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Sample records for microbiological multimedia tool

  1. Multimedia Reference Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberg, Carol S.

    2001-01-01

    Presents suggestions for content-rich classroom encyclopedias on CO-ROM and DVD, including: the Encarta Reference Suite 2001; the 2001 Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia, School Edition; the Britannica 2001 DVD; and the World Book 2001 Deluxe Edition, v5.0. (SM)

  2. Multimedia Tools for Teaching Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira-Ford, Clara V.

    1998-01-01

    Describes one professor's experience in researching the use of multimedia tools for teaching principles of economics. Provides a list of resources consulted, including universities and colleges, books, software, laserdiscs and VHS tapes, Web sites, and journal sources. Found the students generally to be receptive to the introduction of new tools…

  3. Multimedia: Multi-Learning Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Examines facets using multimedia to enhance learning. Highlights include product linkage and customization; flexibility for lesson plans; hypermedia authoring tools; student presentations; expense; incompatible and confusing systems; high memory demands; hardware standards for Windows and Macintosh programs; and CD-ROM products. (AEF)

  4. Employing Cognitive Tools within Interactive Multimedia Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedberg, John; And Others

    This paper describes research into the use of cognitive tools in the classroom using "Exploring the Nardoo", an information landscape designed to support student investigation. Simulations and support tools which allow multimedia reporting are embedded in the package and are supported by several metacognitive tools for the writing process. The…

  5. Multimedia Authoring Tools: The Quest for an Educational Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaskalis, Theodore H.; Tzidamis, Theodore D.; Margaritis, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    Since the explosion in multimedia computing, educators have been trying to work their way towards integrated human-computer interaction. Consequently, a large number of multimedia tools have been created, always following the trend of simpler and easier multimedia development. After outlining the transition from hardcore programming to modern…

  6. Online multimedia teaching tool for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Misiaszek, Greg; Riconscente, Michelle; Henke, Maria; Walsh, John P

    2008-01-01

    We developed an online multimedia tool designed to enhance the student-learning environment in neurosciences through multi-sensory engagement. The combined use of scrolling text, narrations, and visual imagery engages multiple sensory modalities for effective learning, and it assists students in visualizing complex processes in the nervous system. The initial rollout of the online tool is for instruction in Parkinson's disease (PD), but its structure is flexible and can be used for teaching a variety of subjects. The instructor can access the tool online during lecture, and students can access the same information via the internet outside of class. In addition, each chapter is stand-alone and thus can be accessed online by other faculty or students to supplement other courses. Within each chapter or module, information is presented in outline format with greater detail accessible via sequential drop-down menus. This layering of related topics creates a spatial and motor-accessed path for learning. These multiple forms of engagement offer rich information representations to improve students' knowledge encoding, storing, and retrieval via multiple pathways. For instance, the tool includes student-controlled 2-D and 3-D animations, and video clip demonstrations of both patient case studies and on-campus research projects directly related to the subject material. Supplemental readings consist of current research articles (in Adobe Acrobat PDF file format) accessed within each educational topic. The teaching tool for PD is online at http://geroauen.usc.edu/Gero414_Beta/.

  7. Electronic tools for infectious diseases and microbiology.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Steven D

    2007-11-01

    Electronic tools for infectious diseases and medical microbiology have the ability to change the way the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases are approached. Medical information today has the ability to be dynamic, keeping up with the latest research or clinical issues, instead of being static and years behind, as many textbooks are. The ability to rapidly disseminate information around the world opens up the possibility of communicating with people thousands of miles away to quickly and efficiently learn about emerging infections. Electronic tools have expanded beyond the desktop computer and the Internet, and now include personal digital assistants and other portable devices such as cellular phones. These pocket-sized devices have the ability to provide access to clinical information at the point of care. New electronic tools include e-mail listservs, electronic drug databases and search engines that allow focused clinical questions. The goal of the present article is to provide an overview of how electronic tools can impact infectious diseases and microbiology, while providing links and resources to allow users to maximize their efficiency in accessing this information. Links to the mentioned Web sites and programs are provided along with other useful electronic tools.

  8. Using Multimedia Authoring Tools in Primary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a project in which children develop instructional technology skills while learning a great deal of science. Explains how children construct a multimedia presentation on the topic of invertebrates. (DDR)

  9. Multimedia as a desktop and classroom tool

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.

    1994-02-01

    The major thrust of the study leading to this report was a quick, but in-depth, understanding of the process for using multimedia computer equipment for information exchange within our engineering office and within the school environment. That is, how feasible is it to augment the typical office memo or school instruction sheet with pictures, video, and sounds? What specialized skills, hardware, and software are needed by those of us who want to use the technology? The brief study period allowed for an examination of available hardware and software, observation of current approaches to multimedia within our particular environment, and the development of applications, all within the context of several project areas: The Sandia Science Advisors program; a Sandia scientific project associated with the National Information Infrastructure Testbed; the curriculum of Monte Vista Elementary School of Albuquerque Public Schools; and the University of New Mexico Medical School Health Scene project.

  10. Multimedia Instructional Tools and Student Learning in Computer Applications Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Debra Laier

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology and changes in educational strategies have resulted in the integration of technology into the classroom. Multimedia instructional tools (MMIT) have been identified as a way to provide student-centered active-learning instructional material to students. MMITs are common in introductory computer applications courses based on…

  11. Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, S. M. (Marty)

    1993-01-01

    Offers an introduction to multimedia, the computer-controlled interactive medium that integrates in real time external visual and audio inputs with computer-generated text, graphics, animation, and audio. Discusses the multimedia team, multimedia's advantages and disadvantages, and multimedia today and in the future. Offers an extensive glossary…

  12. Exploiting available Internet tools for multimedia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Andrew C.

    1997-01-01

    The rapidly increasing number of tools available on the internet is changing the way people view software systems. People are now used to downloading plug in helper tools in order to decode and display different types of media within web browsers. The ease with which this can now be done is a far cry from the days, quite recently, when data had to be manually processed by a number of obviously independent software packages. Using the tools available to simply decode and display new data formats in only one way in which such software can be used, one could even consider a web browser as just another tool. Compete new applications could be constructed by selecting a suitable range of tools and supplying minimal glue software. This paper describes, as an example of this approach, a collaborative application supporting synchronous audio-visual communication and collaborative web browsing. The system develop is designed to make use of a wide range of freely available tools with no modification of existing web servers or clients. Alternative implementation strategies are discussed, followed by a detailed description of the approach chosen for this implementation. A technique allowing small to medium sized groups World Wide Web users to be tracked and their location to be presented to people with similar interests is then explained, followed by details of a mechanism allowing the information gained about such groups to be shared among arbitrary of similar groups.

  13. Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The second session of IT@EDU98 consisted of four papers on multimedia and was chaired by Luu Tien Hiep (Lotus College, Vietnam). "Multimedia Education" (Tran Van Hao, Ngo Huy Hoang) describes "Multimedia Education v. 1.0," an educational software program for elementary school children that uses games to teach counting, spelling, mathematics,…

  14. A Usability Study of Users' Perceptions toward a Multimedia Computer-Assisted Learning Tool for Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Douglas J.; Terrell, Mark A.; Fleming, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This usability study evaluated users' perceptions of a multimedia prototype for a new e-learning tool: Anatomy of the Central Nervous System: A Multimedia Course. Usability testing is a collection of formative evaluation methods that inform the developmental design of e-learning tools to maximize user acceptance, satisfaction, and adoption.…

  15. Utilizing multimedia tools for LRAM project documentation and marketing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.G.; Hatton, P.D.; Boehm, A.

    1996-08-01

    Land Rehabilitation and Maintenance program managers at U.S. Army Training Installations must present technical material relating to LRAM projects to a variety of audiences, ranging from installation commanders to installation visitors and environmental interest groups. These audiences may play a role in approving and/or funding LRAM projects. Effective communication to these audiences can facilitate the achievement of LRAM program objectives. The rapid development of computer-based multimedia technology provides LRAM managers with powerful tools for creating highly effective project presentations that can be presented from notebook computers for use in briefings or distributed on CD-ROM for use on desktop computers. This paper presents an example of use of multimedia to document and present an LRAM revegetation project conducted at the Freiholser Forst Local Training Area in Germany. This CD-ROM presentation makes extensive use of digitized photos, video, maps, and text to present a detailed summary of the project, including project justification, background, methods, costs, and results. The application design allows the viewer to select topics of particular interest for detailed examination and to omit other topics or examine them in less detail. Virtually every important revegetation procedure is presented in photographs supplemented by brief video clips and text. Interactive charts allow easy comparison of alternative revegetation procedures that use different combinations of soil amendments, seedbed preparation, and seed mixes. Slide sequences and video clips clearly illustrate differences between conditions before and after the LRAM project was conducted. The presentation will be used to brief commanding officers, installation visitors, and host country officials about this highly successful LRAM project.

  16. Multi-Media and Technology Tools: Curriculum and Activities for Idaho Business Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, Marty; Kitchel, K. Allen; Allen, Tacey

    This guide contains information, curriculum, and activities that provide business teachers with a tool for using the World Wide Web, multimedia, and technology to enhance their programs. The opening sections contain the following: computer use policy, multimedia fact sheet, tips on using Netscape Navigator, directory of educational resources on…

  17. IPMP 2013--a comprehensive data analysis tool for predictive microbiology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan

    2014-02-01

    Predictive microbiology is an area of applied research in food science that uses mathematical models to predict the changes in the population of pathogenic or spoilage microorganisms in foods exposed to complex environmental changes during processing, transportation, distribution, and storage. It finds applications in shelf-life prediction and risk assessments of foods. The objective of this research was to describe the performance of a new user-friendly comprehensive data analysis tool, the Integrated Pathogen Modeling Model (IPMP 2013), recently developed by the USDA Agricultural Research Service. This tool allows users, without detailed programming knowledge, to analyze experimental kinetic data and fit the data to known mathematical models commonly used in predictive microbiology. Data curves previously published in literature were used to test the models in IPMP 2013. The accuracies of the data analysis and models derived from IPMP 2013 were compared in parallel to commercial or open-source statistical packages, such as SAS® or R. Several models were analyzed and compared, including a three-parameter logistic model for growth curves without lag phases, reduced Huang and Baranyi models for growth curves without stationary phases, growth models for complete growth curves (Huang, Baranyi, and re-parameterized Gompertz models), survival models (linear, re-parameterized Gompertz, and Weibull models), and secondary models (Ratkowsky square-root, Huang square-root, Cardinal, and Arrhenius-type models). The comparative analysis suggests that the results from IPMP 2013 were equivalent to those obtained from SAS® or R. This work suggested that the IPMP 2013 could be used as a free alternative to SAS®, R, or other more sophisticated statistical packages for model development in predictive microbiology.

  18. Application of Multimedia Design Principles to Visuals Used in Course-Books: An Evaluation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzu, Abdullah; Akbulut, Yavuz; Sahin, Mehmet Can

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces an evaluation tool prepared to examine the quality of visuals in course-books. The tool is based on Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (i.e. Generative Theory) and its principles regarding the correct use of illustrations within text. The reason to generate the tool, the development process along with the…

  19. Single-Cell Microbiology: Tools, Technologies, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    The field of microbiology has traditionally been concerned with and focused on studies at the population level. Information on how cells respond to their environment, interact with each other, or undergo complex processes such as cellular differentiation or gene expression has been obtained mostly by inference from population-level data. Individual microorganisms, even those in supposedly “clonal” populations, may differ widely from each other in terms of their genetic composition, physiology, biochemistry, or behavior. This genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity has important practical consequences for a number of human interests, including antibiotic or biocide resistance, the productivity and stability of industrial fermentations, the efficacy of food preservatives, and the potential of pathogens to cause disease. New appreciation of the importance of cellular heterogeneity, coupled with recent advances in technology, has driven the development of new tools and techniques for the study of individual microbial cells. Because observations made at the single-cell level are not subject to the “averaging” effects characteristic of bulk-phase, population-level methods, they offer the unique capacity to observe discrete microbiological phenomena unavailable using traditional approaches. As a result, scientists have been able to characterize microorganisms, their activities, and their interactions at unprecedented levels of detail. PMID:15353569

  20. E-Classical Fairy Tales: Multimedia Builder as a Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteokleous, Nikleia; Ktoridou, Despo; Tsolakidis, Symeon

    2011-01-01

    The study examines pre-service teachers' experiences in delivering a traditional-classical fairy tale using the Multimedia Builder software, in other words an e-fairy tale. A case study approach was employed, collecting qualitative data through classroom observations and focus groups. The results focus on pre-service teachers' reactions, opinions,…

  1. Using Multimedia Tools to Support Teacher Candidates' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Michael J.; Ely, Emily; Thomas, Cathy Newman; Pullen, Paige C.; Newton, Jennifer R.; Ashworth, Kristen; Cole, Mira T.; Lovelace, Shelly P.

    2012-01-01

    Content Acquisition Podcasts (CAPs), created using Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning, are a form of instructional technology that can deliver critical course content and be used by teacher educators to conserve limited face-to-face instructional time. In this study, the authors investigate whether the sequence of instruction for CAP…

  2. Understanding the Effects of Databases as Cognitive Tools in a Problem-Based Multimedia Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Rui; Liu, Min

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the potential of using computer databases as cognitive tools to share learners' cognitive load and facilitate learning in a multimedia problem-based learning (PBL) environment designed for sixth graders. Two research questions were: (a) can the computer database tool share sixth-graders' cognitive load? and…

  3. An evaluation report of multimedia environments as cognitive learning tools.

    PubMed

    Seel, Norbert M; Schenk, Katharina

    2003-05-01

    This article deals with the evaluation of a multimedia learning environment which has been developed and evaluated within the broader context of a research project on the learning-dependent progression of mental models in economics. To carry out formative evaluations, we have adapted a particular evaluation approach which allows and requires the implementation of specific evaluation instruments. The crucial questions of our evaluation studies were the efficacy of a multimedia-based realization of the cognitive apprenticeship (CA) approach, the diagnosis of mental model progression through the CA based instruction, and the effects of implemented metacognitive training. For the assessment of the learning-dependent progression of the mental models, we developed and used a special diagnostic instrument for causal diagrams, which are understood as reproductions of students' mental models. In order to be able to meet statements about the practicability of a multimedia based realization of CA, we measured the results of the tasks of learning during each different learning phase. Additionally, several motivational variables and persistent learning strategies were measured. In this article, we will specify the adapted evaluation instruments. Furthermore, we will report on the results of five replication studies and discuss the consequences for instructional design in connection with the design of constructive learning environments. PMID:24011490

  4. Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lucia

    1976-01-01

    Presents classroom activities for teaching microbiology at the elementary and secondary levels. Activities demonstrate the existence of the microbial world, types of microbes, and their growth needs and effects in nature. (MLH)

  5. Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes various types of training programs carried out in the study of microbiology. Indicates that the need for new energy sources and the expansion of medical schools and food industry may lead to an increasing demand for qualified microbiologists. (CC)

  6. A Usability Study of Users’ Perceptions Toward a Multimedia Computer-Assisted Learning Tool for Neuroanatomy

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Douglas J.; Terrell, Mark A.; Fleming, Jo

    2015-01-01

    This usability study evaluated users’ perceptions of a multimedia prototype for a new e-learning tool: Anatomy of the Central Nervous System: A Multimedia Course. Usability testing is a collection of formative evaluation methods that inform the developmental design of e-learning tools to maximize user acceptance, satisfaction, and adoption. Sixty-two study participants piloted the prototype and completed a usability questionnaire designed to measure two usability properties: program need and program applicability. Statistical analyses were used to test the hypothesis that the multimedia prototype was well designed and highly usable, it was perceived as: 1) highly needed across a spectrum of educational contexts, 2) highly applicable in supporting the pedagogical processes of teaching and learning neuroanatomy, and 3) was highly usable by all types of users. Three independent variables represented user differences: level of expertise (faculty vs. student), age, and gender. Analysis of the results supports the research hypotheses that the prototype was designed well for different types of users in various educational contexts and for supporting the pedagogy of neuroanatomy. In addition, the results suggest that the multimedia program will be most useful as a neuroanatomy review tool for health-professions students preparing for licensing or board exams. This study demonstrates the importance of integrating quality properties of usability with principles of human learning during the instructional design process for multimedia products. PMID:19177405

  7. Multi-Criteria Adaptation in a Personalized Multimedia Testing Tool Based on Semantic Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarinis, Fotis; Green, Steve; Pearson, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present the characteristics and the design of a modular personalized multimedia testing tool based fully on XML learning specifications. Personalization is based on the characteristics of the individual learners, thus the testing paths are tailored to their needs and goals. The system maintains learner profiles rich in content…

  8. In-Service Science Teachers' and the Use of Multimedia as a Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ameyaw, Y.; Quansah, E.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the attitudes of in-service teachers' towards the use of multimedia as a tool for science teaching in Junior High Schools in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. The population sample consisted of 100 Junior High School (JHS) science teachers made up of 60 urban teachers and 40 rural teachers from three selected…

  9. Microsoft Producer: A Software Tool for Creating Multimedia PowerPoint[R] Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffingwell, Thad R.; Thomas, David G.; Elliott, William H.

    2007-01-01

    Microsoft[R] Producer[R] is a powerful yet user-friendly PowerPoint companion tool for creating on-demand multimedia presentations. Instructors can easily distribute these presentations via compact disc or streaming media over the Internet. We describe the features of the software, system requirements, and other required hardware. We also describe…

  10. Multimedia Instructional Tools' Impact on Student Motivation and Learning Strategies in Computer Applications Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Debra; Wang, Shuyan

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia instructional tools (MMIT) have been identified as a way effectively and economically present instructional material. MMITs are commonly used in introductory computer applications courses as MMITs should be effective in increasing student knowledge and positively impact motivation and learning strategies, without increasing costs. This…

  11. Ontology-Based Multimedia Authoring Tool for Adaptive E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Lawrence Y.; Keh, Huan-Chao; Liu, Yi-Jen

    2010-01-01

    More video streaming technologies supporting distance learning systems are becoming popular among distributed network environments. In this paper, the authors develop a multimedia authoring tool for adaptive e-learning by using characterization of extended media streaming technologies. The distributed approach is based on an ontology-based model.…

  12. The development of a quality-and-multimedia-based health web information searching tool.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Jou; Chang, Polun

    2009-01-01

    People have not been satisfied with the search tools of web health information. We built a prototype easy-to-use web information searching tool by using multimedia techniques, combined with the emphasis of result presentation and content quality information. Instead of traditional search methods, we provide quality and webpage source information of websites for people to get useful information, and present search result by graphs and animations for people to get better user experience.

  13. IPMP 2013 - A comprehensive data analysis tool for predictive microbiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictive microbiology is an area of applied research in food science that uses mathematical models to predict the changes in the population of pathogenic or spoilage microorganisms in foods undergoing complex environmental changes during processing, transportation, distribution, and storage. It f...

  14. Multimedia Programs in Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschbrown, Lita, Ed.

    This is a catalog of films, filmstrips, slides, video tapes, and audio cassettes. Most of the materials listed are for college or adult levels. The entries contain the following information: title, format, date released, distributor, running time, costs, author, consultants, and producer. Some of the entries bear recommendations or reviews. The…

  15. Map based multimedia tool on Pacific theatre in World War II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakala Venkata, Devi Prasada Reddy

    Maps have been used for depicting data of all kinds in the educational community for many years. A standout amongst the rapidly changing methods of teaching is through the development of interactive and dynamic maps. The emphasis of the thesis is to develop an intuitive map based multimedia tool, which provides a timeline of battles and events in the Pacific theatre of World War II. The tool contains summaries of major battles and commanders and has multimedia content embedded in it. The primary advantage of this Map tool is that one can quickly know about all the battles and campaigns of the Pacific Theatre by accessing Timeline of Battles in each region or Individual Battles in each region or Summary of each Battle in an interactive way. This tool can be accessed via any standard web browser and motivate the user to know more about the battles involved in the Pacific Theatre. It was made responsive using Google maps API, JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS.

  16. A novel multimedia tool to improve bedside teaching of cardiac auscultation.

    PubMed

    Woywodt, A; Herrmann, A; Kielstein, J T; Haller, H; Haubitz, M; Purnhagen, H

    2004-06-01

    Training in cardiac auscultation is a core element of undergraduate teaching but recent studies have documented a remarkable decline in auscultatory skills. Therefore there is an interest in new ways to teach cardiac auscultation. In analogy to phonocardiography, an electronic system for simultaneous auscultation and visualisation of murmurs was sought. For this purpose, an electronic stethoscope was linked to a laptop computer and software created to visualise auscultatory findings. In a preliminary trial in undergraduate students, this approach greatly facilitated teaching. Amalgamating traditional phonocardiography with a multimedia approach, this system represents a novel tool for bedside teaching of cardiac auscultation.

  17. Multimedia Technology and Indigenous Language Revitalization: Practical Educational Tools and Applications Used within Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galla, Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation reports findings from a study documenting the use of multimedia technology among Indigenous language communities to assist language learners, speakers, instructors, and institutions learn about multimedia technologies that have contributed to Indigenous language revitalization, education, documentation, preservation, and…

  18. One Way Multimedia Broadcasting as a Tool for Education and Development in Developing Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, M. G.; Venugopal, D.; Sebastian, M.; Chari, B.

    2000-07-01

    interesting and unpopular in most of the developing countries. The proposed digital audio and multimedia offering from WorldSpace to millions of consumers spread across more than 120 countries is considered as a unique tool for education and development, particularly in the developing nations. In this paper, an attempt is made to briefly describe the issues associated with education and development in developing countries, the WorldSpace offering and how a developing nation can benefit from this offering in the coming decades.

  19. The Effects of a Synchronous Communication Tool (Yahoo Messenger) on Online Learners' Sense of Community and Their Multimedia Authoring Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiang-Kwei

    2008-01-01

    Literature suggests that developing a community of learners is the key to a successful online-learning experience. In this study, the instructor of a multimedia authoring course adopted a synchronous communication tool (Yahoo Messenger) to interact with learners orally on a weekly basis and, thereby, to establish a sense among the learners that…

  20. Online teaching tool simplifies faculty use of multimedia and improves student interest and knowledge in science.

    PubMed

    Walsh, John P; Chih-Yuan Sun, Jerry; Riconscente, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies can improve student interest and knowledge in science. However, researching the vast number of websites devoted to science education and integrating them into undergraduate curricula is time-consuming. We developed an Adobe ColdFusion- and Adobe Flash-based system for simplifying the construction, use, and delivery of electronic educational materials in science. The Online Multimedia Teaching Tool (OMTT) in Neuroscience was constructed from a ColdFusion-based online interface, which reduced the need for programming skills and the time for curriculum development. The OMTT in Neuroscience was used by faculty to enhance their lectures in existing curricula. Students had unlimited online access to encourage user-centered exploration. We found the OMTT was rapidly adapted by multiple professors, and its use by undergraduate students was consistent with the interpretation that the OMTT improved performance on exams and increased interest in the field of neuroscience.

  1. Online Teaching Tool Simplifies Faculty Use of Multimedia and Improves Student Interest and Knowledge in Science

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John P.; Chih-Yuan Sun, Jerry; Riconscente, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies can improve student interest and knowledge in science. However, researching the vast number of websites devoted to science education and integrating them into undergraduate curricula is time-consuming. We developed an Adobe ColdFusion– and Adobe Flash–based system for simplifying the construction, use, and delivery of electronic educational materials in science. The Online Multimedia Teaching Tool (OMTT) in Neuroscience was constructed from a ColdFusion-based online interface, which reduced the need for programming skills and the time for curriculum development. The OMTT in Neuroscience was used by faculty to enhance their lectures in existing curricula. Students had unlimited online access to encourage user-centered exploration. We found the OMTT was rapidly adapted by multiple professors, and its use by undergraduate students was consistent with the interpretation that the OMTT improved performance on exams and increased interest in the field of neuroscience. PMID:21885826

  2. Application of Interactive Multimedia Tools in Teaching Mathematics--Examples of Lessons from Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milovanovic, Marina; Obradovic, Jasmina; Milajic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the benefits and importance of using multimedia in the math classes by the selected examples of multimedia lessons from geometry (isometric transformations and regular polyhedra). The research included two groups of 50 first year students of the Faculty of the Architecture and the Faculty of Civil Construction Management.…

  3. A Class at Mount Holyoke College Uses "Frankenstein" as a Tool for Teaching Student Multimedia Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    1997-01-01

    A Mount Holyoke College (Massachusetts) class on computer applications in history and the humanities, entitled "Frankenstein Meets Multimedia," uses topics from the 1818 novel as the basis for students to develop multimedia compact disks about it. The novel is used because its author was heavily influenced by the philosophy of the Enlightenment…

  4. Adding Value to Large Multimedia Collections through Annotation Technologies and Tools: Serving Communities of Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabajee, Paul; Miller, Libby; Dingley, Andy

    A group of research projects based at HP-Labs Bristol, the University of Bristol (England) and ARKive (a new large multimedia database project focused on the worlds biodiversity based in the United Kingdom) are working to develop a flexible model for the indexing of multimedia collections that allows users to annotate content utilizing extensible…

  5. Fluorescence-based tools for single-cell approaches in food microbiology.

    PubMed

    Bridier, A; Hammes, F; Canette, A; Bouchez, T; Briandet, R

    2015-11-20

    The better understanding of the functioning of microbial communities is a challenging and crucial issue in the field of food microbiology, as it constitutes a prerequisite to the optimization of positive and technological microbial population functioning, as well as for the better control of pathogen contamination of food. Heterogeneity appears now as an intrinsic and multi-origin feature of microbial populations and is a major determinant of their beneficial or detrimental functional properties. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind the behavior of bacteria in microbial communities requires therefore observations at the single-cell level in order to overcome "averaging" effects inherent to traditional global approaches. Recent advances in the development of fluorescence-based approaches dedicated to single-cell analysis provide the opportunity to study microbial communities with an unprecedented level of resolution and to obtain detailed insights on the cell structure, metabolism activity, multicellular behavior and bacterial interactions in complex communities. These methods are now increasingly applied in the field of food microbiology in different areas ranging from research laboratories to industry. In this perspective, we reviewed the main fluorescence-based tools used for single-cell approaches and their concrete applications with specific focus on food microbiology.

  6. An Exploration of the Use of Multimedia Cases as a Reflective Tool in Teacher Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ellen

    2001-04-01

    Multimedia cases are perceived to be a means of bridging the gap between theory and practice in teacher education. However, little is known about how prospective teachers actually learn with these cases. In this paper, we examine how multimedia cases can stimulate reflective thought among preservice teachers. Gestalt psychology is employed as a theoretical lens to examine how seven preservice teachers work with a multimedia case. Data were collected by means of audiotaped work-aloud protocols, interviews and questionnaires. Results indicate that preservice teachers remain at low levels of abstraction of their ideas about teaching as a result of case examination. Directed assignments and collaboration among prospective teachers were a useful, but not always necessary, means of stimulating discussion on the multimedia case. The study leads to the conclusion there is still much to be learned about how prospective teachers interact with multimedia case, particularly about how such cases might stimulate reflective practice.

  7. DialBetics With a Multimedia Food Recording Tool, FoodLog

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayo; Aizawa, Kiyoharu; Kato, Shigeko; Fujita, Hideo; Lee, Hanae; Kobayashi, Haruka; Ogawa, Makoto; Mouri, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Takashi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes self-management education is an essential element of diabetes care. Systems based on information and communication technology (ICT) for supporting lifestyle modification and self-management of diabetes are promising tools for helping patients better cope with diabetes. An earlier study had determined that diet improved and HbA1c declined for the patients who had used DialBetics during a 3-month randomized clinical trial. The objective of the current study was to test a more patient-friendly version of DialBetics, whose development was based on the original participants’ feedback about the previous version of DialBetics. Method: DialBetics comprises 4 modules: data transmission, evaluation, exercise input, and food recording and dietary evaluation. Food recording uses a multimedia food record, FoodLog. A 1-week pilot study was designed to determine if usability and compliance improved over the previous version, especially with the new meal-input function. Results: In the earlier 3-month, diet-evaluation study, HbA1c had declined a significant 0.4% among those who used DialBetics compared with the control group. In the current 1-week study, input of meal photos was higher than with the previous version (84.8 ± 13.2% vs 77.1% ± 35.1% in the first 2 weeks of the 3-month trial). Interviews after the 1-week study showed that 4 of the 5 participants thought the meal-input function improved; the fifth found input easier, but did not consider the result an improvement. Conclusions: DialBetics with FoodLog was shown to be an effective and convenient tool, its new meal-photo input function helping provide patients with real-time support for diet modification. PMID:25883164

  8. Modeling tools for the assessment of microbiological risks during floods: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collender, Philip; Yang, Wen; Stieglitz, Marc; Remais, Justin

    2015-04-01

    Floods are a major, recurring source of harm to global economies and public health. Projected increases in the frequency and intensity of heavy precipitation events under future climate change, coupled with continued urbanization in areas with high risk of floods, may exacerbate future impacts of flooding. Improved flood risk management is essential to support global development, poverty reduction and public health, and is likely to be a crucial aspect of climate change adaptation. Importantly, floods can facilitate the transmission of waterborne pathogens by changing social conditions (overcrowding among displaced populations, interruption of public health services), imposing physical challenges to infrastructure (sewerage overflow, reduced capacity to treat drinking water), and altering fate and transport of pathogens (transport into waterways from overland flow, resuspension of settled contaminants) during and after flood conditions. Hydrological and hydrodynamic models are capable of generating quantitative characterizations of microbiological risks associated with flooding, while accounting for these diverse and at times competing physical and biological processes. Despite a few applications of such models to the quantification of microbiological risks associated with floods, there exists limited guidance as to the relative capabilities, and limitations, of existing modeling platforms when used for this purpose. Here, we review 17 commonly used flood and water quality modeling tools that have demonstrated or implicit capabilities of mechanistically representing and quantifying microbial risk during flood conditions. We compare models with respect to their capabilities of generating outputs that describe physical and microbial conditions during floods, such as concentration or load of non-cohesive sediments or pathogens, and the dynamics of high flow conditions. Recommendations are presented for the application of specific modeling tools for assessing

  9. Developing and testing multimedia educational tools to teach Polar Sciences in the Italian school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macario, Maddalena; Cattadori, Matteo; Bianchi, Cristiana; Zattin, Massimiliano; Talarico, Franco Maria

    2013-04-01

    In the last few years science education moved forward rapidly by connecting the expertise and enthusiasm of polar educators worldwide. The interest in Polar Sciences determined the creation of a global professional network for those that educate in, for, and about the Polar Regions. In Italy, this cooperation is well represented by APECS-Italy, the Italian section of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) that is composed by young researchers and teachers of the Italian School. The Polar Regions represent one of the best natural environments where students can investigate directly on global changes. In this sense, the working group UNICAMearth of the Geology Division of School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino (Italy), promotes the arrangement of instructional resources based on real data coming from the research world. Our project aims to develop innovative teaching resources and practices designed to bring the importance of the Polar Regions closer to home. Consequently, Polar Sciences could become a focus point in the new national school curricula, where Earth Sciences have to be thought and learnt in an integrated way together with other sciences. In particular, M. Macario is producing a teaching tool package, starting from a case study, which includes a dozen of full lesson plans based on multimedia tools (images, smart board lessons and videos of lab experiments) as well as on hands-on activities about polar issues and phenomena. Among the resources the teaching tool package is referring to, there is also an App for tablet named CLAST (CLimate in Antartica from Sediments and Tectonics). This App has been designed by a team made up of polar scientists belonging to the University of Siena and University of Padova, two science teachers of the Museo delle Scienze (MUSE) of Trento other than M. Macario. CLAST has been funded by two Research Projects, CLITEITAM ("CLImate-TEctonics Interactions along the TransAntarctic Mountains

  10. Screen-Capture Instructional Technology: A Cognitive Tool for Designing a Blended Multimedia Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeffrey G.; Smith, Rita L.

    2012-01-01

    Online instruction has been demonstrated to increase the academic achievement for post-secondary students; however, little empirical investigation has been conducted on high school students learning from online multimedia instruction in the traditional classroom. This study investigated the knowledge acquisition, transfer, and favorability of…

  11. Developing and Evaluating an Interactive Multimedia Instructional Tool: Learning Outcomes and User Experiences of Optometry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ling

    2008-01-01

    This study developed an interactive multimedia-based software program for Optics instruction, which was expected to overcome the imperfection of traditional optical labs. The researcher evaluated the effectiveness of the program through an experimental study that compared the learning outcomes of the students who used and did not use the software.…

  12. Comparing Novice and Expert Perceptions of Interactive Multimedia Tools for Conveying Conceptions of Size and Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magana, Alejandra; Newby, Timothy; Brophy, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Education in nanotechnology presents major challenges in science literacy. One of these challenges relates to conveying size and scale-related concepts. Because of the potential difficulties in conveying concepts and ideas that are not visible to the naked eye, multimedia for learning could be an appropriate vehicle to deliver curricular materials…

  13. INVESTIGATING UNCERTAINTY AND SENSITIVITY IN INTEGRATED, MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS: TOOLS FOR FRAMES-3MRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elucidating uncertainty and sensitivity structures in environmental models can be a difficult task, even for low-order, single-medium constructs driven by a unique set of site-specific data. Quantitative assessment of integrated, multimedia models that simulate hundreds of sites...

  14. Multi -omics and metabolic modelling pipelines: challenges and tools for systems microbiology.

    PubMed

    Fondi, Marco; Liò, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Integrated -omics approaches are quickly spreading across microbiology research labs, leading to (i) the possibility of detecting previously hidden features of microbial cells like multi-scale spatial organization and (ii) tracing molecular components across multiple cellular functional states. This promises to reduce the knowledge gap between genotype and phenotype and poses new challenges for computational microbiologists. We underline how the capability to unravel the complexity of microbial life will strongly depend on the integration of the huge and diverse amount of information that can be derived today from -omics experiments. In this work, we present opportunities and challenges of multi -omics data integration in current systems biology pipelines. We here discuss which layers of biological information are important for biotechnological and clinical purposes, with a special focus on bacterial metabolism and modelling procedures. A general review of the most recent computational tools for performing large-scale datasets integration is also presented, together with a possible framework to guide the design of systems biology experiments by microbiologists.

  15. The Recording of Student Performance in the Microbiology Laboratory as a Training, Tutorial, and Motivational Tool

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Steven M.; Gair, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory component of a microbiology course consists of exercises which mandate a level of proficiency and manual dexterity equal to and often beyond that recognized among other biology courses. Bacterial growth, maintenance, identification (e.g., Gram stain, biochemical tests, genomics), as well as the continuous need to maintain laboratory safety and sterile technique, are only a few skills/responsibilities critical to the discipline of microbiology. Performance of the Gram stain remains one of the most basic and pivotal skills that must be mastered in the microbiology laboratory. However, a number of students continually have difficulty executing the Gram stain and preparative procedures associated with the test. In order to address this issue, we incorporated real-time digital recording as a supplemental teaching aid in the microbiology laboratory. Our use of the digital movie camera in the teaching setting served to enhance interest, motivate students, and in general, improve student performance. PMID:23653741

  16. WGS Analysis and Interpretation in Clinical and Public Health Microbiology Laboratories: What Are the Requirements and How Do Existing Tools Compare?

    PubMed Central

    Wyres, Kelly L.; Conway, Thomas C.; Garg, Saurabh; Queiroz, Carlos; Reumann, Matthias; Holt, Kathryn; Rusu, Laura I.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have the potential to transform the field of clinical and public health microbiology, and in the last few years numerous case studies have demonstrated successful applications in this context. Among other considerations, a lack of user-friendly data analysis and interpretation tools has been frequently cited as a major barrier to routine use of these techniques. Here we consider the requirements of microbiology laboratories for the analysis, clinical interpretation and management of bacterial whole-genome sequence (WGS) data. Then we discuss relevant, existing WGS analysis tools. We highlight many essential and useful features that are represented among existing tools, but find that no single tool fulfils all of the necessary requirements. We conclude that to fully realise the potential of WGS analyses for clinical and public health microbiology laboratories of all scales, we will need to develop tools specifically with the needs of these laboratories in mind. PMID:25437808

  17. Using Supplementary Video in Multimedia Instruction as a Teaching Tool to Increase Efficiency of Learning and Quality of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljubojevic, Milos; Vaskovic, Vojkan; Stankovic, Srecko; Vaskovic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to investigate efficiency of use of supplementary video content in multimedia teaching. Integrating video clips in multimedia lecture presentations may increase students' perception of important information and motivation for learning. Because of that, students can better understand and remember key…

  18. Software for predictive microbiology and risk assessment: a description and comparison of tools presented at the ICPMF8 Software Fair.

