a theoretical core assumption: that traumatic experience rooted in collective violence (a human-made stressor) should be understood bearing in mind its social roots (pretraumatic situation), its personal and collective harm (collective injury), and the destruction of the social fabric. These are the arguments for his conceptualization of psychosocial trauma. Twenty-six years after the violent murder of Martín-Baró, along with 5 Jesuit priests, a housekeeper, and his teenage daughter, the current authors have adopted his general framework. Based on new theoretical insights and supporting data, the authors propose an expanded 4-dimension theoretical argument on psychosocial trauma: (a) pretrauma conditions based on social distress, (b) shared network of fear leading to breakdown of core social assumptions, (c) the outgroup as a target of negative emotions, and (d) destruction of family ties and community networks. PMID:27042882

  2. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagarina, E.; Ambati, V. R.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.; Bokhove, O.

    2014-10-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves using the potential flow approximation. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles' variational principle for water waves together with a finite element discretization that is continuous in space and discontinuous in time. One novel feature of this variational finite element approach is that the free surface evolution is variationally dependent on the mesh deformation vis-à-vis the mesh deformation being geometrically dependent on free surface evolution. Another key feature is the use of a variational (dis)continuous Galerkin finite element discretization in time. Moreover, in the absence of a wave maker, it is shown to be equivalent to the second order symplectic Störmer-Verlet time stepping scheme for the free-surface degrees of freedom. These key features add to the stability of the numerical method. Finally, the resulting numerical scheme is verified against nonlinear analytical solutions with long time simulations and validated against experimental measurements of driven wave solutions in a wave basin of the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands.

  3. Transverse target spin asymmetry in inclusive DIS with two-photon exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-09-06

    We study the transverse target spin dependence of the cross section for the inclusive electron-nucleon scattering with unpolarized beam. Such dependence is absent in the one-photon exchange approximation (Christ-Lee theorem) and arises only in higher orders of the QED expansion, from the interference of one-photon and absorptive two-photon exchange amplitudes as well as from real photon emission (bremsstrahlung). We demonstrate that the transverse spin-dependent two-photon exchange cross section is free of QED infrared and collinear divergences. We argue that in DIS kinematics the transverse spin dependence should be governed by a "parton-like" mechanism in which the two-photon exchange couples mainly to a single quark. We calculate the normal spin asymmetry in an approximation where the dominant contribution arises from quark helicity flip due to interactions with non-perturbative vacuum fields (constituent quark picture) and is proportional to the quark transversity distribution in the nucleon. Such helicity-flip processes are not significantly Sudakov-suppressed if the infrared scale for gluon emission in the photon-quark subprocess is of the order of the chiral symmetry breaking scale, mu^2_chiral>>Lambda^2_QCD. We estimate the asymmetry in the kinematics of the planned Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment to be of the order 10^-4, with different sign for proton and neutron. We also comment on the spin dependence in the limit of soft high-energy scattering.

  4. Immunogenomic engineering of a plug-and-(dis)play hybridoma platform

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, Mark; Parola, Cristina; Kelton, William J.; Heuberger, Paul; Reddy, Sai T.

    2016-01-01

    Hybridomas, fusions of primary mouse B cells and myelomas, are stable, rapidly-proliferating cell lines widely utilized for antibody screening and production. Antibody specificity of a hybridoma clone is determined by the immunoglobulin sequence of the primary B cell. Here we report a platform for rapid reprogramming of hybridoma antibody specificity by immunogenomic engineering. Here we use CRISPR-Cas9 to generate double-stranded breaks in immunoglobulin loci, enabling deletion of the native variable light chain and replacement of the endogenous variable heavy chain with a fluorescent reporter protein (mRuby). New antibody genes are introduced by Cas9-targeting of mRuby for replacement with a donor construct encoding a light chain and a variable heavy chain, resulting in full-length antibody expression. Since hybridomas surface express and secrete antibodies, reprogrammed cells are isolated using flow cytometry and cell culture supernatant is used for antibody production. Plug-and-(dis)play hybridomas can be reprogrammed with only a single transfection and screening step. PMID:27531490

  5. Social (dis)order and psychosocial trauma: Look earlier, look outside, and look beyond the persons.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Amalio; Blanco, Rubén; Díaz, Darío

    2016-04-01

    The most common and extreme suffering humankind has ever experienced comes from interpersonal and collective intentional violence. In dealing with traumatic outcomes psychology must overcome the mutually constitutive interaction between the (dis)order of a given macro or microsocial context and the mental health of the persons living in it. Social psychologist Ignacio Martín-Baró addressed in a preferential way the study of civil war in El Salvador in terms of intergroup hostility and polarization. He also approached the aftereffects of war by means of a theoretical core assumption: that traumatic experience rooted in collective violence (a human-made stressor) should be understood bearing in mind its social roots (pretraumatic situation), its personal and collective harm (collective injury), and the destruction of the social fabric. These are the arguments for his conceptualization of psychosocial trauma. Twenty-six years after the violent murder of Martín-Baró, along with 5 Jesuit priests, a housekeeper, and his teenage daughter, the current authors have adopted his general framework. Based on new theoretical insights and supporting data, the authors propose an expanded 4-dimension theoretical argument on psychosocial trauma: (a) pretrauma conditions based on social distress, (b) shared network of fear leading to breakdown of core social assumptions, (c) the outgroup as a target of negative emotions, and (d) destruction of family ties and community networks.

  6. Preparation of Dis-Azo Dyes Derived from p-Aminophenol and Their Fastness Properties for Synthetic Polymer-Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otutu, J. O.; Okoro, D.; Ossai, E. K.

    The preparation and properties of a series of dis-azo dyes derived from p-aminophenol is described. The influence on colour, dyeing fastness properties of the dyes on synthetic polymer-fibres is reported. Most of the dyes synthesized afford better light fastness and better wet (wash, perspiration) fastness on PET than on nylon 6 fabric. The structure of each compound was confirmed by using infrared, UV-VIS and elemental analysis.

  7. Kinetics of Assembly and Dis-assembly of Structures Forming a Chromonic Liquid Crystal at Low Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieser, Kenneth; Collings, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The molecules of the near-IR absorbing dye IR-806 spontaneously assemble in water at very low concentrations, forming a chromonic liquid crystal phase at room temperature when the concentration is above 0.5 wt%. The assembly process proceeds in two steps and results in a complex structure that orientationally orders in a liquid crystal phase. The kinetics of the assembly and dis-assembly of these complex structures can be followed through absorption measurements by rapidly mixing the initial sample with either a small fraction of salt solution (assembly) or a large fraction of water (dis-assembly). The kinetics of dis-assembly is exponential while the kinetics of assembly is non-exponential, both with rate constants depending on the starting and ending conditions, but falling in the 0.1-1.0 s-1 range. While past equilibrium absorption measurements on IR-806 offer evidence for a threshold concentration for the assembly of these complex structures, the kinetics experiments show with certainty the existence of such a threshold. Similar experiments on Benzopurpurin 4B, another dye that forms a chromonic liquid crystal at low concentrations, reveal kinetics that are slower by two orders of magnitude and a threshold concentration for the assembly of complex structures. Acknowledgment is made to the donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for partial support of this research.

  8. Chains of (dis)trust: exploring the underpinnings of knowledge-sharing and quality care across mental health services.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick R; Calnan, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Quality and safety in healthcare settings are underpinned by organisational cultures, which facilitate or impede the refinement, sharing and application of knowledge. Avoiding the use of the term culture as a residual category, we focus specifically on describing chains of (dis)trust, analysing their development across relatively low-trust service contexts and their impact upon knowledge-sharing and caregiving. Drawing upon data from in-depth interviews with service users, healthcare professionals, service managers and other stakeholders across three mental healthcare (psychosis) teams in southern England, we identify micro-mechanisms that explain how (dis)trust within one intra-organisational relationship impacts upon other relationships. Experiences and inferences of vulnerability, knowledge, uncertainty, interests and time, among actors who are both trustees and trusters across different relationships, are pertinent to such analyses. This more micro-level understanding facilitates detailed conceptualisations of trust chains as meso-level tendencies that contribute to wider vicious or virtuous cycles of organisational (dis)trust. We explore how knowledge-sharing and caregiving are vitally interwoven within these chains of trust or distrust, enhancing and/or inhibiting the instrumental and communicative aspects of quality healthcare as a result. PMID:26614364

  9. Low-cost real-time 3D PC distributed-interactive-simulation (DIS) application for C4I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, David L.; Veron, Harry

    1998-04-01

    A 3D Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) application was developed and demonstrated in a PC environment. The application is capable of running in the stealth mode or as a player which includes battlefield simulations, such as ModSAF. PCs can be clustered together, but not necessarily collocated, to run a simulation or training exercise on their own. A 3D perspective view of the battlefield is displayed that includes terrain, trees, buildings and other objects supported by the DIS application. Screen update rates of 15 to 20 frames per second have been achieved with fully lit and textured scenes thus providing high quality and fast graphics. A complete PC system can be configured for under $2,500. The software runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT. It is written in C++ and uses a commercial API called RenderWare for 3D rendering. The software uses Microsoft Foundation classes and Microsoft DirectPlay for joystick input. The RenderWare libraries enhance the performance through optimization for MMX and the Pentium Pro processor. The RenderWare and the Righteous 3D graphics board from Orchid Technologies with an advertised rendering rate of up to 2 million texture mapped triangles per second. A low-cost PC DIS simulator that can partake in a real-time collaborative simulation with other platforms is thus achieved.

  10. 9 CFR 82.2 - Criteria for determining birds or poultry to be infected with, exposed to, or free from END.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... poultry to be infected with, exposed to, or free from END. 82.2 Section 82.2 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.2 Criteria for determining birds or poultry to be infected with, exposed to,...

  11. 9 CFR 82.2 - Criteria for determining birds or poultry to be infected with, exposed to, or free from END.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... poultry to be infected with, exposed to, or free from END. 82.2 Section 82.2 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.2 Criteria for determining birds or poultry to be infected with, exposed to,...

  12. Network protocol changes can improve DisCom WAN performance : evaluating TCP modifications and SCTP in the ASC tri-lab environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2005-06-01

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Distance Computing (DisCom) Wide Area Network (WAN) is a high performance, long distance network environment that is based on the ubiquitous TCP/IP protocol set. However, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the algorithms that govern its operation were defined almost two decades ago for a network environment vastly different from the DisCom WAN. In this paper we explore and evaluate possible modifications to TCP that purport to improve TCP performance in environments like the DisCom WAN. We also examine a much newer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) that claims to provide reliable network transport while also implementing multi-streaming, multi-homing capabilities that are appealing in the DisCom high performance network environment. We provide performance comparisons and recommendations for continued development that will lead to network communications protocol implementations capable of supporting the coming ASC Petaflop computing environments.

  13. Exploring Physicians' Dissatisfaction and Work-Related Stress: Development of the PhyDis Scale

    PubMed Central

    Pedrazza, Monica; Berlanda, Sabrina; Trifiletti, Elena; Bressan, Franco

    2016-01-01

    with reference to attachment styles, which is recognized as being a central variable of individual difference supporting caregiving practices. This study represents an original and innovative attempt to address physicians' dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. The PhyDis scale has been developed and, in line with international findings, our results indicate that role uncertainty and loss of social esteem are the most dissatisfying factors. PMID:27588013

  14. Exploring Physicians' Dissatisfaction and Work-Related Stress: Development of the PhyDis Scale.

    PubMed

    Pedrazza, Monica; Berlanda, Sabrina; Trifiletti, Elena; Bressan, Franco

    2016-01-01

    reference to attachment styles, which is recognized as being a central variable of individual difference supporting caregiving practices. This study represents an original and innovative attempt to address physicians' dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. The PhyDis scale has been developed and, in line with international findings, our results indicate that role uncertainty and loss of social esteem are the most dissatisfying factors.

  15. Exploring Physicians' Dissatisfaction and Work-Related Stress: Development of the PhyDis Scale.

    PubMed

    Pedrazza, Monica; Berlanda, Sabrina; Trifiletti, Elena; Bressan, Franco

    2016-01-01

    reference to attachment styles, which is recognized as being a central variable of individual difference supporting caregiving practices. This study represents an original and innovative attempt to address physicians' dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. The PhyDis scale has been developed and, in line with international findings, our results indicate that role uncertainty and loss of social esteem are the most dissatisfying factors. PMID:27588013

  16. cos (4 φ ) azimuthal anisotropy in small-x DIS dijet production beyond the leading power TMD limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    We determine the first correction to the quadrupole operator in high-energy QCD beyond the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) limit of Weizsäcker-Williams and linearly polarized gluon distributions. These functions give rise to isotropic, respectively, ˜cos 2 ϕ angular distributions in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dijet production. On the other hand, the correction produces a ˜cos 4 ϕ angular dependence which is suppressed by one additional power of the dijet transverse momentum scale (squared) P2.

  17. Predictions on the Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetries at Subleading Twist of Pion Production in Semi-Inclusive DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenjuan; Lu, Zhun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We estimate the single-spin asymmetries with sin ϕS and sin(2ϕh ‑ ϕS) angular dependencies for electroproduction of pions in transversely polarized semi-inclusive DIS process. We consider the effect of the twist-3 transverse momentum dependent distributions which convoluted with twist-2 fragmentation functions. We calculate these distributions in a spectator-diquark model, and predict the corresponding single-spin asymmetries at the kinematics of HERMES, JLab and COMPASS. We find that the numerical estimates show that the asymmetries are sizable, and the T-odd twist-3 TMDs play an important role in these asymmetries.

  18. 9 CFR 82.21 - Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry. 82.21 Section 82.21 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Chlamydiosis in Poultry § 82.21 Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used...

  19. 9 CFR 82.21 - Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., troughs, and other equipment used for infected poultry. 82.21 Section 82.21 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Chlamydiosis in Poultry § 82.21 Vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, and other equipment used...

  20. VennDIS: a JavaFX-based Venn and Euler diagram software to generate publication quality figures.

    PubMed

    Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Sinha, Ankit; Boutros, Paul C; Kislinger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Venn diagrams are graphical representations of the relationships among multiple sets of objects and are often used to illustrate similarities and differences among genomic and proteomic datasets. All currently existing tools for producing Venn diagrams evince one of two traits; they require expertise in specific statistical software packages (such as R), or lack the flexibility required to produce publication-quality figures. We describe a simple tool that addresses both shortcomings, Venn Diagram Interactive Software (VennDIS), a JavaFX-based solution for producing highly customizable, publication-quality Venn, and Euler diagrams of up to five sets. The strengths of VennDIS are its simple graphical user interface and its large array of customization options, including the ability to modify attributes such as font, style and position of the labels, background color, size of the circle/ellipse, and outline color. It is platform independent and provides real-time visualization of figure modifications. The created figures can be saved as XML files for future modification or exported as high-resolution images for direct use in publications. PMID:25545689

  1. VennDIS: a JavaFX-based Venn and Euler diagram software to generate publication quality figures.

    PubMed

    Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Sinha, Ankit; Boutros, Paul C; Kislinger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Venn diagrams are graphical representations of the relationships among multiple sets of objects and are often used to illustrate similarities and differences among genomic and proteomic datasets. All currently existing tools for producing Venn diagrams evince one of two traits; they require expertise in specific statistical software packages (such as R), or lack the flexibility required to produce publication-quality figures. We describe a simple tool that addresses both shortcomings, Venn Diagram Interactive Software (VennDIS), a JavaFX-based solution for producing highly customizable, publication-quality Venn, and Euler diagrams of up to five sets. The strengths of VennDIS are its simple graphical user interface and its large array of customization options, including the ability to modify attributes such as font, style and position of the labels, background color, size of the circle/ellipse, and outline color. It is platform independent and provides real-time visualization of figure modifications. The created figures can be saved as XML files for future modification or exported as high-resolution images for direct use in publications.

  2. Automated Dissolution for Enteric-Coated Aspirin Tablets: A Case Study for Method Transfer to a RoboDis II.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sarah A; Martini, Luigi

    2014-08-01

    Dissolution method transfer is a complicated yet common process in the pharmaceutical industry. With increased pharmaceutical product manufacturing and dissolution acceptance requirements, dissolution testing has become one of the most labor-intensive quality control testing methods. There is an increased trend for automation in dissolution testing, particularly for large pharmaceutical companies to reduce variability and increase personnel efficiency. There is no official guideline for dissolution testing method transfer from a manual, semi-automated, to automated dissolution tester. In this study, a manual multipoint dissolution testing procedure for an enteric-coated aspirin tablet was transferred effectively and reproducibly to a fully automated dissolution testing device, RoboDis II. Enteric-coated aspirin samples were used as a model formulation to assess the feasibility and accuracy of media pH change during continuous automated dissolution testing. Several RoboDis II parameters were evaluated to ensure the integrity and equivalency of dissolution method transfer from a manual dissolution tester. This current study provides a systematic outline for the transfer of the manual dissolution testing protocol to an automated dissolution tester. This study further supports that automated dissolution testers compliant with regulatory requirements and similar to manual dissolution testers facilitate method transfer.

  3. Dihadron Electroproduction in DIS with Transversely Polarized 3He Target at 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The transversity distribution function is one of the important and least known parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the nucleon. It can be studied via both single-hadron and double-hadron electro-production from a transversely polarized target in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) region. Due to the low cross section, the data for the transversity distribution functions are very scarce. After 12 GeV upgrade, the high intensity 12 GeV electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab (JLab), togather with tThe large acceptance of the proposed Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) in Hall A, will provide very good opportunities to study the transversity distribution functions in high precision. In this talk, we will present the dihadron program with SoLID. We plan to measure the single target spin asymmetries (SSA) of dihadron production in DIS region using 11 and 8.8 GeV electron beam on a transversely polarized 3He target. We will map the SSA in a 4-D space of x, Q2, zh and Mh. Assuming leading twist dominance, the transversity distribution, h1, can be extracted by combine with the world data on dihadron fragmentation functions (DiFF). These data will provide crucial inputs to the flavor separation of the transversity, especially the d quark distribution.

  4. Functional requirements document for NASA/MSFC Earth Science and Applications Division: Data and information system (ESAD-DIS). Interoperability, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. Briscoe; Grider, Gary W.

    1992-01-01

    These Earth Science and Applications Division-Data and Information System (ESAD-DIS) interoperability requirements are designed to quantify the Earth Science and Application Division's hardware and software requirements in terms of communications between personal and visualization workstation, and mainframe computers. The electronic mail requirements and local area network (LAN) requirements are addressed. These interoperability requirements are top-level requirements framed around defining the existing ESAD-DIS interoperability and projecting known near-term requirements for both operational support and for management planning. Detailed requirements will be submitted on a case-by-case basis. This document is also intended as an overview of ESAD-DIs interoperability for new-comers and management not familiar with these activities. It is intended as background documentation to support requests for resources and support requirements.

  5. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  6. The beneficial endophyte Trichoderma hamatum isolate DIS 219b promotes growth and delays the onset of the drought response in Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hanhong; Sicher, Richard C; Kim, Moon S; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Strem, Mary D; Melnick, Rachel L; Bailey, Bryan A

    2009-01-01

    Theobroma cacao (cacao) is cultivated in tropical climates and is exposed to drought stress. The impact of the endophytic fungus Trichoderma hamatum isolate DIS 219b on cacao's response to drought was studied. Colonization by DIS 219b delayed drought-induced changes in stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis, and green fluorescence emissions. The altered expression of 19 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (seven in leaves and 17 in roots with some overlap) by drought was detected using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. Roots tended to respond earlier to drought than leaves, with the drought-induced changes in expression of seven ESTs being observed after 7 d of withholding water. Changes in gene expression in leaves were not observed until after 10 d of withholding water. DIS 219b colonization delayed the drought-altered expression of all seven ESTs responsive to drought in leaves by > or = 3 d, but had less influence on the expression pattern of the drought-responsive ESTs in roots. DIS 219b colonization had minimal direct influence on the expression of drought-responsive ESTs in 32-d-old seedlings. By contrast, DIS 219b colonization of 9-d-old seedlings altered expression of drought-responsive ESTs, sometimes in patterns opposite of that observed in response to drought. Drought induced an increase in the concentration of many amino acids in cacao leaves, while DIS 219b colonization caused a decrease in aspartic acid and glutamic acid concentrations and an increase in alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations. With or without exposure to drought conditions, colonization by DIS 219b promoted seedling growth, the most consistent effects being an increase in root fresh weight, root dry weight, and root water content. Colonized seedlings were slower to wilt in response to drought as measured by a decrease in the leaf angle drop. The primary direct effect of DIS 219b colonization was promotion of root growth, regardless of water status, and an

  7. Analyse And Graphical Representation On Implementation Of New ISO/DIS 14001:2015 Revision In Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagateanu, Alina Mihaela; Nicolaescu, Sergiu Ştefan; Kifor, Claudiu Vasile

    2015-09-01

    We live in a dynamic world that is constantly changing in order to lighten our daily activities. All changes made must meet several conditions, most of them having a direct relationship with the environment and are applicable for more than one person. Considering that in this moment the standard for environment protection has passed the review period and will be published in the near future, the present article aims to highlight the most important changes from the new version of ISO / DIS 14001: 2015. The information is structured for the organizations which holds the old version ISO 14001: 2004, so, the necessary steps to follow can be easily understood while moving totally to the new version.

  8. Managing risk and marginalizing identities: on the society-of-captives thesis and the harm of social dis-ease.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    This article develops the constitutive features of the society-of-captives thesis as suggested by Arrigo and Milovanovic, and Arrigo, Bersot, and Sellers. The relevance of this thesis is briefly explored in relation to the institutional and community-based treatment philosophies that currently inform the mental health and criminal justice systems. This exploration specifies how risk (being human and doing humanness differently) is managed symbolically, linguistically, materially, and culturally. The management of this risk extends to the kept as well as to their keepers, regulators, and watchers (i.e., the society of captives). This article calls for a new clinical praxis (being/doing a critical mindfulness) designed to overcome the totalizing madness (the harm of social dis-ease) that follows from managing risk fearfully and marginalizing identities desperately as reified recursively through society's captivity. The ethical underpinnings of this clinical praxis represent an emergent direction for undertaking correctional policy reform.

  9. Student (dis)engagement and need-supportive teaching behavior: a multi-informant and multilevel approach.

    PubMed

    Van den Berghe, Lynn; Tallir, Isabel B; Cardon, Greet; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen

    2015-08-01

    Starting from self-determination theory, we explored whether student engagement/disengagement relates to teachers' need support and whether this relationship is moderated by teachers' causality orientations. A sample of 2004 students situated in 127 classes taught by 33 physical education teachers participated in the study. Both teachers and students reported on students' (dis)engagement, allowing investigation of the proposed relationships both at the student and teacher level. Most of the variance in need support was at the student level, but there was also between-teacher and between-class variance in need support. Engagement related to more need support, but only at the student level. In total, few moderation effects were found. Teachers with a relatively low controlled orientation were more need supportive when perceiving their students as emotionally and behaviorally engaged. By making teachers aware of these dynamics, automatic responses to student engagement can be better thought out. Recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:26442767

  10. Student (dis)engagement and need-supportive teaching behavior: a multi-informant and multilevel approach.

    PubMed

    Van den Berghe, Lynn; Tallir, Isabel B; Cardon, Greet; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen

    2015-08-01

    Starting from self-determination theory, we explored whether student engagement/disengagement relates to teachers' need support and whether this relationship is moderated by teachers' causality orientations. A sample of 2004 students situated in 127 classes taught by 33 physical education teachers participated in the study. Both teachers and students reported on students' (dis)engagement, allowing investigation of the proposed relationships both at the student and teacher level. Most of the variance in need support was at the student level, but there was also between-teacher and between-class variance in need support. Engagement related to more need support, but only at the student level. In total, few moderation effects were found. Teachers with a relatively low controlled orientation were more need supportive when perceiving their students as emotionally and behaviorally engaged. By making teachers aware of these dynamics, automatic responses to student engagement can be better thought out. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

  11. Infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a natural killer (NK) cell response in cattle that is lacking following vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a role in innate antiviral immunity by directly lysing virus-infected cells and producing antiviral cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNgamma). We developed a system for characterizing the bovine NK response to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes a dis...

  12. Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy That Accounts for Dis/Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waitoller, Federico R.; Thorius, Kathleen A. King

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Federico R. Waitoller and Kathleen A. King Thorius extend recent discussions on culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP) in order to explicitly account for student dis/ability. The authors engage in this work as part of an inclusive education agenda. Toward this aim, they discuss how CSP and universal design for learning will benefit…

  13. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  14. Lower respiratory tract infections: prevention using vaccines.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Cynthia G; Harper, Scott A

    2004-12-01

    In summary, vaccines are available to prevent two of the most common and most deadly causes of lower respiratory tract infections: pneumococcal disease and influenza. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents pneumococcal bacteremia; influenza vaccines prevent influenza as well as several complications of influenza. Despite all that is known about how well these vaccines work, influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are underused markedly, especially among some minority groups that are affected dis-proportionately by disease. Coverage also remains low among health care workers, although providing influenza vaccine to health care workers saves lives among patients. Tools such as standing orders can help clinicians increase vaccine coverage in their patient populations. While research for new and improved vaccines to prevent lower respiratory tract infections continues,focusing on simple measures for increasing vaccine use can help prevent morbidity and mortality now.

  15. [Microbiological diagnosis of infections of the skin and soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Burillo, Almudena; Moreno, Antonio; Salas, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections are often seen in clinical practice, yet their microbiological diagnosis is among the most complex of laboratory tasks. The diagnosis of a skin and a soft tissue infection is generally based on clinical criteria and not microbiological results. A microbiological diagnosis is reserved for cases in which the etiology of infection is required, e.g., when the infection is particularly severe, when less common microorganisms are suspected as the causative agent (e.g. in immunocompromised patients), when response to antimicrobial treatment is poor, or when a longstanding wound does not heal within a reasonable period of time. We report the indications, sampling and processing techniques, and interpretation criteria for various culture types, including quantitative cultures from biopsy or tissue specimens and semiquantitative and qualitative cultures performed on all types of samples. For non-invasive samples taken from open wounds, application of the Q index to Gram stains is a cost-effective way to standardize sample quality assessment and interpretation of the pathogenic involvement of the different microorganisms isolated from cultures. All these issues are covered in the SEIMC microbiological procedure number 22: Diagnóstico microbiológico de las infecciones de piel y tejidos blandos (Microbiological diagnosis of infections of the skin and soft tissues) (2nd ed., 2006, www.seimc.org/protocolos/microbiologia).

  16. Thermodiffusion as a close-to-interface effect that matters in non-isothermal (dis)orderly protein aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadomski, A.; Kruszewska, N.

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this discussion letter is to argue how and why an inherent nanoscale thermodiffusion (Soret-type) effect can be relevant in (dis)orderly protein aggregation. We propose a model in which the aggregation of proteins, in the presence of temperature gradient, is described in terms of Smoluchowski dynamics in the phase space of nuclei sizes. The Soret coefficient of the aggregation is proportional to the variations of the aggregation free energy over temperature. The free energy is related to the (interface) boundary condition of the system. When boundary condition is of equilibrium Gibbs-Thomson type, with a well-stated surface tension of the nucleus, to the system can be assigned a negative Soret effect. On the contrary, when a non-equilibrium perturbing (salting-out) term enters the boundary condition, a positive Soret effect may manifest. A zero-value Soret regime is expected to occur in between, yielding very soft (“fragile”) non-Kossel protein-type crystals.

  17. Stigma, discrimination, and sexual (dis)satisfaction among people living with HIV: results from the "AIDES et toi" survey.

    PubMed

    Rojas Castro, D; Le Gall, J M; Andreo, C; Spire, B

    2010-08-01

    The effects of HIV-related stigma and discrimination have been studied in several areas, such as access to testing, quality of care quality, and access to work. Nevertheless, the effects of stigma and discrimination on the sexual life of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have not been studied enough. AIDES, a French community-based organization, has developed a biannual survey which assesses several socioeconomical and psychosocial dimensions of the people in contact with this organization. A focus on the results concerning sexual (dis)satisfaction and the factors associated are presented here. A convenience sample of 521 HIV-positive men having sex with men, heterosexual men and women was analyzed. A logistic regression was performed to examine which factors were significantly associated with sexual dissatisfaction. Results showed that being older, not having a full-time job, not having a steady sexual partner, lower frequency of sexual intercourse, discrimination in the sexual relationship setting, and the perception of loneliness were independently associated with sexual dissatisfaction. A quality health approach must include the aspects linked to sexual life and sexual satisfaction. Given the potentially harmful effects that HIV-related stigma and discrimination have on PLWHA's well-being, more specific actions and advocacy in this direction should be developed and implemented.

  18. (Dis)placing trust: the long-term effects of job displacement on generalised trust over the adult lifecourse.