    PubMed

    Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny; Ellouze, Mariem

    2015-02-01

    The 8th International Conference on Predictive Modelling in Food was held in Paris, France in September 2013. One of the major topics of this conference was the transfer of knowledge and tools between academics and stakeholders of the food sector. During the conference, a "Software Fair" was held to provide information and demonstrations of predictive microbiology and risk assessment software. This article presents an overall description of the 16 software tools demonstrated at the session and provides a comparison based on several criteria such as the modeling approach, the different modules available (e.g. databases, predictors, fitting tools, risk assessment tools), the studied environmental factors (temperature, pH, aw, etc.), the type of media (broth or food) and the number and type of the provided micro-organisms (pathogens and spoilers). The present study is a guide to help users select the software tools which are most suitable to their specific needs, before they test and explore the tool(s) in more depth.

  19. Multimedia storytelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, C. A.; Wilbert, M.; Holmes, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Multimedia video presentations, which integrate still photographs with video clips, audio interviews, ambient sounds, and music, are an effective and engaging way to tell science stories. In July 2009, Linder joined professors and undergraduates on an expedition to the Kolyma River in northeastern Siberia. This IPY science project, called The Polaris Project (http://www.thepolarisproject.org), is an undergraduate research experience where students and faculty work together to increase our understanding of climate change impacts, including thawing permafrost, in this remote corner of the world. During the summer field season, Linder conducted dozens of interviews, captured over 20,000 still photographs and hours of ambient audio and video clips. Following the 2009 expedition, Linder blended this massive archive of visual and audio information into a 10-minute overview video and five student vignettes. In 2010, Linder again traveled to Siberia as part of the Polaris Project, this time mentoring an environmental journalism student who will lead the production of a video about the 2010 field season. Using examples from the Polaris productions, we will present tips, tools, and techniques for creating compelling multimedia science stories.

  20. Evaluation of the HACCP system in a university canteen: microbiological monitoring and internal auditing as verification tools.

    PubMed

    Osimani, Andrea; Aquilanti, Lucia; Tavoletti, Stefano; Clementi, Francesca

    2013-04-17

    Food safety is essential in mass catering. In Europe, Regulation (EC) No. 852/2004 requires food business operators to put in place, implement and maintain permanent procedures based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles. Each HACCP plan is specifically implemented for the processing plant and processing methods and requires a systematic collection of data on the incidence, elimination, prevention, and reduction of risks. In this five-year-study, the effectiveness of the HACCP plan of a University canteen was verified through periodic internal auditing and microbiological monitoring of meals, small equipment, cooking tools, working surfaces, as well as hands and white coats of the canteen staff. The data obtained revealed no safety risks for the consumers, since Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were never detected; however, a quite discontinuous microbiological quality of meals was revealed. The fluctuations in the microbial loads of mesophilic aerobes, coliforms, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and sulphite-reducing clostridia were mainly ascribed to inadequate handling or processing procedures, thus suggesting the need for an enhancement of staff training activities and for a reorganization of tasks. Due to the wide variety of the fields covered by internal auditing, the full conformance to all the requirements was never achieved, though high scores, determined by assigning one point to each answer which matched with the requirements, were achieved in all the years.

  1. Atomic Force Microscopy as a Tool for Applied Virology and Microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Boris

    2003-12-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) can be successfully used for simple and fast solution of many applied biological problems. In this paper the survey of the results of the application of atomic force microscope SolverP47BIO (NT-MDT, Russia) in State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology "Vector" is presented. The AFM has been used: - in applied virology for the counting of viral particles and examination of virus-cell interaction; - in microbiology for measurements and indication of bacterial spores and cells; - in biotechnology for control of biotechnological processes and evaluation of the distribution of particle dimension for viral and bacterial diagnostic assays. The main advantages of AFM in applied researches are simplicity of the processing of sample preparation and short time of the examination.

  2. The New Face of Genetics: Creating A Multimedia Educational Tool for the Twenty-First Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Audrey

    In the study of certain genetic conditions, it is important to understand the specific "dysmorphology" associated with them. This describes the unique anatomical manifestations of the genetic condition. Traditionally, students learn about dysmorphology by reading text descriptions or looking at photographs of affected individuals. The New Face of Genetics is a film project that aims to teach students dysmorphology by featuring people who have specific genetic conditions. The goal is to enhance students' understanding of these conditions as well as to impart the humanity and beauty of the people who appear in the film. Students will have the opportunity to see dysmorphic features on the animated human form as well as meet individuals who are living with genetic difference. The target audience includes genetic counseling students and other medical professionals. Three short films were made in this format to demonstrate how this type of educational tool can be made. The featured conditions were Marfan syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome and Joubert syndrome. Future work will be carried out by other genetic counseling students who will make additional films based on our templates. A compendium of approximately 20 films will be eventually completed and released to genetic counseling programs and medical schools.

  3. A simple microbiological tool to evaluate the effect of environmental health interventions on hand contamination.

    PubMed

    Devamani, Carol; Norman, Guy; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter

    2014-11-01

    The effects of interventions such as sanitation or hand hygiene on hand contamination are difficult to evaluate. We explored the ability of a simple microbiological test to: (1) detect recontamination after handwashing; (2) reflect risk factors for microbial contamination and (3) be applicable to large populations. The study was done in rural Andhra Pradesh, India, and Maputo, Mozambique. Participants placed all 10 fingertips on a chromogenic agar that stains Enterococcus spp. and E. coli spp. Outcomes were the number of colonies and the number of fingertips with colonies. In the recontamination study, participants were randomised to handwashing with soap and no handwashing, and tested at 30 min intervals afterwards. In two cross sectional studies, risk factors for hand contamination were explored. Recontamination of hands after washing with soap was fast, with baseline levels reached after 1 h. Child care was associated with higher Enterococcus spp. counts, whereas agricultural activities increased E. coli spp. counts. Food preparation was associated with higher counts for both organisms. In Maputo, counts were not strongly associated with water access, latrine type, education or diarrhoea. The method seems unsuitable for the evaluation of handwashing promotion. It may reflect immediately preceding risk practices but not household-level risk factors. PMID:25407420

  4. A simple microbiological tool to evaluate the effect of environmental health interventions on hand contamination.

    PubMed

    Devamani, Carol; Norman, Guy; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter

    2014-11-01

    The effects of interventions such as sanitation or hand hygiene on hand contamination are difficult to evaluate. We explored the ability of a simple microbiological test to: (1) detect recontamination after handwashing; (2) reflect risk factors for microbial contamination and (3) be applicable to large populations. The study was done in rural Andhra Pradesh, India, and Maputo, Mozambique. Participants placed all 10 fingertips on a chromogenic agar that stains Enterococcus spp. and E. coli spp. Outcomes were the number of colonies and the number of fingertips with colonies. In the recontamination study, participants were randomised to handwashing with soap and no handwashing, and tested at 30 min intervals afterwards. In two cross sectional studies, risk factors for hand contamination were explored. Recontamination of hands after washing with soap was fast, with baseline levels reached after 1 h. Child care was associated with higher Enterococcus spp. counts, whereas agricultural activities increased E. coli spp. counts. Food preparation was associated with higher counts for both organisms. In Maputo, counts were not strongly associated with water access, latrine type, education or diarrhoea. The method seems unsuitable for the evaluation of handwashing promotion. It may reflect immediately preceding risk practices but not household-level risk factors.

  5. A Simple Microbiological Tool to Evaluate the Effect of Environmental Health Interventions on Hand Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Devamani, Carol; Norman, Guy; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The effects of interventions such as sanitation or hand hygiene on hand contamination are difficult to evaluate. We explored the ability of a simple microbiological test to: (1) detect recontamination after handwashing; (2) reflect risk factors for microbial contamination and (3) be applicable to large populations. The study was done in rural Andhra Pradesh, India, and Maputo, Mozambique. Participants placed all 10 fingertips on a chromogenic agar that stains Enterococcus spp. and E. coli spp. Outcomes were the number of colonies and the number of fingertips with colonies. In the recontamination study, participants were randomised to handwashing with soap and no handwashing, and tested at 30 min intervals afterwards. In two cross sectional studies, risk factors for hand contamination were explored. Recontamination of hands after washing with soap was fast, with baseline levels reached after 1 h. Child care was associated with higher Enterococcus spp. counts, whereas agricultural activities increased E. coli spp. counts. Food preparation was associated with higher counts for both organisms. In Maputo, counts were not strongly associated with water access, latrine type, education or diarrhoea. The method seems unsuitable for the evaluation of handwashing promotion. It may reflect immediately preceding risk practices but not household-level risk factors. PMID:25407420

  6. The Daktari: An Interactive, Multi-Media Tool for Knowledge Transfer among Poor Livestock Keepers in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Louise; Heffernan, Claire; Lin, Yibo; Yu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the findings from the assessment of a touch-screen, multi-media learning program on livestock health and production: "The Daktari." The program was tested on a sample of 62 livestock keepers in the Nairobi slums of Kariobangi and Kibera. The study examined prior knowledge regarding three livestock diseases (liver fluke,…

  7. An Integrated Approach to the Use of Complementary Visual Learning Tools in an Undergraduate Microbiology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Bernadette

    2011-01-01

    The ability to appreciate the inter-connectedness of complex biological relationships can be difficult for many students. Graphical knowledge in the form of concept maps and flow charts are learning tools which can assist students to recognise the inter-connectivity. This report focuses on a trial which incorporates these two related visual…

  8. Single-stranded DNA phages: from early molecular biology tools to recent revolutions in environmental microbiology.

    PubMed

    Székely, Anna J; Breitbart, Mya

    2016-03-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) phages are profoundly different from tailed phages in many aspects including the nature and size of their genome, virion size and morphology, mutation rate, involvement in horizontal gene transfer, infection dynamics and cell lysis mechanisms. Despite the importance of ssDNA phages as molecular biology tools and model systems, the environmental distribution and ecological roles of these phages have been largely unexplored. Viral metagenomics and other culture-independent viral diversity studies have recently challenged the perspective of tailed, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) phages, dominance by demonstrating the prevalence of ssDNA phages in diverse habitats. However, the differences between ssDNA and dsDNA phages also substantially limit the efficacy of simultaneously assessing the abundance and diversity of these two phage groups. Here we provide an overview of the major differences between ssDNA and tailed dsDNA phages that may influence their effects on bacterial communities. Furthermore, through the analysis of 181 published metaviromes we demonstrate the environmental distribution of ssDNA phages and present an analysis of the methodological biases that distort their study through metagenomics. PMID:26850442

  9. [Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis in microbiology: a tool for the evaluation of the antimicrobial treatment].

    PubMed

    Canut Blasco, Andrés; Aguilar Alfaro, Lorenzo; Cobo Reinoso, Javier; Giménez Mestre, M José; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The selection of multiresistant microorganisms, as a side-effect of the use of antimicrobials, together with the lack of new therapeutic drugs expected in the near future, forces to a rational use of antibiotics. The optimisation of antibacterial treatments based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis (PK/PD) may contribute to prolong the life of antibiotics and to contain the bacterial resistance to them. A review is made of the importance of the appropriateness of the dose regimen selected, the application of PK/PD analysis of antimicrobials, the Monte Carlo simulation, PK/PD indices for efficacy, and PK/PD cut-off points. PK/PD analysis is also applicable to the prevention of bacterial resistance. Different methods have been used to study the factors that lead to its emergence and spread, such as in vitro and animal models, and resistance prevention studies (mutant selection window). Although the PK/PD analysis is a very useful tool for the selection of the most appropriate dose regimen of antibiotics, several problems limit its use in clinical practice.

  10. [Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis in microbiology: a tool for the evaluation of the antimicrobial treatment].

    PubMed

    Canut Blasco, Andrés; Aguilar Alfaro, Lorenzo; Cobo Reinoso, Javier; Giménez Mestre, M José; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The selection of multiresistant microorganisms, as a side-effect of the use of antimicrobials, together with the lack of new therapeutic drugs expected in the near future, forces to a rational use of antibiotics. The optimisation of antibacterial treatments based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis (PK/PD) may contribute to prolong the life of antibiotics and to contain the bacterial resistance to them. A review is made of the importance of the appropriateness of the dose regimen selected, the application of PK/PD analysis of antimicrobials, the Monte Carlo simulation, PK/PD indices for efficacy, and PK/PD cut-off points. PK/PD analysis is also applicable to the prevention of bacterial resistance. Different methods have been used to study the factors that lead to its emergence and spread, such as in vitro and animal models, and resistance prevention studies (mutant selection window). Although the PK/PD analysis is a very useful tool for the selection of the most appropriate dose regimen of antibiotics, several problems limit its use in clinical practice. PMID:23850188

  11. Clinical Microbiology Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. PMID:25278581

  12. Clinical microbiology informatics.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-10-01

    The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future.

  13. Forensic microbiology.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    The field of forensic microbiology is fairly new and still evolving. With a threat of bioterror and biocrime, the rapid identification and subtyping of infectious agents is of upmost importance. Microbial genetic analysis is a valuable tool in this arena. The cost to sequence a microbial genome has fallen dramatically in recent years making this method more widely available. Surveillance and vigilance are important as is further research. The United States Department of Homeland Security established the Bioforensics Analysis Center to become the foremost U.S. biodefense research institution involved with bioforensics. Many countries are better prepared for biologic events than ever before, but more work is needed. Most medical laboratory scientists are not familiar with forensic principles or testifying in court. Demonstrating chain of custody and quality assurance are critical so that test results will be admissible in a court of law. The Scientific Working Group on Microbial Genetics and Forensics has published guidelines for forensic microbiology laboratories. Incorporating these guidelines help to provide test results that are useful in legal proceedings. If a laboratory scientist suspects bioterror or biocrime, or other legal case, law enforcement agents must be notified and diagnostic samples preserved. Additional sample testing might be necessary in court cases.

  14. Modelling the exposure to chemicals for risk assessment: a comprehensive library of multimedia and PBPK models for integration, prediction, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis - the MERLIN-Expo tool.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, P; Alfonso, B; Altenpohl, A; Banjac, Z; Bierkens, J; Brochot, C; Critto, A; De Wilde, T; Fait, G; Fierens, T; Garratt, J; Giubilato, E; Grange, E; Johansson, E; Radomyski, A; Reschwann, K; Suciu, N; Tanaka, T; Tediosi, A; Van Holderbeke, M; Verdonck, F

    2016-10-15

    MERLIN-Expo is a library of models that was developed in the frame of the FP7 EU project 4FUN in order to provide an integrated assessment tool for state-of-the-art exposure assessment for environment, biota and humans, allowing the detection of scientific uncertainties at each step of the exposure process. This paper describes the main features of the MERLIN-Expo tool. The main challenges in exposure modelling that MERLIN-Expo has tackled are: (i) the integration of multimedia (MM) models simulating the fate of chemicals in environmental media, and of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models simulating the fate of chemicals in human body. MERLIN-Expo thus allows the determination of internal effective chemical concentrations; (ii) the incorporation of a set of functionalities for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis, from screening to variance-based approaches. The availability of such tools for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis aimed to facilitate the incorporation of such issues in future decision making; (iii) the integration of human and wildlife biota targets with common fate modelling in the environment. MERLIN-Expo is composed of a library of fate models dedicated to non biological receptor media (surface waters, soils, outdoor air), biological media of concern for humans (several cultivated crops, mammals, milk, fish), as well as wildlife biota (primary producers in rivers, invertebrates, fish) and humans. These models can be linked together to create flexible scenarios relevant for both human and wildlife biota exposure. Standardized documentation for each model and training material were prepared to support an accurate use of the tool by end-users. One of the objectives of the 4FUN project was also to increase the confidence in the applicability of the MERLIN-Expo tool through targeted realistic case studies. In particular, we aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of building complex realistic exposure scenarios and the accuracy of the

  15. Modelling the exposure to chemicals for risk assessment: a comprehensive library of multimedia and PBPK models for integration, prediction, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis - the MERLIN-Expo tool.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, P; Alfonso, B; Altenpohl, A; Banjac, Z; Bierkens, J; Brochot, C; Critto, A; De Wilde, T; Fait, G; Fierens, T; Garratt, J; Giubilato, E; Grange, E; Johansson, E; Radomyski, A; Reschwann, K; Suciu, N; Tanaka, T; Tediosi, A; Van Holderbeke, M; Verdonck, F

    2016-10-15

    MERLIN-Expo is a library of models that was developed in the frame of the FP7 EU project 4FUN in order to provide an integrated assessment tool for state-of-the-art exposure assessment for environment, biota and humans, allowing the detection of scientific uncertainties at each step of the exposure process. This paper describes the main features of the MERLIN-Expo tool. The main challenges in exposure modelling that MERLIN-Expo has tackled are: (i) the integration of multimedia (MM) models simulating the fate of chemicals in environmental media, and of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models simulating the fate of chemicals in human body. MERLIN-Expo thus allows the determination of internal effective chemical concentrations; (ii) the incorporation of a set of functionalities for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis, from screening to variance-based approaches. The availability of such tools for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis aimed to facilitate the incorporation of such issues in future decision making; (iii) the integration of human and wildlife biota targets with common fate modelling in the environment. MERLIN-Expo is composed of a library of fate models dedicated to non biological receptor media (surface waters, soils, outdoor air), biological media of concern for humans (several cultivated crops, mammals, milk, fish), as well as wildlife biota (primary producers in rivers, invertebrates, fish) and humans. These models can be linked together to create flexible scenarios relevant for both human and wildlife biota exposure. Standardized documentation for each model and training material were prepared to support an accurate use of the tool by end-users. One of the objectives of the 4FUN project was also to increase the confidence in the applicability of the MERLIN-Expo tool through targeted realistic case studies. In particular, we aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of building complex realistic exposure scenarios and the accuracy of the

  16. Networked Multimedia for Communication and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Christopher M.; And Others

    Networked multimedia is described as a tool for collaborative learning, focusing on learning through discussion. It is proposed that multimedia may be used to structure and enhance communication, thereby promoting learning. The background and application of collaborative learning is outlined. Several dimensions of media which influence the…

  17. Learning Where the Truth Lies: Use and Abuse of Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Robert

    The ease and glamour of multimedia seem to be shifting the emphasis of such products from content to style. This paper considers the need for multimedia designers, whether professionals or students, to take seriously their intellectual responsibility. The interactive and non-linear nature of multimedia makes it a powerful tool. Rather than using…

  18. Multimedia Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costache, G. N.; Gavat, I.

    2004-09-01

    Along with the aggressive growing of the amount of digital data available (text, audio samples, digital photos and digital movies joined all in the multimedia domain) the need for classification, recognition and retrieval of this kind of data became very important. In this paper will be presented a system structure to handle multimedia data based on a recognition perspective. The main processing steps realized for the interesting multimedia objects are: first, the parameterization, by analysis, in order to obtain a description based on features, forming the parameter vector; second, a classification, generally with a hierarchical structure to make the necessary decisions. For audio signals, both speech and music, the derived perceptual features are the melcepstral (MFCC) and the perceptual linear predictive (PLP) coefficients. For images, the derived features are the geometric parameters of the speaker mouth. The hierarchical classifier consists generally in a clustering stage, based on the Kohonnen Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) and a final stage, based on a powerful classification algorithm called Support Vector Machines (SVM). The system, in specific variants, is applied with good results in two tasks: the first, is a bimodal speech recognition which uses features obtained from speech signal fused to features obtained from speaker's image and the second is a music retrieval from large music database.

  19. Salty Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneegurt, Mark A.; Wedel, Adrianne N.; Pokorski, Edward W.

    2004-01-01

    Using microbiology activities in the classroom is an effective way for teachers to address National Standards in the life sciences. However, common microbiology activities that involve swabbing doorknobs and hands are too risky due to the likelihood of culturing human pathogens. In addition, making sterile media and maintaining sterile conditions…

  20. Multimedia Transformation: A Special Report on Multimedia in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In science and math classes across the country, digital tools are being used to conduct experiments, analyze data, and run 3-D simulations to explain complex concepts. Language arts teachers are now pushing the definition of literacy to include the ability to express ideas through media. This report, "Multimedia Transformation," examines the many…

  1. Development of 3D multimedia with advanced computer animation tools for outreach activities related to Meteor Science and Meteoritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Documentaries related to Astronomy and Planetary Sciences are a common and very attractive way to promote the interest of the public in these areas. These educational tools can get benefit from new advanced computer animation software and 3D technologies, as these allow making these documentaries even more attractive. However, special care must be taken in order to guarantee that the information contained in them is serious and objective. In this sense, an additional value is given when the footage is produced by the own researchers. With this aim, a new documentary produced and directed by Prof. Madiedo has been developed. The documentary, which has been entirely developed by means of advanced computer animation tools, is dedicated to several aspects of Meteor Science and Meteoritics. The main features of this outreach and education initiative are exposed here.

  2. Creating Multimedia Courseware for ESP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goertzen, Philip; Howard, Ron

    1995-01-01

    This report details the development of computer software to teach English-as-a-Second-Language skills for medical diagnosis. Design of a prototype unit of multimedia materials using a common authoring tool required about 300 hours of work over a period of 9 months. The report describes the overall design of the courseware, hardware used, stages of…

  3. Virtual learning using interactive multimedia-based tools for knowledge transfer and development of global patient care pathway in haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Bajoria, Rekha; Shah, Farrukh; Rodeck, Charles H; Chatterjee, Ratna

    2011-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are the most common global monogenic disorders with significant mortality and morbidity of the survivors. This is due to poor understanding of the disease(s) by health care professionals and also lack of resources. We have designed a Master's degree in hemoglobinopathies course, the first of its kind, using cutting-edge lively state-of the-art media-based technology, to attain excellence in teaching and learning. The modular program is delivered by 100% virtual learning (VLE) tools. The lectures, given by international experts, are blended with interactive quizzes and assessment tools to make the program engaging. Other activities include video-based tutorials, walk-in surgeries, journal clubs and other web-based activities. We have currently received 40 intakes and the program is running successfully with excellent student feedback using quality control framework of the University College London (UCL), London, UK. In conclusion, we have shown the feasibility of VLE for knowledge and skill transfer to global healthcare professionals for a monogenic disorder.

  4. A multimedia comprehensive informatics system with decision support tools for a multi-site collaboration research of stroke rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ximing; Documet, Jorge; Garrison, Kathleen A.; Winstein, Carolee J.; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of adult disability. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (I-CARE) clinical trial aims to evaluate a therapy for arm rehabilitation after stroke. A primary outcome measure is correlative analysis between stroke lesion characteristics and standard measures of rehabilitation progress, from data collected at seven research facilities across the country. Sharing and communication of brain imaging and behavioral data is thus a challenge for collaboration. A solution is proposed as a web-based system with tools supporting imaging and informatics related data. In this system, users may upload anonymized brain images through a secure internet connection and the system will sort the imaging data for storage in a centralized database. Users may utilize an annotation tool to mark up images. In addition to imaging informatics, electronic data forms, for example, clinical data forms, are also integrated. Clinical information is processed and stored in the database to enable future data mining related development. Tele-consultation is facilitated through the development of a thin-client image viewing application. For convenience, the system supports access through desktop PC, laptops, and iPAD. Thus, clinicians may enter data directly into the system via iPAD while working with participants in the study. Overall, this comprehensive imaging informatics system enables users to collect, organize and analyze stroke cases efficiently.

  5. Agricultural Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Winston J.

    1981-01-01

    Elucidates strategies for applying microbiological techniques to traditional agricultural practices. Discusses the manipulation of microorganisms that live with plants and also the problems involved in the introduction of new genes into crop plants by recombinant DNA methods. (CS)

  6. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Alita R; Smith, James J

    2016-05-01

    An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education. PMID:27158306

  7. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Burmeister, Alita R.; Smith, James J.

    2016-01-01

    An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:27158306

  8. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Alita R; Smith, James J

    2016-05-01

    An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  9. Microbiological investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, J. K.; Taylor, G. R.; Mieszkuc, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    The crew microbiology program was conducted to evaluate lunar contamination, to detect potentially pathogenic microoganisms, to identify medically important microorganisms recovered from ill crewmen, to aid in diagnosis and treatment, and to collect microbiological data that would aid in elucidating the response of the crew microbial autoflora to the space flight environment and in evaluating the resultant effect on the crewmember. Microbiological sampling of selected sites in the command module was initiated in support of the quarantine program. During lunar quarantine missions, microbial screening was accomplished for all support personnel to be isolated with the returning crewman. Virology support for the Apollo project consisted of characterization of the viral and mycoplasma flora of the crewmembers and performance of viral serology for crewmembers, crew contacts, and key mission personnel. Procedures and results are discussed in detail.

  10. Tools for Supporting Response-Based Literature Teaching and Learning: A Multimedia Exploration of the Beat Generation. Report Series 2.29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meskill, Carla; And Others

    A project reviewed 54 commercially available multimedia products with literature as the subject matter, to determine what pedagogical approaches steered the design of literature software, and whether these were aligned with response-based views of literature teaching/learning. Findings indicated that the design of commercial products advocates an…

  11. Creating Effective Multimedia Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Gregory C.

    1999-01-01

    Presents information on several critical themes related to multimedia instruction for those involved in the design, development, or use of computer delivered instruction. Addresses software product life cycle; systematic approach to design; multimedia design and development teams; production values; critical components of effective multimedia;…

  12. A History of Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Larry Kenneth

    The history of multimedia and descriptions of various multimedia events from 1900 to 1972 are presented. The development of multimedia events is described for four eras and four main classifications of events: multiscreen presentations, electronic media and performers, environmental theater, and environments. Five appendixes include a discussion…

  13. Industrial Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demain, Arnold L.; Solomon, Nadine A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an overview of the field of industrial microbiology, providing historical backgrounds of scientific discoveries in the field and descriptions of industrially important microorganisms. Applied research in industry is also detailed, with mention of gene amplification, DNA recombination, pharmaceutical approaches, and detoxification and…

  14. Coral microbiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Kellogg, Christina A.; Rohwer, Forest

    2007-01-01

    In the last 30 years, there has been approximately a 30% loss of corals worldwide, largely due to emerging diseases (Harvell et al., 2002, 2007; Hughes et al., 2003). Coral microbiology is a new field, driven largely by a desire to understand the interactions between corals and their symbiotic microorganisms and to use this knowledge to eventually prevent the spread of coral diseases.

  15. The Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Judson, I.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R.

    1997-07-01

    With the growing presence of multimedia-enabled systems, one will see an integration of collaborative computing concepts into the everyday environments of future scientific and technical workplaces. Desktop teleconferencing is in common use today, while more complex desktop teleconferencing technology that relies on the availability of multipoint (greater than two nodes) enabled tools is now starting to become available on PCs. A critical problem when using these collaboration tools is the inability to easily archive multistream, multipoint meetings and make the content available to others. Ideally one would like the ability to capture, record, playback, index, annotate and distribute multimedia stream data as easily as one currently handles text or still image data. While the ultimate goal is still some years away, the Argonne Voyager project is aimed at exploring and developing media server technology needed to provide a flexible virtual multipoint recording/playback capability. In this article the authors describe the motivating requirements, architecture implementation, operation, performance, and related work.

  16. Supervised multimedia categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldershoff, Frank; Salden, Alfons H.; Iacob, Sorin M.; Kempen, Masja

    2003-01-01

    Static multimedia on the Web can already be hardly structured manually. Although unavoidable and necessary, manual annotation of dynamic multimedia becomes even less feasible when multimedia quickly changes in complexity, i.e. in volume, modality, and usage context. The latter context could be set by learning or other purposes of the multimedia material. This multimedia dynamics calls for categorisation systems that index, query and retrieve multimedia objects on the fly in a similar way as a human expert would. We present and demonstrate such a supervised dynamic multimedia object categorisation system. Our categorisation system comes about by continuously gauging it to a group of human experts who annotate raw multimedia for a certain domain ontology given a usage context. Thus effectively our system learns the categorisation behaviour of human experts. By inducing supervised multi-modal content and context-dependent potentials our categorisation system associates field strengths of raw dynamic multimedia object categorisations with those human experts would assign. After a sufficient long period of supervised machine learning we arrive at automated robust and discriminative multimedia categorisation. We demonstrate the usefulness and effectiveness of our multimedia categorisation system in retrieving semantically meaningful soccer-video fragments, in particular by taking advantage of multimodal and domain specific information and knowledge supplied by human experts.

  17. Look@NanoSIMS--a tool for the analysis of nanoSIMS data in environmental microbiology.

    PubMed

    Polerecky, Lubos; Adam, Birgit; Milucka, Jana; Musat, Niculina; Vagner, Tomas; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2012-04-01

    We describe an open-source freeware programme for high throughput analysis of nanoSIMS (nanometre-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry) data. The programme implements basic data processing and analytical functions, including display and drift-corrected accumulation of scanned planes, interactive and semi-automated definition of regions of interest (ROIs), and export of the ROIs' elemental and isotopic composition in graphical and text-based formats. Additionally, the programme offers new functions that were custom-designed to address the needs of environmental microbiologists. Specifically, it allows manual and automated classification of ROIs based on the information that is derived either from the nanoSIMS dataset itself (e.g. from labelling achieved by halogen in situ hybridization) or is provided externally (e.g. as a fluorescence in situ hybridization image). Moreover, by implementing post-processing routines coupled to built-in statistical tools, the programme allows rapid synthesis and comparative analysis of results from many different datasets. After validation of the programme, we illustrate how these new processing and analytical functions increase flexibility, efficiency and depth of the nanoSIMS data analysis. Through its custom-made and open-source design, the programme provides an efficient, reliable and easily expandable tool that can help a growing community of environmental microbiologists and researchers from other disciplines process and analyse their nanoSIMS data. PMID:22221878

  18. Multimedia Analysis plus Visual Analytics = Multimedia Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Thomas, James J.; Wong, Pak C.; Christel, Michael; Ribarsky, Martin W.

    2010-10-01

    Multimedia analysis has focused on images, video, and to some extent audio and has made progress in single channels excluding text. Visual analytics has focused on the user interaction with data during the analytic process plus the fundamental mathematics and has continued to treat text as did its precursor, information visualization. The general problem we address in this tutorial is the combining of multimedia analysis and visual analytics to deal with multimedia information gathered from different sources, with different goals or objectives, and containing all media types and combinations in common usage.

  19. What Expertise Do Teachers Require To Facilitate Pupils' Self-Expression with Multimedia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    This paper describes the expertise that teachers need to acquire in order to facilitate pupils' self-expression with multimedia. The central idea behind the argument is that multimedia is a creative tool for children and that multimedia learning in the near future is expected to be "Learning by Producing." In such a context of creative learning,…

  20. Integrating Multimedia into the Malaysian Classroom: Engaging Students in Interactive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neo, Tse-Kian; Neo, Mai

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, with the infusion of the multimedia technology into the education arena, traditional educational materials can be translated into interactive electronic form through the use of multimedia authoring tools. This has allowed teachers to design and incorporate multimedia elements and choreograph them in an orderly sequence to convey…

  1. Online and Blended Learning Approach on Instructional Multimedia Development Courses in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicen, Hüseyin; Ozdamli, Fezile; Uzunboylu, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an e-learning environment was designed for teacher candidates. Teacher candidates developed multimedia-based projects by means of multimedia tools. This research aims to determine the effects of online and blended learning approaches on the success level of multimedia projects and the teacher candidates' attitudes, opinions and…

  2. Classification of multimedia processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Omid; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    1998-12-01

    Multimedia system design presents challenges from the perspectives of both hardware and software. Each media in a multimedia environment requires different processes, techniques, algorithms and hardware implementations. Multimedia processing which necessitates real time digital video, audio, and 3D graphics processing is an essential part of new systems as 2D graphics and image processing was in current systems. Multimedia applications require efficient VLSI implementations for various media processing algorithms. Emerging multimedia standards and algorithms will result in hardware systems of high complexity. In addition to recent advances in enabling VLSI technology for high density and fast circuit implementations, special investigation of architectural approaches is also required. In the past few years, multimedia hardware design has captured the most attentions among researchers. New programmable processors, high-speed storage and modern parallelism techniques are among the variety of subjects, which are being addressed in this domain. A detailed categorization of available multimedia processing strategies is required to help designers in adapting these techniques into new architectures. Some of important options in multimedia hardware design include: processor structure, parallelization and granularity, data distribution techniques, instruction level parallelism, memory interface and flexibility. In this paper, we address important issues in the design of a programmable multimedia processor.

  3. Multimedia content description framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Lawrence David (Inventor); Kim, Michelle Yoonk Yung (Inventor); Li, Chung-Sheng (Inventor); Mohan, Rakesh (Inventor); Smith, John Richard (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A framework is provided for describing multimedia content and a system in which a plurality of multimedia storage devices employing the content description methods of the present invention can interoperate. In accordance with one form of the present invention, the content description framework is a description scheme (DS) for describing streams or aggregations of multimedia objects, which may comprise audio, images, video, text, time series, and various other modalities. This description scheme can accommodate an essentially limitless number of descriptors in terms of features, semantics or metadata, and facilitate content-based search, index, and retrieval, among other capabilities, for both streamed or aggregated multimedia objects.

  4. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry: A Powerful Tool for Clinical Microbiology at Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal (West Africa)

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Cheikh I.; Fall, Bécaye; Sambe-Ba, Bissoume; Diawara, Silman; Gueye, Mamadou W.; Mediannikov, Oleg; Sokhna, Cheikh; Faye, Ngor; Diemé, Yaya; Wade, Boubacar; Raoult, Didier; Fenollar, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Our team in Europe has developed the routine clinical laboratory identification of microorganisms by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). To evaluate the utility of MALDI-TOF MS in tropical Africa in collaboration with local teams, we installed an apparatus in the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Senegal), performed routine identification of isolates, and confirmed or completed their identification in France. In the case of discordance or a lack of identification, molecular biology was performed. Overall, 153/191 (80.1%) and 174/191 (91.1%) isolates yielded an accurate and concordant identification for the species and genus, respectively, with the 2 different MALDI-TOF MSs in Dakar and Marseille. The 10 most common bacteria, representing 94.2% of all bacteria routinely identified in the laboratory in Dakar (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) were accurately identified with the MALDI-TOF MS in Dakar. The most frequent misidentification in Dakar was at the species level for Achromobacter xylosoxidans, which was inaccurately identified as Achromobacter denitrificans, and the bacteria absent from the database, such as Exiguobacterium aurientacum or Kytococcus schroeteri, could not be identified. A few difficulties were observed with MALDI-TOF MS for Bacillus sp. or oral streptococci. 16S rRNA sequencing identified a novel bacterium, “Necropsobacter massiliensis.” The robust identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS in Dakar and Marseille demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS can be used as a first-line tool in clinical microbiology laboratories in tropical countries. PMID:26716681

  5. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry: A Powerful Tool for Clinical Microbiology at Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Lo, Cheikh I; Fall, Bécaye; Sambe-Ba, Bissoume; Diawara, Silman; Gueye, Mamadou W; Mediannikov, Oleg; Sokhna, Cheikh; Faye, Ngor; Diemé, Yaya; Wade, Boubacar; Raoult, Didier; Fenollar, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Our team in Europe has developed the routine clinical laboratory identification of microorganisms by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). To evaluate the utility of MALDI-TOF MS in tropical Africa in collaboration with local teams, we installed an apparatus in the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Senegal), performed routine identification of isolates, and confirmed or completed their identification in France. In the case of discordance or a lack of identification, molecular biology was performed. Overall, 153/191 (80.1%) and 174/191 (91.1%) isolates yielded an accurate and concordant identification for the species and genus, respectively, with the 2 different MALDI-TOF MSs in Dakar and Marseille. The 10 most common bacteria, representing 94.2% of all bacteria routinely identified in the laboratory in Dakar (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) were accurately identified with the MALDI-TOF MS in Dakar. The most frequent misidentification in Dakar was at the species level for Achromobacter xylosoxidans, which was inaccurately identified as Achromobacter denitrificans, and the bacteria absent from the database, such as Exiguobacterium aurientacum or Kytococcus schroeteri, could not be identified. A few difficulties were observed with MALDI-TOF MS for Bacillus sp. or oral streptococci. 16S rRNA sequencing identified a novel bacterium, "Necropsobacter massiliensis." The robust identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS in Dakar and Marseille demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS can be used as a first-line tool in clinical microbiology laboratories in tropical countries.