    PubMed

    Laurence, James

    2015-03-01

    Increasing rates of job displacement (i.e. involuntary job loss from redundancy, downsizing, restructuring) have been suggested to be a key driver of declining macro-levels of generalised trust. This article undertakes the first test of how job displacement affects individuals' tendencies to (dis)trust over the adult lifecourse, using two-waves of the Great Britain National Child Development Study cohort data, on a sample of n=6840 individuals. Applying both lagged dependent variable logistic regression and two-wave change-score models, experiencing job displacement between the ages of 33 and 50 appears to significantly scar individuals' generalised trust, with depressed trust observable at least nine years after the event occurred. However, this effect is dependent on the value an individual places on work: the greater the attachment to employment the stronger the negative effect of displacement. A range of mediators, such as physical health, mental well-being, and personal efficacy, do not appear to account for the effect.

  19. Hookworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... The last 2 types also occur in animals. Hookworm disease is common in the moist tropics and ...

  20. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  1. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including ... Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder ...

  2. Whipworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the large intestine with a type of roundworm. ... Whipworm infection is caused by the roundworm Trichuris trichiura. It is a common infection that mainly affects children. Children may become infected if they swallow soil contaminated with whipworm ...

  3. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  4. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  5. Dis-appearance and dys-appearance anew: living with excess skin and intestinal changes following weight loss surgery.

    PubMed

    Groven, Karen Synne; Råheim, Målfrid; Engelsrud, Gunn

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this article is to explore bodily changes following weight loss surgery. Our empirical material is based on individual interviews with 22 Norwegian women. To further analyze their experiences, we build primarily on the phenomenologist Drew Leder`s distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. Additionally, our analysis is inspired by Simone de Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty and Julia Kristeva. Although these scholars have not directed their attention to obesity operations, they occupy a prime framework for shedding light on different dimensions of bodily change. In doing so, we were able to identify two main themes: The felt "inner" body versus the visible "surface" body and the "old" body versus the "new" body. In different, though interconnected ways, these main themes encompass tensions between changes the women experienced as contributing to a more "normal" and active life, feeling more accepted, and changes that generated ambivalence. In particular, their skin became increasingly problematic because it did not "shrink" like the rest of the body. On the contrary, it became looser and looser. Moreover, badsmelling folds of skin that wobbled, sweated and chafed at the smallest movement, aprons of fat hanging in front of their stomachs, batwing arms, thick flabby thighs and sagging breasts were described as a huge contrast to the positive response they received to their changed body shape when they were out and about with their clothes on. At the same time, they expressed ambivalence with regards to removing the excess skin by means of plastic surgery. Through their own and other women`s experiences they learned removing the excess skin by means of surgery could be a double-edged sword. By illuminating the experiences of the ones undergoing such changes our article offers new insight in a scholarly debate predominated by medical research documenting the positive outcomes of weight loss surgery.

  6. Detection of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in water samples of Spain by specific real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Grúas, Cristina; Llambi, Silvia; Arruga, M Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary cause of the legionellosis diseases (90 %) (Yu et al. in J Infect Dis 186:127-128, 2002; Doleans et al. in J Clin Microbiol 42:458-460, 2004; Den Boer et al. in Clin Microbiol Infect 14:459-466, 2008). In this study, methodologies based on molecular biology were developed in order to provide a quick diagnosis of the bacterial presence in water samples of Spain. Multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were realized to target the 16S rRNA and macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) genes of, respectively, Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila including in the design of an internal control. The results obtained by the culture and the gene amplification methods agreed in 94.44 % for the 16S rRNA gene, and a concordance of 66.67 % of the cases was obtained for the mip gene.

  7. Laboratory Testing of Operator Seat Vibration with 37 SUBJECTS—CRITICAL Comment on Iso/dis 7096

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, B.; Menzel, G.; Blüthner, R.; Seidel, H.

    1998-08-01

    The operators of earth moving machinery are often exposed to a low frequency vibration environment caused by the movement of vehicles over uneven ground and the task carried out. The seat constitutes the least state of suspension before the driver. The efficiency of attenuation under consideration of the best design practice today is the basis for the revision of ISO 7096 for the testing seats for earth moving machinery. This standard requires the participation of two subjects with different body masses (52-55 kg; 98-103 kg). The aim of the study was to investigate (1) the extent and the influence of individual variability and posture change on the result of seat tests, and (2) the possibility of deducing representative results for the user population. 37 male subjects took part in the experimental investigations. They were exposed in three postures for 67 s to three acceleration signals in a vertical direction corresponding to the spectral classes (EM2, EM5, EM6) in ISO/DIS 7096 on two commercial suspension seats. The vertical accelerations were measured at the seat basis and at the interface between seat cushion and subject. The results of the analysis of variance show a significant influence of exposure, type of seat, and interactions exposure-by-posture, exposure-by-type of seat, and posture-by type of seat on the SEAT factor. Simple and multiple regression analyses were applied in order to test the predictability of the seat factor (SEAT) by anthropometric variables. The conclusions were drawn that the seat testing could be improved by (1) selecting subjects according to the 5th and 95th percentile masses of the population of vehicle or machinery users for which the seat is intended (ISO 10326), instead of fixed masses (ISO 7096), (2) considering other anthropometric parameters for the selection like the body height and body mass supported by the seat, and (3) the inclusion of several subjects near the 50th percentile in order to assess the variability of the

  8. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  9. Coronavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be able to reduce your risk of infection by washing your hands often with soap and ... sick. There is no vaccine to prevent coronavirus infection. There are no specific treatments. You can relieve ...

  10. Campylobacter infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection occurs in the small intestine from a bacteria called Campylobacter jejuni . It is a type of food poisoning. ... Campylobacter enteritis is a common cause of intestinal infection . ... of traveler's diarrhea or food poisoning . People most often ...

  11. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  12. [Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) guidelines for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections. 2010 update].

    PubMed

    Ayats, Josefina; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Sánchez, Fernando; García-Rodríguez, Julio; Guarro, Josep; Guinea, Jesús; Linares, María J; Pontón, José; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines are an update of recommendations for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections by the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) published in 2004 (Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2004, 22:32-9). In this updated version of the guidelines, a comprehensive review of the most recent diagnostic innovations and levels of evidence to recommend those diagnostic procedures are included. We first analyse conventional diagnostic methods, microscopic examination and culture, underlining their limitations which have led to the development of alternative methods, such as fungal antigen and DNA quantification. Those alternative methods of diagnosis are analysed by fungal infection. We also briefly review the methods for molecular identification of fungal species and recommendations for carrying out susceptibility tests for antifungal drugs, including reference procedures, commercial techniques and their indications.

  13. Acinetobacter baumannii Genes Required for Bacterial Survival during Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Smith, Sara; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Crepin, Sebastien; Kole, Monica; Zahdeh, Carina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is emerging as a leading global multiple-antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogen. The identity of genes essential for pathogenesis in a mammalian host remains largely unknown. Using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS), we identified A. baumannii genes involved in bacterial survival in a leukopenic mouse model of bloodstream infection. Mice were inoculated with a pooled transposon mutant library derived from 109,000 mutants, and TraDIS was used to map transposon insertion sites in the genomes of bacteria in the inoculum and of bacteria recovered from mouse spleens. Unique transposon insertion sites were mapped and used to calculate a fitness factor for every insertion site based on its relative abundance in the inoculum and postinfection libraries. Eighty-nine transposon insertion mutants that were underrepresented after experimental infection in mice compared to their presence in the inocula were delineated as candidates for further evaluation. Genetically defined mutants lacking feoB (ferrous iron import), ddc (d-ala-d-ala-carboxypeptidase), and pntB (pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase subunit) exhibited a fitness defect during systemic infection resulting from bacteremia. In vitro, these mutants, as well as a fepA (ferric enterobactin receptor) mutant, are defective in survival in human serum and within macrophages and are hypersensitive to killing by antimicrobial peptides compared to the survival of the parental strain under these conditions. Our data demonstrate that FepA is involved in the uptake of exogenous enterobactin in A. baumannii. Genetic complementation rescues the phenotypes of mutants in assays that emulate conditions encountered during infection. In summary, we have determined novel A. baumannii fitness genes involved in the pathogenesis of mammalian infection. IMPORTANCE A. baumannii is a significant cause of bacterial bloodstream infection in humans. Since multiple antibiotic resistance

  14. Giardia Infection Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2010;4(5):e682. File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  15. Postpartum Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News ... Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's Health Issues ... Bladder and Kidney Infections Breast Infection Postpartum Blood Clots Postpartum Thyroid Disorders Postpartum ...

  16. Infection Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way to prevent the spread of infections in hospitals. If you are a patient, don't be afraid to remind friends, family and health care providers to wash their hands before getting close to you. Other ...

  17. Salmonella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for both acute and chronic poultry diseases. These diseases cause economically significant losses for poultry producers in many nations and absorb large investments of public and private resources in testing and control efforts. Infect...

  18. Development of a spatio-temporal disaggregation method (DisNDVI) for generating a time series of fine resolution NDVI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, V. M.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-03-01

    Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a key parameter in understanding the vegetation dynamics, has high spatial and temporal variability. However, continuous monitoring of NDVI is not feasible at fine spatial resolution (<60 m) owing to the long revisit time needed by the satellites to acquire the fine spatial resolution data. Further, the study attains significance in the case of humid tropical regions of the earth, where the prevailing atmospheric conditions restrict availability of fine resolution cloud free images at a high temporal frequency. As an alternative to the lack of high resolution images, the current study demonstrates a novel disaggregation method (DisNDVI) which integrates the spatial information from a single fine resolution image and temporal information in terms of crop phenology from time series of coarse resolution images to generate estimates of NDVI at fine spatial and temporal resolution. The phenological variation of the pixels captured at the coarser scale provides the basis for relating the temporal variability of the pixel with the NDVI available at fine resolution. The proposed methodology was tested over a 30 km × 25 km spatially heterogeneous study area located in the south of Tamil Nadu, India. The robustness of the algorithm was assessed by an independent comparison of the disaggregated NDVI and observed NDVI obtained from concurrent Landsat ETM+ imagery. The results showed good spatial agreement across the study area dominated with agriculture and forest pixels, with a root mean square error of 0.05. The validation done at the coarser scale showed that disaggregated NDVI spatially averaged to 240 m compared well with concurrent MODIS NDVI at 240 m (R2 > 0.8). The validation results demonstrate the effectiveness of DisNDVI in improving the spatial and temporal resolution of NDVI images for utility in fine scale hydrological applications such as crop growth monitoring and estimation of evapotranspiration.

  19. The World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument for people with intellectual and physical disabilities (WHOQOL-Dis): evidence of validity of the Brazilian version

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of people with disabilities in Brazil and worldwide has grown substantially in recent decades. Cross-cultural quality of life instruments can be helpful in the development of interventions designed to meet the needs of this population and contribute to rational allocation of resources. This study sought to provide evidence of validity and reliability the Brazilian Portuguese version of WHOQOL-Dis-D (a cross-cultural, multicentre instrument developed by the WHOQOL-Group for the assessment of quality of life in persons with physical disability – PD) and WHOQOL-Dis-ID (for persons with intellectual disability – ID). Methods Classical psychometric methods were used to conduct independent analyses of the PD and ID samples. Criterion groups were established for analysis of construct validity. Concurrent validity was assessed in relation to SWLS and BDI-II scores; discriminant validity, in relation to WHODAS-II. Cronbach alpha was used to test the instrument scales and subscales for reliability. The ID subgroup was retested, and test-retest reliability assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficients and paired Student’s t-test. Results A total of 162 (98 females) people with PD and 156 (55 females) people with ID participated in the study. Cronbach alpha was satisfactory across practically all domains and factors in the PD subsample. In IDs, most factors or domains had coefficients higher than 0.70, but four subscales exhibited less satisfactory performance. Evidence of construct and concurrent validity and reliability were obtained. Conclusions The analyses presented herein provide satisfactory evidence of the validity and reliability of the instrument and corroborated the factor structure revealed during cross-cultural research. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to obtain additional evidence of validity and reliability. PMID:24886102

  20. Nail infections.

    PubMed

    Jules, K T; Bonar, P L

    1989-04-01

    Nail infections are and will continue to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to all foot physicians. Attention to basic concepts of accurate detailed history and physical examination will aid in the determination of the etiology of these infections. Following basic guidelines of incision and drainage, gram stain, soaks, and antibiotics will be the cornerstone of initial treatment of pyogenic infections. Upon resolution of the acute infection a permanent treatment plan can be constituted based on the etiology. Nail infections of mycotic nature require an understanding by both patient and doctor as to the difficulty and resistance to treatment of this problem. It is the authors' opinion that aggressive persistent treatment will provide the best long-term result when dealing with mycotic infections. This may require nail removal, local and systemic treatment as well as change in shoe environment. As we have seen and is stated throughout this text, the nail and its pathologic processes can be a mirror of systemic disease. Many times a dystrophic infected nail may be the initial clinical presentation of a much more involved disease process. It is the responsibility and duty of all foot physicians to have a total understanding of knowledge of normal and pathologic process that affect the nail plates, nail bed, and surrounding nail proper. I hope this article will stimulate the foot physician to approach the disease of the nail with a high index of suspicion and respect. PMID:2650850

  1. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds. The most common one causes tuberculosis. Another one causes leprosy. Still others cause infections ... aren't "typical" because they don't cause tuberculosis. But they can still harm people, especially people ...

  2. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all children in the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before ...

  3. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... nearby What to Do Teach kids not to pop, pick at, or scratch pimples, pus-filled infections, ... Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your ...

  4. Bacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  5. Salmonella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... vegetables. You also can get infected after handling pets, especially reptiles like snakes, turtles, and lizards. Symptoms include Fever Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Headache Possible nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite Symptoms usually last 4-7 days. ...

  6. Hantavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... can enter the air. People can get the disease if they breathe infected air or come into contact with rodents or their urine or droppings. You cannot catch it from people. Early symptoms of HPS include ...

  7. Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor will do a physical exam and health history. Possible tests may include blood, imaging, or lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Vaccines can prevent pneumococcal infections. There are two ...

  8. Hand Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread to others. Necrotizing Fasciitis, or “Flesh-Eating Bacteria” Necrotizing fasciitis is a very rare but severe infection. Streptococcus pyogenes or other “flesh-eating bacteria” enter the body through a cut. Bacteria toxins ...

  9. Giardia Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... a parasite called Giardia intestinalis. It lives in soil, food, and water. It may also be on ... Doctors use several drugs to treat it. The best way to prevent giardia infection is to practice ...

  10. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of skin infections (eg, impetigo, pimples, boils). Staphylococcus aureus also causes toxin-related illnesses, including toxic shock syndrome, scalded skin syndrome, and staphylococcal-related food poisoning. In fact, ... Staphylococcus that you should be familiar with include the ...

  11. Norovirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Noroviruses are a group of related viruses. Infection with these viruses causes an illness called gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. It can spread from person to person, or ...

  12. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Ear Infections Overview How does the ear work? A tube called the eustachian (say: "you-stay-shee-an") tube connects the middle ear with the back of the nose. Normally this ...

  13. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Candida is the scientific name for yeast. It is a fungus that lives almost everywhere, including in ... infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida esophagitis is thrush that spreads to your esophagus, ...

  14. (Dis)organization of Palliative Care as a Potential Quality-of-Life Issue in the Senior Population--Croatian Experiences.

    PubMed

    Turina, Iva Sorta-Bilajac; Kresina, Helena Glibotić; Babić, Svjetlana Gašparović; Janković, Suzana; Kresina, Sandro; Brkljačić, Morana

    2015-06-01

    This paper analyses the current situation in the Croatian health-care system, with special emphasis on the (dis)organization of palliative care within the public health, more precisely gerontology context. Namely, population world-wide is getting older, that is both a statistical and an everyday-medical fact. Today we consider citizens after the age of 65 as the elderly, with a tendency to move the age-limit to 75 years. Croatia on the matter swiftly follows global trends, while literature points to the fact that an increase in the elderly population dictates the need for an organized system of palliative care and hospice building. Although we cannot ignore the fact that children can become palliative care patients, we can conclude that these are predominantly elderly patients. In fact, approximately half of patients--users of palliative care--have some type of oncological diagnosis; a significant number of patients suffer from dementia, stroke, or heart failure. As for the Primorsko-goranska county and the City of Rijeka, they show similar trend, as can be illustrated with data from the 2011 census, when the share of citizens over 65 years in the population of the Primorsko-goranska county reached 18.91%, and in the population of the City of Rijeka 19.74%. Thus, one of the main quality-of-life issues in the Croatian senior population is the (dis)function of the palliative medicine/care system. Practice, namely, shows that there has still been no implementation. In particular, palliative medicine is not yet recognized as a speciality or sub-speciality, standards and norms for this activity are not set, palliative care is still not included in the system of obligatory health insurance, and as far as the national strategy of health policy for the area of palliative care, Croatian Government at its meeting held on 27th December 2013 finally adopted the "Strategic Plan for Palliative Care of the Republic of Croatia for the period from 2014 to 2016". Exactly because we

  15. Tinea Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Tinea is the name of a group of diseases caused by a fungus. Types of tinea include ringworm, athlete's foot and jock itch. These infections are ... depend on the affected area of the body: Ringworm is a red skin rash that forms a ...

  16. Chlamydia Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... PID). PID can cause permanent damage to your reproductive system. This can lead to long-term pelvic pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy. Women who have had chlamydia infections more than once are at higher risk of serious reproductive health complications. Men often don't have health ...

  17. Campylobacter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campylobacter is found in the intestines of many wild and domestic animals. The bacteria are passed in their feces (poop), which can lead to infection in humans via contaminated food, meats (especially chicken), water taken from contaminated sources (streams or rivers ...

  18. Fusarium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muhammed, Maged; Anagnostou, Theodora; Desalermos, Athanasios; Kourkoumpetis, Themistoklis K.; Carneiro, Herman A.; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Coleman, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fusarium species is a ubiquitous fungus that causes opportunistic infections. We present 26 cases of invasive fusariosis categorized according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria of fungal infections. All cases (20 proven and 6 probable) were treated from January 2000 until January 2010. We also review 97 cases reported since 2000. The most important risk factors for invasive fusariosis in our patients were compromised immune system, specifically lung transplantation (n = 6) and hematologic malignancies (n = 5), and burns (n = 7 patients with skin fusariosis), while the most commonly infected site was the skin in 11 of 26 patients. The mortality rates among our patients with disseminated, skin, and pulmonary fusariosis were 50%, 40%, and 37.5%, respectively. Fusarium solani was the most frequent species, isolated from 49% of literature cases. Blood cultures were positive in 82% of both current study and literature patients with disseminated fusariosis, while the remaining 16% had 2 noncontiguous sites of infection but negative blood cultures. Surgical removal of focal lesions was effective in both current study and literature cases. Skin lesions in immunocompromised patients should raise the suspicion for skin or disseminated fusariosis. The combination of medical monotherapy with voriconazole or amphotericin B and surgery in such cases is highly suggested. PMID:24145697

  19. Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... it, you'll be saying bye-bye to fungi (say: FUN-guy). What Is a Fungal Infection? Fungi , the word for more than one fungus, can ... but of course, they're not!). Because the fungi that cause tinea (ringworm) live on different parts ...

  20. Hepatitis Infection in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence and Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kresina, Thomas F; Sylvestre, Diana; Seeff, Leonard; Litwin, Alain H; Hoffman, Kenneth; Lubran, Robert; Clark, H Westley

    2008-01-01

    Many new and existing cases of viral hepatitis infections are related to injection drug use. Transmission of these infections can result directly from the use of injection equipment that is contaminated with blood containing the hepatitis B or C virus or through sexual contact with an infected individual. In the latter case, drug use can indirectly contribute to hepatitis transmission through the dis-inhibited at-risk behavior, that is, unprotected sex with an infected partner. Individuals who inject drugs are at-risk for infection from different hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A, B, or C. Those with chronic hepatitis B virus infection also face additional risk should they become co-infected with hepatitis D virus. Protection from the transmission of hepatitis viruses A and B is best achieved by vaccination. For those with a history of or who currently inject drugs, the medical management of viral hepatitis infection comprising screening, testing, counseling and providing care and treatment is evolving. Components of the medical management of hepatitis infection, for persons considering, initiating, or receiving pharmacologic therapy for opioid addiction include: testing for hepatitis B and C infections; education and counseling regarding at-risk behavior and hepatitis transmission, acute and chronic hepatitis infection, liver disease and its care and treatment; vaccination against hepatitis A and B infection; and integrative primary care as part of the comprehensive treatment approach for recovery from opioid abuse and dependence. In addition, participation in a peer support group as part of integrated medical care enhances treatment outcomes. Liver disease is highly prevalent in patient populations seeking recovery from opioid addiction or who are currently receiving pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. Pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction is not a contraindication to evaluation, care, or treatment of liver disease due to hepatitis virus infection. Successful

  1. Fungal nail infection

    MedlinePlus

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  2. Viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Puigdomènech, Isabel; de Armas-Rillo, Laura; Machado, José-David

    2011-01-01

    Viruses have developed different survival strategies in host cells by crossing cell-membrane compartments, during different steps of their viral life cycle. In fact, the non-regenerative viral membrane of enveloped viruses needs to encounter the dynamic cell-host membrane, during early steps of the infection process, in which both membranes fuse, either at cell-surface or in an endocytic compartment, to promote viral entry and infection. Once inside the cell, many viruses accomplish their replication process through exploiting or modulating membrane traffic, and generating specialized compartments to assure viral replication, viral budding and spreading, which also serve to evade the immune responses against the pathogen. In this review, we have attempted to present some data that highlight the importance of membrane dynamics during viral entry and replicative processes, in order to understand how viruses use and move through different complex and dynamic cell-membrane structures and how they use them to persist. PMID:21966556

  3. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Prendergast, Bernard D

    2016-02-27

    Infective endocarditis occurs worldwide, and is defined by infection of a native or prosthetic heart valve, the endocardial surface, or an indwelling cardiac device. The causes and epidemiology of the disease have evolved in recent decades with a doubling of the average patient age and an increased prevalence in patients with indwelling cardiac devices. The microbiology of the disease has also changed, and staphylococci, most often associated with health-care contact and invasive procedures, have overtaken streptococci as the most common cause of the disease. Although novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have emerged, 1 year mortality has not improved and remains at 30%, which is worse than for many cancers. Logistical barriers and an absence of randomised trials hinder clinical management, and longstanding controversies such as use of antibiotic prophylaxis remain unresolved. In this Seminar, we discuss clinical practice, controversies, and strategies needed to target this potentially devastating disease.

  4. Dermatophyte infections.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Barry L

    2003-01-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi that require keratin for growth. These fungi can cause superficial infections of the skin, hair, and nails. Dermatophytes are spread by direct contact from other people (anthropophilic organisms), animals (zoophilic organisms), and soil (geophilic organisms), as well as indirectly from fomites. Dermatophyte infections can be readily diagnosed based on the history, physical examination, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) microscopy. Diagnosis occasionally requires Wood's lamp examination and fungal culture or histologic examination. Topical therapy is used for most dermatophyte infections. Cure rates are higher and treatment courses are shorter with topical fungicidal allylamines than with fungistatic azoles. Oral therapy is preferred for tinea capitis, tinea barbae, and onychomycosis. Orally administered griseofulvin remains the standard treatment for tinea capitis. Topical treatment of onychomycosis with ciclopirox nail lacquer has a low cure rate. For onychomycosis, "pulse" oral therapy with the newer imidazoles (itraconazole or fluconazole) or allylamines (terbinafine) is considerably less expensive than continuous treatment but has a somewhat lower mycologic cure rate. The diagnosis of onychomycosis should be confirmed by KOH microscopy, culture, or histologic examination before therapy is initiated, because of the expense, duration, and potential adverse effects of treatment.

  5. Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Daniel A.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is rare in developed countries. However, recent outbreaks in the United States and Europe and the potential use of the bacteria for bioterrorism have focused interest on it. Furthermore, although anthrax was known to typically occur as one of three syndromes related to entry site of (i.e., cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational), a fourth syndrome including severe soft tissue infection in injectional drug users is emerging. Although shock has been described with cutaneous anthrax, it appears much more common with gastrointestinal, inhalational (5 of 11 patients in the 2001 outbreak in the United States), and injectional anthrax. Based in part on case series, the estimated mortalities of cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalational, and injectional anthrax are 1%, 25 to 60%, 46%, and 33%, respectively. Nonspecific early symptomatology makes initial identification of anthrax cases difficult. Clues to anthrax infection include history of exposure to herbivore animal products, heroin use, or clustering of patients with similar respiratory symptoms concerning for a bioterrorist event. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with Gram stain and culture from blood or surgical specimens followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR or immunohistochemistry). Although antibiotic therapy (largely quinolone-based) is the mainstay of anthrax treatment, the use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists is a consideration. PMID:21852539

  6. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Fonseca, Ana Catarina

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease of the endocardium of the heart and cardiac valves, caused by a variety of infectious agents, ranging from streptococci to rickettsia. The proportion of cases associated with rheumatic valvulopathy and dental surgery has decreased in recent years, while endocarditis associated with intravenous drug abuse, prosthetic valves, degenerative valve disease, implanted cardiac devices, and iatrogenic or nosocomial infections has emerged. Endocarditis causes constitutional, cardiac and multiorgan symptoms and signs. The central nervous system can be affected in the form of meningitis, cerebritis, encephalopathy, seizures, brain abscess, ischemic embolic stroke, mycotic aneurysm, and subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke in endocarditis is an ominous prognostic sign. Treatment of endocarditis includes prolonged appropriate antimicrobial therapy and in selected cases, cardiac surgery. In ischemic stroke associated with infective endocarditis there is no indication to start antithrombotic drugs. In previously anticoagulated patients with an ischemic stroke, oral anticoagulants should be replaced by unfractionated heparin, while in intracranial hemorrhage, all anticoagulation should be interrupted. The majority of unruptured mycotic aneurysms can be treated by antibiotics, but for ruptured aneurysms, endovascular or neurosurgical therapy is indicated.

  7. Fish tapeworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    Fish tapeworm infection is an intestinal infection with the tapeworm parasite found in fish. ... The fish tapeworm ( Diphyllobothrium latum ) is the largest parasite that infects humans. Humans become infected when they eat raw ...

  8. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Holland, Thomas L; Baddour, Larry M; Bayer, Arnold S; Hoen, Bruno; Miro, Jose M; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a rare, life-threatening disease that has long-lasting effects even among patients who survive and are cured. IE disproportionately affects those with underlying structural heart disease and is increasingly associated with health care contact, particularly in patients who have intravascular prosthetic material. In the setting of bacteraemia with a pathogenic organism, an infected vegetation may form as the end result of complex interactions between invading microorganisms and the host immune system. Once established, IE can involve almost any organ system in the body. The diagnosis of IE may be difficult to establish and a strategy that combines clinical, microbiological and echocardiography results has been codified in the modified Duke criteria. In cases of blood culture-negative IE, the diagnosis may be especially challenging, and novel microbiological and imaging techniques have been developed to establish its presence. Once diagnosed, IE is best managed by a multidisciplinary team with expertise in infectious diseases, cardiology and cardiac surgery. Antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of IE remains controversial. Efforts to develop a vaccine that targets common bacterial causes of IE are ongoing, but have not yet yielded a commercially available product. PMID:27582414

  9. [Norovirus infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2007-10-01

    During the last winter season, there was the hitherto largest norovirus gastroenteritis epidemic in Germany. Noroviruses are genetically highly variable, non-enveloped viruses with a single-stranded, positive sense RNA genome. They are the major cause of epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and have been identified as the cause of more than 70% of outbreaks and approximately half of all gastroenteritis outbreaks. Noroviruses also are frequently involved in sporadic cases of gastroenteritis. Typically, norovirus-associated enteritis is characterized by the sudden onset of vomiting and watery diarrhoea, frequently accompanied by several unspecific symptoms, e. g. abdominal pain, anorexia, malaise, headache, and low-grade fever. Diarrhoea without emesis as well as asymptomatic infections is also common. With few exceptions, diseases due to noroviruses are self-limited and the illness duration is restricted to a few days. Noroviruses are transmitted primarily from person-to-person by the faecal-oral route, but airborne transmission also occurs. Contamination of food and water represent important sources for human infection. Treatment ofnorovirus gastroenteritis is usually symptomatic and comprises a sufficient fluid and electrolyte substitution. There is no specific antiviral therapy. For prophylaxis, obeying of common hygienic rules in canteen kitchens and community institutions is regarded to be sufficient. Food with high risk of contamination should be cooked thoroughly. Because of the high stability of noroviruses to several environmental conditions, disinfection should be performed applying disinfectants with proven activity against noroviruses.

  10. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  11. The DisHuman Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine; Liddiard, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the relationship between the human and disability; with specific focus on the lives of disabled children and young people. We begin with an analysis of the close relationship between "the disabled" and "the freak". We demonstrate that the historical markings of disability as object of curiosity and…

  12. Physics results from polarized DIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G. P.

    1998-03-23

    We have extracted polarized nucleon distributions from recent data at CERN, SLAC and DESY. The flavor-dependent valence and sea quark spin distributions are determined for each experiment. We take into account possible differences in the up and down sea distributions, and assume that the strange sea contribution is suppressed by mass effects. Physics results determined from different experiments are compared, including higher order corrections.

  13. DisPATCh as a tool to evaluate coarse-scale remotely sensed soil moisture using localized in situ measurements: Application to SMOS and AMSR-E data in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbéteau, Yoann; Merlin, Olivier; Molero, Beatriz; Rüdiger, Christoph; Bacon, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Validating coarse-scale satellite soil moisture data still represents a big challenge, notably due to the large mismatch existing between the spatial resolution (> 10 km) of microwave radiometers and the representativeness scale (several m) of localized in situ measurements. This study aims to examine the potential of DisPATCh (Disaggregation based on Physical and Theoretical scale Change) for validating SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) and AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth observation system) level-3 soil moisture products. The ∽40-50 km resolution SMOS and AMSR-E data are disaggregated at 1 km resolution over the Murrumbidgee catchment in Southeastern Australia during a one year period in 2010-2011, and the satellite products are compared with the in situ measurements of 38 stations distributed within the study area. It is found that disaggregation improves the mean difference, correlation coefficient and slope of the linear regression between satellite and in situ data in 77%, 92% and 94% of cases, respectively. Nevertheless, the downscaling efficiency is lower in winter than during the hotter months when DisPATCh performance is optimal. Consistently, better results are obtained in the semi-arid than in a temperate zone of the catchment. In the semi-arid Yanco region, disaggregation in summer increases the correlation coefficient from 0.63 to 0.78 and from 0.42 to 0.71 for SMOS and AMSR-E in morning overpasses and from 0.37 to 0.63 and from 0.47 to 0.73 for SMOS and AMSR-E in afternoon overpasses, respectively. DisPATCh has strong potential in low vegetated semi-arid areas where it can be used as a tool to evaluate coarse-scale remotely sensed soil moisture by explicitly representing the sub-pixel variability.

  14. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Listeria Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Listeria Infections Print A ... to Call the Doctor en español Listeriosis About Listeria Listeria infections (known as listeriosis ) are rare. When ...

  15. Infections and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you are pregnant, an infection can be more than just a problem for you. Some infections can be dangerous to your baby. You can help yourself avoid infections: Don't eat raw or undercooked meat Don' ...

  16. Chlamydial infections - male

    MedlinePlus

    Chlamydia infection in males is an infection of the urethra (the tube that drains urine from the ... and passes through the penis). This type of chlamydia infection is passed from one person to another ...

  17. Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    MedlinePlus

    CMV mononucleosis; Cytomegalovirus (CMV) ... Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) is very common. The infection is spread by: Blood transfusions Organ transplants Respiratory droplets Saliva Sexual contact ...

  18. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Herregods, M-C

    2011-01-01

    Despite the progress in medicine, infectious endocarditis is often diagnosed late, as its symptomatology is subject to a high variability. The clinical features are usually atypical. Since the introduction of the Duke criteria, clinical, bacteriological and echocardiographical findings are being integrated, allowing an earlier definitive diagnosis. The incidence remains practically stable. The decrease in post-rheumatic valvular heart disease at population level is compensated by an increase in degenerative valvular heart disease as predisposing factor. Moreover, the share of patients with intravascular foreign material is increasing. Endocarditis is usually characterized by a complicated development. About half of the patients develop heart failure as a consequence of the destruction of the affected valve with serious valvular insufficiency. One third of the patients present cerebral or peripheral embolization. Embolization predominantly occurs at the beginning, until the first two weeks of antibiotic treatment. Abscess formation occurs more frequently than is suspected based on echographical examinations. Particularly a Staphylococcus aureus infection in the presence of an artificial valve leads to extravalvular extension with abscess formation around the artificial valve. Treatment should be initiated promptly. High doses of antibiotics, tailored to the microorganism and the valve type (native or artificial valve), are administered intravenously during four, or more frequently, six weeks. In more than half of the patients cardiac surgery is also required. As soon as an indication for cardiac surgery is present, the operation should not be postponed. Experience learns that a smaller risk is associated with an early intervention. The operation is performed in a technically easier way. Eventually, also the total duration of hospitalization is shorter. Despite the available antibiotics and the technical progress in cardiac surgery, mortality remains high. This is

  19. Monitoring of West Nile virus infections in Germany.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, U; Seidowski, D; Angenvoort, J; Eiden, M; Müller, K; Nowotny, N; Groschup, M H

    2012-09-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a flavivirus that is maintained in an enzootic cycle between ornithophilic mosquitoes, mainly of the Culex genus, and certain wild bird species. Other bird species like ravens, jays and raptors are highly susceptible to the infection and may develop deadly encephalitis, while further species of birds are only going through subclinical infection. The objective of this study was to continue in years 2009-2011 the serological and molecular surveillance in wild birds in Germany (see Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 10, 639) and to expand these investigations for the first time also to sera from domestic poultry and horses collected between 2005 and 2009. All three cohorts function as indicators for the endemic circulation of WNV. The presence of WNV-specific antibodies was detected in all samples by virus neutralization test (VNT), indirect immunofluorescence test (IFT) and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The presence of WNV genomes was monitored in relevant sera using two qRT-PCRs that amplify lineage 1 and 2 strains. A total of 364 migratory and resident wild bird serum samples (with emphasis on Passeriformes and Falconiformes) as well as 1119 serum samples from domestic poultry and 1282 sera from horses were analysed. With the exception of one hooded crow, antibody carriers were exclusively found in migratory birds, but not in resident birds/domestic poultry or in local horses. Crows are facultative, short-distance winter migrants in Germany. WNV-specific nucleic acids could not be demonstrated in any of the samples. According to these data, there is no convincing evidence for indigenous WNV infections in equines and in wild/domestic birds in Germany. However, since a few years, WNV infections are endemic in other European countries such as Austria, Hungary, Greece and Italy, a state-of-the-art surveillance system for the detection of incursions of WNV into Germany deems mandatory.

  20. Who Gets Fungal Infections?

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections can also happen in people without weak immune systems Fungal infections that are not life-threatening, such ... likely to cause an infection. People with weak immune systems Infections that happen because a person’s immune system ...

  1. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  2. [Infection and urinary lithiasis].

    PubMed

    Bruyere, F; Traxer, O; Saussine, C; Lechevallier, E

    2008-12-01

    Urinary infection is a risk factor for lithiasis. Urinary tract infection is a factor of gravity of urinary stone. The stone can exist before the infection which colonizes the stone, infected stone. The infection can be the cause of the stone, infectious stone (struvite stone). Infectious stones can be secondary to a non urinary infectious agent, oxalobacter formigenes (OF) and nanobacteria. The first-line treatment of struvite stone is percutaneous surgery. Perioperative antibiotics, renal urines and stone cultures are obligatory. PMID:19033073

  3. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI. PMID:26950194

  4. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Botwin, Gregory J; Morgan, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial infections occur in 25-35 % of cirrhotics admitted to hospital. Health-care associated and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections are the most common epidemiology, with community acquired infections less common (15-30 %). Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and urinary infections are the most common sites, with spontaneous bacteremia, pneumonia, cellulitis and other sites being less common. The risk of infection is increased among subjects with more severe liver disease and an infection in the past 6 months. Bacteria are isolated from approximately half of patients with a clinical diagnosis of infection. Gram-negative enterobacteriaceae are the most common organisms among community acquired infections; Gram-positive cocci are the most common organisms isolated among subjects with nosocomial infections. Up to 30 % of hospital associated infections are with multidrug resistant bacteria. Consequently, empiric antibiotic therapy that is recommended for community acquired infections is often inadequate for nosocomial infections. Infections worsen liver function. In-hospital and 1-year mortality of cirrhotics with infections is significantly higher than among cirrhotics without infection. In-hospital complications of infections, such as severe sepsis and septic shock, and mortality, are increased among subjects with multidrug-resistant infections as compared with cirrhotics with susceptible bacteria. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis of cirrhotics with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and long-term antibiotic prophylaxis of selected cirrhotics with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis reduces infections and improves survival. Albumin administration to cirrhotics with SBP and evidence of advanced liver disease improves survival. The benefit of albumin administration to cirrhotics with infections other than SBP is under investigation. PMID:26201326

  5. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  6. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days. NIH: National Institute ...

  7. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  8. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the urethra is called urethritis . Some UTIs Lead to Severe Problems Most UTIs are not serious. But some UTIs, such as kidney infections, can lead to severe problems. Bacteria from a kidney infection ...

  9. Urinary tract infection - children

    MedlinePlus

    UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children ... They may occur often around age 3, as children begin toilet training. Boys who are not circumcised ...

  10. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  11. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  12. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  13. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  14. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2010). Candida Infections of the Genitourinary Tract . Clinical Microbiology Reviews; 23(2): 253–273. National Institute of ... 2010). Candida Infections of the Genitourinary Tract . Clinical Microbiology Reviews; 23(2): 253–273. National Institute of ...

  15. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fungal Skin Infections Overview of Fungal Skin Infections Candidiasis Overview of Dermatophytoses (Ringworm, Tinea) Athlete's Foot Jock ... are caused by yeasts (such as Candida —see Candidiasis ) or dermatophytes, such as Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton ( ...

  16. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  17. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  18. Tapeworm infection - Hymenolepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States. Insects eat the eggs of these worms. Humans and other animals become infected when they ... an infected person, it is possible for the worm's entire life cycle to be completed in the ...

  19. Necrotizing soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Urschel, J.

    1999-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a group of highly lethal infections that typically occur after trauma or surgery. Many individual infectious entities have been described, but they all have similar pathophysiologies, clinical features, and treatment approaches. The essentials of successful treatment include early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics, and supportive intensive treatment unit care. The two commonest pitfalls in management are failure of early diagnosis and inadequate surgical debridement. These life-threatening infections are often mistaken for cellulitis or innocent wound infections, and this is responsible for diagnostic delay. Tissue gas is not a universal finding in necrotizing soft tissue infections. This misconception also contributes to diagnostic errors. Incision and drainage is an inappropriate surgical strategy for necrotizing soft tissue infections; excisional debridement is needed. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be useful, but it is not as important as aggressive surgical therapy. Despite advances in antibiotic therapy and intensive treatment unit medicine, the mortality of necrotizing soft tissue infections is still high. This article emphasizes common treatment principles for all of these infections, and reviews some of the more important individual necrotizing soft tissue infectious entities.


Keywords: fasciitis; gas gangrene; clostridium infections; streptococcal infections; necrosis; debridement; surgical infections; soft tissue infections PMID:10621873

  20. Recurrent infective endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Lossos, I. S.; Oren, R.

    1993-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease associated with high mortality. Patients surviving recurrent bouts of infective endocarditis are reported infrequently. We report on a non-drug abuser patient who experienced seven episodes of infective endocarditis--the largest number reported to our knowledge in a single non-drug abuser patient. PMID:8290417

  1. Disseminated Balamuthia mandrillaris Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neil; Almira-Suarez, M. I.; Reese, Jennifer M.; Hoke, George M.; Mandell, James W.; Roy, Sharon L.; Visvesvara, Govinda

    2015-01-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a rare cause of human infection, but when infections do occur, they result in high rates of morbidity and mortality. A case of disseminated Balamuthia infection is presented. Early diagnosis and initiation of recommended therapy are essential for increased chances of successful outcomes. PMID:26135864

  2. Infections and intravascular devices.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T S; Faroqui, M H

    Complications associated with intravascular devices include infections mainly caused by Staphylococcus epidermis and S. aureus. The reported incidence of these infections varies. Several factors influence the propensity for catheter infections. We recommend strategies for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related sepsis. PMID:1422561

  3. Infection after hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Ring, David

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative infections are uncommon after hand surgery. Infection can delay recovery and contribute to scarring and stiffness. Measures intended to reduce the risk of infection after hand surgery include hand washing, skin preparation, sterile technique, and prophylactic antibiotics. The role of prophylactic antibiotics for small, clean, elective hand surgery procedures lasting less than 2 hours is debated.

  4. Infection after hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Ring, David

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative infections are uncommon after hand surgery. Infection can delay recovery and contribute to scarring and stiffness. Measures intended to reduce the risk of infection after hand surgery include hand washing, skin preparation, sterile technique, and prophylactic antibiotics. The role of prophylactic antibiotics for small, clean, elective hand surgery procedures lasting less than 2 hours is debated. PMID:25934209

  5. Inflammation, Infection, and Future Cardiovascular Risk

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-15

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Myocardial Infarction; Venous Thromboembolism; Heart Diseases; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Herpesviridae Infections; Inflammation

  6. Informatics in Infection Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Michael Y; Trick, William E

    2016-09-01

    Informatics tools are becoming integral to routine infection control activities. Informatics has the potential to improve infection control outcomes in surveillance, prevention, and connections with public health. Surveillance activities include fully or semiautomated surveillance of infections, surveillance of device use, and hospital/ward outbreak investigation. Prevention activities include awareness of multidrug-resistant organism carriage on admission, enhanced interfacility communication, identifying inappropriate infection precautions, reducing device use, and antimicrobial stewardship. Public health activities include electronic communicable disease reporting, syndromic surveillance, and regional outbreak detection. The challenge for infection control personnel is in translating the knowledge gained from electronic surveillance systems into action.

  7. Opportunistic Infections and Other Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxo) Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) Tuberculosis (TB) Vaginal yeast infections Treatments for HIV/AIDS Research and clinical ... fact sheet Urinary tract infections fact sheet Vaginal yeast infections fact sheet More information on opportunistic infections ...

  8. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds of infections. These infections can range from mild ear infections to severe diseases, like bloodstream infections. When the bacteria invade parts of the body that are normally free from germs, like spinal fluid or blood, this ...

  9. Diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Gemechu, Fassil W; Seemant, Fnu; Curley, Catherine A

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic foot infection, defined as soft tissue or bone infection below the malleoli, is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus leading to hospitalization and the most frequent cause of nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. Diabetic foot infections are diagnosed clinically based on the presence of at least two classic findings of inflammation or purulence. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial. The most common pathogens are aerobic gram-positive cocci, mainly Staphylococcus species. Osteomyelitis is a serious complication of diabetic foot infection that increases the likelihood of surgical intervention. Treatment is based on the extent and severity of the infection and comorbid conditions. Mild infections are treated with oral antibiotics, wound care, and pressure off-loading in the outpatient setting. Selected patients with moderate infections and all patients with severe infections should be hospitalized, given intravenous antibiotics, and evaluated for possible surgical intervention. Peripheral arterial disease is present in up to 40% of patients with diabetic foot infections, making evaluation of the vascular supply critical. All patients with diabetes should undergo a systematic foot examination at least once a year, and more frequently if risk factors for diabetic foot ulcers exist. Preventive measures include patient education on proper foot care, glycemic and blood pressure control, smoking cessation, use of prescription footwear, intensive care from a podiatrist, and evaluation for surgical interventions as indicated.

  10. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  11. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F.; Miner, Lonnie; Petheram, Susan J.

    2002-05-01

    Intrauterine infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a betaherpesvirus, remains the most frequent congenital virus infection in many regions of the world. Although most CMV-infected newborns lack signs of CMV infection, approximately 10% have signs that can consist of low birth weight, jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, skin rash, microcephaly, and chorioretinitis. Neonates with signs of CMV infection at birth have high rates of audiologic and neurodevelopmental sequelae. Although postnatal therapy with ganciclovir transiently reduces virus shedding and may lessen the audiologic consequences of CMV in some infected infants, additional strategies are needed to prevent congenital CMV disease and to improve the neurodevelopmental prognosis of infants infected with CMV in utero. Some cases of intrauterine infections can be prevented in susceptible women by avoiding contact with the urine or saliva of young children who may be shedding CMV. Vaccines against CMV remain in the experimental stages of development. Termination of pregnancy can be offered to women whose infants have evidence of intrauterine CMV infection and sonographic signs of central nervous system damage. Infants who survive symptomatic intrauterine infections have high rates of neurodevelopmental sequelae and require comprehensive evaluation and therapy through center and home-based early intervention programs. PMID:11931729

  12. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  13. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  14. [Diagnosis of congenital infection].

    PubMed

    Sampedro Martínez, Antonio; Martínez, Luis Aliaga; Teatino, Pablo Mazuelas; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier

    2011-12-01

    In general, congenital diagnosis is based on: a) maternal serologic assays; b) microbiologic study of amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling; and c) serology in children and microorganism detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or culture. Congenital infections due to cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, varicella, B19 erythrovirus and toxoplasmosis are usually the result of primary infection in the mother. Therefore, when IgG antibodies are detected before pregnancy, these infections are ruled out. Definitive serologic diagnosis of acute infection in pregnant women requires the demonstration of seroconversion (i.e., from seronegative to seropositive). In these cases, amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling should be performed to determine the presence of intrauterine congenital infection. Cytomegalovirus, rubella and toxoplasmosis can be diagnosed by detection of specific IgM antibodies in fetal blood. However, PCR in amniotic fluid has replaced conventional prenatal diagnostic techniques, including fetal blood sampling, in the diagnosis of these infections. In the newborn, these infections may be confirmed by measuring IgM specific antibodies. B19 erythrovirus can be detected by PCR in amniotic fluid or fetal blood. Congenital varicella-zoster infection may be diagnosed on the basis of persistence of IgG antibodies after birth. Definitive diagnosis of herpes simplex virus infection requires viral isolation. Swabs or scraping from clinical specimens can be inoculated into susceptible cell lines for isolation. PMID:22305665

  15. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection. PMID:27509655

  16. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  17. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  18. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections.

  19. Particle exposures and infections.

    PubMed

    Ghio, A J

    2014-06-01

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, agricultural work, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), wood stoves, traffic-related emissions, gas stoves, and ambient air pollution are all particle-related exposures associated with an increased risk for respiratory infections. In addition, cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, and ETS can result in an elevated risk for tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis. One of the mechanisms for particle-related infections includes an accumulation of iron by surface functional groups of particulate matter (PM). Since elevations in metal availability are common to every particle exposure, all PM potentially contributes to these infections. Therefore, exposures to wood stove emissions, diesel exhaust, and air pollution particles are predicted to increase the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis, albeit these elevations are likely to be small and detectable only in large population studies. Since iron accumulation correlates with the presence of surface functional groups and dependent metal coordination by the PM, the risk for infection continues as long as the particle is retained. Subsequently, it is expected that the cessation of exposure will diminish, but not totally reverse, the elevated risk for infection.

  20. Preventing infections when visiting

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 36. Infection control. In: Mills JE, ed. Nursing Procedures . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009:chap 2. Pollock M. Universal precautions. ...

  1. Corneal ulcers and infections

    MedlinePlus

    Bacterial keratitis; Fungal keratitis; Acanthamoeba keratitis; Herpes simplex keratitis ... occur in people with a suppressed immune system. Herpes simplex keratitis is a serious viral infection. It ...

  2. Preventing Giardia Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, W. Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Outdoor recreationists are at risk for developing giardia infection from drinking contaminated stream water. Giardia is the most common human parasite found in contaminated water that causes gastrointestinal illness. Describes medical treatment and ways of preventing infection through water treatment, including heat, filtration, and chemical…

  3. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body. You may have a UTI if you notice ...

  4. Repeated Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of an infection, such as being in day-care centers. Children in day-care centers give infections to each other. They drool ... winter, you could move your child out of day care, where so many other children would have colds. ...

  5. Infection prevention in NOTES.

    PubMed

    Kantsevoy, Sergey V

    2008-04-01

    Prevention of infection during natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) was identified as one of the most important challenges for translumenal surgery. Does infection prevention during NOTES warrant such attention? This article summarizes the accumulated data about septic complications during translumenal surgery.

  6. [Nosocomial urinary infections].

    PubMed

    Butreau-Lemaire, M; Botto, H

    1997-09-01

    The concept of nosocomial urinary tract infection now corresponds to a precise definition. It is generally related to bladder catheterization, constitutes the most frequent form of nosocomial infection (30 to 50% of infections), and represents the third most frequent portal of entry of bacteraemia. The organism most frequently isolated is Escherichia coli; but the flora is changing and the ecological distribution is continually modified. Despite their usually benign nature, these nosocomial infections can nevertheless influence hospital mortality; they increase the hospital stay by an average of 2.5 days and their treatment represents a large share of the antibiotic budget. Prevention of these infections is therefore essential, with particular emphasis on simple and universally accessible measures: very precise indications for vesical catheterization, use of closed circuit drainage, maximal asepsis when handling catheters, after washing the hands.

  7. [Infection by human cytomegalovirus].

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu Gámez, Sara; Ruiz, Mercedes Pérez; Navarro Marí, José María

    2014-02-01

    Prevalence of human cytomegalovirus infection is very high worldwide. Following primary infection, the virus remains latent, being able to cause recurrences either by reinfection with a new strain or by reactivation of the replication of the latent virus. The most severe disease is seen in congenital infection and in immunosuppressed patients, in whom the virus act as an opportunistic pathogen. Serological techniques are the methods of choice in primary infection and to determine the immune status against CMV in organ donor and receptor. Although well-standardized studies are lacking, the recent commercial availability of methods that measure cellular immune response are promising to predict the risk of CMV disease in immunosuppressed individuals. Molecular assays, that have gradually been substituting viral culture and/or antigen detection, are the most widely used methods for the diagnosis and control of CMV infection.

  8. Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... faeces, which contaminate the soil in areas where sanitation is poor. Approximately 2 billion people are infected ... worms health education to prevent re-infection improved sanitation to reduce soil contamination with infective eggs. Safe ...

  9. Infections in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Andréa; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with a risk of severe infections. While neutropenia is likely to be the main predisposing factor, several other immune defects have been reported, including impaired neutrophil function, B-, T- and NK-cell defects and the possible consequences of iron overload due to red blood cell transfusions. The advanced age of most patients, their frequent comorbidities, and the fact that drugs such as hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide, which are effective in myelodysplastic syndromes but can transiently worsen neutropenia, may increase the risk of infection and their severity in this context. The majority of infections in myelodysplastic syndromes are bacterial, while the incidence of fungal infections is not well known and viral infections seem to be rare. No prophylactic measures against infections have demonstrated efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes. However, pending more data, we propose here some recommendations for the management of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In the future, an important contribution can be made by prospective trials testing the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to infection in these patients, especially in the context of the new drugs available for myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:22733024

  10. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  11. [CMV infection in elderly].

    PubMed

    Pytka, Dorota; Czarkowska-Pączek, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects approximately 40-90% of the world population. The infection is usually asymptomatic in immunocompetent persons. However, it may have negative impact on physiological status or accompanying diseases especially in the elderly. In particular, increasing number of data suggests that persistent infection with CMV is associated with accelerated aging of the immune system accompanying by the decrease in the number of naïve T cells, the increase in in the number of late-differentiated T cells, and reduced TCD4/ TCD8 ratio. This constellation reduces immunity against a variety of diseases, including infectious diseases, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and alters the response to vaccinations. CMV infection could also influence the pathophysiology of age-related diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, however, the mechanism of such influence is still not clear. It is not clear as well, whether CMV infection influences the all-cause and cardiovascular diseases-related mortality. In conclusion, CMV infection could intensify immunosenescence and contribute to age-related diseases, but inconsistent results of many experiments do not allow currently to define clear guidelines for the treatment of CMV infection in elderly. PMID:27526428

  12. Rarely seen infections.

    PubMed

    Amer, Mohamed; Amer, Amin

    2014-01-01

    There are many rare cutaneous infections of the face. This phrase seems irrelevant, because rare infections in certain parts of the world are common in others. This is more apparent if applied to different sites of the body (eg, face). For instance, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is common in Central and South America and uncommon in the United States. Because most medical practitioners in this country have never seen a case, it is easy for them to miss a diagnosis. Cutaneous leishmaniasis, a protozoan infection transmitted by phlebotomine sand flies, is typically divided into two forms: one found in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and southern Europe, called Old World leishmaniasis, and one found in Latin and Central America, called New World leishmaniasis. Also atypical mycobacterial infection has been described in the medical literature since the mid-1950s. The development and introduction of a rapid radiometric mycobacterial detection system has advanced the field of mycobacteriology over the past 20 years. This method has allowed the distinction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from other mycobacteria and enabled the performance of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of mycobacteria. The increased frequency of atypical mycobacterial infection stems from advances in the diagnostic procedures concerning the infection paired with the prevalence of mycobacterial disease in immunocompromised patients infected with HIV. Erysipelas and facial cellulitis are covered briefly in this paper.

  13. DENGUE INFECTION IN PREGNANCY.

    PubMed

    Khamim, Kriangsak; Khamim, Boonluck; Pengsaa, Krisana

    2015-01-01

    While dengue infection is still on the increase in adults in Thailand, it also affects pregnant women, especially pregnant teenagers. This study was designed to investigate dengue infection during pregnancy. Seven cases of dengue infection in pregnant women were admitted to Ban Pong Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Dengue infection presented in all pregnancy trimesters. There were two severe cases: one was dengue hemorrhagic fever in the first trimester, and the second was at a critical stage of the infection during labor. There were three cases of abortion. These three cases included one complete, one incomplete, and one threatened abortion, with rising hematocrits of 22.8%, 17.1%, and 14.7%, respectively. Two out of the three teenage pregnancies experienced complete and threatened abortions, while the third abortion case was a threatened abortion pregnancy at the critical stage of infection during intrapartum. Leukopenia was identified in six out of seven women. Low baseline hematocrit and low maximum hematocrit were laboratory findings. Clinical management involved administration of intravenous fluids and antipyretics. Favorable outcomes can be obtained through early diagnosis and supportive treatment. The morbidity profile can be more serious in teenage pregnancies. Additional studies should be conducted to establish whether low baseline hematocrit, low percentages of rising hematocrit in pregnant women with dengue infection, and abortions (with a high degree of increasing hematocrit during the critical stage of the disease) are typical clinical signs.

  14. Hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Dalton, Harry R; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  15. DENGUE INFECTION IN PREGNANCY.

    PubMed

    Khamim, Kriangsak; Khamim, Boonluck; Pengsaa, Krisana

    2015-01-01

    While dengue infection is still on the increase in adults in Thailand, it also affects pregnant women, especially pregnant teenagers. This study was designed to investigate dengue infection during pregnancy. Seven cases of dengue infection in pregnant women were admitted to Ban Pong Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Dengue infection presented in all pregnancy trimesters. There were two severe cases: one was dengue hemorrhagic fever in the first trimester, and the second was at a critical stage of the infection during labor. There were three cases of abortion. These three cases included one complete, one incomplete, and one threatened abortion, with rising hematocrits of 22.8%, 17.1%, and 14.7%, respectively. Two out of the three teenage pregnancies experienced complete and threatened abortions, while the third abortion case was a threatened abortion pregnancy at the critical stage of infection during intrapartum. Leukopenia was identified in six out of seven women. Low baseline hematocrit and low maximum hematocrit were laboratory findings. Clinical management involved administration of intravenous fluids and antipyretics. Favorable outcomes can be obtained through early diagnosis and supportive treatment. The morbidity profile can be more serious in teenage pregnancies. Additional studies should be conducted to establish whether low baseline hematocrit, low percentages of rising hematocrit in pregnant women with dengue infection, and abortions (with a high degree of increasing hematocrit during the critical stage of the disease) are typical clinical signs. PMID:26506742

  16. Multiple sclerosis and infections.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The intersection between infections and multiple sclerosis (MS) is complex and bidirectional. Numerous infectious agents have been posited to play a role in the initiation of MS, while emerging evidence suggests a potential relationship between established MS and the gut microbiome. As both systemic and CNS infections are major complications of MS, the clinical manifestations and evolving epidemiology of these infections over the lifespan of the MS patient are examined in this review. Data from animal models and human studies are discussed. PMID:26611265

  17. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  18. Parasitic infections & ectoparasitic infestations.

    PubMed

    Cockerell, C J

    1995-06-01

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, histopathology, and differential diagnosis of parasitic infections and ectoparasitic infestations, especially scabies, in HIV-positive patients are examined. Treatment options for scabies include lindane cream or lotion or five percent permethrin cream. Precipitated sulfur in petrolatum may also be effective. Post-treatment sensitivity can be treated with corticosteroids. Various antifungal agents are used to treat demodicidosis, pneumocystosis, strongyloidiasis, amebiasis, and leishmaniasis, although different drugs may be required to treat these infections in immunocompromised hosts. Suggestions are provided to treat prurititis which accompanies these infections.