  6. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry: A Powerful Tool for Clinical Microbiology at Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Lo, Cheikh I; Fall, Bécaye; Sambe-Ba, Bissoume; Diawara, Silman; Gueye, Mamadou W; Mediannikov, Oleg; Sokhna, Cheikh; Faye, Ngor; Diemé, Yaya; Wade, Boubacar; Raoult, Didier; Fenollar, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Our team in Europe has developed the routine clinical laboratory identification of microorganisms by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). To evaluate the utility of MALDI-TOF MS in tropical Africa in collaboration with local teams, we installed an apparatus in the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Senegal), performed routine identification of isolates, and confirmed or completed their identification in France. In the case of discordance or a lack of identification, molecular biology was performed. Overall, 153/191 (80.1%) and 174/191 (91.1%) isolates yielded an accurate and concordant identification for the species and genus, respectively, with the 2 different MALDI-TOF MSs in Dakar and Marseille. The 10 most common bacteria, representing 94.2% of all bacteria routinely identified in the laboratory in Dakar (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) were accurately identified with the MALDI-TOF MS in Dakar. The most frequent misidentification in Dakar was at the species level for Achromobacter xylosoxidans, which was inaccurately identified as Achromobacter denitrificans, and the bacteria absent from the database, such as Exiguobacterium aurientacum or Kytococcus schroeteri, could not be identified. A few difficulties were observed with MALDI-TOF MS for Bacillus sp. or oral streptococci. 16S rRNA sequencing identified a novel bacterium, "Necropsobacter massiliensis." The robust identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS in Dakar and Marseille demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS can be used as a first-line tool in clinical microbiology laboratories in tropical countries. PMID:26716681

  7. Good practice in multimedia courseware development.

    PubMed

    Schulz, C

    1998-01-01

    The main goal of the European TALENT/ESPRIT project is to create a generic environment for developing multimedia courseware. The first phase of the project concerns itself with developing conversion tools for converting text based course material into multimedia format. The second phase of the project adds network support to the courseware in the form of the network tutoring and networked supply chain support. One year into the project specifications for developing multimedia have been made and can be found in the project's deliverables. Also a summary of good practice in multimedia courseware development has been drawn up. First phase demonstrators (converted text based courses) are currently being prepared. This article starts with a global overview of the TALENT project itself. In more detail an overview of best practice guidelines in multimedia courseware development will be given. The information shown was obtained from an extensive survey among experts in the field of computer based training. The survey was conducted early this year as part of one of the project's deliverables. Finally some comments will be made on a multimedia demonstrator which is currently under development at HISCOM. PMID:10179628

  8. Multimedia Technologies. Desk Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    This annotated bibliography was developed as a result of a May, 1991, Technology Seminar on Multimedia, and is intended to provide researchers with an overview of the literature pertaining to the development of multimedia technology, innovative applications, design, and implementation issues as well as with descriptions of major multimedia…

  9. Multimedia Makes Its Mark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steelman, Jane D.

    2005-01-01

    High-quality multimedia products make use of technology to further the understanding of a topic in ways that traditional media cannot accomplish. This article describes the use of multimedia in collaborative student projects dealing with an area of study in the standard curriculum for their state or country. The projects facilitated the…

  10. Imaging mass spectrometry in microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry tools which allow for the 2-D visualization of the distribution of trace metals, metabolites, surface lipids, peptides and proteins directly from biological samples without the need for chemical tagging or antibodies are becoming increasingly useful for microbiology applications. These tools, comprised of different imaging mass spectrometry techniques, are ushering in an exciting new era of discovery by allowing for the generation of chemical hypotheses based on of the spatial mapping of atoms and molecules that can correlate to or transcend observed phenotypes. In this review, we explore the wide range of imaging mass spectrometry techniques available to microbiologists and describe their unique applications to microbiology with respect to the types of microbiology samples to be investigated. PMID:21822293

  11. Leveraging the power of Web 2.0 tools: a wiki platform as a multimedia teaching and learning environment in dental education.

    PubMed

    Salajan, Florin D; Mount, Greg J

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a wiki-based application for the delivery of educational content in dentistry. The Dental Procedure Education System (DPES) is a new web application that uses SharePoint to combine online collaborative authoring characteristic of wiki spaces with instructional video documentaries. Harnessing the wiki's versatility, DPES offers faculty members an avenue to develop an authoritative source of information for both students, through DPES Pro, and the public at large, through DPES Public. Principles of cognitive theory of multimedia learning, constructivist theory, and collaborative writing were employed in the development of DPES. An authoring protocol, with a clearly defined sequence of steps, was established in order to keep the production of the DPES procedures consistent and predictable. Initial, anecdotal user reports indicate that DPES is well received among dental students and faculty members. Expected outcomes and benefits of DPES use are discussed, and directions for research are proposed.

  12. Leveraging the power of Web 2.0 tools: a wiki platform as a multimedia teaching and learning environment in dental education.

    PubMed

    Salajan, Florin D; Mount, Greg J

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a wiki-based application for the delivery of educational content in dentistry. The Dental Procedure Education System (DPES) is a new web application that uses SharePoint to combine online collaborative authoring characteristic of wiki spaces with instructional video documentaries. Harnessing the wiki's versatility, DPES offers faculty members an avenue to develop an authoritative source of information for both students, through DPES Pro, and the public at large, through DPES Public. Principles of cognitive theory of multimedia learning, constructivist theory, and collaborative writing were employed in the development of DPES. An authoring protocol, with a clearly defined sequence of steps, was established in order to keep the production of the DPES procedures consistent and predictable. Initial, anecdotal user reports indicate that DPES is well received among dental students and faculty members. Expected outcomes and benefits of DPES use are discussed, and directions for research are proposed. PMID:22473554

  13. Digital Documentation: Using Computers to Create Multimedia Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speitel, Tom; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes methods for creating integrated multimedia documents using recent advances in print, audio, and video digitization that bring added usefulness to computers as data acquisition, processing, and presentation tools. Discusses advantages of digital documentation. (JRH)

  14. Understanding Children's Museum Learning from Multimedia Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwi, Asmidah; McKay, Elspeth

    2013-01-01

    The use of multimedia instructions for online learning has become very common particularly with the advances of the Internet technology. Consequently museums around the world utilize such information and communications technology (ICT) tools in order to provide richer learning experiences for their visitors. This paper discusses a study that…

  15. Role of Audience in Multimedia Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steed, Marlo

    This paper describes an ongoing research project that uses a set of formative evaluation activities to examine a multimedia production group project in a teacher education course at the University of Lethbridge (Alberta, Canada). The study presents the notion of peer evaluation and target population feedback as tools for scaffolding students'…

  16. Producing a multimedia CD-ROM.

    PubMed

    Vogel, M; Bennett, G C

    2001-08-01

    The multimedia capabilities of modern computers promise a rich contribution to medical education, integrating video, animation and graphics as a single courseware package. Using the new generation of design tools, computer-assisted learning material can be successfully created in-house. PMID:11530589

  17. Concept Mapping with Multimedia on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Sherman R.; Gruenberg, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Discusses concept maps and describes an extension to computer-based concept mapping tools that provides representational capabilities that allows students to express their knowledge more fully by incorporating dynamic media-sound, video, and animated images. Explains multimedia knowledge maps, accessibility via Web browsers, and possible future…

  18. Multidisciplinary Knowledge Transfer in Training Multimedia Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyens, Benoit; Martin, Marguerite

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--Training multimedia projects often face identical knowledge-transfer obstacles that partly originate in the multidisciplinarity of the project team. The purpose of this paper is to describe these difficulties and the tools used to overcome them. In particular, the aim is to show how elements of cognitive psychology theory (concept maps,…

  19. Human eye haptics-based multimedia.

    PubMed

    Velandia, David; Uribe-Quevedo, Alvaro; Perez-Gutierrez, Byron

    2014-01-01

    Immersive and interactive multimedia applications offer complementary study tools in anatomy as users can explore 3D models while obtaining information about the organ, tissue or part being explored. Haptics increases the sense of interaction with virtual objects improving user experience in a more realistic manner. Common eye studying tools are books, illustrations, assembly models, and more recently these are being complemented with mobile apps whose 3D capabilities, computing power and customers are increasing. The goal of this project is to develop a complementary eye anatomy and pathology study tool using deformable models within a multimedia application, offering the students the opportunity for exploring the eye from up close and within with relevant information. Validation of the tool provided feedback on the potential of the development, along with suggestions on improving haptic feedback and navigation.

  20. [Quality control in molecular microbiology].

    PubMed

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Guna Serrano, María Remedio; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción; Pérez, José L

    2008-07-01

    The term quality assurance (QA) refers to the quality control activities related to analytical procedures performed in the clinical microbiology laboratory. QA should include both external and internal quality assessment. Application of quality control tools in molecular microbiology assays is crucial to ensure the accuracy of results and appropriate patient management. External quality control is used for laboratory intercomparisons, detection of random and systematic errors, evaluation of the suitability of some reagents or commercial diagnostic kits, and continuing education. The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology includes quality control procedures for molecular microbiology, as well as specific programs for quantitative determination of the viral load of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), two highly important molecular markers in clinical settings due to their prognostic value and utility as a treatment guide. Internal quality control allows random and systematic errors to be detected through the inclusion of quality control samples in the assays performed in the laboratory, equipment monitoring, and audit. Evaluation of all molecular microbiology assays before their inclusion in the daily routine work of the laboratory is of utmost importance.

  1. Visuals, Path Control, and Knowledge Gain: Variables that Affect Students' Approval and Enjoyment of a Multimedia Text as a Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George-Palilonis, Jennifer; Filak, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    As graphically driven, animated, interactive applications offer educators new opportunities for shaping course content, new avenues for research arise as well. Along with these developments comes a need to study the effectiveness of the individual tools at our disposal as well as various methods for integrating those tools in a classroom setting.…

  2. Displays enabling mobile multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Jyrki

    2007-02-01

    With the rapid advances in telecommunications networks, mobile multimedia delivery to handsets is now a reality. While a truly immersive multimedia experience is still far ahead in the mobile world, significant advances have been made in the constituent audio-visual technologies to make this become possible. One of the critical components in multimedia delivery is the mobile handset display. While such alternatives as headset-style near-to-eye displays, autostereoscopic displays, mini-projectors, and roll-out flexible displays can deliver either a larger virtual screen size than the pocketable dimensions of the mobile device can offer, or an added degree of immersion by adding the illusion of the third dimension in the viewing experience, there are still challenges in the full deployment of such displays in real-life mobile communication terminals. Meanwhile, direct-view display technologies have developed steadily, and can provide a development platform for an even better viewing experience for multimedia in the near future. The paper presents an overview of the mobile display technology space with an emphasis on the advances and potential in developing direct-view displays further to meet the goal of enabling multimedia in the mobile domain.

  3. Transactional interactive multimedia banner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shae, Zon-Yin; Wang, Xiping; von Kaenel, Juerg

    2000-05-01

    Advertising in TV broadcasting has shown that multimedia is a very effective means to present merchandise and attract shoppers. This has been applied to the Web by including animated multimedia banner ads on web pages. However, the issues of coupling interactive browsing, shopping, and secure transactions e.g. from inside a multimedia banner, have only recently started to being explored. Currently there is an explosively growing amount of back-end services available (e.g., business to business commerce (B2B), business to consumer (B2C) commerce, and infomercial services) in the Internet. These services are mostly accessible through static HTML web pages at a few specific web portals. In this paper, we will investigate the feasibility of using interactive multimedia banners as pervasive access point for the B2C, B2B, and infomercial services. We present a system architecture that involves a layer of middleware agents functioning as the bridge between the interactive multimedia banners and back-end services.

  4. The effects of using screencasting as a multimedia pre-training tool to manage the intrinsic cognitive load of chemical equilibrium instruction for advanced high school chemistry students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musallam, Ramsey

    Chemistry is a complex knowledge domain. Specifically, research notes that Chemical Equilibrium presents greater cognitive challenges than other topics in chemistry. Cognitive Load Theory describes the impact a subject, and the learning environment, have on working memory. Intrinsic load is the facet of Cognitive Load Theory that explains the complexity innate to complex subjects. The purpose of this study was to build on the limited research into intrinsic cognitive load, by examining the effects of using multimedia screencasts as a pre-training technique to manage the intrinsic cognitive load of chemical equilibrium instruction for advanced high school chemistry students. A convenience sample of 62 fourth-year high school students enrolled in an advanced chemistry course from a co-ed high school in urban San Francisco were given a chemical equilibrium concept pre-test. Upon conclusion of the pre-test, students were randomly assigned to two groups: pre-training and no pre-training. The pre-training group received a 10 minute and 52 second pre-training screencast that provided definitions, concepts and an overview of chemical equilibrium. After pre-training both group received the same 50-minute instructional lecture. After instruction, all students were given a chemical equilibrium concept post-test. Independent sample t-tests were conducted to examine differences in performance and intrinsic load. No significant differences in performance or intrinsic load, as measured by ratings of mental effort, were observed on the pre-test. Significant differences in performance, t(60)=3.70, p=.0005, and intrinsic load, t(60)=5.34, p=.0001, were observed on the post-test. A significant correlation between total performance scores and total mental effort ratings was also observed, r(60)=-0.44, p=.0003. Because no significant differences in prior knowledge were observed, it can be concluded that pre-training was successful at reducing intrinsic load. Moreover, a significant

  5. Sensor based framework for secure multimedia communication in VANET.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Aneel; Khan, Zeeshan Shafi; Bin Muhaya, Fahad T; Sher, Muhammad; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Secure multimedia communication enhances the safety of passengers by providing visual pictures of accidents and danger situations. In this paper we proposed a framework for secure multimedia communication in Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks (VANETs). Our proposed framework is mainly divided into four components: redundant information, priority assignment, malicious data verification and malicious node verification. The proposed scheme jhas been validated with the help of the NS-2 network simulator and the Evalvid tool. PMID:22163462

  6. Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

    This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

  7. Learner Perceptions on Instructional Design of Multimedia in Learning Abstract Concepts in Science at a Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulasekara, Geetha Udayangani; Jayatilleke, Buddhini Gayathri; Coomaraswamy, Uma

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore learner perceptions on the instructional design features of interactive multimedia (IMM), which was especially designed to support the open and distance learners studying microbiology as a part of the BSc degree programme of the Open University of Sri Lanka (OUSL). The purpose of developing this IMM was to…

  8. Participatory Multimedia Learning: Engaging Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiili, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a participatory multimedia learning model for use in designing multimedia learning environments that support an active learning process, creative participation, and learner engagement. Participatory multimedia learning can be defined as learning with systems that enable learners to produce part of the…

  9. Using Multimedia for Admission Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudema, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Multimedia can grab the attention of prospective students in an engaging, appealing way, while giving admission officers the opportunity to deliver information about every facet of campus life. Describes multimedia, its potential, and the production process as well as five current distribution methods. Discusses appropriateness of multimedia for…

  10. Phyllosphere microbiology.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Steven E; Leveau, Johan H J

    2002-06-01

    Aerial plant surfaces harbor large numbers of microbes, some of which are deleterious to plants whereas others are benign or beneficial. Commercial formulations of bacteria antagonistic to plant pathogenic microbes and ice nucleation active bacteria have been utilized as an environmentally safe method to manage plant disease and to prevent frost damage. Molecular genetic tools, microscopic examination and whole-cell bacterial biosensors have provided extensive information on these microbes, their complex associations and their habitat. The aerial habitat influenced by plants, termed the phyllosphere, is particularly amenable to studies of microbial ecology and the information gained should lead to more effective means of plant protection. PMID:12180099

  11. [The microbiology department].

    PubMed

    Struelens, M; Delforge, M L; Denis, O; Liesnard, C; Rodriguez-Villalobos, H

    2002-01-01

    From the outset, the Department of Microbiology of Erasme Hospital has striven to offer to clinical teams a full range of high performance tests for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic infections, including opportunistic infections. Furthermore, the laboratory has developed and made available cutting edge tools for the epidemiologic surveillance and outbreak investigation in support to the hospital infection control and antibiotic resistance control programmes. Research and development programmes have led to technological innovation in the fields of molecular virologic diagnosis, notably for HIV and herpes viruses, rapid bacterial identification, detection of resistance genes and epidemiological typing. Research in collaboration with clinical teams has focused on congenital infections, HIV infection, opportunistic infections and prevention of nosocomial infection. The Department acts as national reference laboratory for a number of infectious diseases and co-ordinates or actively participates to several European multicentre studies and epidemiologic surveillance networks.

  12. Multimedia modeling of autonomous mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zada, Fatma; Guirguis, S.

    1997-09-01

    Modeling of autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) is sought to enable the designers to investigate various aspects of the design before the actual implementation takes place. Simulation techniques are undoubtedly enriching the design tools, by which the designer would be able to vary the design parameters as appropriate until achieving some optimal performance point. Although they are general purpose, multimedia tools, especially authoring tools, can give the AMR designer some degree of assistance in fulfilling his simulation task as fast as possible. This rapid prototyping tool is rather cost effective, and allow the designer to interactively manipulate his design in simple steps. In this paper, a multimedia environment has been constructed to enable designers to simulate AMRs in order to investigate aspects concerning their kinematics and dynamics. It is also sought that these design experiences can be gathered and categorized in a tutoring system that could be used by practitioners and students enrolled in highly technical courses such as robotics. The rich multimedia environment can assist the learner in so many ways by devising examples, suggesting solutions and design tradeoffs that have been experienced before.

  13. Development of probabilistic multimedia multipathway computer codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Arnish, J.; Kamboj, S.; Biwer, B. M.; Cheng, J.-J.; Zielen, A. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Mo, T.; Abu-Eid, R.; Thaggard, M.; Sallo, A., III.; Peterson, H., Jr.; Williams, W. A.; Environmental Assessment; NRC; EM

    2002-01-01

    The deterministic multimedia dose/risk assessment codes RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD have been widely used for many years for evaluation of sites contaminated with residual radioactive materials. The RESRAD code applies to the cleanup of sites (soils) and the RESRAD-BUILD code applies to the cleanup of buildings and structures. This work describes the procedure used to enhance the deterministic RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD codes for probabilistic dose analysis. A six-step procedure was used in developing default parameter distributions and the probabilistic analysis modules. These six steps include (1) listing and categorizing parameters; (2) ranking parameters; (3) developing parameter distributions; (4) testing parameter distributions for probabilistic analysis; (5) developing probabilistic software modules; and (6) testing probabilistic modules and integrated codes. The procedures used can be applied to the development of other multimedia probabilistic codes. The probabilistic versions of RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD codes provide tools for studying the uncertainty in dose assessment caused by uncertain input parameters. The parameter distribution data collected in this work can also be applied to other multimedia assessment tasks and multimedia computer codes.

  14. [Creating a software package and improving the multimedia teaching of genetics course].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun-Hai; Ma, Qiu-Lan; Wu, Jian-Guo

    2006-08-01

    Multimedia as a pedagogical tool has been widely adopted for improving the quality of teaching. This paper describes the construction of a teaching software package based on the characteristics of the "Genetics" course. It also discusses some particulars of multimedia teaching, the collection of teaching materials, the improvement of teaching effects, and the compilation of a multimedia textbook. How to enhance the quality of the teachers as well as the motivation of the students are also discussed. PMID:16870586

  15. The Multimedia Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Means, Barbara; Simkins, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Teachers implementing a local history project in Belmont, California, had help from a federally funded technology innovation challenge grant: the Challenge 2000 Multimedia Project. Sponsored by a Silicon Valley school-business partnership, the initiative illustrates how technology can transform classroom learning while supporting instructional…

  16. Storyboarding Multimedia Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Linda C.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how to include interactivity when designing multimedia-based training (MBT) storyboards is a major key for a successful MBT. Discusses the basic formats of interactions and when to use each format. Describes how to storyboard and areas to address, including: the display area, prompts, branching, programming and graphics notes,…

  17. Multimedia Networks: Mission Impossible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    Running multimedia on a network, often difficult because of the memory and processing power required, is becoming easier thanks to new protocols and products. Those developing network design criteria may wish to consider making use of Fast Ethernet, Asynchronous Transfer Method (ATM), switches, "fat pipes", additional network segmentation, and…

  18. Multimedia: Beyond the Desktop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbreath, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Central Media Resource System (CMRS), a method that allows multimedia instruction to large groups of students. Highlights include the information infrastructure, including fiber optics and coaxial cable; use of the CMRS in the classroom and in the media resource center; and future possibilities, including local and wide area…

  19. Multimedia Web Searching Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmutlu, Seda; Spink, Amanda; Ozmutlu, H. Cenk

    2002-01-01

    Examines and compares multimedia Web searching by Excite and FAST search engine users in 2001. Highlights include audio and video queries; time spent on searches; terms per query; ranking of the most frequently used terms; and differences in Web search behaviors of U.S. and European Web users. (Author/LRW)

  20. Multimedia Document Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkarahan, Esen

    1995-01-01

    This study develops an integrated conceptual representation scheme for multimedia documents that are viewed to comprise an object-oriented database; the necessary abstractions for the conceptual model and extensions to the relational model used as the search structure; a retrieval model that includes associative, semantic and media-specific…

  1. Evaluation of routinely reported surgical site infections against microbiological culture results: a tool to identify patient groups where diagnosis and treatment may be improved

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgeons may improve their decision making by assessing the extent to which their initial clinical diagnosis of a surgical site infection (SSI) was supported by culture results. Aim of the present study was to evaluate routinely reported SSI by surgeons against microbiological culture results, to identify patient groups with lower agreement where decision making may be improved. Methods 701 admissions with SSI were reported by surgeons in a university medical centre in the period 1997-2005, which were retrospectively checked for microbiological culture results. Reporting a SSI was conditional on treatment being given (e.g. antibiotics) and was classified by severity. To identify specific patient groups, patients were classified according to the surgery group of the first operation during admission (e.g. trauma). Results Of all reported SSI, 523 (74.6%) had a positive culture result, 102 (14.6%) a negative culture result and 76 (10.8%) were classified as unknown culture result (due to no culture taken). Given a known culture result, reported SSI with positive culture results less often concerned trauma patients (16% versus 26%, X2 = 4.99 p = 0.03) and less severe SSI (49% versus 85%, X2 = 10.11 p < 0.01) suggesting that a more conservative approach may be warranted in these patients. The trauma surgeons themselves perceived to have become too liberal in administering antibiotics (and reporting SSI). Conclusion Routine reporting of SSI was mostly supported by culture results. However, this support was less often found in trauma patients and less severe SSI, thereby giving surgeons feedback that diagnosis and treatment may be improved in these cases. PMID:19900294

  2. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  3. Microbiology & Toxicology: Space Environment

    NASA Video Gallery

    One key aspect in maintaining crew health and performance during spaceflight missions is the provision of a habitable environment with acceptably low concentrations of microbiological and toxicolog...

  4. Quantitative microbiological risk assessment as a tool to obtain useful information for risk managers--specific application to Listeria monocytogenes and ready-to-eat meat products.

    PubMed

    Mataragas, M; Zwietering, M H; Skandamis, P N; Drosinos, E H

    2010-07-31

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes in a sliced cooked, cured ham-like meat product was quantitatively assessed. Sliced cooked, cured meat products are considered as high risk products. These ready-to-eat, RTE, products (no special preparation, e.g. thermal treatment, before eating is required), support growth of pathogens (high initial pH=6.2-6.4 and water activity=0.98-0.99) and has a relatively long period of storage at chilled temperatures with a shelf life equal to 60 days based on manufacturer's instructions. Therefore, in case of post-process contamination, even with low number of cells, the microorganism is able to reach unacceptable levels at the time of consumption. The aim of this study was to conduct a Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) on the risk of L. monocytogenes presence in RTE meat products. This may help risk managers to make decisions and apply control measures with ultimate objective the food safety assurance. Examples are given to illustrate the development of practical risk management strategies based on the results obtained from the QMRA model specifically developed for this pathogen/food product combination.

  5. Introducing the Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Ryan; Christensen, L. L.; Gauthier, A.; Hurt, R.

    2008-05-01

    The goal of the Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project (VAMP) is to promote and vastly multiply the use of astronomy multimedia resources—from images and illustrations to animations, movies, and podcasts—and enable innovative future exploitation of a wide variety of outreach media by systematically linking resource archives worldwide. High-quality astronomical images, accompanied by rich caption and background information, abound on the web and yet prove notoriously difficult to locate efficiently using existing search tools. The Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project offers a solution via the Astronomy Visualization Metadata (AVM) standard. Due to roll out in time for IYA2009, VAMP manages the design, implementation, and dissemination of the AVM standard for the education and public outreach astronomical imagery that observatories publish. VAMP will support implementations in World Wide Telescope, Google Sky, Portal to the Universe, and 365 Days of Astronomy, as well as Uniview and DigitalSky software designed specifically for planetariums. The VAMP workshop will introduce the AVM standard and describe its features, highlighting sample image tagging processes using diverse tools—the critical first step in getting media into VAMP. Participants with laptops will have an opportunity to experiment first hand, and workshop organizers will update a web page with system requirements and software options in advance of the conference (see http://virtualastronomy.org/ASP2008/ for links to resources). The workshop will also engage participants in a discussion and review of the innovative AVM image hierarchy taxonomy, which will soon be extended to other types of media.

  6. Multimedia Arts Learning in an Activity System: New Literacies for At-Risk Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, J. David

    2006-01-01

    This study concerns a multi-year after school arts technology program, the Multimedia Arts Education Program (MAEP). The Tucson Pima Arts Council (TPAC) sponsored MAEP in downtown Tucson for low-income youth. A five-semester curriculum was developed to introduce multimedia literacies in the electronic arts workplace and provide tools for students…

  7. Multimedia electronic mail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Brian

    1990-08-01

    Electronic mail is a facility, analogous to postal mail, in which computers are used to compose, deliver, and receive messages. Traditional electronic mail systems rely solely on text as the medium of communication. A multi-media electronic mall application, Mail, combines the media of Rich Text, voice, images, and electronic documents to facilitate interpersonal communication. With Mail, these various media can be integrated into a single message. The variety of available media and the complexity of the messages that result from their combination make it important for Mail to have a simple user interface. It was possible to develop a simple, graphically-based interface that would accommodate Mail's message complexity. The integration of these diverse media is made practical by the rich operating environment in which Mail runs. Modern advances in hardware, operating systems, libraries, and servers make possible this powerful multi-media electronic mail application.

  8. Multimedia environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Soesilo, J.A.; Wiley, W.D.

    1999-09-01

    This book explores and supports the argument that effective environmental management must be based on a multimedia approach, which focuses simultaneously on air, water, and waste and enables managers to assess the resulting financial, operation, and management benefits. The multimedia approach, which can be used to design an effective compliance program, includes proper waste and material handling management, systematic monitoring, and record keeping requirements. This approach integrates a wide array of environmental requirements and decision processes, which the authors examine in sixteen chapters, organized into four parts: the role of environmental management; environmental aspects of business operation, environmental processes; and environmental management trends. Within these parts, the authors highlight the development of modern environmental management and provide an overview of federal laws pertinent to multimedia environmental management. They examine such issues as chemical storage and transportation, tank system operations and requirements, waste determination, spill response procedures, and employee training. Environmental processes addressed in the book include the management of solid and hazardous waste, wastewater treatment systems, stormwater management, air emission control, and site remediation. The authors also briefly discuss significant initiatives in US environmental management and look toward corporate sustainable development.

  9. Security of medical multimedia.

    PubMed

    Tzelepi, S; Pangalos, G; Nikolacopoulou, G

    2002-09-01

    The application of information technology to health care has generated growing concern about the privacy and security of medical information. Furthermore, data and communication security requirements in the field of multimedia are higher. In this paper we describe firstly the most important security requirements that must be fulfilled by multimedia medical data, and the security measures used to satisfy these requirements. These security measures are based mainly on modern cryptographic and watermarking mechanisms as well as on security infrastructures. The objective of our work is to complete this picture, exploiting the capabilities of multimedia medical data to define and implement an authorization model for regulating access to the data. In this paper we describe an extended role-based access control model by considering, within the specification of the role-permission relationship phase, the constraints that must be satisfied in order for the holders of the permission to use those permissions. The use of constraints allows role-based access control to be tailored to specifiy very fine-grained and flexible content-, context- and time-based access control policies. Other restrictions, such as role entry restriction also can be captured. Finally, the description of system architecture for a secure DBMS is presented.

  10. Egg Microbiology Basics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbiology is the study of living microorganisms. This includes any single living animal not visible to the naked eye most of which are less than 0.1 mm in diameter. Bacteria, yeasts, molds, viruses, some algae and protozoans are considered microorganisms. Microbiology is a diverse field and fo...

  11. Microbiology, philosophy and education.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Maureen A

    2016-09-01

    There are not only many links between microbiological and philosophical topics, but good educational reasons for microbiologists to explore the philosophical issues in their fields. I examine three broad issues of classification, causality and model systems, showing how these philosophical dimensions have practical implications. I conclude with a discussion of the educational benefits for recognising the philosophy in microbiology.

  12. Microbiology of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of microbiology of water, covering publications of 1967-77. This review covers: (1) microbial indicators of pollution; and (2) microbiology of rivers, potable waters, natural lakes, and impoundments. A list of 192 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Microbiology of Waste Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unz, Richard F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the microbiology of waste treatment, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes topics such as: (1) sanitary microbiology; (2) wastewater disinfectant; (3) viruses in wastewater; and (4) wastewater microbial populations. A list of 142 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. Microbiology, philosophy and education.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Maureen A

    2016-09-01

    There are not only many links between microbiological and philosophical topics, but good educational reasons for microbiologists to explore the philosophical issues in their fields. I examine three broad issues of classification, causality and model systems, showing how these philosophical dimensions have practical implications. I conclude with a discussion of the educational benefits for recognising the philosophy in microbiology. PMID:27465488

  15. [Environmental microbiological control].

    PubMed

    Martín Salas, Carmen; Tordoya Titichoca, Igberto J; Ezpeleta Baquedano, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    The environmental microbiological control is necessary to prevent infections associated with certain procedures that are performed at the hospital. In this review the procedures for control of water and dialysis fluids, and air in operating rooms and immunocompromised units are addressed. The dialysis quality management guidelines define the highest levels of chemical, microbiological and endotoxin in purified water and dialysis fluids based on the recommendations of scientific societies. The microbiological control of water and dialysis fluids should include detection of microorganisms and endotoxin levels. Regarding the microbiological air sampling of operating rooms and immunocompromised units the types of clean rooms in which is recommended to perform microbiological air monitoring; the sample collection methods; culture media; incubation conditions; the most common microorganisms, and permissible levels depending on the type of surgery are described. PMID:27474243

  16. [Environmental microbiological control].

    PubMed

    Martín Salas, Carmen; Tordoya Titichoca, Igberto J; Ezpeleta Baquedano, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    The environmental microbiological control is necessary to prevent infections associated with certain procedures that are performed at the hospital. In this review the procedures for control of water and dialysis fluids, and air in operating rooms and immunocompromised units are addressed. The dialysis quality management guidelines define the highest levels of chemical, microbiological and endotoxin in purified water and dialysis fluids based on the recommendations of scientific societies. The microbiological control of water and dialysis fluids should include detection of microorganisms and endotoxin levels. Regarding the microbiological air sampling of operating rooms and immunocompromised units the types of clean rooms in which is recommended to perform microbiological air monitoring; the sample collection methods; culture media; incubation conditions; the most common microorganisms, and permissible levels depending on the type of surgery are described.

  17. Multimedia Applications and Development: Essential Competencies for Librarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, S.

    2010-10-01

    The Department of Library and Information Science, University of Pune, Maharashtra, India, has designed a special elective course entitled "Multimedia Applications and Development" in its two-year integrated Masters Degree program of Library and Information Science. During the course, various open source tools for creating multimedia content were taught. This paper discusses eight different information products which were created by students of the department from 2007-2009. Each project was designed for special users with their specific needs. Students gained much confidence in handling various media. They got an opportunity to interact with experts in the fields of communication and mass media. Library Science professionals can take advantage of open source multimedia tools as well to create or repackage content according to users' needs. The paper concludes with feedback about the course from students and teachers.

  18. Cognitive Synergy in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Daesang; Kim, Dong-Joong; Whang, Woo-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of our study was to investigate multimedia effects that had different results from the findings of existing multimedia learning studies. First, we describe and summarize three experimental studies we conducted from 2006 to 2010. Then we analyze our findings to explore learner characteristics that may impact the cognitive processes…

  19. Multimedia File Literacy for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William H.; Baker, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that instructors can help to alleviate students' fears regarding different multimedia techniques by taking time to give some basic file explanations. Discusses a few of the most common multimedia file types in Windows (graphic, audio, and video), as well as compressed files. Uses slide show software as a base because of its widespread use…

  20. Multimedia Principle in Teaching Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kari Jabbour, Khayrazad

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia learning principle occurs when we create mental representations from combining text and relevant graphics into lessons. This article discusses the learning advantages that result from adding multimedia learning principle into instructions; and how to select graphics that support learning. There is a balance that instructional designers…

  1. Multimedia Classrooms and Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajkumar, T. M; Dawley, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    With the advances in multimedia, classrooms and the supporting infrastructures are undergoing changes. Advances that are taking place in multimedia and computer networking are described. Selected issues are then discussed for taking advantage of these educational technologies to improve instruction and learning. (Author/AEF)

  2. Learning about Trusses with Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Siegfried M.; Andruet, Raul H.

    The researchers are developing a learning environment in the subject area of statics that includes physical models, interactive multimedia, traditional pencil-and-paper activities, and cooperative learning in the framework of experiential learning (Kolb, 1984). They are using Authorware Professional to construct the multimedia program. The…

  3. Multimedia Production: A Critical Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Ronald E.

    This paper synthesizes speculation in the professional literature about the future impact of multimedia. Many experts believe that multimedia will soon become the major focus of entertainment dollars and time because its versatility gives it the potential to be a very powerful way to communicate ideas and search for information. In its current…

  4. New Communication Model: Multimedia Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srnic, Vesna

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project, which the author as a mentor has realized during the 2006/2007, was to invent new Educational model, to fill the gap in Education by showing the positive influence of Multimedia Art, especially Multimedia Performance on Permanent Learning at the level of primary school students, college students and teachers or on…

  5. Applications for predictive microbiology to food packaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictive microbiology has been used for several years in the food industry to predict microbial growth, inactivation and survival. Predictive models provide a useful tool in risk assessment, HACCP set-up and GMP for the food industry to enhance microbial food safety. This report introduces the c...

  6. European journals on microbiology.

    PubMed

    Ronda, C; Vázquez, M

    1997-12-01

    A survey on the scientific journals dealing with microbiology published in Europe has been carried out. Eighteen European countries publish microbiological journals with the United Kingdom. Netherlands and Germany leading in number of journals on this specialty. Most of the European journals on microbiology are published bimonthly (27%), and English is the most common language used (54%). Most of these journals (86%) are included in some database, but only 36 (25%) are indexed in the six databases studied. Out of the 146 journals registered, 71 (49%), published in 11 European countries, are included in the 1995 Journal Citation Reports (ISI, Philadelphia).

  7. Can Multimedia Instruction Meet Our Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Loretta L.; Smith, Stanley G.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of multimedia instruction, including differences in goals from those of computer-assisted instruction; guidelines for the successful use of interactive multimedia instruction; the use of multimedia lessons in an introductory chemistry course; applications of multimedia instruction for indexing, hypermedia, simulations,…

  8. Issues and Obstacles with Multimedia Authoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Fillia; And Others

    This paper discusses some of the common threads shared by three dissimilar cases of multimedia authoring: multimedia conference proceedings, multimedia courseware development, and multimedia information kiosks. The benefits and pitfalls of academic development are reviewed and points of wisdom are shared. The paper draws on the experiences from…

  9. 14 CFR 1213.108 - Multimedia materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Multimedia materials. 1213.108 Section 1213... AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.108 Multimedia materials. (a) NASA's multimedia material, from all... original or duplicate files of news-oriented imagery and other digital multimedia material generated...

  10. 14 CFR 1213.108 - Multimedia materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Multimedia materials. 1213.108 Section 1213... AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.108 Multimedia materials. (a) NASA's multimedia material, from all... original or duplicate files of news-oriented imagery and other digital multimedia material generated...