  19. Microsporidia and human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Shadduck, J A; Greeley, E

    1989-01-01

    Protozoa of the phylum Microspora are obligate intracellular pathogens that are being detected with increasing frequency in humans, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Organisms from four genera have been reported to date, and serological data suggest the occurrence of latent infections. Sources of human infections are not known, but microsporidia are widespread in lower vertebrates and invertebrates. There is no known treatment. Study of the disease in mammals suggests that infection often will be clinically silent, that intact T-cell-mediated host defenses are required for resistance, and that serious clinical disease may occur under circumstances in which extensive parasite replication can occur. Images PMID:2650860

  20. [Relationship between odontogenic infections and infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Jaime

    2012-03-24

    Revised guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis published by national and international associations in the last years do not support the indiscriminate use of antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures. However, some of them still recommend its use in high-risk patients before dental treatments likely to cause bleeding. Given the high prevalence of bacteremia of dental origin due to tooth-brushing, mastication or other daily activities, it appears unlikely that infective endocarditis from oral microorganisms can be completely prevented. A good oral health status and satisfactory level of oral hygiene are sufficient to control the consequences of the systemic spread of oral microorganisms in healthy individuals. However, caution is still needed and prophylactic antibiotics must be administered to susceptible or medically compromised patients. This review briefly outlines the current concepts of odontogenic bacteremia and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing dental treatment.

  1. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, Veronique E J; Stam, Edo D; Welborn, Kathleen M; Sas, Theo C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease.

  2. Viral infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Kwon, Ja-Young; Racicot, Karen; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be 'immunosuppressed', the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

  3. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    PubMed

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  4. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections. PMID:27168147

  5. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  6. Infective endocarditis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be transient bacteremia, which is common during dental, upper respiratory, urologic, and lower gastrointestinal diagnostic and surgical procedures. The infection can cause growths on the heart valves, the lining of the ...

  7. Infection Prevention in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pergam, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients undergoing hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation are increasing every year, as are the number of centers both transplanting and caring for these patients. Improvements in transplant procedures, immunosuppressive regimens, and prevention of transplant-associated complications have led to marked improvements in survival in both populations. Infections remain one of the most important sources of excess morbidity and mortality in transplant, and therefore, infection prevention strategies are a critical element for avoiding these complications in centers caring for high-risk patients. This manuscript aims to provide an update of recent data on prevention of major healthcare-associated infections unique to transplantation, reviews the emergence of antimicrobial resistant infections, and discusses updated strategies to both identify and prevent transmission of these pathogens in transplant recipients.

  8. Cancer treatment: preventing infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells drop too low, it is called neutropenia . Often this is a short-lived side effect ... 17, 2015. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Neutropenia and Risk for Infection. www.cdc.gov/cancer/ ...

  9. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  10. Infection and Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lee Ann; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease hallmarked by chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation in the vasculature. Although lipid modification and deposition are thought to be a major source of the continuous inflammatory stimulus, a large body of evidence suggests that infectious agents may contribute to atherosclerotic processes. This could occur by either direct effects through infection of vascular cells and/or through indirect effects by induction of cytokine and acute phase reactant proteins by infection at other sites. Multiple bacterial and viral pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis by seroepidemiological studies, identification of the infectious agent in human atherosclerotic tissue, and experimental studies demonstrating an acceleration of atherosclerosis following infection in animal models of atherosclerosis. This review will focus on those infectious agents for which biological plausibility has been demonstrated in animal models and on the challenges of proving a role of infection in human atherosclerotic disease. PMID:26004263

  11. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in people who work in the health care industry. Chronic paronychia is most common in adult women and those who work in places where their hands are kept moist, such as food handlers. Signs and Symptoms Bacterial nail infection most ...

  12. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript ... this? Submit Button Information For: Travelers Related Links Parasites A-Z Index Parasites Glossary Neglected Tropical Diseases ...

  13. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript ... this? Submit Button Information For: Travelers Related Links Parasites A-Z Index Parasites Glossary Neglected Tropical Diseases ...

  14. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  15. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Toxoplasmosis ( Toxoplasma infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Toxoplasmosis General Information Toxoplasmosis FAQs Toxoplasmosis & Pregnancy FAQs Epidemiology & ...

  16. Phlebovirus infections in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Kontana, Anastasia; Tsergouli, Katerina

    2015-07-01

    Sandfly fever viruses are endemic in the Mediterranean region causing to humans asymptomatic or mild infections to severe neurological syndromes. In order to investigate the epidemiology of phlebovirus infections in Greece, samples from 499 patients with acute febrile illness (50.2% accompanied by neurological symptoms) were tested during 2010-2014 by serological and molecular methods. Phlebovirus infection was detected in 40 (8%) patients, 25 of them presenting acute neurological infection. Most cases were observed in the summer, with a peak in August. Increased number of cases was observed in 2013, and three of them were observed in Athens. Toscana virus lineage C RNA was detected in one encephalitis case, while the serological results showed that most cases were caused by phleboviruses belonging to the sandfly fever Naples virus serocomplex. This study provided the first insight into the epidemiology of phleboviral disease in Greece.

  17. VIRAL INFECTIONS DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Racicot, Karen; Kwon, Ja-Young; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be “immunosuppressed”, the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy, and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

  18. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  19. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines to treat vaginal yeast infections are available as creams, ointments, vaginal tablets or suppositories and oral tablets. Most can be bought without needing to see your provider. Treating yourself at home is probably OK if: Your ...

  20. Systemic opportunistic fungal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Vanbreuseghem, R.; Vroey, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of "opportunistic" fungal infections in compromised hosts, asthenomycoses, differ from those caused by the same fungus in otherwise normal people. Examples are given on the field of dermatophytoses, aspergillosis, candidiasis and cryptococcosis. PMID:523345

  1. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, G N; Fernando, S; Fernando, D J; Seneviratne, S L

    2004-10-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections.

  2. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  3. Advances in infection control

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several initiatives took place in recent years in relation to nosocomial infection control in order to increase patient safety. Some of these initiatives will be commented in this brief review. PMID:27074240

  4. Fungal Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Fungal Eye Infections Recommend on ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch File Formats Help: How do ...

  5. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish). PMID:15748591

  6. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is E. coli? E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. E. ... and especially in people who have another illness. E. coli infection is more common during the summer months and ...

  7. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of most infections start within 3 days of contamination and usually go away without medical treatment. At ... surfaces regularly. Salmonellosis also can spread through cross-contamination, so when you're preparing meals, keep uncooked ...

  8. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection) FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... washcloths. Showering may be preferred to avoid possible contamination of bath water. Careful handling and frequent changing ... bedding can help reduce infection, reinfection, and environmental contamination with pinworm eggs. These items should be laundered ...

  9. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... t diagnose this condition by a person’s medical history and physical examination. They usually diagnose yeast infection by examining vaginal secretions under a microscope for evidence of yeast. Treatment Various antifungal vaginal ...

  10. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... in and drinking water from contaminated streams or lakes can lead to an infection and chronic diarrhea. ... or camping, never drink from streams, springs, or lakes unless local health authorities have certified the water ...

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two- ... breath or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of ...

  12. [Update on infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Parize, P; Mainardi, J-L

    2011-10-01

    Infective endocarditis has continuously evolved since its first clinical description by William Osler in the late 19th century. The epidemiological and microbiological profile of the disease has changed as the result of the progress of the medical care and demographic mutation in industrialized countries. Furthermore, advances in anti-infective therapy and in cardiovascular surgery have contributed to an improvement in the management and the prognosis of this severe infectious disease. During the past decade, the recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have changed dramatically. Guidelines on management of infective endocarditis and state-of-the-art articles have been published recently and this work aims to outline current recommendations about this evolving disease.

  13. Treatment of chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Cierny, George; DiPasquale, Doreen

    2006-01-01

    Failure of an acute inflammatory response to resolve a wound infection heralds a cascade of events that affects the host and pathogens, culminating in a chronic, refractory condition. The factors contributing to this outcome include immune compromise of the host, antimicrobial resistance, wound-healing deficiencies, and the adherence of pathogens to themselves and wound surfaces via an impenetrable, resistant biofilm. To eradicate chronic infection, the pathogens, biofilm, surfaces available for adherence, and compromised tissue must be removed.

  14. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    PubMed

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections.

  15. Detection and Characterization of Infections and Infection Susceptibility

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Immune Disorders; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Genetic Immunological Deficiencies; Hyperimmunoglobulin-E Recurrent Infection Syndrome; Recurrent Infections; Unknown Immune Deficiency; GATA2 Deficiency (MonoMAC); Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections; Hyper IgE (Job s) Syndrome; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Susceptibility to Disseminated Infections; Primary Immune Deficiency Disease (PIDD)

  16. Sternal mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Sternal mycobacterial infections are rare. Due to the rarity, its clinical characteristics, diagnoses, and regular management strategies are still scanty. A total of 76 articles on this topic were obtained by a comprehensive literature collection. The clinical features, diagnosis, management strategies and prognosis were carefully analyzed. There were totally 159 patients including 152 (95%) cases of tuberculosis (TB) and seven (5%) cases of non-TB sternal infections. Sternal mycobacterial infections can be categorized into three types: Primary, secondary, and postoperative, according to the pathogenesis; and categorized into isolated, peristernal, and multifocal, according to the extent of the lesions. Microbiological investigation is more sensitive than medical imaging and Mantoux tuberculin skin test in the diagnosis of sternal infections. Most patients show good responses to the standard four-drug regimen and a surgical intervention was necessary in 28.3% patients. The prognoses of the patients are good with a very low mortality. A delayed diagnosis of sternal mycobacterial infections may bring about recurrent sternal infections and sustained incurability. An early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic regimens may significantly improve the patients' outcomes. PMID:27168857

  17. Deep neck space infections.

    PubMed

    Beasley, D J; Amedee, R G

    1995-05-01

    The incidence of deep neck space infections has dramatically decreased since the advent of antibiotics, but with delayed treatment they carry the potential for significant morbidity and mortality. Odontogenic infections with involvement of the submandibular space are the most common source of deep neck space infections in adults, whereas in the pediatric population the most common cause is acute tonsillitis with involvement of the peritonsillar space. The newest group of patients at risk for deep neck space infections are intravenous drug abusers who inject the major vessels of the neck. Knowledge of neck spaces and fascial relationships is important in understanding the presentation, treatment, and complications of deep neck space infections. The spaces, which are created by various fasciae of the head and neck, are only potential spaces in that under normal conditions they cannot be examined clinically or radiographically. As the spaces are invaded by bacteria, a cellulitis or abscess occurs, and this infection may travel through paths of least resistance from one space to another.

  18. Stubborn vaginal yeast infections.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Fungi, which along with plants and animals comprise a distinct group in the classification of living things, break down and recycle organic matter. One sub-group with over 600 varieties consists of microscopic, single-celled yeasts. Of the genus Candida, the species Candida albicans accounts for 94% of all cases of fungal vaginitis. Yeasts thrive in human bodies as either beneficial or pathogenic agents. Even when they are an innocuous presence in a healthy human body, they are always poised to create opportunistic infections in susceptible individuals. Candida has been known to infect every organ of the body, but its ability to cause infection depends upon the presence of a sufficient amount of fungal organisms or generally reduced resistance or both. Often use of modern medical drugs such as oral contraceptives, antibiotics, or immunosuppressant drugs can trigger an infection. The symptoms of vaginal infection are vaginal itching, inflammation, and swelling; a burning sensation; and a white, cheesy discharge. Yeast infections can occur in females of all ages (although they are most common in women of child-bearing age) and prompt a large percentage of trips to the gynecologist. Recurrence is common, and each occurrence is harder to eradicate. Often frustrated women turn to alternative therapies. Successful treatment depends upon reducing the yeast population in the body, building up the beneficial bacteria population, limiting and controlling yeast triggers, and strengthening overall health. PMID:12318962

  19. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  20. Bartonella (Rochalimaea) quintana infections.

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, M; Raoult, D

    1996-01-01

    Bartonella (formerly Rochalimaea) quintana is the etiological agent of trench fever, a disease extensively reported during the World Wars. Recent molecular biology approaches have allowed dramatic extension of the spectrum of Bartonella infections. B. quintana is now also recognized as an etiological agent of fever and bacteremia, endocarditis, bacillary angiomatosis, and chronic lymphadenopathy. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and/or homeless people are the most vulnerable to infection. Poverty and louse infestation were the main epidemiological factors associated with B. quintana infections during wartime. Although poverty and chronic alcoholism have been associated with modern cases of trench fever and bacteremia due to B. quintana in Europe and the United States, vectors for B. quintana have not been clearly identified and B. quintana has not been isolated from modern-day lice. Microscopic bacillary angiomatosis lesions are characterized by tumor-like capillary lobules, with proliferating endothelial cells. In vitro experiments have shown that B. quintana survives within endothelial cells and stimulates cell proliferation. These observations, together with the finding that lesions may regress when antibiotic therapy is administered, strongly suggest that B. quintana itself stimulates angiogenesis. Bartonella infections are characterized by a high frequency of relapses after brief courses of antibiotic therapy. It is to be noted that in vitro, although Bartonella species are highly susceptible to antibiotics, only the aminoglycosides have proved to be bactericidal. However, the most effective antibiotic regimen for Bartonella infections remains to be established. PMID:8809460

  1. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  2. Neuroparasitic Infections: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M.D.; Zunt, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system—Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.—is reviewed. Objectives On completion of this article, the reader should be able to summarize the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of the common nematodal infections of the nervous system. Accreditation The Indiana University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit The Indiana University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 Category 1 credit toward the AMA Physicians Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. Disclosure Statements of disclosure have been obtained regarding the authors’ relevant financial relationships. The authors have nothing to disclose. PMID:16170738

  3. Hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2007-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a worldwide health problem and may cause acute, fulminant, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or hepatocelullar carcinoma (HCC). Infection with HBV in infancy or early childhood may lead to a high rate of persistent infection (25-90%), while the rates are lower if infection occurs during adulthood (5-10%). In most endemic areas, infection occurs mainly during early childhood and mother-to-infant transmission accounts for approximately 50% of the chronic infection cases. Hepatitis B during pregnancy does not increase maternal mortality or morbidity or the risk of fetal complications. Approximately 90% of the infants of HBsAg carrier mothers with positive hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) will become carriers if no immunoprophylaxis is given. Transplacental HBeAg may induce a specific non-responsiveness of helper T cells and HBcAg. Spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion to anti-HBe may develop with time but liver damage may occur during the process of the immune clearance of HBV and HBeAg. Mother-to-infant transmission of HBV from HBeAg negative but HBsAg positive mothers is the most important cause of acute or fulminant hepatitis B in infancy. Although antiviral agents are available to treat and avoid the complications of chronic hepatitis B, prevention of HBV infection is the best way for control. Screening for maternal HBsAg with/without HBeAg, followed by three to four doses of HBV vaccine in infancy and hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) within 24h of birth is the most effective way to prevent HBV infection. In areas with a low prevalence of HBV infection or with limited resources, omitting maternal screening but giving three doses of HBV vaccine universally in infancy can also produce good protective efficacy. The first universal HBV immunisation programme in the world was launched in Taiwan 22 years ago. HBV infection rates, chronicity rates, incidence of HCC and incidence of fulminant hepatitis in children have been effectively

  4. Evaluation and Field Validation of PCR Tests for Detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Subclinically Infected Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Broes, André; Harel, Josée; Kobisch, Marylène; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    Eight PCR tests were evaluated for their abilities to detect Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in swine tonsils. At first they were compared regarding their specificities by using A. pleuropneumoniae and related bacterial species and their analytical sensitivities by using tonsils experimentally infected in vitro. PCRs were carried out both directly with tonsil homogenates (direct PCR) and after culture of the sample (after-culture PCR). Most tests demonstrated good specificities; however, some tests gave false-positive results with some non-A. pleuropneumoniae species. High degrees of variation in the analytical sensitivities among the tests were observed for the direct PCRs (109 to 102 CFU/g of tonsil), whereas those of most of the after-culture PCRs were similar (102 CFU/g of tonsil). In a second phase, the effects of sample storage time and storage conditions were evaluated by using tonsils from experimentally infected animals. Storage at −20°C allowed the detection of the organism for at least 4 months. Finally, the omlA PCR test described by Savoye et al. (C. Savoye et al., Vet. Microbiol. 73:337-347, 2000) and the commercially available Adiavet App PCR test were further validated with field samples. Their effectiveness was compared to those of standard and immunomagnetic separation-based methods of bacterial isolation. In addition, a comparison of tonsil biopsy specimens (from living animals) and whole tonsils (collected at the slaughterhouse) was also conducted. A. pleuropneumoniae was neither isolated nor detected by PCR from a herd serologically negative for A. pleuropneumoniae. PCR was more sensitive than the standard isolation method with whole tonsils from three infected herds. After-culture PCR offered the highest degree of sensitivity (93 and 83% for the omlA and Adiavet App PCRs, respectively). The PCR detection rate was higher with whole tonsils than with tonsil biopsy specimens. Good agreement (κ = 0.65) was found between the presence of A

  5. Epidemiology of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Baldo, V; Baldovin, T; Trivello, R; Floreani, A

    2008-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately 130-170 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). According to data from WHO community and blood donor surveys, the African and Eastern Mediterranean countries report the highest prevalence rates (>10%). The rates of infection in the general population and the incidence of newly-acquired cases indicate an appreciable change in the epidemiology of the infection in recent years. Prior to the widespread screening of blood donations, infected blood and blood products represented a common source of infection. On the other hand, the high peak in HCV antibodies among the elderly in Italian epidemiological studies on the population at large reflects a cohort effect due to an epidemic of HCV infection occurring after the Second World War. According to data reported by the CDC Surveillance System, the incidence of acute hepatitis C has declined since the late 1980s. In 2005, as in previous years, the majority of such cases in North America and Northern Europe occurred among young adults and injected drug use was the most common risk factor. Other, less commonly reported modes of HCV acquisition are occupational exposure to blood, high-risk sexual activity, tattooing, body piercing and other forms of skin penetration. Finally, the overall rate of mother-to-child transmission from HCV-infected, HIV-negative mothers has been estimated at around 5% (coinfection with HIV raises this figure to 19.4%). HCV prevention relies on identifying and counseling uninfected persons at risk of contracting hepatitis C. PMID:18673187

  6. [Emerging invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Alvez, F; Figueras, C; Roselló, E

    2010-07-01

    The frequency and diversity of invasive fungal infections has changed over the last 25 years. The emergence of less common, but medically important fungi has increased, and the children at risk has expanded, with the inclusion of medical conditions such as cancer, mainly haematological malignancy or stem cell transplant, immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged neutropenia, and T-cell immunodeficiency. Among mould infections, fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis (Dematiaceous fungi) have been increasingly reported in this group of patients. To successfully manage these challenging infections, it is imperative that paediatricians and sub-specialists remain aware of the optimal and timely diagnosis and therapeutic options. Unlike other common mycoses that cause human disease, there no simple antigen or serological tests available to detect these pathogens in tissue or blood. The outcome for these disseminate, and often refractory fungal infections in neutropenic patients and transplant recipients remains extremely poor, requiring early and aggressive therapy. Unfortunately there are no guidelines outlining the choices for optimal therapy in the treatment of paediatric invasive fungal infections do not exist, and on the other hand are limited paediatric data available comparing antifungal agents in children with proven, probable or suspected invasive fungal infection. The options for treatment rest mainly on some adult guidelines that comment on the treatment of these emerging and uncommon important fungi in children. Despite the sparse clinical trials available on treatment and its poor outcome, options for treatment of invasive fungal infections have increased with the advance of new antifungal agents, with improved tolerability and increased range of activity. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis are discussed in this article.

  7. Infections with flaviviridae.

    PubMed

    Neyts, J; Leyssen, P; De Clercq, E

    1999-01-01

    The family of the Flaviviridae contains 3 genera: (i) the hepaciviruses, to which belongs Hepatitis C virus (HCV), (ii) the flaviviruses and (iii) the pestiviruses. Over 140 million people, more than four times the number of HIV-positive individuals, are chronically infected with the HCV. Hepatitis G virus (HGV) has not yet been assigned to a genus. The impact of this recently discovered virus is yet to be established. Infections with flaviviruses such as Yellow Fever virus (YFV), Dengue Fever virus (DENV), Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) and Tick-borne Encephalitis virus (TBEV) are emerging world-wide. The Pestiviruses, Bovine Viral Diarrhea virus (BVDV), Classical Swine Fever virus (CSFV) and Border Disease virus (BDV) have a serious impact on life-stock. At present, only treatment with interferon, alone or combined with ribavirin, has been approved for the treatment of HCV infections. No specific antivirals are available for the treatment of infections with Hepaci-, Flavi- or Pestiviruses. Possible targets for inhibition of the replication of Flaviviridae are the binding to, and the uptake of the virus in the cell; the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) of Hepaci- and Pestiviruses; viral proteases; the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the viral helicase. The search for specific inhibitors of HCV replication is hindered by the absence of an efficient cell culture system for propagation of this virus. In addition, small laboratory animals, including mice, are not susceptible to HCV infection. Flaviviruses may cause infection in mice, but do so mainly following direct intracerebral inoculation. We have established a small animal model for flavivirus infections in SCID mice inoculated peripherally with the murine flavivirus Modoc.

  8. Frequently Asked Questions about Surgical Site Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Infections What is a Surgical Site Infection (SSI)? Can SSIs be treated? What are some of ... a Surgical Site Infection? A surgical site infection (SSI) is an infection that occurs after surgery in ...

  9. [Diagnosis of maternofetal infections].

    PubMed

    Vauloup-Fellous, Christelle; Bouthry, Elise

    2015-06-01

    Prevention is an essential aspect of management of infections that can be transmitted from mother to fetus during pregnancy: The prescription and interpretation of serologic markers differ according to clinical context: screening, counts, clinical signs, or ultrasound signs. Testing for rubella IgG antibodies is recommended at the beginning of pregnancy, in the absence of written results proving either immunity or previous vaccination with two doses. Monthly serologic monitoring (IgG and IgM) is recommended for woman lacking immunity to toxoplasmosis. Diagnosis of a primary infection requires the concomitant detection of IgG and IgM. Nonetheless, the presence of specific IgM is not necessarily a marker of recent infection. IgG avidity must be measured to confirm or rule out a recent primary infection when IgM is positive. The observation of stable antibody titers is often inaccurately considered to be reassuring. In fact, depending on the individuals tested and especially the technique used, antibodies may reach a plateau several days or several weeks after the onset of the infection. Clinical diagnosis of rubella is not reliable, and its rarity today means that physicians are unlikely to recognize it or consider it as a possible differential diagnosis. Nonetheless, residual circulation of the rubella virus continues in France. A chickenpox rash is diagnosed clinically. For atypical eruptions, the virus can be sought directly in the vesicular fluid. Serology is not helpful in this case. PMID:26033555

  10. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  11. Infection control for norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, L.; Park, G. W.; Vega, E.; Hall, A.; Parashar, U.; Vinjé, J.; Lopman, B.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are notoriously difficult to prevent and control, owing to their low infectious dose, high shedding titre, and environmental stability. The virus can spread through multiple transmission routes, of which person-to-person and foodborne are the most important. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have helped to establish norovirus as the most common cause of sporadic gastroenteritis and the most common cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis across all ages. In this article, we review the epidemiology and virology of noroviruses, and prevention and control guidelines, with a focus on the principles of disinfection and decontamination. Outbreak management relies on sound infection control principles, including hand hygiene, limiting exposure to infectious individuals, and thorough environmental decontamination. Ideally, all infection control recommendations would rely on empirical evidence, but a number of challenges, including the inability to culture noroviruses in the laboratory and the challenges of outbreak management in complex environments, has made it difficult to garner clear evidence of efficacy in certain areas of infection control. New experimental data on cultivable surrogates for human norovirus and on environmental survivability and relative resistance to commonly used disinfectants are providing new insights for further refinining disinfection practices. Finally, clinical trials are underway to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines, which may shift the current infection control principles to more targeted interventions. PMID:24813073

  12. Hospital-Associated Infections.

    PubMed

    Babady, N Esther

    2016-06-01

    Hospital-associated infection (HAI) in immunocompromised patients can result in high rates of morbidity and mortality. Infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) are especially worrisome because of the limited choice of remaining antibiotics available when a patient becomes colonized or infected with an MDRO. It is therefore important that immunocompromised patients be cared for in an environment that limits the risk for acquiring infections. However, with healthcare being increasingly delivered in settings other than the traditional inpatient hospital wards, a bigger effort will need to be set forth to prevent or rapidly diagnose HAI. The last few years have seen a significant increase in the number of singleplex and multiplex molecular assays for the detection of many of the organisms responsible for HAI, but more is needed as infections caused by organisms like Legionella pneumophila and Aspergillus species are still diagnosed with methods that have relatively low yield and are slow to provide actionable results. Finally, the use of novel techniques for outbreak investigations will provide new information on transmission of infectious agents in healthcare settings and allow stronger, evidence-based recommendations to be developed for prevention of HAIs in the immunocompromised host. PMID:27337459

  13. Dirofilarial infections in Europe.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Claudio; Kramer, Laura H; Rivasi, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    Nematodes of the genus Dirofilaria are currently considered emerging agents of parasitic zoonoses in Europe. Climatic changes and an increase in the movement of reservoirs (mostly infected dogs) have caused an increase in the geographical range of these parasites from the traditionally endemic/hyperendemic southern regions, and the risk for human infection has increased. In the last several years, forecast models have predicted that current summer temperatures are sufficient to facilitate extrinsic incubation of Dirofilaria in many areas of Europe. The global warming projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that warm summers suitable for Dirofilaria transmission in Europe will be the rule in the future decades, and if the actual trend of temperature increase continues, filarial infection should spread into previously infection-free areas. Dirofilaria repens is currently the filarial species that is most commonly reported as spreading from southern to northern areas. This article reviews the zoonotic aspects, effects of climate, and other global drivers on Dirofilaria infections in Europe and the possible implications on the transmission and control of these mosquito-borne nematodes.

  14. DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

  15. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  16. Infected Dentine Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Edwina; Fejerskov, Ole; Nyvad, Bente

    2015-11-01

    Dentine becomes infected as a result of caries lesion formation on root surfaces and when lesions progress following cavitation of enamel lesions. However, this infection is unimportant because the driving force for lesion formation and progression is the overlying biofilm. This explains why root surface caries can be controlled by mechanical plaque control and fluoride, and restorations are not needed to arrest these lesions. Similarly, the infected dentine in cavitated coronal lesions does not have to be removed to arrest the lesion. If the lesion is either accessible or opened for cleaning by the patient or parent, the lesion can be arrested. Sealing of infected dentine within the tooth, either by a Hall crown in the primary dentition or by partial caries removal prior to placing a well-sealed filling, will also arrest the lesion. When restoring deep lesions in symptomless, vital teeth, vigorous excavation of infected dentine is likely to expose the pulp and make root canal treatment necessary. Thus complete excavation'is not needed and should be avoided. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Root surface caries can be arrested by cleaning and fluoride application. Restorations are not essential. Vigorous excavation of softened dentine in deep cavities of symptomless, vital teeth is contra-indicated. It is not needed and increases the risk of pulp exposure. PMID:26749788

  17. The Biophysics of Infection.

    PubMed

    Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the processes involved in infection has grown enormously in the past decade due in part to emerging methods of biophysics. This new insight has been enabled through advances in interdisciplinary experimental technologies and theoretical methods at the cutting-edge interface of the life and physical sciences. For example, this has involved several state-of-the-art biophysical tools used in conjunction with molecular and cell biology approaches, which enable investigation of infection in living cells. There are also new, emerging interfacial science tools which enable significant improvements to the resolution of quantitative measurements both in space and time. These include single-molecule biophysics methods and super-resolution microscopy approaches. These new technological tools in particular have underpinned much new understanding of dynamic processes of infection at a molecular length scale. Also, there are many valuable advances made recently in theoretical approaches of biophysics which enable advances in predictive modelling to generate new understanding of infection. Here, I discuss these advances, and take stock on our knowledge of the biophysics of infection and discuss where future advances may lead.

  18. Zika virus infections.

    PubMed

    de Laval, F; Leparc-Goffart, I; Meynard, J-B; Daubigny, H; Simon, F; Briolant, S

    2016-05-01

    Since its discovery in 1947 in Uganda, the Zika virus (ZIKV) remained in the shadows emerging in 2007 in Micronesia, where hundreds of dengue-like syndromes were reported. Then, in 2013-2014, it was rife in French Polynesia, where the first neurological effects were observed. More recently, its arrival in Brazil was accompanied by an unusually high number of children with microcephaly born to mothers infected with ZIKV during the first trimester of pregnancy. In 2016, the World Health Organization declared ZIKV infection to be a public health emergency and now talks about a ZIKV pandemic. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about ZIKV infection, successively addressing its transmission, epidemiology, clinical aspects, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention before discussing some perspectives. PMID:27412976

  19. Emerging chlamydial infections.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    Chlamydiae are important intracellular bacterial pathogens of vertebrates. In the last years, novel members of this group have been discovered: Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis seems to be emerging respiratory human pathogens, while Waddlia chondrophila might be a new agent of bovine abortion. Various species have been showed to infect also the herpetofauna and fishes, and some novel chlamydiae are endosymbionts of arthropods. In addition, molecular studies evidenced a huge diversity of chlamydiae from both environmental and clinical samples, most of such a diversity could be formed by novel lineages of chlamydiae. Experimental studies showed that free-living amoebae may support multiplication of various chlamydiae, then could play an important role as reservoir/vector of chlamydial infections. Here we reviewed literature data concerning chlamydial infections, with a particular emphasis on the novely described chlamydial organisms.