  11. Automatization of Student Assessment Using Multimedia Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taniar, David; Rahayu, Wenny

    Most use of multimedia technology in teaching and learning to date has emphasized the teaching aspect only. An application of multimedia in examinations has been neglected. This paper addresses how multimedia technology can be applied to the automatization of assessment, by proposing a prototype of a multimedia question bank, which is able to…

  12. Multimedia in the University Textiles and Clothing Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batra, Mansi; Marcketti, Sara B.; Ratute, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Teaching has always been a multimedia enterprise; what has changed dramatically is the technology available for delivering course information. The use of technology for today's "digital native" students is an assumed rather than a novel activity. From a pedagogical perspective, technology is a powerful tool for customizing instruction to the needs…

  13. Smithsonian Folkways: Resources for World and Folk Music Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beegle, Amy Christine

    2012-01-01

    This column describes multimedia resources available to teachers on the Smithsonian Folkways website. In addition to massive collections of audio and video recordings and advanced search tools already available through this website, the Smithsonian Global Sound educational initiative brought detailed lesson plans and interactive features to the…

  14. Developing Multimedia Courseware for the Internet's Java versus Shockwave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majchrzak, Tina L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes and compares two methods for developing multimedia courseware for use on the Internet: an authoring tool called Shockwave, and an object-oriented language called Java. Topics include vector graphics, browsers, interaction with network protocols, data security, multithreading, and computer languages versus development environments. (LRW)

  15. Authoring Multimedia Learning Material Using Open Standards and Free Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellez, Alberto Gonzalez

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the case of synchronized multimedia presentations. Design/methodology/approach: The proposal is based on SMIL as composition language. Particularly, the paper reuses and customizes the SMIL template used by INRIA on their technical presentations. It also proposes a set of free tools to produce…

  16. Semantic Storyboard of Judicial Debates: A Novel Multimedia Summarization Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fersini, E.; Sartori, F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The need of tools for content analysis, information extraction and retrieval of multimedia objects in their native form is strongly emphasized into the judicial domain: digital videos represent a fundamental informative source of events occurring during judicial proceedings that should be stored, organized and retrieved in short time and…

  17. Multimedia Projects in Education: Designing, Producing, and Assessing, Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivers, Karen S.; Barron, Ann E.

    2005-01-01

    Building on the materials in the two previous successful editions, this book features approximately 40% all new material and updates the previous information. The authors use the DDD-E model (Decide, Design, Develop--Evaluate) to show how to select and plan multimedia projects, use presentation and development tools, manage graphics, audio, and…

  18. Multimedia Sandbox: Teaching, Learning, and the Transfer of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ignazio, Fred

    1992-01-01

    Argues for new instructional methods that envision teacher explorer classrooms in which teachers and students utilize multimedia tools to construct knowledge. Describes the changing roles of the teacher and student and methods to evaluate the classroom process. Describes a classroom that includes hardware, software, training, motivation, and…

  19. Multimedia approach to dental education in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, A; David, B

    1995-10-01

    Today's technology allows educators to design and create tools that enable teachers and students to work with material from different sources and to attend courses at various sites. The personal computer represents perhaps the greatest boon to this movement by providing a vehicle for "user friendly," interactive, multimedia courseware. A discussion of that courseware, its development and implementation, is provided here. PMID:7478384

  20. Evaluation of Educational Multimedia Support System for Students with Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poobrasert, Onintra; Cercone, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The use of a multimedia program as a teaching tool, especially for special needs students, offers sufficient and personal attention to the student using it, while allowing instruction to proceed at the student's pace and also supporting in motivation. The purposes of this proposal are (1) to examine the degree of effectiveness of a multimedia…

  1. Microbiology: a dangerous profession?

    PubMed

    Piqueras, Mercè

    2007-09-01

    The history of science contains many cases of researchers who have died because of their professional activity. In the field of microbiology, some have died or have come close to death from infection by agents that were the subject of their research (Table 1). Infections that had a lethal outcome were usually accidental. Sometimes, however, researchers inoculated themselves with the pathogen or did not take preventive measures against the potential pathogen because they wanted to prove their hypotheses--or disprove someone else's--regarding the origin of the infection. Here is an overview of several episodes in the history of microbiology since the mid nineteenth century involving researchers or workers in fields related to microbiology who have become infected. They are considered here in their historical context to provide insights into some of the pillars of modern microbiology--The giants on whose shoulders several generations of microbiologists have stood to see further.

  2. Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2001-05-01

    Jim contributed a chapter to this book, in addition to co-editing it with Madilyn Fletcher. Fredrickson, J. K., and M. Fletcher. (eds.) 2001 Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry. Wiley-Liss, Inc., New York.

  3. Microbiology in Introductory Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callery, Michael L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a microbiology unit developed for an introductory college biology course in which the identity of an unknown bacterium is determined. Also described is an interactive taxonomy computer program which aids in the identity of the unknown organism. (CS)

  4. Application of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Binary Typing as Tools in Veterinary Clinical Microbiology and Molecular Epidemiologic Analysis of Bovine and Human Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zadoks, Ruth; van Leeuwen, Willem; Barkema, Herman; Sampimon, Otlis; Verbrugh, Henri; Schukken, Ynte Hein; van Belkum, Alex

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-eight bovine mammary Staphylococcus aureus isolates from diverse clinical, temporal, and geographical origins were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after SmaI digestion of prokaryotic DNA and by means of binary typing using 15 strain-specific DNA probes. Seven pulsed-field types and four subtypes were identified, as were 16 binary types. Concordant delineation of genetic relatedness was documented by both techniques, yet based on practical and epidemiological considerations, binary typing was the preferable method. Genotypes of bovine isolates were compared to 55 previously characterized human S. aureus isolates through cluster analysis of binary types. Genetic clusters containing strains of both human and bovine origin were found, but bacterial genotypes were predominantly associated with a single host species. Binary typing proved an excellent tool for comparison of S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, derived from different host species and from different databases. For 28 bovine S. aureus isolates, detailed clinical observations in vivo were compared to strain typing results in vitro. Associations were found between distinct genotypes and severity of disease, suggesting strain-specific bacterial virulence. Circumstantial evidence furthermore supports strain-specific routes of bacterial dissemination. We conclude that PFGE and binary typing can be successfully applied for genetic analysis of S. aureus isolates from bovine mammary secretions. Binary typing in particular is a robust and simple method and promises to become a powerful tool for strain characterization, for resolution of clonal relationships of bacteria within and between host species, and for identification of sources and transmission routes of bovine S. aureus. PMID:10790124

  5. Innovative Multimedia for Teaching Nematology

    PubMed Central

    Eisenback, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The availability of interactive multimedia authoring software programs promises to revolutionize the teaching of nematology. These programs integrate text, hypertext, graphics, animations, video, and sound. The user interacts with the information on demand in a nonlinear fashion. Beginning students can limit themselves to the general outlines of the subject, and advanced students can explore the information to the limits of their ability. Use of interactive multimedia does not eliminate the need for effective, enthusiastic teachers but provides a mechanism for the efficient transfer of information. An interactive multimedia presentation that supplements lectures in an introductory course is presented as an example of the application of this technology for teaching nematology. PMID:19279782

  6. Human cadavers Vs. multimedia simulation: A study of student learning in anatomy.

    PubMed

    Saltarelli, Andrew J; Roseth, Cary J; Saltarelli, William A

    2014-01-01

    Multimedia and simulation programs are increasingly being used for anatomy instruction, yet it remains unclear how learning with these technologies compares with learning with actual human cadavers. Using a multilevel, quasi-experimental-control design, this study compared the effects of "Anatomy and Physiology Revealed" (APR) multimedia learning system with a traditional undergraduate human cadaver laboratory. APR is a model-based multimedia simulation tool that uses high-resolution pictures to construct a prosected cadaver. APR also provides animations showing the function of specific anatomical structures. Results showed that the human cadaver laboratory offered a significant advantage over the multimedia simulation program on cadaver-based measures of identification and explanatory knowledge. These findings reinforce concerns that incorporating multimedia simulation into anatomy instruction requires careful alignment between learning tasks and performance measures. Findings also imply that additional pedagogical strategies are needed to support transfer from simulated to real-world application of anatomical knowledge.

  7. Multimedia Feedback Systems for Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwell, S.; Gottlieb, E.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Slutter, C.L.

    1998-12-15

    The World Wide Web has become a key tool for information sharing. Engineers and scientists are finding that the web is especially suited to publishing the graphical, multi-layered information that is typical of their work. Web pages are easier to distribute than hardcopy. Web movies have become more accessible, in many offices, than videos. Good VRML viewing software, bundled with most new PCs, has sufficient power to support many engineering needs. In addition to publishing information science and engineering has an important tradition of peer and customer review. Reports, drawings and graphs are typically printed, distributed, reviewed, marked up, and returned to the author. Adding review comments to paper is easy. When, however, the information is in electronic form, this ease of review goes away. It's hard to write on videos. It's even harder to write comments on animated 3D models. These feedback limitations reduce the value of the information overall. Fortunately, the web can also be a useful tool for collecting peer and customer review information. When properly formed, web reports, movies, and 3D animations can be readily linked to review notes. This paper describes three multimedia feed-back systems that Sandia National Laboratories has developed to tap that potential. Each system allows people to make context-sensitive comments about specific web content and electronically ties the comments back to the web content being referenced. The fuel system ties comments to specific web pages, the second system ties the comments to specific frames of digital movies, and the third ties the comments to specific times and viewpoints within 3D animations. In addition to the technologies, this paper describes how they are being used to support intelligent machine systems design at Sandia.

  8. Planning a Multimedia Documentation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockley, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the process of planning and developing a multimedia documentation project. Discusses audience, task, and information analysis; selection of the most appropriate media; effective design; establishment of the development team; hardware and software requirements; costs; and project planning. (SR)

  9. Multimedia chatting system on LAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lung, Chu-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Chao; Lee, Ching-Long; Huang, Huang-Chen

    1994-04-01

    An interactive system designed for talking via multimedia presentation with other parties on Ethernet- LAN is proposed. Our Multimedia Chatting System will take several media services into consideration, like still image, text, pen writing, voice, and slow-motion video, to integrate a practical chatting system. The prototyping subsystem to implement the above idea is currently under development using NETBIOS communication interface and Microsoft Windows environment.

  10. Consolidated clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Robert L; Thomson, Richard B

    2015-05-01

    The manner in which medical care is reimbursed in the United States has resulted in significant consolidation in the U.S. health care system. One of the consequences of this has been the development of centralized clinical microbiology laboratories that provide services to patients receiving care in multiple off-site, often remote, locations. Microbiology specimens are unique among clinical specimens in that optimal analysis may require the maintenance of viable organisms. Centralized laboratories may be located hours from patient care settings, and transport conditions need to be such that organism viability can be maintained under a variety of transport conditions. Further, since the provision of rapid results has been shown to enhance patient care, effective and timely means for generating and then reporting the results of clinical microbiology analyses must be in place. In addition, today, increasing numbers of patients are found to have infection caused by pathogens that were either very uncommon in the past or even completely unrecognized. As a result, infectious disease specialists, in particular, are more dependent than ever on access to high-quality diagnostic information from clinical microbiology laboratories. In this point-counterpoint discussion, Robert Sautter, who directs a Charlotte, NC, clinical microbiology laboratory that provides services for a 40-hospital system spread over 3 states in the southeastern United States explains how an integrated clinical microbiology laboratory service has been established in a multihospital system. Richard (Tom) Thomson of the NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, IL, discusses some of the problems and pitfalls associated with large-scale laboratory consolidation.

  11. Multimedia reviews: multimedia convergence for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Taintor, Zebulon

    2003-12-01

    Introduction by the column editor: In this final column of the year, Dr. Taintor provides an overview of exciting technological developments via his report on the 2003 annual meeting of the American Association for Technology in Psychiatry (AATP). Advances-and convergences-in technology are providing clinicians with increasingly useful tools to enhance the effectiveness of their treatments, increase access to care, reduce errors, and save time. As Dr. Taintor notes, AATP's meeting is traditionally held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA). I hope that his report will encourage APA's members to attend some of next year's informative sessions.

  12. Report and recommendations on multimedia materials for teaching and learning quantum physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Dębowska, E.; Arpornthip, T.; Girwidz, R.; Greczyło, T.; Kohnle, A.; Melder, T.; Michelini, M.; Santi, L.; Silva, J.

    2016-05-01

    An international collaboration of physicists, affiliated with Multimedia Physics for Teaching and Learning (MPTL) and MERLOT, performed a survey and review of multimedia-based learning materials for quantum physics and quantum mechanics. The review process was based on more than a decade of experience with similar topical learning material reviews. A total of approximately 250 items were considered for review and eight were recommended by the reviewers. These are described in this report. Observations about quantum learning resources and multimedia tools are included.

  13. Multimedia electronic teaching file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Krishnaprasad, Vidhya; Staab, Edward V.

    1994-05-01

    To make images and data available to all the radiologists, fellows, and residents at the University of Florida an electronic teaching file was required that was accessible to a wide range of people in a number of locations and could display not only data about cases, but the relevant images to go with the case. The multimedia electronic teaching system (METS) uses Oracle as its database management system with addresses of images stored in the tables. To avoid tedious data entry, a connection to the medical center's radiology information system was made. Findings, diagnosis and ACR codes are entered at the data entry screen along with the image numbers of the relevant images for CT, MRI, and US. These images are retrieved from the PACS system for storage on the METS disks. The user interface to the retrieval and display operation allows a search of any or all of the fields in the database through a query by example facility. Simple image manipulation is possible. A Sun workstation was used to implement the system. The user interface was initially written using the MOTIF window manager that could be run over the network on any other Sun workstation. An upgrade uses a MOSAIC with forms to implement data entry and query facilities.

  14. Tangible Multimedia: A Case Study for Bringing Tangibility into Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsong, Chau Kien; Chong, Toh Seong; Samsudin, Zarina

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia augmented with tangible objects is an area that has not been explored. Current multimedia systems lack the natural elements that allow young children to learn tangibly and intuitively. In view of this, we propose a research to merge tangible objects with multimedia for preschoolers, and propose to term it as "tangible multimedia". To…

  15. Structuring Free-text Microbiology Culture Reports For Secondary Use

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Wen-wai; Evans, Heather L.; Yetisgen, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology lab culture reports are a frequently used diagnostic tool for clinical providers. However, their incorporation into clinical surveillance applications and evidence-based medicine can be severely hindered by the free-text nature of these reports. In this work, we (1) created a microbiology culture template to structure free-text microbiology reports, (2) generated an annotated microbiology report corpus, and (3) built a microbiology information extraction system. Specifically, we combined rule-based, hybrid, and statistical techniques to extract microbiology entities and fill templates for structuring data. System performances were favorable, with entity f1-score 0.889 and relation f1-score 0.795. We plan to incorporate these extractions as features for our ongoing ventilator-associated pneumonia surveillance project, though this tool can be used as an upstream process in other applications. Our newly created corpus includes 1442 unique gram stain and culture microbiology reports generated from a cohort of 715 patients at the University of Washington Medical Facilities. PMID:26306288

  16. Designing high-quality interactive multimedia learning modules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Camillan

    2005-01-01

    Modern research has broadened scientific knowledge and revealed the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences. For today's students, this advance translates to learning a more diverse range of concepts, usually in less time, and without supporting resources. Students can benefit from technology-enhanced learning supplements that unify concepts and are delivered on-demand over the Internet. Such supplements, like imaging informatics databases, serve as innovative references for biomedical information, but could improve their interaction interfaces to support learning. With information from these digital datasets, multimedia learning tools can be designed to transform learning into an active process where students can visualize relationships over time, interact with dynamic content, and immediately test their knowledge. This approach bridges knowledge gaps, fosters conceptual understanding, and builds problem-solving and critical thinking skills-all essential components to informatics training for science and medicine. Additional benefits include cost-free access and ease of dissemination over the Internet or CD-ROM. However, current methods for the design of multimedia learning modules are not standardized and lack strong instructional design. Pressure from administrators at the top and students from the bottom are pushing faculty to use modern technology to address the learning needs and expectations of contemporary students. Yet, faculty lack adequate support and training to adopt this new approach. So how can faculty learn to create educational multimedia materials for their students? This paper provides guidelines on best practices in educational multimedia design, derived from the Virtual Labs Project at Stanford University. The development of a multimedia module consists of five phases: (1) understand the learning problem and the users needs; (2) design the content to harness the enabling technologies; (3) build multimedia materials with web style standards and

  17. Designing high-quality interactive multimedia learning modules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Camillan

    2005-01-01

    Modern research has broadened scientific knowledge and revealed the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences. For today's students, this advance translates to learning a more diverse range of concepts, usually in less time, and without supporting resources. Students can benefit from technology-enhanced learning supplements that unify concepts and are delivered on-demand over the Internet. Such supplements, like imaging informatics databases, serve as innovative references for biomedical information, but could improve their interaction interfaces to support learning. With information from these digital datasets, multimedia learning tools can be designed to transform learning into an active process where students can visualize relationships over time, interact with dynamic content, and immediately test their knowledge. This approach bridges knowledge gaps, fosters conceptual understanding, and builds problem-solving and critical thinking skills-all essential components to informatics training for science and medicine. Additional benefits include cost-free access and ease of dissemination over the Internet or CD-ROM. However, current methods for the design of multimedia learning modules are not standardized and lack strong instructional design. Pressure from administrators at the top and students from the bottom are pushing faculty to use modern technology to address the learning needs and expectations of contemporary students. Yet, faculty lack adequate support and training to adopt this new approach. So how can faculty learn to create educational multimedia materials for their students? This paper provides guidelines on best practices in educational multimedia design, derived from the Virtual Labs Project at Stanford University. The development of a multimedia module consists of five phases: (1) understand the learning problem and the users needs; (2) design the content to harness the enabling technologies; (3) build multimedia materials with web style standards and

  18. Microbiology--Safety Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Sheryl K.

    This paper discusses the risk assessment associated with microbiology instruction based on grade level, general control measures, appropriate activities for middle school and high school students, the preparation and sterilization of equipment, and safe handling techniques. Appended are instructions and figures on making wire loops and the…

  19. Making Microbiology Even Smaller!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Linda Mull; Motz, Vicki Abrams

    2013-01-01

    We outline protocols for producing slant-minis (SLINIs) and mini-deeps (MEEPs) and examples of their use in simple microbiology experiments suitable for high school students. The principal benefits of these protocols are decreased cost associated with significantly reduced media use; easier, less expensive disposal of waste; and increased safety…

  20. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental microbiology is the study of those microorganisms which exist in natural or artificial environments. The origin of scientific research in this field rests in the observations of Antony van Leewenhoeck that were published in 1677(4). Van Leewenhoeck used a microsco...

  1. Microbiology Made Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronholm, Lois S.; Metz, Mildred C.

    1976-01-01

    Described are two hospital-based laboratory exercises which helped students perceive the relationship between the principles of microbiology and the practice of nursing. The exercises involved an environmental study focusing on problems of nosocomial infection and a study of patients hospitalized with infectious diseases. (Author/MS)

  2. History and Multimedia Technology. Media Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, although multimedia technology offers new options for history instruction, its value depends on the consistency, reliability, and convenience of operational methods. Provides reviews of three recommended and one not recommended multimedia packages. (CFR)

  3. Forensic hash for multimedia information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenjun; Varna, Avinash L.; Wu, Min

    2010-01-01

    Digital multimedia such as images and videos are prevalent on today's internet and cause significant social impact, which can be evidenced by the proliferation of social networking sites with user generated contents. Due to the ease of generating and modifying images and videos, it is critical to establish trustworthiness for online multimedia information. In this paper, we propose novel approaches to perform multimedia forensics using compact side information to reconstruct the processing history of a document. We refer to this as FASHION, standing for Forensic hASH for informatION assurance. Based on the Radon transform and scale space theory, the proposed forensic hash is compact and can effectively estimate the parameters of geometric transforms and detect local tampering that an image may have undergone. Forensic hash is designed to answer a broader range of questions regarding the processing history of multimedia data than the simple binary decision from traditional robust image hashing, and also offers more efficient and accurate forensic analysis than multimedia forensic techniques that do not use any side information.

  4. Increasing Student Learning through Multimedia Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkins, Michael; Cole, Karen; Tavalin, Fern; Means, Barbara

    This book discusses enhancing student achievement through project-based learning with multimedia. Chapter 1 describes project-based multimedia learning. Chapter 2 presents a multimedia primer, including the five basic types of media objects (i.e., images, text, sound, motion, and interactivity). Chapter 3 addresses making a real-world connection,…

  5. Interactive Multimedia in Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sanjaya, Ed.; Sharma, Ramesh C., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Interactive Multimedia in Education and Training" emerges out of the need to share information and knowledge on the research and practices of using multimedia in various educational settings. The book discusses issues related to planning, designing and development of interactive multimedia in a persuasive tone and style, offering rich research…

  6. Security Management in a Multimedia System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rednic, Emanuil; Toma, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    In database security, the issue of providing a level of security for multimedia information is getting more and more known. For the moment the security of multimedia information is done through the security of the database itself, in the same way, for all classic and multimedia records. So what is the reason for the creation of a security…

  7. Standards of Multimedia Graphic Design in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldalalah, Osamah Ahmad; Ababneh, Ziad Waleed Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine Standards of Multimedia Graphic Design in Education through the analysis of the theoretical basis and previous studies related to this subject. This study has identified the list of standards of Multimedia, Graphic Design, each of which has a set indicator through which the quality of Multimedia can be evaluated in…

  8. Development of interactive multimedia applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, Albert; Wang, Lui

    1993-01-01

    Multimedia is making an increasingly significant contribution to our informational society. The usefulness of this technology is already evident in education, business presentations, informational kiosks (e.g., in museums), training and the entertainment environment. Institutions, from grade schools to medical schools, are exploring the use of multifaceted electronic text books and teaching aids to enhance course materials. Through multimedia, teachers and students can take full advantage of the cognitive value of animation, audio, video and other types in a seamless application. The Software Technology Branch at NASA Johnson Space Center (NASA/JSC) is taking similar approaches to apply the state-of-the-art technology to space training, mission operations and other applications. This paper discusses the characteristics and development of multimedia applications at the NASA/JSC.

  9. Exploring creative activity: a software environment for multimedia systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrett, Peter W.; Jardine, David A.

    1992-03-01

    This paper examines various issues related to the theory, design, and implementation of a system that supports creative activity for a multimedia environment. The system incorporates artificial intelligence notions to acquire concepts of the problem domain. This paper investigates this environment by considering a model that is a basis for a system, which supports a history of user interaction. A multimedia system that supports creative activity is problematic. It must function as a tool allowing users to experiment dynamically with their own creative reasoning process--a very nebulous task environment. It should also support the acquisition of domain knowledge so that empirical observation can be further evaluated. This paper aims to illustrate that via the reuse of domain-specific knowledge, closely related ideas can be quickly developed. This approach is useful in the following sense: Multimedia navigational systems hardcode referential links with respect to a web or network. Although users can access or control navigation in a nonlinear (static) manner, these referential links are 'frozen' and can not capture their creative actions, which are essential in tutoring or learning applications. This paper describes a multimedia assistant based on the notion of knowledge- links, which allows users to navigate through creative information in a nonlinear (dynamic) fashion. A selection of prototype code based on object-oriented techniques and logic programming partially demonstrates this.

  10. On the Accuracy Potential in Underwater/Multimedia Photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are refracted at interfaces between optical media with different refractive indices according to Snell’s Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more planar glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here. In the second part of the paper, several aspects, which are relevant for an assessment of the accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry, are discussed. These aspects include network geometry and interface planarity issues as well as effects caused by refractive index variations and dispersion and diffusion under water. All these factors contribute to a rather significant degradation of the geometric accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry. In practical experiments, a degradation of the quality of results by a factor two could be determined under relatively favorable conditions. PMID:26213942

  11. On the Accuracy Potential in Underwater/Multimedia Photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2015-07-24

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are refracted at interfaces between optical media with different refractive indices according to Snell's Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more planar glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here. In the second part of the paper, several aspects, which are relevant for an assessment of the accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry, are discussed. These aspects include network geometry and interface planarity issues as well as effects caused by refractive index variations and dispersion and diffusion under water. All these factors contribute to a rather significant degradation of the geometric accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry. In practical experiments, a degradation of the quality of results by a factor two could be determined under relatively favorable conditions.

  12. Trends in wine microbiology.

    PubMed

    Ramón, D

    1997-12-01

    During the last few years many winemakers have started to use pure Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, frequently isolated from their own geographical regions, to produce wines of more reproductable quality. This microbiological simplification has opened the way for the genetic modification of wine yeast strains. This review concerns the application of molecular techniques in oenology, not only from the point of view of the construction of recombinant strains but also for the study of the population dynamics of wine fermentations.

  13. Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), which may be released to the environment due to human-related activities, can move across environmental phase boundaries and be found in most media. Given the rapid development and growing applications of nanotechnology, there is concern and thus the need to assess the potential environmental impact associated with ENMs. Accordingly, a modeling platform was developed to enable evaluation of the dynamic multimedia environmental distribution of ENMs (MendNano) and the range of potential exposure concentrations of ENMs. The MendNano was based on a dynamic multimedia compartmental modeling approach that was guided by detailed analysis of the agglomeration of ENMs, life-cycle analysis based estimates of their potential release to the environment, and incorporation of mechanistic sub-models of various intermedia transport processes. Model simulations for various environmental scenarios indicated that ENM accumulation in the sediment increased significantly with increased ENMs attachment to suspended solids in water. Atmospheric dry and wet depositions can be important pathways for ENMs input to the terrestrial environment in the absence of direct and distributed ENM release to soil. Increased ENM concentration in water due to atmospheric deposition (wet and dry) is expected as direct ENM release to water diminishes. However, for soluble ENMs dissolution can be the dominant pathway for suspended ENM removal from water even compared to advective transport. For example, simulations for Los Angeles showed that dry deposition, rain scavenging, and wind dilution can remove 90% of ENMs from the atmospheric airshed in ~100-230 days, ~2-6 hrs, and ~0.5-2 days, respectively. For the evaluated ENMs (metal, metal oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNT), nanoclays), mass accumulation in the multimedia environment was mostly in the soil and sediment. Additionally, simulation results for TiO2 in Los Angeles demonstrates that the ENM concentrations in air and

  14. Microbiological analysis of cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Cosmetics are products of chemical or natural origin dedicated specifically for use in skin and mucosa. The constant development of the cosmetic industry has generated the necessity to carry out microbiological analysis on the raw materials used in the industrial production of cosmetics as well as the final products, with the purpose of obtaining products of good microbiological quality. Cosmetic products are recognized to be substrates for the survival and development of a large variety of microorganisms, since they possess some of the nutrients that facilitate growth such as: lipids, polysaccharides, alcohol, proteins, amino acids, glucosides, esteroids, peptides, and vitamins. Also, the conditions of readiness (oxygenation, pH, temperature, osmotic degree, superficial activity, perfume, and essential oils) present in the cosmetic products favor microbial multiplication. Routine analyses to determine the microbiological quality of a cosmetic product include the following: Count of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms. Most probable number (MPN) of total coliforms. Count of molds and yeasts. Absence/presence of Staphylococcus aureus probe. Absence/presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa probe. PMID:15156038

  15. Microbiological analysis of cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Cosmetics are products of chemical or natural origin dedicated specifically for use in skin and mucosa. The constant development of the cosmetic industry has generated the necessity to carry out microbiological analysis on the raw materials used in the industrial production of cosmetics as well as the final products, with the purpose of obtaining products of good microbiological quality. Cosmetic products are recognized to be substrates for the survival and development of a large variety of microorganisms, since they possess some of the nutrients that facilitate growth such as: lipids, polysaccharides, alcohol, proteins, amino acids, glucosides, esteroids, peptides, and vitamins. Also, the conditions of readiness (oxygenation, pH, temperature, osmotic degree, superficial activity, perfume, and essential oils) present in the cosmetic products favor microbial multiplication. Routine analyses to determine the microbiological quality of a cosmetic product include the following: Count of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms. Most probable number (MPN) of total coliforms. Count of molds and yeasts. Absence/presence of Staphylococcus aureus probe. Absence/presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa probe.

  16. Seductive Details in Multimedia Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The seductive detail principle asserts that people learn more deeply from a multimedia presentation when interesting but irrelevant adjuncts are excluded rather than included. However, critics could argue that studies about this principle contain methodological problems. The recent experiment attempts to overcome these problems. Students (N = 108)…

  17. Multimedia teleconferencing with H.324

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, David; Malvar, Henrique S.

    1995-12-01

    An overview of the new H.324 standard for real-time multimedia teleconferencing is presented. Its main components, H.223, H.245, H.263, and G.723 are briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the improvements of each one over their corresponding H.320 series standards.

  18. Multimedia. TAM Topical Guide #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Randall, Ed.; Higgins, Kyle, Ed.

    Educational multimedia and hypermedia systems, which integrate computer-generated text and graphics with full-motion video and stereo sound, dominate much discussion about the future of computer use in education. This guide brings together the thoughts, ideas, and experience of elementary school students, classroom teachers, administrators,…

  19. Volitional Aspects of Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deimann, Markus; Keller, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Research on multimedia learning has produced a vast body of findings which, however, are not yet being integrated into a comprehensive framework of reference. For a considerable time, cognitive centered approaches have dominated the literature. Although motivational variables are now being taken into account, there is still a large gap in regard…

  20. Multimedia and Technology in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantiri, Franky

    2014-01-01

    This essay explores the use of computer technology and multimedia in students learning. Undoubtedly, the advent of computer technology has changed the way humans learn and do things. Moreover, "Computer has become standard equipment" (Bitter & Pierson, 2002) in everyday life. The ability to process data in a real time has helped…

  1. Multimedia Equipment for Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Scott S.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the use of multimedia equipment for distance education. Topics addressed include use of the Internet; distance learning for educators; and cable television and/or fiber optics, including interactive television and satellite technology. A sidebar lists online and telecommunications providers. (LRW)

  2. Accessible Multimedia for the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaparyniuk, Nicholas; Code, Jillianne

    With the Internet taking a dominant role in corporate training, education, retail, and customer based product exploration, authors of Web-based information need to ensure that the media they deliver is accessible to the widest possible audience. Whether users have a visual, auditory, physical, or developmental disability, accessible multimedia can…

  3. Scaffolding Learning through Multimedia Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Mei; Swan, Karen; Kratcoski, Annette

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a third grade class's use of technology during a science unit on forces and motion. The investigation documents the unique ways in which children can construct knowledge and create multimedia representations of their learning when afforded ready access to a variety of digital devices. Further, the study explores the way…

  4. Interactive Multimedia: Practice and Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latchem, Colin, Ed.; And Others

    This book describes developments in interactive multimedia (IMM) in the early 1990s. Its aim is to provide educators, students, trainers, librarians, managers, and practitioners with an overview, not only of the directions and uses of the technology, but also of the research foundations and educational and contextual issues that need to be…

  5. Emotional Design in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Um, Eunjoon; Plass, Jan L.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Homer, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Can multimedia learning environments be designed to foster positive emotions that will improve learning and related affective outcomes? College students (N = 118) were randomly assigned to 4 conditions created by 2 factors related to learners' emotion: "external mood induction" (positive vs. neutral emotions) and "emotional design induction"…

  6. [Validation and verfication of microbiology methods].

    PubMed

    Camaró-Sala, María Luisa; Martínez-García, Rosana; Olmos-Martínez, Piedad; Catalá-Cuenca, Vicente; Ocete-Mochón, María Dolores; Gimeno-Cardona, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    Clinical microbiologists should ensure, to the maximum level allowed by the scientific and technical development, the reliability of the results. This implies that, in addition to meeting the technical criteria to ensure their validity, they must be performed with a number of conditions that allows comparable results to be obtained, regardless of the laboratory that performs the test. In this sense, the use of recognized and accepted reference methodsis the most effective tool for these guarantees. The activities related to verification and validation of analytical methods has become very important, as there is continuous development, as well as updating techniques and increasingly complex analytical equipment, and an interest of professionals to ensure quality processes and results. The definitions of validation and verification are described, along with the different types of validation/verification, and the types of methods, and the level of validation necessary depending on the degree of standardization. The situations in which validation/verification is mandatory and/or recommended is discussed, including those particularly related to validation in Microbiology. It stresses the importance of promoting the use of reference strains as controls in Microbiology and the use of standard controls, as well as the importance of participation in External Quality Assessment programs to demonstrate technical competence. The emphasis is on how to calculate some of the parameters required for validation/verification, such as the accuracy and precision. The development of these concepts can be found in the microbiological process SEIMC number 48: «Validation and verification of microbiological methods» www.seimc.org/protocols/microbiology.

  7. [Validation and verfication of microbiology methods].

    PubMed

    Camaró-Sala, María Luisa; Martínez-García, Rosana; Olmos-Martínez, Piedad; Catalá-Cuenca, Vicente; Ocete-Mochón, María Dolores; Gimeno-Cardona, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    Clinical microbiologists should ensure, to the maximum level allowed by the scientific and technical development, the reliability of the results. This implies that, in addition to meeting the technical criteria to ensure their validity, they must be performed with a number of conditions that allows comparable results to be obtained, regardless of the laboratory that performs the test. In this sense, the use of recognized and accepted reference methodsis the most effective tool for these guarantees. The activities related to verification and validation of analytical methods has become very important, as there is continuous development, as well as updating techniques and increasingly complex analytical equipment, and an interest of professionals to ensure quality processes and results. The definitions of validation and verification are described, along with the different types of validation/verification, and the types of methods, and the level of validation necessary depending on the degree of standardization. The situations in which validation/verification is mandatory and/or recommended is discussed, including those particularly related to validation in Microbiology. It stresses the importance of promoting the use of reference strains as controls in Microbiology and the use of standard controls, as well as the importance of participation in External Quality Assessment programs to demonstrate technical competence. The emphasis is on how to calculate some of the parameters required for validation/verification, such as the accuracy and precision. The development of these concepts can be found in the microbiological process SEIMC number 48: «Validation and verification of microbiological methods» www.seimc.org/protocols/microbiology. PMID:24958671

  8. Next Generation Multimedia Distributed Data Base Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Stuart E.

    1997-01-01

    The paradigm of client/server computing is changing. The model of a server running a monolithic application and supporting clients at the desktop is giving way to a different model that blurs the line between client and server. We are on the verge of plunging into the next generation of computing technology--distributed object-oriented computing. This is not only a change in requirements but a change in opportunities, and requires a new way of thinking for Information System (IS) developers. The information system demands caused by global competition are requiring even more access to decision making tools. Simply, object-oriented technology has been developed to supersede the current design process of information systems which is not capable of handling next generation multimedia.

  9. Personal telepresence: an interactive multimedia workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlman, Mike; Farrell, Renee E.

    1994-04-01

    Personal Telepresence is an interactive multimedia tool that allows individuals or groups to, affordably, meet with remotely located individuals or groups--from their desktop--as if they were all in the same location. A Personal Telepresence workstation would include telephony, computer, desktop videoconferencing, groupware, and graphics capability on a single platform. The user interface presented will allow natural, face-to-face interaction between all those involved in `virtual' meeting, classroom, office or manufacturing problem solving sessions. Files could be opened and placed on a virtual `conference table' where changes could be made interactively by any or all the `meeting' participants. `Copies' of the files can be made, `stapled' together, and given to each of the attendees. The desktop would include a `whiteboard' for brainstorming sessions and a `projector screen' to display movies, video mail, and/or the results of a simulation program. This paper discusses desktop collaboration needs and the Personal Telepresence project at LLNL.

  10. Using multimedia and peer assessment to promote collaborative e-learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Enrique; Aguirre Herrera, Sandra; Ygnacio Pastor Caño, Jose; Quemada Vives, Juan

    2014-04-01

    Collaborative e-learning is increasingly appealing as a pedagogical approach that can positively affect student learning. We propose a didactical model that integrates multimedia with collaborative tools and peer assessment to foster collaborative e-learning. In this paper, we explain it and present the results of its application to the "International Seminars on Materials Science" online course. The proposed didactical model consists of five educational activities. In the first three, students review the multimedia resources proposed by the teacher in collaboration with their classmates. Then, in the last two activities, they create their own multimedia resources and assess those created by their classmates. These activities foster communication and collaboration among students and their ability to use and create multimedia resources. Our purpose is to encourage the creativity, motivation, and dynamism of the learning process for both teachers and students.

  11. Genomics and metagenomics in medical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Roshan; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades, sequencing tools have evolved from laborious time-consuming methodologies to real-time detection and deciphering of genomic DNA. Genome sequencing, especially using next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the landscape of microbiology and infectious disease. This deluge of sequencing data has not only enabled advances in fundamental biology but also helped improve diagnosis, typing of pathogen, virulence and antibiotic resistance detection, and development of new vaccines and culture media. In addition, NGS also enabled efficient analysis of complex human micro-floras, both commensal, and pathological, through metagenomic methods, thus helping the comprehension and management of human diseases such as obesity. This review summarizes technological advances in genomics and metagenomics relevant to the field of medical microbiology.

  12. Careers in Microbiology...Horizons Unlimited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldschmidt Millicent C.; Whitt, Dixie

    1978-01-01

    A broad range of present microbiological work is discussed in order to indicate the many possible careers now open in microbiology. Some areas are immunology, environmental microbiology, agricultural, industrial, and food microbiology, and space microbiology. An employment outlook is also given. (MDR)

  13. Design Interactive: A Nonlinear, Multimedia Approach to Teaching Introduction to Visual Communication and Principles of Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palilonis, Jennifer; Butler, Darrell; Leidig-Farmen, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    As online teaching techniques continue to evolve, new opportunities surface for research and insight regarding best practices for the development and implementation of interactive, multimedia teaching and learning tools. These tools are particularly attractive for courses that lend themselves to a rich media approach. Such is the case for visual…

  14. Hypermedia, Multimedia: What's Going On in Today's Classrooms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sandra

    Definitions and discussions of the terms hypermedia and multimedia are followed by discussions of three different ways in which schools are using multimedia: multimedia produced by publishers for use in elementary and secondary classes; teacher developed multimedia and hypermedia for use with students; and student created multimedia compositions.…

  15. Benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models: RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.J.; Faillace, E.R.; Gnanapragasam, E.K.

    1995-11-01

    Multimedia modelers from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated to conduct a comprehensive and quantitative benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models. The three models-RESRAD (DOE), MMSOILS (EPA), and MEPAS (DOE)-represent analytically based tools that are used by the respective agencies for performing human exposure and health risk assessments. The study is performed by individuals who participate directly in the ongoing design, development, and application of the models. A list of physical/chemical/biological processes related to multimedia-based exposure and risk assessment is first presented as a basis for comparing the overall capabilities of RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS. Model design, formulation, and function are then examined by applying the models to a series of hypothetical problems. Major components of the models (e.g., atmospheric, surface water, groundwater) are evaluated separately and then studied as part of an integrated system for the assessment of a multimedia release scenario to determine effects due to linking components of the models. Seven modeling scenarios are used in the conduct of this benchmarking study: (1) direct biosphere exposure, (2) direct release to the air, (3) direct release to the vadose zone, (4) direct release to the saturated zone, (5) direct release to surface water, (6) surface water hydrology, and (7) multimedia release. Study results show that the models differ with respect to (1) environmental processes included (i.e., model features) and (2) the mathematical formulation and assumptions related to the implementation of solutions (i.e., parameterization).

  16. The case for biocentric microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy Karam

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology is a relatively modern scientific discipline intended to objectively study microorganisms, including pathogens and nonpathogens. However, since its birth, this science has been negatively affected by anthropocentric convictions, including rational and irrational beliefs. Among these, for example, is the artificial separation between environmental and medical microbiology that weakens both disciplines. Anthropocentric microbiology also fails to properly answer questions concerning the evolution of microbial pathogenesis. Here, I argue that an exclusively biocentric microbiology is imperative for improving our understanding not only of the microbial world, but also of our own species, our guts, and the world around us. PMID:19653908

  17. Rapid microbiology - raising awareness.

    PubMed

    Bailie, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A 'high-level overview' of some of the emerging rapid microbiology technologies designed to help healthcare engineering and infection control teams working in hospitals and other healthcare facilities more rapidly identify potentially hazardous levels of waterborne microorganisms in their water systems, enabling them to take prompt remedial action, and a look at the some of the 'pros and cons' of such testing techniques, was given by Nalco technical director, Howard Barnes, the vice-chair of the Legionella Control Association (LCA), at a recent LCA open day. HEJ editor, Jonathan Bailie, reports.

  18. Microbiology of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, I

    2016-07-01

    Most sinus infections are viral and only a small percentage develop bacterial infection. Rhino-, influenza, and para-influenza viruses are the most frequent viral causes of sinusitis. The most common bacterial isolates from children and adult patients with community-acquired acute bacterial sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic organisms (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the commonest isolates in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Aerobic and anaerobic beta lactamase-producing bacteria (BLPB) were recovered from over a third of these patients. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounted for over 60 % of S. aureus isolates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative Gram-negative rods are frequently recovered in nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and in cystic fibrosis. The CRS infection evolves the formation of a biofilm that might play a significant role in the pathogenesis and persistence of CRS. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens. Recognition of the unique microbiology of CRS and their antimicrobial susceptibility is of great importance when selecting antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27086363

  19. [Microbiological diagnosis of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Fille, M; Streif, W; Luef, G; Schmutzhard, E; Dierich, M P

    1994-01-01

    The increased incidence of tuberculosis as well as the availability of new diagnostic testing methods clearly have various implications for the routine microbiology laboratory: samples must be sent to the microbiology lab for testing immediately after being taken and microscopically investigated the same day. In other countries, difficult to treat, multi-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains have occurred. Thus decisive hygienic measures must be taken early on in cases of highly infectious patients (i.e. patients with microscopically positive sputum). Liquid media (MB Check Roche, Bactec) as well as Löwenstein Jensen media must be inoculated in the lab. Liquid media allow both faster detection of certain atypical mycobacteria and increased accuracy. Classification of culturally established agents through commercial genetic probes (AccuProbe Mycobacterien) or with high pressure liquid chromatography is possible within hours when acid-fast rods are present. Time consuming identification by determination of biochemical and culture morphological characteristics should be reserved for reference labs. Today, rapid tests like analysis of tuberculostearic acid or polymerase chain reaction are already useful for special questions like ruling out tuberculous meningitis. In most cases, however, these rapid tests cannot replace identification of microbes with culture techniques. PMID:7941601

  20. Infusing Interactive, Multimedia CD-ROM Technology into the First-Year College-Level Geology Curriculum: Recent Examples from Radford University, United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sethi, Parvinder S.; Newbill, Phyllis Leary

    In recent years, several CD-ROM-based instructional technology applications have been developed for use in both high school and college level classrooms. As multimedia authoring techniques evolve as important tools for teaching, it is imperative that teachers and multimedia authors understand the importance of focusing on specifically how the…

  1. Current trends in multimedia technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tescher, Andrew G.

    1999-01-01

    Multimedia, as an application, has at its very core the field of signal processing technology. Although, multimedia has leveraged on numerous disciplines, signal processing is the most relevant. Some of the basic concepts, such as spectral analyses, sampling theory and the theory of partial differential equations have become the fundamental building blocks for numerous applications and subsequently have been reinvested in such diverse areas as transform coding, display technology and neural networks. The latter, most recently, leads to a fast implementation of vector quantization. It is evident, that the diverse signal processing algorithms, concepts and applications are interconnected and in numerous instances appear in various reincarnated forms. For example, sub-band coding existed for many years before wavelets became fashionable. In this paper, an attempt will be made to provide a historical overview of signal processing through the present, followed by a highly personal speculation for the future.

  2. A preliminary study of current multimedia information technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    This paper surveys more than 70 articles published in the IEEE Multimedia journal and other journals. The survey summarizes aspects of multimedia information technology and categorizes application areas of multimedia information technology and interesting research areas related to it.

  3. Improving Multimedia Foundations: Design of a Micro-Syllabus for Integrating Multimedia Modules into College Courses at the University of Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    At the University of Delaware there has been growth in the use of multimedia technologies to facilitate the process of learning. However, many students entering higher educational institutions today, despite growing up with access to these tools, do not use them in interesting and meaningful ways. When given the opportunity to create multimedia…

  4. Oral Microbiology: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    He, Xue-song; Shi, Wen-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Since the initial observations of oral bacteria within dental plaque by van Leeuwenhoek using his primitive microscopes in 1680, an event that is generally recognized as the advent of oral microbiological investigation, oral microbiology has gone through phases of “reductionism” and “holism”. From the small beginnings of the Miller and Black period, in which microbiologists followed Koch's postulates, took the reductionist approach to try to study the complex oral microbial community by analyzing individual species; to the modern era when oral researchers embrace “holism” or “system thinking”, adopt new concepts such as interspecies interaction, microbial community, biofilms, poly-microbial diseases, oral microbiological knowledge has burgeoned and our ability to identify the resident organisms in dental plaque and decipher the interactions between key components has rapidly increased, such knowledge has greatly changed our view of the oral microbial flora, provided invaluable insight into the etiology of dental and periodontal diseases, opened the door to new approaches and techniques for developing new therapeutic and preventive tools for combating oral poly-microbial diseases. PMID:20687296

  5. Colloquium and Report on Systems Microbiology: Beyond Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Merry R. Buckley

    2004-12-13

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium June 4-6, 2004 to confer about the scientific promise of systems microbiology. Participants discussed the power of applying a systems approach to the study of biology and to microbiology in particular, specifics about current research efforts, technical bottlenecks, requirements for data acquisition and maintenance, educational needs, and communication issues surrounding the field. A number of recommendations were made for removing barriers to progress in systems microbiology and for improving opportunities in education and collaboration. Systems biology, as a concept, is not new, but the recent explosion of genomic sequences and related data has revived interest in the field. Systems microbiology, a subset of systems biology, represents a different approach to investigating biological systems. It attempts to examine the emergent properties of microorganisms that arise from the interplay of genes, proteins, other macromolecules, small molecules, organelles, and the environment. It is these interactions, often nonlinear, that lead to the emergent properties of biological systems that are generally not tractable by traditional approaches. As a complement to the long-standing trend toward reductionism, systems microbiology seeks to treat the organism or community as a whole, integrating fundamental biological knowledge with genomics, metabolomics, and other data to create an integrated picture of how a microbial cell or community operates. Systems microbiology promises not only to shed light on the activities of microbes, but will also provide biology the tools and approaches necessary for achieving a better understanding of life and ecosystems. Microorganisms are ideal candidates for systems biology research because they are relatively easy to manipulate and because they play critical roles in health, environment, agriculture, and energy production. Potential applications of systems microbiology research

  6. Microbiological safety of water.

    PubMed

    Dawson, D J; Sartory, D P

    2000-01-01

    Significant advances in water treatment over the last century have resulted in massive improvements in the microbiological safety of public drinking water supplies in the UK and the developed countries. Incidences of illness due to poor treatment or post-treatment contamination are rare, but when they occur tend to attract considerable media attention. A well managed water treatment works and supply system can provide high quality drinking water wherever in the world it is located. As a rule, throughout the world, private supplies tend to be of a poorer quality than public supplies, but poorly managed public supplies have the potential to make a large number of people ill and continued effort is needed to maintain and improve drinking water quality world-wide.

  7. New microbiological features.

    PubMed

    Lee, A

    1995-04-01

    Recent developments in the microbiology of Helicobacter pylori have aimed to improve our understanding of the organism in order to define better methods of diagnosis and cure, and to explore possible methods of prevention. Investigations of the basic biochemistry of the bacterium have revealed many interesting physiological anomalies including characteristics of a eukaryotic parasite rather than a bacterium. The latest in a growing list of adhesins to be identified shows specificity for the Lewis b antigen, possibly providing an explanation for the postulated link between blood group and peptic ulceration. However, there are many contradictory features in the H. pylori adhesin story in urgent need of resolution. The search for the ulcerogenic strain has revealed only one possible candidate to date, the cagA phenotype, which appears to be inflammatory. Recently, the cloning frenzy has resulted in the sequencing of a multitude of putative virulence factors, the challenge now is to prove their importance in relevant animal models. PMID:7600134

  8. Treatment bed microbiological control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, Gilbert E.; Fitzpatrick, Timothy W.; Kril, Michael B.; Wilber, Georgia A.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of microbial fouling on treatment bed (TB) performance are being studied. Fouling of activated carbon (AC) and ion exchange resins (IEX) by live and devitalized bacteria can cause decreased capacity for selected sorbates with AC and IEX TB. More data are needed on organic species removal in the trace region of solute sorption isotherms. TB colonization was prevented by nonclassical chemical disinfectant compositions (quaternary ammonium resins) applied in suitable configurations. Recently, the protection of carbon beds via direct disinfectant impregnation has shown promise. Effects (of impregnation) upon bed sorption/removal characteristics are to be studied with representative contaminants. The potential need to remove solutes added or produced during water disinfection and/or TB microbiological control must be investigated.

  9. Starting small: using microbiology to foster scientific literacy.

    PubMed

    Savage, Amy F; Jude, Brooke A

    2014-07-01

    In order to achieve scientific literacy for all students, Bard College recently implemented Citizen Science, a common January course for all first-year students. Structured around the question 'how do we reduce the global burden of disease?', this course uses microbiological tools to develop an understanding of potential answers.

  10. Copyright and Multimedia, Part Two: Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talab, Rosemary

    1995-01-01

    Discusses copyright issues related to the use of multimedia in higher education. Highlights include student impetus for change; constructivism; growth of the Internet; faculty copyright buybacks; lack of university multimedia policy; student and faculty productions; transmission and downloading; educational music licensing; a video clearinghouse;…

  11. Research on evaluation techniques for immersive multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Aslinda M.; Romli, Fakaruddin Fahmi; Zainal Osman, Zosipha

    2013-03-01

    Nowadays Immersive Multimedia covers most usage in tremendous ways, such as healthcare/surgery, military, architecture, art, entertainment, education, business, media, sport, rehabilitation/treatment and training areas. Moreover, the significant of Immersive Multimedia to directly meet the end-users, clients and customers needs for a diversity of feature and purpose is the assembly of multiple elements that drive effective Immersive Multimedia system design, so evaluation techniques is crucial for Immersive Multimedia environments. A brief general idea of virtual environment (VE) context and `realism' concept that formulate the Immersive Multimedia environments is then provided. This is followed by a concise summary of the elements of VE assessment technique that is applied in Immersive Multimedia system design, which outlines the classification space for Immersive Multimedia environments evaluation techniques and gives an overview of the types of results reported. A particular focus is placed on the implications of the Immersive Multimedia environments evaluation techniques in relation to the elements of VE assessment technique, which is the primary purpose of producing this research. The paper will then conclude with an extensive overview of the recommendations emanating from the research.

  12. Designing, Developing, and Marketing Multimedia Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Anna; Randall, Sonja

    1998-01-01

    States that more and more technical writers across the discipline are likely to become involved in designing and developing multimedia products in the future. Finds that this will require retooling current skills used in production of text-based information products. Presents an overview of the process of bringing a multimedia product to the point…

  13. Accessing Distributed Multimedia Documents for Instructional Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourdeau, J.; And Others

    Students, teachers, and authors need to access multimedia documents over heterogeneous networks. The efficient handling of time-dependent multimedia information such as audio and video in distributed systems requires considerable network and computing resources. The term Quality of Service (QoS) refers collectively to the specifications of these…

  14. The Role of Narrative in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Myrna Elyse

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive case study investigated the role of narrative in multimedia learning and teaching and observed how teachers applied their understanding of narrative, and new constructivist technologies, to design multimedia presentations for instruction. The study looked specifically at the cognitive strategies, visual narrative concepts, and…

  15. 14 CFR 1213.108 - Multimedia materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.108 Multimedia materials. (a) NASA's multimedia material, from all... will provide the media, the public, and as necessary, NASA Headquarters with: (1) Selected prints...

  16. Infotech Interactive: Increasing Student Participation Using Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Anthony Q.

    Multimedia techniques allow one to present information using text, video, animations, and sound. "Infotech Interactive" is a CD-ROM multimedia product developed to enhance an introductory computing concepts course. The software includes the following module topics: (1) "Mouse Basics"; (2) "Data into Information"; (3) "Applications Software"; (4)…

  17. A Multitude of Risks in Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loving, Bill

    Multimedia presentations offer educators and other communicators new avenues to reach audiences, but they combine a variety of legal hazards. Producers of multimedia can end up on the receiving end of lawsuits based on the many facets of copyright, privacy, and defamation law, as this guide illustrates. Copyright gives authors, composers,…

  18. Multimedia Category Preferences of Working Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baukal, Charles E., Jr.; Ausburn, Lynna J.

    2016-01-01

    Many have argued for the importance of continuing engineering education (CEE), but relatively few recommendations were found in the literature for how to use multimedia technologies to deliver it most effectively. The study reported here addressed this gap by investigating the multimedia category preferences of working engineers. Four categories…

  19. Field Trip: Multimedia and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, George

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development of the Academy of Communications and Multimedia Technology--a school-to-work program integrating English, social studies, and mathematics with multimedia, art, and television production--at Mainland High School in Daytona Beach, Florida. Discusses the program's goals, student recruitment, roles of business partners (such…

  20. Multimedia Representation of Experiments in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirstein, Juergen; Nordmeier, Volkhard

    2007-01-01

    In most physics courses using multimedia, real experiments are represented as digital video demonstrations. These time-based media have the disadvantage that students are often in the state of passive learners. Also, traditional multimedia learning environments only allow for the selection of different digitized media, but the learning process is…

  1. Developing protein documentaries and other multimedia presentations for molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Quinn, G; Wang, H P; Martinez, D; Bourne, P E

    1999-01-01

    Computer-based multimedia technology for distance learning and research has come of age--the price point is acceptable, domain experts using off-the-shelf software can prepare compelling materials, and the material can be efficiently delivered via the Internet to a large audience. While not presenting any new scientific results, this paper outlines experiences with a variety of commercial and free software tools and the associated protocols we have used to prepare protein documentaries and other multimedia presentations relevant to molecular biology. A protein documentary is defined here as a description of the relationship between structure and function in a single protein or in a related family of proteins. A description using text and images which is further enhanced by the use of sound and interactive graphics. Examples of documentaries prepared to describe cAMP dependent protein kinase, the founding structural member of the protein kinase family for which there is now over 40 structures can be found at http://franklin.burnham-inst.org/rcsb. A variety of other prototype multimedia presentations for molecular biology described in this paper can be found at http://fraklin.burnham-inst.org. PMID:10380212

  2. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  3. Interactive visual comparison of multimedia data through type-specific views

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; Bohn, Shawn J.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2013-02-05

    Analysts who work with collections of multimedia to perform information foraging understand how difficult it is to connect information across diverse sets of mixed media. The wealth of information from blogs, social media, and news sites often can provide actionable intelligence; however, many of the tools used on these sources of content are not capable of multimedia analysis because they only analyze a single media type. As such, analysts are taxed to keep a mental model of the relationships among each of the media types when generating the broader content picture. To address this need, we have developed Canopy, a novel visual analytic tool for analyzing multimedia. Canopy provides insight into the multimedia data relationships by exploiting the linkages found in text, images, and video co-occurring in the same document and across the collection. Canopy connects derived and explicit linkages and relationships through multiple connected visualizations to aid analysts in quickly summarizing, searching, and browsing collected information to explore relationships and align content. In this paper, we will discuss the features and capabilities of the Canopy system and walk through a scenario illustrating how this system might be used in an operational environment. Keywords: Multimedia (Image/Video/Music) Visualization.

  4. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  5. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  6. Introducing Multimedia Applications into the Curriculum Using IBMs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarbeau, Brian G.

    Following a definition of multimedia, a description of the advantages of multimedia software, and a list of necessary multimedia hardware, this paper describes in detail the phasing in of new technology into the curriculum at Lake-Sumter Community College (Florida). Implementation of a one-credit course entitled Introduction to Multimedia Computer…

  7. Spectrometric microbiological analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Meissner, Ken E.

    1996-04-01

    Currently, there are four general approaches to microbiological analysis, i.e., the detection, identification and quantification of micro-organisms: (1) Traditional culturing and staining procedures, metabolic fermentations and visual morphological characteristics; (2) Immunological approaches employing microbe-specific antibodies; (3) Biotechnical techniques employing DNA probes and related genetic engineering methods; and (4) Physical measurement techniques based on the biophysical properties of micro-organisms. This paper describes an instrumentation development in the fourth of the above categories, physical measurement, that uses a combination of fluorometric and light scatter spectra to detect and identify micro-organisms at the species level. A major advantage of this approach is the rapid turnaround possible in medical diagnostic or water testing applications. Fluorometric spectra serve to define the biochemical characteristics of the microbe, and light scatter spectra the size and shape morphology. Together, the two spectra define a 'fingerprint' for each species of microbe for detection, identification and quantification purposes. A prototype instrument has been developed and tested under NASA sponsorship based on fluorometric spectra alone. This instrument demonstrated identification and quantification capabilities at the species level. The paper reports on test results using this instrument, and the benefits of employing a combination of fluorometric and light scatter spectra.

  8. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  9. NASA scientific and technical information program multimedia initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Kaye, Karen

    1993-01-01

    This paper relates the experiences of the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program in introducing multimedia within the STI Program framework. A discussion of multimedia technology is included to provide context for the STI Program effort. The STI Program's Multimedia Initiative is discussed in detail. Parallels and differences between multimedia and traditional information systems project development are highlighted. Challenges faced by the program in initiating its multimedia project are summarized along with lessons learned. The paper concludes with a synopsis of the benefits the program hopes to provide its users through the introduction of multimedia illustrated by examples of successful multimedia projects.

  10. Cases for the Net Generation: An Empirical Examination of Students' Attitude toward Multimedia Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Michael; Vibert, Conor

    2016-01-01

    Case studies have been an important tool in business, legal, and medical education for generations of students. Traditional text-based cases tend to be self-contained and structured in such a way as to teach a particular concept. The multimedia cases introduced in this study feature unscripted web-hosted video interviews with business owners and…

  11. Blended Learning in the Visual Communications Classroom: Student Reflections on a Multimedia Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George-Palilonis, Jennifer; Filak, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Advances in digital technology and a rapidly evolving media landscape continue to dramatically change teaching and learning. Among these changes is the emergence of multimedia teaching and learning tools, online degree programs, and hybrid classes that blend traditional and digital content delivery. At the same time, visual communication programs…

  12. Multimedia Exploratory Data Analysis for Geospatial Data Mining: The Case for Augmented Seriation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Myke

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the role of exploratory data analysis (EDA) for spatial data mining and presents a case study addressing environmental risk assessments in New York State to illustrate the feasibility and usability of augmenting seriation for spatial data analysis. Describes augmentation with multimedia tools to understand relationships among spatial,…

  13. WEBCAP: Web Scheduler for Distance Learning Multimedia Documents with Web Workload Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habib, Sami; Safar, Maytham

    2008-01-01

    In many web applications, such as the distance learning, the frequency of refreshing multimedia web documents places a heavy burden on the WWW resources. Moreover, the updated web documents may encounter inordinate delays, which make it difficult to retrieve web documents in time. Here, we present an Internet tool called WEBCAP that can schedule…

  14. Using Evidence-Based Multimedia to Improve Vocabulary Performance of Adolescents With LD: A UDL Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Michael J.; Thomas, Cathy Newman; Meyer, J. Patrick; Alves, Kat D.; Lloyd, John Wills

    2014-01-01

    Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework that is commonly used for guiding the construction and delivery of instruction intended to support all students. In this study, we used a related model to guide creation of a multimedia-based instructional tool called content acquisition podcasts (CAPs). CAPs delivered vocabulary instruction…

  15. Multimedia Courseware for Teaching Arabic Vocabulary: Let's Learn from the Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuddin, Nurkhamimi; Sahrir, Muhammad Sabri

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to analyze and evaluate theories and design principles for the design and development of multimedia program for teaching and learning Arabic vocabulary among non-native speakers. In this paper, the researchers mentioned about the research tools, sampling technique and steps as well as population which are related to the design…

  16. Interactive Multimedia Instruction versus Traditional Training Programmes: Analysis of Their Effectiveness and Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanthy, T. Rajula; Thiagarajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the practicability of introduction of computer multimedia as an educational tool was compared with the traditional approach for training sugarcane growers in ratoon management practices in three villages of Tamil Nadu state, India using pre-test, post-test control group experimental design. A CD-ROM was developed as a multimedia…

  17. Building Environmental Literacy through Participation in GIS and Multimedia Assisted Field Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, C. P.; Affolter, James M.; Reeves, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    A Learning Support System (LSS) that emphasizes experiential research in natural environments using the cutting-edge technologies of GIS and multimedia has been developed for teaching environmental literacy to undergraduate students at the University of Georgia. Computers are used as cognitive tools to create a context in which students become…

  18. Integration of Multimedia Courseware into ESP Instruction for Technological Purposes in Higher Technical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shu-Chiao

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on integrating ESP (English for specific purposes) multimedia courseware for semiconductor technology into instruction of three different language programs in higher education by using it as a silent partner. It focuses primarily on techniques and tools to motivate retention of under-prepared students in an EFL setting. The…

  19. The Effect of De-Contextualized Multimedia Software on Taiwanese College Level Students' English Vocabulary Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yaw-liang

    2010-01-01

    Computer technology has been applied widely as an educational tool in second language learning for a long time. There have been many studies discussing the application of computer technology to different aspects in second language learning. However, the learning effect of both de-contextualized multimedia software and sound gloss on second…

  20. Microbiological Methodology in Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abyzov, S. S.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; Hoover, R. B.; Mitskevich, I. N.; Mulyukin, A. L.; Poglazova, M. N.; Rozanov, A. Y.

    2005-01-01

    Searching for life in astromaterials to be delivered from the future missions to extraterrestrial bodies is undoubtedly related to studies of the properties and signatures of living microbial cells and microfossils on Earth. As model terrestrial analogs of Martian polar subsurface layers are often regarded the Antarctic glacier and Earth permafrost habitats where alive microbial cells preserved viability for millennia years due to entering the anabiotic state. For the future findings of viable microorganisms in samples from extraterrestrial objects, it is important to use a combined methodology that includes classical microbiological methods, plating onto nutrient media, direct epifluorescence and electron microscopy examinations, detection of the elemental composition of cells, radiolabeling techniques, PCR and FISH methods. Of great importance is to ensure authenticity of microorganisms (if any in studied samples) and to standardize the protocols used to minimize a risk of external contamination. Although the convincing evidence of extraterrestrial microbial life will may come from the discovery of living cells in astromaterials, biomorphs and microfossils must also be regarded as a target in search of life evidence bearing in mind a scenario that alive microorganisms had not be preserved and underwent mineralization. Under the laboratory conditions, processes that accompanied fossilization of cyanobacteria were reconstructed, and artificially produced cyanobacterial stromatolites resembles by their morphological properties those found in natural Earth habitats. Regarding the vital importance of distinguishing between biogenic and abiogenic signatures and between living and fossil microorganisms in analyzed samples, it is worthwhile to use some previously developed approaches based on electron microscopy examinations and analysis of elemental composition of biomorphs in situ and comparison with the analogous data obtained for laboratory microbial cultures and

  1. Establishing molecular microbiology facilities in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salman S; Alp, Emine; Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Doganay, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology laboratories play an important role in epidemiology and infection control programs. Within microbiology laboratories, molecular microbiology techniques have revolutionized the identification and surveillance of infectious diseases. The combination of excellent sensitivity, specificity, low contamination levels and speed has made molecular techniques appealing methods for the diagnosis of many infectious diseases. In a well-equipped microbiology laboratory, the facility designated for molecular techniques remains indiscrete. However, in most developing countries, poor infrastructure and laboratory mismanagement have precipitated hazardous consequences. The establishment of a molecular microbiology facility within a microbiology laboratory remains fragmented. A high-quality laboratory should include both conventional microbiology methods and molecular microbiology techniques for exceptional performance. Furthermore, it should include appropriate laboratory administration, a well-designed facility, laboratory procedure standardization, a waste management system, a code of practice, equipment installation and laboratory personnel training. This manuscript lays out fundamental issues that need to be addressed when establishing a molecular microbiology facility in developing countries.

  2. Storage and distribution system for multimedia information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tokumichi

    1994-06-01

    Recent advances in technologies such as digital signal processing, LSI devices and storage media have led to an explosive growth in multimedia environment. Multimedia information services are expected to provide an information-oriented infrastructure which will integrate visual communication, broadcasting and computer services. International standardizations in video/audio coding accelerate permeation of these services into society. In this paper, from trends of R & D and international standardization in video coding techniques, an outline is given of a storage and distribution system for multimedia information, and a summary of the requirements of digital storage media.

  3. Application-oriented architecture for multimedia teleservices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanrijssen, Erwin; Widya, Ing; Michiels, Eddie

    This paper looks into communications capabilities that are required by distributed multimedia applications to achieve relation preserving information exchange. These capabilities are derived by analyzing the notion of 'information exchange' and are embodied in communications functionalities. To emphasize the importance of the users' view, a top-down approach is applied. The revised Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Application Layer Structure (OSI-ALS) is used to model the communications functionalities and to develop an architecture for composition of multimedia teleservices with these functionalities. This work may therefore be considered an exercise to evaluate the suitability of OSI-ALS for composition of multimedia teleservices.

  4. Building an Integrated Environment for Multimedia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Multimedia courseware on the solar system and earth science suitable for use in elementary, middle, and high schools was developed under this grant. The courseware runs on Silicon Graphics, Incorporated (SGI) workstations and personal computers (PCs). There is also a version of the courseware accessible via the World Wide Web. Accompanying multimedia database systems were also developed to enhance the multimedia courseware. The database systems accompanying the PC software are based on the relational model, while the database systems accompanying the SGI software are based on the object-oriented model.

  5. Tools for Language Programs. ICEM Technical Information Bulletin No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezard, M.; Bourguignon, C.

    This overview of available technologies and how they can be used in teaching languages is divided into three sections. The first, "Multimedia Inputs," examines digitized multimedia tools and their role in language courses, electronic books, encyclopedias and dictionaries, and games, and takes a closer look at "unimedia" products and audiovisual…

  6. FTDD973: A multimedia knowledge-based system and methodology for operator training and diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hekmatpour, Amir; Brown, Gary; Brault, Randy; Bowen, Greg

    1993-01-01

    FTDD973 (973 Fabricator Training, Documentation, and Diagnostics) is an interactive multimedia knowledge based system and methodology for computer-aided training and certification of operators, as well as tool and process diagnostics in IBM's CMOS SGP fabrication line (building 973). FTDD973 is an example of what can be achieved with modern multimedia workstations. Knowledge-based systems, hypertext, hypergraphics, high resolution images, audio, motion video, and animation are technologies that in synergy can be far more useful than each by itself. FTDD973's modular and object-oriented architecture is also an example of how improvements in software engineering are finally making it possible to combine many software modules into one application. FTDD973 is developed in ExperMedia/2; and OS/2 multimedia expert system shell for domain experts.

  7. [The modern microbiology in the clinical managing].

    PubMed

    Casal Román, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The tuberculosis is one of the most important and mortal diseases of the world. The microbiological confirmatory diagnosis and the microbiological therapeutic orientation are fundamental nowadays in the tuberculosis in AIDS and in the Resistant tuberculosis. They are described throughout the time by the classic Microbiology: From 1882 to final 20th century (130 years). With the modern current Microbiology: In the beginning of the 21st century (20-30 years). And as will be done with the future Microbiology: From the years 2020-30. The important advances are outlined in the modern and future clinical microbiology, for the control of the Tuberculosis.

  8. Multimedia instruction of cardiac auscultation.

    PubMed Central

    Criley, J. M.; Criley, D.; Zalace, C.

    1997-01-01

    The cardiac physical examination is in itself a multimedia experience. It is an amalgamation of visible, palpable, and audible sensations, preceded by the collection of an appropriate historical context in which to place these multiple sensations. It is unlikely that any electronic media could ever replace the real life experience of admitting, examining, diagnosing, and effectively treating a patient with mitral stenosis who has decompensated because of the onset of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response, or a patient with sudden, severe aortic regurgitation due to endocarditis. These potentially fatal conditions can be effectively treated only if the suspicion of their presence is seriously raised. Although there is no substitute for first-hand experience, attempts to provide an effective surrogate experience are worth pursuing. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:9108683

  9. An interpersonal multimedia visualization system

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Media View is a computer program that provides a generic infrastructure for authoring and interacting with multimedia documents. Among its many applications is the ability to furnish a user with a comprehensive environment for analysis and visualization. With MediaView the user produces a document'' that contains mathematics, datasets and associated visualizations. From the dataset or embedded mathematics animated sequences can be produced in situ. The mathematical content of the document'' can be explored through manipulation with Mathematica {trademark}. Since the document'' is all digital, it can be shared with a co-worker on a local network or mailed electronically to a colleague at a distant site. Animations and any other substructure of the document'' persist through the mailing process and can be awakened at the destination by the recipient. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  10. 3D Integration for Wireless Multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmich, Georg

    The convergence of mobile phone, internet, mapping, gaming and office automation tools with high quality video and still imaging capture capability is becoming a strong market trend for portable devices. High-density video encode and decode, 3D graphics for gaming, increased application-software complexity and ultra-high-bandwidth 4G modem technologies are driving the CPU performance and memory bandwidth requirements close to the PC segment. These portable multimedia devices are battery operated, which requires the deployment of new low-power-optimized silicon process technologies and ultra-low-power design techniques at system, architecture and device level. Mobile devices also need to comply with stringent silicon-area and package-volume constraints. As for all consumer devices, low production cost and fast time-to-volume production is key for success. This chapter shows how 3D architectures can bring a possible breakthrough to meet the conflicting power, performance and area constraints. Multiple 3D die-stacking partitioning strategies are described and analyzed on their potential to improve the overall system power, performance and cost for specific application scenarios. Requirements and maturity of the basic process-technology bricks including through-silicon via (TSV) and die-to-die attachment techniques are reviewed. Finally, we highlight new challenges which will arise with 3D stacking and an outlook on how they may be addressed: Higher power density will require thermal design considerations, new EDA tools will need to be developed to cope with the integration of heterogeneous technologies and to guarantee signal and power integrity across the die stack. The silicon/wafer test strategies have to be adapted to handle high-density IO arrays, ultra-thin wafers and provide built-in self-test of attached memories. New standards and business models have to be developed to allow cost-efficient assembly and testing of devices from different silicon and technology

  11. Microbiological studies on hamburgers

    PubMed Central

    Tamminga, S. K.; Beumer, R. R.; Kampelmacher, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-two raw, 112 pre-cooked and 750 cooked hamburgers composed mainly of beef or beef and pork were subjected to microbiological examination. Raw hamburgers gave total bacterial counts from 106 to 108 per g, counts of Enterobacteriaceae from 104 to 106 per g, of Escherichia coli from 103 to 105, of group D streptococci from 102 to 104, of Staphylococcus aureus from 3 to 102 and of Clostridium perfringens less than 10 bacteria per g. Of the samples, 32% contained salmonellas; the highest most probable number was 102 per g but most estimates were below 1 per g. Corresponding figures for the pre-cooked samples were 2-3 log cycles lower, and only one sample contained salmonella. Yersinia enterocolitica was not isolated from any raw or pre-cooked sample. Three hundred and ninety-five of the cooked hamburgers were prepared by grilling raw hamburgers for between 2 and 5·5 min. These gave total bacterial counts from 105 to 107 per g, and counts of Enterobacteriaceae from 102 to 105 per g. Of the samples, 9·4% contained salmonellas, always in numbers below 1 per g. The remaining 355 cooked hamburgers were prepared from samples pre-cooked for 10 min at 80 °C. Some were grilled and some fat fried. The total bacterial counts were from 103 to 105 per g, and counts of Enterobacteriaceae below 102 per g. Salmonellae, again in small numbers only, were recovered from 3·5% of samples. When hamburgers were artificially contaminated with Salmonella typhimurium it took 5·5 min on a commercial grill, 2·25 min frying in a frying pan and 1·75 min on a household grill to reliably reduce the salmonella count one hundredfold. This means that at many vending places hamburgers are often cooked for too short a time. D-values were determined for S. typhimurium in hamburger meat at 50, 55, 60, 65 and 70 °C, these values were 7·1, 5·1, 1·2, 0·9 and 0·6 min respectively. It can be concluded that the heating action in the centre of the hamburgers will take place more

  12. Digital Multimedia Instruction: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Ling

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the background and features of digital multimedia instruction, and discusses the benefits and limitations. Applications and future trends are described, and the major areas of applications--education, training, and entertainment--are identified. (Author/AEF)

  13. Storyboard Development for Interactive Multimedia Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Kay L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses procedures for storyboard development and provides guidelines for designing interactive multimedia courseware, including interactivity, learner control, feedback, visual elements, motion video, graphics/animation, text, audio, and programming. A topical bibliography that lists 98 items is included. (LRW)

  14. Index to Psychology (Multimedia). First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. National Information Center for Educational Media.

    Films, videotapes, transparencies, recordings and multimedia presentations for teaching psychology are listed in this 460-page catalog. Catalog entries are classified by subject and alphabetically by title. Subject classifications include animal, clinical, experimental, and physiological psychology, and research methodology. (MG)

  15. Multimedia category preferences of working engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baukal, Charles E.; Ausburn, Lynna J.

    2016-09-01

    Many have argued for the importance of continuing engineering education (CEE), but relatively few recommendations were found in the literature for how to use multimedia technologies to deliver it most effectively. The study reported here addressed this gap by investigating the multimedia category preferences of working engineers. Four categories of multimedia, with two types in each category, were studied: verbal (text and narration), static graphics (drawing and photograph), dynamic non-interactive graphics (animation and video), and dynamic interactive graphics (simulated virtual reality (VR) and photo-real VR). The results showed that working engineers strongly preferred text over narration and somewhat preferred drawing over photograph, animation over video, and simulated VR over photo-real VR. These results suggest that a variety of multimedia types should be used in the instructional design of CEE content.

  16. 14 CFR 1213.108 - Multimedia materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... developments and other events of historic or public interest. (4) Interactive multimedia features that can be incorporated into the Agency's Internet portal for use by internal and external audiences, including the...