  20. Zika virus infections.

    PubMed

    de Laval, F; Leparc-Goffart, I; Meynard, J-B; Daubigny, H; Simon, F; Briolant, S

    2016-05-01

    Since its discovery in 1947 in Uganda, the Zika virus (ZIKV) remained in the shadows emerging in 2007 in Micronesia, where hundreds of dengue-like syndromes were reported. Then, in 2013-2014, it was rife in French Polynesia, where the first neurological effects were observed. More recently, its arrival in Brazil was accompanied by an unusually high number of children with microcephaly born to mothers infected with ZIKV during the first trimester of pregnancy. In 2016, the World Health Organization declared ZIKV infection to be a public health emergency and now talks about a ZIKV pandemic. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about ZIKV infection, successively addressing its transmission, epidemiology, clinical aspects, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention before discussing some perspectives.

  1. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S; White, H Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled "epilepsy." Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered.

  2. Emerging and Resistant Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kalil, Andre C.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ghedin, Elodie; Kolls, Jay K.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2014-01-01

    The lungs are a major target for infection and a key battleground in the fight against the development of antimicrobial drug–resistant pathogens. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is associated with mortality rates of 24–50%. The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy against VAP is unknown, but prolonged courses are associated with the emergence of bacterial resistance. De-escalation strategies in which treatment is discontinued based on signs of clinical resolution, fixed durations of therapy (generally 7–8 d), or serum procalcitonin responses have been shown to decrease antibiotic consumption. Outcomes are comparable to longer treatment courses, with the possible exception of VAP due to nonfermenting, gram-negative bacilli such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of VAP and other infections. Outcomes after S. aureus infection are shaped by the interplay between environmental, bacterial, and host genetic factors. It is increasingly clear that mechanisms of pathogenesis vary in different types of S. aureus infections. Genome-scale studies of S. aureus strains, host responses, and host genetics are redefining our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying VAP. Genome-sequencing technologies are also revolutionizing our understanding of the molecular epidemiology, evolution, and transmission of influenza. Deep sequencing using next-generation technology platforms is defining the remarkable genetic diversity of influenza strains within infected hosts. Investigators have demonstrated that antiviral drug-resistant influenza may be present prior to the initiation of treatment. Moreover, drug-resistant minor variant influenza strains can be transmitted from person to person in the absence of selection pressure. Studies of lung infections and the causative pathogens will remain at the cutting edge of clinical and basic medical research. PMID:25148425

  3. [Incidence of congenital infections].

    PubMed

    Friese, K; Beichert, M; Hof, H; Weikel, W; Falke, D; Sickinger, R; Melchert, F

    1991-11-01

    The discussions on the pros and cons of obstetric screening for connatal infections have been going on for years. We, therefore, conducted a prevalence study of the most common connatal infections. HIV infection, rubella and syphilis were not subjects of this study. We analysed the relevance of these infections in 512 pregnant women and their newborn infants at the moment of delivery. Further serological tests were run three months post partum, if necessary even for a longer period. Cytomegaly IgG antibodies were found in 46% of the examined women, IgM antibodies in 1.3%. Women under the age of twenty and women of low social standing showed the highest rate of prevalence of infection with CMV. The prevalence of IgG antibodies against parvovirus B 19 was 29%. In 10 mothers, positive IgM titers were found at the time of delivery. In all these women, pregnancies had been uneventful. However, 9 mothers exhibited a significantly raised abortion rate within the last 20 months before delivery. 7 of 512 women turned out to be HBs antigen carriers, 3 women and their babies were anti-HCV positive. The prevalence of toxoplasmosis IgG antibodies was 36%, of IgM antibodies 5.3%. By further investigation (Toxo ISAGA, Toxo IgA) we were able to detect one child with connatal toxoplasmosis. We conclude, that screening for parvovirus B 19 and hepatitis C is required only, if there are contact or clinical hints that the patients might have acquired either one of these infections. But we postulate, that a routine screening programme for hepatitis B and toxoplasmosis should be carried out in all pregnant women.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1663470

  4. Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heinlen, Latisha; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in Europe and North America and is a serious re-emerging pathogen. Recent outbreaks have led to increasing morbidity and mortality and have been associated with a new strain (BI/NAP1/027) of C. difficile that produces more toxin than historical strains. With the increasing incidence of C. difficile infection, clinicians have also seen a change in the epidemiology with increased infections in previously low-risk populations. This chapter highlights the current knowledge on C. difficile virulence, human disease, epidemic outbreaks, and optimal treatment strategies. PMID:20697257

  5. Schmallenberg virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wernike, K; Elbers, A; Beer, M

    2015-08-01

    Since Schmallenberg virus, an orthobunyavirus of the Simbu serogroup, was identified near the German-Dutch border for the first time in late 2011 it has spread extremely quickly and caused a large epidemic in European livestock. The virus, which is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges, infects domestic and wild ruminants. Adult animals show only mild clinical symptoms or none at all, whereas an infection during a critical period of gestation can lead to abortion, stillbirth or the birth of severely malformed offspring. The impact of the disease is usually greater in sheep than in cattle. Vaccination could be an important aspect of disease control. PMID:26601441

  6. Lymphangiosarcoma after filarial infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sordillo, E.M.; Sordillo, P.P.; Hajdu, S.I.; Good, R.A.

    1981-03-01

    A case of lymphangiosarcoma of a lower extremity is described in a patient with chronic lymphedema of that leg from a filarial infection in childhood. Histologically, the neoplasm resembled lymphangiosarcomas that arise in arms that become lymphedematous after mastectomies, but was different in that it also contained areas of calcification consistent with prior filarial infection. Calcifications were also present in muscle uninvolved by the lymphangiosarcoma of this case. The prolonged survival of this patient is unlike that of most patients with lymphangiosarcoma, which is generally shorter. Although lymphedema after filariasis is common, this is the first case of a lymphangiosarcoma arising in chronic lymphedema of filarial origin.

  7. Viral infections in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  8. Dipylidium caninum infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Raúl Romero; Ruiz, Aurora Candil; Feregrino, Raul Romero; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Feregrino, Rodrigo Romero; Zavala, Jorge Tay

    2011-01-01

    Dipylidium caninum is a cestode that requires from the participation of an arthropod in its life cycle. This parasitosis occurs in dogs and cats, and occasionally in human beings. Human cases of D caninum infection have been reported in Europe, Philippines, China, Japan, Latin America and the United States; mostly children, one third of them being infants under 6 months old. The diagnosis of this disease is done by the parasitological study of the feces, observing the characteristics of the gravid proglottids. The treatment is performed by administering broad-spectrum anthelmintics. The authors report a case of a rare infection in a Mexican child. PMID:22674592

  9. Dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Y K; Singh, S; Singh, T

    1998-02-01

    Dengue viral infection produces a spectrum of disease. For example, mild dengue disease is characterized by biphasic fever, myalgia, arthralgia, leukopenia, and lymphadenopathy, while dengue hemorrhagic fever is an often fatal disease characterized by hemorrhages and shock syndrome. The disease, especially in its severe form, is seen more often among children than among adults. With focus upon India, dengue's etiology, epidemiology, pathology, pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever, clinical manifestations of both the mild and severe forms of dengue viral infection, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and prognosis are discussed.

  10. Transverse Force on Quarks in DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The $x^2$-moment of the twist-3 polarized parton distribution $g_2(x)$ is related to the transverse force acting on the active quark in deep-inelastic scattering off a transversely polarized nucleon immediately after it has absorbed the virtual photon. Lattice calculations of the corresponding matrix element as well as experimental measurements of $g_2(x)$ are used to estimate sign and magnitude of this force. Similarly, the $x^2$-moment of the chirally odd twist-3 unpolarized parton distribution $e(x)$ can be related to the transverse force experienced by a transversely polarized quark ejected from a transversely polarized nucleon.

  11. The GMO-Nanotech (Dis)Analogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Ronald; Kay, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetically-modified-organism (GMO) experience has been prominent in motivating science, industry, and regulatory communities to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. However, there are some significant problems with the GMO-nanotech analogy. First, it overstates the likelihood of a GMO-like backlash against…

  12. Dis/Ability through Artists' Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Suesi; Gervais, Julie; Dase, Monica; Griseta, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    An individual's concept of disability depends upon one's experience, based on personal, physical, mental, and emotional knowledge (Linton, 1998; Wendell, 1996). The United Nations (United Nations, 2005) defines disability as any restriction or deficiency of ability to perform within the range of what is considered normal for an individual. A…

  13. International Education and (Dis)Embodied Cosmopolitanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidhu, Ravinder Kaur; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of practices and representations that constitute international education. While international education has provided substantial contributions and benefits for nation-states and international students, we question the discourses and practices which inform the international education export industry. The…

  14. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

  15. New DIS and collider results on PDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, E.

    2015-05-15

    The HERA ep collider experiments have measured the proton structure functions over a wide kinematic range. New data from the H1 experiment now extend the range to higher 4-momentum transfer (√(Q{sup 2})) over which a precision of ∼ 2% is achieved in the neutral current channel. A factor of two reduction in the systematic uncertainties over previous measurement is attained. The charged current structure function measurements are also significantly improved in precision. These data, when used in QCD analyses of the parton density functions (PDFs) reduce the PDF uncertainties particularly at high momentum fractions x which is relevant to low energy neutrino scattering cross sections. New data from the LHC pp collider experiments may also offer significant high x PDF improvements as the experimental uncertainties improve.

  16. The (dis)unity of nursing science.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Robyn L

    2014-10-01

    This paper looks at the implications of contemporary work in philosophy of science for nursing science. Early work on the nature of theories in nursing was strongly influenced by logical empiricism, and this influence remains even long after nurse scholars have come to reject logical empiricism as an adequate philosophy of science. Combined with the need to establish nursing as an autonomous profession, nursing theory's use of logical empiricism has led to serious conceptual problems. Philosophers of science have also rejected many of the central tenets of logical empiricism, including its focus on the logical justification of theories and the idea that science is, or should be, unified. Instead, there has been an increasing focus on the practice of science, which in turn has led to a pluralist understanding of science that emphasizes the construction of scientific models that are appropriate for certain purposes or in certain contexts. I suggest that this approach to philosophy of science may provide better resources for nursing science.

  17. The (dis)unity of nursing science.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Robyn L

    2014-10-01

    This paper looks at the implications of contemporary work in philosophy of science for nursing science. Early work on the nature of theories in nursing was strongly influenced by logical empiricism, and this influence remains even long after nurse scholars have come to reject logical empiricism as an adequate philosophy of science. Combined with the need to establish nursing as an autonomous profession, nursing theory's use of logical empiricism has led to serious conceptual problems. Philosophers of science have also rejected many of the central tenets of logical empiricism, including its focus on the logical justification of theories and the idea that science is, or should be, unified. Instead, there has been an increasing focus on the practice of science, which in turn has led to a pluralist understanding of science that emphasizes the construction of scientific models that are appropriate for certain purposes or in certain contexts. I suggest that this approach to philosophy of science may provide better resources for nursing science. PMID:24861155

  18. Rubella infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M; Cavaliere, A F; Straface, G; Caruso, A

    2006-05-01

    Rubella is the first virus demonstrated as a teratogen. There is a high risk to develop congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) if the infection occurs in the first part of pregnancy, particularly in women without specific immunological protection. Specific therapies to prevent CRS are not available. Many developed countries have specific vaccination programs and maternal rubella is rare. However, in developing countries or where campaigns of rubella surveillance and preconceptional vaccination are inadequate, there are still cases of CRS registered despite primary possibilities of prevention. Maternal infection is not indicative of vertical transmission in 100% of cases, and damage does not necessarily occur in all cases of fetal infection. This is the reason why an adequate prenatal counselling is mandatory, particularly in cases of proven maternal infection. Advanced prenatal diagnostic techniques, invasive or not, should be offered to the women especially in order to distinguish the cases without fetal damage. Prevention of voluntary interruption of pregnancy for the latter or in case of maternal false IgM rubella antibody positivity or IgM "chronic carrier" patients is mandatory. World wide, the aim is to perform an adequate primary prevention through vaccination of childbearing age women without specific immunological protection. PMID:16580940

  19. Salivary gland infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... least twice a day. This may help with healing and prevent an infection from spreading. Rinse your mouth ... if you are a smoker, to speed up healing. Drink lots of water and use sugar-free lemon drops to increase the ...

  20. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could: 1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, 2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, 3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and 4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  1. Acute upper airway infections.

    PubMed

    West, J V

    2002-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections are common and important. Although rarely fatal, they are a source of significant morbidity and carry a considerable economic burden. Numerous therapies for the common cold have no effect on symptoms or outcome. Complications such as cough are not improved by over-the-counter preparations, while labelling cough alone as a symptom of asthma may result in unnecessary use of inhaled steroid treatment. Clinical presentation of sore throat does not accurately predict whether the infection is viral or bacterial, while throat culture and rapid antigen tests do not significantly change prescribing practice. Antibiotics have only a limited place in the management of recurrent sore throat due to group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal infection. Routine use of antibiotics in upper respiratory infection enhances parent belief in their effectiveness and increases the likelihood of future consultation in primary care for minor self-limiting illness. Respiratory viruses play a major role in the aetiology of acute otitis media (AOM); prevention includes the use of influenza or RSV vaccination, in addition to reducing other risk factors such as early exposure to respiratory viruses in day-care settings and to environmental tobacco smoke. The use of ventilation tubes (grommets) in secretory otitis media (SOM) remains controversial with conflicting data on developmental outcome and quality of life in young children. New conjugate pneumococcal vaccines appear safe in young children and prevent 6-7% of clinically diagnosed AOM.

  2. Infections and Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Christina N.; Tsimis, Michael; Burd, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Several different bodies of evidence support a link between infection and altered brain development. Maternal infections, such as influenza and human immunodeficiency virus, have been linked to the development of autism spectrum disorders, differences in cognitive test scores, and bipolar disorder; an association that has been shown in both epidemiologic and retrospective studies. Several viral, bacterial, and parasitic illnesses are associated with alterations in fetal brain structural anomalies including brain calcifications and hydrocephalus. The process of infection can activate inflammatory pathways causing the release of various proinflammatory biomarkers and histological changes consistent with an infectious intrauterine environment (chorioamnionitis) or umbilical cord (funisitis). Elevations in inflammatory cytokines are correlated with cerebral palsy, schizophrenias, and autism. Animal studies indicate that the balance of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is critical to the effect prenatal inflammation plays in neurodevelopment. Finally, chorioamnionitis is associated with cerebral palsy and other abnormal neurodevelopmental outcomes. In conclusion, a plethora of evidence supports, albeit with various degrees of certainty, the theory that maternal infection and inflammation that occur during critical periods of fetal development could theoretically alter brain structure and function in a time-sensitive manner. PMID:26490164

  3. [Focal infections in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T

    2016-01-01

    This publication is focused on the mechanisms underlying the clinical course of acute focal infections concomitant with ENT pathology, factors responsible for their chronization and the development of complications. Also discussed are the methods for the early adequate conservative and surgical treatment of these conditions. Special emphasis is placed on the principles of management of chronic tonsillitis. PMID:26977559

  4. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. PMID:27486731

  5. Vascular graft infections.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Barbara; Husmann, Lars; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Weber, Rainer; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Vascular procedures are rarely complicated by infection, but if prosthetic vascular graft infection (PVGI) occurs, morbidity and mortality are high. Several patient-related, surgery-related and postoperative risk factors are reported, but they are not well validated. PVGI is due to bacterial colonisation of the wound and the underlying prosthetic graft, generally as a result of direct contamination during the operative procedure, mainly from the patient's skin or adjacent bowel. There is no consensus on diagnostic criteria or on the best management of PVGI. On the basis of reported clinical studies and our own experience, we advocate a surgical approach combining repeated radical local debridement, with graft preservation whenever possible or partial excision of the infected graft, depending on its condition, plus simultaneous negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT). In addition, antimicrobial therapy is recommended, but there is no consensus on which classes of agent are adequate for the treatment of PVGI and whether certain infections may be treated by means of NPWT alone. Since staphylococci and Gram-negative rods are likely to be isolated, empirical treatment might include a penicillinase-resistant beta-lactam or a glycopeptide, plus an aminoglycoside, the latter for Gram-negative coverage and synergistic treatment of Gram-positive cocci. Additionally, empirical treatment might include rifampicin since it penetrates well into biofilms.

  6. [Emergent viral infections].

    PubMed

    Galama, J M

    2001-03-31

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infections such as dengue and hepatitis E, but also of hepatitis A, which is no longer endemic. Apart from import diseases new viruses have appeared (Nipah-virus and transfusion-transmitted virus). Existing viruses may suddenly cause more severe diseases, e.g. infection by enterovirus 71. The distribution area of a virus may change, e.g. in case of West Nile virus, an Egyptian encephalitis virus that appears to have established itself in the USA. Furthermore, there is no such thing as a completely new virus; it is always an existing virus that has adapted itself to another host or that was already present in humans but has only recently been discovered. A number of factors facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases. These include intensive animal husbandry and the transport of animals. The unexpected appearance of West Nile virus in the western hemisphere was possibly due to animal transportation.

  7. Parainfluenza Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Branche, Angela R; Falsey, Ann R

    2016-08-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are single-stranded, enveloped RNA viruses of the Paramyoviridaie family. There are four serotypes which cause respiratory illnesses in children and adults. HPIVs bind and replicate in the ciliated epithelial cells of the upper and lower respiratory tract and the extent of the infection correlates with the location involved. Seasonal HPIV epidemics result in a significant burden of disease in children and account for 40% of pediatric hospitalizations for lower respiratory tract illnesses (LRTIs) and 75% of croup cases. Parainfluenza viruses are associated with a wide spectrum of illnesses which include otitis media, pharyngitis, conjunctivitis, croup, tracheobronchitis, and pneumonia. Uncommon respiratory manifestations include apnea, bradycardia, parotitis, and respiratory distress syndrome and rarely disseminated infection. Immunity resulting from disease in childhood is incomplete and reinfection with HPIV accounts for 15% of respiratory illnesses in adults. Severe disease and fatal pneumonia may occur in elderly and immunocompromised adults. HPIV pneumonia in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is associated with 50% acute mortality and 75% mortality at 6 months. Though sensitive molecular diagnostics are available to rapidly diagnose HPIV infection, effective antiviral therapies are not available. Currently, treatment for HPIV infection is supportive with the exception of croup where the use of corticosteroids has been found to be beneficial. Several novel drugs including DAS181 appear promising in efforts to treat severe disease in immunocompromised patients, and vaccines to decrease the burden of disease in young children are in development. PMID:27486735

  8. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Babies Born with CMV (Congenital CMV Infection) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Detection and Intervention Helping Children With Congenital CMV Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  9. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  10. Pathogenesis of gastrointestinal infection.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Alan

    2008-06-01

    The last 30 years has seen the recognition of many intestinal pathogens, through a combination of microscopy, tissue availability and open minds. In the developing world the challenge to eradicate such infections continues, especially in infancy and early childhood. In developed communities, however, the challenge is shifting to pathogens ('super bugs') arising from our own interventions and lifestyles which will occupy many future careers.

  11. [Urinary calculi and infection].

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Infection urinary stones resulting from urease-producing bacteria are composed by struvite and/or carbonate apatite. Bacterial urease splits urea and promotes the formation of ammonia and carbon dioxide leading to urine alkalinization and formation of phosphate salts. Proteus species are urease-producers, whereas a limited number of strains of other Gram negative and positive species may produce urease. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Corynebacterium urealyticum are urease-producers that are not isolated by conventional urine cultures, but require specific tests for identification. Primary treatment requires surgical removal of stones as complete as possible. Extracorporeal and endoscopic treatments are usually preferred, while open surgery is actually limited to few selected cases. Residual stones or fragments should be treated by chemolysis via ureteral catheter or nephrostomy or administration of citrate salts in order to achieve a stone-free renal unit. Postoperatively, recurrent urinary tract infection should be treated with appropriate antibiotic treatment although long-term antibiotic prophylaxis can cause resistance. Urinary acidification has been proposed for the prophylaxis of infection stones, but long-term acidification is difficult to achieve in urine infected by urease-producing bacteria. Urease inhibitors lead to prevention and/or dissolution of stones and encrustations in patients with infection by urea-splitting bacteria, but their use is limited by their toxicity. The administration of citrate salts involves an increase of the value of nucleation pH (pHn), that is the pH value at which calcium and magnesium phosphate crystallization occurs, in a greater way than the corresponding increase in the urinary pH due to its alkalinizing effect and resulting in a reduction of the risk of struvite crystallization. In conclusion prevention of the recurrence of infection stones can be achieved by an integrated approach tailored on the single patient. Complete

  12. Salmonella Infections in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Bula-Rudas, Fernando J; Rathore, Mobeen H; Maraqa, Nizar F

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella are gram-negative bacilli within the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Animals (pets) are an important reservoir for nontyphoidal Salmonella, whereas humans are the only natural host and reservoir for Salmonella Typhi. Salmonella infections are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They account for an estimated 2.8 billion cases of diarrheal disease each year. The transmission of Salmonella is frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated water and food of animal origin, and it is facilitated by conditions of poor hygiene. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infections have a worldwide distribution, whereas most typhoidal Salmonella infections in the United States are acquired abroad. In the United States, Salmonella is a common agent for food-borne–associated infections. Several outbreaks have been identified and are most commonly associated with agricultural products. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection is usually characterized by a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent hosts in industrialized countries, but it may also cause invasive disease in vulnerable individuals (eg, children less than 1 year of age, immunocompromised). Antibiotic treatment is not recommended for treatment of mild to moderate gastroenteritis by nontyphoidal Salmonella in immunocompetent adults or children more than 1 year of age. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in infants less than 3 months of age, because they are at higher risk for bacteremia and extraintestinal complications. Typhoid (enteric) fever and its potential complications have a significant impact on children, especially those who live in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of typhoid fever has become challenging because of the emergence of Salmonella Typhi strains that are resistant to classically used first-line agents: ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. The

  13. Bistability and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Roy; Shochat, Eliezer; Rom-Kedar, Vered

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistable case (type II), one equilibrium corresponds to a healthy state whereas the other corresponds to a fulminant bacterial infection. We demonstrate that published data of in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis bactericidal experiments are inconsistent with both the type I dynamics and the commonly used linear model and are consistent with type II dynamics. We argue that type II dynamics is a plausible mechanism for the development of a fulminant infection. PMID:20463954

  14. The distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in naturally infected badgers.

    PubMed

    Corner, Leigh A L; O'Meara, D; Costello, E; Lesellier, S; Gormley, E

    2012-11-01

    Populations of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis infection) are a significant reservoir of infection for cattle in Ireland and the United Kingdom. In this study the distribution of infection, histological lesions and gross lesions was determined in a sample of 132 culled badgers from naturally-infected wild populations. Badgers were culled when an epidemiological investigation following a tuberculosis breakdown in a cattle herd implicated badgers as the probable source of infection. The definition of tuberculosis infection was based on the isolation of M. bovis from tissues or clinical samples. An accurate diagnosis of infection was achieved by culturing a wide range of lymph nodes (LN) and organ tissues (mean 32.1) and clinical samples (faeces and urine) from each badger. Infection was detected in 57/132 badgers (43.2%). Histological lesions consistent with tuberculosis were seen in 39/57 (68.4%) culture-positive and 7/75 (9.3%) culture-negative animals. Gross lesions were seen in only 30/57 (52.6%) infected badgers, leaving a high proportion (47.4%) of infected animals with latent infection (no grossly visible lesions). The most frequently infected tissues were the lungs and axillary LN, followed by the deep cervical LN, parotid LN and tracheobronchial LN. The data support the hypotheses that in badgers there are only two significant routes of infection, namely, the lower respiratory tract and bite wounds, and that badgers are very susceptible to infection but resistant to the development and progression of the disease. At all levels of disease severity, infection was found in widely dispersed anatomical locations suggesting that there is early dissemination of infection in the period preceding the development of active immunity.

  15. [Implant-associated infections - Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Renz, N; Müller, M; Perka, C; Trampuz, A

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of implant-associated infections is challenging as chronic low-grade infections often only manifest as subtle clinical symptoms. Clinical evaluation, patient history, imaging, histopathological and microbiological examinations build the cornerstones of the diagnostics for implant-associated infections. New onset of pain at rest, local symptoms at the surgical site and early loosening of the prosthesis or pseudarthrosis should raise suspicion for an infection and prompt further evaluation. Percutaneous sinus tracts, purulent wound secretions and skin erosions with exposure of the implant are certain signs of implant-associated infections. Elevated C‑reactive protein levels in blood support the diagnosis of infection but are neither sufficient sensitive nor specific to confirm or exclude infection. Preoperative antibiotic therapy interferes with the diagnostic evaluation and should be avoided. In periprosthetic joint infections, joint aspiration with determination of the leukocyte count and microbiological examination is a crucial first diagnostic step. Through microbiological and histopathological examinations of intraoperative tissue samples, as well as sonication of explanted implants, the causative pathogen can be identified in most cases. In osteosynthesis-associated infections imaging plays a key role to detect non-union, infection callus, sequester, peri-implant osteolysis and extraosseous and intramedullary pathologies. In prosthetic joint infections imaging provides information about the position and stability of the prosthesis. In case of hematogenic infection seeding from a distant focus, blood cultures should be sampled, followed by a meticulous investigation of potential primary focus of infection, depending on the causative agent.

  16. Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Mark S.

    2001-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a spherical enveloped RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, classified within the Hepacivirus genus. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis that progresses in some patients to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, approximately 4 million people have been infected with HCV, and 10,000 HCV-related deaths occur each year. Due to shared routes of transmission, HCV and HIV co-infection are common, affecting approximately one third of all HIV-infected persons in the United States. In addition, HIV co-infection is associated with higher HCV RNA viral load and a more rapid progression of HCV-related liver disease, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis. HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV disease, particularly by increasing the risk of antiretroviral drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, chronic HCV infection acts as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected persons because the incidence of infection is increased and the natural history of HCV infection is accelerated in co-infected persons. Strategies to prevent primary HCV infection and to modify the progression of HCV-related liver disease are urgently needed among HIV/HCV co-infected individuals.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Mark S

    2007-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a spherical enveloped RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, classified within the Hepacivirus genus. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis that progresses in some patients to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, approximately 4 million people have been infected with HCV, and 10,000 HCVrelated deaths occur each year. Due to shared routes of transmission, HCV and HIV co-infection are common, affecting approximately one third of all HIV-infected persons in the United States. In addition, HIV co-infection is associated with higher HCV RNA viral load and a more rapid progression of HCV-related liver disease, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis. HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV disease, particularly by increasing the risk of antiretroviral drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, chronic HCV infection acts as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected persons because the incidence of infection is increased and the natural history of HCV infection is accelerated in co-infected persons. Strategies to prevent primary HCV infection and to modify the progression of HCV-related liver disease are urgently needed among HIV/HCV co-infected individuals.

  18. 1: Infections in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2002-03-01

    Some infections are more serious in pregnant than non-pregnant women because of the potential for vertical transmission to the fetus or infant (eg, varicella, rubella, cytomegalovirus infection, toxoplasmosis and listeriosis). Pre-pregnancy or routine antenatal screening for presence of, or susceptibility to, some of these infections and appropriate management can prevent adverse fetal or perinatal outcomes; screening should include rubella IgG, hepatitis B surface antigen, serological tests for syphilis and HIV antibody. If certain other vertically transmissible infections are suspected because of a positive antenatal test result, confirmatory tests for maternal and, if indicated, fetal infection are essential before intervention is considered (eg, cytomegalovirus infection). For some vertically transmissible infections that are not readily preventable, appropriate management of maternal infection can reduce fetal damage (eg, toxoplasmosis). PMID:11999241

  19. Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search AAAAI Breadcrumb navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Library ▸ Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies Share | Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI ...

  20. Thrush and Other Candida Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... these infections are caused by Candida albicans, a yeast-like fungus, although other species of Candida are ... in some cases. Teenaged girls who develop a yeast infection of the vagina and the surrounding area ...

  1. Zika Virus Infection and Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2016-01-01

    A Task Force established by the Brazil Ministry of Health investigated the possible association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and a registry for microcephaly cases among women suspected to have had Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

  2. HIV/AIDS and Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are bacterial infections. Viral infections include cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C. Fungi cause thrush (candidiasis), cryptococcal meningitis, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) and histoplasmosis, and parasites ...