  17. A broadband multimedia TeleLearning system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruiping; Karmouch, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we discuss a broadband multimedia TeleLearning system under development in the Multimedia Information Research Laboratory at the University of Ottawa. The system aims at providing a seamless environment for TeleLearning using the latest telecommunication and multimedia information processing technology. It basically consists of a media production center, a courseware author site, a courseware database, a courseware user site, and an on-line facilitator site. All these components are distributed over an ATM network and work together to offer a multimedia interactive courseware service. An MHEG-based model is exploited in designing the system architecture to achieve the real-time, interactive, and reusable information interchange through heterogeneous platforms. The system architecture, courseware processing strategies, courseware document models are presented.

  18. The American Revolution; A Bibliography of Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fultz, Norma J.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography lists several types of multimedia instructional materials useful in teaching the American Revolution for elementary and secondary students. The following types of media are included: audiotapes, films, filmstrips, kits, phonodiscs, pictures, realia, simulations, slides, and transparencies. (JR)

  19. [Post-mortem microbiology analysis].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Amparo; Alberola, Juan; Cohen, Marta Cecilia

    2013-12-01

    Post-mortem microbiology is useful in both clinical and forensic autopsies, and allows a suspected infection to be confirmed. Indeed, it is routinely applied to donor studies in the clinical setting, as well as in sudden and unexpected death in the forensic field. Implementation of specific sampling techniques in autopsy can minimize the possibility of contamination, making interpretation of the results easier. Specific interpretation criteria for post-mortem cultures, the use of molecular diagnosis, and its fusion with molecular biology and histopathology have led to post-mortem microbiology playing a major role in autopsy. Multidisciplinary work involving microbiologists, pathologists, and forensic physicians will help to improve the achievements of post-mortem microbiology, prevent infectious diseases, and contribute to a healthier population.

  20. [Post-mortem microbiology analysis].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Amparo; Alberola, Juan; Cohen, Marta Cecilia

    2013-12-01

    Post-mortem microbiology is useful in both clinical and forensic autopsies, and allows a suspected infection to be confirmed. Indeed, it is routinely applied to donor studies in the clinical setting, as well as in sudden and unexpected death in the forensic field. Implementation of specific sampling techniques in autopsy can minimize the possibility of contamination, making interpretation of the results easier. Specific interpretation criteria for post-mortem cultures, the use of molecular diagnosis, and its fusion with molecular biology and histopathology have led to post-mortem microbiology playing a major role in autopsy. Multidisciplinary work involving microbiologists, pathologists, and forensic physicians will help to improve the achievements of post-mortem microbiology, prevent infectious diseases, and contribute to a healthier population. PMID:23195835

  1. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    DOEpatents

    Coffland, Douglas R.

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  2. Microbiological risk assessment in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Sarah M; Jouve, Jean-Louis R

    2004-09-01

    Microbiological risk assessment (MRA) has been evolving at the national and international levels as a systematic and objective approach for evaluating information pertaining to microbiological hazards in foods and the risks they pose. This process has been catalyzed by international food trade requirements to base sanitary measures on sound scientific evidence and appropriate risk assessments. All countries, including developing countries, need to understand and use MRA. MRA is resource intensive, as has been demonstrated by some of the the assessments undertaken in industrialized countries. However, when used in the appropriate circumstances MRA offers many benefits. The process of undertaking MRA improves the understanding of key issues, enables an objective evaluation of risk management options, and provides a scientific justification for actions. Although the gap between developing countries and some industrialized countries is quite extensive with regard to MRA, many developing countries recognize the need to at least understand and move toward using MRA. This process requires development of infrastructure and enhancement of scientific and technical expertise while making optimal use of limited resources. International organizations, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, are in a position to provide countries with guidance, training, information resources, and technical assistance to develop and/or strengthen food safety infrastructure. Enhanced cooperation and collaboration at all levels are needed for such efforts to be successful and to ensure that MRA, as a food safety tool, is available to all countries. PMID:15453597

  3. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-08-26

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  4. [Microbiology laboratory management: an (almost) pending matter].

    PubMed

    Aznar, Javier; Nogueira, José Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Many professionals from distinct disciplines work in health centers and consequently these workplaces should be considered as service companies, involving human, material and financial resources aimed at providing a service required by society. Hospitals are one of the most complex types of company, in which diverse goods and services are produced and consumed. Like the hospital as a whole, the various units and departments in which the hospital is divided, including the microbiology department, are sufficiently different to be called distinct, but related, branches of the same company, given that none can perform their function without the others. Viewing a hospital service as a branch of a large company (the hospital as a whole) allows its production, the resources used in this production, and its clients to be identified more clearly. The healthcare model based on clinical management units aims to constitute a new organizational model for public health systems in which health strategies are performed that allow innovation and decentralization of the healthcare network. Clinical management provides the framework for attending to the population's healthcare needs through a person-centered approach and involves all the professionals in any of the settings in which healthcare is provided. Among the aims of this model is to guarantee continuity of care, facilitate comprehensive health promotion and deliver daily healthcare effectively. The main instruments of clinical management are structured knowledge of the population's health needs, the use of the best scientific knowledge available, and a comprehensive and participatory practical model, together with assessment tools. Three possible clinical management models are proposed for the work of specialists in microbiology and parasitology: a) a microbiology clinical management unit; b) a biological diagnosis clinical management unit, and c) a multidisciplinary clinical management unit with cross-competencies with

  5. Frontiers in Microbiology: Envisioning a Curriculum Unit for High School Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Bloom

    2004-06-18

    Microbiology is undergoing a quiet revolution. Techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, high throughput DNA sequencing, whole genome shotgun sequencing, DNA microarrays, and bioinformatics analyses are greatly aiding our understanding of the estimated one billion species of microbes that inhabit the Earth. Unfortunately, the rapid pace of research in microbiology stands in contrast to the much slower pace of change in educational reform. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) hosted a two-day planning meeting to discuss whether or not a new curriculum unit on microbiology is desirable for the high school audience. Attending the meeting were microbiologists, high school biology teachers, and science educators. The consensus of the participants was that an inquiry-based unit dealing with advances in microbiology should be developed for a high school biology audience. Participants established content priorities for the unit, discussed the unit's conceptual flow, brainstormed potential student activities, and discussed the role of educational technology for the unit. As a result of the planning meeting discussions, BSCS staff sought additional funding to develop, disseminate, and evaluate the Frontiers in Microbiology curriculum unit. This unit was intended to be developed as a replacement unit suitable for an introductory biology course. The unit would feature inquiry-based student activities and provide approximately four weeks of instruction. As appropriate, activities would make use of multimedia. The development and production processes would require about two years for completion. Unfortunately, BSCS staff was not able to attract sufficient funding to develop the proposed curriculum unit. Since there were some unexpended funds left over from the planning meeting, BSCS requested and received permission from DOE to use the balance of the funds to prepare background materials about advances in microbiology that would be useful to teachers. These materials

  6. A semantic medical multimedia retrieval approach using ontology information hiding.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kehua; Zhang, Shigeng

    2013-01-01

    Searching useful information from unstructured medical multimedia data has been a difficult problem in information retrieval. This paper reports an effective semantic medical multimedia retrieval approach which can reflect the users' query intent. Firstly, semantic annotations will be given to the multimedia documents in the medical multimedia database. Secondly, the ontology that represented semantic information will be hidden in the head of the multimedia documents. The main innovations of this approach are cross-type retrieval support and semantic information preservation. Experimental results indicate a good precision and efficiency of our approach for medical multimedia retrieval in comparison with some traditional approaches.

  7. Motivational Multimedia: Examining Students' Learning and Motivation as They Use a Multimedia Enriched Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Olmanson, Justin; Horton, Lucas; Toprac, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This study examines middle school students' learning and motivation as they engaged in a multimedia enriched problem-based learning (PBL) environment for middle school science. Using a mixed-method design with both quantitative and qualitative data, we investigated the effect of a multimedia environment on sixth graders' science learning, their…

  8. For Effective Use of Multimedia in Education, Teachers Must Develop Their Own Educational Multimedia Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiker, Mohd. Elmagzoub A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes the strong claim that for multimedia to have any significant effect on education, the educational multimedia applications must be designed by the teachers of those classes. The arguments supporting this claim are presented in the headlines: curriculum, software, hardware and evaluation. The paper begins with an introduction which…

  9. 75 FR 49528 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (“NMG”) Excluding the Multimedia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... ] published in the Federal Register on July 1, 2010 (75 FR 38141). At the request of the petitioners, the... Employment and Training Administration Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG..., applicable to workers of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG''),...

  10. Microsoft's Windows with Multimedia Extensions: Standards, Simplicity and Success in Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    Describes Microsoft's Windows with Multimedia Extensions Software for the IBM PC. Topics addressed include hardware and software requirements, enhancements to the standard Windows environment, computing standards utilized, how Multimedia Extensions interacts with applications and devices, extensibility and ease of use, and CD-ROM performance…

  11. 42 CFR 493.909 - Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Microbiology. 493.909 Section 493.909 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.909 Microbiology. The subspecialties under the specialty of microbiology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  12. 42 CFR 493.821 - Condition: Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Microbiology. 493.821 Section 493.821 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.821 Condition: Microbiology. The specialty of microbiology includes, for purposes...

  13. 42 CFR 493.821 - Condition: Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Microbiology. 493.821 Section 493.821 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.821 Condition: Microbiology. The specialty of microbiology includes, for purposes...

  14. 42 CFR 493.909 - Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Microbiology. 493.909 Section 493.909 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.909 Microbiology. The subspecialties under the specialty of microbiology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  15. 42 CFR 493.821 - Condition: Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Microbiology. 493.821 Section 493.821 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.821 Condition: Microbiology. The specialty of microbiology includes, for purposes...

  16. 42 CFR 493.821 - Condition: Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Microbiology. 493.821 Section 493.821 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.821 Condition: Microbiology. The specialty of microbiology includes, for purposes...

  17. 42 CFR 493.909 - Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Microbiology. 493.909 Section 493.909 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.909 Microbiology. The subspecialties under the specialty of microbiology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  18. 42 CFR 493.909 - Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Microbiology. 493.909 Section 493.909 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.909 Microbiology. The subspecialties under the specialty of microbiology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  19. 42 CFR 493.821 - Condition: Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Microbiology. 493.821 Section 493.821 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.821 Condition: Microbiology. The specialty of microbiology includes, for purposes...

  20. 42 CFR 493.909 - Microbiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Microbiology. 493.909 Section 493.909 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.909 Microbiology. The subspecialties under the specialty of microbiology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  1. 21 CFR 866.2540 - Microbiological incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microbiological incubator. 866.2540 Section 866.2540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2540...

  2. 21 CFR 866.2540 - Microbiological incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microbiological incubator. 866.2540 Section 866.2540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2540...

  3. 21 CFR 866.2540 - Microbiological incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microbiological incubator. 866.2540 Section 866.2540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2540...

  4. 21 CFR 866.2540 - Microbiological incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological incubator. 866.2540 Section 866.2540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2540...

  5. 21 CFR 866.2540 - Microbiological incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microbiological incubator. 866.2540 Section 866.2540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2540...

  6. Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 4th edition of Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry Edited by Eldor Paul continues in the vein of the 3rd edition by providing an excellent, broad-reaching introduction to soil biology. The new edition improves on the previous by providing extensive supplementary materials, links to outs...

  7. Veterinary Microbiology, 3rd Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary Microbiology, Third Edition is organized into four sections and begins with an updated and expanded introductory section on infectious disease pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. The second section covers bacterial and fungal pathogens, and the third section describes viral d...

  8. Interactive visual comparison of multimedia data through type-specific views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtner, Russ; Bohn, Shawn; Payne, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Analysts who work with collections of multimedia to perform information foraging understand how difficult it is to connect information across diverse sets of mixed media. The wealth of information from blogs, social media, and news sites often can provide actionable intelligence; however, many of the tools used on these sources of content are not capable of multimedia analysis because they only analyze a single media type. As such, analysts are taxed to keep a mental model of the relationships among each of the media types when generating the broader content picture. To address this need, we have developed Canopy, a novel visual analytic tool for analyzing multimedia. Canopy provides insight into the multimedia data relationships by exploiting the linkages found in text, images, and video co-occurring in the same document and across the collection. Canopy connects derived and explicit linkages and relationships through multiple connected visualizations to aid analysts in quickly summarizing, searching, and browsing collected information to explore relationships and align content. In this paper, we will discuss the features and capabilities of the Canopy system and walk through a scenario illustrating how this system might be used in an operational environment.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  10. The Role of the Clinical Laboratory in the Future of Health Care: Lean Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Linoj

    2014-01-01

    This commentary will introduce lean concepts into the clinical microbiology laboratory. The practice of lean in the clinical microbiology laboratory can remove waste, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. Lean, Six Sigma, and other such management initiatives are useful tools and can provide dividends but must be accompanied by organizational leadership commitment to sustaining the lean culture in the laboratory setting and providing resources and time to work through the process. PMID:24574289

  11. Microbiological Quantitative Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Silvia; Schaffner, Donald W.

    The meat and poultry industry faces ongoing challenges due to the natural association of pathogens of concern (e.g., Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7) with a variety of domesticated food animals. In addition, pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes pose a significant cross-contamination risk during further meat and poultry processing, distribution, and storage. Furthermore, the meat and poultry industries are constantly changing with the addition of new products, use of new raw materials, and targeting of new consumer populations, each of which may give rise to potential new risks. National and international regulations are increasingly using a “risk-based” approach to food safety (where the regulatory focus is driven by the magnitude of the risk), so risk assessment is becoming a valuable tool to systematically organize and evaluate the potential public health risk posed by food processing operations.

  12. "Ten Years in a Box": A Multi-Media Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Television International, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Discussed are the preparation and contents of a multimedia kit designed to supplement educational television programs dealing with the Depression. The article is condensed from a report. The 1930s Multi-Media Kit, by Anthony Barton. (LS)

  13. HyperRhetoric: Multimedia, Literacy, and the Future of Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heba, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Notes that literacy today involves more than the three R's. Uses a semiotic approach to present a rhetorical model of multimedia communication and its elements. Includes an analysis of the multimedia composition process and its rhetorical features. (RS)

  14. Multimedia and the Future of Distance Learning Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, John

    1992-01-01

    Describes recent innovations in distance learning technology, including the use of video technology; personal computers, including computer conferencing, computer-mediated communication, and workstations; multimedia, including hypermedia; Integrated Services Digital Networks (ISDN); and fiber optics. Research implications for multimedia and…

  15. Developing Multimedia Career Portfolios in Australia: Opportunities and Obstacles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnell-Young, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Multimedia career portfolios can be displayed on CD-ROMs, laptops, or the Internet. Developing them provides an opportunity to acquire and demonstrate technology skills. Multimedia presentations reduce information overload and appeal to different communication styles. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  16. DVD: The Next Evolutionary Step for Publishing Multimedia Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kousha, Kayvan

    1999-01-01

    Provides an overview of the recent trends towards publishing digital video disc (DVD) multimedia reference sources. Discusses the advantages of DVD-ROMs and the gigabyte storage potential of the technology for publishing multimedia reference sources. (AEF)

  17. SIMULATION MODELS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MULTIMEDIA ANALYSIS OF TOXIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multimedia understanding of pollutant behavior in the environment is of particular concern for chemicals that are toxic and are subject to accumulation in the environmental media (air, soil, water, vegetation) where biota and human exposure is significant. Multimedia simulation ...

  18. Global and site specific multimedia (field) studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cutshall, N.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with radioactive fallout, with organic contaminants and with heavy metals has amply demonstrated that cross-media transfers are common and that understanding the transport, cycling, and fate of these contaminants requires a multimedia approach. Nonetheless, pollutants with similar physical and chemical attributes may follow markedly different pathways. The frequency of exceptions to predictions based on simplistic models is also sufficient to show that direct investigation of environmental contamination is essential to confirm validity of models used for conceptualizing a problem or for control. Modeling based on multimedia premises and regulatory controls that encompass multimedia considerations are challenged by a dilemma, however. First, the development of multimedia models or regulatory frameworks represents simplification and generalization. This is true for several reasons: (1) inadequate understanding of physical and environmental factors which control specific cross-media transfer; (2) the absence of specific data on certain multimedia pollutant concentrations; (3) even the most powerful computers do not have sufficient speed and capacity to deal with the known complexities of natural systems. On the other hand, for contaminants such as mercury, it may be necessary to include great detail; the overall distribution in the environment may be less important than the rate of some minor process. With sufficient experience and good judgment of what can be ignored, the simplifications and generalizations can be made. For the present, and for the foreseeable future, however, they absolutely must be accompanied by thorough field validation and monitoring.

  19. Night Gallery: An Innovative Multimedia Strategy for Delivering a General Microbiology Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, John; Mixter, Phil

    2008-01-01

    In delivering a core science course to pre-health-related majors, the authors sought ways to engage students, make material relevant to life-long learning, and present it in a memorable way. Their goals were to present scientific content fused with history, ethics, public policy, and art in such a way that the students would be provided a unique…

  20. Effect of Instructor-Personalized Multimedia in the Online Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandernach, B. Jean

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that well-designed multimedia resources can enhance learning outcomes, yet there is little information on the role of multimedia in influencing essential motivational variables, such as student engagement. The current study examines the impact of instructor-personalized multimedia supplements on student engagement in…

  1. Approaches of Inquiry Learning With Multimedia Resources in Primary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Wing-Mui Winnie; Kong, Siu-Cheung

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to examine the design of approaches for inquiry learning with multimedia resources in primary classrooms. The study describes the development of a multimedia learning unit that helps learners understand the natural phenomenon of the movement of the Earth. An analysis of the use of the multimedia learning unit by a teacher in two…

  2. The 5 W's and the H of Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Janet

    1992-01-01

    Provides a primer on multimedia instructional technology, including examples of applications from the Maricopa Community Colleges. Identifies needed equipment and software components, the players in multimedia development and use; various uses of multimedia; and issues to consider. Looks at ways community colleges have overcome problems and…

  3. Problems in Multi-Media Use in the Reading Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Multi-media instruction needs to be adapted to assist students in achieving objectives of instruction. Multi-media approaches need to stress quality sequence, and also need to provide a meaningful context for student learning. The developers of multi-media class resources should provide for diverse styles of learning and need to develop materials…

  4. Edification of Multimedia Resources: Aligning Technology for Student Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thamarasseri, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Multimedia offers exciting possibilities for meeting the needs of 21st century learners. Multimedia learning can be defined in a number of ways. Multimedia learning is the delivery of instructional content using multiple modes that include visual and auditory information and students' use of this information to construct knowledge. Today's…

  5. 14 CFR § 1213.108 - Multimedia materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.108 Multimedia materials. (a) NASA's multimedia material, from all... will provide the media, the public, and as necessary, NASA Headquarters with: (1) Selected prints and original or duplicate files of news-oriented imagery and other digital multimedia material generated...

  6. Multimedia Security System for Security and Medical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Yicong

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces a new multimedia security system for the performance of object recognition and multimedia encryption in security and medical applications. The system embeds an enhancement and multimedia encryption process into the traditional recognition system in order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of object detection and…

  7. Optimization of Multimedia English Teaching in Context Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Weiyan; Fang, Fan

    2008-01-01

    Using multimedia to create a context to teach English has its unique advantages. This paper explores the characteristics of multimedia and integrates how to use multimedia to optimize the context of English teaching as its purpose. In this paper, eight principles, specifically Systematization, Authenticity, Appropriateness, Interactivity,…

  8. 36 CFR 1194.24 - Video and multimedia products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Video and multimedia products... Video and multimedia products. (a) All analog television displays 13 inches and larger, and computer... training and informational video and multimedia productions which support the agency's mission,...

  9. 36 CFR 1194.24 - Video and multimedia products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Video and multimedia products... Video and multimedia products. (a) All analog television displays 13 inches and larger, and computer... training and informational video and multimedia productions which support the agency's mission,...

  10. 36 CFR 1194.24 - Video and multimedia products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Video and multimedia products... Video and multimedia products. (a) All analog television displays 13 inches and larger, and computer... training and informational video and multimedia productions which support the agency's mission,...

  11. 36 CFR 1194.24 - Video and multimedia products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Video and multimedia products... Video and multimedia products. (a) All analog television displays 13 inches and larger, and computer... training and informational video and multimedia productions which support the agency's mission,...

  12. 36 CFR 1194.24 - Video and multimedia products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Video and multimedia products... Video and multimedia products. (a) All analog television displays 13 inches and larger, and computer... training and informational video and multimedia productions which support the agency's mission,...

  13. Quo Vadimus? The 21st Century and Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Allan D.

    This paper relates the concept of computer-driven multimedia to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP). Multimedia is defined here as computer integration and output of text, animation, audio, video, and graphics. Multimedia is the stage of computer-based information that allows…

  14. Designing an eMap to Teach Multimedia Applications Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffini, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers and students use multimedia software to create interactive presentations and content projects. Popular multimedia programs include: Microsoft's PowerPoint[R], Knowledge Adventure's HyperStudio[R], and Macromedia's Director MX 2004[R]. Creating multimedia projects engage students in active learning and thinking as they complete projects…

  15. Efficacy of Multimedia Package in Communicative Skill in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singaravelu, G.

    2014-01-01

    The study enlightens the effectiveness of Multimedia Package in learning communicative skill in English. Objectives of the study: To prepare a Multimedia Package for developing communicative skill in English. To find out the impact of Multimedia Package in improving communicative skill in English. Quasi Experimental method was adopted in the…

  16. Efficient content production for a university multimedia learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtze, Ali; Grau, Ronald; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2005-03-01

    The use of multimedia learning environments in educational institutions is often associated with the need of uncomplicated content production and moreover, the problem to animate users to maintain the system and its content. A recently developed prototype, 'Instant Seminar,' which is being used at the University of Applied Sciences Brandenburg in Germany, can be seen as an approach for creating an easy-to-use, low-price learning management system (LMS) for multimedia learning environments. The system could be suitable as a solution for those universities wishing to extend their teachings with an electronic learning environment, but which are presently not prepared for a commercial LMS implementation, mostly due to financial or organizational reasons. 'Instant Seminar' follows the didactic concept of 'Hybrid Learning Arrangements' and we considered corresponding features for communication and personal tutoring as part of the design. Important part of the prototype is a production tool called 'Lecture Wizard,' which is basically a Web-based application running on Apache and MySQL servers. It employs Windows Media Services to allow production, modification and broadcasting of AV streams corresponding with the other content of created lectures. Produced streams may have different bandwidths and the distribution of lectures is possible within local and wide area networks. Recently, 'Instant Seminar' has been further developed to serve mobile devices.

  17. Musculoskeletal ultrasound education: orthopaedic resident ability following a multimedia tutorial.

    PubMed

    Piposar, Jonathan R; Easley, Mark; Nunley, James A; DeOrio, James K; Talusan, Paul G; Gubler, Kyle E; Reach, John S

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK-US) is a quick and effective imaging tool that can be utilized by orthopaedic surgeons to identify common musculoskeletal pathology such as ankle tendinopathy. This study evaluated the ability of 15 orthopaedic surgery residents to identify and measure ankle tendons after attending a multimedia tutorial on MSK-US. Afterwards, proficiency of usage was assessed by identification and quantification of three ankle tendons (Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus) in a cadaver limb. Resident comfort level and plan for future use were also assessed. After completing the tutorial, accuracy measuring the Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus tendons was 94.8%, 90.2%, and 90.1%, respectively. Resident comfort level improved from a level of 2.3 before the tutorial to 6.8 afterwards. Seventy-one percent of residents plan to use ultrasound in clinical practice. These results show that orthopaedic surgery residents can identify and assess tendon size via MSK-US with sufficient accuracy after a multimedia tutorial. PMID:25830266

  18. Instructional multimedia computing in the health sciences.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P

    1992-01-01

    This article focuses on the development and utilization of interactive videodisc (IVD) and multimedia instruction in the health sciences. The characteristics of IVD and multimedia are outlined and the four levels of IVD systems that can be used in health science education are described. The advantages of utilization of videodisc or multimedia materials are presented, as well as instructional approaches. Potential applications such as simulations, tutorials, role-modeling, and drill-and-practice are described. Research findings, levels of curricular integration, instructional delivery, and courseware networking are also described. The article concludes with suggestions for institutional development of IVD materials or the incorporation of off-the-shelf programs into health science curricula. PMID:1400275

  19. Microbiological Spoilage of Cereal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Frederick K.; Johnson, Billie L.

    A wide range of cereal products, including bakery items, refrigerated dough, fresh pasta products, dried cereal products, snack foods, and bakery mixes, are manufactured for food consumption. These products are subject to physical, chemical, and microbiological spoilage that affects the taste, aroma, leavening, appearance, and overall quality of the end consumer product. Microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature and have the potential for causing food spoilage and foodborne disease. However, compared to other categories of food products, bakery products rarely cause food poisoning. The heat that is applied during baking or frying usually eliminates pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, and low moisture contributes to product stability. Nevertheless, microbiological spoilage of these products occurs, resulting in substantial economic losses.

  20. Microbiology and Human Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    As humans continue to travel further into space, microorganisms will accompany them. Thus, understanding how microorganisms can impact the crew, the spacecraft, and spacecraft systems is critical to enable future spaceflight exploration. To mitigate microbial risks during spaceflight, NASA relies heavily on preventative measures, including appropriate vehicle design, crew quarantine prior to flight, and extensive microbial monitoring. While these precautions minimize the proliferation of infectious agents, their presence cannot be completely eliminated. Microbiological contamination of vehicle systems can also be a key issue for long duration missions, as system deterioration and fouling have been previously observed in spacecraft. Current studies of the microbiomes of the crew and the International Space Station environment are providing a wealth of information and hold the potential to help refine microbiological requirements for NASA mission beyond low Earth orbit, as spaceflight environments and mission architectures rapidly evolve.

  1. Microbiological treatment of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.

    1992-12-31

    The ability of microorganisms which are ubiquitous throughout nature to bring about information of organic and inorganic compounds in radioactive wastes has been recognized. Unlike organic contaminants, metals cannot be destroyed, but must be either removed or converted to a stable form. Radionuclides and toxic metals in wastes may be present initially in soluble form or, after disposal may be converted to a soluble form by chemical or microbiological processes. The key microbiological reactions include (i) oxidation/reduction; (ii) change in pH and Eh which affects the valence state and solubility of the metal; (iii) production of sequestering agents; and (iv) bioaccumulation. All of these processes can mobilize or stabilize metals in the environment.

  2. Microbiological Testing of Skylab Foods

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rowley, D. B.; Powers, E. M.; Bourland, C. T.; McQueen, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab manned space flight program presented unique food microbiology problems. This challenge was successfully met by careful evaluation of the total Skylab food system by considering the nature of Skylab foods, their processing and handling, and Skylab food safety requirements. Some of the unique problems encountered with the Skylab foods involved: extended storage times, variations in storage temperatures, no opportunity to resupply or charge foods after launch of the Skylab Workshop, first use of frozen foods in space, first use of a food-warming device in weightlessness, relatively small size of production lots requiring statistically valid sampling plans, and use of the food as an accurately controlled segment of sophisticated life science experiments. Consideration of all of these situations generated the need for definitive microbiological tests and test limits. These tests are described in this paper along with the rationale for their selection. Test results are reported which show successful compliance with the test limits. Images PMID:4346978

  3. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  4. Microbiological testing of Skylab foods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Mcqueen, J. L.; Rowley, D. B.; Powers , E. M.; Bourland, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the unique food microbiology problems and problem-generating circumstances the Skylab manned space flight program involves. The situations these problems arise from include: extended storage times, variations in storage temperatures, no opportunity to resupply or change foods after launch of the Skylab Workshop, first use of frozen foods in space, first use of a food-warming device in weightlessness, relatively small size of production lots requiring statistically valid sampling plans, and use of food as an accurately controlled part in a set of sophisticated life science experiments. Consideration of all of these situations produced the need for definite microbiological tests and test limits. These tests are described along with the rationale for their selection. Reported test results show good compliance with the test limits.

  5. Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), which may be released to the environment due to human-related activities, can move across environmental phase boundaries and be found in most media. Given the rapid development and growing applications of nanotechnology, there is concern and thus the need to assess the potential environmental impact associated with ENMs. Accordingly, a modeling platform was developed to enable evaluation of the dynamic multimedia environmental distribution of ENMs (MendNano) and the range of potential exposure concentrations of ENMs. The MendNano was based on a dynamic multimedia compartmental modeling approach that was guided by detailed analysis of the agglomeration of ENMs, life-cycle analysis based estimates of their potential release to the environment, and incorporation of mechanistic sub-models of various intermedia transport processes. Model simulations for various environmental scenarios indicated that ENM accumulation in the sediment increased significantly with increased ENMs attachment to suspended solids in water. Atmospheric dry and wet depositions can be important pathways for ENMs input to the terrestrial environment in the absence of direct and distributed ENM release to soil. Increased ENM concentration in water due to atmospheric deposition (wet and dry) is expected as direct ENM release to water diminishes. However, for soluble ENMs dissolution can be the dominant pathway for suspended ENM removal from water even compared to advective transport. For example, simulations for Los Angeles showed that dry deposition, rain scavenging, and wind dilution can remove 90% of ENMs from the atmospheric airshed in ~100-230 days, ~2-6 hrs, and ~0.5-2 days, respectively. For the evaluated ENMs (metal, metal oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNT), nanoclays), mass accumulation in the multimedia environment was mostly in the soil and sediment. Additionally, simulation results for TiO2 in Los Angeles demonstrates that the ENM concentrations in air and

  6. Microbiological quality of natural waters.

    PubMed

    Borrego, J J; Figueras, M J

    1997-12-01

    Several aspects of the microbiological quality of natural waters, especially recreational waters, have been reviewed. The importance of the water as a vehicle and/or a reservoir of human pathogenic microorganisms is also discussed. In addition, the concepts, types and techniques of microbial indicator and index microorganisms are established. The most important differences between faecal streptococci and enterococci have been discussed, defining the concept and species included. In addition, we have revised the main alternative indicators used to measure the water quality.

  7. [Modified lateral condensation (microbiological analysis)].

    PubMed

    Jácome Musule, J L; Vázquez del Mercado, M A; Hernández, J L; Granillo, N E

    1989-05-01

    In order to ascertain the presence of endodontobacterial flora, an in vivo microbiological study on fifty human teeth with necrotic pulp and periapical bone destruction, is submitted. The study verifies elimination of bacteria through a technique for the preparation of root canals. Results of this research ratify the presence of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms, as well as the means to inhibit them. That will allow performing obturation under optimal conditions, thus increasing assurance of success in the endodontic therapy.

  8. Secure Multimedia Authoring with Dishonest Collaborators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Nicholas Paul; Safavi-Naini, Reihaneh; Ogunbona, Philip

    2004-12-01

    Many systems have been proposed for protecting the intellectual property of multimedia authors and owners from the public at large, who have access to the multimedia only after it is published. In this paper, we consider the problem of protecting authors' intellectual property rights from insiders, such as collaborating authors and producers, who interact with the creative process before publication. We describe the weaknesses of standard proof-of-ownership watermarking approaches against dishonest insiders and propose several possible architectures for systems that avoid these weaknesses. We further show how these architectures can be adapted for fingerprinting in the presence of dishonest insiders.

  9. Multimedia Database at National Museum of Ethnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Shigeharu

    This paper describes the information management system at National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka, Japan. This museum is a kind of research center for cultural anthropology, and has many computer systems such as IBM 3090, VAX11/780, Fujitu M340R, etc. With these computers, distributed multimedia databases are constructed in which not only bibliographic data but also artifact image, slide image, book page image, etc. are stored. The number of data is now about 1.3 million items. These data can be retrieved and displayed on the multimedia workstation which has several displays.

  10. Multimedia in Education. Proceedings of an Invitational Conference on Multimedia in Education (Cupertino, California, June 19-20, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambron, Sueann, Ed.; Hooper, Kristina, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This collection of articles exploring multimedia in education was compiled from presentations at an invitational conference on Multimedia in Education. Following an introduction by Sueann Ambron ("New Visions of Reality: Multimedia and Education"), articles are grouped under six headings: (1) Computer Science and Engineering: "The Augmentation…

  11. Learning Stress Distribution in Soils Using a Digital Multimedia Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva Ferreira, Ronaldo

    The available technologies of microcomputers and international communication - Internet, are powerful sources for the Teaching and Learning Process. Undergraduate courses can take advantage of these resources to help students and teachers in the classroom. Thinking on this the Project REESC - Reengineering of Engineering Education in Santa…

  12. Exchangeable Multimedia Framework for Digital Library in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Hao; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Lin, Ming-Chin; Li, Yu-Chuan

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a multimedia framework to manage a medical information database. The system is operated through the Internet and the information is presented in a form of digital museum or library1. The multimedia framework has the capability of exchanging, storing/retrieving, presenting and managing large amount of medical multimedia. To achieve the challenges described above, the framework was designed to be composed of three parts: the presentation module, the module of metadata description, an d the multimedia database. Accompany With the exchangeable open architecture developed, medical multimedia data can be operated in many different ways.

  13. An overview of a multimedia benchmarking analysis for three risk assessment models: RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS.

    PubMed

    Laniak, G F; Droppo, J G; Faillace, E R; Gnanapragasam, E K; Mills, W B; Strenge, D L; Whelan, G; Yu, C

    1997-04-01

    Multimedia modelers from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated to conduct a detailed and quantitative benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models. The three models--RESRAD (DOE), MMSOILS (EPA), and MEPAS (DOE)--represent analytically-based tools that are used by the respective agencies for performing human exposure and health risk assessments. The study is performed by individuals who participate directly in the ongoing design, development, and application of the models. Model form and function are compared by applying the models to a series of hypothetical problems, first isolating individual modules (e.g., atmospheric, surface water, groundwater) and then simulating multimedia-based risk resulting from contaminant release from a single source to multiple environmental media. Study results show that the models differ with respect to environmental processes included (i.e., model features) and the mathematical formulation and assumptions related to the implementation of solutions. Depending on the application, numerical estimates resulting from the models may vary over several orders-of-magnitude. On the other hand, two or more differences may offset each other such that model predictions are virtually equal. The conclusion from these results is that multimedia models are complex due to the integration of the many components of a risk assessment and this complexity must be fully appreciated during each step of the modeling process (i.e., model selection, problem conceptualization, model application, and interpretation of results). PMID:9202489

  14. An overview of a multimedia benchmarking analysis for three risk assessment models: RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS.

    PubMed

    Laniak, G F; Droppo, J G; Faillace, E R; Gnanapragasam, E K; Mills, W B; Strenge, D L; Whelan, G; Yu, C

    1997-04-01

    Multimedia modelers from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated to conduct a detailed and quantitative benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models. The three models--RESRAD (DOE), MMSOILS (EPA), and MEPAS (DOE)--represent analytically-based tools that are used by the respective agencies for performing human exposure and health risk assessments. The study is performed by individuals who participate directly in the ongoing design, development, and application of the models. Model form and function are compared by applying the models to a series of hypothetical problems, first isolating individual modules (e.g., atmospheric, surface water, groundwater) and then simulating multimedia-based risk resulting from contaminant release from a single source to multiple environmental media. Study results show that the models differ with respect to environmental processes included (i.e., model features) and the mathematical formulation and assumptions related to the implementation of solutions. Depending on the application, numerical estimates resulting from the models may vary over several orders-of-magnitude. On the other hand, two or more differences may offset each other such that model predictions are virtually equal. The conclusion from these results is that multimedia models are complex due to the integration of the many components of a risk assessment and this complexity must be fully appreciated during each step of the modeling process (i.e., model selection, problem conceptualization, model application, and interpretation of results).

  15. Dutch dairy farmers' need for microbiological mastitis diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Griffioen, Karien; Hop, Geralda E; Holstege, Manon M C; Velthuis, Annet G J; Lam, Theo J G M

    2016-07-01

    Although several microbiological mastitis diagnostic tools are currently available, dairy farmers rarely use them to base treatment decisions on. In this study, we conducted a telephone interview among 195 randomly selected Dutch dairy farmers to determine their current use of and their need for microbiological diagnostics for clinical mastitis (CM), subclinical mastitis (SCM), and dry-cow treatment (DCT), followed by the test characteristics they consider important. A structured questionnaire was used, based on face-to-face interviews previously held with other farmers. The answers were registered in a database and analyzed using descriptive statistics and univariable and multivariable models. Antimicrobial treatment decisions for CM, SCM, and DCT were mainly based on clinical signs and somatic cell count. In case of CM, 34% of farmers indicated that they currently submit milk samples for bacteriological culture (BC). This would increase to 71% if an on-farm test resulting in treatment advice within 12 h were available. For SCM, use would increase from 22 to 55%, and for DCT, from 7 to 34%, if the same 12-h test were available. For CM and DCT, the preferred test outcome was advice on which antibiotic to use, according to 58 and 15% of the farmers, respectively. For SCM, the preferred test outcome was the causative bacterium for 38% of the farmers. Farmers who currently submit CM milk samples for BC were 13.1 times more likely to indicate, as the preferred test outcome, advice on which antibiotic to use, compared with farmers who do not currently submit CM milk samples for BC. Fourteen percent of the farmers indicated not being interested at all in microbiological mastitis diagnostics for CM. For SCM and DCT, 27 and 55%, respectively, were not interested in microbiological mastitis diagnostics. Regarding test characteristics that farmers considered important, reliability was most often indicated (44-51% of the farmers). Additionally, a preferred time-to-result of

  16. Multimedia Book Reviews: An Instructional Resource Developed for and Disseminated by the National Reading Research Center. Instructional Resource No. 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, David; Bonham, Steve

    This guide highlights the basic operation of software that provides a framework and tools for students to encounter computer-based multimedia reviews of the books the have read independently given minimal equipment and expertise, and suggests ways to go beyond the basic operation for those who have the capability to do so. After a background and…

  17. Standards for Excellence in Education. [Multimedia Kit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Basic Education, Washington, DC.

    This multimedia kit contains information on academic standards and includes supplementary materials. The kit includes a 286-page book that presents condensed, edited, and commonly formatted versions of national standards in the arts, civics, foreign languages, geography, history, and science. Mathematics and English-language arts standards have…

  18. How To Develop Streaming Multimedia Lecture Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Thomas

    This paper show instructors how to develop their own streaming multimedia presentations that can be loaded onto a schools' server and played by students over the Internet. Topics covered include: the use of courseware to create an online course or to complement face-to-face instruction; features of Oncourse, Indiana Universitys proprietary version…

  19. Teaching Writing Strategies through Multimedia Authorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlin-Menter, Shannon M.; Shuell, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the possibility that multimedia authorship may help students become more proficient writers. Four classes of 8th-grade students in an urban setting participated in the study, which took place over seven successive class periods. Students were given a 7-paragraph article on teen smoking to use in developing a nonlinear…

  20. (Teaching) Essayist Literacy in the Multimedia World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khadka, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an argument for the "re-turn" of essayist literacy in multimedia and multiliteracy contexts. For its democratic, pedagogical, and intellectual potential, essayist literacy is too important to be removed from composition curriculum, but it needs to be re-imagined within a diversity of essay traditions, including the…

  1. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  2. Singingfish: Advancing the Art of Multimedia Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Singingfish provides multimedia search services that enable Internet users to locate audio and video online. Over the last few years, the company has cataloged and indexed over 30 million streams and downloadable MP3s, with 150,000 to 250,000 more being added weekly. This article discusses a deal with Microsoft; the technology; improving the…

  3. Teaching Technology: Multimedia Presentations in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troxclair, Debra; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a university-sponsored multimedia application course for gifted high school students. The course focused on the use of computer technology to enhance thinking and affective skills; develop and enhance process skills; and design products using word processing software, presentation software, and graphics converters. (CR)

  4. Multi-Media Reviews Index Supplement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, C. Edward

    1973-01-01

    The Multi-Media Reviews Index is compiled on a cooperative indexing basis by professional AV personnel and librarians from coast to coast. The present installment continues the updating service begun in the October 1971 issue of Audiovisual Instruction, and supplements coverage contained in MMRI-1972. (Author)

  5. Optimal Structures for Multimedia Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goguen, Joseph; And Others

    This 2-year study, which took a multidisciplinary approach to the problem of discovering principles for designing effective multimedia instruction, focused on the effects on instructional effectiveness of the discourse structure of instructional materials and the coordination of multiple instructional media. The task domain was a logic box said to…

  6. Multimedia Technologies for Training: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann E.; Orwig, Gary W.

    This guide introduces trainers, managers, and educators to a variety of new multimedia technologies now being used for presentation and training in business, military, and academic settings. The text describes advances in and implementation of technologies that range from wireless local area networks (LANs) and high definition television (HDTV) to…

  7. Multimedia Centers: Concepts for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crannell, Philip A.

    Because of public demand for access to new media, librarians must be able to provide specialized systems and facilities. To support librarians in the planning and rethinking of new multimedia libraries, the firm of Gee & Jenson, which specializes in library design, created this guide. It provides an illustration of the possibilities and important…

  8. Interactive Multimedia and Learning: Realizing the Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairncross, Sandra; Mannion, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Considers the potential of interactive multimedia and argues that in order to design effective interactive learning environments, a user-centered approach must be taken that is based on human-computer interaction and educational theory. Discusses the learning process, navigation strategies, individual preferences, and integration into the…

  9. Lifeprints ESL for Adults: Literacy. [Multimedia Kit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham Florez, MaryAnn

    Lifeprints is a four-level program that helps adult English- as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students gain the English language skills they need to participate effectively at work and in their communities. This multimedia kit contains the first level in the series. Level one is divided into six units: "Welcome to English Class"; "Personal Information";…

  10. Revising the Redundancy Principle in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.; Johnson, Cheryl I.

    2008-01-01

    College students viewed a short multimedia PowerPoint presentation consisting of 16 narrated slides explaining lightning formation (Experiment 1) or 8 narrated slides explaining how a car's braking system works (Experiment 2). Each slide appeared for approximately 8-10 s and contained a diagram along with 1-2 sentences of narration spoken in a…

  11. Technology Review for Mobile Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styliaras, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the technological advancement in mobile devices has made possible the development of hypermedia applications that exploit their features. A potential application domain for mobile devices is multimedia educational applications and modules. Such modules may be shared, commented and further reused under other circumstances through the…

  12. Applying Cognitive Theories to Multimedia Instructional Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Michael E.

    Noting that cognitive science has developed a number of theories relevant to learning and the development of thinking skills, this paper contains an attempt to broaden the limited application of cognitive science by developing four distinct categories of applicable cognitive theories for multimedia instructional design. The paper summarizes the…

  13. The Interactivity Effect in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chris; Gibbons, Nicola J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of interactivity to a computer-based learning package enhances the learning process. A sample of 33 (22 male and 11 female) undergraduates on a Business and Management degree used a multimedia system to learn about the operation of a bicycle pump. The system consisted of a labelled…

  14. Is There Computer Graphics after Multimedia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Kellogg S.

    Computer graphics has been driven by the desire to generate real-time imagery subject to constraints imposed by the human visual system. The future of computer graphics, when off-the-shelf systems have full multimedia capability and when standard computing engines render imagery faster than real-time, remains to be seen. A dedicated pipeline for…

  15. Multimedia Web Searching Trends: 1997-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmutlu, Seda; Spink, Amanda; Ozmutlu, Huseyin C.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an analysis of 1,025,010 Excite queries from 2001 are compared to similar Excite datasets from 1997 to 1999. Overall, results indicate that multimedia Web searching is undergoing major changes as Web content and searching evolves. (AEF)

  16. Mercer University's Graduate Certificate in Interactive Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, David C.

    Although most programs in technical communication reside in English departments where the focus is on writing, rhetoric, and exposition, the graduate certificate program in interactive multimedia at Mercer University is being developed for the Technical Communication Department within the School of Engineering. As a result, many of the…

  17. Multimedia Tutors for Science and Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Beverly Park; Poli, Corrado; Grosse, Ian; Day, Roberta

    We have built several multimedia tutors for science and engineering education. This paper discusses Design for Manufacturing tutors and an electronic homework systems used by over 2000 students daily. The engineering tutors instruct students on efficient procedures for designing parts for manufacture. The goal is to support a deeper understanding…

  18. Developing and Maintaining a Multimedia Language Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Scott; Humphries, Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Recent trends in education have pushed for multimedia to be made a part of every effective language program. As a result, language programs around the world are incorporating computer labs into their curricula. However, as many instructors and administrators are unfamiliar with this newer technology, integrating computer assisted language learning…

  19. MPEG-7 multimedia-based query format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2006-08-01

    Searching multimedia content for image, audio, and video is getting more attention especially for personal media content due to the affordability of consumer electronic devices such as MP3 recordable players, digital cameras, DV camcorders, and well-integrated smart phones. The precise search and retrieval of the content derived from these devices can be a very challenging task. Many leading edge search engine vendors have been applying sophisticated and advanced indexing and retrieval techniques on various text-based document formats, but when it comes to retrieving multimedia content, searching based on the media clip filename is the most common practice. As a result, there is an imprecise and ineffective user experience for searching multimedia content. This paper presents a new development underway from a joint effort between International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnial Commission (IEC) Subcommittee (SC) 29 Working Group (WG) 11 MPEG (Moving Picture Experts Group) and WG1 JPEG (Joint Picture Experts Group) for a universal standard query format called MPEG-7 Query Format (MP7QF) as a means to enable a good user experience for consumers searching multimedia content. It also provides the industry with a unified way to accept and respond to user queries. This paper presents the core requirements for such a universal query format.

  20. Enriching Language Learning through a Multimedia Corpus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerley, Katherine; Coccetta, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, use has been made almost exclusively of text-based concordancers in the analysis of spoken corpora. This article discusses research being carried out on Padua University's Multimedia English Corpus (Padova MEC) using the multimodal concordancer "MCA "("Multimodal Corpus Authoring System," Baldry, 2005). This highly innovative…

  1. You Be the Chemist [Multimedia Kit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Chemical Distributors, Arlington, VA. Educational Foundation.

    This multimedia kit includes a teacher's manual, video, and activity packet. The unique interactive course uses safe, controlled dynamic experiments to teach kids about chemistry, the proper handling of chemicals, and responsible product stewardship. Students are asked to hypothesize about chemical substances, collect and analyze data, and share…

  2. The Multi-Media Teaching Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Craig; Klein, Richard

    1977-01-01

    An innovation in management education is described that utilizes the multi-media teaching case (MMTC). A MMTC presents concrete situations requiring administrative analysis and action in ways that necessitate students using two or more of their sense organs so the reality of the situation is more authentically experienced. (LBH)

  3. Multimedia-Based Chip Design Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catalkaya, Tamer; Golze, Ulrich

    This paper focuses on multimedia computer-based training programs on chip design. Their development must be fast and economical, in order to be affordable by technical university institutions. The self-produced teaching program Illusion, which demonstrates a monitor controller as an example of a small but complete chip design, was implemented to…

  4. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 9, Universal Gravitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the ninth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials relating to universal gravitation are presented in this study guide. The subject is concerned with the quantitative meaning of the law of universal gravitation and its applications in astronomy. The content is arranged in scrambled form, and the use of matrix…

  5. Multimedia in Modern Language Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raya, Manuel Jimenez

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the professional development of primary modern language teachers through the use of new technologies. The paper explores principles upon which the development of a multimedia learning environment, FLiP (Foreign Languages in Primary), was constructed. Ways in which technology can support the principles of effective professional…

  6. Guidelines for Repackaging Multi-Media Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Asian Centre for Educational Innovation for Development.

    This manual outlines a general procedure for deciding whether or not a multimedia package should be adapted or repackaged to meet local needs, reviews both general and specific factors to be considered in repackaging materials, describes the process of repackaging, and outlines procedures for the try-out, evaluation, and renewal of repackaged…

  7. Interface Design Principles for Interactive Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feifer, Richard G.; Tazbaz, Denise

    1997-01-01

    Good human-computer interfaces are essential in multimedia. Discusses methods of organizing information: non-linear versus linear, interactive, meaningful choices, and chunking; principles of interface design: knowing the users and offering options that are distinct, non-ambiguous, from user point of view, and in user terms; and interface…

  8. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 10, Circular Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the tenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials relating to circular motion are presented in this study guide. The topics are concerned with instantaneous velocity, centripetal force, centrifugal force, and satellite paths. The content is arranged in scrambled form, and the use of matrix transparencies is…

  9. Index to Psychology (Multimedia). Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. National Information Center for Educational Media.

    Films, videotapes, transparencies, recordings, and multimedia presentations for teaching psychology are listed in this over-700-page catalog. Catalog entries are classified by subject and alphabetically by title. Subject classifications include animal, clinical, experimental, and physiological psychology, and research methodology. (MG)

  10. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 7, Combining Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the seventh lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to the force combination. The topics are concerned with the definition and units of forces, sliding forces on inclined planes, and the equilibrant of two or more forces. The content is arranged in scrambled…

  11. Delivering Multimedia Teaching Modules via the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudge, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet for delivering teaching modules and makes recommendations for successful use of the Internet. Highlights include the availability of information at all times and from remote locations, multimedia capabilities, infrastructure needed, security issues, updating, needed skills, and…

  12. Science CAP: Curriculum Assistance Program. [Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DEMCO, Inc., Madison, WI.

    Science Curriculum Assistance Program (Science CAP(TM)) is a multimedia package developed to create a model for preserving classroom science activities that can be shared and customized by teachers. This program is designed to assist teachers in preparing classroom science activities for grades five through eight, and to foster an environment of…

  13. Approaches to Cell Biology: Developing Educational Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyden, Robin J.

    2004-01-01

    Educational research points to the effectiveness of using multimedia activities in instructional settings. The capacity for repetition, new methods for encouraging student exploration and discovery, assistance with complex and highly visual processes, and accommodation of a wider range of learning styles are all cited as key contributors to the…

  14. Effectively incorporating selected multimedia content into medical publications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Until fairly recently, medical publications have been handicapped by being restricted to non-electronic formats, effectively preventing the dissemination of complex audiovisual and three-dimensional data. However, authors and readers could significantly profit from advances in electronic publishing that permit the inclusion of multimedia content directly into an article. For the first time, the de facto gold standard for scientific publishing, the portable document format (PDF), is used here as a platform to embed a video and an audio sequence of patient data into a publication. Fully interactive three-dimensional models of a face and a schematic representation of a human brain are also part of this publication. We discuss the potential of this approach and its impact on the communication of scientific medical data, particularly with regard to electronic and open access publications. Finally, we emphasise how medical teaching can benefit from this new tool and comment on the future of medical publishing. PMID:21329532

  15. Leadership & Sustainability (Multimedia Kit) A Multimedia Kit for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This complete resource provides staff developers with the necessary tools for training leaders at all levels of the educational system to become the catalysts for large scale, sustainable reform. Hear from practicing principals, superintendents, and educational experts; observe actual training sessions; and visit classrooms to see how the model to…

  16. 7 CFR 58.528 - Microbiological requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Requirements for Cottage Cheese Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.528 Microbiological requirements. Compliance shall...

  17. [Microbiology of ground water and drinking water].

    PubMed

    Dott, W; Frank, C; Kämpfer, P; Tuschewitzki, G J; Wernicke, F

    1986-10-01

    Groundwater has been considered a safe source for drinking water protected against surface contamination. However, a number of reports about chemical and microbiological contamination have disproved this assumption. Besides hygienical monitoring, little is known about the microbiology of ground- and drinking water. The purpose of this paper is to give a review about the main fields of investigation concerning microbial activity in ground- and drinking-water-action. The hygienical relevant topics are: survival and transport of microorganisms, microbiological degradation of organic pollutants, turn-over of nitrogen compounds, oxidation and reduction of iron and manganese and development of methods for microbiological water examination.

  18. Multimedia systems in ultrasound image boundary detection and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Chalana, Vikram; Kim, Yongmin

    1997-05-01

    Ultrasound as a medical imaging modality offers the clinician a real-time of the anatomy of the internal organs/tissues, their movement, and flow noninvasively. One of the applications of ultrasound is to monitor fetal growth by measuring biparietal diameter (BPD) and head circumference (HC). We have been working on automatic detection of fetal head boundaries in ultrasound images. These detected boundaries are used to measure BPD and HC. The boundary detection algorithm is based on active contour models and takes 32 seconds on an external high-end workstation, SUN SparcStation 20/71. Our goal has been to make this tool available within an ultrasound machine and at the same time significantly improve its performance utilizing multimedia technology. With the advent of high- performance programmable digital signal processors (DSP), the software solution within an ultrasound machine instead of the traditional hardwired approach or requiring an external computer is now possible. We have integrated our boundary detection algorithm into a programmable ultrasound image processor (PUIP) that fits into a commercial ultrasound machine. The PUIP provides both the high computing power and flexibility needed to support computationally-intensive image processing algorithms within an ultrasound machine. According to our data analysis, BPD/HC measurements made on PUIP lie within the interobserver variability. Hence, the errors in the automated BPD/HC measurements using the algorithm are on the same order as the average interobserver differences. On PUIP, it takes 360 ms to measure the values of BPD/HC on one head image. When processing multiple head images in sequence, it takes 185 ms per image, thus enabling 5.4 BPD/HC measurements per second. Reduction in the overall execution time from 32 seconds to a fraction of a second and making this multimedia system available within an ultrasound machine will help this image processing algorithm and other computer-intensive imaging

  19. From multimedia stream models to GUI generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bescos, Jesus; Martinez, Jose M.; Cisneros, Guillermo

    1997-01-01

    This paper is centered on the description of a model that generalizes multimedia data flows handling including complete behavior and interaction mechanisms, hence allowing full integration of GUIs generation -- GUI components are upgraded to interactive media items -- into the same unified model. It aims to reinforce portability, reusability, and quick development of multimedia applications. A picture of previous and of current state-of-art in multimedia application development clearly shows the need for standard abstractions in this field. Current work in this direction leads to a discussion on generic application structure (objects, semantics, etc.) and on different approaches to reach platform independence and efficient object sharing (formal representation languages, interpreted programming languages, distributed environments, etc.). At this point, we present a basic model based on several stream-based models and implementations on multimedia data flows, and built on the basis of the source-stream-sink paradigm. It follows with a detailed explanation of the unified (common to all media) abstract basic stream from which all monomedia flows (including GUI elements) are derived: stream setting- up (source-sink adaptation, and negotiation), flow control procedure, stream sensibility, behavior pattern, etc. The model presentation ends up with the introduction of the multimedia stream that performs synchronization and inter- stream communication tasks, and channels all sensibility, from/towards its managed streams, and allows for the design of an application generator. Then it deeps into the definition of the abstract class hierarchy that guides the model implementation. Finally, several implementation issues are addressed and some practical achievements are described.

  20. Multimedia systems overview: the big picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccomi, Alfred

    1993-01-01

    The golden opportunities represented by multimedia systems have been recognized by many. The risk and cost involved in developing the products and the markets has led to a bonanza of unlikely consortia of strange bedfellows. The premier promoter of personal computing systems, Apple Computer, has joined forces with the dominant supplier of corporate computing, IBM, to form a multimedia technology joint venture called Kaleida. The consumer electronics world's leading promoter of free trade, Sony, has joined forces with the leader of Europe's protectionist companies, Philips, to create a consumer multimedia standard called CD-I. While still paying lip service to CD-I, Sony and Philips now appear to be going their separate ways. The software world's most profitable/fastest growing firm, Microsoft, has entered into alliances with each and every multimedia competitor to create a mish mash of product classes and defacto standards. The battle for Multimedia Standards is being fought on all fronts: on standards committees, in corporate strategic marketing meetings, within industry associations, in computer retail stores, and on the streets. Early attempts to set proprietary defacto standards were fought back, but the proprietary efforts continue with renewed vigor. Standards committees were, as always, slow to define specifications, but the official standards are now known nd being implemented; ... but the proprietary efforts continue with renewed vigor. Ultimately, the buyers will decide -- like it or not. Success by the efforts to establish proprietary defacto standards could prove to be a boon to the highly creative and inventive U.S. firms, but at the cost of higher prices for consumers and slower market growth. Success by the official standards could bring lower prices for consumers and fast market growth, but force the higher-wage/higher-overhead U.S. firms to compete on a level playing field. As is always the case, you can't have your cake and eat it too.

  1. MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF FOOD SUPPLEMENTS.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Magdalena; Kubicka, Marcelina M; Kamińska, Dorota; Długaszewska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Many specialists note that the food offered today - as a result of very complex technological processing - is devoid of many components that are important for the organism and the shortages have to be supplemented. The simplest for it is to consume diet supplements that provide the missing element in a concentrated form. In accordance with the applicable law, medicinal products include all substances or mixtures of substances that are attributed with properties of preventing or treating diseases with humans or animals. Permits to admit supplements to the market are issued by the Chief Sanitary Inspector and the related authorities; permits for medicines are issued by the Chief Pharmaceutical Inspector and the Office for Registration of Medicinal Products, Medical Devices and Biocidal Products. Therefore, admittance of a supplement to the market is less costly and time consuming_than admittance of a medicine. Supplements and medicines may contain the same component but medicines will have a larger concentration than supplements. Sale of supplements at drug stores and in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids or powders makes consumer often confusing supplements with medicines. Now there are no normative documents specifying limits of microbiological impurities in diet supplements. In Polish legislation, diet supplements are subject to legal acts concerning food. Medicines have to comply with microbiological purity requirements specified in the Polish Pharmacopeia. As evidenced with the completed tests, the proportion of diet supplement samples with microbiological impurities is 6.5%. Sales of diet supplements have been growing each year, they are consumed by healthy people but also people with immunology deficiencies and by children and therefore consumers must be certain that they buy safe products. PMID:26642690

  2. Microbiology Learning and Education Online.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Niño, Silvia M

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquity of devices that connect to the Internet has exploded, allowing for easy dissemination of information. Many teachers from kindergarten to universities use the information obtained online or post material they want their students to access. Online media readily places articles, books, videos, and games at our fingertips. The public in general also gathers health information from the Internet. The following review will explore what has been published regarding microbiology education and learning online and the use of electronic media by microbiologists for scientific purposes. PMID:26935727

  3. Microbiology Learning and Education Online.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Niño, Silvia M

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquity of devices that connect to the Internet has exploded, allowing for easy dissemination of information. Many teachers from kindergarten to universities use the information obtained online or post material they want their students to access. Online media readily places articles, books, videos, and games at our fingertips. The public in general also gathers health information from the Internet. The following review will explore what has been published regarding microbiology education and learning online and the use of electronic media by microbiologists for scientific purposes.

  4. Microbiology Learning and Education Online

    PubMed Central

    Niño, Silvia M.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquity of devices that connect to the Internet has exploded, allowing for easy dissemination of information. Many teachers from kindergarten to universities use the information obtained online or post material they want their students to access. Online media readily places articles, books, videos, and games at our fingertips. The public in general also gathers health information from the Internet. The following review will explore what has been published regarding microbiology education and learning online and the use of electronic media by microbiologists for scientific purposes. PMID:26935727

  5. An innovative approach to multimedia waste reduction: Measuring performance for environmental cleanup projects

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; George, S.M. )

    1993-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges we now face in environmental cleanup is measuring the progress of minimizing multimedia transfer releases and achieving waste reduction. Briefly, multimedia transfer refers to the air, land, and water where pollution is not controlled, concentrated, and moved from one medium to another. An example of multimedia transfer would be heavy metals in wastewater sludges moved from water to land disposal. Over $2 billion has been budgeted for environmental restoration site cleanups by the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1994. Unless we reduce the huge waste volumes projected to be generated in the near future, then we will devote more and more resources to the management and disposal of these wastes. To meet this challenge, the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has explored the value of a multimedia approach by designing an innovative Pollution Prevention Life-Cycle Model. The model consists of several fundamental elements (Fig. 1) and addresses the two major objectives of data gathering and establishing performance measures. Because the majority of projects are in the remedial investigation phase, the focus is on the prevention of unnecessary generation of investigation-derived waste and multimedia transfers at the source. A state-of-the-art tool developed to support the life-cycle model for meeting these objectives is the Numerical Scoring System (NSS), which is a computerized, user-friendly data base system for information management, designed to measure the effectiveness of pollution prevention activities in each phase of the ER Program. This report contains a discussion of the development of the Pollution Prevention Life-Cycle Model and the role the NSS will play in the pollution prevention programs in the remedial investigation phase of the ER Program at facilities managed by Energy Systems for DOE.

  6. Dynamic quality of service model for improving performance of multimedia real-time transmission in industrial networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandran C; Karunakaran, Manivannan

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, quality of service (QoS) is very popular in various research areas like distributed systems, multimedia real-time applications and networking. The requirements of these systems are to satisfy reliability, uptime, security constraints and throughput as well as application specific requirements. The real-time multimedia applications are commonly distributed over the network and meet various time constraints across networks without creating any intervention over control flows. In particular, video compressors make variable bit-rate streams that mismatch the constant-bit-rate channels typically provided by classical real-time protocols, severely reducing the efficiency of network utilization. Thus, it is necessary to enlarge the communication bandwidth to transfer the compressed multimedia streams using Flexible Time Triggered- Enhanced Switched Ethernet (FTT-ESE) protocol. FTT-ESE provides automation to calculate the compression level and change the bandwidth of the stream. This paper focuses on low-latency multimedia transmission over Ethernet with dynamic quality-of-service (QoS) management. This proposed framework deals with a dynamic QoS for multimedia transmission over Ethernet with FTT-ESE protocol. This paper also presents distinct QoS metrics based both on the image quality and network features. Some experiments with recorded and live video streams show the advantages of the proposed framework. To validate the solution we have designed and implemented a simulator based on the Matlab/Simulink, which is a tool to evaluate different network architecture using Simulink blocks.

  7. Dynamic quality of service model for improving performance of multimedia real-time transmission in industrial networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandran C; Karunakaran, Manivannan

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, quality of service (QoS) is very popular in various research areas like distributed systems, multimedia real-time applications and networking. The requirements of these systems are to satisfy reliability, uptime, security constraints and throughput as well as application specific requirements. The real-time multimedia applications are commonly distributed over the network and meet various time constraints across networks without creating any intervention over control flows. In particular, video compressors make variable bit-rate streams that mismatch the constant-bit-rate channels typically provided by classical real-time protocols, severely reducing the efficiency of network utilization. Thus, it is necessary to enlarge the communication bandwidth to transfer the compressed multimedia streams using Flexible Time Triggered- Enhanced Switched Ethernet (FTT-ESE) protocol. FTT-ESE provides automation to calculate the compression level and change the bandwidth of the stream. This paper focuses on low-latency multimedia transmission over Ethernet with dynamic quality-of-service (QoS) management. This proposed framework deals with a dynamic QoS for multimedia transmission over Ethernet with FTT-ESE protocol. This paper also presents distinct QoS metrics based both on the image quality and network features. Some experiments with recorded and live video streams show the advantages of the proposed framework. To validate the solution we have designed and implemented a simulator based on the Matlab/Simulink, which is a tool to evaluate different network architecture using Simulink blocks. PMID:25170768

  8. Dynamic Quality of Service Model for Improving Performance of Multimedia Real-Time Transmission in Industrial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandran C.; Karunakaran, Manivannan

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, quality of service (QoS) is very popular in various research areas like distributed systems, multimedia real-time applications and networking. The requirements of these systems are to satisfy reliability, uptime, security constraints and throughput as well as application specific requirements. The real-time multimedia applications are commonly distributed over the network and meet various time constraints across networks without creating any intervention over control flows. In particular, video compressors make variable bit-rate streams that mismatch the constant-bit-rate channels typically provided by classical real-time protocols, severely reducing the efficiency of network utilization. Thus, it is necessary to enlarge the communication bandwidth to transfer the compressed multimedia streams using Flexible Time Triggered- Enhanced Switched Ethernet (FTT-ESE) protocol. FTT-ESE provides automation to calculate the compression level and change the bandwidth of the stream. This paper focuses on low-latency multimedia transmission over Ethernet with dynamic quality-of-service (QoS) management. This proposed framework deals with a dynamic QoS for multimedia transmission over Ethernet with FTT-ESE protocol. This paper also presents distinct QoS metrics based both on the image quality and network features. Some experiments with recorded and live video streams show the advantages of the proposed framework. To validate the solution we have designed and implemented a simulator based on the Matlab/Simulink, which is a tool to evaluate different network architecture using Simulink blocks. PMID:25170768

  9. ISMuS: interactive, scalable, multimedia streaming platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jihun; Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Jeong, Seyoon; Kim, Kyuheon; Patrikakis, Charalampos; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2005-08-01

    Technical evolutions in the field of information technology have changed many aspects of the industries and the life of human beings. Internet and broadcasting technologies act as core ingredients for this revolution. Various new services that were never possible are now available to general public by utilizing these technologies. Multimedia service via IP networks becomes one of easily accessible service in these days. Technical advances in Internet services, the provision of constantly increasing network bandwidth capacity, and the evolution of multimedia technologies have made the demands for multimedia streaming services increased explosively. With this increasing demand Internet becomes deluged with multimedia traffics. Although multimedia streaming services became indispensable, the quality of a multimedia service over Internet can not be technically guaranteed. Recently users demand multimedia service whose quality is competitive to the traditional TV broadcasting service with additional functionalities. Such additional functionalities include interactivity, scalability, and adaptability. A multimedia that comprises these ancillary functionalities is often called richmedia. In order to satisfy aforementioned requirements, Interactive Scalable Multimedia Streaming (ISMuS) platform is designed and developed. In this paper, the architecture, implementation, and additional functionalities of ISMuS platform are presented. The presented platform is capable of providing user interactions based on MPEG-4 Systems technology [1] and supporting an efficient multimedia distribution through an overlay network technology. Loaded with feature-rich technologies, the platform can serve both on-demand and broadcast-like richmedia services.

  10. Laboratory Design for Microbiological Safety

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, G. Briggs; Runkle, Robert S.

    1967-01-01

    Of the large amount of funds spent each year in this country on construction and remodeling of biomedical research facilities, a significant portion is directed to laboratories handling infectious microorganisms. This paper is intended for the scientific administrators, architects, and engineers concerned with the design of new microbiological facilities. It develops and explains the concept of primary and secondary barriers for the containment of microorganisms. The basic objectives of a microbiological research laboratory, (i) protection of the experimenter and staff, (ii) protection of the surrounding community, and (iii) maintenance of experimental validity, are defined. In the design of a new infectious-disease research laboratory, early identification should be made of the five functional zones of the facility and their relation to each other. The following five zones and design criteria applicable to each are discussed: clean and transition, research area, animal holding and research area, laboratory support, engineering support. The magnitude of equipment and design criteria which are necessary to integrate these five zones into an efficient and safe facility are delineated. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:4961771

  11. Microbiology on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Editor); Mcginnis, Michael R. (Editor); Mishra, S. K. (Editor); Wogan, Christine F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This panel discussion convened in Houston, Texas, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, on November 6 to 8, 1989, to review NASA's plans for microbiology on Space Station Freedom. A panel of distinguished scientists reviewed, validated, and recommended revisions to NASA's proposed acceptability standards for air, water, and internal surfaces on board Freedom. Also reviewed were the proposed microbiology capabilities and monitoring plan, disinfection procedures, waste management, and clinical issues. In the opinion of this advisory panel, ensuring the health of the Freedom's crews requires a strong goal-oriented research effort to determine the potential effects of microorganisms on the crewmembers and on the physical environment of the station. Because there are very few data addressing the fundamental question of how microgravity influences microbial function, the panel recommended establishing a ground-based microbial model of Freedom, with subsequent evaluation using in-flight shuttle data. Sampling techniques and standards will be affected by both technological advances in microgravity-compatible instrumentation, and by changes in the microbial population over the life of the station.

  12. Online reinforcement learning for dynamic multimedia systems.

    PubMed

    Mastronarde, Nicholas; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2010-02-01

    In our previous work, we proposed a systematic cross-layer framework for dynamic multimedia systems, which allows each layer to make autonomous and foresighted decisions that maximize the system's long-term performance, while meeting the application's real-time delay constraints. The proposed solution solved the cross-layer optimization offline, under the assumption that the multimedia system's probabilistic dynamics were known a priori, by modeling the system as a layered Markov decision process. In practice, however, these dynamics are unknown a priori and, therefore, must be learned online. In this paper, we address this problem by allowing the multimedia system layers to learn, through repeated interactions with each other, to autonomously optimize the system's long-term performance at run-time. The two key challenges in this layered learning setting are: (i) each layer's learning performance is directly impacted by not only its own dynamics, but also by the learning processes of the other layers with which it interacts; and (ii) selecting a learning model that appropriately balances time-complexity (i.e., learning speed) with the multimedia system's limited memory and the multimedia application's real-time delay constraints. We propose two reinforcement learning algorithms for optimizing the system under different design constraints: the first algorithm solves the cross-layer optimization in a centralized manner and the second solves it in a decentralized manner. We analyze both algorithms in terms of their required computation, memory, and interlayer communication overheads. After noting that the proposed reinforcement learning algorithms learn too slowly, we introduce a complementary accelerated learning algorithm that exploits partial knowledge about the system's dynamics in order to dramatically improve the system's performance. In our experiments, we demonstrate that decentralized learning can perform equally as well as centralized learning, while

  13. Manual of Environmental Microbiology - Literature Review.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The field of environmental microbiology has made tremendous strides since the original microscopic observations of Antony van Leeuwenhock in 1677. The Manual of Environmental Microbiology, 3rd edition embraces these technological advances and is perhaps the most comprehensive and informative book s...

  14. Rapid methods and automation in dairy microbiology.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, P C

    1993-10-01

    The importance of microbiology to the dairy industry has been demonstrated by recent outbreaks of foodborne illness associated with consumption of milk and dairy products that had been contaminated with pathogenic organisms or toxins. Undesirable microorganisms constitute the primary hazard to safety, quality, and wholesomeness of milk and dairy foods. Consequently, increased emphasis has been placed on the microbiological analysis of milk and dairy products designed to evaluate quality and to ensure safety and regulatory compliance. The focus of dairy microbiology, however, remains largely on conventional methods: plate counts, most probable numbers, and dye reduction tests. These methods are slow, tedious, intensive in their requirements for material and labor, and often not suitable for assessing the quality and shelf-life of perishable dairy foods. With the exception of coliforms, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus, isolation and characterization of various organisms occurring in milk and milk products are seldom a part of the routine microbiological analysis in the dairy industry. Recent emphasis on the programs based on HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) for total quality management in the dairy industry and increased demand for microbiological surveillance of products, process, and environment have led to increased interest in rapid methods and automation in microbiology. Several methods for rapid detection, isolation, enumeration, and characterization of microorganisms are being adapted by the dairy industry. This presentation reviews rapid methods and automation in microbiology for microbiological analysis of milk and dairy products.

  15. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Interdisciplinary Microbiology Workshop, Estes Park, Colorado, October 15-17, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Briggs, Kay Marano

    2010-01-01

    Preface A U.S. Geological Survey Interdisciplinary Microbiology Workshop was held in Estes Park, Colorado, on October 15-17, 2008. Participants came from all USGS regions and disciplines. This report contains abstracts from 36 presentations and 35 poster sessions and notes from 5 breakout sessions. The seven presentation topics follow: Ecology of wildlife and fish disease Mechanisms of fish and wildlife disease Microbial ecology Geographic patterns/visualization Public health and water quality Geomicrobiology Ecosystem function The six poster session topics follow: Wildlife disease Disease detection methods Water quality Microbial ecology Metabolic processes Tools and techniques Five working groups met in breakout sessions on October 16, 2008. The highlights for each working group are summarized in this report, and their goals are listed below: Working Group I: to plan a Fact Sheet on interdisciplinary microbiology in the USGS Working Group II: to plan a USGS interdisciplinary microbiology Web site Working Group III: to suggest ways to broadcast and publicize the types of microbiology conducted at the USGS Working Group IV: to identify emerging issues in USGS interdisciplinary microbiology research Working Group V: to identify potential opportunities for interdisciplinary microbiology work at the USGS After the workshop, the USGS interdisciplinary microbiology Web site was activated in June 2009 at http://microbiology.usgs.gov/.

  16. Microbiological Food Safety Surveillance in China.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xiaoyan; Li, Ning; Guo, Yunchang; Liu, Xiumei; Yan, Lin; Li, Ying; Yang, Shuran; Hu, Jing; Zhu, Jianghui; Yang, Dajin

    2015-09-01

    Microbiological food safety surveillance is a system that collects data regarding food contamination by foodborne pathogens, parasites, viruses, and other harmful microbiological factors. It helps to understand the spectrum of food safety, timely detect food safety hazards, and provide relevant data for food safety supervision, risk assessment, and standards-setting. The study discusses the microbiological surveillance of food safety in China, and introduces the policies and history of the national microbiological surveillance system. In addition, the function and duties of different organizations and institutions are provided in this work, as well as the generation and content of the surveillance plan, quality control, database, and achievement of the microbiological surveillance of food safety in China.