  3. Do dental infections really cause central nervous system infections?

    PubMed

    Lazow, Stewart K; Izzo, Steven R; Vazquez, David

    2011-11-01

    In the post-World War I antibiotic era, the prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) infections is estimated to be 1 per 100,000 population. The literature is replete with anecdotal case reports of CNS infections of apparent dental etiology. Conversely, it is widely cited that the incidence of CNS infection of dental etiology is only in the range of 1% to 2%. We seek to answer the question if dental infections really cause CNS infections. In this article, we focus on septic cavernous sinus thrombosis and brain abscess and if it is a diagnosis of exclusion or evidence-based.

  4. Retroviral infections of small animals.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Stephen P; Graham, Elizabeth

    2008-07-01

    Retroviral infections are particularly important in cats, which are commonly infected with feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus. This article describes the biology of these viruses and explores current issues regarding vaccination and diagnosis. The seeming lack of a recognized retrovirus infection in dogs is speculated on, and current and potential future therapies are discussed.

  5. Postoperative infections: prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Gaston, R Glenn; Kuremsky, Marshall A

    2010-05-01

    Postoperative infections continue to be a challenging problem. The incidence of bacterial antibiotic resistance such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is rising. There are numerous intrinsic patient factors that should be optimized before surgery to minimize the risk of surgical site infections. When postoperative infections develop, treatment must be individualized. This article outlines the principles that can help guide treatment.

  6. Postcircumcision urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H A; Drucker, M M; Vainer, S; Ashkenasi, A; Amir, J; Frydman, M; Varsano, I

    1992-06-01

    The possible association of urinary tract infection (UTI) with ritual circumcision on the eighth day of life was studied by analyzing the epidemiology of urinary tract infections during the first year of life in 169 children with UTI (56 males and 113 females) born in Israel from 1979 to 1984. Forty-eight percent of the episodes of UTI occurring in males appeared during the 12 days following circumcision, and the increased incidence during that period was highly significant. The median age of the males at the time of the UTI was 16 days, compared with seven months in females. Ritual Jewish circumcision as practiced in Israel may be a predisposing factor for UTI during the 12-day period following that procedure.

  7. Nosocomial viral respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Graman, P S; Hall, C B

    1989-12-01

    Nosocomial infections with respiratory tract viruses, particularly influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses, account for the majority of serious nosocomial viral disease. Chronically ill, immunocompromised, elderly, and very young hosts are especially vulnerable to potentially life-threatening involvement of the lower respiratory tract. Effective preventive strategies are based upon early accurate viral diagnosis and an appreciation of the epidemiology and mechanisms of transmission for each viral agent. Influenza viruses spread via airborne dispersion of small particle aerosols, resulting in explosive outbreaks; control measures emphasize immunization and chemoprophylaxis of susceptible patients and personnel, and isolation of those already infected. Transmission of respiratory syncytial virus, in contrast, seems to require closer contact, with virus passed on hands, fomites, or in large droplets inoculated into the eyes and nose at close range. Strategies for control of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus are designed to interrupt hand carriage and inoculation of virus onto mucous membranes.

  8. Varicella infection modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  9. Third molar infections.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Pericoronitis is an infectious disease often associated with the eruption of a third molar. It can be either acute (serous and suppurative) or chronic. Pain is usually the predominant symptom in acute stages, whereas chronic forms of the disease may display very few symptoms. Both present exudate. The infection is multimicrobial, predominantly caused strictly by betalactamase-producing anaerobeic microorganisms. Treatment measures are symptomatic, antimicrobial and surgical. Antimicrobial treatment is indicated for preoperative prophylaxis when there is a high risk of postoperative infection and, during the acute stages of suppurative pericoronitis when surgery must be postponed. First-line treatment in this case consists of amoxicillin with associated clavulanic acid. Although surgical treatment of pericoronitis presenting at the third molar is indicated as a Grade C recommendation for extraction, it is the most common indication for extraction of a retained third molar, owing to the improved quality of life it can offer the patient.

  10. Fusobacterium infections in children

    PubMed Central

    Arane, Karen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Question A 2-year-old patient in my practice with acute otitis media that has progressed to mastoiditis with a high fever returns with positive culture results for Fusobacterium. What should I do next? Answer Fusobacterium is a genus of anaerobic bacteria. Although Fusobacterium infections are rare, they can become severe if not treated promptly. Appropriate treatment is combination antibiotic therapy consisting of a β-lactam (penicillin, cephalosporin) and an anaerobic antimicrobial agent (metronidazole, clindamycin). At times surgical involvement is required for mastoiditis such as drainage of abscesses or insertion of a ventilation tube. Delayed treatment of an infection caused by Fusobacterium can lead to serious complications, including Lemierre syndrome. Children should be seen in a hospital for close monitoring. PMID:27737977

  11. Lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anne B; Chang, Christina C; O'Grady, K; Torzillo, P J

    2009-12-01

    Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. ALRIs are important indicators of the health disparities that persist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children in developed countries. Bronchiolitis and pneumonia account for the majority of the ALRI burden. The epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of these diseases in Indigenous children are discussed. In comparison with non-Indigenous children in developing countries they have higher rates of disease, more complications, and their management is influenced by several unique factors including the epidemiology of disease and, in some remote regions, constraints on hospital referral and access to highly trained staff. The prevention of repeat infections and the early detection and management of chronic lung disease is critical to the long-term respiratory and overall health of these children.

  12. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Jaythoon; O’Neill, Derek; Honari, Bahman; De Gascun, Cillian; Connell, Jeff; Keogan, Mary; Hickey, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections occur worldwide and primary infection usually occurs in early childhood and is often asymptomatic whereas primary infection in adults may result in symptomatic illness. CMV establishes a chronic latent infection with intermittent periods of reactivation. Primary infection or reactivation associate with increased mortality and morbidity in those who are immunocompromised. Transplacental transmission may result in significant birth defects or long-term sensorineural hearing loss. We performed a study to determine the CMV seroprevalence and the association between HLA Class I alleles and frequency of CMV infection in Ireland. The presence of CMV IgG, a marker of previous CMV infection, was determined for a cohort of 1849 HLA typed solid organ transplant donors between 1990 and 2013. The presence of CMV IgG was correlated with HLA type. The CMV seroprevalence in solid organ transplant donors was 33.4% (range 22–48% per annum) over the time period 1990 to 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that both age and HLA alleles were associated with CMV seropositivity. A significant and positive relationship between age and CMV seropositivity was observed (OR = 1.013, P < 0.001, CI [1.007, 1.019]). Chi-square analysis revealed that the female gender was independently associated with CMV seropositivity (P < 0.01). Seroprevalence in women of reproductive age (20–39 years) was significantly higher than men of the same age (37% vs 26%, P < 0.01). The frequencies of HLA-A1, HLA-A2, and HLA-A3 in our cohort were 40.8%, 48.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of HLA-A1 but not HLA-A2 or HLA-A3 was independently associated with CMV seronegativity (P < 0.01). Interestingly, individuals who co-expressed HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 alleles were significantly more likely to be CMV seropositive (P < 0.02). The frequencies of HLA-B5, HLA-B7, and HLA-B8 in our cohort

  13. Human microsporidial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, R; Bryan, R T; Schwartz, D A; Owen, R L

    1994-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular spore-forming protozoal parasites belonging to the phylum Microspora. Their host range is extensive, including most invertebrates and all classes of vertebrates. More than 100 microsporidial genera and almost 1,000 species have now been identified. Five genera (Enterocytozoon spp., Encephalitozoon spp., Septata spp., Pleistophora sp., and Nosema spp.) and unclassified microsporidia (referred to by the collective term Microsporidium) have been associated with human disease, which appears to manifest primarily in immunocompromised persons. The clinical manifestations of microsporidiosis are diverse and include intestinal, pulmonary, ocular, muscular, and renal disease. Among persons not infected with human immunodeficiency virus, ten cases of microsporidiosis have been documented. In human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, on the other hand, over 400 cases of microsporidiosis have been identified, the majority attributed to Enterocytozoon bieneusi, an important cause of chronic diarrhea and wasting. Diagnosis of microsporidiosis currently depends on morphological demonstration of the organisms themselves. Initial detection of microsporidia by light microscopic examination of tissue sections and of more readily obtainable specimens such as stool, duodenal aspirates, urine, sputum, nasal discharge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and conjunctival smears is now becoming routine practice. Definitive species identification is made by using the specific fluorescein-tagged antibody (immunofluorescence) technique or electron microscopy. Treatment options are limited, but symptomatic improvement of Enterocytozoon bieneusi infection may be achieved with the anthelmintic-antiprotozoal drug albendazole. Preliminary observations suggest that Septata intestinalis and Encephalitozoon infections may be cured with albendazole. Progress is being made with respect to in vitro propagation of microsporidia, which is crucial for developing

  14. Endotoxin in meningococcal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, H R

    1980-01-01

    26 children with meningococcal infections were studied to find out the relationaship between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels of endotoxin, the clinical outcome, the level of antigen in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, and indices of complement activation and disseminated intravascular coagulation. No association was found between endotoxin levels and the other factors. A high cerebrospinal fluid antigen level in patients with meningitis was associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:6776899

  15. IL-17 and infections.

    PubMed

    Ling, Y; Puel, A

    2014-10-01

    IL-17 immunity has been shown to be essential for mucocutaneous protection against Candida albicans in mice and humans. However, mice with defective IL-17 immunity display broader susceptibility, as they are also prone to infections with diverse infectious agents at various sites. Humans with genetic defects affecting their IL-17 immunity usually suffer from chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC): recurrent or persistent infections of the skin, nails, and mucosae with C. albicans, with or without other clinical signs. Most patients with autosomal dominant (AD) hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) due to STAT3 deficiency or AD STAT1 gain-of-function display impaired IL-17-producing T-cell development, and CMC is one of their principal clinical manifestations. Similarly, patients with autosomal recessive (AR) autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) caused by AIRE deficiency have high levels of neutralizing autoantibodies against IL-17A, IL-17F and/or IL-22 and present CMC as their only infectious disease. Finally, CMC is the main clinical phenotype observed in patients with inborn errors specifically affecting IL-17 immunity. Indeed, patients with AD IL-17F deficiency or AR IL-17RA or ACT1 deficiency display CMC and, to a lesser extent, superficial staphylococcal diseases. Candida infection was recently reported in psoriasis patients treated with anti-IL-17A antibodies. Careful monitoring for CMC is thus important during anti-IL-17 treatment. PMID:25398490

  16. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  17. [Hantaviruses and hantavirus infections].

    PubMed

    Dekonenko, A E; Tkachenko, E A

    2004-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HVRS) has been for decades a topical problem for healthcare systems of many countries in the Eurasian continent. Viruses triggering HVRS alongside with other related viruses (but not pathogenic to man) were discovered in 70-80-ies and formed a new genus Hantavirus of the Bunyaviridae family. The study results of a severe outbreak of the respiratory disease with the mortality rate of 60% (South-West of the USA, 1933) showed that hantaviruses were also among the causative agents. Later, the disease was designated as hantavirus cardio-pulmonary syndrome. By now, it has been established that hantaviruses are wide spread with different rodents being their carriers. The discussed viruses cause, in rodents, a chronic asymptomatic infection and are transferred, later, to man by the aerogenic path through excretions of infected animals. Studies of hantaviruses have been restricted for a long time due to their high pathogenicity (protection equipment not below than the P-3 level is needed), because of a lack of a laboratory model of infected animals and because of a low growth in cell cultures. With the rapid development and application of molecular biological techniques of the recent years, substantial progress has been made in studies of hantaviruses. Different aspects of hantavirus ecology, molecular biology, morphology, pathogenesis and diagnostics are discussed in the offered survey.

  18. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships. PMID:26350312

  19. Paleomicrobiology of Bartonella infections.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Drancourt, Michel; Aboudharam, Gérard; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Studying ancient infectious diseases is a challenge, as written contemporary descriptions, when available, are often imprecise and do not allow for accurate discrimination among the pathogens endemic at that time. Paleomicrobiology offers a unique access to the history of these infections by identifying precisely the causative agents. Body louse-transmitted infections are amongst the most epidemic diseases in history, especially in war and famine periods. Of these, Bartonella quintana was detected by suicide PCR in 4000-year-old human remains, thus representing the oldest evidence to date of an arthropod-transmitted infection to human beings. This species has also been detected in human specimens from the 11th to 15th, 18th and 19th centuries. In addition, Bartonella henselae, a cat- and flea-associated pathogen, was detected in cat specimens from the 13th to 18th centuries, therefore demonstrating an association of the bacterium and its reservoir for over 800 years. Therefore, pathogenic Bartonella species have been involved in several outbreaks in the past millennia and should systematically be investigated in human remains from suspected epidemics.

  20. Fungal toenail infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Fungal infections are reported to cause 23% of foot diseases and 50% of nail conditions in people seen by dermatologists, but are less common in the general population, affecting 3% to 12% of people. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral treatments for fungal toenail infections in adults? What are the effects of topical treatments for fungal toenail infections in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 13 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amorolfine, butenafine, ciclopirox, fluconazole, itraconazole, terbinafine, tioconazole, and topical ketoconazole. PMID:24625577

  1. Fungal toenail infections

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Fungal infections are reported to cause 23% of foot diseases and 50% of nail conditions in people seen by dermatologists, but are less common in the general population, affecting 3% to 5% of people. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral treatments for fungal toenail infections? What are the effects of topical treatments for fungal toenail infections? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amorolfine, butenafine, ciclopirox, fluconazole, griseofulvin, itraconazole, ketoconazole, mechanical debridement, terbinafine, and tioconazole. PMID:21846413

  2. Bat lyssavirus infections.

    PubMed

    McColl, K A; Tordo, N; Aguilar Setién, A A

    2000-04-01

    Bats, which represent approximately 24% of all known mammalian species, frequently act as vectors of lyssaviruses. In particular, insectivorous bats play an important role in the epidemiology of rabies and some rabies-like viruses, while the haematophagous vampire bats are the major wildlife vector for rabies in Latin America. In contrast, the role of fruit bats (flying foxes) in the epidemiology of the recently discovered Australian bat lyssavirus is only just emerging. Information on the pathogenesis of lyssaviruses in bats is scarce. However, in general, mortality in bats infected via a natural route appears to be low, and seroconversion occurs in many of those that survive. While transmission of rabies from an infected bat may be via a bite, other routes are apparently also possible. Methods for the diagnosis of bat lyssavirus infections in bats and terrestrial mammals (including humans) are similar to the classical procedures for rabies. Measures for the prevention and control of these diseases are also similar to those for rabies, although additional innovative methods have been tested, specifically to control vampire bat rabies. PMID:11189715

  3. Microscopes and ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Olcerst, R B

    1987-05-01

    Environmental microbial assays of industrial microscope eyepieces were conducted following reports of multiple intershift ocular infections. Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus was identified among the microorganisms cultured. This paper suggests that direct contact with industrial microscope eyepieces provides a potentially significant route of transmission of both bacterial and viral ocular infections. An industrial hygiene ocular health questionnaire was distributed to a first and second shift manufacturing operation to assess the incidence of ocular infections. These data were compared to the questionnaire responses of 122 control manufacturing workers who did not use microscopes. Based on self-reporting by employees, those who used microscopes were found to have statistically significant incidence of sites and conjunctivitis that was 8.3 times that of the control group. Sterilization of eyepieces by ethylene oxide, formaldehyde and isopropyl alcohol were considered, but ultimately rejected. These biocides were found respectively to damage ocular lens coatings, contribute to volatile organic emissions, or be ineffective against spore-forming bacteria. This article presents a detailed evaluation of a commercially available ultraviolet sanitization unit (manufactured by the King Bactostat Corp., 7115 Armistad Street, El Paso, TX 79912). This ultraviolet disinfection process proved to be rapid and emission free; it also yielded eyepieces free of residual chemical biocides that have the potential for ocular irritation. Field tests involving 60 eyepieces demonstrated effective disinfection by a Chi-Square statistical comparison, at values greater than 95% confidence level, as compared to unirradiated eyepieces.

  4. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships.

  5. Modeling intraocular bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Astley, Roger A; Coburn, Phillip S; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye which can result in significant loss of visual acuity. Even with prompt antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and surgical intervention, vision and even the eye itself may be lost. For the past century, experimental animal models have been used to examine various aspects of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial endophthalmitis, to further the development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacies of antibiotics. Experimental models allow independent control of many parameters of infection and facilitate systematic examination of infection outcomes. While no single animal model perfectly reproduces the human pathology of bacterial endophthalmitis, investigators have successfully used these models to understand the infectious process and the host response, and have provided new information regarding therapeutic options for the treatment of bacterial endophthalmitis. This review highlights experimental animal models of endophthalmitis and correlates this information with the clinical setting. The goal is to identify knowledge gaps that may be addressed in future experimental and clinical studies focused on improvements in the therapeutic preservation of vision during and after this disease. PMID:27154427

  6. Infections in open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Baddour, L M; Kluge, R M

    1989-01-01

    More than 250,000 open heart surgical procedures are performed annually in the United States. The majority of these procedures are coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) and valve replacements. In this forum our authors discuss the kinds of infections that occur in patients following open heart surgery, as well as the documented risk factors and microbiology of these infections. We also asked each author to outline the criteria used to diagnose post open heart surgery infections, and to address associated consequences and complications. Finally, we were interested in each author's definition of the infection control practitioner's role in the prevention of this particular subset of nosocomial infections.

  7. Interaction of obesity and infections.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhar, N V; Bailey, D; Thomas, D

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence that certain infections may induce obesity. Obese persons may also have more severe infections and have compromised response to therapies. The objective of this study is to review the available literature identifying infections that potentially contribute to greater body mass index (BMI) and differential responses of overweight and obese persons to infections. A systematic literature review of human studies examining associations between infections and weight gain, differential susceptibility, severity, and response to prevention and treatment of infection according to BMI status (January 1980-July 2014) was conducted. Three hundred and forty-three studies were eligible for inclusion. Evidence indicated that viral infection by human adenovirus Ad36 and antibiotic eradication of Helicobacter pylori were followed by weight gain. People who were overweight or obese had higher susceptibility to developing post-surgical infections, H1N1 influenza and periodontal disease. More severe infections tended to be present in people with a larger BMI. People with a higher BMI had a reduced response to vaccinations and antimicrobial drugs. Higher doses of antibiotics were more effective in obese patients. Infections may influence BMI, and BMI status may influence response to certain infections, as well as to preventive and treatment measures. These observations have potential clinical implications. PMID:26354800

  8. Infections Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arnow, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    The epidemiology of infections associated with orthotopic liver transplantation is summarized herein, and approaches to prophylaxis are outlined. Infection is a major complication following orthotopic liver transplantation, and more than half of transplant recipients develop at least one infection. The risk of infection is highest in the first month after transplantation, and the most common pathogens are bacteria and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Bacterial infections usually occur in the first month, arise in the abdomen, and are caused by aerobes. The peak incidence of CMV infection is late in the first month and early in the second month after transplantationn. CMV syndromes include fever and neutropenia, hepatitis, pneumonitis, gut ulceration, and disseminated infection. Other significant problems are Candida intraabdominal infection, Herpes simplex mucocutaneous infection or hepatitis, adenovirus hepatitis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Prophylaxis of infection in liver transplant recipients has not been well-studied. Several different regimens of parenteral, oral absorbable, and/or oral non-absorbable antibiotics active against bacteria and yeast have been used at various centers, but no randomized controlled trials have been conducted. Selective bowel decontamination appears to be a promising approach to the prevention of bacterial and Candida infections, while oral acyclovir may be a relatively convenient and effective agent for CMV prophylaxis. PMID:1650245

  9. Bacterial infection after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Il

    2014-01-01

    Infectious complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation, despite recent advances in the transplant field. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites can cause infection before and after transplantation. Among them, bacterial infections are predominant during the first two months post-transplantation and affect patient and graft survival. They might cause surgical site infections, including deep intra-abdominal infections, bacteremia, pneumonia, catheter-related infections and urinary tract infections. The risk factors for bacterial infections differ between the periods after transplant, and between centers. Recently, the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is great concern in liver transplant (LT) patients. The instructive data about effects of infections with extended-spectrum beta lactamase producing bacteria, carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, and glycopeptide-resistant gram-positive bacteria were reported on a center-by-center basis. To prevent post-transplant bacterial infections, proper strategies need to be established based upon center-specific data and evidence from well-controlled studies. This article reviewed the recent epidemiological data, risk factors for each type of infections and important clinical issues in bacterial infection after LT. PMID:24876741

  10. Interaction of obesity and infections.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhar, N V; Bailey, D; Thomas, D

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence that certain infections may induce obesity. Obese persons may also have more severe infections and have compromised response to therapies. The objective of this study is to review the available literature identifying infections that potentially contribute to greater body mass index (BMI) and differential responses of overweight and obese persons to infections. A systematic literature review of human studies examining associations between infections and weight gain, differential susceptibility, severity, and response to prevention and treatment of infection according to BMI status (January 1980-July 2014) was conducted. Three hundred and forty-three studies were eligible for inclusion. Evidence indicated that viral infection by human adenovirus Ad36 and antibiotic eradication of Helicobacter pylori were followed by weight gain. People who were overweight or obese had higher susceptibility to developing post-surgical infections, H1N1 influenza and periodontal disease. More severe infections tended to be present in people with a larger BMI. People with a higher BMI had a reduced response to vaccinations and antimicrobial drugs. Higher doses of antibiotics were more effective in obese patients. Infections may influence BMI, and BMI status may influence response to certain infections, as well as to preventive and treatment measures. These observations have potential clinical implications.

  11. Intrauterine infections: a literature review.

    PubMed

    França, Cristiane Miranda; Mugayar, Leda R F

    2004-01-01

    During gestation, many microorganisms can infect the fetus, causing severe birth defects. Such organisms and the resulting clinical syndromes have been categorized as TORCH infections, a useful acronym referring to Toxoplasma gondii, other microorganisms (like syphilis), rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpesviruses. Since dental patients typically report pregnancy or previous infections as part of their health history, and TORCH infections can manifest oral symptoms, the dentist is in a position to act as an educator and screener for these infections. This article reviews TORCH agents for dentists to help the clinician in educating pregnant patients about the risks these infections pose to the fetus. The authors also note oral symptoms related to these infections. PMID:15552342

  12. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper FW; Lau, Susanna KP; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  13. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action. PMID:27015018

  14. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action.

  15. Schistosoma mansoni Infections in Young Children: When Are Schistosome Antigens in Urine, Eggs in Stool and Antibodies to Eggs First Detectable?

    PubMed Central

    Stothard, J. Russell; Sousa-Figuereido, Jose C.; Betson, Martha; Adriko, Moses; Arinaitwe, Moses; Rowell, Candia; Besiyge, Fred; Kabatereine, Narcis B.

    2011-01-01

    Background In Uganda, control of intestinal schistosomiasis with preventive chemotherapy is typically focused towards treatment of school-aged children; the needs of younger children are presently being investigated as in lakeshore communities very young children can be infected. In the context of future epidemiological monitoring, we sought to compare the detection thresholds of available diagnostic tools for Schistosoma mansoni and estimate a likely age of first infection for these children. Methods and Findings A total of 242 infants and preschool children (134 boys and 108 girls, mean age 2.9 years, minimum 5 months and maximum 5 years) were examined from Bugoigo, a well-known disease endemic village on Lake Albert. Schistosome antigens in urine, eggs in stool and host antibodies to eggs were inspected to reveal a general prevalence of 47.5% (CI95 41.1–54.0%), as ascertained by a positive criterion from at least one diagnostic method. Although children as young as 6 months old could be found infected, the average age of infected children was between 3¼–3¾ years, when diagnostic techniques became broadly congruent. Conclusion Whilst different assays have particular (dis)advantages, direct detection of eggs in stool was least sensitive having a temporal lag behind antigen and antibody methods. Setting precisely a general age of first infection is problematic but if present Ugandan policies continue, a large proportion of infected children could wait up to 3–4 years before receiving first medication. To better tailor treatment needs for this younger ageclass, we suggest that the circulating cathodic antigen urine dipstick method to be used as an epidemiological indicator. PMID:21245910

  16. Evaluating spray adjuvants to extend residual activity of microbiol pesticides`

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on requests to improve the residual efficacy of baculovirus applications, a commercial adjuvant (Nu-Film 17(R) and an experimental lignin adjuvant were evaluated for resistance to environmental degradation. Nu-Film is a commercial product derived from pine resin; and lignin is a by-product of...

  17. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection: From an Infection Prevention Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Sangeeta; Rahman, Riaz; Yassin, Mohamed H.

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) is indicated for patients with severely reduced ejection fraction or with life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Infection related to a CIED is one of the most feared complications of this life-saving device. The rate of CIED infection has been estimated to be between 2 and 25; though evidence shows that this rate continues to rise with increasing expenditure to the patient as well as healthcare systems. Multiple risk factors have been attributed to the increased rates of CIED infection and host comorbidities as well as procedure related risks. Infection prevention efforts are being developed as defined bundles in numerous hospitals around the country given the increased morbidity and mortality from CIED related infections. This paper aims at reviewing the various infection prevention measures employed at hospitals and also highlights the areas that have relatively less established evidence for efficacy. PMID:26550494

  18. Pathogenesis of foreign body infection. Evidence for a local granulocyte defect.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerli, W; Lew, P D; Waldvogel, F A

    1984-01-01

    Implanted foreign bodies are highly susceptible to pyogenic infections and represent a major problem in modern medicine. In an effort to understand the pathogenesis of these infections, we studied the phagocytic function in the vicinity of a foreign body by using a recently developed guinea pig model of Teflon tissue cages subcutaneously implanted (Zimmerli, W., F.A. Waldvogel, P. Vaudaux, and U.E. Nydegger, 1982, J. Infect. Dis., 146:487-497). Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) purified from tissue cage fluid had poor bactericidal activity against a catalase-positive microorganism. When compared with blood or exudate PMN, they exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to generate superoxide in response to a particulate or a soluble stimulus (72 and 57%, respectively, P less than 0.001). Not only their total contents in myeloperoxidase, beta-glucuronidase, lysozyme, and B12 binding protein were significantly reduced (by 62, 21, 47, and 63%, respectively, P less than 0.01), but also their capability for further secretion of residual B12 binding protein upon stimulation. Ingestion rates of endotoxin-coated opsonized oil particles were reduced by 25% (P less than 0.05). In an effort to reproduce these abnormalities in vitro, fresh peritoneal exudate PMN were incubated with Teflon fibers in the presence of plasma. Interaction of PMN with the fibers led to significant increases in hexose monophosphate shunt activity and exocytosis of secondary granules (P less than 0.01). PMN eluted after such interaction showed defective bactericidal activity, oxidative metabolism, and granular enzyme content similar to those observed in tissue cage PMN. The local injection of fresh blood PMN into tissue cages at the time of, or 3 h after, inoculation with 100 microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus Wood 46) reduced the infection rate from 50 to 56 cages to 1 of 21 (P less than 0.001) and 3 of 8 cages (P less than 0.001), respectively. These results suggest that the in vivo as

  19. [Corynebacterium ulcerans pulmonary infection].

    PubMed

    Thouvenin, Maxime; Beilouny, Bassam; Badell, Edgar; Guiso, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is a bacterium able to infect humans by inducing a disease close to diphtheria. We describe the case of a 83-year-old patient hospitalized as a matter of urgency in intensive care for which C. ulcerans was isolated in pure culture in its bronchial samples. Even if the isolate was not secreting toxin in vitro, it possesses the tox gene which motivated the use of specific antitoxin serum. After two months of intensive care the patient went out of the service. It is about a remarkable case of clinicobiologic collaboration.

  20. Pediatric osteoarticular infection update.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Nicole I; Rosenfeld, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are a common cause of morbidity in children. A multitude of studies over the past few years have improved our knowledge and understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Staphylococcus aureus continues to be the most common pathogen; however, new and innovative organism identification techniques are improving the speed and accuracy of diagnosis and increasing the identification of other less common organisms. Improved capability for patient assessment with a combination of advanced imaging studies and timely laboratory tests allow for a more thorough understanding of the disease process and more efficient patient care.

  1. Remains of infection

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Alan

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease, musculoskeletal symptoms can persist after treatment, which has led to the hypothesis that the causal organism itself may escape antibiotic therapy. The controversy that surrounds this question extends beyond patients, physicians, and scientists, as public health organizations struggle with how the disease should be diagnosed and treated. Is Lyme disease an infection that resolves, or is the spirochetal agent resilient and evasive? In this issue of the JCI, Bockenstedt et al. address this issue and present compelling evidence that the residues of nonviable spirochetes can persist in cartilaginous tissue long after treatment and may contribute to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:22728928

  2. Infective endocarditis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Diz Dios, P

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for infective endocarditis continues to be administered empirically, although its indications are ever more restrictive. Some expert committees have even suggested that antibiotic prophylaxis is unnecessary, rekindling the controversy between those who defend the scientific evidence and those working in clinical practice; in any case, this proposal will facilitate the undertaking of prospective placebo-controlled trials, so necessary to resolve this issue. In the meantime, the most prudent approach is to adopt the recommendations proposed by the expert committees in each country. PMID:24373017

  3. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  4. Coconut and Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Carl P.; Mosbach, Klaus; Bibit, Venuso C.; Watson, Colin H.