  17. Microbiological Food Safety Surveillance in China

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xiaoyan; Li, Ning; Guo, Yunchang; Liu, Xiumei; Yan, Lin; Li, Ying; Yang, Shuran; Hu, Jing; Zhu, Jianghui; Yang, Dajin

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological food safety surveillance is a system that collects data regarding food contamination by foodborne pathogens, parasites, viruses, and other harmful microbiological factors. It helps to understand the spectrum of food safety, timely detect food safety hazards, and provide relevant data for food safety supervision, risk assessment, and standards-setting. The study discusses the microbiological surveillance of food safety in China, and introduces the policies and history of the national microbiological surveillance system. In addition, the function and duties of different organizations and institutions are provided in this work, as well as the generation and content of the surveillance plan, quality control, database, and achievement of the microbiological surveillance of food safety in China. PMID:26343705

  18. ['Specificity' in microbiology and immunochemistry between 1880 and 1930].

    PubMed

    Corbellini, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    During the second half of the XIX Century, microbiological sciences acquired a set of conceptual, methodological and technological tools that radically transformed theoretical and empirical knowledge of the microorganisms, with particular regard to their biochemical properties and their etiopathological role in infectious diseases. During that period, theoretical and experimental researches in general microbiology and immunochemistry addressed the nature and empirical appearances of microbes, both pathogens and not, and the origins of chemical properties of immune sera. In other words, microbiologists tried operatively explaining the origins of the morphological, physiological, and pathogenetic differences between the microbial species. At the same time physiologists and biochemists investigated the chemical basis of the selective or specific interactions between microorganisms or their chemical components and humoral factors contained into the sera produced by the body in response to the contact with microbes. During the half a century, between 1880 and 1930, qualitative and quantitative experimental studies demonstrated that the specificity of microbiological phenomena depended on the biology of microbes and that the specificity of immune reactions hinged upon the biochemical properties of special molecules synthesized by some physiological system which can recognize and react against any foreign substance.

  19. Quo vadimus? The 21st Century and multimedia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Allan D.

    1991-01-01

    The concept is related of computer driven multimedia to the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP). Multimedia is defined here as computer integration and output of text, animation, audio, video, and graphics. Multimedia is the stage of computer based information that allows access to experience. The concepts are also drawn in of hypermedia, intermedia, interactive multimedia, hypertext, imaging, cyberspace, and virtual reality. Examples of these technology developments are given for NASA, private industry, and academia. Examples of concurrent technology developments and implementations are given to show how these technologies, along with multimedia, have put us at the threshold of the 21st century. The STI Program sees multimedia as an opportunity for revolutionizing the way STI is managed.

  20. Multimedia conversion and storage in the PCS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Gregory D.

    1996-01-01

    Multimedia on standalone and LAN based desktop computers is exploding. Multimedia markets are growing, applications are serving new areas, available processing power is increasing, network bandwidth is increasing, and technology developments are providing new capabilities. However, multimedia development in a wireless or mobile environment is not growing at the same rate at LAN based applications. Much attention has been placed on wireless device design including power management in an attempt to increase the wireless device's capability in step with a desktop device. However not much attention has been placed on the issue of bringing multimedia applications into the mobile operating environment. This paper examines some of the issues involved with bringing multimedia applications from the desktop to the mobile environment. The interaction with mobility management is explored in terms of multimedia messaging applications.

  1. Source-term development for a contaminant plume for use by multimedia risk assessment models

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Gene ); McDonald, John P. ); Taira, Randal Y. ); Gnanapragasam, Emmanuel K.; Yu, Charley; Lew, Christine S.; Mills, William B.

    1999-12-01

    Multimedia modelers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are collaborating to conduct a comprehensive and quantitative benchmarking analysis of four intermedia models: DOE's Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS), EPA's MMSOILS, EPA's PRESTO, and DOE's RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD). These models represent typical analytically, semi-analytically, and empirically based tools that are utilized in human risk and endangerment assessments for use at installations containing radioactive and/or hazardous contaminants. Although the benchmarking exercise traditionally emphasizes the application and comparison of these models, the establishment of a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) should be viewed with equal importance. This paper reviews an approach for developing a CSM of an existing, real-world, Sr-90 plume at DOE's Hanford installation in Richland, Washington, for use in a multimedia-based benchmarking exercise bet ween MEPAS, MMSOILS, PRESTO, and RESRAD. In an unconventional move for analytically based modeling, the benchmarking exercise will begin with the plume as the source of contamination. The source and release mechanism are developed and described within the context of performing a preliminary risk assessment utilizing these analytical models. By beginning with the plume as the source term, this paper reviews a typical process and procedure an analyst would follow in developing a CSM for use in a preliminary assessment using this class of analytical tool.

  2. MPEG-7: standard metadata for multimedia content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2005-08-01

    The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) metadata technology of describing media contents has emerged as a dominant mode of making media searchable both for human and machine consumptions. To realize this premise, many online Web applications are pushing this concept to its fullest potential. However, a good metadata model does require a robust standardization effort so that the metadata content and its structure can reach its maximum usage between various applications. An effective media content description technology should also use standard metadata structures especially when dealing with various multimedia contents. A new metadata technology called MPEG-7 content description has merged from the ISO MPEG standards body with the charter of defining standard metadata to describe audiovisual content. This paper will give an overview of MPEG-7 technology and what impact it can bring forth to the next generation of multimedia indexing and retrieval applications.

  3. Multimedia case management system implemented in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Howard D.; Davis, Midge L.; Handy, Dale L.; Kvarfordt, Kent B.; Ford, Glenn

    1999-01-01

    Managing the timely access of information is a major challenge facing law enforcement agencies. One of the areas of greatest need is that of the case management process. During the course of FY98, the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), the Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center (CTAC), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and the Criminal Investigative Bureau (CIB) of the state of Idaho, created a Northwest testbed to develop and integrate a multimedia case management system. A system was developed to assist investigators in tracking and maintaining investigative cases and improving access to internal and external data resources. In this paper, we discuss the results of our case management system development and the ability to present state and federal information incorporating object oriented and multimedia techniques. We then outline our plans for future research and development.

  4. Visual Attention and Applications in Multimedia Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Le Callet, Patrick; Niebur, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Making technological advances in the field of human-machine interactions requires that the capabilities and limitations of the human perceptual system are taken into account. The focus of this report is an important mechanism of perception, visual selective attention, which is becoming more and more important for multimedia applications. We introduce the concept of visual attention and describe its underlying mechanisms. In particular, we introduce the concepts of overt and covert visual attention, and of bottom-up and top-down processing. Challenges related to modeling visual attention and their validation using ad hoc ground truth are also discussed. Examples of the usage of visual attention models in image and video processing are presented. We emphasize multimedia delivery, retargeting and quality assessment of image and video, medical imaging, and the field of stereoscopic 3D images applications. PMID:24489403

  5. Animating the curriculum: integrating multimedia into teaching.

    PubMed Central

    Stensaas, S S

    1994-01-01

    At many medical schools, the medical library assists faculty in finding and integrating new technology into the classroom, student laboratories, and lecture or small group sessions. Libraries also provide faculty with a place to do development. This paper recounts the author's experience creating software-based educational materials. In the process of creating the Slice of Life videodisc and developing and distributing other medical education software, techniques that do and do not work in producing multimedia for medical education became evident. Use of multimedia features and new modalities not possible with books, rather than development of electronic versions of texts and atlases, should be emphasized. Important human factors include collaboration, continuity, evaluation, and sharing of equipment, software, code, effort, expertise, and experiences. Distribution and technical support also are important activities in which medical libraries can participate. PMID:8004014

  6. Synchronizable Objects in Distributed Multimedia Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Feijs, Loe

    In training and gaming systems, distributed multimedia are often used, in which the basic content elements must be conveyed or presented in a synchronized order at synchronized moments over multiple devices and in many cases over a network. These content elements are often presented or represented as "Synchronizable Objects" with which their control and management fall into a design pattern. This paper uses the pattern language to capture the common features of these "Synchronizable Objects", in combination of the formal Object-Z specification to treat the architectural construct. The proposed pattern can be applied for content elements with or without intrinsic timing in distributed multimedia applications. Examples are given to show how this pattern can be applied in distributed applications.

  7. 76 FR 19128 - Extension of Time for Comments on NIJ Draft Vehicular Digital Multimedia Evidence Recording...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... of Justice Programs Extension of Time for Comments on NIJ Draft Vehicular Digital Multimedia Evidence... Enforcement Vehicular Digital Multimedia Evidence Recording System Selection and Application Guide AGENCY... Digital Multimedia Evidence Recording System Certification Program Requirements for Law...

  8. Microbiological monitoring in geothermal plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawi, M.; Lerm, S.; Vetter, A.; Vieth, A.; Seibt, A.; Wolfgramm, M.; Würdemann, H.

    2009-12-01

    In times of increasing relevance of alternative energy resources the utilization of geothermal energy and subsurface energy storage gains importance and arouses increasing interest of scientists. The research project “AquiScreen” investigates the operational reliability of geothermally used groundwater systems under microbial, geochemical, mineralogical and petrological aspects. Microbiological analyses based on fluid and solid phases of geothermal systems are conducted to evaluate the impact of microbial populations on these systems. The presentation focuses on first results obtained from microbiological monitoring of geothermal plants located in two different regions of Germany: the North German Basin and the Molasse Basin in the southern part characterized by different salinities and temperatures. Fluid and filter samples taken during regular plant operation were investigated using genetic fingerprinting based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes to characterize the microbial biocenosis of the geothermal aquifer. Sequencing of dominant bands of the fingerprints and the subsequent comparison to 16S rRNA genes from public databases enables a correlation to metabolic classes and provides information about the biochemical processes in the deep biosphere. The genetic profiles revealed significant differences in microbiological community structures of geothermal aquifers investigated. Phylogenetic analyses indicate broad metabolical diversity adapted to the specific conditions in the aquifers. Additionally a high amount of so far uncultivated microorganisms was detected indicating very specific indigenous biocenosis. However, in all geothermal plants bacteria were detected despite of fluid temperatures from 45° to 120°C. The identified microorganisms are closely related to thermophilic and hyperthermophilic species detectable in hot wells and hot springs, like Thermus scotoductus and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii, respectively. Halophilic species were detected in

  9. A computer-based training system combining virtual reality and multimedia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansfield, Sharon A.

    1993-01-01

    Training new users of complex machines is often an expensive and time-consuming process. This is particularly true for special purpose systems, such as those frequently encountered in DOE applications. This paper presents a computer-based training system intended as a partial solution to this problem. The system extends the basic virtual reality (VR) training paradigm by adding a multimedia component which may be accessed during interaction with the virtual environment. The 3D model used to create the virtual reality is also used as the primary navigation tool through the associated multimedia. This method exploits the natural mapping between a virtual world and the real world that it represents to provide a more intuitive way for the student to interact with all forms of information about the system.

  10. The Atlas of Physiology and Pathophysiology: Web-based multimedia enabled interactive simulations.

    PubMed

    Kofranek, Jiri; Matousek, Stanislav; Rusz, Jan; Stodulka, Petr; Privitzer, Pavol; Matejak, Marek; Tribula, Martin

    2011-11-01

    The paper is a presentation of the current state of development for the Atlas of Physiology and Pathophysiology (Atlas). Our main aim is to provide a novel interactive multimedia application that can be used for biomedical education where (a) simulations are combined with tutorials and (b) the presentation layer is simplified while the underlying complexity of the model is retained. The development of the Atlas required the cooperation of many professionals including teachers, system analysts, artists, and programmers. During the design of the Atlas, tools were developed that allow for component-based creation of simulation models, creation of interactive multimedia and their final coordination into a compact unit based on the given design. The Atlas is a freely available online application, which can help to explain the function of individual physiological systems and the causes and symptoms of their disorders.

  11. A computer-based training system combining virtual reality and multimedia

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, S.A.

    1993-04-28

    Training new users of complex machines is often an expensive and time-consuming process. This is particularly true for special purpose systems, such as those frequently encountered in DOE applications. This paper presents a computer-based training system intended as a partial solution to this problem. The system extends the basic virtual reality (VR) training paradigm by adding a multimedia component which may be accessed during interaction with the virtual environment: The 3D model used to create the virtual reality is also used as the primary navigation tool through the associated multimedia. This method exploits the natural mapping between a virtual world and the real world that it represents to provide a more intuitive way for the student to interact with all forms of information about the system.

  12. WISH: a Wireless Mobile Multimedia Information System in Healthcare using RFID.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weider D; Ray, Pradeep; Motoc, Tiberiu

    2008-05-01

    It is important to improve the efficiency of healthcare-related operations and the associated costs. Healthcare organizations are constantly under increased pressure to streamline operations and provide enhanced services to their patients. Wireless mobile computing technology has the potential to provide the desired benefits and would be a critical part of today's healthcare information system. In this paper, a system is presented to better facilitate the functions of physicians and medical staff in healthcare by using modern wireless mobile technology, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tools, and multimedia streaming. The paper includes a case study of the development of such a system in the context of healthcare in the United States. The results of the study show how wireless mobile multimedia systems can be developed for the improvement of the quality and efficiency in healthcare for other nations as well. Our testing data show a time reduction of more than 50% in the daily activities of hospital staff.

  13. Intersecting Virtual Patients and Microbiology: Fostering a culture of learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Gorman, Ciaran; Gormley, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background The use and integration of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) resources in medical education has attracted considerable commentary and support. “Virtual Patients” are one such resource. Whilst evidence exists supporting the benefits of these resources, there has not been specific consideration of their implications for teaching microbiology; nor attention paid to both the internal and external factors that influence learner engagement with virtual patients. The principle aims of this study are to identify factors that explicitly and implicitly influence the student's interaction with a microbiology virtual patient resource and how these interactions reflect upon the use of the resource. Methods A mixed method quantitative (online questionnaire; n=161) and qualitative (student focus groups; N=11) study was undertaken amongst third year medical students enrolled at Queen's University Belfast in the academic year 2012 – 2013. Results The results supported prior evidence that virtual patients are a useful learning tool (mean score of 5.09 out of 7) that helped them to integrate microbiology principles with clinical experiences. How students used the virtual patients and the depth of the subsequent benefits was dependent upon their perception of the importance of the resource. This was influenced by a number of factors including how the resources were presented and positioned within the curriculum, whether they were formally examined or timetabled and the importance attributed by peers who had already completed the examinations. Conclusion Integration of virtual patients into the microbiology curriculum is widely endorsed and may even be considered superior to other methods of teaching. How students use these resources is dependent upon a positive perception of their importance. Educators should be aware of the factors that shape this perception when integrating TEL resources into curricula. PMID:26668421

  14. Multimedia group communications: towards new services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauthe, A.; Hutchison, D.; Coulson, G.; Namuye, S.

    1996-09-01

    Interpersonal communication among a group of users employing different media types is becoming more and more widespread in computing and telecommunications. Group communication places a variety of new requirements onto the underlying communications architecture and although many existing protocols and services do offer some limited support for multicast group communication, these new requirements make it difficult to find efficient and comprehensive solutions. The impact of multimedia group communication on the communication system and the way in which existing systems, international standardization bodies and researchers cope with these challenges is the subject of this paper. First the characteristics and requirements of multimedia group applications are discussed and illustrated by examples of existing group applications. Subsequently a survey of the kind of support available in today's communication system is presented. In addition the ongoing discussion about the standardization of group communication within ISO and ITU and the direction these efforts take is briefly summarized. Further, some selected examples of research projects which deal with different communication and protocol related aspects of multimedia group communication are presented which give an indication of the trends in this area.

  15. Expert systems in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, Trevor; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-07-01

    This review aims to discuss expert systems in general and how they may be used in medicine as a whole and clinical microbiology in particular (with the aid of interpretive reading). It considers rule-based systems, pattern-based systems, and data mining and introduces neural nets. A variety of noncommercial systems is described, and the central role played by the EUCAST is stressed. The need for expert rules in the environment of reset EUCAST breakpoints is also questioned. Commercial automated systems with on-board expert systems are considered, with emphasis being placed on the "big three": Vitek 2, BD Phoenix, and MicroScan. By necessity and in places, the review becomes a general review of automated system performances for the detection of specific resistance mechanisms rather than focusing solely on expert systems. Published performance evaluations of each system are drawn together and commented on critically.

  16. The microbiology of terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.N.

    1987-01-01

    Emphasizing the role of soil organisms, especially fungi and bacteria, in maintaining productive and stable ecosystems, this book addresses the imbalance found in most ecological texts, which often neglect microorganisms. It stresses the inter-relationship between soil microbes and plants in functional activities such as the capture and transfer of energy and the circulation of chemical elements in ecological systems. It begins with a review of basic concepts followed by a description of the soil as a living entity, including its physical and chemical characteristics, and the life forms found within it. Organic matter mineralization is treated in the context if energy flow and carbon turnover in the biosphere. Also covered are mineral cycling, the microbiology of the rhizosphere, mycorrhiza, root nodule symbiosis, and the cycling of nutrients in the soil-plant-atmosphere system.

  17. Expert Systems in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Trevor; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Summary: This review aims to discuss expert systems in general and how they may be used in medicine as a whole and clinical microbiology in particular (with the aid of interpretive reading). It considers rule-based systems, pattern-based systems, and data mining and introduces neural nets. A variety of noncommercial systems is described, and the central role played by the EUCAST is stressed. The need for expert rules in the environment of reset EUCAST breakpoints is also questioned. Commercial automated systems with on-board expert systems are considered, with emphasis being placed on the “big three”: Vitek 2, BD Phoenix, and MicroScan. By necessity and in places, the review becomes a general review of automated system performances for the detection of specific resistance mechanisms rather than focusing solely on expert systems. Published performance evaluations of each system are drawn together and commented on critically. PMID:21734247

  18. [Predictive microbiology and risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, G; Kleer, J

    2004-05-01

    Predictive microbiology (predictive modelling PM), in spite of its limits and short-comings, may often contribute to a reduction of the problems arising when HACCP systems are established or microbiological risk assessment is done. Having identified the agents which constitute a risk and the contamination rate and density in the raw material, the influences of production steps and storage on these microorganisms have to be examined. Finally, there should be an exposure assessment, i.e. an estimate of the contamination density in the final product at the time of consumption. Should the exposure assessment together with data from dose response assessments reveal a potential for intake of inacceptable numbers of organisms, the risk identified has to be characterized. As a consequence, risk management should result in a modification of the composition of the product and/or of the production process so that the risk does not surpass an acceptable limit. For this approach it is indispensable to have product- and process-specific information on the multiplication of pathogens prior to heat treatment, on reduction of their density by thermal treatment and on growth or dying of organisms having survived heat treatment or penetrated into the product after heat treatment as post-process contaminant. Commonly, challenge tests are conducted to provide such information. But they are time consuming and, as their results are only valid for the specific product tested and the conditions prevailing during the experiment, the have to be repeated if there is any modification of intrinsic or extrinsic factors. At least partially, the PM may replace the challenge tests. The efficiency of the models is rated particularly high if they are used already at the stage of product development when the question has to be answered whether a planned recipe or process of production are already save or have to be modified to become save. PMID:15233338

  19. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  20. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools.

    PubMed

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  1. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools.

    PubMed

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-09-09

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample.

  2. The Evolution of a Collaborative Concept Mapping Activity for Undergraduate Microbiology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinchin, Ian M.; De-Leij, Frans A. A. M.; Hay, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Concept mapping activities were trialed over a 2 year period as part of an undergraduate microbiology course. This paper describes this developmental process and offers insight into the most beneficial ways of employing this tool in a higher education setting. The aim was to investigate the use of mapping activities to improve students'…

  3. Adoption of Lean Principles in a High-Volume Molecular Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, P. Shawn; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are constantly facing challenges to do more with less, enhance quality, improve test turnaround time, and reduce operational expenses. Experience with adopting and applying lean concepts and tools used extensively in the manufacturing industry is described for a high-volume clinical molecular microbiology laboratory, illustrating how operational success and benefits can be achieved. PMID:24829247

  4. Adoption of lean principles in a high-volume molecular diagnostic microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P Shawn; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Yao, Joseph D C

    2014-07-01

    Clinical laboratories are constantly facing challenges to do more with less, enhance quality, improve test turnaround time, and reduce operational expenses. Experience with adopting and applying lean concepts and tools used extensively in the manufacturing industry is described for a high-volume clinical molecular microbiology laboratory, illustrating how operational success and benefits can be achieved. PMID:24829247

  5. Adoption of lean principles in a high-volume molecular diagnostic microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P Shawn; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Yao, Joseph D C

    2014-07-01

    Clinical laboratories are constantly facing challenges to do more with less, enhance quality, improve test turnaround time, and reduce operational expenses. Experience with adopting and applying lean concepts and tools used extensively in the manufacturing industry is described for a high-volume clinical molecular microbiology laboratory, illustrating how operational success and benefits can be achieved.

  6. Automation in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Novak, Susan M; Marlowe, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Imagine a clinical microbiology laboratory where a patient's specimens are placed on a conveyor belt and sent on an automation line for processing and plating. Technologists need only log onto a computer to visualize the images of a culture and send to a mass spectrometer for identification. Once a pathogen is identified, the system knows to send the colony for susceptibility testing. This is the future of the clinical microbiology laboratory. This article outlines the operational and staffing challenges facing clinical microbiology laboratories and the evolution of automation that is shaping the way laboratory medicine will be practiced in the future. PMID:23931839

  7. Automation in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Novak, Susan M; Marlowe, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Imagine a clinical microbiology laboratory where a patient's specimens are placed on a conveyor belt and sent on an automation line for processing and plating. Technologists need only log onto a computer to visualize the images of a culture and send to a mass spectrometer for identification. Once a pathogen is identified, the system knows to send the colony for susceptibility testing. This is the future of the clinical microbiology laboratory. This article outlines the operational and staffing challenges facing clinical microbiology laboratories and the evolution of automation that is shaping the way laboratory medicine will be practiced in the future.

  8. Microbiological Spoilage of Acidified Specialty Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, William H.

    Acidified specialty products or condiments are among the most microbiologically stable and safe food products. Often formulated, packaged, and distributed without heat treatments, they are microbiologically stable indefinitely at ambient temperatures in unopened containers. The packaged, acidified products are often intended for multiple uses, exposing them at the points of consumption to numerous opportunities for contamination with microorganisms. Nonetheless, they remain resistant to microbiological spoilage for many months, often under refrigerated conditions that are used to retard chemical reactions, flavor changes, and yeast growth.

  9. Multimedia medical case authorship and simulator program.

    PubMed

    Berger, R G; Boxwala, A

    1995-01-01

    For the last several years, third and fourth year medical students rotating on the rheumatology/immunology service at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have been using a laptop computer as a teaching adjunct to their formal training in rheumatology. The laptop contains diagnostic programs, reference management and clinical note generation facilities, remote medline access, and most recently, multimedia case simulations. These simulations have been created by the use of a case authoring and simulation system which is presented in this demonstration. The program is divided into simulator and designer modules and uses graphics and sound to portray such data as physical examination findings, blood smears, radiographs, heart sounds, etc. The simulator module includes diagnostic sections with feedback to the student as well as robust patient management trees with an occasional circuitous route for patient outcome. The student receives a numerical score based on deviations from the correct path and optimal cost as designated by the case designer. The system simulates complete management of a patient from the first encounter until treatment is complete. During each encounter, a student obtains the patient's history, physical examination findings, orders tests and reviews their results, makes a differential diagnosis, and treats the patient. The patient's progress and further treatment options at any time are dependent on the treatment option selected by the student at an earlier stage. Students are given the costs of ancillary tests and hospitalization before they order them. Words or phrases can be marked as hypertext and the student can get more information about the marked words by a mouse click. The designer interface of the program creates the clinical case by prompts and requests for information from the designer who needs no programming skills. The designer is almost always an expert faculty member who bases the simulated case on a real patient

  10. Clinical microbiology: Should microbiology be a clinical or a laboratory speciality?

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Clinical microbiology is a specific combination of knowledge, attitude and practice aimed at direct clinical involvement in infectious disease management using the core principles of medical microbiology and clinical medicine. In this article certain areas in microbiology, where a more proactive approach could make a significant difference in clinical outcome has been delineated. The article reiterates the role of a medical microbiologist in a hospital setting. The practices described are the norm in well-organized hospitals. These areas include management of positive blood cultures, management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs), hospital infection control and public health microbiology, development of hospital and community anti-infective policy, organization of clinical-microbiological meetings and provision of emergency out-of-hours service. The implementation of this clinical approach and increased engagement with direct patient care would require changes in existing training structure and working patterns of medical and technical staffs in microbiology.

  11. An Hypermedia Multilevel Interactive Language Learning Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Antonio J.; Ramos, Fernando; Caixinha, Helder; Mealha, Oscar

    This paper describes technical and educational issues related to the development of SIMMPATICO, a multimedia tool for the teaching of Portuguese as a foreign language. The first section presents an overview of the motivation for the project. Package organization is discussed in the second section, including the linguistic approach and its…

  12. Microbiological profile of selected mucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbek-Szreniawska, M.; Wyczółkowski, A. I.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Matyka-Sarzynska and Sokolowska (2000) emphasize that peats and peat soils comprise large areas of Poland. The creation of soil begins when the formation of swamp has ended. Gawlik (2000) states that the degree of influence of the mucky process of organic soils on the differentiations of the conditions of growth and development of plants is mainly connected with the changes of moisture-retentive properties of mucks which constitute the material for these soils, and the loss of their wetting capacities. The above-mentioned changes, which usually occur gradually and show a clear connection with the extent of dehydration and, at times, with its duration, intensify significantly when the soils are under cultivation. The mucky process of peat soils leads to transformations of their physical, chemical and biological properties. The main ingredient of peat soils is organic substance. The substance is maintained inside them by the protective activity of water. The process of land improvement reduces the humidity of the environment, and that Intensifies the pace of the activity of soil microorganisms which cause the decay of organic substance. The decay takes place in the direction of two parallel processes: mineralization and humification. All groups of chemical substances constituting peat undergo mineralization. Special attention should be called to the mineralization of carbon and nitrogen compounds, which constitute a large percentage of theorganic substance of the peat organic mass. Okruszko (1976) has examined scientificbases of the classification of peat soils depending on the intensity of the muck process. The aim of this publication was to conduct a microbiological characteristic of selected mucky material. METHODS AND MATERIALS Soil samples used in the experiments were acquired from the Leczynsko-Wlodawski Lake Region, a large area of which constitutes a part of the Poleski National Park, which is covered to a large extent with high peat bogs. It was

  13. Microbiology in Schools Advisory Committee (MISAC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainbridge, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the work of the committee, lists its membership, and provides the addresses of (English) suppliers of microbiological equipment and (British) sources of microbial cultures, including bacteria, fungi, and freshwater plankton. (AL)

  14. Experiments with Writing to Teach Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Described are the experiences of one teacher with the teaching of writing in college level microbiology, virology, and immunology courses. Assignments, methods, evaluation, and student responses are discussed. (CW)

  15. The Three-Minute Classroom Walk-Through (Multimedia Kit): A Multimedia Kit for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Carolyn J.; Steffy, Betty E.; English, Fenwick W.; Frase, Larry E.; Poston, William K.

    2006-01-01

    Showcasing the "Downey Walk-Through"--a method developed over a 40-year period, tested and refined in real-world schools and classrooms, and described in the pioneering book, "The Three-Minute Classroom Walk-Through," this innovative multimedia presentation provides trainers and staff developers with a complete resource answering the questions…

  16. The Educational Buzzword of the 1990's: Multimedia, or Is It Hypermedia, or Interactive Multimedia, or...?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbreath, Jeremy

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the definition of multimedia and describes various storage platforms currently in use as well as future possibilities. Highlights include interactive video; digital-based storage platforms; CD-ROM; digital video interactive (DVI); compact disc-interactive (CD-I); Commodore dynamic total vision (CDTV); CD-ROM extended architecture (CD-ROM…

  17. The Effect of Audio and Animation in Multimedia Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroghlanian, Carol; Klein, James D.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of audio, animation, and spatial ability in a multimedia computer program for high school biology. Participants completed a multimedia program that presented content by way of text or audio with lean text. In addition, several instructional sequences were presented either with static illustrations or animations.…

  18. Partial Verbal Redundancy in Multimedia Presentations for Writing Strategy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Rod D.; Jacovina, Matthew E.; Harry, Danielle; Russell, Devin G.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia instructional materials require learners to select, organize, and integrate information across multiple modalities. To facilitate these comprehension processes, a variety of multimedia design principles have been proposed. This study further explores the redundancy principle by manipulating the degree of partial redundancy between…

  19. Evaluating Course Design Principles for Multimedia Learning Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Bernard; Cong, Chunyu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on evaluation studies of principles of course design for interactive multimedia learning materials. Design/methodology/approach: At the Defence Academy of the UK, Cranfield University has worked with military colleagues to produce multimedia learning materials for courses on "Military Knowledge". The courses are…

  20. Learning through Multimedia Construction--A Complex Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Multimedia construction is a complex and theoretically valid process for developing higher order thinking that can be implemented as a teaching activity and optionally associated with formal assessment in many ways. This paper explores the associated learning strategy--learning through multimedia construction, through research and reflective…

  1. Student Perception of Multimedia in the Undergraduate Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowaczyk, Ronald H.; Santos, Lyndee T.; Patton, Chad

    1998-01-01

    Describes a study wherein college students evaluated the effectiveness of multimedia in two undergraduate psychology courses. Graphics, video, and instructor-prepared multimedia were evaluated, and results indicate that students were able to differentiate among the media in terms of their contributions to student interest and understanding of…

  2. On the Application of Multimedia in Economics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Mengchun; Li, Hongxin

    2011-01-01

    Multimedia has become an important teaching technology in higher education inside and outside, with its advantages of super-media, strong expression, and interaction. The application of multimedia teaching connects closely with teaching reform and innovation. In this paper, authors conclude the defects of traditional economics teaching and the…

  3. Logical Meanings in Multimedia Learning Materials: A Multimodal Discourse Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorvilas, George

    2014-01-01

    Multimedia educational applications convey meanings through several semiotic modes (e.g. text, image, sound, etc.). There is an urgent need for multimedia designers as well as for teachers to understand the meaning potential of these artifacts and discern the communicative purposes they serve. Towards this direction, a hermeneutic semiotic…

  4. Sounds in CD-ROM--Integrating Audio in Multimedia Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosebush, Judson

    1992-01-01

    Describes how audio technology is being integrated into CD-ROMs to create multimedia products. Computer hardware and software are discussed, including the use of HyperCard to combine still pictures, moving video pictures, and sound; and specific new multimedia products produced by the Voyager Company are described. (LRW)

  5. The Power of Peer Review in Multimedia Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steed, Marlo

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of how multimedia productions are perceived by others focuses on a study of an undergraduate course at the University of Lethbridge (Canada) that investigated whether peer and target population evaluations influenced the production of student-generated multimedia projects. Results suggest that formative evaluation activities encouraged…

  6. Interactive Printouts Integrating Multilingual Multimedia and Sign Language Electronic Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanev, Kamen; Barneva, Reneta P.; Brimkov, Valentin E.; Kaneva, Dimitrina

    2010-01-01

    In this article we outline our previous implementations of multilingual multimedia dictionaries and discuss possibilities for adding new functionalities and expanding their coverage. Independently developed sign language dictionary resources are further explored and considered for inclusion in an integrated multilingual multimedia dictionary with…

  7. Interactive Multimedia and Concrete Three-Dimensional Modelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, J. H.; Preece, Peter F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Compares a multimedia package for teaching about the phases of the moon to grade 8 (12-year-old) students with a conventional three-dimensional modeling approach. Results show both methods were equally effective in terms of student learning, for male and female students, and prior computer experience was not a factor in multimedia use. (Author/LRW)

  8. Towards an Adaptive Multimedia Learning Environment: Enhancing the Student Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurzel, Frank; Slay, Jill; Rath, Michelle; Chau, Yenha

    This paper describes the development of an adaptive multimedia learning environment that utilizes multimedia presentation techniques in its interface while still providing Internet connectivity for management and delivery purposes. The system supports the WWW as its addressing space but uses the local client areas to store media items expensive in…

  9. Coding Categories To Record Student Talk at a Multimedia Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, S.

    1999-01-01

    Using case study methodology, this paper examines how pairs of first-time high school student users navigated through a multimedia geography CD-ROM together. Discusses coding methods for student activity; student interaction; dialog analysis; multimedia literacy; and further research needs. (Author/LRW)

  10. Does Whole-Word Multimedia Software Support Literacy Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karemaker, Arjette M.; Pitchford, Nicola J.; O'Malley, Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which multimedia features of typical literacy learning software provide added benefits for developing literacy skills compared with typical whole-class teaching methods. The effectiveness of the multimedia software Oxford Reading Tree (ORT) for Clicker in supporting early literacy acquisition was investigated…

  11. Improving Teacher Candidates' Knowledge of Phonological Awareness: A Multimedia Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Michael J.; Driver, Melissa K.; Pullen, Paige C.; Ely, Emily; Cole, Mira T.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of phonological awareness (PA) and how to teach students to develop PA is an important component of teacher preparation given its role in learning to read. We believe multimedia can play a key role in improving how educators acquire, master, and prepare to implement evidence-based reading instruction in any nation. One multimedia-based…

  12. Olfactory enhanced multimedia applications: perspectives from an empirical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ademoye, Oluwakemi A.; Ghinea, Gheorghita

    2007-01-01

    The increasing demand for multi-modal systems and applications that are highly interactive and multi-sensory in nature has led to the introduction of new media and new user interface devices in multimedia computing. Computer generated smell, also known as olfactory data, is one of such media objects currently generating a lot of interest in the multimedia industry. We are currently focusing our attention on exploring user perception of computer generated smell when combined with other media to enrich their multimedia experience. In this paper, we present the results of an empirical study into users' perception of olfactory enhanced multimedia displays. Results showed that users generally enjoy an enhanced multimedia experience when augmented by olfactory stimuli, and that the presence of such stimuli increases the sense of relevance. Whilst there is a general positive bias towards olfactory enhanced multimedia applications, specific properties of smell such as diffusion and lingering mean that in practice specific attention needs to be given when a mix of smells is associated with visualised multimedia content; moreover, it was found that whilst smell was incorrectly identified in some instances, the presence of smell per se is generally enough to create a richer user multimedia experience.

  13. A TAPS Interactive Multimedia Package to Solve Engineering Dynamics Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidhu, S. Manjit; Selvanathan, N.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To expose engineering students to using modern technologies, such as multimedia packages, to learn, visualize and solve engineering problems, such as in mechanics dynamics. Design/methodology/approach: A multimedia problem-solving prototype package is developed to help students solve an engineering problem in a step-by-step approach. A…

  14. Multimedia Projects in Education: Designing, Producing, and Assessing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivers, Karen S.; Barron, Ann E.

    This handbook provides educators with strategies and ideas for incorporating multimedia projects into the curriculum for grades 4-12. With a focus on student learning, the authors show how to plan and implement multimedia activities and engage students in expressing themselves through a variety of media. Using the DDD-E model (Decide, Design,…

  15. An Evolving Methodology for Managing Multimedia Courseware Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giller, Susan; Barker, Philip

    2006-01-01

    It is often claimed that techniques such as "multimedia" and the use of blended learning environments can be used to achieve powerful interactive pedagogies. Indeed, the advent of easy-to-use multimedia technologies has meant that a plethora of digital learning products is now becoming available. Despite the relative ease-of-use of these new…

  16. Cognitive Theory and the Design of Multimedia Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, William R.

    2004-01-01

    A research involving cognitive theory, and the pattern of multimedia information is discussed. The research has produced eight provisional rules for the multimedia approach, and indicates how cognitive science helps in generating information, while instructional research strengthens the concepts of cognitive science.

  17. Multimedia Technology and Kid TV: A New Approach to Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Larry; Pyryt, Michael

    This paper provides a brief description of multimedia technology available in schools, details the "Multimedia Technology and Kid TV" project, reviews the project's preliminary findings, and discusses their implications. The project focuses on using technology to improve students' self-image, self-motivation, and decision-making skills. Seven…

  18. Development and Validation of the Educational Technologist Multimedia Competency Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Martin, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to identify the multimedia competencies of an educational technologist by creating a valid and reliable survey instrument to administer to educational technology professionals. The educational technology multimedia competency survey developed through this research is based on a conceptual framework that…

  19. Mode, Meaning, and Synaesthesia in Multimedia L2 Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mark Evan

    2006-01-01

    This study of digital storytelling attempts to apply Kress's (2003) notions of synaesthesia, transformation, and transduction to the analysis of four undergraduate L2 writers' multimedia text creation processes. The students, entering freshmen, participated in an experimental course entitled "Multimedia Writing," whose purpose was to experience…

  20. Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor and Roles of Information Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Edna

    In Malaysia, the government is supporting the diffusion of the Internet and is spearheading a project to bring Malaysia into the information age, by helping to design a smart city called the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). The MSC is being planned as a high-technology center where world-class multimedia companies can develop state-of-the-art…