    1967-01-01

    Raw, unprocessed coconut supports the growth of salmonellae as well as that of other enteric bacteria, salmonellae being particularly resistant to subsequent desiccation. Original contamination is not due to carriers or to polluted water supplies, but to contact with bacteria-containing soils followed by dispersion via infected coconut milk and shells. Pasteurization of raw coconut meat in a water bath at 80 C for 8 to 10 min effectively killed such bacteria, did not injure the product, and provided a prophylactic method now widely used by the coconut industry. PMID:5340650

  5. Emerging viral infections.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F

    2012-09-01

    Unique disorders appear episodically in human populations and cause life-threatening systemic or neurological disease. Historical examples of such disorders include von Economo encephalitis, a disorder of presumed viral etiology; acquired immune deficiency syndrome, caused by the human immunodeficiency virus; and severe acute respiratory syndrome, caused by a member of the coronavirus family. This article describes the factors that contribute to the emergence of infectious diseases and focuses on selected recent examples of emerging viral infections that can affect the nervous system of infants, children, and adolescents.

  6. Haemoproteus infections in waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.

    1954-01-01

    It is proposed that Haemoproteus nettionis (Johnston and Cleland, 1909) Coatney, 1936 be accepted as the correct name for the Haemoproteus of Anatidae. A list of synonyms and amended description of the parasite is given. Infections are reported from wood ducks (Aix sponsa) and from domestic ducks and geese, the last representing a new host record. Natural transmission was demonstrated at the Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland. Possible seasonal variation is suggested with active carriers present as early as mid-April among adult wood ducks and most active transmission occurring in June and early July with limited transmission earlier or later.

  7. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alina; Nizran, Parminder; Malone, Michael A; Riley, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Clinical presentation helps differentiate between upper and lower urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs are classified as either complicated or uncomplicated. A complicated UTI is associated with an underlying condition that increases the risk of failing therapy. Primary laboratory tests for UTIs consist of urinalysis and urine culture. The most common pathogen for uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis is Escherichia coli. Nitrofurantoin, fosfomycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are first-line therapies for acute uncomplicated cystitis. Decisions regarding antibiotic agents should be individualized based on patients' allergies, tolerability, community resistance rates, cost, and availability.

  8. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  9. Infections Caused by Scedosporium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Quiroz-Telles, Flavio; Meletiadis, Joseph; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Knudsen, Tena; Buchanan, Wendy; Milanovich, Jeffrey; Sutton, Deanna A.; Fothergill, Annette; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Shea, Yvonne R.; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Kottilil, Shyam; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Scedosporium spp. are increasingly recognized as causes of resistant life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Scedosporium spp. also cause a wide spectrum of conditions, including mycetoma, saprobic involvement and colonization of the airways, sinopulmonary infections, extrapulmonary localized infections, and disseminated infections. Invasive scedosporium infections are also associated with central nervous infection following near-drowning accidents. The most common sites of infection are the lungs, sinuses, bones, joints, eyes, and brain. Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans are the two principal medically important species of this genus. Pseudallescheria boydii, the teleomorph of S. apiospermum, is recognized by the presence of cleistothecia. Recent advances in molecular taxonomy have advanced the understanding of the genus Scedosporium and have demonstrated a wider range of species than heretofore recognized. Studies of the pathogenesis of and immune response to Scedosporium spp. underscore the importance of innate host defenses in protection against these organisms. Microbiological diagnosis of Scedosporium spp. currently depends upon culture and morphological characterization. Molecular tools for clinical microbiological detection of Scedosporium spp. are currently investigational. Infections caused by S. apiospermum and P. boydii in patients and animals may respond to antifungal triazoles. By comparison, infections caused by S. prolificans seldom respond to medical therapy alone. Surgery and reversal of immunosuppression may be the only effective therapeutic options for infections caused by S. prolificans. PMID:18202441

  10. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304 U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058 U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  11. Submasseteric Infection: A Rare, Deep Space Cheek Infection Causing Trismus.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Richard H; Bahadori, Robert S; Willis, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Submasseteric space infections are rare at any age but particularly so in primary school children. The origin of the infection is usually odontogenic, from pericoronitis in a third molar. Submasseteric inflammation is a deep facial space inflammation, often progressing to mature abscess, and usually misdiagnosed as staphylococcal or streptococcal lymphadenitis or pyogenic parotitis. The hallmark of a masticatory space infection is trismus. The cardinal signs of this infection include a firm mass in the body of the masseter muscle with overlying cellulitis with trismus.

  12. Vaccines for emerging infections.

    PubMed

    Marano, N; Rupprecht, C; Regnery, R

    2007-04-01

    Emerging infectious diseases represent a grave threat to animal and human populations in terms of their impact on global health, agriculture and the economy. Vaccines developed for emerging infections in animals can protect animal health and prevent transmission of zoonotic diseases to humans. Examples in this paper illustrate how industry and public health can collaborate to develop a vaccine to prevent an emerging disease in horses (West Nile virus vaccine), how poultry vaccination can protect animals and prevent transmission to people (avian influenza vaccine), how regulatory changes can pave the way for vaccines that will control the carrier state in animals and thus prevent infection in humans (Bartonella henselae vaccine in cats) and how novel technologies could be applied to vaccinate wildlife reservoir species for rabies. Stemming from the realisation that zoonotic diseases are the predominant source of human emerging infectious diseases, it behoves academic, public health, and animal health agencies to consider creative constructive approaches to combat serious public health challenges. Vaccination of vector/reservoir species, when efficacious vaccines are available, offers significant advantages to combating zoonotic human disease. PMID:17633303

  13. [New foodborne infections].

    PubMed

    Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2003-05-15

    The last 20 years have witnessed a profound reshaping of the spectrum of foodborne infections in industrialized countries. Food products are overall very safe, but the industrial scale and standardisation of food production have spawned spectacular epidemics, bringing into the light previously little known microorganisms such as Listeria or Escherichia coli O157:H7, the causative agent of the "hamburger disease". The recent "mad cow disease" crisis is another illustration of a food industry gone astray under the pressure of underlying economic stakes. Through unprecedented efforts from the countries involved--epitomized in France by the creation of the Agence française de sécurité sannitaire des aliments in 1999--these diseases are about to be curtailed in their epidemic form. But new dangers emerge yet with Campylobacter infections, Norovirus gastroenteritis or the spread of multi-resistant bacteria. Issues mostly unknown to the general public that are likely to be strongly publicized in the future. PMID:12846023

  14. [Pneumocystosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Sodqi, M; Oulad Lahsen, A; Chakib, A; Marih, L; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2016-08-01

    Pneumocystosis is an opportunistic disease caused by invasion of unicellular fungus Pneumocystic jirovecii which is responsible for febrile pneumonia among patients with cellular immunodeficiency especially those HIV infected. Despite the decreasing of its incidence due to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, as well as anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis among these patients, Pneumocystis pneumonia remains the first AIDS-defining event and a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. The usual radiological presentation is that of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the detection of trophozoides and/or cysts P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples using several staining techniques. The use of polymerase chain reaction in the BAL samples in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more has allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. The standard regimen of treatment is the association of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole which has been utilized as an effective treatment with a favourable recovery. Early HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy should reduce the incidence of this dreaded disease. PMID:27349824

  15. Pregnancy and helminth infections

    PubMed Central

    Mpairwe, H; Tweyongyere, R; Elliott, A

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that helminth infection may be particularly detrimental during pregnancy, through adverse effects on maternal anaemia and on birth outcomes, and that anthelminthic treatment during pregnancy will therefore be particularly beneficial. However, the few treatment trials that have been conducted have given, but little support to this notion and further trials in settings of nutritional stress are needed. It has also been proposed that prenatal exposure to helminth infection has an important effect on the development of the foetal immune response. There is evidence that this may impact, long-term, upon responses to helminth and nonhelminth antigens, and to allergens. Exposure to helminths in utero may also have nonspecific effects that may modify the offspring's susceptibility to diseases mediated by inflammation, including metabolic disorders. The mechanisms of such effects are not known, but they deserve to be explored as current epidemiological findings suggest the possibility of primary prevention for inflammatory conditions such as allergy, through intervention during pregnancy. PMID:24471654

  16. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  17. Candida Infections of Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Erna M.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2004-01-01

    The number of indwelling medical devices is escalating, and an increasing proportion of device-related infections are being caused by Candida spp. Candida spp. produce biofilms on synthetic materials, which facilitates adhesion of the organisms to devices and renders them relatively refractory to medical therapy. Management of device-related Candida infections can be challenging. Removal of the infected device is generally needed to establish cure of Candida infections of medical devices. However, since the pathogenesis of Candida bloodstream infection is complicated, more studies are necessary to determine the role of catheter exchange in patients with both gastrointestinal tract mucositis and indwelling catheters. The medical and economic impact of these infections is enormous. PMID:15084500

  18. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Gauhar; Lee, Jessica D

    2013-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is an infection of the inner surface or endocardium of the heart, in most instances involving the heart valves or the mural portion of the endocardium. As nonbacterial organisms such as rickettsia, fungi, and even viruses may also cause endocarditis, the term "infective endocarditis" is preferred over the older terminology of "bacterial endocarditis." Despite advancements in medical treatment and surgical therapies over the last few decades, infective endocarditis continues to be associated with a poor prognosis. There are many different factors affecting the clinical outcome in patient with infective endocarditis, including the type of organism and its virulence, patient characteristics, comorbid illness, time to diagnosis and treatment, indications for surgery, and time to surgery when indicated. In this article, we will review the epidemiology of endocarditis, the neurologic complications of infective endocarditis, and the current therapeutic strategies.

  19. [Pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi

    2012-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a life-threatening disease. The development of invasive fungal disease is dependent on multiple factors, such us colonization and efficient host immune response. We aimed to review the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections, in particular, those caused by Candida and Aspergillus. For this we propose, to describe the fungal characteristics, to detail the host defence mechanisms against fungus and to analyse the host risk factors for invasive fungal infection.

  20. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  1. Superficial fungal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Danielle M; Smidt, Aimee C

    2014-04-01

    Superficial fungal infections can involve the hair, skin, and nails. Most affected children are healthy, although immunosuppression is a risk factor for more severe presentation. Causative organisms typically are members of the Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton genera (dermatophytes), can be acquired from other infected humans, animals, or soil, and illicit a host inflammatory response. Nondermatophyte infections include pityriasis versicolor. In this article, the most common clinical presentations, diagnostic recommendations, and treatment algorithms for dermatophyte and nondermatophyte mycoses in children and adolescents are described.

  2. Fungal infection of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Surat

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application. PMID:25364269

  3. Virus infection and knee injury.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, P; Venner, R; Clements, G B

    1987-01-01

    Serological evidence of virus infection was sought in 31 consecutive patients presenting with knee swelling and compared with age/sex-matched controls. In a normal age/sex-matched control group, 42% of patients had evidence of recent or past infection with Coxsackie B virus, emphasising the care required in the evaluation of the significance of Coxsackie B neutralization titres in individual patients. Of 12 patients presenting with knee swelling and a history of a twisting injury, eight had serological evidence of recent or past infection with Coxsackie B virus, and one had evidence of a current adenovirus infection. PMID:2825728

  4. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman. PMID:27079865

  5. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman.

  6. Skin and Soft Tissue Infections.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C; Agudelo Higuita, Nelson Ivan

    2015-09-15

    Skin and soft tissue infections result from microbial invasion of the skin and its supporting structures. Management is determined by the severity and location of the infection and by patient comorbidities. Infections can be classified as simple (uncomplicated) or complicated (necrotizing or nonnecrotizing), or as suppurative or nonsuppurative. Most community-acquired infections are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococcus. Simple infections are usually monomicrobial and present with localized clinical findings. In contrast, complicated infections can be mono- or polymicrobial and may present with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation. Laboratory testing may be required to confirm an uncertain diagnosis, evaluate for deep infections or sepsis, determine the need for inpatient care, and evaluate and treat comorbidities. Initial antimicrobial choice is empiric, and in simple infections should cover Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. Patients with complicated infections, including suspected necrotizing fasciitis and gangrene, require empiric polymicrobial antibiotic coverage, inpatient treatment, and surgical consultation for debridement. Superficial and small abscesses respond well to drainage and seldom require antibiotics. Immunocompromised patients require early treatment and antimicrobial coverage for possible atypical organisms. PMID:26371732

  7. HIV and co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  8. Current controversies in infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Prendergast, Bernard D

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening disease caused by a focus of infection within the heart. For clinicians and scientists, it has been a moving target that has an evolving microbiology and a changing patient demographic. In the absence of an extensive evidence base to guide clinical practice, controversies abound. Here, we review three main areas of uncertainty: first, in prevention of infective endocarditis, including the role of antibiotic prophylaxis and strategies to reduce health care-associated bacteraemia; second, in diagnosis, specifically the use of multimodality imaging; third, we discuss the optimal timing of surgical intervention and the challenges posed by increasing rates of cardiac device infection. PMID:26918142

  9. [Rapid diagnosis of respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Toru

    2012-08-01

    The identification of pathogens is very important for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory infectious disease. Bacterial culture is a basic method to identify various pathogens, but it takes several days to get the final results. Many new methods for the rapid diagnosis of respiratory infection have been developed in recent years. This has changed the treatment of respiratory infection. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were often used to treat respiratory infection previously, but rapid diagnosis has changed the choice of antibiotics from broad-spectrum to specific ones. New methods of rapid diagnosis are very useful and powerful tools in the treatment of respiratory infection.

  10. Animal infection models and ethics -- the perfect infection model.

    PubMed

    Zak, Oto; O'Reilly, Terence

    1993-05-01

    Experimental infection models have long been recognized as an essential part of testing anti-infective therapies. A perfect animal model would be a model that satisfied not only scientific criteria, but ethical criteria as well. In the design and execution of such experiments, scientific and ethical considerations are not mutually exclusive, but should be convergent and therefore result in the optimal model.

  11. Pulmonary Strongyloides stercoralis infection

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Canan; Gayaf, Mine; Ozsoz, Ayse; Sahin, Birsen; Aksel, Nimet; Karasu, Isil; Aydogdu, Zekiye; Turgay, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    The 17-year-old male patient presented with fever, weakness, dyspnea and weight loss. His chest radiography demonstrated diffuse reticulonodular density, and high-resolution lung tomography indicated diffuse micronodules and prevalent ground-glass pattern. The findings were consistent with miliary involvement. The patient underwent examinations for rheumatology, immunology, cytology and infectious conditions. His immune system was normal and had no comorbidities or any history of immunosuppressive treatment. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were noted upon direct inspection of the feces. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved with albendazole 400 mg/day. This case is being presented since miliary involvement in the lungs caused by S. stercoralis infection in an individual with intact immune system is rare and difficult to diagnosis. PMID:26029521

  12. [Nosocomial measles infections].

    PubMed

    Wicker, S; Rabenau, H F; Marckmann, G; Gottschalk, R

    2013-11-01

    Measles is re-emerging in several developed countries because of suboptimal vaccination coverage. Health-care facilities play a crucial role in the transmission of measles infection. Nosocomial measles may contribute for an important part of cases in measles epidemics, especially in countries where measles is largely under control. The risk of acquiring measles is estimated to be 2 to 19 times higher for susceptible healthcare personnel (HCP) than for the general population. Measles vaccination of HCP should be included by all health care facilities as part of a strict occupational health program. All HCP should have documented evidence of measles immunity. Immunity against measles should be a prerequisite for working in areas where the most vulnerable patients are cared for. Both occupational and public health measures are needed to ensure that nosocomial measles should be comprehensively monitored and consistently prevented. PMID:24221979

  13. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  14. Morbillivirus Infections: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    Research on morbillivirus infections has led to exciting developments in recent years. Global measles vaccination coverage has increased, resulting in a significant reduction in measles mortality. In 2011 rinderpest virus was declared globally eradicated – only the second virus to be eradicated by targeted vaccination. Identification of new cellular receptors and implementation of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins in a range of model systems have provided fundamental new insights into the pathogenesis of morbilliviruses, and their interactions with the host immune system. Nevertheless, both new and well-studied morbilliviruses are associated with significant disease in wildlife and domestic animals. This illustrates the need for robust surveillance and a strategic focus on barriers that restrict cross-species transmission. Recent and ongoing measles outbreaks also demonstrate that maintenance of high vaccination coverage for these highly infectious agents is critical. This introduction briefly summarizes the most important current research topics in this field. PMID:25685949

  15. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  16. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed. PMID:23691509

  17. Bacteriophages infecting Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lood, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  18. Epigenetics and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases. PMID:23209181

  19. Akabane virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, P D

    2015-08-01

    Akabane virus is a Culicoides-borne orthobunyavirus that is teratogenic to the fetus of cattle and small ruminant species. Depending upon the stage of gestation atwhich infection occurs, and the length of gestation of the mammalian host, a range of congenital defects may be observed. The developing central nervous system is usually the most severely affected, with hydranencephaly and arthrogryposis most frequently observed. Less commonly, some strains of Akabane virus can cause encephalitis in the neonate or, rarely, adult cattle. Akabane viruses are known to be widespread in temperate and tropical regions of Australia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East and some African countries. Disease is infrequently observed in regions where this virus is endemic and the presence of the virus remains unrecognised in the absence of serological surveillance. In some Asian countries, vaccines are used to minimise the occurrence of disease. PMID:26601444

  20. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Nicolò; Lewis, Russell E.; Giannella, Maddalena; Ambretti, Simone; Bartoletti, Michele; Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Cristini, Francesco; Trapani, Filippo; Gaibani, Paolo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Multidrug resistance associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among K. pneumoniae is endemic in southern Europe. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of resistance on the appropriateness of empirical therapy and treatment outcomes of K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) during a 2-year period at a 1420-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Italy. We identified 217 unique patient BSIs, including 92 (42%) KPC-positive, 49 (23%) ESBL-positive, and 1 (0.5%) metallo-beta-lactamase-positive isolates. Adequate empirical therapy was administered in 74% of infections caused by non-ESBL non-KPC strains, versus 33% of ESBL and 23% of KPC cases (p < 0.0001). To clarify the impact of resistance on BSI treatment outcomes, we compared several different models comprised of non-antibiotic treatment-related factors predictive of patients’ 30-day survival status. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score determined at the time of positive blood culture was superior to other investigated models, correctly predicting survival status in 83% of the study cohort. In multivariate analysis accounting for APACHE II, receipt of inadequate empirical therapy was associated with nearly a twofold higher rate of death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1–3.4; p = 0.02). Multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae accounted for two-thirds of all K. pneumoniae BSIs, high rates of inappropriate empirical therapy, and twofold higher rates of patient death irrespective of underlying illness. PMID:25398065

  1. Candida Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Baddley, John W.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Patel, Mukesh; Miró, José; Athan, Eugene; Barsic, Bruno; Bouza, Emilio; Clara, Liliana; Elliott, Tom; Kanafani, Zeina; Klein, John; Lerakis, Stamatios; Levine, Donald; Spelman, Denis; Rubinstein, Ethan; Tornos, Pilar; Morris, Arthur J.; Pappas, Paul; Fowler, Vance G.; Chu, Vivian H.; Cabell, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. Methods We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2716 patients with non-fungal IE in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study. Patients were enrolled and data collected from June 2000 until August 2005. Results Patients with Candida IE were more likely to have prosthetic valves (p<0.001), short term indwelling catheters (p<0.0001), and have healthcare-associated infection (p<0.001). Reasons for surgery differed between the two groups: myocardial abscess (46.7% vs. 22.2% p=0.026) and persistent positive blood cultures (33.3% vs. 9.9%, p=0.003) were more common among those with Candida IE. Mortality at discharge was higher in patients with Candida IE (30.3%) when compared to non-fungal cases (17%, p=0.046). Among Candida patients, mortality was similar in patients who received combination surgical and antifungal therapy versus antifungal therapy alone (33.3% vs. 27.8%, p=0.26). New antifungal drugs, particularly echinocandins, were used frequently. Conclusions These multi-center data suggest distinct epidemiologic features of Candida IE when compared to non-fungal cases. Indications for surgical intervention are different and mortality is increased. Newer antifungal treatment options are increasingly used. Large, multi-center studies are needed to help better define Candida IE. PMID:18283504

  2. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  3. Candida infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Baddley, J W; Benjamin, D K; Patel, M; Miró, J; Athan, E; Barsic, B; Bouza, E; Clara, L; Elliott, T; Kanafani, Z; Klein, J; Lerakis, S; Levine, D; Spelman, D; Rubinstein, E; Tornos, P; Morris, A J; Pappas, P; Fowler, V G; Chu, V H; Cabell, C

    2008-07-01

    Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore the epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2,716 patients with non-fungal IE in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis-Prospective Cohort Study (ICE-PCS). Patients were enrolled and the data collected from June 2000 until August 2005. We noted that patients with Candida IE were more likely to have prosthetic valves (p < 0.001), short-term indwelling catheters (p < 0.0001), and have healthcare-associated infections (p < 0.001). The reasons for surgery differed between the two groups: myocardial abscess (46.7% vs. 22.2%, p = 0.026) and persistent positive blood cultures (33.3% vs. 9.9%, p = 0.003) were more common among those with Candida IE. Mortality at discharge was higher in patients with Candida IE (30.3%) when compared to non-fungal cases (17%, p = 0.046). Among Candida patients, mortality was similar in patients who received combination surgical and antifungal therapy versus antifungal therapy alone (33.3% vs. 27.8%, p = 0.26). New antifungal drugs, particularly echinocandins, were used frequently. These multi-center data suggest distinct epidemiologic features of Candida IE when compared to non-fungal cases. Indications for surgical intervention are different and mortality is increased. Newer antifungal treatment options are increasingly used. Large, multi-center studies are needed to help better define Candida IE.

  4. Effect of Murine Norovirus Infection on Mouse Parvovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Paturzo, Frank X; Macy, James D

    2010-01-01

    Enzootic infection with mouse parvovirus (MPV) remains a common problem in laboratory colonies, and diagnosis of MPV infection is complicated by viral and host factors. The effect of an underlying viral infection on MPV infection has not previously been investigated. We assessed the effect of murine norovirus (MNV) infection, the most prevalent infectious agent in laboratory mice, on MPV shedding, tissue distribution and transmission. Fecal MPV shedding persisted longer in BALB/c mice infected with MNV 1 wk prior to MPV infection than in mice infected with MPV only, but transmission of MPV to soiled-bedding sentinels was not prolonged in coinfected mice. MPV DNA levels in coinfected BALB/c mice were higher in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens at 1 and 2 wk after inoculation and in small intestines at 1 wk after inoculation compared with levels in mice infected with MPV only. In C57BL/6 mice, fecal shedding was prolonged, but no difference in soiled bedding transmission or MPV DNA levels in tissues was detected between singly and coinfected mice. MPV DNA levels in singly and coinfected SW mice were similar. MPV DNA levels were highest in SW, intermediate in BALB/c and lowest in C57BL/6 mice. MPV DNA levels in mesenteric lymph nodes of BALB/c and SW mice exceeded those in small intestines and feces, whereas the inverse occurred in C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, MNV infection increased the duration of MPV shedding and increased MPV DNA levels in tissues of BALB/c mice. PMID:20122310

  5. Infectivity of human coronavirus strain 229E.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, M R; Thomas, B J; Davies, H A; Patterson, S

    1980-09-01

    The replication of human coronavirus strain 229E was observed by using indirect immunofluorescence in infected monolayers of MRC continuous cells. By 8 h after infection, bright cytoplasmic fluorescence was detected in cells infected with human coronavirus 229E. Discrete foci of infection were observed from 8 to 16 h after infection in cells infected with high dilutions of human coronavirus 229E; each fluorescent focus corresponded to a single virus infection. A fluorescent focus assay is described, using indirect immunofluorescence, which is more sensitive than the established techniques of tube titration and plaque assay. Particle/infectivity ratios for unpurified and purified virus preparations revealed a considerable drop in infectivity on purification.

  6. Uncovering common bacterial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria

    2013-03-10

    The four most common bacterial skin infections are impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis, and folliculitis. This article summarizes current information about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and implications for primary care practice needed to effectively diagnose and treat common bacterial skin infections. PMID:23361375

  7. Petriellidium boydii infection of knee

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, H.B.S.; Bedford, A.F.; Fincham, W.J.

    1982-12-01

    A case of Petriellidium boydii (synonym: Allescheria boydii) infection of the knee joint is described. It followed a penetrating soft tissue injury with a pitchfork. Such infections are rare in this country and bone involvement has not been recorded previously except in maduramycosis contracted in tropical areas.

  8. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM. PMID:25410222

  9. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM.

  10. Asymptomatic infection with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C; Sikand, Vijay K; Schoen, Robert T; Nowakowski, John

    2003-08-15

    The natural history of asymptomatic seroconversion to Borrelia burgdorferi has been unclear. We report here, on the basis of a post hoc assessment, the frequency and outcome of asymptomatic seroconversion to B. burgdorferi in participants of a large Lyme disease vaccine trial. We show that infection with B. burgdorferi may be asymptomatic but that asymptomatic infection is unusual in the United States.

  11. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  12. Surgical management of orofacial infections.

    PubMed

    Flynn, T R

    2000-03-01

    This overview of the surgical management of orofacial odontogenic infections is designed as a practical guide for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Fortunately, the incidence of serious odontogenic infections is decreasing. This decreased frequency, however, necessitates diligent study and mental preparation in advance of the emergent situations in which such cases present.

  13. Odontogenic infection mimicking antral polyps.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1997-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can extend into the maxillary sinus and produce sinusitis that mimics other pathoses. Infection of odontogenic origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis. Sinusitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of maxillary posterior teeth with acute or chronic symptoms.

  14. Infections and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Skare, Thelma Larocca; Dagostini, Jéssica Scherer; Zanardi, Patricia Imai; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the incidence of infections in a population of systemic lupus erythematosus individuals and the characteristics of infections regarding original site, as well as to study the possible associations between infections and treatment. Methods An analytical retrospective study using data from medical charts of systemic lupus erythematosus patients from a single university hospital. A total of 144 patients followed up for five years were included. Data collected comprised age of patients and age at onset of lupus, sex and ethnicity, disease duration before the study period, medications, cumulative dose of prednisone, occurrence of infections and their original site. Results The most frequent infections were urinary tract infections (correlated to use of prednisone − p<0.0001 and cyclophosphamide − p=0.045), upper airways infections (correlated to use of prednisone − p=0.0004, mycophenolate mofetil − p=0.0005, and cyclosporine − p=0.025), and pneumonia (associated to prednisone − p=0.017). Conclusion Prednisone was the drug more often associated with presence of infections, pointing to the need for a more judicious management of this drug. PMID:27074234

  15. Ear Infections and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E.; Zeisel, Susan A.

    Ear infections in infants and preschoolers can cause mild or moderate temporary hearing loss, which may in turn affect a child's ability to understand and learn language. Noting that providing children with proper medical treatment for ear infections or middle ear fluid is important in preventing possible problems with language development, this…

  16. HIV Infection: The Cellular Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jonathan N.; Weiss, Robin A.

    1988-01-01

    Explains a key finding of the research which revealed that initial infection resulted from the binding of the human immunodeficiency virus to a molecule known as the CD4 antigen. Describes various assays used to determine the affect of antibodies on the ability of the virus to infect the cells. (RT)

  17. HIV Infection Presenting with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, K; Gupta, Avneet; Manoj, S; Seshadri, Kp

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of dementia in a young healthy individual. On evaluation he was detected to have HIV infection with low CD4 count and a high viral load. He had no opportunistic infections or any other AIDS defining illnesses. He recovered fully within 3 months of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27604445

  18. Approach to urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Najar, M. S.; Saldanha, C. L.; Banday, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection experienced by humans after respiratory and gastro-intestinal infections, and also the most common cause of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections for patients admitted to hospitals. For better management and prognosis, it is mandatory to know the possible site of infection, whether the infection is uncomplicated or complicated, re-infection or relapse, or treatment failure and its pathogenesis and risk factors. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in certain age groups and has different connotations. It needs to be treated and completely cured in pregnant women and preschool children. Reflux nephropathy in children could result in chronic kidney disease; otherwise, urinary tract infections do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. Symptomatic urinary tract infections occur most commonly in women of child-bearing age. Cystitis predominates, but needs to be distinguished from acute urethral syndrome that affects both sexes and has a different management plan than UTIs. The prostatitis symptoms are much more common than bacterial prostatic infections. The treatment needs to be prolonged in bacterial prostatitis and as cure rates are not very high and relapses are common, the classification of prostatitis needs to be understood. The consensus conference convened by National Institute of Health added two more groups of patients, namely, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, in addition to acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Although white blood cells in urine signify inflammation, they do not always signify UTI. Quantitative cultures of urine provide definitive evidence of UTI. Imaging studies should be done 3-6 weeks after cure of acute infection to identify abnormalities predisposing to infection or renal damage or which may affect management. Treatment of cystitis in women should be a three-day course and if

  19. Malassezia infections: a medical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Ana Filipa; Lisboa, Carmen; Gonçalves Rodrigues, Acácio

    2014-07-01

    Malassezia yeasts have long been considered commensal fungi, unable to elicit significant damage. However, they have been associated with a diversity of cutaneous diseases, namely pityriasis versicolor, Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and confluent and reticulate papillomatosis. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathogenic mechanisms of these fungi, but none have been confirmed. More recently, such organisms have been increasingly isolated from bloodstream infections raising serious concern about these fungi. Given the difficulty to culture these yeasts to proceed with speciation and antimicrobial susceptibility tests, such procedures are most often not performed and the cutaneous infections are treated empirically. The recurring nature of superficial skin infections and the potential threat of systemic infections raise the need of faster and more sensitive techniques to achieve isolation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility profile. This article reviews and discusses the latest available data concerning Malassezia infections and recent developments about diagnostic methods, virulence mechanisms, and susceptibility testing. PMID:24569116

  20. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  1. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  2. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  3. Testing for Occult Heartworm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stogdale, L.

    1984-01-01

    Heartworm infection in dogs is endemic in southern Ontario but occurs only sporadically throughout the remainder of Canada. The disease may either be associated with microfilariae in the patient's blood, a patent infection, or it may be occult. This paper describes a case of occult dirofilariasis in a dog, with emphasis on the diagnosis. A patent infection could be missed if the clinician tests an insufficient amount of blood. He should perform multiple concentration tests using either the modified Knott's technique or a filtration method. Occult infections occur in prepatent or unisexual infections, when the worms become sterile following therapy, or when the host produces antibodies that result in the destruction of the microfilariae. The recent release of a kit which detects the presence of antibodies to the adult heartworms now enables veterinarians to make an accurate diagnosis in the vast majority of dogs. PMID:17422386

  4. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  5. Cryptosporidium infection causes undernutrition and, conversely, weanling undernutrition intensifies infection.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Bruna P; Oriá, Reinaldo B; Vieira, Carlos M G; Sevilleja, Jesus Emmanuel A D; Warren, Cirle A; Maciel, Jamilly G; Thompson, Meghan R; Pinkerton, Relana C; Lima, Aldo A M; Guerrant, Richard L

    2008-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a leading pathogen in children in developing countries. To investigate whether early postnatal malnutrition leads to heavier C. parvum infections, we assessed intestinal adaptation and parasite load in suckling mice during the first 2 wk of life, analogous to the first postnatal yr in humans. Undernutrition was induced by daily C57BL6J pup separation from lactating dams. Half of the pups were separated daily, for 4 hr on day 4, 8 hr on day 5, and for 12 hr from day 6 until day 14. On day 6, each pup received an oral inoculum of 10(5) to 10(7) parasites in 10-25 microl of PBS. Littermate controls received PBS alone. Stools were assessed from days 8, 11, and 14 for oocyst counts. Mice were killed on day 14, 8 days postinoculation, at the peak of the infection. Ileal and colon segments were obtained for histology, real-time and reverse transcriptase PCR, and immunoassays. Villus and crypt lengths and cross-sectional areas were also measured. Undernourished and nourished mice infected with excysted 10(6) or 10(7) oocysts exhibited the poorest growth outcomes compared with their uninfected controls. Nourished 10(6)-infected mice had comparable weight decrements to uninfected undernourished mice. Body weight and villi were additively affected by malnutrition and cryptosporidiosis. Hyperplastic crypts and heavier inflammatory responses were found in the ilea of infected malnourished mice. Undernourished infected mice exhibited greater oocyst shedding, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma intestinal levels, and mRNA expression compared to nourished mice infected with either 10(5) or 10(6) oocysts. Taken together, these findings show that Cryptosporidium infection can cause undernutrition and, conversely, that weanling undernutrition intensifies infection and mucosal damage.

  6. Tecovirimat for smallpox infections.

    PubMed

    Bolken, T C; Hruby, D E

    2010-02-01

    SIGA Technologies, Inc. is a small biotech company committed to developing novel products for the prevention and treatment of serious viral diseases, with an emphasis on products to combat outbreaks that could result from bioterrorism. With government support, SIGA has developed the necessary infrastructure to successfully advance new antiviral drugs from the discovery stage through to licensing. Currently, there is a need to develop safe and effective inhibitors for poxvirus-induced diseases such as smallpox caused by variola, which is a potential biological warfare agent. Likewise emerging zoonotic infections due to cowpox virus and monkeypox virus require the development of effective countermeasures. Tecovirimat, also known as ST-246, has shown efficacy in all small animal and nonhuman primate prophylaxis and therapeutic efficacy models of poxvirus-induced disease tested to date. Phase I clinical trials and new drug application-enabling toxicology studies have been completed with tecovirimat. A phase II clinical study is being run and SIGA has initiated commercial scale-up manufacturing and preparation for the pivotal safety and efficacy studies. SIGA is committed to getting approval for tecovirimat and supplying it to the Strategic National Stockpile, the Department of Defense and global health authorities. PMID:20393639

  7. Neuroretinitis with dual infections.

    PubMed

    Kiu, Kwong-Han; Hanizasurana, Hashim; Zunaina, Embong

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old Malay female presented with left eye floaters for 2 weeks, associated with temporal visual field defect and metamorphopsia for 3 days. She has a guinea pig and a hedgehog at home, but denied being bitten or scratched by them. Her visual acuity at presentation was 6/12 on the left eye and 6/6 on the right eye. Her left eye relative afferent pupillary defect was barely positive with mild anterior chamber reaction. Fundus examination of the left eye showed mild vitritis, swollen optic disc with macular star, crops of active choroidal lesions at superonasal retina with a linear arrangement in the form of migratory track nasally. However, there were no nematodes seen on fundus examination. Investigations showed normal full blood count with no eosinophilia and positive serology test for Bartonella henselae. She was diagnosed to have dual infection - diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN), based on the presence of crops of choroidal lesions with migratory track, and cat scratch disease (CSD) based on a positive serological test. She was treated with oral albendazole 400 mg 12 hourly for 6 weeks for DUSN and oral doxycycline 100 mg 12 hourly for 4 weeks for CSD. Focal laser had been applied to the area of migratory track in the left eye. Her left eye vision improved to 6/6 at 1 month after treatment, with resolution of neuroretinitis.

  8. Cryptococcus gattii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Meyer, Wieland

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding of the taxonomy and phylogeny of Cryptococcus gattii has been advanced by modern molecular techniques. C. gattii probably diverged from Cryptococcus neoformans between 16 million and 160 million years ago, depending on the dating methods applied, and maintains diversity by recombining in nature. South America is the likely source of the virulent C. gattii VGII molecular types that have emerged in North America. C. gattii shares major virulence determinants with C. neoformans, although genomic and transcriptomic studies revealed that despite similar genomes, the VGIIa and VGIIb subtypes employ very different transcriptional circuits and manifest differences in virulence phenotypes. Preliminary evidence suggests that C. gattii VGII causes severe lung disease and death without dissemination, whereas C. neoformans disseminates readily to the central nervous system (CNS) and causes death from meningoencephalitis. Overall, currently available data indicate that the C. gattii VGI, VGII, and VGIII molecular types more commonly affect nonimmunocompromised hosts, in contrast to VGIV. New, rapid, cheap diagnostic tests and imaging modalities are assisting early diagnosis and enabling better outcomes of cerebral cryptococcosis. Complications of CNS infection include increased intracranial pressure, severe neurological sequelae, and development of immune reconstitution syndrome, although the mortality rate is low. C. gattii VGII isolates may exhibit higher fluconazole MICs than other genotypes. Optimal therapeutic regimens are yet to be determined; in most cases, initial therapy with amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine is recommended. PMID:25278580

  9. Neuroretinitis with dual infections

    PubMed Central

    Kiu, Kwong-Han; Hanizasurana, Hashim; Zunaina, Embong

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old Malay female presented with left eye floaters for 2 weeks, associated with temporal visual field defect and metamorphopsia for 3 days. She has a guinea pig and a hedgehog at home, but denied being bitten or scratched by them. Her visual acuity at presentation was 6/12 on the left eye and 6/6 on the right eye. Her left eye relative afferent pupillary defect was barely positive with mild anterior chamber reaction. Fundus examination of the left eye showed mild vitritis, swollen optic disc with macular star, crops of active choroidal lesions at superonasal retina with a linear arrangement in the form of migratory track nasally. However, there were no nematodes seen on fundus examination. Investigations showed normal full blood count with no eosinophilia and positive serology test for Bartonella henselae. She was diagnosed to have dual infection – diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN), based on the presence of crops of choroidal lesions with migratory track, and cat scratch disease (CSD) based on a positive serological test. She was treated with oral albendazole 400 mg 12 hourly for 6 weeks for DUSN and oral doxycycline 100 mg 12 hourly for 4 weeks for CSD. Focal laser had been applied to the area of migratory track in the left eye. Her left eye vision improved to 6/6 at 1 month after treatment, with resolution of neuroretinitis. PMID:26527902

  10. Autophagy in infection.

    PubMed

    Deretic, Vojo

    2010-04-01

    Autophagy is a ubiquitous eukaryotic cytoplasmic quality and quantity control pathway. The role of autophagy in cytoplasmic homeostasis seamlessly extends to cell-autonomous defense against intracellular microbes. Recent studies also point to fully integrated, multitiered regulatory and effector connections between autophagy and nearly all facets of innate and adaptive immunity. Autophagy in the immune system as a whole confers measured immune responses; on the flip side, suppression of autophagy can lead to inflammation and tissue damage, as evidenced by Crohn's disease predisposition polymorphisms in autophagy basal apparatus (Atg16L) and regulatory (IRGM) genes. Polymorphisms in the IRGM gene in human populations have also been linked to predisposition to tuberculosis. There are several areas of most recent growth: first, links between autophagy regulators and infectious disease predisposition in human populations; second, demonstration of a role for autophagy in infection control in vivo in animal models; third, the definition of specific antiautophagic defenses in highly evolved pathogens; and fourth, recognition of connections between the ubiquitin system and autophagy of bacteria (and interestingly mitochondria, which are incidentally organelles of bacterial evolutionary origin) via a growing list of modifier and adapter proteins including p62/SQSTM1, NDP52, Atg32, Parkin, and Nix/BNIP3L. PMID:20116986

  11. Systems Medicine and Infection.

    PubMed

    Bowness, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    By using a systems-based approach, mathematical and computational techniques can be used to develop models that describe the important mechanisms involved in infectious diseases. An iterative approach to model development allows new discoveries to continually improve the model and ultimately increase the accuracy of predictions.SIR models are used to describe epidemics, predicting the extent and spread of disease. Genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies can be used to identify the biological mechanisms behind diseases. These tools help to build strategies for disease prevention and treatment, an example being the recent outbreak of Ebola in West Africa where these techniques were deployed.HIV is a complex disease where much is still to be learned about the virus and the best effective treatment. With basic mathematical modeling techniques, significant discoveries have been made over the last 20 years. With recent technological advances, the computational resources now available, and interdisciplinary cooperation, further breakthroughs are inevitable.In TB, modeling has traditionally been empirical in nature, with clinical data providing the fuel for this top-down approach. Recently, projects have begun to use data derived from laboratory experiments and clinical trials to create mathematical models that describe the mechanisms responsible for the disease.A systems medicine approach to infection modeling helps identify important biological questions that then direct future experiments, the results of which improve the model in an iterative cycle. This means that data from several model systems can be integrated and synthesized to explore complex biological systems.

  12. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation and/or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs ... or viral infection of the fluid of the middle ear, which causes production of fluid or pus. ...

  13. Extinction of Viral Infectivity Through Lethal Defection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iranzo, J.; Manrubia, S. C.

    2010-04-01

    During persistent infections, selective pressure over infectivity is relaxed. In RNA viruses this results in the appearance of "parasitic" defectives, non-infective individuals that are able to take over the population causing its extinction.

  14. Pathology of CNS parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic infections of the central nervous system (CNS) include two broad categories of infectious organisms: single-celled protozoa and multicellular metazoa. The protozoal infections include malaria, American trypanosomiasis, human African trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, amebiasis, microsporidiasis, and leishmaniasis. The metazoal infections are grouped into flatworms, which include trematoda and cestoda, and roundworms or nematoda. Trematoda infections include schistosomiasis and paragonimiasis. Cestoda infections include cysticercosis, coenurosis, hydatidosis, and sparganosis. Nematoda infections include gnathostomiasis, angiostrongyliasis, toxocariasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis, baylisascariasis, dracunculiasis, micronemiasis, and lagochilascariasis. The most common route of CNS invasion is through the blood. In some cases, the parasite invades the olfactory neuroepithelium in the nasal mucosa and penetrates the brain via the subarachnoid space or reaches the CNS through neural foramina of the skull base around the cranial nerves or vessels. The neuropathological changes vary greatly, depending on the type and size of the parasite, geographical strain variations in parasitic virulence, immune evasion by the parasite, and differences in host immune response. Congestion of the leptomeninges, cerebral edema, hemorrhage, thrombosis, vasculitis, necrosis, calcification, abscesses, meningeal and perivascular polymorphonuclear and mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate, microglial nodules, gliosis, granulomas, and fibrosis can be found affecting isolated or multiple regions of the CNS, or even diffusely spread. Some infections may be present as an expanding mass lesion. The parasites can be identified by conventional histology, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and PCR.

  15. Tuberculosis and HIV infection worldwide.

    PubMed

    Murray, J F

    1995-12-01

    The incidence of HIV-associated tuberculosis is increasing worldwide and will continue to increase during the foreseeable future, especially in developing countries. HIV infection appears to increase the opportunity for M. tuberculosis to succeed in causing infection after inhalation into the lungs. Moreover, there is persuasive evidence that in the presence of HIV infection, new-onset tuberculous infection will progress rapidly to clinically significant disease and the likelihood that latent tuberculous infection will reactivate is enormously increased. The accelerating and amplifying influence of HIV infection is contributing to the increasing incidence of disease caused by multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Neither clinical or radiographic features reliably distinguish the majority of patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis from those who are non-HIV-infected. The remainder, however, may have atypical manifestations and be difficult to diagnose. Six months of chemotherapy with conventional antituberculosis drugs cures most patients, but many die during or after treatment of other AIDS-related complications.

  16. Cardiac Involvement with Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia; Vogenthaler, Nicholas; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Rassi, Anis

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Parasitic infections previously seen only in developing tropical settings can be currently diagnosed worldwide due to travel and population migration. Some parasites may directly or indirectly affect various anatomical structures of the heart, with infections manifested as myocarditis, pericarditis, pancarditis, or pulmonary hypertension. Thus, it has become quite relevant for clinicians in developed settings to consider parasitic infections in the differential diagnosis of myocardial and pericardial disease anywhere around the globe. Chagas' disease is by far the most important parasitic infection of the heart and one that it is currently considered a global parasitic infection due to the growing migration of populations from areas where these infections are highly endemic to settings where they are not endemic. Current advances in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis offer hope to prevent not only the neurological complications but also the frequently identified cardiac manifestations of this life-threatening parasitic infection. The lack of effective vaccines, optimal chemoprophylaxis, or evidence-based pharmacological therapies to control many of the parasitic diseases of the heart, in particular Chagas' disease, makes this disease one of the most important public health challenges of our time. PMID:20375355

  17. [Infection-induced urinary stones].

    PubMed

    Bichler, K-H; Eipper, E; Naber, K

    2003-01-01

    Infection stones make up approximately 15% of urinary stone diseases and are thus an important group. These stones are composed of struvite and/or carbonate apatite. The basic precondition for the formation of infection stones is a urease-positive urinary tract infection. Urease is necessary to split urea into ammonia and CO(2). As a result, ammonia ions can form and at the same time alkaline urine develops, both being preconditions for the formation of struvite and carbonate apatite crystals. When these crystals are deposited infection stones form. Pathogenetically, various risk factors play a role: urinary obstruction, neurogenic bladder, dRTA, and MSK. If these infections are not treated and the stones are not removed, the kidney will be damaged. Modern methods are available for stone removal, e.g., ESWL and/or instrumental urinary stone removal. Here, especially less invasive methods are preferable. Any treatment must be adjusted to the patient individually. Patients should be examined frequently for recurrent urinary tract infections and stone recurrences, and new infections must be resolutely treated. Good therapy and prophylaxis are possible with present-day treatment modalities. PMID:12574884

  18. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26372825

  20. The Nef-Infectivity Enigma: Mechanisms of Enhanced Lentiviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jolien; Vanbillemont, Griet; Witkowski, Wojciech; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The Nef protein is an essential factor for lentiviral pathogenesis in humans and other simians. Despite a multitude of functions attributed to this protein, the exact role of Nef in disease progression remains unclear. One of its most intriguing functions is the ability of Nef to enhance the infectivity of viral particles. In this review we will discuss current insights in the mechanism of this well-known, yet poorly understood Nef effect. We will elaborate on effects of Nef, on both virion biogenesis and the early stage of the cellular infection, that might be involved in infectivity enhancement. In addition, we provide an overview of different HIV-1 Nef domains important for optimal infectivity and briefly discuss some possible sources of the frequent discrepancies in the field. Hereby we aim to contribute to a better understanding of this highly conserved and therapeutically attractive Nef function. PMID:22103831

  1. Preventing HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Ramirez, Catalina; Auerbach, Judith D.; Aral, Sevgi O.; Hodder, Sally; Wingood, Gina; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of new infections has declined recently, women still constitute almost half of the world's 34 million people with HIV infection, and HIV remains the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Prevention research has made considerable progress during the past few years in addressing the biological, behavioral and social factors that influence women's vulnerability to HIV infection. Nevertheless, substantial work still must be done in order to implement scientific advancements and to resolve the many questions that remain. This article highlights some of the recent advances and persistent gaps in HIV prevention research for women and outlines key research and policy priorities. PMID:23764631

  2. Neurosurgical approaches to spinal infections.

    PubMed

    Hazer, Derya Burcu; Ayhan, Selim; Palaoglu, Selcuk

    2015-05-01

    Spinal infection is rare. Clinical suspicion is important in patients with nonmechanical neck and/or back pain to make the proper diagnosis in early disease. Before planning surgery, a thorough evaluation of the spinal stability, alignment, and deformity is necessary. Timing of surgery, side of approach, appropriate surgical technique, and spinal instruments used are crucial. Biomechanical preservation of the spinal column during and after the infection is a significant issue. Postoperative spine infection is another entity of which spinal surgeons should be aware of. Proper septic conditions with meticulous planning of surgery are essential for successful spine surgery and better outcome. PMID:25952179

  3. Nanoparticle approaches against bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infections still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infections. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections.

  4. Infection after primary hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The aim of the present study was to assess incidence of and risk factors for infection after hip arthroplasty in data from 3 national health registries. We investigated differences in risk patterns between surgical site infection (SSI) and revision due to infection after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and hemiarthroplasty (HA). Materials and methods This observational study was based on prospective data from 2005–2009 on primary THAs and HAs from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR), the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR), and the Norwegian Surveillance System for Healthcare–Associated Infections (NOIS). The Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) was used for evaluation of case reporting. Cox regression analyses were performed with revision due to infection as endpoint for data from the NAR and the NHFR, and with SSI as the endpoint for data from the NOIS. Results The 1–year incidence of SSI in the NOIS was 3.0% after THA (167/5,540) and 7.3% after HA (103/1,416). The 1–year incidence of revision due to infection was 0.7% for THAs in the NAR (182/24,512) and 1.5% for HAs in the NHFR (128/8,262). Risk factors for SSI after THA were advanced age, ASA class higher than 2, and short duration of surgery. For THA, the risk factors for revision due to infection were male sex, advanced age, ASA class higher than 1, emergency surgery, uncemented fixation, and a National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) risk index of 2 or more. For HAs inserted after fracture, age less than 60 and short duration of surgery were risk factors of revision due to infection. Interpretation The incidences of SSI and revision due to infection after primary hip replacements in Norway are similar to those in other countries. There may be differences in risk pattern between SSI and revision due to infection after arthroplasty. The risk patterns for revision due to infection appear to be different for HA and THA. PMID:22066562

  5. Hand adornment and infection control.

    PubMed

    Ward, Deborah Jane

    Studies have shown that despite infection control guidelines recommending that false fingernails, nail varnish, stoned rings and wrist watches not be worn by clinical staff, a large proportion of them continue to do so. The recently updated epic guidelines (Pratt et al, 2007) state that hand jewellery and false finger nails should be kept short, clean and free from nail polish. This article discusses the bacterial carriage, contributions to outbreaks of infection and interference with proper hand hygiene practices, thereby explaining why these recommendations are made in infection control policies and guidelines. PMID:17577182

  6. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  7. [Infection, wounds and local treatments].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Baffie, Aurélie; Trad, Florence Rollot

    2011-06-01

    Infection is the result of complex interactions between bacteria, the host, treatments and the wound environment. The clinical signs and the diagnosis can be obvious, subclinical or relate to an intermediary situation rather than a confirmed infection. Suitable local treatments do not automatically involve the use of antibacterial drugs and consist in washing and draining the wound with appropriate dressings. The local treatment of the infected wound is set to develop further in order to be more effective with regard to both the biofilm as well as the circulating bacteria.

  8. Chronic infections of the spine.

    PubMed

    Bas, Teresa; Bas, Paloma; Blasco, Alejandro; Bas, José Luis

    2013-07-01

    Chronic infections following posterior fusion are relatively uncommon. They develop in a previous asymptomatic patient at a distant time from the surgery. Chronic infections arise from direct inoculation or hematogenous seeding. To eradicate a chronic infection, the pathogens, biofilm, non-viable tissues, adherence on surfaces, and instrumentation must be removed. The appropriate antibiotherapy is used in a short (4 weeks) or long protocol (9 weeks). Some patients may need repeated surgeries (leaving the instrumentation in situ) to avoid progressive deformity or symptomatic pseudoarthrosis in cases of implant removal.

  9. Neurological complication of dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Murthy, J M K

    2010-01-01

    Dengue infection is endemic in more than 100 countries, mostly in the developing world. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue is changing, and that neurological manifestations are being reported more frequently. The exact incidence of various neurological complications is uncertain. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations is multiple and includes: neurotrophic effect of the dengue virus, related to the systemic effects of dengue infection, and immune mediated. In countries endemic to dengue, it will be prudent to investigate for dengue infection in patients with fever and acute neurological manifestations. There is need for understanding of the pathogenesis of various neurological manifestations.

  10. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  11. Cryptococcal Infections in Non-Hiv-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Infections due to Cryptococcus species occur globally and in a wide variety of hosts, ranging from those who are severely immunosuppressed to those who have phenotypically “normal” immune systems. Approximately 1 million cases of cryptococcosis occur throughout the world, and is it estimated that there are 650,000 associated deaths annually. Most of these cases occur among patients with advanced HIV disease, but a growing number occur among solid organ transplant recipients and others receiving exogenous immunosuppression, patients with innate and acquired immunodeficiency, and otherwise immunologically normal hosts. Much of our recent knowledge is solely derived from clinical experience over the last 2 to 3 decades of cryptococcosis among HIV-infected patients. However, based on recent observations, it is clear that there are substantial differences in the epidemiology, clinical features, approaches to therapy, and outcome when comparing HIV-infected to non–HIV-infected individuals who have cryptococcosis. If one carefully examines cryptococcosis in the three largest subgroups of patients based on host immune status, specifically, those with HIV, solid organ transplant recipients, and those who are non-HIV, non-transplant (NHNT) infected persons, then one can observe very different risks for infection, varied clinical presentations, long-term complications, mortality, and approaches to therapy. This article focuses on cryptococcosis in the non–HIV-infected patient, including a brief review of ongoing events in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada relative to the outbreak of Cryptococcus gattii infections among a largely immunologically normal population, and highlights some of the key insights and questions which have emerged as a result of these important new observations. PMID:23874010

  12. Genes Required for the Fitness of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium during Infection of Immunodeficient gp91-/- phox Mice.

    PubMed

    Grant, Andrew J; Oshota, Olusegun; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Mayho, Matthew; Peters, Sarah E; Clare, Simon; Maskell, Duncan J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella enterica causes systemic diseases (typhoid and paratyphoid fever), nontyphoidal septicemia (NTS), and gastroenteritis in humans and other animals worldwide. An important but underrecognized emerging infectious disease problem in sub-Saharan Africa is NTS in children and immunocompromised adults. A current goal is to identify Salmonella mutants that are not pathogenic in the absence of key components of the immune system such as might be found in immunocompromised hosts. Such attenuated strains have the potential to be used as live vaccines. We have used transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS) to screen mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for their ability to infect and grow in the tissues of wild-type and immunodeficient mice. This was to identify bacterial genes that might be deleted for the development of live attenuated vaccines that would be safer to use in situations and/or geographical areas where immunodeficiencies are prevalent. The relative fitness of each of 9,356 transposon mutants, representing mutations in 3,139 different genes, was determined in gp91(-/-) phox mice. Mutations in certain genes led to reduced fitness in both wild-type and mutant mice. To validate these results, these genes were mutated by allelic replacement, and resultant mutants were retested for fitness in the mice. A defined deletion mutant of cysE was attenuated in C57BL/6 wild-type mice and immunodeficient gp91(-/-) phox mice and was effective as a live vaccine in wild-type mice.

  13. Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  14. Group B Strep Infection in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bacteremia and sepsis (blood infections) symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumonia (lung infection) symptoms include: Fever and chills Cough Rapid breathing or difficulty breathing Chest pain ...

  15. BK virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, J; Muñoz, P; Garcia de Viedma, D; Cabrero, I; Loeches, B; Montilla, P; Gijon, P; Rodriguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in our hospital. The presence of BKV was analysed in urine and plasma samples from 78 non-selected HIV-infected patients. Clinical data were recorded using a pre-established protocol. We used a nested PCR to amplify a specific region of the BKV T-large antigen. Positive samples were quantified using real-time PCR. Mean CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 472 cells/mm3 and median HIV viral load was <50 copies/mL. BKV viraemia was detected in only 1 HIV-positive patient, but 57.7% (45 out of 78) had BKV viruria, which was more common in patients with CD4 counts>500 cells/mm3 (74.3% vs 25.7%; p=0.007). Viruria was present in 21.7% of healthy controls (5 out of 23 samples, p=0.02). All viral loads were low (<100 copies/mL), and we could not find any association between BKV infection and renal or neurological manifestations. We provide an update on the prevalence of BKV in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART. BKV viruria was more common in HIV-infected patients; however, no role for BKV has been demonstrated in this population.

  16. Parasitic infections in HIV infected individuals: Diagnostic & therapeutic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, parasites have been one of the most common opportunistic infections (OIs) and one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-infected patients. Due to severe immunosuppression, enteric parasitic pathogens in general are emerging and are OIs capable of causing diarrhoeal disease associated with HIV. Of these, Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli are the two most common intestinal protozoan parasites and pose a public health problem in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. These are the only two enteric protozoan parasites that remain in the case definition of AIDS till today. Leismaniasis, strongyloidiasis and toxoplasmosis are the three main opportunistic causes of systemic involvements reported in HIV-infected patients. Of these, toxoplasmosis is the most important parasitic infection associated with the central nervous system. Due to its complexity in nature, toxoplasmosis is the only parasitic disease capable of not only causing focal but also disseminated forms and it has been included in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADI) ever since. With the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), cryptosporidiosis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, and toxoplasmosis are among parasitic diseases reported in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). This review addresses various aspects of parasitic infections in term of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with HIV-infection. PMID:22310820

  17. Risk factors for surgical infection.

    PubMed

    Leaper, D J

    1995-06-01

    In the last century remarkable advances have been made in surgery, associated with the lowest recorded rates of infection or sepsis. Many surgical practices are time honoured but have little scientific basis to prevent postoperative infection whereas some local and systemic factors are well recognized and can be modified to lower infection risks. Surgical skill is not easily measurable but shorter operations in experienced hands leaving the minimum of tissue damage, haematoma or dead space have the lowest infection rates in general surgery: < 2% in clean and < 10% in contaminated operations. Adequate surgical scrub, appropriate suture materials and antibiotic prophylaxis, perioperative correction of dehydration and poor nutrition are examples of effective therapy which can be conformed to by all surgeons. Other factors, such as the use of wound guards, drains and surgical dressings are less easy to estimate for effectiveness or be sure that they could be changed or left out of surgical ritual.

  18. Candida infection of the skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... albicans . Candida is the most common cause of diaper rash in infants. The fungi take advantage of the warm, moist conditions inside the diaper. Candida infection is particularly common in people with ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more serious infection that reaches the kidneys. continue Bacteria Are to Blame UTIs are usually caused by ... as soon as possible. previous continue Battling the Bacteria Only your health care provider can treat urinary ...

  20. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School Butterflies? ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What Is an Ear Infection? KidsHealth > For Kids > What ...